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Sample records for mass transfer liquid-liquid

  1. Methods to control phase inversions and enhance mass transfer in liquid-liquid dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Tsouris, Constantinos; Dong, Junhang

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effects of applied electric fields on liquid-liquid dispersions. In general, the present invention is directed to the control of phase inversions in liquid-liquid dispersions. Because of polarization and deformation effects, coalescence of aqueous drops is facilitated by the application of electric fields. As a result, with an increase in the applied voltage, the ambivalence region is narrowed and shifted toward higher volume fractions of the dispersed phase. This permits the invention to be used to ensure that the aqueous phase remains continuous, even at a high volume fraction of the organic phase. Additionally, the volume fraction of the organic phase may be increased without causing phase inversion, and may be used to correct a phase inversion which has already occurred. Finally, the invention may be used to enhance mass transfer rates from one phase to another through the use of phase inversions.

  2. Physical modeling of liquid/liquid mass transfer in gas stirred ladles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Hyo; Fruehan, R. J.

    1987-06-01

    Several of the metallurgical reactions occurring in gas stirred steel ladles are controlled by liquid phase mass transfer between the metal and slag. In order to calculate the rate of these reactions, information about the two phase mass transfer parameter is necessary. The mass transfer between two immiscible liquids, oil and water simulating slag and steel, respectively, was measured in a scale model of a ladle. The mass transferred species was thymol which has an equilibrium partition ratio between oil and water similar to that for sulfur between slag and metal. The mass transfer rate was measured as a function of gas flow rate, tuyere position and size, method of injection, oil viscosity, and oil/water volume ratio. In addition, mixing times in the presence of the oil layer and mass transfer coefficient for the dissolution of solid benzoic acid rods were measured. The results show that there are three gas flow rate regimes in which the dependence of mass transfer on gas flow rate is different. At a critical gas flow rate, the oil layer breaks into droplets which are entrained into the water, resulting in an increase in the two phase interfacial area. This critical gas flow rate was found to be a function of tuyere position, oil volume, densities of two phases, and interfacial tension. Two phase mass transfer for a lance and a tuyere was found to be the same for the same stirring energy in low energy regions regardless of lance depth. Mass transfer is faster for a center tuyere as compared to an offcenter tuyere, but mixing times are smaller for the offcenter tuyere. From the results obtained, the optimum stirring conditions for metallurgical reactions are qualitatively discussed.

  3. Exploring bubble oscillation and mass transfer enhancement in acoustic-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Yang, Shikuan; Lu, Mengqian; Zhao, Yanhui; Mai, John D.; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated bubble oscillation and its induced enhancement of mass transfer in a liquid-liquid extraction process with an acoustically-driven, bubble-based microfluidic device. The oscillation of individually trapped bubbles, of known sizes, in microchannels was studied at both a fixed frequency, and over a range of frequencies. Resonant frequencies were analytically identified and were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations. The acoustic streaming induced by the bubble oscillation was identified as the cause of this enhanced extraction. Experiments extracting Rhodanmine B from an aqueous phase (DI water) to an organic phase (1-octanol) were performed to determine the relationship between extraction efficiency and applied acoustic power. The enhanced efficiency in mass transport via these acoustic-energy-assisted processes was confirmed by comparisons against a pure diffusion-based process. PMID:26223474

  4. Electron transfer kinetics at polarized nanoscopic liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxin; Mirkin, Michael V

    2006-01-11

    Rapid kinetics of electron transfer (ET) reactions across the interface between water and 1,2-dichloroethane were measured by steady-state voltammetry at nanopipet electrodes (50- to 400-nm orifice radius). The origins of previously reported imperfect voltammetric responses of ET reactions at micropipets were investigated. Several new experimental systems were explored, and two of them yielded high-quality voltammograms suitable for kinetic experiments. The determined standard rate constants were compared to those measured previously at polarized and nonpolarized liquid/liquid interfaces. The effect of the interfacial dimensions on the magnitude of the apparent ET rate constant is discussed. A new approach to ET kinetic measurements based on the use of the scanning electrochemical microscope with a nanopipet tip and a metallic substrate has been developed and employed to check the validity of determined kinetic parameters. PMID:16390144

  5. Ion transfer battery: storing energy by transferring ions across liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Peljo, Pekka; Bichon, Marie; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-07-28

    A battery utilizing the Galvani potential difference between aqueous and organic phases is demonstrated. The battery consists of two organic redox electrolytes separated by an immiscible aqueous phase. The charge is stored by transferring a salt from the aqueous phase into organic phases in ion transfer coupled electron transfer reactions. PMID:27327108

  6. Ion-transfer voltammetric determination of folic acid at meso-liquid-liquid interface arrays.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuheng; Gao, Kui; Hu, Daopan; Wang, Huanhuan; Bian, Shujuan; Chen, Yong

    2015-04-21

    Voltammetric studies on the simple ion transfer (IT) behaviors of an important water-soluble B-vitamin, folic acid (FA), at the liquid-liquid (L-L) interface were firstly performed and then applied as a novel detection method for FA under physiological conditions. Meso-water-1,6-dichlorohexane (W-DCH) and meso-water-organogel interface arrays were built by using a hybrid mesoporous silica membrane (HMSM) with a unique structure of pores-in-pores and employed as the new platforms for the IT voltammetric study. In view of the unique structure of the HMSM, the impact of the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), self-assembled within the silica nanochannels of the HMSM, was investigated. In particular, its effect on the IT voltammetric behavior and detection of FA at meso-L-L interface arrays was systematically examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV). It was found that all the voltammetric responses of CV, DPV, and DPSV and the corresponding detection limit of FA at such meso-L-L interface arrays are closely related to the CTAB in the HMSM. Significantly, the calculated detection limit of FA could be improved to 80 nM after the combination of the DPSV technique with the additional preconcentration of FA in the silica-CTAB nanochannels, achieved through an anion-exchange process between FA(-) and the bromide of CTAB in HMSM. This provides a new and attractive strategy for the detection of those biological anions. PMID:25730302

  7. Automated on-line liquid-liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid-liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053-2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h(-1)). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. PMID:26423626

  8. Detection of Posaconazole by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry with Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Pin-Shiuan; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2015-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the detection of posaconazole using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection (SALDI/MS) was developed. After the DLLME, posaconazole was detected using SALDI/MS with colloidal gold and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as the co-matrix. Under optimal extraction and detection conditions, the calibration curve, which ranged from 1.0 to 100.0 nM for posaconazole, was observed to be linear. The limit of detection (LOD) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 nM for posaconazole. This novel method was successfully applied to the determination of posaconazole in human urine samples.

  9. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  10. Photoinduced Electron Transfer of PAMAM Dendrimer-Zinc(II) Porphyrin Associates at Polarized Liquid|Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nagatani, Hirohisa; Sakae, Hiroki; Torikai, Taishi; Sagara, Takamasa; Imura, Hisanori

    2015-06-01

    The heterogeneous photoinduced electron-transfer reaction of the ion associates between NH2-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato zinc(II) (ZnTPPS(4-)) was studied at the polarized water|1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) interface. The positive photocurrent arising from the photoreduction of ZnTPPS(4-) by a lipophilic quencher, decamethylferrocene, in the interfacial region was significantly enhanced by the ion association with the PAMAM dendrimers. The photocurrent response of the dendrimer-ZnTPPS(4-) associates was dependent on the pH condition and on the generation of dendrimer. A few cationic additives such as polyallylamine and n-octyltrimethyammonium were also examined as alternatives to the PAMAM dendrimer, but the magnitude of the photocurrent enhancement was rather small. The high photoreactivity of the dendrimer-ZnTPPS(4-) associates was interpreted mainly as a result of the high interfacial concentration of photoreactive porphyrin units associated stably with the dendrimer which was preferably adsorbed at the polarized water|DCE interface. The photochemical data observed in the second and fourth generation PAMAM dendrimer systems demonstrated that the higher generation dendrimer which can incorporate a porphyrin molecule more completely in the interior is less efficient for the photocurrent enhancement at the interface. These results indicated that the photoreactivity of ionic reactant at a polarized liquid|liquid interface can readily be modified via ion association with the charged dendrimer. PMID:25989445

  11. Electrochemical Sensing and Imaging Based on Ion Transfer at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Kim, Jiyeon; Izadyar, Anahita; Kabagambe, Benjamin; Shen, Mei; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    Here we review the recent applications of ion transfer (IT) at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) for electrochemical sensing and imaging. In particular, we focus on the development and recent applications of the nanopipet-supported ITIES and double-polymer-modified electrode, which enable the dynamic electrochemical measurements of IT at nanoscopic and macroscopic ITIES, respectively. High-quality IT voltammograms are obtainable using either technique to quantitatively assess the kinetics and dynamic mechanism of IT at the ITIES. Nanopipet-supported ITIES serves as an amperometric tip for scanning electrochemical microscopy to allow for unprecedentedly high-resolution electrochemical imaging. Voltammetric ion sensing at double-polymer-modified electrodes offers high sensitivity and unique multiple-ion selectivity. The promising future applications of these dynamic approaches for bioanalysis and electrochemical imaging are also discussed. PMID:24363454

  12. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of phosphatidylethanol in blood by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cabarcos, Pamela; Ángel Cocho, José; Moreda, Antonio; Míguez, Martha; Jesús Tabernero, María; Fernández, Purificación; María Bermejo, Ana

    2013-07-15

    Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is a phospholipid which requires for its metabolic formation the presence of relatively high ethanol levels. PEth is thus a promising marker to quentify ethanol abuse. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction has become a popular technique because it is fast, inexpensive, easy to operate and consumes low volume of organic solvent. In this method, the appropriate mixture of extraction solvent (230 μL dichloromethane) and disperser solvent (630 μL acetone) are injected into the sample by syringe, rapidly. The liquid chromatography method using a reversed phase-C8 column and a negative ion mode electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry detection instrument was developed for the determination of small amounts of PEth that might be present in blood samples, using phosphatidylbutanol (PBut) as an internal standard. The sensitivity of detection obtained with tandem MS was better than that of previous methods. Good linearity was obtained for a range of LOQ-10 μg/mL for PEth, whereas all of the deviations in precision and accuracy were less than 15% except for the LLOQ, where it should not exceed 20%. A set of 50 blood samples were analyzed by such method and whole blood concentrations of PEth 16:0/18:1 ranged from LLOQ to 1.71 μg/mL. PMID:23622544

  13. Accelerated solvent extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction before gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the sensitive determination of phenols in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Xing, Han-Zhu; Wang, Xia; Chen, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Ming-Lin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2015-05-01

    A method combining accelerated solvent extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed for the first time as a sample pretreatment for the rapid analysis of phenols (including phenol, m-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) in soil samples. In the accelerated solvent extraction procedure, water was used as an extraction solvent, and phenols were extracted from soil samples into water. The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique was then performed on the obtained aqueous solution. Important accelerated solvent extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction parameters were investigated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, the new method provided wide linearity (6.1-3080 ng/g), low limits of detection (0.06-1.83 ng/g), and excellent reproducibility (<10%) for phenols. Four real soil samples were analyzed by the proposed method to assess its applicability. Experimental results showed that the soil samples were free of our target compounds, and average recoveries were in the range of 87.9-110%. These findings indicate that accelerated solvent extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a sample pretreatment procedure coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is an excellent method for the rapid analysis of trace levels of phenols in environmental soil samples. PMID:25676868

  14. Determination of suvorexant in human plasma using 96-well liquid-liquid extraction and HPLC with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Breidinger, S A; Simpson, R C; Mangin, E; Woolf, E J

    2015-10-01

    A method, using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS), was developed for the determination of suvorexant (MK-4305, Belsomra(®)), a selective dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment insomnia, in human plasma over the concentration range of 1-1000ng/mL. Stable isotope labeled (13)C(2)H3-suvorexant was used as an internal standard. The sample preparation procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction, in the 96-well format, of a 100μL plasma sample with methyl t-butyl ether. The compounds were chromatographed under isocratic conditions on a Waters dC18 (50×2.1mm, 3μm) column with a mobile phase consisting of 30/70 (v/v %) 10mM ammonium formate, pH3/acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. Multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion pairs for suvorexant (m/z 451→186) and (13)C(2)H3-suvorexant (m/z 455→190) on an Applied Biosystems API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer was used for quantitation. Intraday assay precision, assessed in six different lots of control plasma, was within 10% CV at all concentrations, while assay accuracy ranged from 95.6 to 105.0% of nominal. Quality control (QC) samples in plasma were stored at -20°C. Initial within day analysis of QCs after one freeze-thaw cycle showed accuracy within 9.5% of nominal with precision (CV) of 6.7% or less. The plasma QC samples were demonstrated to be stable for up to 25 months at -20°C. The method described has been used to support clinical studies during Phase I through III of clinical development. PMID:26343269

  15. Estrogenic compounds determination in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Asensio-Ramos, María; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Fanali, Salvatore; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2014-05-30

    In this work, a group of 12 estrogenic compounds, i.e., four natural sexual hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-estradiol and estriol), an exoestrogen (17α-ethynylestradiol), a synthetic stilbene (dienestrol), a mycotoxin (zearalenone) and some of their major metabolites (2-methoxyestradiol, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol) have been separated and determined by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) coupled to electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry. For this purpose, a background electrolyte containing an aqueous solution of 45 mM of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) adjusted to pH 9.0 with an ammonia solution, as MS friendly surfactant, and methanol (10% (v/v)), as organic modifier, was used. To further increase the sensitivity, normal stacking mode was applied by injecting the sample dissolved in an aqueous solution of 11.5mM of ammonium PFO (APFO) at pH 9.0 containing 10% (v/v) of methanol for 25s. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, using 110 μL of chloroform and 500 μL of acetonitrile as extraction and dispersion solvents, respectively, was employed to extract and preconcentrate the target analytes from different types of environmental water samples (mineral, run-off and wastewater) containing 30% (w/v) NaCl and adjusted to pH 3.0 with 1M HCl. The limits of detection achieved were in the range 0.04-1.10 μg/L. The whole method was validated in terms of linearity, precision, recovery and matrix effect for each type of water, showing determination coefficients higher than 0.992 for matrix-matched calibration and absolute recoveries in the range 43-91%. PMID:24780255

  16. In-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and silylation prior gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultraviolet filters determination in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, Sabrina; Avivar, Jessica; Suárez, Ruth; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-04-22

    A novel online approach involving in-syringe magnetic stirring assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of seven UV filters extensively used in cosmetic products in environmental water samples. The effect of parameters such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, dispersive solvent and derivatization agent, pH, ionic strength and stirring time, was studied using multivariate experimental design. Extraction, derivatization and preconcentration were simultaneously performed using acetone as dispersive solvent, N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as derivatization agent and trichloroethylene as extraction solvent. After stirring during 160s, the sedimented phase was transferred to a rotary micro-volume injection valve (3 μL) and introduced by an air stream into the injector of the GC through a stainless-steel tube used as interface. The detection limits were in the range of 0.023-0.16 μg L(-1) and good linearity was observed up to 500 μg L(-1) of the studied UV filters, with R(2) ranging between 0.9829 and 0.9963. The inter-day precision expressed as relative standard deviation (n=5) varied between 5.5 and 16.8%. Finally, the developed method was satisfactorily applied to assess the occurrence of the studied UV filters in seawater and pool water samples. Some of the studied UV filters were found in these samples and an add-recovery test was also successfully performed with recoveries between 82 and 111%. PMID:27016119

  17. Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Thomas; Münchow, Götz; Hardt, Steffen

    2011-05-11

    The mass transfer resistance of a liquid-liquid interface in an aqueous two-phase system composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran is investigated. Different types of proteins and DNA stained with fluorescent dyes serve as probes to study the transport processes close to the interface. A microfluidic device is employed to enable the electrophoretic transport of biomolecules from one phase to another. The results obtained for proteins can be explained solely via the different electrophoretic mobilities and different affinities of the molecules to the two phases, without any indications of a significant mass transfer resistance of the liquid-liquid interface. By contrast, DNA molecules adsorb to the interface and only desorb under an increased electric field strength. The desorption process carries the signature of a thermally activated escape from a metastable state, as reflected in the exponential decay of the fluorescence intensity at the interface as a function of time. PMID:21508474

  18. Assessment of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction conditions for gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry identification of organic compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, M; Rodríguez, I; Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Cela, R; Sulaiman, S A; Gan, S H

    2014-11-14

    The suitability of the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique for gas chromatography (GC) characterization of minor organic compounds in honey samples is evaluated. Under optimized conditions, samples were pre-treated by liquid-liquid extraction with acetonitrile followed by DLLME using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, 0.075 mL) as extractant. The yielded settled phase was analyzed by GC using high resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The whole sample preparation process is completed in approximately 10 min, with a total consumption of organic solvents below 4 mL, relative standard deviations lower than 12% and with more than 70 organic compounds, displaying linear retention index in the range from 990 to 2900, identified in the obtained extracts. In comparison with HS SPME extraction, higher peak intensities were attained for most volatile and semi-volatile compounds amenable to both extraction techniques. Furthermore, other species such as highly polar and water soluble benzene acids, long chain fatty acids, esters and flavonoids, which are difficult to concentrate by HS SPME, could be identified in DLLME extracts. Some of the compounds identified in DLLME extracts have been proposed as useful for samples classification and/or they are recognized as markers of honeys from certain geographic areas. PMID:25441341

  19. Determination of atranol and chloroatranol in perfumes using simultaneous derivatization and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Nogueroles, Marina; Chisvert, Alberto; Salvador, Amparo

    2014-05-15

    A new analytical method based on simultaneous derivatization and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), for the determination of the allergenic compounds atranol and chloroatranol in perfumes, is presented. Derivatization of the target analytes by means of acetylation with anhydride acetic in carbonate buffer was carried out. Thereby volatility and detectability were increased for improved GC-MS sensitivity. In addition, extractability by DLLME was also enhanced due to a less polar character of the solutes. A liquid-liquid extraction was performed before DLLME to clean up the sample and to obtain an aqueous sample solution, free of the low polar matrix from the essential oils, as donor phase. Different parameters, such as the nature and volume of both the extraction and disperser solvents, the ionic strength of the aqueous donor phase or the effect of the derivatization reagent volume, were optimized. Under the selected conditions (injection of a mixture of 750μL of acetone as disperser solvent, 100μL of chloroform as extraction solvent and 100μL of anhydride acetic as derivatization reagent) the figures of merit of the proposed method were evaluated. Limits of detection in the low ngmL(-1) range were obtained. Matrix effect was observed in real perfume samples and thus, standard addition calibration is recommended. PMID:24793850

  20. Suitability of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the in situ silylation of chlorophenols in water samples before gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Ghambari, Hoda

    2015-10-01

    Trace analysis of chlorophenols in water was performed by simultaneous silylation and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was carried out using an organic solvent lighter than water (n-hexane). The effect of different silylating reagents on the method efficiency was investigated. The influence of derivatization reagent volume, presence of catalyst and derivatization/extraction time on the yield of the derivatization reaction was studied. Different parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as kind and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH of the sample and addition of salt were also investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.05-100 ng/mL and the limit of detection was 0.01 ng/mL. The enrichment factors were 242, 351, and 363 for 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, respectively. The values of intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were in the range of 3.0-6.4 and 6.1-9.9%, respectively. The applicability of the method was investigated by analyzing water and wastewater samples. PMID:26257251

  1. Determination of Macrolide Antibiotics Using Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Thomas C.; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2012-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of macrolide antibiotics using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection was developed. Acetone and dichloromethane were used as the disperser solvent and extraction solvent, respectively. A mixture of extraction solvent and disperser solvent were rapidly injected into a 1.0 mL aqueous sample to form a cloudy solution. After the extraction, macrolide antibiotics were detected using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI/MS) with colloidal silver as the matrix. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 2, 3, 3, and 2 nM for erythromycin (ERY), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TILM), and tylosin (TYL), respectively. This developed method was successfully applied to the determination of macrolide antibiotics in human urine samples.

  2. Multicomponent mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.; Krishna, R.

    1993-01-01

    This is an important book on multicomponent mass transfer, meant for readers already acquainted with the theory of mass transfer and the fundamentals of transport phenomena. Part 1, entitled Molecular Diffusion, contains the following chapters: Preliminary Concepts; The Maxwell-Stefan Relations; Fick's Law; Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients; Solution of multicomponent Diffusion Problems: The Linearized Theory; and Solution of Multicomponent Diffusion Problems: Effective Diffusivity Methods. Part 2, entitled Interphase Transfer, contains the following chapters: Mass-Transfer Coefficients; Film Theory; Unsteady-State Mass-Transfer Models; Mass Transfer in Turbulent Flow; and Simultaneous Mass and Energy Transfer. Part 3, entitled Design, contains the following chapters: Multicomponent Distillation: Mass-Transfer Models; Multicomponent Distillation: Efficiency Models; Multicomponent Distillation: A Nonequilibrium Stage Model; and Condensation of Vapor Mixtures. Appendices are provided on matrix algebra, equation-solving and estimation of a thermodynamic derivative matrix. A computer diskette is provided with the book; the examples in Chapters 1--13 are solvable using this diskette and the commercial package Mathcad which the user must obtain. A separate software package, Chemsep, is needed for some of the exercises in Chapter 14.

  3. Sonication effect on the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene with sodium sulfide in liquid-liquid multi-site phase-transfer catalysis condition - kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Abimannan, Pachaiyappan; Selvaraj, Varathan; Rajendran, Venugopal

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of di-p-tolylsulfane from the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene (BMB) with sodium sulfide was carried out using a multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) viz., 1,4-dihexyl-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octanium dibromide and ultrasonic irradiation in a liquid-liquid reaction condition. The overall reaction rate is greatly enhanced when catalyzed by multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) combined with sonication (40 kHz, 300 W) in a batch reactor than catalyzed by MPTC without sonication. Effects on the reaction due to various operating conditions, such as agitation speed, different ultrasound frequencies, different phase-transfer catalysts, different organic solvents, the amount of MPTC, temperature, amount of sodium sulfide, effect of sodium hydroxide, volume of n-hexane and the concentration of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene. The reaction obeys a pseudo first-order rate law and a suitable mechanism was proposed based on the experimental observation. PMID:25199442

  4. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of carbamates in juices by micellar electrokinetic chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, David; Huertas-Pérez, José F; García-Campaña, Ana M; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura

    2015-07-01

    A new method based on vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction has been developed for the extraction of carbamate pesticides in juice samples prior to their determination by micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This sample treatment allowed the satisfactory extraction and the extract clean-up of 25 carbamates from different fruit and vegetal juices (banana, tomato, and peach). In this study, the addition of ammonium perfluorooctanoate in the aqueous sample in combination with vortex agitation, provided very clean extracts with short extraction times. Under optimized conditions, recoveries of the proposed method for these pesticides from fortified juice samples ranged from 81% to 104%, with relative standard deviations lower than 15%. Limits of quantification were between 2.3µgkg(-)(1) and 4.7µgkg(-)(1), showing the high sensitivity of this fast and simple method. PMID:25882424

  5. Determination of spirocyclic tetronic/tetramic acid derivatives and neonicotinoid insecticides in fruits and vegetables by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry after dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Belda, Marta; Garrido, Isabel; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Fenoll, José

    2016-07-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was used to preconcentrate three spirocyclic tetronic/tetramic acid derivatives (spirotetramat, spiromesifen and spirodiclofen) and five neonicotinoid (thiamethoxam, chlotianidin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid) insecticides previously extracted from fruit and vegetable matrices with acetonitrile. The organic enriched phase was evaporated, reconstituted in 25μL acetonitrile and analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole in selected reaction monitoring mode. Enrichment factors in the 15-100 range were obtained. A matrix effect was observed, the detection limits varying between 0.025 and 0.5ngg(-1), depending on the compound and the sample matrix. The developed method was applied to the analysis of 25 samples corresponding to five different fruit and vegetable matrices. Only thiamethoxam was detected in a lemon sample at a concentration close to the quantification limit, and spiromesifen and spirotetramat at concentrations between 11.6 and 54.5ngg(-1). PMID:26920309

  6. Screening and quantitative determination of twelve acidic and neutral pharmaceuticals in whole blood by liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Buck, Maike; Hansen, Lene; Linnet, Kristian

    2010-09-01

    We describe a multi-method for simultaneous identification and quantification of 12 acidic and neutral compounds in whole blood. The method involves a simple liquid-liquid extraction, and the identification and quantification are performed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was fully validated for salicylic acid, paracetamol, phenobarbital, carisoprodol, meprobamate, topiramate, etodolac, chlorzoxazone, furosemide, ibuprofen, warfarin, and salicylamide. The method also tentatively includes thiopental, theophylline, piroxicam, naproxen, diclophenac, and modafinil, but these drugs were not included in the full validation program and are not described in detail here. Limit of quantitation was 1 mg/kg for the compounds with coefficients of variation of < 20%, except for furosemide, which had a coefficient of variation of 32% at limit of quantitation. The measuring interval was wide for most components. Extraction efficiencies were high, reflecting the high-yield capacity of the method. PMID:20822673

  7. Analysis of potential migrants from plastic materials in milk by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with liquid-liquid extraction and low-temperature purification.

    PubMed

    Bodai, Zsolt; Szabó, Bálint Sámuel; Novák, Márton; Hámori, Susanne; Nyiri, Zoltán; Rikker, Tamás; Eke, Zsuzsanna

    2014-10-15

    A simple and fast analytical method was developed for the determination of six UV stabilizers (Cyasorb UV-1164, Tinuvin P, Tinuvin 234, Tinuvin 326, Tinuvin 327, and Tinuvin 1577) and five antioxidants (Irgafos 168, Irganox 1010, Irganox 3114, Irganox 3790, and Irganox 565) in milk. For sample preparation liquid-liquid extraction with low-temperature purification combined with centrifugation was used to remove fats, proteins, and sugars. After the cleanup step, the sample was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). External standard and matrix calibrations were tested. External calibration proved to be acceptable for Tinuvin P, Tinuvin 234, Tinuvin 326, Tinuvin 327, Irganox 3114, and Irganox 3790. The method was successfully validated with matrix calibration for all compounds. Method detection limits were between 0.25 and 10 μg/kg. Accuracies ranged from 93 to 109%, and intraday precisions were <13%. PMID:25251884

  8. Analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls in waters and wastewaters using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Senar

    2011-03-01

    A method was developed for viable and rapid determination of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in water samples with vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At first, the most suitable extraction solvent and extraction solvent volume were determined. Later, the parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as vortex extraction time, rotational speed of the vortex, and ionic strength of the sample were optimized by using a 2(3) factorial experimental design. The optimized extraction conditions for 5 mL water sample were as follows: extractant solvent 200 μL of chloroform; vortex extraction time of 2 min at 3000 rpm; centrifugation 5 min at 4000 rpm, and no ionic strength. Under the optimum condition, limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.36 to 0.73 ng/L. Mean recoveries of PCBs from fortified water samples are 96% for three different fortification levels and RSDs of the recoveries are below 5%. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the determination of PCBs in real water and wastewater samples such as tap, well, surface, bottled waters, and municipal, treated municipal, and industrial wastewaters. The performance of the proposed method was compared with traditional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of real water samples and the results show that efficiency of proposed method is comparable to the LLE. However, the proposed method offers several advantages, i.e. reducing sample requirement for measurement of target compounds, less solvent consumption, and reducing the costs associated with solvent purchase and waste disposal. It is also viable, rapid, and easy to use for the analyses of PCBs in water samples by using GC-MS. PMID:21280211

  9. Probing Ion Transfer across Liquid-Liquid Interfaces by Monitoring Collisions of Single Femtoliter Oil Droplets on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Kummer, Sina; Kragl, Udo; Strauss, Steven H; Bard, Allen J

    2016-08-01

    We describe a method of observing collisions of single femtoliter (fL) oil (i.e., toluene) droplets that are dispersed in water on an ultramicroelectrode (UME) to probe the ion transfer across the oil/water interface. The oil-in-water emulsion was stabilized by an ionic liquid, in which the oil droplet trapped a highly hydrophobic redox probe, rubrene. The ionic liquid also functions as the supporting electrolyte in toluene. When the potential of the UME was biased such that rubrene oxidation would be possible when a droplet collided with the electrode, no current spikes were observed. This implies that the rubrene radical cation is not hydrophilic enough to transfer into the aqueous phase. We show that current spikes are observed when tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate or tetrahexylammonium hexafluorophosphate are introduced into the toluene phase and when tetrabutylammonium perchlorate is introduced into the water phase, implying that the ion transfer facilitates electron transfer in the droplet collisions. The current (i)-time (t) behavior was evaluated quantitatively, which indicated the ion transfer is fast and reversible. Furthermore, the size of these emulsion droplets can also be calculated from the electrochemical collision. We further investigated the potential dependence on the electrochemical collision response in the presence of tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate in toluene to obtain the formal ion transfer potential of tetrabutylammonium across the toluene/water interface, which was determined to be 0.754 V in the inner potential scale. The results yield new physical insights into the charge balance mechanism in emulsion droplet collisions and indicate that the electrochemical collision technique can be used to probe formal ion transfer potentials between water and solvents with very low (ε < 5) dielectric constants. PMID:27387789

  10. Determination of volatile nitrosamines in meat products by microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Martínez-Castillo, Nelson; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were evaluated for use in the extraction and preconcentration of volatile nitrosamines in meat products. Parameters affecting MAE, such as the extraction solvent used, and DLLME, including the nature and volume of the extracting and disperser solvents, extraction time, salt addition and centrifugation time, were optimized. In the MAE method, 0.25g of sample mass was extracted in 10mL NaOH (0.05M) in a closed-vessel system. For DLLME, 1.5mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 20μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by syringe into 5mL of the sample extract solution (previously adjusted to pH 6), thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and a volume of 3μL of the sedimented phase was analyzed by GC-MS. The enrichment factors provided by DLLME varied from 220 to 342 for N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosopiperidine, respectively. The matrix effect was evaluated for different samples, and it was concluded that sample quantification can be carried out by aqueous calibration. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits ranged from 0.003 to 0.014ngmL(-1) for NPIP and NMEA, respectively (0.12-0.56ngg(-1) in the meat products). PMID:21376329

  11. Simultaneous determination of polycyclic musks in blood and urine by solid supported liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Huang, Liping; Chen, Yuxin; Guo, Liman; Li, Limin; Zhou, Haiyun; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-06-15

    A rapid, precise and accurate method for the simultaneous determination of 5 polycyclic musks (PCMs) in biological fluids was developed by solid supported liquid-liquid extraction (SLE) coupled with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). All parameters influencing SLE-GC-MS performance, including electron energy of electron-impact ionization source, collision energy for tandem mass spectrometer when operated in selected-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode, type and volume of elution reagent, nitrogen evaporation time, pH and salinity of sample have been carefully optimized. Eight milliliter of n-hexane was finally chosen as elution reagent. Blood and urine sample could be loaded into SLE cartridge without adjusting pH and salinity. Deuterated tonalide (AHTN-d3) was chosen as internal standard. The correlation coefficient (r(2)) of the calibration curves of target compounds ranged from 0.9996 to 0.9998. The dynamic range spanned over two orders of magnitude. The limit of detection (LOD) of target compounds in blood and urine ranged from 0.008 to 0.105μgL(-1) and 0.005 to 0.075μgL(-1), respectively. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of PCMs in human blood and urine obtaining satisfying recoveries on low, medium and high levels. The method was compared with SLE-GC-MS and shown one to two orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. PMID:25965876

  12. Simultaneous determination of plant hormones in peach based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiaomei; Zhang, Wenmin; Gao, Jia; Lu, Minghua; Zhang, Lan; Li, Jianrong

    2015-06-15

    Fruit development is influenced greatly by endogenous hormones including salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Mass spectrometry with high sensitivity has become a routine technology to analyze hormones. However, pretreatment of plant samples remains a difficult problem. Thus, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was used to concentrate trace plant hormones before liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ITMS) analysis. Standard curves were linear within the ranges of 0.5-50, 0.2-20ng/mL for SA and ABA, respectively. The correlation coefficients were greater than 0.9995 with recoveries above 87.5%. The limits of detection were 0.2ng/mL for SA and 0.1ng/mL for ABA in spiked water solution, respectively (injection 20μL). The successful analysis of SA and ABA in fruit samples indicated our DLLME-LC-ITMS approach was efficient, allowing reliable quantification of both two compounds from very small amounts of plant material. Moreover, this research revealed the relationship between SA and ABA content and development of peach fruit at different growth stages. PMID:25939092

  13. Sensitive liquid chromatography positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of tegaserod in human plasma using liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara

    2009-02-01

    A sensitive and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography-positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method is developed and validated for the quantitation of tegaserod in human plasma. Following liquid-liquid extraction, the analytes are separated using an isocratic mobile phase on a reversed-phase column and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode using the respective (M+H)+ ions, m/z 302 to 173 for tegaserod and m/z 409 to 228 for the internal standard. The assay exhibits a linear dynamic range of 100-10000 pg/mL for tegaserod in human plasma. The lower limit of quantitation is 100 pg/mL with a relative standard deviation of less than 7%. Acceptable precision and accuracy are obtained for concentrations over the standard curve range. A run time of 2.0 min for each sample makes it possible to analyze more than 250 human plasma samples per day. The validated method is successfully used to analyze human plasma samples for application in pharmacokinetic, bioavailability, or bioequivalence studies. PMID:19222925

  14. Determination of 2-ethylhexyl 4-(dimethylamino) benzoate using membrane-assisted liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Genestar, C; Simonet, B M

    2009-06-01

    A flow-cell for micro-porous membrane liquid-liquid extraction with a sheet membrane was used to extract 2-ethylhexyl 4-(dimethylamino) benzoate (EDB) from urine of solar-cream users and spiked wine samples. The cell enabled the target analyte to be extracted from 7.9 mL of donor solution into 200 microL of acceptor solution (decane). After extraction, the acceptor solution was transferred to a micro-vial for GC-MS analysis without derivation. In this work, variables affecting the enrichment factor were also studied, such as organic solvent, extraction time, recirculation flow of the donor solution through the donor chamber, presence of potassium chloride and ethanol in the donor solution and pH. The method has been evaluated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, limits of detection and quantification and extraction efficiency. Limits of quantification were 1 and 3 microg L(-1) EDB for urine and wine, respectively. Quantitative analysis has been carried out by applying the method of standard additions. Within- and between-day relative standard deviations were lower than 12% and 20%, respectively. EDB was found in the urine of users of cream containing EDB in the concentration interval 1.2-7.2 microg L(-1). Therefore, this provides evidence of EDB dermal absorption and subsequent excretion through the urinary tract. EDB was not found in the analysed wine samples. PMID:19347661

  15. Determination of 13 Organic Toxicants in Human Blood by Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupling High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiying

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides and antidepressants are frequently misused in drug-facilitated crime because of their toxicological effect and easy-availability. Therefore, it is essential for the development of a simple and reliable method for the determination of these organic toxicants in biological fluids. Here, we report on an applicable method by the combination of optimized liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) procedure and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantify dimethoate, omethoate, dichlorvos, carbofuran, fenpropathrin, diazepam, estazolam, alprazolam, triazolamm, chlorpromazine, phenergan, barbitone and phenobarbital in human blood. The method demonstrated a linear calibration curve in range of 20 - 500 μg/L (r > 0.994). The accuracy evaluated by recovery spiked at three different concentrations (50, 100 and 200 μg/L) was in the range of 58.8 - 83.1% with a relative standard deviations (RSD) of 3.7 - 7.4%. The limits of quantification ranged over 6.7 - 33.3 μg/L. This method was proved to be simple and reliable, and was thus successfully applied to forensic toxicology. PMID:27302585

  16. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid and sensitive determination of UV filters in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Negreira, N; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Cela, R

    2010-09-01

    The performance of the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique for the determination of eight UV filters and a structurally related personal care species, benzyl salicylate (BzS), in environmental water samples is evaluated. After extraction, analytes were determined by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS). Parameters potentially affecting the performance of the sample preparation method (sample pH, ionic strength, type and volume of dispersant and extractant solvents) were systematically investigated using both multi- and univariant optimization strategies. Under final working conditions, analytes were extracted from 10 mL water samples by addition of 1 mL of acetone (dispersant) containing 60 μL of chlorobenzene (extractant), without modifying either the pH or the ionic strength of the sample. Limits of quantification (LOQs) between 2 and 14 ng L(-1), inter-day variability (evaluated with relative standard deviations, RSDs) from 9% to 14% and good linearity up to concentrations of 10,000 ng L(-1) were obtained. Moreover, the efficiency of the extraction was scarcely affected by the type of water sample. With the only exception of 2-ethylhexyl-p-dimethylaminobenzoate (EHPABA), compounds were found in environmental water samples at concentrations between 6 ± 1 ng L(-1) and 26 ± 2 ng mL(-1). PMID:20652544

  17. Up-and-down-shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of fungicides in wine.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shang-Ping; Tseng, Wan-Chi; Kong, Po-Hsin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chen, Jung-Hsuan; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2015-10-15

    An up-and-down-shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UDSA-DLLME) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of fungicides (cyprodinil, procymidone, fludioxonil, flusilazole, benalaxyl, and tebuconazole) in wine. The developed method requires 11 μL of 1-octanol without the need for dispersive solvents. The total extraction time was approximately 3 min. Under optimum conditions, the linear range of the method was 0.05-100 μg L(-1) for all fungicides and the limit of detection was 0.007-0.025 μg L(-1). The absolute and relative recoveries were 31-83% and 83-107% for white wine, respectively, and 32-85% and 83-108% for red wine, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precision were 0.5-7.5% and 0.7-6.1%, respectively. Our developed method had good sensitivity and high extraction efficiency. UDSA-DLLME is a desirable method in terms of performance and speed. PMID:25952882

  18. Determination of Earthy-musty Odorous Compounds in Drinking Water by Vortex Assisted Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Wu, Zhong-Ping; Che, Wen-Jun; Xian, Yan-Ping; Guo, Xin-Dong; Lv, Jia-Xin; Li, He

    2016-01-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of eight earthy-musty compounds in drinking water by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). In this work, the type and volume of extraction solvent and dispersion agent, and the amount of NaCl were optimized; the linearity, detection limit, recovery and precision of method were investigated. The results indicated that the target analytes were in the range of 0.2 - 100 μg/L with correlation coefficient (r) ranging from 0.9991 to 0.9999, the limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) of the analytes ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 ng/L with the enrichment factor of 320. The mean recoveries for drinking water at three spiked concentrations levels of 0.6 - 32 ng/L were in the range of 91.3 to 103%, the precision ranged from 3.1 to 7.5% (n = 6), and the inter-day precision was from 6.1 to 11.1% (n = 5). Only one of 15 selected real samples tested positive for GSM, and the concentration was 3 ng/L. This method was confirmed to be simple, fast, efficient, and accurate for the determination of earthy-musty compounds in aqueous samples. PMID:27063712

  19. Determination of immunosuppressive drugs in human urine and serum by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Shiuan; Cheng, Yu-Han; Lin, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Sarah Y

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for the determination of immunosuppressive drugs through surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection (SALDI/MS) was developed. Colloidal Pd and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) were used as the SALDI co-matrix. To eliminate interference and enhance the sensitivity, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was employed to extract the immunosuppressive drugs from the aqueous solutions. Under optimal extraction and detection conditions, calibration curves for cyclosporine and everolimus in aqueous solutions were linear over a concentration range from 0.01 to 1.20 μM. For sirolimus, the linear concentration range of the calibration curve was from 0.05 to 2.00 μM. The limits of detection (LODs) were calculated to be 3, 3, and 14 nM for cyclosporine, everolimus, and sirolimus, respectively. The enrichment factors of DLLME were calculated to be 108, 122, and 101 for cyclosporine, everolimus, and sirolimus, respectively. This novel method was successfully applied for the determination of immunosuppressive drugs in human urine and serum samples. PMID:26521180

  20. Rapid Monitoring and Determination of Class 1 Residual Solvents in Pharmaceuticals Using Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Azizi, Saber

    2015-07-01

    A simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for monitoring and determination of class 1 residual solvents, benzene (Bz), carbon tetrachloride (CT), 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCE), in pharmaceuticals was developed and evaluated. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of analytes such as type and volume of extraction solvent, type and volume of dispersive solvent and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. 1-Octanol and methanol proved to be the most suitable extraction and dispersive solvents, respectively. The method showed linearity for 1,1-DCE, 1,1,1-TCE, CT, Bz and 1,2-DCE in the ranges of 0.001-80, 0.005-80, 0.002-80, 0.0001-40 and 0.001-80 µg/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries were in the range of 84-92, 87-98, 83-94, 89-98 and 87-96% for 1,1-DCE, 1,1,1-TCE, CT, Bz and 1,2-DCE, respectively. The obtained results showed that the proposed method can be used to monitor and determine class 1 residual solvents in pharmaceuticals. PMID:25398952

  1. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of nitrophenols in soils by microvial insert large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-07-22

    A rapid and sensitive procedure for the determination of six NPs in soils by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is proposed. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) is used for NP extraction from soil matrices to an organic solvent, while the environmentally friendly technique dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is used for the preconcentration of the resulting UAE extracts. NPs were derivatized by applying an "in-situ" acetylation procedure, before being injected into the GC-MS system using microvial insert large volume injection (LVI). Several parameters affecting UAE, DLLME, derivatization and injection steps were investigated. The optimized procedure provided recoveries of 86-111% from spiked samples. Precision values of the procedure (expressed as relative standard deviation, RSD) lower than 12%, and limits of quantification ranging from 1.3 to 2.6ngg(-1), depending on the compound, were obtained. Twenty soil samples, obtained from military, industrial and agricultural areas, were analyzed by the proposed method. Two of the analytes were quantified in two of the samples obtained from industrial areas, at concentrations in the 4.8-9.6ngg(-1) range. PMID:27317004

  2. Speciation of mercury in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Han, Yi; Liu, Xinli; Duan, Taicheng; Chen, Hangting

    2011-01-01

    The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation of mercury in water samples was described. Firstly methylmercury (MeHg +) and mercury (Hg 2+) were complexed with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, and then the complexes were extracted into carbon tetrachloride by using DLLME. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factors of 138 and 350 for MeHg + and Hg 2+ were obtained from only 5.00 mL sample solution. The detection limits of the analytes (as Hg) were 0.0076 ng mL -1 for MeHg + and 0.0014 ng mL -1 for Hg 2+, respectively. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.5 ng mL -1 MeHg + and Hg 2+ were 6.9% and 4.4%, respectively. Standard reference material of seawater (GBW(E)080042) was analyzed to verify the accuracy of the method and the results were in good agreement with the certified values. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the speciation of mercury in three environmental water samples.

  3. An in situ derivatization - dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas-chromatography - mass spectrometry for determining biogenic amines in home-made fermented alcoholic drinks.

    PubMed

    Płotka-Wasylka, Justyna; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 13 biogenic amines in home-made wine samples. The method allows to simultaneous extraction and derivatization of the amines providing a simple and fast mode of extract enrichment. During the study, two different procedures were examined. Statistical analysis was performed to choose better procedure, as well as the conditions of derivatization reaction. At least, a mixture of methanol (dispersive solvent; 215μL), chloroform (extractive solvent; 400μL), and isobutyl choloroformate (derivatizing reagent; 90μL) was used as extractive/derivatizing reagent, added to 5mL of sample. The addition of mixture of pyridine and HCl was necessary to eliminate the by-products. The proposed method showed good linearity (correlation coefficients >0.9961), good recoveries (from 77 to 105%), and good intra-day precision (below 13%) and inter-day precision (below 10%). Moreover, detection limits were never over 4.1μg/L. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of 17 home-made wine samples not regulated by law. All of the biogenic amines analyzed were found in most of the wines. PMID:27237593

  4. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of new generation pesticides in soils by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Belda, Marta; Garrido, Isabel; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Fenoll, José

    2015-05-15

    A sensitive method for the determination of five new generation pesticides (chlorantraniliprole, spirotetramat, spiromesifen, spirodiclofen and flubendiamide) in soil samples has been developed using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS(2)) with a triple-quadrupole in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The target analytes are released from the solid matrix by single-phase extraction in acetonitrile (SLE), this organic phase being used as dispersant solvent in the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) step. The different parameters affecting the extraction efficiency in DLLME were carefully studied, being 1.5mL of acetonitrile extract (disperser solvent), 125μL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 10mL aqueous solution, the selected conditions. The enriched organic phase was evaporated, reconstituted with 50μL acetonitrile and injected into a liquid chromatograph with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid under gradient elution and a C8 stationary phase. Detection limits in the 0.0015-0.0090ngg(-1) range were obtained. Insecticide concentrations ranging from 0.03 to 197ngg(-1), depending on the compound, were found in the soil samples analysed. The recovery values obtained by SLE-DLLME-LC-ESI-MS(2) for three spiked soils at three concentration levels varied between 87 and 114%, with RSDs of between 5.5 and 14%. PMID:25841611

  5. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Ultrahigh Performance Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Determination of Organophosphate Esters in Aqueous Samples

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Haiying; Xian, Yanping; Guo, Xindong; Luo, Donghui; Lu, Yujing; Yang, Bao

    2014-01-01

    A new technique was established to identify eight organophosphate esters (OPEs) in this work. It utilised dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in combination with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The type and volume of extraction solvents, dispersion agent, and amount of NaCl were optimized. The target analytes were detected in the range of 1.0–200 µg/L with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9982 to 0.9998, and the detection limits of the analytes were ranged from 0.02 to 0.07 µg/L (S/N = 3). The feasibility of this method was demonstrated by identifying OPEs in aqueous samples that exhibited spiked recoveries, which ranged between 48.7% and 58.3% for triethyl phosphate (TEP) as well as between 85.9% and 113% for the other OPEs. The precision was ranged from 3.2% to 9.3% (n = 6), and the interprecision was ranged from 2.6% to 12.3% (n = 5). Only 2 of the 12 selected samples were tested to be positive for OPEs, and the total concentrations of OPEs in them were 1.1 and 1.6 µg/L, respectively. This method was confirmed to be simple, fast, and accurate for identifying OPEs in aqueous samples. PMID:24616613

  6. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Whole Water by Continuous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 69 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on aquatic organisms in wastewater. This method also is useful for evaluating the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are indicators of wastewater or have endocrine-disrupting potential. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Wastewater compounds in whole-water samples were extracted using continuous liquid-liquid extractors and methylene chloride solvent, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 0.5 microgram per liter averaged 72 percent ? 8 percent relative standard deviation. The concentration of 21 compounds is always reported as estimated because method recovery was less than 60 percent, variability was greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation, or standard reference compounds were prepared from technical mixtures. Initial method detection limits averaged 0.18 microgram per liter. Samples were preserved by adding 60 grams of sodium chloride and stored at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory established a sample holding-time limit prior to sample extraction of 14 days from the date of collection.

  7. Determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in aqueous samples by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Ya; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    A simple and solvent-minimized procedure for the determination of six commonly found synthetic polycyclic musks in aqueous samples using ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of analytes from water samples were systematically investigated. The best extraction conditions involved the rapid injection of a mixture of 1.0 mL of isopropyl alcohol (as a dispersant) and 10 μL of carbon tetrachloride (as an extractant) into 10 mL of water containing 0.5 g of sodium chloride in a conical-bottom glass tube. After ultrasonication for 1.0 min and centrifugation at 5,000 rpm (10 min), the sedimented phase 1.0 μL was directly injected into the GC-MS system. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were less than 0.6 ng/L. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), was less than 11% for both intra- and interday analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 71 and 104%. Their total concentrations were determined in the range from 8.3 to 63.9 ng/L in various environmental samples by using a standard addition method. PMID:22139524

  8. Determination of phthalate esters in cleaning and personal care products by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Campillo, Natalia; Pastor-Belda, Marta; Oller, Ainhoa; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PEs) were preconcentrated from cleaning products, detergents and cosmetics using ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) in the presence of acetonitrile, and then submitted to dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). For DLLME, 3mL of acetonitrile extract, 150μL carbon tetrachloride and 10mL aqueous solution were used. The enriched organic phase was evaporated, reconstituted with 25μL acetonitrile and injected into a liquid chromatograph with a mobile phase (acetonitrile:10mM ammonium acetate, pH 4) under gradient elution. Detection was carried out using both diode-array (DAD) and electrospray-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MS/MS) in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) of the positive fragment ions. Quantification was carried out using matrix-matched standards. Detection limits were in the range 0.04-0.45ngmL(-1) for the six PEs considered. The recoveries obtained were in the 84-124% range, with RSDs lower than 10%. Thirty three different cleaning products were analyzed. The most frequently found compound was diethyl phthalate. PMID:25537172

  9. Determination of volatile components of saffron by optimised ultrasound-assisted extraction in tandem with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sereshti, Hassan; Heidari, Reza; Samadi, Soheila

    2014-01-15

    In the present research, a combined extraction method of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) in conjunction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was applied to isolation and enrichment of saffron volatiles. The extracted components of the saffron were separated and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. The mixture of methanol/acetonitrile was chosen for the extraction of the compounds and chloroform was used at the preconcentration stage. The important parameters, such as composition of extraction solvent, volume of preconcentration solvent, ultrasonic applying time, and salt concentration were optimised by using a half-fraction factorial central composite design (CCD). Under the optimal conditions, the linear dynamic ranges (LDRs) were 10-10,000mgL(-)(1). The determination coefficients (R(2)) were from 0.9990 to 0.9997. The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) for the extracted compounds were 6-123mgL(-)(1) and 20-406mgL(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.48-9.82% (n=3). The enhancement factors (EFs) were 3.6-41.3. PMID:24054273

  10. Determination of cyclic and linear siloxanes in wastewater samples by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cortada, Carol; dos Reis, Luciana Costa; Vidal, Lorena; Llorca, Julio; Canals, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A fast, simple and environmentally friendly ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (USA-DLLME) procedure has been developed to preconcentrate eight cyclic and linear siloxanes from wastewater samples prior to quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A two-stage multivariate optimization approach has been developed employing a Plackett-Burman design for screening and selecting the significant factors involved in the USA-DLLME procedure, which was later optimized by means of a circumscribed central composite design. The optimum conditions were: extractant solvent volume, 13 µL; solvent type, chlorobenzene; sample volume, 13 mL; centrifugation speed, 2300 rpm; centrifugation time, 5 min; and sonication time, 2 min. Under the optimized experimental conditions the method gave levels of repeatability with coefficients of variation between 10 and 24% (n=7). Limits of detection were between 0.002 and 1.4 µg L(-1). Calculated calibration curves gave high levels of linearity with correlation coefficient values between 0.991 and 0.9997. Finally, the proposed method was applied for the analysis of wastewater samples. Relative recovery values ranged between 71 and 116% showing that the matrix had a negligible effect upon extraction. To our knowledge, this is the first time that combines LLME and GC-MS for the analysis of methylsiloxanes in wastewater samples. PMID:24468359

  11. Salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with acetonitrile for the determination of trimetazidine in rat plasma using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xin; Yang, Li

    2015-02-01

    A high-throughout bioanalytical method based on salting-out-assisted liquid/liquid extraction (SALLE) method with acetonitrile and mass spectrometry-compatible salts followed by LC-MS/MS analysis of trimetazidine in rat plasma is presented. It required only 50 μL of plasma and allows the use of minimal volumes of organic solvents. The seamless interface of SALLE and LC-MS eliminated the drying-down step and the extract was diluted and injected into an LC-MS/MS system with a cycle time of 2.5 min/sample. The retention times of trimetazidine and IS were approximately 1.1 and 1.7 min, respectively. Calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 0.1-100 ng/mL, which can be extended to 500 ng/mL by dilution. The intra- and inter-batch precision, accuracy and the relative standard deviation were all <15%. This method was successfully applied to determine trimetazidine concentrations in rat plasma. PMID:24954771

  12. Rapid determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in grilled meat using microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamankesh, Marzieh; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Hosseini, Hedayat; Modarres Tehrani, Zohreh

    2015-05-01

    A simple and rapid analytical tech nique for the simultaneous determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in grilled meat was developed using microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MAE-DLLME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effective parameters in DLLME process were optimized. Good linear relationships were obtained for 16 PAHs in a range of 1-200 ng g(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) higher than 0.98. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were 0.15-0.3 ng g(-1) and 0.47-1 ng g(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD%) for seven analyses were less than 9%. The recoveries of those compounds in grilled meat were obtained from 85% to 104%. Low consumption of the solvent, high recovery, short extraction time, no matrix interference and good merit figures compared to other methods are advantages of the proposed method. The performance of the present method was evaluated for the determination of PAHs in various types of real grilled meat samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:25618021

  13. [Determination of capsaicinoids and eugenol in waste-edible-oil by liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Pan

    2012-11-01

    A method was developed for the determination of capsaicinoids (capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin and synthetic capsaicin) and eugenol in waste-edible-oil extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The capsaicinoids and eugenol in waste-edible-oil were extracted by methanol, and then separated by a SUPEL COSIL ABZ + Plus dC18 column (150 mm x4.6 mm, 5 microm). The analysis was performed by MS/MS with electrospray ionization in positive and negative ion modes with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The limits of detection for capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, synthetic capsaicin and eugenol were 0.02, 0.03, 0.03 and 0.6 microg/L, respectively. The good linear relationships were obtained in certain concentration ranges of capsaicinoids and eugenol. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) of same-worker and different-worker were less than 5%. The method is exclusive, sensitive and accurate, and can be used in waste-edible-oil determination. PMID:23451511

  14. A novel aeration-assisted homogenous liquid-liquid microextration for determination of thorium and uranium in water and hair samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Veyseh, Somayeh; Niazi, Ali

    2016-01-15

    A novel method based on aeration-assisted homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction using high density solvent is presented, which is combined with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy in which simultaneous preconcentration and determination of thorium and uranium with arsenazo III as the chelating reagent is carried out. To achieve optimum conditions, several parameters such as pH, concentration of arsenazo III, extraction and homogenous solvent types and their volumes, salt concentration and extraction time were investigated. Under which, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.5-600.0ng L(-1) for thorium and 0.3-550.0ng L(-1) for uranium. Good linearities were obtained for both analytes with R(2) values larger than 0.9990. The limits of detection (LOD, 3Sb/m, n=5) of this method were 0.12 and 0.09ng L(-1), and the enrichment factors were estimated to be 370 and 410 for thorium and uranium, respectively. The proposed method was applied to determine the thorium and uranium in human hair and different environmental water samples. Acceptable recoveries ranged from 99.4% to 100.7% with standard deviation of 0.05 to 0.17. PMID:26592585

  15. Fast automated dual-syringe based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Tan, Shufang; Li, Xiao; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-03-18

    An automated procedure, combining low density solvent based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, was developed for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental water samples. Capitalizing on a two-rail commercial autosampler, fast solvent transfer using a large volume syringe dedicated to the DLLME process, and convenient extract collection using a small volume microsyringe for better GC performance were enabled. Extraction parameters including the type and volume of extraction solvent, the type and volume of dispersive solvent and demulsification solvent, extraction and demulsification time, and the speed of solvent injection were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the linearity ranged from 0.1 to 50 μg/L, 0.2 to 50 μg/L, and 0.5 to 50 μg/L, depending on the analytes. Limits of detection were determined to be between 0.023 and 0.058 μg/L. The method was applied to determine PAHs in environmental water samples. PMID:26893021

  16. Evaluation of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the simultaneous determination of chlorophenols and haloanisoles in wines and cork stoppers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Cacho, Juan I; Peñalver, Rosa; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2010-11-19

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was evaluated for the simultaneous determination of five chlorophenols and seven haloanisoles in wines and cork stoppers. Parameters, such as the nature and volume of the extracting and disperser solvents, extraction time, salt addition, centrifugation time and sample volume or mass, affecting the DLLME were carefully optimized to extract and preconcentrate chlorophenols, in the form of their acetylated derivatives, and haloanisoles. In this extraction method, 1mL of acetone (disperser solvent) containing 30μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by a syringe into 5mL of sample solution containing 200μL of acetic anhydride (derivatizing reagent) and 0.5mL of phosphate buffer solution, thereby forming a cloudy solution. After extraction, phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and a volume of 4μL of the sedimented phase was analyzed by GC-MS. The wine samples were directly used for the DLLME extraction (red wines required a 1:1 dilution with water). For cork samples, the target analytes were first extracted with pentane, the solvent was evaporated and the residue reconstituted with acetone before DLLME. The use of an internal standard (2,4-dibromoanisole) notably improved the repeatability of the procedure. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits ranged from 0.004 to 0.108ngmL(-1) in wine samples (24-220pgg(-1) in corks), depending on the compound and the sample analyzed. The enrichment factors for haloanisoles were in the 380-700-fold range. PMID:20956005

  17. Determination of lewisite metabolite 2-chlorovinylarsonous acid in urine by use of dispersive derivatization liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Babri, Mehran; Saeidian, Hamid; Sarabadani, Mansour; Ashrafi, Davood; Taghizadeh, Naser

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a sensitive and simple method, based on dispersive derivatization liquid-liquid microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DDLLME-GC-MS) in scanning and selected-ion-monitoring (SIM) modes, for detection of 2-chlorovinylarsonous acid (CVAA) as a hydrolysis product and urinary metabolite of lewisite in urine samples. Chloroform (65 μL), methanol (500 μL), and ethanedithiol (10 μL) were used as extraction solvent, dispersive solvent, and derivatizing reagent, respectively. Critical conditions of the proposed method were optimized. The nucleophilic reactions of dithiol and monothiol compounds with CVAA were also studied using a competitive method. In view of the high affinity of trivalent arsenic for sulfhydryl groups, the interaction between CVAA and bis(2-chlorovinyl)arsonous acid (BCVAA) and free cysteine (Cys) was also investigated using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). The interference of Cys, present in human urine, with the detection of CVAA was evaluated using dithiol and monothiol chemicals as derivatization agents. The developed method provided a preconcentration factor of 250, and limits of detection of 0.015 and 0.30 μg L(-1) in SIM and scanning modes, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 1-400 μg L(-1) in full-scan mode. The relative standard deviation (RSD) values were calculated to be 5.5 and 3.2% at concentrations of 20 and 100 μg L(-1), respectively. Collision-induced dissociation studies of the major electron-impact (EI) ions were performed to confirm the proposed fragment structure of CVAA-dithiols derivatives. Results indicated that the developed method for analysis of CVAA is suitable not only for verification of human exposure to lewisite, but also for quantification of CVAA in urine samples. PMID:24677032

  18. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of synthetic musk fragrances in aqueous matrices by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Homem, Vera; Alves, Alice; Alves, Arminda; Santos, Lúcia

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of twelve synthetic musks in water samples, using ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was successfully developed. The influence of seven factors (volume of the extraction solvent and disperser solvent, sample volume, extraction time, ionic strength, type of extraction and disperser solvent) affecting the UA-DLLME extraction efficiency was investigated using a screening design. The significant factors were selected and optimised employing a central composite design: 80 μL of chloroform, 880 μL of acetonitrile, 6 mL of sample volume, 3.5% (wt) of NaCl and 2 min of extraction time. Under the optimised conditions, this methodology was successfully validated for the analysis of 12 synthetic musk compounds in different aqueous samples (tap, sea and river water, effluent and influent wastewater). The proposed method showed enrichment factors between 101 and 115 depending on the analyte, limits of detection in the range of 0.004-54 ng L(-1) and good repeatability (most relative standard deviation values below 10%). No significant matrix effects were found, since recoveries ranged between 71% and 118%. Finally, the method was satisfactorily applied to the analysis of five different aqueous samples. Results demonstrated the existence of a larger amount of synthetic musks in wastewaters than in other water samples (average concentrations of 2800 ng L(-1) in influent and 850 ng L(-1) in effluent). Galaxolide, tonalide and exaltolide were the compounds most detected. PMID:26653427

  19. Determination of aqueous fullerene aggregates in water by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    A simple and solvent-minimized method for the determination of three aqueous fullerene aggregates (nC₆₀, nC₇₀, and aqueous [6,6]-phenyl C₆₁ butyric acid methyl ester (nPCBM)) in water samples is described. The method involves the use of ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure photoionization (LC-APPI-MS/MS). The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the analytes from water samples were systematically investigated and the conditions optimized. The best extraction conditions involved the rapid injection of a mixture of 1.0 mL of 2-propanol (as a disperser solvent) and 10 μL of benzyl bromide (as an extraction solvent) into 10 mL of an aqueous solution (pH 10.0) containing 1% sodium chloride in a conical bottom glass tube. After ultrasonication for 1.0 min and centrifugation at 5000 pm (10 min), the sedimented phase 5.0 μL was directly injected into the LC-APPI-MS/MS system. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 150, 60 and 8 ng L⁻¹ for nPCBM, nC₆₀ and nC₇₀, respectively. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), were less than 12% for both intra- and inter-day analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 70 and 86%. A standard addition method was used to quantitate three aqueous fullerene aggregates, and the concentrations of these aqueous fullerene aggregates were determined to be in the range from n.d. to 130 ng L⁻¹ in various environmental samples including municipal influent and effluent samples, industrial wastewater samples, and surface water samples. PMID:22209304

  20. Rapid analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2013-10-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method based on simultaneous protein precipitation and extraction of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis was developed for the determination of AFM1 in milk samples. In order to precipitate the proteins and extract AFM1 from milk, a sample pretreatment using acetonitrile and NaCl as the extraction/denaturant solvent and salting-out agent, respectively, was optimised. Subsequently, the acetonitrile (upper) phase, containing AFM1, was used as the disperser solvent in DLLME, and extractant (chloroform) and water were added in turn to the extract to perform the DLLME process. The main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the whole analytical procedure, such as acetonitrile volume, amount of salt, type and volume of extractant and water volume, were carefully optimised by experimental design. Under optimum conditions, the developed method provides an enrichment factor of 33 and detection and quantification limits (0.6 and 2.0 ng kg(-1), respectively) below the maximum levels imposed by current regulations for AFM1 in milk and infant milk formulae. Recoveries (61.3-75.3%) and repeatability (RSD < 10, n = 3), tested in different types of milk at four AFM1 levels, met the performance criteria required by EC Regulation No. 401/2006. Moreover, the matrix effect on the signal intensity of the analyte was negligible. The proposed method provides a rapid extraction and an accurate determination of AFM1 in milk and formula milk using a simple and inexpensive sample preparation procedure. PMID:23942569

  1. Ultra sound assisted one step rapid derivatization and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of amino acids in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Ratnasekhar, Ch

    2013-05-24

    A rapid and economical method for the simultaneous determination of 20 amino acids in complex biological and food matrices (hair, urine and soybean seed samples) has been developed using ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid micro extraction (UA-DLLME). The method involves simultaneous derivatization and extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of amino acids. The parameters of UA-DLLME were optimized with the aid of design of experiments approach. The procedure involves the rapid injection of mixture of acetonitrile (disperser solvent), trichloroethylene (TCE) (extraction solvent) and ethylchloroformate (derivatization reagent) into the aqueous phase of sample extract containing pyridine. The Plackett-Burman design has indicated that, the factors such as volume of disperser and extraction solvents and pH were found to be significantly affects the extraction efficiency of the method. The optimum conditions of these factors based on central composite design were found to be 250μL of acetonitrile, 80μL of TCE and pH of 10. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be in the range of 0.36-3.68μgL(-1) and 1.26-12.01μgL(-1) respectively. This is the first application of DLLME for the analysis of amino acids in any matrices. The advantages like (i) in situ derivatization and extraction of amino acids without any prior lyophilization and cleanup of sample, (ii) low consumption of extraction solvent, (iii) fast and simple, (iv) cost-effective and (iv) good repeatability make the method amenable for the routine analysis of amino acids in clinical, toxicological, nutritional and quality control laboratories. PMID:23602642

  2. Determination of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol in water and wine samples by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cortada, Carol; Vidal, Lorena; Canals, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A fast, simple and environmentally friendly ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (USADLLME) procedure has been developed to preconcentrate geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) from water and wine samples prior to quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A two-stage multivariate optimization approach was developed by means of a Plackett-Burman design for screening and selecting the significant variables involved in the USADLLME procedure, which was later optimized by means of a circumscribed central composite design. The optimum conditions were: solvent volume, 8μL; solvent type: tetrachloroethylene; sample volume, 12 mL; centrifugation speed, 2300 rpm; extraction temperature 20 °C; extraction time, 3 min; and centrifugation time, 3 min. Under the optimized experimental conditions the method gave good levels of repeatability with coefficient of variation under 11% (n=10). Limits of detection were 2 and 9 ng L⁻¹ for geosmin and MIB, respectively. Calculated calibration curves gave high levels of linearity with correlation coefficient values of 0.9988 and 0.9994 for geosmin and MIB, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the analysis of two water (reservoir and tap) samples and three wine (red, rose and white) samples. The samples were previously analyzed and confirmed free of target analytes. Recovery values ranged between 70 and 113% at two spiking levels (0.25 μg L⁻¹ and 30 ng L⁻¹) showing that the matrix had a negligible effect upon extraction. Only red wine showed a noticeable matrix effect (70-72% recovery). Similar conclusions have been obtained from an uncertainty budget evaluation study. PMID:21112591

  3. A validated method for the analysis of cannabinoids in post-mortem blood using liquid-liquid extraction and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Rebecca; Paterson, Sue

    2012-10-10

    A validated method for the identification and quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in post-mortem blood specimens is described. Liquid-liquid extraction was used to extract the cannabinoids from 1 mL of post-mortem blood. The extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The final derivatized extracts were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was 0.25 ng/mL for all analytes and the limit of quantification of the assay was 0.25 ng/mL for THC, CBN, 11-OH-THC and 0.5 ng/mL for CBD and THC-COOH. The assay was linear across the concentration range 0.25-50 ng/mL (determined with a low and a high calibration range) with correlation coefficients ≥0.992 for all analytes. Inter-day and intra-day accuracy was within ±15% of the target concentration for all analytes. The co-efficients of variation (%CV) for inter-day and intra-day precision were ≤12% for all analytes. The extraction efficiency was >73% for all analytes. The method has successfully been applied to 54 post-mortem blood specimens to date. To the authors knowledge this is the first validated 2D GC-MS method for the analysis of THC, CBD, CBN, 11-OH-THC and THC-COOH following LLE and its application to post-mortem specimens. PMID:22717553

  4. Ultra-trace determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental water by surfactant assisted dispersive liquid liquid microextraction coupled with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2016-08-01

    A new method by coupling surfactant assisted dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (SA-DLLME) with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was proposed for the analysis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in environmental water samples. Effective separation of AuNPs from ionic gold species was achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. Various experimental parameters affecting SA-DLLME of AuNPs, such as the organic solvent, organic solvent volume, pH of the sample, the kind of surfactant, surfactant concentration, vortex time, speed of centrifugation, centrifugation time, and different coating as well as sizes of AuNPs were investigated carefully. Furthermore, the interference of coexisting ions, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other metal nanoparticles (NPs) were studied. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 2.2 ng L- 1 and an enrichment factor of 152-fold was achieved for AuNPs, and the original morphology of the AuNPs could be maintained during the extraction process. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of AuNPs in environmental water samples, including tap water, the East Lake water, and the Yangtze River water, with recoveries in the range of 89.6-102%. Compared with the established methods for metal NPs analysis, the proposed method has the merits of simple and fast operation, low detection limit, high selectivity, good tolerance to the sample matrix and no digestion or dilution required. It provides an efficient quantification methodology for monitoring AuNPs' pollution in the environmental water and evaluating its toxicity.

  5. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineral phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.

  6. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineralmore » phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.« less

  7. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  8. Optimization of an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the separation and determination of essential oil from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Sun, Qiushi; Hu, Zhiyan; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was established and employed for the extraction, concentration and analysis of essential oil constituents from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Response surface methodology was performed to optimize the key parameters in accelerated solvent extraction on the extraction efficiency, and key parameters in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction were discussed as well. Two representative constituents in Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, (Z)-ligustilide and n-butylphthalide, were quantitatively analyzed. It was shown that the qualitative result of the accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction approach was in good agreement with that of hydro-distillation, whereas the proposed approach took far less extraction time (30 min), consumed less plant material (usually <1 g, 0.01 g for this study) and solvent (<20 mL) than the conventional system. To sum up, the proposed method could be recommended as a new approach in the extraction and analysis of essential oil. PMID:26304788

  9. Microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for isolation and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smoked fish.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh-Mohammadi, Vahid; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Hashemi, Maryam; Khaksar, Ramin; Haratian, Parivash

    2012-05-11

    A simple and efficient method was developed using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the extraction and quantification of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked fish. Benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene and pyrene were employed as model compounds and spiked to smoked fish to assess the extraction procedure. Several parameters, including the nature and volume of hydrolysis, extracting and disperser solvents, microwave time and pH, were optimized. In the optimum condition for MAE, 1g of fish sample was extracted in 12 mL KOH (2M) and ethanol with a 50:50 ratio in a closed-vessel system. For DLLME, 500 μL of acetone (disperser solvent) containing 100 μL of ethylene tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by syringe into 12 mL of the sample extract solution (previously adjusted to pH 6.5), thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation and a volume of 1.5 μL of the sedimented phase was analyzed by GC-MS in select ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Satisfactory results were achieved when this method was applied to analyze the PAHs in smoked fish samples. The MAE-DLLME method coupled with GC-MS provided excellent enrichment factors (in the range of 244-373 for 16 PAHs) and good repeatability (with a relative standard deviation between 2.8 and 9%) for spiked smoked fish. The calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1-200 ng g(-1), with the square of the correlation coefficient (R(2))>0.981 and detection limits between 0.11 and 0.43 ng g(-1). The recoveries of those compounds in smoked fish were from 82.1% to 105.5%. A comparison of this method with previous methods demonstrated that the proposed method is an accurate, rapid and reliable sample-pretreatment method that gives very good enrichment factors and detection limits for extracting and determining PAHs from smoked fish. PMID:22483095

  10. Simultaneous derivatization and ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of chloropropanols in soy milk and other aqueous matrices combined with gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carro, A M; González, P; Lorenzo, R A

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach involving ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) and derivatization combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of chloropropanols in water and beverages. UA-DLLME was optimized as less solvent-consuming and cost-effective extraction method for water, fruit juice, milk and soy milk samples. The effect of parameters such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, the type and volume of dispersive solvent, amount of derivatization agent, temperature, pH of sample and ionic strength was investigated and optimized for each specimen, using experimental designs. By adding acetonitrile as dispersive solvent, N-heptafluorobutyrylimizadole (HFBI) as derivatization agent and chloroform as extraction solvent, the extraction-derivatization and preconcentration were simultaneously performed. The analytical concentration range was investigated in detail for each analyte in the different samples, obtaining linearity with R(2) ranging between 0.9990 and 0.9999. The method detection limits were in the range of 0.2-1.8μgL(-1) (water), 0.5-15μgL(-1) (fruit juices) and 0.9-3.6μgkg(-1) (milk) and 0.1-1.0μgkg(-1) (soy milk). The method was applied to the analysis of a variety of specimens, with recoveries of 98-101% from water, 97-102% from juices, 99-103% from milk and 97-105% from soy beverage. The relative standard deviation (precision, n=6) varied between 1.3 and 4.9%RSD in water, 2.3 and 5.8%RSD in juices, 1.0 and 5.7%RSD in milk and 3.9 and 9.3%RSD in soy milk. The proposed method was applied to analysis of twenty-eight samples. 1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol was found in an influent water sample from urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (2.1±0.04mgL(-1)) but no chloropropanols were found in the corresponding effluent water sample. This result suggests that the purification system used in the WWTP has been effective for this compound. Moreover, the results revealed the presence of 3

  11. Simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic, selenium and tellurium in environmental water samples by dispersive liquid liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    A new method based on dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) was developed for the simultaneous speciation of inorganic arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and tellurium (Te) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as both chelating reagent and chemical modifier. As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) were transformed into DDTC-chelates at pH 7 and extracted into the fine droplets formed by injecting the binary solution of bromobenzene (extraction solvent) and methanol (dispersive solvent) into the sample solution. After phase separation by centrifugation, As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) preconcentrated in the organic phase were determined by ETV-ICP-MS. Total inorganic As, Se and Te were obtained by reducing As(V), Se(VI) and Te(VI) to As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) with L-cysteine, which were then subjected to the same DLLME-ETV-ICP-MS process. The concentration of As(V), Se(VI), Te(VI) were calculated by subtracting the concentration of As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV) from the total inorganic As, Se and Te, respectively. The main factors affecting the microextraction efficiency and the vaporization behavior of target species were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were 2.5, 8.6 and 0.56 ng L(-1) for As(III), Se(IV) and Te(IV), respectively, with the relative standard deviations (n=7) of 8.5-9.7%. The developed method was applied to the speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ50004-88, GBW(E)080395 and GBW(E)080548 environmental waters, and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also successfully applied to the simultaneous speciation of inorganic As, Se and Te in different environmental water samples with the recoveries in the range of 86.3-107% for the spiked samples. PMID:26003714

  12. Simultaneous determination of total fatty acid esters of chloropropanols in edible oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Han, Feng; Xie, Ke; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to establish a novel robust method for the simultaneous determination of total fatty acid esters of 4 chloropropanols including fatty acid esters of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD esters), 2-monochloropropane-1,3-diol (2-MCPD esters), 1,3-dichloropropan-2-ol (1,3-DCP esters) and 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol (2,3-DCP esters) in edible oils. In this method, sodium methylate in methanol was used as the reagent for the ester cleavage reaction of chloropropanols esters. The reaction products were extracted by a sodium sulfate solution, and then purified by solid-supported liquid-liquid extraction (SLE) using diatomaceous earth (Hydromatrix™) as the sorbent. Finally, the extracts were derivatized with heptafluorobutyrylim idazole (HFBI) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Quantification was achieved using deuterated chloropropanols as their respective internal standards, including 3-MCPD-d5, 2-MCPD-d5, 1,3-DCP-d5 and 2,3-DCP-d5. A good linear relationship between peak area and concentrations was obtained within the range of 0.025-2.000mgL(-1) with a correlation coefficients not less than 0.999 for all the chloropropanols esters. The limits of detection (LODs) of esters of 3-MCPD, 2-MCPD, 1,3-DCP and 2,3-DCP (calculated as corresponding chloropropanols) were 30, 30, 100 and 30μgkg(-1), respectively. The average recoveries of the 3-MCPD esters and the 4 chloropropanols spiked at 0.1, 0.5 and 2mgkg(-1) into blank oil matrix were typically in a range from 70.7% to 113.3%. The robust method validation data including calibration, LOD/LOQ, accuracy and repeatability and proficiency test results (Z-score: -0.5) of the official Food Analysis Performance Assessment Scheme (FAPAS) indicated that the present quantitative method could be successfully applied to the determination of total chloropropanols esters in various edible oils. PMID:24070627

  13. Development and application of a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of tetracyclines in beef by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mookantsa, S O S; Dube, S; Nindi, M M

    2016-02-01

    A rapid, cost effective and environmentally friendly extraction method, based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for the determination of six tetracyclines in meat destined for human consumption. Meat extracts were analysed for tetracyclines using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), a sensitive and selective analytical technique. Various factors influencing the pre-concentration of tetracyclines such as sample pH, type and volume of both disperser solvent and extraction solvent were optimized. Validation parameters such as calibration function, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), detection capability (CCα), decision limit (CCβ), accuracy and precision were established according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Linearity in the range of 25-200 µg kg(-1) was obtained with regression coefficients ranging from 0.9991 to 0.9998. Recoveries of spiked blank muscle samples at three levels (50, 100 and 150 µg kg(-1)) ranged from 80% to 105% and reproducibility was between 2% and 7%. LODs and LOQs ranged from 2.2 to 3.6 µg kg(-1) and from 7.4 to 11.5 µg kg(-1) respectively while CCα ranged from 105 to 111 µg kg(-1) and CCβ ranged from 107 to 122 µg kg(-1). The proposed method compared well with the existing accepted dispersive solid phase extraction method and was successfully applied to the pre-concentration and determination of tetracyclines in meat samples. Eleven of the thirty bovine muscle samples obtained from local abattoirs and butcheries were found to contain residues of two tetracycline antibiotics (chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline), with oxytetracycline being the most detected. Concentration levels of the tetracycline residues detected in bovine muscle samples were lower (12.4 and 68.9 µg kg(-1)) than the stipulated European Union maximum residue level (MRL) of 100 µg kg(-1), hence the meat was fit for human consumption. From this work it can be concluded that the DLLME

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Mass Transfer in Laminar Motion of a Droplet in a Liquid Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, D. V.; Elizarov, V. V.; Kamaliev, T. S.; D‧yakonov, S. G.

    2016-03-01

    Consideration is given to mathematical modeling of the process of nonstationary liquid-liquid extraction in apparatuses with free motion of a dispersed phase. Solutions of nonstationary equations of transfer of momentum and mass in the boundary layer on the droplet and inside the droplet near the phase boundary are given. Equations for calculation of the coefficients of mass transfer and concentration of the extracted component are obtained. A comparison is made of the calculated data and experimental results in extracting various liquid mixtures.

  15. Comparison of two ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction approaches for the determination of benzoylurea insecticides in wastewater using liquid chromatography-quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometry: evaluation of green parameters.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M M Parrilla; Vázquez, P Parrilla; Galera, M Martínez; Moreno, A Uclés

    2014-08-22

    Two dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) approaches including temperature-controlled ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (TCIL-DLLME) and ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (US-IL-DLLME) were compared for the extraction of six benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron, triflumuron, hexaflumuron, teflubenzuron, lufenuron and flufenoxuron) from wastewater samples prior to their determination by high-performance liquid chromatography with a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometer (LC-QqLIT-MS/MS). Influential parameters affecting extraction efficiency were systematically studied and optimized and the most significant green parameters were quantified and compared. The best results were obtained using the US-IL-DLLME procedure, which employed the IL 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C8MIM][PF6]) and methanol (MeOH) as extraction and disperser solvent, respectively. US-IL-DLLME procedure was fast, easy, low environmental toxicity and, it was also able to successfully extract all selected benzoylureas. This method was extensively validated with satisfactory results: limits of detection and quantification were in the range 0.5-1.0 ng L(-1) and 1.5-3.5 ng L(-1), respectively, whereas recovery rates ranged from 89 to 103% and the relative standard deviations were lower than 13.4%. The applicability of the method was assessed with the analysis of effluent wastewater samples from a wastewater treatment plant located in an agricultural zone of Almería (Spain) and the results indicated the presence of teflubenzuron at mean concentration levels of 11.3 ng L(-1). US-IL-DLLME sample treatment in combination with LC-QqLIT-MS/MS has demonstrated to be a sensitive, selective and efficient method to determine benzoylurea insecticides in wastewaters at ultra-trace levels. PMID:24993054

  16. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of macrocyclic lactones in milk by liquid chromatography with diode array detection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Férez-Melgarejo, Gema; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-03-22

    Eprinomectin (EPRI), abamectin (ABA), doramectin (DOR), moxidectin (MOX) and ivermectin (IVM) were determined in milk samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and liquid chromatography with diode array detection (LC-DAD) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in negative ion mode ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MS/MS). Milk proteins were removed by precipitation with trichloroacetic acid and the analytes were preconcentrated using 2mL of acetonitrile containing 200μL of chloroform as extraction mixture. The effect of several parameters for the liquid-liquid microextraction efficiency was evaluated. Standard additions method was used for quantification purposes, the correlation coefficients were better than 0.9970 in all cases and the quantification limits ranged from 1.0 to 4.7ngg(-1) and from 0.1 to 2.4ngg(-1) when using DAD and MS, respectively. The DLLME-LC-APCI-IT-MS/MS optimized method was successfully applied to different milk samples and none of the studied analytes was detected in the samples studied. The recoveries for milk samples spiked at concentration levels ranging between 0.5 and 50ngg(-1), depending on the compound, were between 89.5 and 105%, with relative standard deviations lower than 9% (n=135). Simplicity, rapidity and reliability are important advantages of the proposed method, while the sample preparation step can be regarded as environmentally friendly. PMID:23415139

  17. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Using Low-Toxic Solvent for the Determination of Heavy Metals in Water Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Zhou, Guangming; Chen, Junhua; Tang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    A low-toxic dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with inductively coupled plasma-MS was used for preconcentration and determination of Cu, Cr, Cd, Ni, Mn, and Pb in real-water samples. In traditional DLLME analysis, chlorinated solvents have been widely used as extraction solvents. However, these solvents are not environmentally friendly. To overcome this problem, we used a low-toxic bromosolvent (1-bromo-3-methylbutane; lethal concentration, 50%, 6150 mg/kg) as the extraction solvent. To study the effects of different parameters on the extraction efficiency, an orthogonal array experimental design with an L16(4(5)) matrix was used. Under the best experimental conditions (i.e., concentration of complexing reagent 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol, 1.5 × 10(-3) mol/L; pH, 7.0; volume of acetone, 0.5 mL; volume of 1-bromo-3 methylbutane, 30 μL; and without salt addition), the enhancement factor ranged from 34 to 40. The linear dynamic range was 1-1000 μg/L with r(2) values of 0.9984-0.9999, and the LODs were between 0.042 and 0.53 μg/L. RSDs (at metal ion concentrations of 20 μg/L, n = 6) were 2.12 to 3.42%. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of the mentioned metal ions in real-water samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:26823154

  18. Multi-residue method for determination of selected neonicotinoid insecticides in honey using optimized dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jovanov, Pavle; Guzsvány, Valéria; Franko, Mladen; Lazić, Sanja; Sakač, Marijana; Šarić, Bojana; Banjac, Vojislav

    2013-07-15

    The objective of this study was to develop analytical method based on optimized dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) as a pretreatment procedure combined with reversed phase liquid chromatographic separation on C18 column and isocratic elution for simultaneous MS/MS determination of selected neonicotinoid insecticides in honey. The LC-MS/MS parameters were optimized to unequivocally provide good chromatographic separation, low detection (LOD, 0.5-1.0 μg kg(-1)) and quantification (LOQ, 1.5-2.5 μg kg(-1)) limits for acetamiprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, dinotefuran, thiacloprid and nitenpyram in honey samples. Using different types (chloroform, dichloromethane) and volumes of extraction (0.5-3.0 mL) and dispersive (acetonitrile; 0.0-1.0 mL) solvent and by mathematical modeling it was possible to establish the optimal sample preparation procedure. Matrix-matched calibration and blank honey sample spiked in the concentration range of LOQ-100.0 μg kg(-1) were used to compensate the matrix effect and to fulfill the requirements of SANCO/12495/2011 for the accuracy (R 74.3-113.9%) and precision (expressed in terms of repeatability (RSD 2.74-11.8%) and within-laboratory reproducibility (RSDs 6.64-16.2%)) of the proposed method. The rapid (retention times 1.5-9.9 min), sensitive and low solvent consumption procedure described in this work provides reliable, simultaneous, and quantitative method applicable for the routine laboratory analysis of seven neonicotinoid residues in real honey samples. PMID:23622535

  19. Determination of 13 endocrine disrupting chemicals in sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using subcritical water extraction coupled with dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke; Kang, Haining; Yue, Zhenfeng; Yang, Lihua; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-03-25

    In this study, a sample pretreatment method was developed for the determination of 13 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in sediment samples based on the combination of subcritical water extraction (SWE) and dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The subcritical water that provided by accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) was the sample solution (water) for the following DLLME and the soluble organic modifier that spiked in the subcritical water was also used as the disperser solvent for DLLME in succession. Thus, several important parameters that affected both SWE and DLLME were investigated, such as the extraction solvent for DLLME (chlorobenzene), extraction time for DLLME (30s), selection of organic modifier for SWE (acetone), volume of organic modifier (10%) and extraction temperature for SWE (150 °C). In addition, good chromatographic behavior was achieved for GC-MS after derivatisation by using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). As a result, proposed method sensitive and reliable with the limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.006 ng g(-1) (BPA) to 0.639 ng g(-1) (19-norethisterone) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) between 1.5% (E2) and 15.0% (DES). Moreover, the proposed method was compared with direct ASE extraction that reported previously, and the results showed that SWE-DLLME was more promising with recoveries ranging from 42.3% (dienestrol) to 131.3% (4,5α-dihydrotestosterone), except for diethylstilbestrol (15.0%) and nonylphenols (29.8%). The proposed method was then successfully applied to determine 13 EDCs sediment of Humen outlet of the Pearl River, 12 of target compounds could be detected, and 10 could be quantitative analysis with the total concentration being 39.6 ng g(-1), and which indicated that the sediment of Humen outlet was heavily contaminated by EDCs. PMID:25732691

  20. Solid-phase extraction in combination with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis: the ultra-trace determination of 10 antibiotics in water samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ning; Huang, Peiting; Hou, Xiaohong; Li, Zhen; Tao, Lei; Zhao, Longshan

    2016-02-01

    A novel method, solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SPE-DLLME), was developed for ultra-preconcentration of 10 antibiotics in different environmental water samples prior to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detection. The optimized results were obtained as follows: after being adjusted to pH 4.0, the water sample was firstly passed through PEP-2 column at 10 mL min(-1), and then methanol was used to elute the target analytes for the following steps. Dichloromethane was selected as extraction solvent, and methanol/acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) as dispersive solvent. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the range of 1-1000 ng mL(-1) (sulfamethoxazole, cefuroxime axetil), 5-1000 ng mL(-1) (tinidazole), 10-1000 ng mL(-1) (chloramphenicol), 2-1000 ng mL(-1) (levofloxacin oxytetracycline, doxycycline, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin) and 1-400 ng mL(-1) (sulfadiazine) with a good precision. The LOD and LOQ of the method were at very low levels, below 1.67 and 5.57 ng mL(-1), respectively. The relative recoveries of the target analytes were in the range from 64.16% to 99.80% with relative standard deviations between 0.7 and 8.4%. The matrix effect of this method showed a great decrease compared with solid-phase extraction and a significant value of enrichment factor (EF) compared with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and analysis of antibiotics in different water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26780712

  1. Monodisperse droplet generation for microscale mass transfer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christine; Rao, Rekha; Grillet, Anne; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Brooks, Carlton; Nemer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding interfacial mass transport on a droplet scale is essential for modeling liquid-liquid extraction processes. A thin flow-focusing microfluidic channel is evaluated for generating monodisperse liquid droplets for microscale mass transport studies. Surface treatment of the microfluidic device allows creation of both oil in water and water in oil emulsions, facilitating a large parameter study of viscosity and flow rate ratios. The unusually thin channel height promotes a flow regime where no droplets form. Through confocal microscopy, this regime is shown to be highly influenced by the contact angle of the liquids with the channel. Drop sizes are found to scale with a modified capillary number. Liquid streamlines within the droplets are inferred by high speed imagery of microparticles dispersed in the droplet phase. Finally, species mass transfer to the droplet fluid is quantitatively measured using high speed imaging. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  2. High-throughput salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction with acetonitrile for the determination of anandamide in plasma of hemodialysis patients with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Litao; Mao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Anandamide (AEA) is an endocannabinoid present in human plasma that is associated with several physiological functions and disease states. However, low AEA plasma levels pose challenges in terms of analytical characterization. Classical liquid-based lipid extraction and solid-phase extraction require complicated procedures and the drying down of relatively large volumes of solvents, making them unsuitable for high-throughput analysis. Here a high-throughput salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) method with acetonitrile and mass spectrometry compatible salts for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of AEA in human plasma has been developed and validated. The seamless interface of SALLE and LC-MS eliminated the drying-down step, only 100 μL of plasma is required and minimal volumes of organic solvent are used. Good reproducibility, accuracy and precision were demonstrated during the method validation. The method is linear up to 10 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.1 ng/mL for AEA, the accuracy for AEA was from 93.3 to 96.7% and the precision was <8.57%. This new methodology was successfully applied to analysis of clinical samples from maintenance hemodialysis patients. PMID:25622579

  3. Dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization for simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xian-En; Lv, Tao; Zhu, Shuyun; Qu, Fei; Chen, Guang; He, Yongrui; Wei, Na; Li, Guoliang; Xia, Lian; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shijuan; You, Jinmao; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-03-11

    This paper, for the first time, reported a speedy hyphenated technique of low toxic dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (dual-UADLLME) coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization (MAD) for the simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT). The developed method was based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. A mass spectrometry sensitizing reagent, 4'-carboxy-substituted rosamine (CSR) with high reaction activity and ionization efficiency was synthesized and firstly used as derivatization reagent. Parameters of dual-UADLLME, MAD and UHPLC-MS/MS conditions were all optimized in detail. Low toxic brominated solvents were used as extractant instead of traditional chlorinated solvents. Satisfactory linearity, recovery, repeatability, accuracy and precision, absence of matrix effect and extremely low limits of detection (LODs, 0.010 and 0.015ng/mL for PPD and PPT, respectively) were achieved. The main advantages were rapid, sensitive and environmentally friendly, and exhibited high selectivity, accuracy and good matrix effect results. The proposed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics of PPD and PPT in rat plasma. PMID:26877173

  4. OPTIMIZED DETERMINATION OF TRACE JET FUEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BLOOD USING IN-FIELD LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH SUBSEQUENT LABORATORY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS AND ON-COLUMN LARGE VOLUME INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing te...

  5. PHREEQC. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineral phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.

  6. Energy conversion at liquid/liquid interfaces: artificial photosynthetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Gugeshashvili, M. I.; Deamer, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter focuses on multielectron reactions in organized assemblies of molecules at the liquid/liquid interface. We describe the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such reactions, including the structure of the reaction centers, charge movement along the electron transfer pathways, and the role of electric double layers in artificial photosynthesis. Some examples of artificial photosynthesis at the oil/water interface are considered, including water photooxidation to the molecular oxygen, oxygen photoreduction, photosynthesis of amphiphilic compounds and proton evolution by photochemical processes.

  7. Development and application of salting-out assisted liquid/liquid extraction for multi-mycotoxin biomarkers analysis in pig urine with high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Suquan; Ediage, Emmanuel Njumbe; Wu, Aibo; De Saeger, Sarah

    2013-05-31

    Direct determination of urinary mycotoxins is a better approach to assess individual's exposure than the indirect estimation from average dietary intakes. In this study, a new analytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous analysis of aflatoxin B1, deoxynivalenol, fumonisin B1, ochratoxin A, zearalenone and T2 toxin and their metabolites in pig urine. In total 12 analytes were selected. A salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction procedure was used for sample preparation. High performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used for the separation and detection of all the analytes. The extraction recoveries were in a range of 70-108%, with the intra-day relative standard deviation and inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 25% for most of the compounds at 3 different concentration levels. Meanwhile the method bias for all the analytes did not exceed 20%. The limits of quantification ranged from 0.07ngmL(-1) for ochratoxin A to 3.3ngmL(-1) for deoxynivalenol. Matrix effect was evaluated in this study and matrix-matched calibration was used for quantification. The developed method was also validated for human urine as an extension of its application. Finally, the developed method was applied in a pilot study to analyze 28 pig urine samples. Deoxynivalenol, aflatoxin B1, fumonisin B1 and ochratoxin A were detected in these samples. PMID:23177157

  8. Combination of accelerated solvent extraction and vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of dimethyl fumarate in textiles and leathers by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Zhu, Yan

    2014-02-01

    A simple and environmentally friendly sample preparation procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed to assay dimethyl fumarate in textiles and leathers. The sample preparation procedure involved an accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) using water as the extract solvent, followed by the extraction and concentration of dimethyl fumarate from the aqueous solution using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME). The parameters affecting the ASE and VALLME were optimized to achieve the maximum extraction efficiency, and the performance of the developed method was evaluated. Good linearity was observed over the range assayed (0.01-1mg/kg) with a regression coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection and enrichment factor for the VALLME step were 0.001 mg/kg and 53, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision were below 8.9%, and the recovery was approximately 84-103%. The as-developed method was successfully applied to textiles and leather samples. PMID:24401436

  9. Multi-residue method for determination of 58 pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products in water using solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Rombaldi, Caroline; Arias, Jean Lucas de Oliveira; Marube, Liziane Cardoso; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and efficient sample pretreatment using solvent-based de-emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SD-DLLME) coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was studied for the extraction of 58 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and pesticides from water samples. Type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, salt addition, amount of salt and type of demulsification solvent were evaluated. Limits of quantification (LOQ) in the range from 0.0125 to 1.25 µg L(-1) were reached, and linearity was in the range from the LOQ of each compound to 25 μg L(-1). Recoveries ranged from 60% to 120% for 84% of the compounds, with relative standard deviations lower than 29%. The proposed method demonstrated, for the first time, that sample preparation by SD-DLLME with determination by LC-MS/MS can be successfully used for the simultaneous extraction of 32 pesticides and 26 PPCPs from water samples. The entire procedure, including the extraction of 58 organic compounds from the aqueous sample solution and the breaking up of the emulsion after extraction with water, rather than with an organic solvent, was environmentally friendly. In addition, this technique was less expensive and faster than traditional techniques. Finally, the analytical method under study was successfully applied to the analysis of all 58 pesticides and PPCPs in surface water samples. PMID:26695317

  10. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in effluents from the production of petroleum bitumen.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Makoś, Patrycja; Przyjazny, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    We present a new procedure for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of postoxidative effluents from the production of petroleum bitumens using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The eight extraction parameters were optimized for 43 oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The detection limits obtained ranged from 0.07 to 0.82 μg/mL for most of the analytes, the precision was good (relative standard deviation below 2.91% at the 5 μg/mL level and 4.75% at the limit of quantification), the recoveries for the majority of compounds varied from 70.6 to 118.9%, and the linear range was wide, which demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure. The developed procedure was used for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of raw postoxidative effluents and in effluents after chemical treatment. In total, 23 compounds at concentration levels from 0.37 to 32.95 μg/mL were identified in real samples. The same samples were also analyzed in the SCAN mode, which resulted in four more phenol derivatives being identified and tentatively determined. The studies demonstrated the need for monitoring volatile organic compounds content in effluents following various treatments due to the formation of secondary oxygenated volatile organic compounds. PMID:27144480

  11. A fast method for bisphenol A and six analogues (S, F, Z, P, AF, AP) determination in urine samples based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bruno Alves; da Costa, Bruno Ruiz Brandão; de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes; Souza, Juliana Maria Oliveira; Al-Tameemi, Maha; Campiglia, Andres Dobal; Barbosa, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel method combining dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and fast liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the extraction and determination of bisphenol A (BPA) and six bisphenol analogues, namely bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol P (BPP), bisphenol Z (BPZ), bisphenol AP (BPAP) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) in human urine samples. Type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH sample, ionic strength, and agitation were evaluated. The matrix-matched calibration curves of all analytes were linear with correlation coefficients higher than 0.99 in the range level of 0.5-20.0ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD), precision, at three concentrations (1.0, 8.0 and 15.0ngmL(-1)) was lower than 15% with accuracy ranging from 90 to 112%. The biomonitoring capability of the new method was confirmed with the analysis of 50 human urine samples randomly collected from Brazilians. BPA was detected in 92% of the analyzed samples at concentrations ranging

  12. Determination of alkylphenols and bisphenol A in seawater samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for compliance with environmental quality standards (Directive 2008/105/EC).

    PubMed

    Salgueiro-González, N; Concha-Graña, E; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2012-02-01

    A fast, simple, sensitive and green analytical chemistry method for the simultaneous determination of alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol) and bisphenol A in seawater was developed and validated. The procedure was based on a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of a small volume of seawater sample (30 mL) using only 100 μL of 1-octanol, combined with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative mode (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The matrix effect was studied and compensated using deuterated labelled standards as surrogate standards for the quantitation of target compounds. The analytical features of the proposed method were satisfactory: repeatability and intermediate precision were <10% and recoveries were around 84-104% for all compounds. Uncertainty assessment of measurement was estimated on the basis of an in-house validation according to EURACHEM/CITAC guide. Quantitation limits of the method (MQL) ranged between 0.005 and 0.03 μg L⁻¹, therefore the levels established in the Directive 2008/105/EC were achieved. The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated analyzing seawater samples from different sites of A Coruña (Northwest of Spain). The analyses showed the presence of all compounds at levels between 0.035 (bisphenol A) and 0.14 μg L⁻¹ (nonylphenol). PMID:22227360

  13. Determination of nine sensitizing disperse dyes in activated sludge by ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid extraction-ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linjun; Shi, Lili; Liu, Jining; Lv, Fenglan; Xu, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed on the basis of ultrasound-assisted liquid-liquid extraction ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ULLE-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) to determine nine sensitizing disperse dyes in activated sludge. The samples were extracted using ULLE and separated through UPLC on an ACQUITY UPLCTM BEH C18 column with a gradient elution program of acetonitrile and acidified water (containing 2% acetonitrile, 0.2% formic acid, and 0.005 mol/L ammonium; pH 2.7) as the mobile phase. The samples were then identified and quantified through UPLC-ESI-MS/MS in a positive mode and multiple reaction monitoring. Results showed good linearity (10-1000 μg/L, 0.9934-0.9998), detection limit (0.08-2.17 μg/L), and quantification limit (0.27-7.38 μg/L) for the nine sensitizing disperse dyes, with recoveries ranging from 65.0 to 111.3%. The proposed method was applied to detect and determine the concentration of sensitizing disperse dyes in sludge samples obtained from various sewage treatment plants (six dyeing enterprises and one dye manufacturer). Three sensitizing disperse dyes were identified, and the lowest concentration detected was 10 μg/kg. PMID:26521175

  14. [Ultrasound-assisted low-density solvent dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of eight drugs in biological samples by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Meng, Liang; Zhu, Binling; Zheng, Kefang; Zhang, Wenwen; Meng, Pinjia

    2015-03-01

    A novel microextraction technique based on ultrasound-assisted low-density solvent dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-LDS-DLLME) has been developed for the determination of multiple drugs of abuse in biological samples by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QQQ-MS). A total of 100 µL of toluene as extraction solvent was dropped into the sample solution. Then the mixture was sonicated drastically in an ultrasonic bath for 3 min with occasional manual shaking to form a cloudy suspension. After centrifugation at 10,000 r/min for 3 min, the upper layer of low-density extractant was withdrawn and injected into the GC-QQQ-MS for analysis. The parameters affecting extraction efficiency have been investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, good linearities were observed for all analytes with the correlation coefficients ranging from 0. 998 4 to 0. 999 4. The recoveries of 79.3%-100.3% with RSDs < 5.7% were obtained. The LODs (S/N = 3) were in the range from 0.05 to 0.40 µg/L. UA-LDS-DLLME technique has the advantages of less extraction time, suitable for batches of sample pretreatment simultaneously, and higher extraction efficiency. It was successfully applied to the analysis of amphetamines in real human urine samples. PMID:26182473

  15. Trace determination of antibacterial pharmaceuticals in fishes by microwave-assisted extraction and solid-phase purification combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peiting; Zhao, Pan; Dai, Xinpeng; Hou, Xiaohong; Zhao, Longshan; Liang, Ning

    2016-02-01

    A novel pretreatment method involving microwave-assisted extraction and solid-phase purification combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MAE-SPP-DLLME) followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was established for the simultaneous determination of six antibacterial pharmaceuticals including metronidazole, tinidazole, chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol, malachite green and crystal violet. The conditions of MAE were optimized using an orthogonal design and the optimal conditions were found to be 8mL for acetonitrile, 50°C for 5min. Then, neutral alumina column was employed in the solid-phase purification. Finally, the critical parameters affecting DLLME, including selection of extraction and dispersive solvent, adjustment of pH, salt concentration, extraction time, were investigated by single factor study. Under optimum conditions, good linearities (r>0.9991) and satisfied recoveries (Recoveries>87.0%, relative standard deviation (RSD)<6.3%) were observed for all of the target analytes. The limits of detection and quantification were 4.54-101.3pgkg(-1) and 18.02-349.1pgkg(-1), respectively. Intra-day and inter-day RSDs were all lower than 3.6%. An obvious reduction in matrix effect was observed by this method compared with microwave assisted extraction followed by purification. The established method was sensitive, rapid, accurate and employable to simultaneously determine target analytes in farmed fish, river fish and marine fish. PMID:26773891

  16. High-throughput method for macrolides and lincosamides antibiotics residues analysis in milk and muscle using a simple liquid-liquid extraction technique and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Jank, Louise; Martins, Magda Targa; Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Campos Motta, Tanara Magalhães; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara

    2015-11-01

    A fast and simple method for residue analysis of the antibiotics classes of macrolides (erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, tilmicosin and spiramycin) and lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) was developed and validated for cattle, swine and chicken muscle and for bovine milk. Sample preparation consists in a liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with acetonitrile, followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS), without the need of any additional clean-up steps. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a C18 column and a mobile phase composed by acidified acetonitrile and water. The method was fully validated according the criteria of the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Validation parameters such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity, accuracy, repeatability, specificity, reproducibility, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) were evaluated. All calculated values met the established criteria. Reproducibility values, expressed as coefficient of variation, were all lower than 19.1%. Recoveries range from 60% to 107%. Limits of detection were from 5 to 25 µg kg(-1).The present method is able to be applied in routine analysis, with adequate time of analysis, low cost and a simple sample preparation protocol. PMID:26452878

  17. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  18. New reversed phase dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil by rapid resolution liquid chromathography with ultraviolet-visible and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Caballero, M P; Acedo-Valenzuela, M I; Galeano-Díaz, T

    2013-10-25

    The determination of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil using a new reversed phase dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (RP-DLLME) procedure coupled with rapid resolution liquid chromatography-diode array and mass spectrometry detection (RRLC-DAD-MS) have been performed. A rapid resolution Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 column (4.6 mm × 50 mm, 1.8 μm particle size) has been employed and eighteen phenolic compounds belonging to different families have been identified and quantified spending a total time of 26 and 13 min with UV-visible and MS detection, respectively. Response surface methodology has been applied by means of a central composite design for the optimization of the variables affecting the extraction procedure searching for the best recovery. The validation of the methods was performed through the establishment of the external standard calibration curves and the analytical figures of merit. Limits of detection ranging from 10 to 400 ng mL(-1) and 1 to 200 ng mL(-1) were achieved using UV-visible and MS detection, respectively. The extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil was performed in a simple and rapid way by RP-DLLME with ethanol:water 60:40 (v/v) as extracting solvent and 1,4-dioxane as disperser solvent. The quantification of the phenolic compounds in virgin olive oils from different olive varieties was carried out by means of the standard addition method and, finally the procedure for the sample treatment was validated using the well established solid phase extraction procedure with Diol cartridges. PMID:23895920

  19. [Determination of L-dopa and dopamine in rat brain microdialysate by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using stable isotope-coded derivatization coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction].

    PubMed

    Qi, Weimei; Zhao, Xian-en; Qi, Yong; Sun, Zhiwei; Chen, Guang; You, Jinmao; Suo, Yourui

    2015-09-01

    The sensitive detection method of levodopa (L-DOPA) and dopamine (DA) in rat brain microdialysate of Parkinson's disease (PD) is an essential tool for the clinical study and attenuated synergistic drug screening for L-DOPA from traditional Chinese medicines. Using d0/d3-10-methyl-acridone-2-sulfonyl chloride (d0/d3-MASC) as stable isotope derivatization reagent, a novel ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for L-DOPA and DA by stable isotope- coded derivatization coupled with ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME). d3-MASC (light) and d3-MASC (heavy) were used as derivatization reagents for microdialysate samples and standards, respectively. Mixtures of the two solutions were prepared by UA-DLLME for UHPLC-MS/MS analysis with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. With d3-MASC heavy derivatives as internal standards for corresponding light derivatives from samples, the stable isotope internal standard quantification for L-DOPA and DA was carried out. The stable derivatives were obtained in aqueous acetonitrile (pH 10.8 sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate buffer) at 37 °C for 3.0 min, and then were separated within 2.0 min using gradient elution. Linear range was 0.20-1500.0 nmol/L (R > 0.994). LODs were 0.005 and 0.009 nmol/L for DA and L-DOPA (S/N = 3), respectively. This method was validated, and it showed obvious advantages in comparing with the reported methods in terms of sensitivity, analysis speed and anti-matrix interference. This method has been successfully applied to the study of effect of Shouwu Fang on L-DOPA and DA concentration fluctuations in PD rat brain microdialysate. PMID:26753287

  20. Determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol B in canned seafood combining QuEChERS extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Cunha, C; Ferreira, A R; Fernandes, J O

    2012-11-01

    A new simple and reliable method combining an acetonitrile partitioning extractive procedure followed by dispersive solid-phase cleanup (QuEChERS) with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and further gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis was developed for the simultaneous determination of bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol B (BPB) in canned seafood samples. Besides the great enrichment factor provided, the final DLLME extractive step was designed in order to allow the simultaneous acetylation of the compounds required for their gas chromatographic analysis. Tetrachloroethylene was used as extractive solvent, while the acetonitrile extract obtained from QuEChERS was used as dispersive solvent, and anhydride acetic as derivatizing reagent. The main factors influencing QuEChERS and DLLME efficiency including nature of QuEChERS dispersive-SPE sorbents, amount of DLLME extractive and dispersive solvents and nature and amount of derivatizing reagent were evaluated. DLLME procedure provides an effective enrichment of the extract, allowing the required sensitivity even using a single quadropole MS as detector. The optimized method showed to be accurate (>68 % recovery), reproducible (<21 % relative standard deviation) and sensitive for the target analytes (method detection limits of 0.2 μg/kg for BPA and 0.4 μg/kg for BPB). The screening of several canned seafood samples commercialized in Portugal (total = 47) revealed the presence of BPA in more than 83 % of the samples with levels ranging from 1.0 to 99.9 μg/kg, while BPB was found in only one sample at a level of 21.8 μg/kg. PMID:22995997

  1. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of vitamins D and K in foods by liquid chromatography with diode-array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    A simple and rapid method was developed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with both diode array (DAD) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of the vitamins ergocalciferol (D2), cholecalciferol (D3), phylloquinone (K1), menaquinone-4 (K2) and a synthetic form of vitamin K, menadione (K3). The Taguchi experimental method, an orthogonal array design (OAD), was used to optimize an efficient and clean preconcentration step based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). A factorial design was applied with six factors and three levels for each factor, namely, carbon tetrachloride volume, methanol volume, aqueous sample volume, pH of sample, sodium chloride concentration and time of the centrifugation step. The DLLME optimized procedure consisted of rapidly injecting 3 mL of acetonitrile (disperser solvent) containing 150 µL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) into the aqueous sample, thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and the sedimented phase was evaporated with nitrogen, reconstituted with 50 µL of acetonitrile, and injected. The LC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile, 2-propanol and water, under gradient elution. Quantification was carried out by the standard additions method. The APCI-MS spectra, in combination with UV spectra, permitted the correct identification of compounds in the food samples. The method was validated according to international guidelines and using a certified reference material. The validated method was applied for the analysis of vitamins D and K in infant foods and several green vegetables. There was little variability in the forms of vitamin K present in vegetables, with the most abundant vitamer in all the samples being phylloquinone, while menadione could not be detected. Conversely, cholecalciferol, which is present in food of animal origin, was

  2. Quantification of β-carotene, retinol, retinyl acetate and retinyl palmitate in enriched fruit juices using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    A detailed optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was carried out for developing liquid chromatographic (HPLC) techniques, using both fluorescence and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of preforms of vitamin A: retinol (R), retinyl acetate (RA), retinyl palmitate (RP) and β-carotene (β-C). The HPLC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of methanol and water, with gradient elution. The APCI-MS and fluorescence spectra permitted the correct identification of compounds in the analyzed samples. Parameters affecting DLLME were optimized using 2 mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 150 μL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent). The precision ranged from 6% to 8% (RSD) and the limits of detection were between 0.03 and 1.4 ng mL(-1), depending on the compound. The enrichment factor values were in the 21-44 range. Juice samples were analyzed without saponification and no matrix effect was found when using fluorescence detection, so calibration was possible with aqueous standards. However, a matrix effect appeared with APCI-MS, in which case it was necessary to apply matrix-matched calibration. There was great variability in the forms of vitamin A present in the juices, the most abundant ester being retinyl acetate (0.04 to 3.4 μg mL(-1)), followed by the amount of retinol (0.01 to 0.16 μg mL(-1)), while retinyl palmitate was not detected, except in the milk-containing juice, in which RP was the main form. The representative carotenoid β-carotene was present in the orange, peach, mango and multifruit juices in high amounts. The method was validated using two certified reference materials. PMID:23290361

  3. Comparison of hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction and ultrasound-assisted low-density solvent dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of drugs of abuse in biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wenwen; Meng, Pinjia; Zhu, Binling; Zheng, Kefang

    2015-05-01

    Two microextraction techniques based on hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and ultrasound-assisted low-density solvent dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-LDS-DLLME) had been applied for the determination of drugs of abuse (methamphetamine, amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, methcathinone, ketamine, meperidine, and methadone) in urine and blood samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency have been investigated and optimized for both methods. Under the optimum conditions, linearities were observed for all analytes in the range 0.0030-10 μg/ml with the correlation coefficient (R) ranging from 0.9985 to 0.9995 for HF-LPME and in the range 0.0030-10 μg/ml with the R ranging from 0.9985 to 0.9994 for DLLME. The recovery of 79.3-98.6% with RSDs of 1.2-4.5% was obtained for HF-LPME, and the recovery of 79.3-103.4% with RSDs of 2.4-5.7% was obtained for DLLME. The LODs (S/N=3) were estimated to be in the range from 0.5 to 5 ng/ml and 0.5 to 4 ng/ml, respectively. Compared with HF-LPME, the UA-LDS-DLLME technique had the advantages of less extraction time, suitability for batches of sample pretreatment simultaneously, and higher extraction efficiency, while HF-LPME has excellent sample clean-up effect, and is a robust and suitable technique for various sample matrices with better repeatability. Both methods were successfully applied to the analysis of drugs of abuse in real human blood sample. PMID:25801996

  4. Ultrasound leaching-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet for determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment samples by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lana, Nerina B; Berton, Paula; Covaci, Adrian; Atencio, Adrián G; Ciocco, Néstor F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2013-04-12

    Ultrasound leaching-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using solidification of floating organic droplet (USL-DLLME-SFO) technique is proposed for extraction and isolation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from sediment and further determination by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Parameters that affect the efficiency of the procedure were investigated by a full factorial (2(k)) screening design. Variables showing significant effects on the analytical responses were considered within a further central composite design (CCD). The optimization assays have led to following protocol: ultrasound assisted lixiviation of 1g sediment was carried out by using 1.2 mL MeOH. Further, the analytes were isolated from 0.4 mL of the extract using the DLLME-SFO technique. The microextraction was performed using 0.1 mL MeOH, 22 mg 1-dodecanol, 1 mL NaCl solution 6.15M and 4.4 mL ultrapure water as dispersive and extracting solvents, medium ionic strength and dispersant bulk, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the method exhibits good performance in terms of linearity and precision (RSD<9.2%), with recoveries above 71% and limits of detection (LODs) within the range 0.5-1.8 pgg(-1) dry weight (d.w.). Method validation was demonstrated through the analysis of environmental sediment samples in which PBDEs were detected and quantified. The presence of BDE-47, -100, -99 and -153 was reported within the concentration range of

  5. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by microwave-assisted silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for simultaneous trace quantification of bisphenol A and 13 ultraviolet filters in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2015-10-01

    A novel multi-residue gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was validated for the simultaneous determination of trace levels (ng/L) of 13 UV-filters and bisphenol A (BPA) in wastewater samples. It was based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLMME) followed by rapid microwave-assisted silylation of the analytes. Several parameters of both extraction and derivatization steps such as type of extractive and dispersive solvents, solvent volumes, pH, salt addition, time and power of microwave were evaluated to achieve the highest yield and to attain the lowest detection limits. Optimized DLLME consisted in the formation of a cloudy solution promoted by the fast addition to the sample (10mL) of a mixture of tetrachloroethylene (50μL, extraction solvent) in acetone (1mL, dispersive solvent). The sedimented phase obtained was evaporated and further silylated under the irradiation of 600W microwave for 5min, being the derivatization yields similar to those obtained after a conventional heating process for 30min at 75°C. Limits of detection and quantification of the method using real samples were 2ng/L and 10ng/L, respectively. Mean extraction efficiency of 82% for three concentrations were achieved, supporting the accuracy of the method. Intra-day and inter-day repeatability of measurements (expressed as relative standard deviation) were lower than 22%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of UV-filters and BPA in samples collected from 15 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Portugal. Eight analytes were detected, among which 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate, octocrylene, and BPA were consistently found in the three seasons of collection. PMID:26341596

  6. Calculation of mass transfer in multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Gopal, M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper summarizes the results of mass transfer mechanisms under disturbed liquid-gas flow in 10 cm diameter pipe using electrochemical limiting current density and potentiostatic noise technique. The solution used is potassium ferro/ferricyanide dissolve in 1.3 N sodium hydroxide system. Mass transfer coefficients in full pipe flow and slug flow are obtained. The relationship between mass transfer coefficient with full pipe flow velocities and with slug flow Froude numbers are studied. The impact of bubbles in slugs on the mass transfer coefficient is revealed, The impact of flow disturbance, including weld beads and pits, are discussed for both full pipe flow and slug flow.

  7. Detection of food additives by voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Grégoire; Kam, Victor; Berduque, Alfonso; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2008-06-25

    Electrochemistry at the liquid-liquid interface enables the detection of nonredoxactive species with electroanalytical techniques. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of two food additives, aspartame and acesulfame K, was investigated. Both ions were found to undergo ion-transfer voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface. Differential pulse voltammetry was used for the preparation of calibration curves over the concentration range of 30-350 microM with a detection limit of 30 microM. The standard addition method was applied to the determination of their concentrations in food and beverage samples such as sweeteners and sugar-free beverages. Selective electrochemically modulated liquid-liquid extraction of these species in both laboratory solutions and in beverage samples was also demonstrated. These results indicate the suitability of liquid-liquid electrochemistry as an analytical approach in food analysis. PMID:18512937

  8. Hollow fiber apparatus and use thereof for fluids separations and heat and mass transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Bikson, Benjamin; Etter, Stephen; Ching, Nathaniel

    2014-06-10

    A hollow fiber device includes a hollow fiber bundle, comprising a plurality of hollow fibers, a first tubesheet and a second tubesheet encapsulating respective distal ends of the hollow fiber bundle. The tubesheets have boreholes in fluid communication with bores of the hollow fibers. In at least one of the tubesheets, the boreholes are formed radially. The hollow fiber device can be utilized in heat exchange, in gas/gas, liquid/liquid and gas/liquid heat transfer, in combined heat and mass transfer and in fluid separation assemblies and processes. The design disclosed herein is light weight and compact and is particularly advantageous when the pressure of a first fluid introduced into the bores of hollow fibers is higher than the pressure on the shell side of the device.

  9. Transport of microspheres across liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardt, Steffen; Sinha, Ashok; Mollah, Amlan; Ganguly, Ranjan

    2013-11-01

    Experiments with magnetic microspheres crossing the interface between two immiscible polymer solutions under the influence of a magnetic field are reported. The liquids form a bilaminated configuration in a microchannel, allowing a detailed inspection of the liquid-liquid interface. The trajectories of the particles close to the interface are examined using bright-field microscopy and a high-speed camera. During the interaction phase the interface gets deformed and the particles ``snap in,'' indicating that a three-phase contact line is formed. The dependence of the particle-interface interaction on the size of the microspheres is studied, showing that via transfer across a liquid-liquid interface a size separation of particles can be achieved. Comparing the results for 1.29 micron diameter spheres with those for 4.69 micron spheres, it is found that the small particles are able to cross the interface more easily than what is expected from a simple scaling analysis taking into account the balance between magnetic and interfacial forces on the particles. The most likely explanation for this phenomenon involves the line tension that destabilizes smaller particles adsorbed to a liquid-liquid interface more than larger particles.

  10. The balanced-force volume tracking algorithm and global embedded interface formulation for droplet dynamics with mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Marianne M; Carlson, Neil N

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the complex interaction of droplet dynamics with mass transfer and chemical reactions is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction. High-fidelity numerical simulation of droplet dynamics with interfacial mass transfer is particularly challenging because the position of the interface between the fluids and the interface physics need to be predicted as part of the solution of the flow equations. In addition, the discontinuity in fluid density, viscosity and species concentration at the interface present additional numerical challenges. In this work, we extend our balanced-force volume-tracking algorithm for modeling surface tension force (Francois et al., 2006) and we propose a global embedded interface formulation to model the interfacial conditions of an interface in thermodynamic equilibrium. To validate our formulation, we perform simulations of pure diffusion problems in one- and two-dimensions. Then we present two and three-dimensional simulations of a single droplet dynamics rising by buoyancy with mass transfer.

  11. How We Make Mass Transfer Seem Difficult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching of mass transfer can be improved by: (1) using a single, simple definition of mass transfer coefficients; (2) altering use of analogies; and (3) repeatedly stressing differences between mathematical models used for chemical reactions and the actual chemistry of these reactions. Examples for undergraduate/graduate courses…

  12. Automated Agitation-Assisted Demulsification Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Chia, Shao Hua; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-03-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) is an extremely fast and efficient sample preparation procedure. For its capability and applicability to be fully exploited, full automation of its operations seamlessly integrated with analysis is necessary. In this work, for the first time, fully automated agitation-assisted demulsification (AAD)-DLLME integrated with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed for the convenient and efficient determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples. The use of a commercially available multipurpose autosampler equipped with two microsyringes of different capacities allowed elimination or significant reduction of manpower, labor, and time with the large-volume microsyringe used for liquid transfers and the small-volume microsyringe for extract collection and injection for analysis. Apart from enhancing accessibility of DLLME, the procedure was characterized by the application of agitation after extraction to break up the emulsion (that otherwise would need centrifugation or a demulsification solvent), further improving overall operational efficiency and flexibility. Additionally, the application of low-density solvent as extractant facilitated the easy collection of extract as the upper layer over water. Some parameters affecting the automated AAD-DDLME procedure were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the procedure provided good linearity (ranging from a minimum of 0.1-0.5 μg/L to a maximum of 50 μg/L), low limits of detection (0.010-0.058 μg/L), and good repeatability of the extractions (relative standard deviations, below 5.3%, n = 6). The proposed method was applied to analyze PAHs in real river water samples. PMID:26818217

  13. In situ derivatization-ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of neurotransmitters in Parkinson's rat brain microdialysates by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yongrui; Zhao, Xian-En; Zhu, Shuyun; Wei, Na; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Yubi; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Guang; Suo, Yourui; You, Jinmao

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of several neurotransmitters (NTs) linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) has important scientific significance for PD related pathology, pharmacology and drug screening. A new simple, fast and sensitive analytical method, based on in situ derivatization-ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ DUADLLME) in a single step, has been proposed for the quantitative determination of catecholamines and their biosynthesis precursors and metabolites in rat brain microdialysates. The method involved the rapid injection of the mixture of low toxic bromobenzene (extractant) and acetonitrile (dispersant), which containing commercial Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl chloride (LRSC) as derivatization reagent, into the aqueous phase of sample and buffer, and the following in situ DUADLLME procedure. After centrifugation, 50μL of the sedimented phase (bromobenzene) was directly injected for ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. This interesting combination brought the advantages of speediness, simpleness, low matrix effects and high sensitivity in an effective way. Parameters of in situ DUADLLME and UHPLC-MS/MS conditions were all optimized in detail. The optimum conditions of in situ DUADLLME were found to be 30μL of microdialysates, 150μL of acetonitrile containing LRSC, 50μL of bromobenzene and 800μL of NaHCO3-Na2CO3 buffer (pH 10.5) for 3.0min at 37°C. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity was observed with LODs (S/N>3) and LOQs (S/N>10) of LRSC derivatized-NTs in the range of 0.002-0.004 and 0.007-0.015 nmol/L, respectively. It also brought good precision (3.2-12.8%, peak area CVs%), accuracy (94.2-108.6%), recovery (94.5-105.5%) and stability (3.8-8.1%, peak area CVs%) results. Moreover, LRSC derivatization significantly improved chromatographic resolution and MS detection sensitivity of NTs when compared with the

  14. Simultaneous determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol B in beverages and powdered infant formula by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Almeida, C; Mendes, E; Fernandes, J O

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable, cost-effective, fast and simple method to quantify simultaneously both bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol B (BPB) in liquid food matrixes such as canned beverages (soft drinks and beers) and powdered infant formula using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) with in-situ derivatisation coupled with heart-cutting gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the optimisation of the DLLME procedure different amounts of various extractive and dispersive solvents as well as different amounts of the derivative reagent were compared for their effects on extraction efficiency and yields. The optimised procedure consisted of the injection of a mixture containing tetrachloroethylene (extractant), acetonitrile (dispersant) and acetic anhydride (derivatising reagent) directly into an aliquot of beverage samples or into an aqueous extract of powdered milk samples obtained after a pretreatment of the samples. Given the compatibility of the solvents used, and the low volumes involved, the procedure was easily associated with GC-MS end-point determination, which was accomplished by means of an accurate GC dual column (heart-cutting) technique. Careful optimisation of heart-cutting GC-MS conditions, namely pressure of front and auxiliary inlets, have resulted in a good analytical performance. The linearity of the matrix-matched calibration curves was acceptable, with coefficients of determination (r2) always higher than 0.99. Average recoveries of the BPA and BPB spiked at two concentration levels into beverages and powdered infant formula ranged from 68% to 114% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was <15%. The limits of detection (LOD) in canned beverages were 5.0 and 2.0 ng l(-1) for BPA and BPB, respectively, whereas LOD in powdered infant formula were 60.0 and 30.0 ng l(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) in canned beverages were 10.0 and 7.0 ng l-1 for BPA and BPB, respectively

  15. Multiclass method for the determination of quinolones and β-lactams, in raw cow milk using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Junza, Alexandra; Dorival-García, Noemí; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Barrón, Dolores; Ballesteros, Oscar; Barbosa, José; Navalón, Alberto

    2014-08-22

    An analytical method based on a sample treatment by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (UHPLC-MS/MS) for the determination of 17 quinolones and 14 β-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins) in raw cow milk, was validated according to the European Commission guidelines as cited in the Decision 2002/657/EC. The extraction efficiency of the DLLME depends on several parameters such as the nature and volumes of extractant and dispersive solvents, pH, concentration of salt, shaking time and time of centrifugation. These variables were accurately optimized using multivariate optimization strategies. A Plackett-Burman design to select the most influential parameters and a Doehlert design to obtain the optimum conditions have been applied. Two different pH values were used for the extraction of compounds (pH 3 for acidic quinolones and β-lactams and pH 8 for amphoteric quinolones). The method was validated using matrix-matched standard calibration followed by a recovery assay with spiked samples. The limits of quantification found ranged from 0.3 ng g(-1) for amoxicillin to 6.6 ng g(-1) for ciprofloxacin, and the precision was lower than 15% in all cases as is required by the European Regulation. The decision limits (CCα) ranged between 4.1 and 104.8 ng g(-1), while detection capabilities (CCβ) from 4.2 to 109.7 ng g(-1). These values were very close to the corresponding maximum residue limits (MLRs) for the studied antibiotics. Recoveries between 72 and 110% were also obtained. Finally, in order to evaluate the applicability of the method, 28 raw cow milk samples were analysed and it was observed that 28% of the samples were positive. However, only 11% were considered non-compliant with the current EU legislation (Commission Regulation 37/2010), due to some milk samples corresponded to treated cows with these antibiotics. PMID:24997113

  16. Ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometry for simultaneous analysis of pharmaceuticals in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Parrilla Vázquez, M M; Parrilla Vázquez, P; Martínez Galera, M; Gil García, M D; Uclés, A

    2013-05-24

    A simple, rapid, low environmental toxicity and sensitive ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (US-IL-DLLME) procedure was developed for the extraction of nine pharmaceuticals (paracetamol, metoprolol, bisoprolol, betaxolol, ketoprofen, naproxen, ibuprofen, flufenamic acid and tolfenamic acid) in wastewater, and their determination using high-performance liquid chromatography with a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometer (LC-QqLIT-MS). The IL 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C8MIM][PF6]) and acetonitrile (ACN) were used as extraction and disperser solvent, respectively, for the DLLME procedure, instead of using toxic chlorinated solvent. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the type and volume of ionic liquid, type and volume of disperser solvent, cooling in ice-water, sonication time, centrifuging time, sample pH and ionic strength, were optimized. The ultrasound-assisted process was applied to accelerate the formation of the fine cloudy solution using a small volume of disperser solvent (0.5mL of acetonitrile), which increased the extraction efficiency and reduced the equilibrium time. A slight increase in the recoveries of pharmaceuticals was observed when an ice-water bath extraction step was included in the analytical procedure. In this way, enrichment factors between 255 and 340 were obtained. Data acquisition in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM), allowed the simultaneous identification and quantification of the analytes using two transitions (SRM1 and SRM2). Additionally, the information dependent acquisition (IDA) scan was performed to carry out the identification of those analytes whose second transition was absent or was present at low intensity, also providing extra confirmation for the other analytes. The optimized US-IL-DLLME-LC-QqLIT-MS method showed a good precision level, with relative standard deviation values between 1.1% and 11.3%. Limits of

  17. Mass transfer in electromembrane extraction--The link between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuixiu; Jensen, Henrik; Seip, Knut Fredrik; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Electromembrane extraction was introduced in 2006 as a totally new sample preparation concept for the extraction of charged analytes present in aqueous samples. Electromembrane extraction is based on electrokinetic migration of the analytes through a supported liquid membrane and into a μL-volume of acceptor solution under the influence of an external electrical field. To date, electromembrane extraction has mostly been used for the extraction of drug substances, amino acids, and peptides from biological fluids, and for organic micropollutants from environmental samples. Electromembrane extraction has typically been combined with chromatography, mass spectrometry, and electrophoresis for analyte separation and detection. At the moment, close to 125 research papers have been published with focus on electromembrane extraction. Electromembrane extraction is a hybrid technique between electrophoresis and liquid-liquid extraction, and the fundamental principles for mass transfer have only partly been investigated. Thus, although there is great interest in electromembrane extraction, the fundamental principle for mass transfer has to be described in more detail for the scientific acceptance of the concept. This review summarizes recent efforts to describe the fundamentals of mass transfer in electromembrane extraction, and aim to give an up-to-date understanding of the processes involved. PMID:26420509

  18. Direct determination of chlorophenols in water samples through ultrasound-assisted hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction on-line coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Tu, Yi-Ming; Jian, Zhi-Xuan; Wang, Hsaio-Wen; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2013-01-01

    In this study we on-line coupled hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME), assisted by an ultrasonic probe, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this approach, the target analytes - 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 3-chlorophenol (3-CP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), and 3,4-dichlorophenol (3,4-DCP) - were extracted into a hollow fiber (HF) supported liquid membrane (SLM) and then back-extracted into the acceptor solution in the lumen of the HF. Next, the acceptor solution was withdrawn on-line into the HPLC sample loop connected to the HF and then injected directly into the HPLC system for analysis. We found that the chlorophenols (CPs) could diffuse quickly through two sequential extraction interfaces - the donor phase - SLM and the SLM - acceptor phase - under the assistance of an ultrasonic probe. Ultrasonication provided effective mixing of the extracted boundary layers with the bulk of the sample and it increased the driving forces for mass transfer, thereby enhancing the extraction kinetics and leading to rapid enrichment of the target analytes. We studied the effects of various parameters on the extraction efficiency, viz. the nature of the SLM and acceptor phase, the compositions of the donor and acceptor phases, the fiber length, the stirring rate, the ion strength, the sample temperature, the sonication conditions, and the perfusion flow rate. This on-line extraction method exhibited linearity (r(2)≥0.998), sensitivity (limits of detection: 0.03-0.05 μg L(-1)), and precision (RSD%≤4.8), allowing the sensitive, simple, and rapid determination of CPs in aqueous solutions and water samples with a sampling time of just 2 min. PMID:23237709

  19. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollyky, L.J.; Beary, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Hanford Site to determine the most efficient pH and temperature levels for the destruction of complexants in Hanford high-level defense waste. These complexants enhance migration of radionuclides in the soil and inhibit the growth of crystals in the evaporator-crystallizer. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics tests have been outlined for the determination of critical mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the ozone-complexant reaction.

  20. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  1. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  2. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  3. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W; Li, Tingwen; Nicoletti, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  4. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  5. Mass Transfer Enhancement in Moving Biofilm Structures

    PubMed Central

    Taherzadeh, Danial; Picioreanu, Cristian; Horn, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are layers of microbial cells growing on an interface and they can form highly complex structures adapted to a wide variety of environmental conditions. Biofilm streamers have a small immobile base attached to the support and a flexible tail elongated in the flow direction, which can vibrate in fast flows. Herein we report numerical results for the role of the periodical movement of biofilm streamers on the nutrient uptake and in general on the solute mass transfer enhancement due to flow-induced oscillations. We developed what to our knowledge is a novel two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model coupled to unsteady solute mass transport and solved the model using the finite element method with a moving mesh. Results demonstrate that the oscillatory movement of the biofilm tail significantly increases the substrate uptake. The mass transfer coefficient is the highest in regions close to the streamer tip. The reason for substrate transfer enhancement is the increase in speed of tip movement relative to the surrounding liquid, thereby reducing the thickness of the mass transfer boundary layer. In addition, we show that the relative mass transfer enhancement in unsteady conditions compared with the rigid static structure is larger at higher flow velocities, and this relative increase favors a more flexible structure. PMID:22500748

  6. Mass transfer in composite catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Langhendries, G.; Claessens, R.; Baron, G.V.

    1996-12-31

    The partial oxidation of cyclohexane was studied in a composite polymer-zeolite catalytic membrane reactor. In a first step the equilibrium and mass transfer properties (swelling, diffusion and sorption) of dense composite membranes were examined. The swelling behavior of the crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) network was determined for several solvents and related to the differences between the Hildebrand solubility parameters of solvent and polymer. Time lag experiments, which enable us to measure simultaneously diffusion and partition coefficients, were carried out on a dense poly(dimethylsiloxane) membrane. A mathematical model describing the mass transfer behavior of these catalytic membranes was derived and validated with experimental data. Mass transfer through composite catalytic membranes can be predicted using the properties of pure catalyst and polymer material, and a single tortuosity factor. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Development, Fabrication, and Testing of a Liquid/Liquid Microchannel Heat Exchanger for Constellation Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony; Le,Hung; Stephans, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Minimizing mass and volume is critically important for space hardware. Microchannel technology can be used to decrease both of these parameters for heat exchangers. Working in concert with NASA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) has developed a microchannel liquid/liquid heat exchanger that has resulted in significant mass and volume savings. The microchannel heat exchanger delivers these improvements without sacrificing thermal and pressure drop performance. A conventional heat exchanger has been tested and the performance of it recorded to compare it to the microchannel heat exchanger that PNNL has fabricated. The microchannel heat exchanger was designed to meet all of the requirements of the baseline heat exchanger, while reducing the heat exchanger mass and volume. The baseline heat exchanger was designed to have an transfer approximately 3.1 kW for a specific set of inlet conditions. The baseline heat exchanger mass was 2.7 kg while the microchannel mass was only 2.0 kg. More impressive, however, was the volumetric savings associated with the microchannel heat exchanger. The microchannel heat exchanger was an order of magnitude smaller than the baseline heat exchanger (2180cm3 vs. 311 cm3). This paper will describe the test apparatus designed to complete performance tests for both heat exchangers. Also described in this paper will be the performance specifications for the microchannel heat exchanger and how they compare to the baseline heat exchanger.

  8. An innovative arrangement for in-vial membrane-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction: application to the determination of esters of phthalic acid in alcoholic beverages by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    March, Juan Gabriel; Cerdà, Victor

    2015-05-01

    A new arrangement for membrane-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction is presented. The extracting organic solvent was placed into a chromatographic microvial, compatible with the chromatograph autosampler, whose septum was replaced by a disc of porous hydrophobic membrane. This extraction device was completely immersed into the analytical sample contained in a cylindrical container subjected to rotary and basculant movement. Then, the extraction of analytes took place from the sample to the organic solvent contained in the vial through the membrane. Esters of the phthalic acid have been selected as model analytes to determine the performance characteristics of the extraction system. The limits of detection, limits of quantification and relative standard deviations (%) were in the range 0.1-0.4, 0.3-1 and 4-7, respectively. Esters of phthalic acid have been successfully analysed in alcoholic beverages. The main operational advantages of this arrangement consisted of minimal required handling, minimal risk of cross contamination and its simplicity. PMID:25876533

  9. Liquid liquid phase transition in Stillinger Weber silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-04-01

    It was recently demonstrated that Stillinger-Weber silicon undergoes a liquid-liquid first-order phase transition deep into the supercooled region (Sastry and Angell 2003 Nat. Mater. 2 739). Here we study the effects of perturbations on this phase transition. We show that the order of the liquid-liquid transition changes with negative pressure. We also find that the liquid-liquid transition disappears when the three-body term of the potential is strengthened by as little as 5%. This implies that the details of the potential could affect strongly the nature and even the existence of the liquid-liquid phase.

  10. Non-conservative mass transfers in Algols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Öztürk, O.

    2014-06-01

    We applied a revised model for non-conservative mass transfer in semi-detached binaries to 18 Algol-type binaries showing orbital period increase or decrease in their parabolic O-C diagrams. The combined effect of mass transfer and magnetic braking due to stellar wind was considered when interpreting the orbital period changes of these 18 Algols. Mass transfer was found to be the dominant mechanism for the increase in orbital period of 10 Algols (AM Aur, RX Cas, DK Peg, RV Per, WX Sgr, RZ Sct, BS Sct, W Ser, BD Vir, XZ Vul) while magnetic braking appears to be the responsible mechanism for the decrease in that of 8 Algols (FK Aql, S Cnc, RU Cnc, TU Cnc, SX Cas, TW Cas, V548 Cyg, RY Gem). The peculiar behaviour of orbital period changes in three W Ser-type binary systems (W Ser, itself a prototype, RX Cas and SX Cas) is discussed. The empirical linear relation between orbital period (P) and its rate of change (dP/dt) was also revised.

  11. A validated liquid chromatographic method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in honey after homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction using hydrophilic acetonitrile and sodium chloride as mass separating agent.

    PubMed

    Koltsakidou, Anastasia; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-16

    In the present report, a simple and cost-effective method for the determination of twelve US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in honey samples after salting-assisted liquid-liquid extraction and UHPLC with fluorescence detection is proposed. The sample treatment is based on the usage of hydrophilic acetonitrile as extraction solvent and its phase separation under high salinity conditions. Due to the high sugar content of the samples the phase separation is promoted effortlessly. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and method sensitivity including the concentration of the honey samples, the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and quantity of the inorganic salt, extraction time and centrifugation time was systematically investigated. The method was validated in-house according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC guidelines. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method lay between 0.02 and 0.04ngmL(-1) (corresponding to 0.08 and 0.16ngg(-1)) which are close to the quality criteria established by European Regulation (EC) 836/2011 concerning the PAHs in foodstuffs. The mean analytical bias (expressed as relative recoveries) in all spiking levels was acceptable being in the range of 54-118% while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was lower than 19%. The proposed method has been satisfactorily applied for the analysis of the selected PAHs residues in various honey samples obtained from Greek region. PMID:25543304

  12. Evaluation of the combination of a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method with micellar electrokinetic chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for the determination of estrogenic compounds in milk and yogurt.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Asensio-Ramos, María; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel; Fanali, Salvatore

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the suitability of a methodology based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) has been evaluated for the extraction of four endoestrogens (estriol, 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone), an exoestrogen (17α-etynylestradiol), and a mycotoxin (zearalenone), together with some of their major metabolites (2-methoxyestradiol, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol, and β-zearalenol) from different types of milk (whole and skimmed cow milk and semiskimmed goat milk) and whole natural yogurt. The methodology includes a previous protein precipitation with acidified ACN and a defatting step with n-hexane. Separation of the analytes, determination, and quantification were developed by MEKC coupled to ESI-MS using a BGE containing an aqueous solution of ammonium perfluorooctanoate as MS friendly surfactant. Calibration, precision, and accuracy studies of the described DLLME-MEKC-MS/MS method were evaluated obtaining a good linearity and LODs in the low micrograms per liter range. PMID:25394185

  13. Simultaneous derivatization and extraction of chlorophenols in water samples with up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Deng; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-01

    A new up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UDSA-DLLME) for extraction and derivatization of five chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 4-chloro-2-methylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, and pentachlorophenol) has been developed. The method requires minimal solvent usage. The relatively polar, water-soluble, and low-toxicity solvent 1-heptanol (12 μL) was selected as the extraction solvent and acetic anhydride (50 μL) as the derivatization reagent. With the use of an up-and-down shaker, the emulsification of aqueous samples was formed homogeneously and quickly. The derivatization and extraction of chlorophenols were completed simultaneously in 1 min. The common requirement of disperser solvent in DLLME could be avoided. After optimization, the linear range covered over two orders of magnitude, and the coefficient of determination (r (2)) was greater than 0.9981. The detection limit was from 0.05 to 0.2 μg L(-1), and the relative standard deviation was from 4.6 to 10.8 %. Real samples of river water and lake water had relative recoveries from 90.3 to 117.3 %. Other emulsification methods such as vortex-assisted, ultrasound-assisted, and manual shaking-enhanced ultrasound-assisted methods were also compared with the proposed UDSA-DLLME. The results revealed that UDSA-DLLME performed with higher extraction efficiency and precision compared with the other methods. PMID:23727731

  14. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  15. Heat and mass transfer in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Lior, Noam

    Various papers on heat and mass transfer in materials processing are presented. The topics addressed include: heat transfer in plasma spraying, structure of ultrashort pulse plasma for CVD processing, heat flow and thermal contraction during plasma spray deposition, metal melting process by laser heating, improved electron beam weld design and control with beam current profile measurements, transport phenomena in laser materials processing, perspectives on integrated modeling of transport processes in semiconductor crystal growth, numerical simulation of natural convection in crystal growth in space and on the earth, conjugate heat transfer in crystal growth, effects of convection on the solidification of binary mixtures. Also discussed are: heat transfer in in-rotating-liquid-spinning process, thermal oscillations in materials processing, modeling and simulation of manufacturing processes of advanced composite materials, reaction engineering principles of combustion synthesis of advanced materials, numerical evaluation of the physical properties of magnetic fluids suitable for heat transfer control, and measurement techniques of thermophysical properties of high temperature melts. (For individual items see A93-10827 to A93-10843)

  16. Sensitive determination of trace urinary 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene using ionic liquids-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by chemical derivatization and high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huan; Liu, Baizhan; Yang, Jun; Lin, Zuomin; Gan, Wuer

    2016-08-01

    3-Hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OHBaP) is widely used as a biomarker for assessing carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene exposure risks. However, monitoring urinary 3-OHBaP suffers from an insufficient sensitivity due to the pg/mL level in urine excretion. In this study, a sensitive method for determination trace urinary 3-OHBaP was developed, involving enzymatic hydrolysis of the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, ionic liquids dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) enrichment, derivatization with dansyl chloride and HPLC-HRMS/MS analysis in the positive ion mode. Using IL-DLLME makes the enrichment of trace 3-OHBaP very simple, time-saving, efficiency and environmentally-friendly. To enhanced HPLC-HRMS/MS response, an MS-friendly dansyl group was introduced to increase the ionization and fragmentation efficiency. The optimal IL-DLLME extraction parameters and derivatization reaction conditions were investigated. Good linearity was obtained over a concentration range of 0.6-50.0pg/mL with correlation coefficients (r(2)) of 0.9918. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were 0.2pg/mL and 0.58pg/mL, respectively. The recoveries were 92.0±4.2% with the intra-day and inter-day RSD values ranged from 2.2% to 3.8% and from 3.3% to 6.8%, respectively. The proposed IL-DLLME-Dansylation-HPLC-HRMS/MS method was successfully applied to determine urinary 3-OHBaP of non-occupational exposed smokers and nonsmokers. PMID:27294533

  17. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Tao; Guan, Lili

    2013-04-01

    A simple and economical method for the determination of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100,153,154,183, and 209) in water was developed. This method involves the use of ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with GC-MS in negative chemical ionization mode. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, salt concentration, extraction time, and ultrasonic time, were investigated. A volume of 1.0 mL of acetone (dispersive solvent) containing 10 μL tetrachloroethylene (extraction solvent) was injected into 5.0 mL of water samples and then emulsified by ultrasound for 2.0 min to produce the cloudy solution. Under the optimal condition, the enrichment factors for the eight PBDEs were varied from 845- to 1050-folds. Good linearity was observed in the range of 1.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-28, 47, 99, and 100; 5.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-153, 154, and 183; and 5.0-500 ng L(-1) for BDE-209. The RSD values were in the range of 2.5-8.4% (n = 5) and the LODs ranged from 0.40 to 2.15 ng L(-1) (S/N = 3). The developed method was applied for the determination of eight BPDEs in the river and lake water samples, and the mean recoveries at spiking levels of 5.0 and 50.0 ng L(-1) were in the range of 70.6-105.1%. PMID:23483741

  18. Ultra-preconcentration and determination of selected pharmaceutical and personal care products in different water matrices by solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction prior to ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Celano, Rita; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Campone, Luca; Rastrelli, Luca

    2014-08-15

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) are one of the most important classes of emerging contaminants. The potential of ecological and environmental impacts associated with PPCPs are of particular concern because they continually penetrate the aquatic environment. This work describes a novel ultra-preconcentration technique for the rapid and highly sensitive analysis of selected PPCPs in environmental water matrices at ppt levels. Selected PPCPs were rapidly extracted and concentrated from large volumes of aqueous solutions (500 and 250mL) by solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SPE-DLLME) and then analyzed using UHPLC-MS/MS. Experimental parameters were carefully investigated and optimized to achieve the best SPE-DLLME efficiency and higher enrichment factors. The best results were obtained using the ternary mixture acetonitrile/methanol/dichloromethane 3:3:4, v/v/v, both as SPE eluent and DLLME extractant/dispersive mixture. DLLME aqueous solution (5% NaCl, 10mgL(-1) TBAB) was also modified to improve the extraction efficiency of more hydrophilic PPCPs. Under the optimal conditions, an exhaustive extraction for most of the investigated analytes (recoveries >70%), with a precision (RSD <10%) and very high enrichment factors were attained for different aqueous matrices (drinking, sea, river and wastewater). Method detection and quantification limits were at very low ppt levels and below 1 and 3ngL(-1), respectively, for 15 of selected PPCPs. The proposed analytical procedure offers numerous advantages such as the simplicity of operation, rapidity, a high enrichment factor and sensitivity. So it is suitable for monitoring and studies of occurrence of PPCPs in different environmental compartments. PMID:24939087

  19. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  20. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the...

  1. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the...

  2. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the...

  3. 43 CFR 3106.4-3 - Mass transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mass transfers. 3106.4-3 Section 3106.4-3... or Otherwise § 3106.4-3 Mass transfers. (a) A mass transfer may be utilized in lieu of the provisions... large number of Federal leases to the same transferee. (b) Three originally executed copies of the...

  4. [Solvent demulsification-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for simultaneous determination of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Chenghua; Zou, Xiaoli; Huang, Lizhi; Yan, Dong

    2013-11-01

    A novel method for simultaneous determination of eight organochlorine pesticides in solidification of floating organic drop coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established. A mixture of extractant (n-hexadecane) and dispersive agent (acetone) at the ratio of 1/5 (v/v) was injected into aqueous sample to form an emulsion and an extraction process was accomplished. The demulsifier (750 microL acetone) was then injected to break up the emulsion. The two phases were separated quickly without centrifugation. After being solidified in an ice-bath, the upper layer (n-hexadecane) was transferred into an Eppendorf tube and analyzed by GC-MS after melted at room temperature. Factors affecting extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of extractant, dispersive agent and demulsifier, also ionic strength and pH value of extraction system were studied. Under the optimized conditions, the working curve of the proposed method provided a good linearity in the range of 0.025-2.00 microg/L (r = 0.999 5-0.999 9). The detection limits of the organochlorine pesticides calculated by Hubaux-Vos method were 0.012-0.024 microg/L and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 3.15% to 4.53%. The enrichment factors (EF) were 96-101. When the method was applied to the determination of farmland water, the average spiked recoveries were 96.77%-102.93% with the relative standard deviations of 2.68%-4.86%. The proposed method is sensitive and fast. It also has the advantage of little organic solvent consumption so that it is friendly to environment and suitable for batch analysis of organochlorine pesticides in aqueous samples. Meanwhile, it provides technical and methodological support for achieving the automation of sample pretreatment. PMID:24558843

  5. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  6. Development, Fabrication, and Testing of a Liquid/Liquid Microchannel Heat Exchanger for Constellation Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony; Le, Hung; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Microchannel technology can be incorporated into heat exchanger designs to decrease the mass and volume of space hardware. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Johnson Space Center (NASA JSC) partnered with Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to develop a liquid/liquid microchannel heat exchanger that has significant mass and volume savings without sacrificing thermal and pressure drop performance. PNNL designed the microchannel heat exchanger to the same performance design requirements of a conventional plate and fin liquid/liquid heat exchanger; 3 kW duty with inlet temperatures of 26 C and 4 C. Both heat exchangers were tested using the same test parameters on a test apparatus and performance data compared.

  7. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  8. USINT. Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.R.

    1989-12-01

    USINT was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as water and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.

  9. USINT. Heat and Mass Transfer in Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.V.; Knight, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    USINT was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as water and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.

  10. Beyond dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Fuh, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-28

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other dispersion liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) methods have been developed since the first DLLME method was reported in 2006. DLLME is simple, rapid, and affords high enrichment factor, this is due to the large contact surface area of the extraction solvent. DLLME is a method suitable for the extraction in many different water samples, but it requires using chlorinated solvents. In recent years, interest in DLLME or dispersion LPME has been focused on the use of low-toxicity solvents and more conveniently practical procedures. This review examines some of the most interesting developments in the past few years. In the first section, DLLME methods are separated in two categories: DLLME with low-density extraction solvent and DLLME with high-density extraction solvent. Besides these methods, many novel special devices for collecting low-density extraction solvent are also mentioned. In addition, various dispersion techniques with LPME, including manual shaking, air-assisted LPME (aspirating and injecting the extraction mixture by syringe), ultrasound-assisted emulsification, vortex-assisted emulsification, surfactant-assisted emulsification, and microwave-assisted emulsification are described. Besides the above methods, combinations of DLLME with other extraction techniques (solid-phase extraction, stir bar sorptive extraction, molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion and supercritical fluid extraction) are introduced. The combination of nanotechnique with DLLME is also introduced. Furthermore, this review illustrates the application of DLLME or dispersion LPME methods to separate and preconcentrate various organic analytes, inorganic analytes, and samples. PMID:24582396

  11. Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating a fast spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water and a subsequent slow crystallization to ice. It is found that supercooled water separates rapidly into low- and high-density domains so as to reduce the surface energy in the rectangular simulation cell at certain thermodynamic states. The liquid-liquid phase separation, which is about two orders of magnitude faster than the crystallization, suggests a possibility to observe this phenomenon experimentally. PMID:25353404

  12. Numerical modeling of liquid-liquid bi-propellant droplet/gas reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yupai L.; Schuman, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid-liquid bipropellant capability for numerically simulating droplets and gas two-phase flows for impinging type rocket injectors was developed through modification of the KIVA-II computer program. This added feature of liquid-liquid bipropellant sprays makes it possible to analyze the impinging type injectors through prescribed drop size and velocity distributions near the point of impingement. Two sample cases for LOX/liquid propane were run at mixture ratios of 3.06 and 2.72 respectively for a 3.4-inch diameter rocket engine with a contraction ratio of four and an expansion ratio of two. The predicted performance as well as the chamber heat transfer were found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Fundamental mass transfer models for indoor air pollution sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Guo, Z.; Sparks, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses a simple, fundamental mass transfer model, based on Fick's Law of Diffusion, for indoor air pollution wet sorbent-based sources. (Note: Models are needed to predict emissions from indoor sources. While empirical approaches based on dynamic chamber data are useful, a more fundamental approach is needed to fully elucidate the relevant mass transfer processes). In the model, the mass transfer rate is assumed to be gas-phase limited and controlled by the boundary layer mass transfer coefficient, the saturation vapor pressure of the material being emitted, and the mass of volatile material remaining. Results of static and dynamic chamber tests, as well as test house studies, are presented.

  14. Behavior of the mass transfer zone in a biosorption column.

    PubMed

    Naja, Ghinwa; Volesky, Bohumil

    2006-06-15

    Modeling of the mass transfer zone behavior under variable conditions in a flow-through fixed-bed sorption column enabled the prediction of breakthrough curves for Cu2+ and Ca-preloaded Sargassum fluitans biomass. The mass transfer resistance, particle diffusion, and the axial dispersion were incorporated in the model. The dynamics of the mass transfer zone was described under variable sorption column operating conditions including different column lengths and fluid flow rates. Accurate estimation of the behavior of the mass transfer zone as it progressed through the column, reflected eventually in the breakthrough curve, assisted in its relevant interpretations. Furthermore, the proposed mathematical model of the biosorption process was capable of demonstrating the expanding and broadening of the mass transfer zone linked to the equilibrium sorption isotherm. The fundamental understanding of the mass transfer zone dynamics is particularly important for process scale-up where maintaining the process efficiency is critical. PMID:16830573

  15. Influence of high voltage electric fields applied across a horizontal liquid-liquid interface on the rate of metal extraction using a rotating diffusion cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kuipa, P.K.; Hughes, M.A.

    1999-09-01

    The effect of an applied electrical field across a plane liquid-liquid interface on the rate of metal extraction using hydroxyoximes and dialkylphosphoric acids as extractants is examined. The results indicate that applied electric fields have no marked influence on the observed rate of metal extraction when aliphatic hydrocarbons are employed as the diluents in the organic phase. Increases in mass transfer rates of up to 250% were observed when mixtures of octanol and an aliphatic hydrocarbon were employed as the diluent in the organic phase. The mechanism of transfer is thought to be a combination of movement of charges in the bulk of the nonconducting organic phase and electrohydrodynamic flows due to local variations in the effective interfacial tension as a result of the applied electric fields.

  16. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  17. Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate via a strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis in a liquid/liquid biphasic system: homogeneous catalysis, facile heterogeneous separation, and recycling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jinlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis (TPSC) is applied to the Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in a p-xylene/PEG-200 biphasic system. Initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP) are used to establish the TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system using water-soluble TPMA as a ligand, EBPA as an initiator, CuBr2 as a catalyst, and AIBN as a reducing agent. By heating to 70 °C, unlimited miscibility of both solvents is achieved and the polymerization can be carried out under homogeneous conditions; then on cooling to 25 °C, the mixture separates into two phases again. As a result, the catalyst complex remains in the PEG-200 phase while the obtained polymers stay in the p-xylene phase. The catalyst can therefore be removed from the resultant polymers by easily separating the two different layers and can be reused again. It is important that well-defined PMMA with a controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution could be obtained using this TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system. PMID:25155655

  18. A microfluidic study of liquid-liquid extraction mediated by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Gabriella; Salari, Alinaghi; Abolhasani, Milad; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is an important separation and purification method; however, it faces a challenge in reducing the energy consumption and the environmental impact of solvent (extractant) recovery. The reversible chemical reactions of switchable solvents (nitrogenous bases) with carbon dioxide (CO2) can be implemented in reactive liquid-liquid extraction to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of solvent recovery. The development of new effective switchable solvents reacting with CO2 and the optimization of extraction conditions rely on the ability to evaluate and screen the performance of switchable solvents in extraction processes. We report a microfluidic strategy for time- and labour-efficient studies of CO2-mediated solvent extraction. The platform utilizes a liquid segment containing an aqueous extractant droplet and a droplet of a solution of a switchable solvent in a non-polar liquid, with gaseous CO2 supplied to the segment from both sides. Following the reaction of the switchable solvent with CO2, the solvent becomes hydrophilic and transfers from the non-polar solvent to the aqueous droplet. By monitoring the time-dependent variation in droplet volumes, we determined the efficiency and extraction time for the CO2-mediated extraction of different nitrogenous bases in a broad experimental parameter space. The platform enables a significant reduction in the amount of switchable solvents used in these studies, provides accurate temporal characterization of the liquid-liquid extraction process, and offers the capability of high-throughput screening of switchable solvents. PMID:27327198

  19. Novel Detection Method of Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hitoshi; Katayanagi, Hideki; Koga, Yoshikata; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2004-12-01

    A novel method of determining a liquid-liquid phase boundary was developed. This method is based on our discovery that a nascent low-density phase is attracted to the center of a Rankine vortex at the onset of phase separation. Thus a liquid-liquid phase boundary is detected easily, rapidly, and accurately. The phase diagrams of the ternary systems NaCl-H2O-1-propanol and NaCl-H2O-1-butanol were obtained by this method. The results matched well with literature values.

  20. Multiresidue determination of 11 new fungicides in grapes and wines by liquid-liquid extraction/clean-up and programmable temperature vaporization injection with analyte protectants/gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Cancho-Grande, Beatriz; Simal-Gándara, Jesús

    2009-08-01

    A gas chromatographic ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-ITMS) method was developed for the determination of 11 new generation fungicides (benalaxyl, benalaxyl-M, boscalid, cyazofamid, famoxadone, fenamidone, fluquinconazole, iprovalicarb, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin and zoxamide) in grapes and wines. Samples were extracted with ethyl acetate:hexane (1:1, v/v) and cleaned-up with graphitized carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA) solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges using acetonitrile:toluene (3:1, v/v) as eluent. The addition of analyte protectants (3-ethoxy-1,2-propanediol, d-sorbitol and l-gulonic acid gamma-lactone) in the final extracts allowed to avoid the matrix-induced response enhancement effect on quantitation process with absolute recoveries ca. 100%. Precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) was lower than 16% for all fungicides. Limits of detection and quantitation were lower than 0.01 mg/kg or mg/L, except for cyazofamid, much smaller in all cases than maximum residue levels (MRLs) established by European Union for grapes and by Switzerland and Italy for wines. The proposed method was applied to determine fungicide residues in three different white grapes for vinification produced in Ribeiro area in Galicia (NW Spain), as well as in their corresponding final wines. PMID:19576591

  1. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  2. An electrically driven gas-liquid-liquid contactor for bioreactor and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Borole, A.P.; Kaufman, E.N.; DePaoli, D.W.

    1999-05-01

    An electrically driven gas-liquid-liquid bioreactor is described here, in which an aqueous medium containing a biocatalyst is introduced as a discontinuous phase into an organic-continuous liquid phase containing a substrate to be converted by the biocatalyst. A gas discontinuous phase, which may be needed to provide oxygen or a gaseous substrate to the biocatalyst, is also introduced into the bioreactor. In contrast to previous work on electrically driven contactors, it was found that the electroconvection generated by the electric field between parallel-plate electrodes may be employed to increase the volume fraction of the discontinuous gas phase in the bioreactor, providing the means for enhanced mass transfer. The electrically driven bioreactor was utilized for oil desulfurization experiments with Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8 bacteria as the biocatalyst. The organic phase used in the experiments was hexadecane containing dibenzothiophene, a model sulfur compound, that is oxidatively desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by the bacteria in the presence of air or oxygen. The gas volume fraction was increased by 60% by the application of a pulsed electric field, thus providing a means for increased transport of oxygen needed for oxidative desulfurization. The velocity of droplets and bubbles was measured by a phase Doppler velocimeter. The average rising velocity of bubbles was decreased from 13 to less than 3 cm/s and the average horizontal velocity was increased from 0 to 5 cm/s as the field strength was increased from 0 to 4 kV/cm. Desulfurization rates ranged from 1.0 to 5.50 mg of 2-HBP/g of dry cells/h. The desulfurization rate with aeration was doubled under the electric field as compared to the zero-field desulfurization under the same conditions.

  3. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  4. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  5. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  6. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  7. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  8. 13 CFR 307.20 - Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Partial liquidation; liquidation upon termination. 307.20 Section 307.20 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE INVESTMENTS Special Requirements...

  9. Enhanced flavour extraction in continuous liquid-liquid extractors.

    PubMed

    Apps, Peter; Tock, Margaux Lim Ah

    2005-08-12

    Continuous liquid-liquid extraction is a versatile, reliable and robust sample preparation technique, but there is a tendency for the solvent to make channels through the sample, causing uneven and incomplete extraction. A simple, cheap magnetic stirrer that prevents channelling improves extraction efficiency by between 2.8 and 17.6 times. PMID:16078710

  10. Polymers at liquid-liquid interfaces: Photophysics and photoredox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, S.E.

    1990-11-01

    Research continued on polymers at liquid-liquid interfaces. This quarter, work concentrated on: preparation of poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid-co-chromophore) polymers; studies of vinylnapthalene-maleic acid polymers as emulsifying agents for water-octane; and assembly of optical fiber reticon-based transient absorption system. 3 refs., 1 fig. (CBS)

  11. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda

    Liquid/liquid interface, either flat or curved, is a unique template for studying self-assembly of a variety of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles and nanorods. The resultant monolayer films can be ordered or disordered depending on the regularity of the nanomaterials. Integration of nanoparticles into two-dimensional structure leads to intriguing collective properties of the nanoparticles. Crystallization can also be guided by liquid/liquid interface. Due to the particular shape of the interface, crystallization can happen in a different manner comparing to the normal solution crystallization. In this dissertation, liquid/liquid interface is employed to guide the crystallization of polymers, mainly focusing on using curved liquid/liquid interface. Due to the unique shape of the interface and feasibility to control the curvature, polymer crystallization can take place in different manner and lead to the formation of curved or vesicular crystals. Curved liquid/liquid interface is typically created through o/w emulsions. With the presence of surfactant, the emulsions are controlled to be stable at least for the polymer crystallization periods. The difference to normal solution crystallization is: the nuclei will diffuse to the curved interface due to the Pickering effect and guide the crystallization along the curved liquid/liquid interface. If the supercooling can be controlled to be very small, crystal growth in the bulk droplets can be avoided. The advantages of this strategy are: 1) the formation process of vesicular type crystals can be monitored by controlling the polymer supply; 2) curved crystals, bowl-like structures and enclosed capsules can be easily obtained comparing to the self-assembly method for vesicle formation; 3) the obtained vesicles will be made of polymer crystals, which will possess the extraordinary mechanical properties. Based on the nucleation type, this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on the self

  12. Probing the Mass-Transfer Stability Limit in Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, M. C. R.; Motl, P. M.; Tohline, J. E.; Frank, J.

    2004-12-01

    We present results from numerical simulations that follow the nonlinear development of mass-transfer instabilities in close binary star systems. A self-consistent-field (SCF) technique is used to construct initial equilibrium models, which are synchronously rotating, semi-detached, polytropic stars on circular orbits. These models are evolved with an Eulerian, finite-difference hydrodynamics code in a fully self-consistent manner. Results are presented for binary systems having a wide range of initial conditions; emphasis is placed on systems in which the mass-transfer stream directly impacts the surface of the accreting star. Some systems are dynamically unstable and result in a merger; others approach a long-term, stable phase of mass transfer. The time-evolutionary behavior of the binary separation, mass transfer rate, spin angular momentum of the accretor, and gravitational wave strain are presented.

  13. Nonstationary Mass Transfer Near the Surface of a Cylindrical Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudobashta, S. P.; Kosheleva, M. K.; Kartashov, É. M.

    2015-11-01

    The problem of nonstationary diffusion of the target component to a phase that is external relative to the surface of a cylindrical body has been formulated and solved analytically. From the found solution the dependences have been obtained for calculating the instantaneous mass transfer coefficient and the phase-contact-time mean mass transfer coefficient, on the basis of which the process of extraction of technological pollutants from fibrous materials has been analyzed.

  14. Heat and mass transfer in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasawa, I. . Inst. of Industrial Science); Lior, N. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics)

    1992-01-01

    This book contains forty papers presented at the seminar. The papers are representative of the seminar's scope, and include plasma spraying, laser and electron beam processing, crystal growth, solidification, steel processing, casting and molding, and papermaking, as well as fundamental heat transfer issues and physical properties underlying all of the above. The seminar emphasized thorough discussion of the presentations and of the subfields. Brief summaries of the discussions are presented in the rapporteurs' reports.

  15. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jin, P.; Goldstein, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Locmore » al mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord) are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 10 5 ) and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%). The mass transfer on the tip surface is significant along its pressure edge at the smallest tip clearance. At the two largest tip clearances, the separation bubble on the tip surface can cover the whole width of the tip on the second half of the tip surface. The average mass-transfer rate is highest at a tip clearance of 1.72% of chord. The average mass-transfer rate on the tip surface is four and six times as high as on the suction and the pressure surface, respectively. A high mainstream turbulence level of 12.0% reduces average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface, while the higher mainstream Reynolds number generates higher local and average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface.« less

  16. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 2. Canopy mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Falter, James L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass transfer rates from submerged canopies constructed from arrays of vertical cylinders were investigated for a range of different cylinder spacings under both unidirectional and oscillatory flow. Individual canopy elements made from gypsum were dissolved in fresh water to simulate the mass transfer of dissolved metabolites to and from canopies of living benthic organisms. Mass transfer rates under oscillatory flow were up to three times higher than values measured for a comparable unidirectional current. This enhancement was shown to be a strong function of the canopy element spacing. A model was developed to predict canopy mass transfer rates on the basis of the in-canopy flow speed and was generalized to incorporate either unidirectional or oscillatory flow. Agreement between the modeled and experimentally measured mass transfer rates indicate that enhanced mass transfer to/from living benthic canopies under oscillatory flow is driven primarily by the higher in-canopy water motion generated by the oscillatory flow, as detailed in the companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005).

  17. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  18. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  19. Mass transfer between debris discs during close stellar encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jílková, Lucie; Hamers, Adrian S.; Hammer, Michael; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-04-01

    We study mass transfers between debris discs during stellar encounters. We carried out numerical simulations of close flybys of two stars, one of which has a disc of planetesimals represented by test particles. We explored the parameter space of the encounters, varying the mass ratio of the two stars, their pericentre and eccentricity of the encounter, and its geometry. We find that particles are transferred to the other star from a restricted radial range in the disc and the limiting radii of this transfer region depend on the parameters of the encounter. We derive an approximate analytic description of the inner radius of the region. The efficiency of the mass transfer generally decreases with increasing encounter pericentre and increasing mass of the star initially possessing the disc. Depending on the parameters of the encounter, the transfer particles have a specific distribution in the space of orbital elements (semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre) around their new host star. The population of the transferred particles can be used to constrain the encounter through which it was delivered. We expect that many stars experienced transfer among their debris discs and planetary systems in their birth environment. This mechanism presents a formation channel for objects on wide orbits of arbitrary inclinations, typically having high eccentricity but possibly also close to circular (eccentricities of about 0.1). Depending on the geometry, such orbital elements can be distinct from those of the objects formed around the star.

  20. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  1. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  2. Bubble departure in the direct-contact boiling field with a continuous liquid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoguchi, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-15

    Behavior of vapor bubbles was experimentally investigated in the boiling field where a volatile liquid layer of per-fluorocarbon PF5050 (boiling point 306K) was directly in contact with an immiscible hot liquid layer of water above it. Heat was supplied to the continuous liquid-liquid interface by the impingement of the downward hot water jet. Vapor bubbles were generated not only from this continuous interface but from a large number of PF5050 droplets floating on it. According to precise observation, incipience of boiling did not occur at the liquid-liquid interface but in the PF5050 liquid close to the interface in both cases of continuous and dispersed interfaces. As a result, the bubbles broke up the thin PF5050 liquid film above them and rose up into the water layer. This bubble departure phenomenon, which does not occur in the ordinary pool boiling field on the solid heating wall, is very important to evaluate the heat transfer performance in the present direct-contact boiling system. For modeling this behavior, sizes of the bubbles were measured at the moment just after they were released into the water pool. Volumes of the bubbles were larger in the case of departing from the continuous liquid-liquid interface than from the droplets. This tendency could be explained by taking into account the buoyancy force acting on unit area of the thin PF5050 liquid film above the bubble before departure, which was one of the most important parameters for the liquid film breakdown. (author)

  3. Monolithic supports with unique geometries and enhanced mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of natural gas has been the topic of much research over the past decade. Interest in this technology results from a desire to decrease or eliminate the emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX) from gas turbine power plants. A low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic monolith, is ideal for this high-temperature, high-flow application. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. 'Robocasting' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low pressure drops. This report details the mass transfer effects for novel 3-dimensional robocast monoliths, traditional honeycomb-type monoliths, and ceramic foams. The mass transfer limit is experimentally determined using the probe reaction of CO oxidation over a Pt / {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, and the pressure drop is measured for each monolith sample. Conversion versus temperature data is analyzed quantitatively using well-known dimensionless mass transfer parameters. The results show that, relative to the honeycomb monolith support, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application.

  4. Liquid-liquid critical point: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daanoun, A.

    2006-09-01

    Theoretical simulations and experimental studies have showed that many systems (like liquid metals) can exhibit two phase transitions: gas-liquid and liquid-liquid. Consequently the fluid phase of these systems presents two critical points, namely the usual gas-liquid (G-L) critical point and the liquid-liquid critical point that results from a phase transition between two liquids of different densities: a low density liquid (LDL) and a high density liquid (HDL). The van der Waals theory for simple fluids [Phys. Rev. E 50, 2913 (1994)] is based on taking a system with purely repulsive forces as a reference, is able to describe two stable first-order phase transitions between fluids of different densities. The particles in our system interact via a total pair potential, which splits into a repulsive VR and a density-dependent attractive VA part.

  5. Polymer single crystal membrane from liquid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Li, Christopher; Soft Matter Research Group-Drexel University Team

    2013-03-01

    Vesicles, mimicking the structure of cell membrane at the molecular scale, are small membrane-enclosed sacks that can store or transport substances. The weak mechanical properties and the nature of environment-sensitivity of the current available vesicles: liposomes, polymersomes, colloidsomes limit their applications as an excellent candidate for targeting delivery of drugs/genes in biomedical engineering and treatment. Recently, we developed an emulsion-based method to grow curved polymer single crystals. Varying the polymer concentration and/or the emulsification conditions (such as surfactant concentration, water-oil volume ratio), curved crystals with different sizes and different openness could be obtained. This growing process was attributed to polymer crystal growth along the liquid/liquid interface. In addition, the liquid/liquid interfacial crystal growth is promising for synthesis of enclosed hollow sphere.

  6. Liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasisht, Vishwas V.; Saw, Shibu; Sastry, Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    A novel liquid-liquid phase transition has been investigated for a wide variety of pure substances, including water, silica and silicon. From computer simulations using the Stillinger-Weber (SW) classical empirical potential, Sastry and Angell demonstrated a first order liquid-liquid transition in supercooled silicon at zero pressure, supported by subsequent experimental and simulation studies. Whether the line of such first order transitions will terminate at a critical point, expected to lie at negative pressures, is presently a matter of debate. Here we report evidence for a liquid-liquid critical point at negative pressures, from computer simulations using the SW potential. We identify Tc~1,120+/-12K, Pc~-0.60+/-0.15GPa as the critical temperature and pressure. We construct the phase diagram of supercooled silicon, which reveals the interconnection between thermodynamic anomalies and the phase behaviour of the system as suggested in previous works. We also observe a strong relationship between local geometry (quantified by the coordination number) and diffusivity, both of which change dramatically with decreasing temperature and pressure.

  7. Agitating mass transfer with a warped disc's shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, H.

    2015-10-01

    For compact objects fed by Roche lobe overflow, accretion-generated X-rays irradiating the donor star can alter gas flow towards the Lagrange point thus varying mass transfer. The latest work specific to this topic consists of simple yet insightful two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations stressing the role of global flow. To explore how a time-varying disc shadow affects mass transfer, I generalize the geometry, employ a robust hydrodynamics solver, and use phase space analysis near the nozzle to include coriolis lift there. Without even exposing the nozzle, a warped disc's shadow can drive mass transfer cycles by shifting the equatorial edges of the irradiation patches in turns: drawing in denser ambient gas before sweeping it into the nozzle. Other important effects remain missing in two-dimensional models, which I discuss along with prospects for more detailed yet efficient models.

  8. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  9. Heat and mass transfer over slippery, superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, A. Sander; Lammertink, Rob G. H.

    2016-04-01

    The classical Graetz-Nusselt problem is extended to describe heat and mass transfer over heterogeneously slippery, superhydrophobic surfaces. The cylindrical wall consists of segments with a constant temperature/concentration and areas that are insulating/impermeable. Only in the case of mass transport do the locations of hydrodynamic slip and mass exchange coincide. This makes advection near the mass exchanging wall segments larger than near the heat exchanging regions. Also the direction of radial fluid flow is reversed for heat and mass transport, which has an influence on the location where the concentration or temperature boundary layer is compressed or extended. As a result, mass transport is more efficient than heat transfer. Also the influence of axial diffusion on the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers is investigated for various Péclet numbers Pe. When Pe < 102, which is characteristic for heat transfer over superhydrophobic surfaces, axial conduction should be taken into account. For Pe ≥ 102, which are typical numbers for mass transport in microfluidic systems, axial diffusion can be neglected.

  10. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    DOEpatents

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  11. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  12. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  13. Combined heat and mass transfer in absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The approach to theoretical analysis of the combined heat and mass transfer process taking place in absorption systems is described. The two tranfer phenomena are strongly coupled here. The purpose of the analysis is to relate, quantitatively, the heat and mass transfer coefficients to the physical properties of the working fluids and to the geometry of the system. The preferred configuration is that of a falling film of liquid on a metallic surface which serves to transfer heat from the absorbent in contact with the vapor of the absorbate. The model developed may be solved for laminar, turbulent, or transition flow regimes. The results of the solution describe the development of the thermal and concentration boundary layers and the variation of the temperatures, concentrations, and heat and mass fluxes. These quantities in their normalized, dimensionless form depend on two characteristic parameters of the system: the Lewis number Le and the dimensionless heat of absorption lambda. The length in the direction of flow is normalized with respect to the Peclet number and the film thickness. Heat and mass transfer coefficients for the system were calculated. The Sherwood number for mass transfer from the vapor-liquid interface to the bulk of the film reaches a constant value of 3.63 with fully developed boundary layers for both the adiabatic and constant temperature wall. The Nusselt number for heat transfer from the interface to the bulk reaches under the same conditions values of 3.63 and 2.67 for the adiabatic and constant temperature wall, respectively. The Nusselt number for heat tranfer from the bulk to the wall reaches 1.60.

  14. TWIN BINARIES: STUDIES OF STABILITY, MASS TRANSFER, AND COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, J. C.; Holtzman, W.; Gearity, K.; Dooley, K. L.; Kalogera, V.; Rasio, F. A.

    2011-08-20

    Motivated by suggestions that binaries with almost equal-mass components ('twins') play an important role in the formation of double neutron stars and may be rather abundant among binaries, we study the stability of synchronized close and contact binaries with identical components in circular orbits. In particular, we investigate the dependency of the innermost stable circular orbit on the core mass, and we study the coalescence of the binary that occurs at smaller separations. For twin binaries composed of convective main-sequence stars, subgiants, or giants with low-mass cores (M{sub c} {approx}< 0.15M, where M is the mass of a component), a secular instability is reached during the contact phase, accompanied by a dynamical mass transfer instability at the same or at a slightly smaller orbital separation. Binaries that come inside this instability limit transfer mass gradually from one component to the other and then coalesce quickly as mass is lost through the outer Lagrangian points. For twin giant binaries with moderate to massive cores (M{sub c} {approx}> 0.15M), we find that stable contact configurations exist at all separations down to the Roche limit, when mass shedding through the outer Lagrangian points triggers a coalescence of the envelopes and leaves the cores orbiting in a central tight binary. In addition to the formation of binary neutron stars, we also discuss the implications of our results for the production of planetary nebulae with double degenerate central binaries.

  15. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  16. Microfluidic droplet-based liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Mary, Pascaline; Studer, Vincent; Tabeling, Patrick

    2008-04-15

    We study microfluidic systems in which mass exchanges take place between moving water droplets, formed on-chip, and an external phase (octanol). Here, no chemical reaction takes place, and the mass exchanges are driven by a contrast in chemical potential between the dispersed and continuous phases. We analyze the case where the microfluidic droplets, occupying the entire width of the channel, extract a solute-fluorescein-from the external phase (extraction) and the opposite case, where droplets reject a solute-rhodamine-into the external phase (purification). Four flow configurations are investigated, based on straight or zigzag microchannels. Additionally to the experimental work, we performed two-dimensional numerical simulations. In the experiments, we analyze the influence of different parameters on the process (channel dimensions, fluid viscosities, flow rates, drop size, droplet spacing, ...). Several regimes are singled out. In agreement with the mass transfer theory of Young et al. (Young, W.; Pumir, A.; Pomeau, Y. Phys. Fluids A 1989, 1, 462), we find that, after a short transient, the amount of matter transferred across the droplet interface grows as the square root of time and the time it takes for the transfer process to be completed decreases as Pe-2/3, where Pe is the Peclet number based on droplet velocity and radius. The numerical simulation is found in excellent consistency with the experiment. In practice, the transfer time ranges between a fraction and a few seconds, which is much faster than conventional systems. PMID:18351786

  17. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  18. Analysis of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Murase, Sousuke; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Okajima, Jirou; Matsuoka, Fumio

    The study aims at clarifying the local heat and mass transfer in the desiccant rotor, and at obtaining the design aspects of high efficient desiccant rotor and operation method. In the paper, theoretical analysis is performed for rotary dehumidifier. Both surface diffusion and mass transfer coefficient are considered in the model. It is examined that the results of calculation agree well with the experimental data. The local temperature, humidity and the amount of adsorbed water vapor are calculated. It is clarified that temperature and humidity of air in the rotor change clockwise between each inlet air condition on the psychrometric chart. The outlet temperature and humidity distribution of the rotor is clarified in the system showing the optimum rotor speed. Furthermore, it is clarified that local desorption rate is higher than adsorption rate. It is attributed to the increase of mass transfer coefficient and surface diffusivity of the rotor during desorption process. And, it is clarified that the influence of surface diffusion on amount of adsorbed water vapor is much larger than that of mass transfer coefficient.

  19. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  20. FUNDAMENTAL MASS TRANSFER MODELS FOR INDOOR AIR POLLUTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a simple, fundamental mass transfer model, based on Fick's Law of Diffusion, for indoor air pollution wet sorbent-based sources. (Note: Models are needed to predict emissions from indoor sources. hile empirical approaches based on dynamic chamber data are usef...

  1. LUT observations of the mass-transferring binary AI Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Li, Linjia; Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Ergang; Liu, Nianping

    2016-06-01

    Complete UV band light curve of the eclipsing binary AI Dra was observed with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) in October 2014. It is very useful to adopt this continuous and uninterrupted light curve to determine physical and orbital parameters of the binary system. Photometric solutions of the spot model are obtained by using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is confirmed that AI Dra is a semi-detached binary with secondary component filling its critical Roche lobe, which indicates that a mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one should happen. Orbital period analysis based on all available eclipse times suggests a secular period increase and two cyclic variations. The secular period increase was interpreted by mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one at a rate of 4.12 ×10^{-8}M_{⊙}/yr, which is in agreement with the photometric solutions. Two cyclic oscillations were due to light travel-time effect (LTTE) via the presence of two cool stellar companions in a near 2:1 mean-motion resonance. Both photometric solutions and orbital period analysis confirm that AI Dra is a mass-transferring binary, the massive primary is filling 69 % of its critical Roche lobe. After the primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration.

  2. Interphase mass transfer between fluids in subsurface formations: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Copty, Nadim K.; Scheytt, Traugott; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a review of the state-of-the-art on interphase mass transfer between immiscible fluids in porous media with focus on the factors that have significant influence on this process. In total close to 300 papers were reviewed focusing to a large extent on the literature relating to NAPL contamination of the subsurface. The large body of work available on this topic was organized according to the length scale of the conducted studies, namely the pore, meso and field scales. The interrelation of interphase mass transfer at these different scales is highlighted. To gain further insight into interphase mass transfer, published studies were discussed and evaluated in terms of the governing flow configurations defined in terms of the wettability and mobility of the different phases. Such organization of the existing literature enables the identification of the interfacial domains that would have significant impact on interphase mass transfer. Available modeling approaches at the various length scales are discussed with regard to current knowledge on the physics of this process. Future research directions are also suggested.

  3. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  4. Multidimensional mechanistic modeling of interfacial heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, D. R.; Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2012-07-01

    A combined theoretical and computational study in modeling multidimensional, diabatic vapor/liquid flows is presented. Models have been developed governing kinematic aspects of multiphase flow as well as interfacial mass and heat transfer for flows of condensable gas (vapor) and liquids. The modeling formulation is based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) type multi-field approach which utilizes a complete set of conservation equations for each fluid component 1. The modeled interfacial interactions include energy, mass, and momentum transfer. Emphasis in the model development work has been placed on the mechanisms governing coupled interfacial heat and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor fields (condensation and/or boiling). A method for tracking changes in bubble size is presented and tested. Locally based models of multidimensional effects have been analyzed, including distributions of fluid temperatures and volume fractions. The overall model accounts for both kinematic and thermodynamic nonequilibrium between the component fluids including superheated vapor. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. Results from the kinematic model are compared to experimental data and good agreement is demonstrated. The heat and mass transfer model is parametrically tested to show the multidimensional effects on the rate of heat and mass transfer. These effects are explained in terms of local characteristics of the two-phase flow. The model is applied to a scenario of saturated vapor injected into a subcooled flow through a heated, porous wall. This provides a reasonable approximation to subcooled boiling. The results are found to be dependent on the partitioning of the wall heat flux between direct liquid heating and vapor generation. However, the observed dependencies are explained and the modeling is considered consistent. (authors)

  5. Mass and heat transfer model of Tubular Solar Still

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Amimul; Fukuhara, Teruyuki

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, a new mass and heat transfer model of a Tubular Solar Still (TSS) was proposed incorporating various mass and heat transfer coefficients taking account of the humid air properties inside the still. The heat balance of the humid air and the mass balance of the water vapor in the humid air were formulized for the first time. As a result, the proposed model enabled to calculate the diurnal variations of the temperature, water vapor density and relative humidity of the humid air, and to predict the hourly condensation flux besides the temperatures of the water, cover and trough, and the hourly evaporation flux. The validity of the proposed model was verified using the field experimental results carried out in Fukui, Japan and Muscat, Oman in 2008. The diurnal variations of the calculated temperatures and water vapor densities had a good agreement with the observed ones. Furthermore, the proposed model can predict the daily and hourly production flux precisely. (author)

  6. Mass transfer experiments on single irregular-shaped particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramezan, M. ); Kale, S.R. ); Anderson, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Mass transfer from irregular-shaped naphthalene particles (100-200 {mu}m in size) was studied in an electrodynamic balance. Charged particles were suspended in an electrostatic field directly in line with a calibrated air jet. Mass and size change histories were obtained under ambient conditions, and under steady- and pulsed-flow conditions. For natural convection, the time-averaged Sherwood number was similar to that for spheres. Forced-convection Sherwood number under steady-flow conditions was strongly dependent on particle shape and particle Reynolds number, and was consistently higher than values predicted for spheres at comparable Reynolds numbers. This paper validates the technique and indicates the shape effect on mass transfer from single particles.

  7. Synergism by co-assembly at the origin of ion selectivity in liquid-liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dourdain, S.; Hofmeister, I.; Dufreche, J.F.; Turgis, R.; Pellet-Rostaing, S.; Zemb, T.; Pecheur, O.; Leydier, A.; Jestin, J.; Testard, F.

    2012-08-15

    In liquid-liquid extraction, synergism emerges when for a defined formulation of the solvent phase, there is an increase of distribution coefficients for some cations in a mixture. To characterize the synergistic mechanisms, we determine the free energy of mixed co-assembly in aggregates. Aggregation in any point of a phase diagram can be followed not only structurally by SANS, SAXS, and SLS, but also thermodynamically by determining the concentration of monomers coexisting with reverse aggregates. Using the industrially used couple HDEHP/TOPO forming mixed reverse aggregates, and the representative couple U/Fe, we show that there is no peculiarity in the aggregates microstructure at the maximum of synergism. Nevertheless, the free energy of aggregation necessary to form mixed aggregates containing extracted ions in their polar core is comparable to the transfer free energy difference between target and nontarget ions, as deduced from the synergistic selectivity peak. (authors)

  8. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand.

    PubMed

    Scoppola, Ernesto; Watkins, Erik B; Campbell, Richard A; Konovalov, Oleg; Girard, Luc; Dufrêche, Jean-Francois; Ferru, Geoffroy; Fragneto, Giovanna; Diat, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid-liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand. PMID:27320727

  9. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent rotor. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the rotor block. Overall transfer coefficients were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was examined that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer coefficient was not constant. It seems that both film fluid and diffusion resistance govern the coefficients in the block, and the influence of air flow on the time averaged coefficients is estimated by a considering the laminar forced convection from a flat plate. There is little difference of the coefficient between adsorption and desorption process. The correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  10. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  11. Optofluidic router based on tunable liquid-liquid mirrors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Kopp, Daniel; Llobera, Andreu; Zappe, Hans

    2014-02-21

    We present an electrically tunable 1 × 5 optofluidic router for on-chip light routing. The device can redirect light from an optical input channel into five output channels by exploiting total internal reflection (TIR) at a liquid-liquid interface. The liquid-liquid mirrors, demonstrated for the first time, are tuned using integrated electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD) actuators. The router is assembled from two chips fabricated by standard MEMS techniques. Through a combination of microfluidic with micro-optical components on chip, reliable light routing is achieved with switching times of [1.5-3.3] s, efficiencies of coupling into channels of up to 12%, optical cross-talk as low as -24 dB, a required drive voltage of 50 V, and a low power consumption of <5 mW, using a device 12 × 13 × 2 mm(3) in size. The optofluidic approach enables addressing of multiple channels over a broad wavelength range. Such optical routing capabilities are important for lab-on-chip devices focusing on optical spectroscopy, optical detection, or even optical manipulation. When integrated with external light sources and a low-cost disposable photonic lab-on-a-chip, the router could thus lead to novel laboratory measurement systems. PMID:24287814

  12. Simplified Simulation of Mass Transfer in Double White Dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannah, Sara; Frank, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    The behavior both stable and unstable mass transfer in semi-detached double white dwarfs triggers a cornucopia of astrophysical phenomena including Type Ia supernovae and AM CVn stars. Current 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution these systems following the mass transfer, binary orbital parameters, and the self-consistent gravitational field over several tens of orbital periods have produced a wealth of data. However, these simulations can take weeks to months in high-performance computing platforms to execute. To help with the interpretation of results of such large scale simulations, and to enable a quick exploration of binary parameter space, we have developed a Mathematica code that integrates forward in time a system of 5 ODEs describing the orbit-averaged evolution of the binary separation as well as the radius, mass, and spin angular momentum of both components of the binary. By adjusting a few parameters describing the mass transfer as a function of the Roche-lobe overflow and the strength of the tidal coupling between the orbit and component spins we are able to obtain approximate fits to previously run hydrodynamic simulations. This simplified simulation is able to run simulations similar to the hydrodynamic versions in a matter of seconds on a dual-core PC or Mac computer.

  13. Evaporative Mass Transfer Behavior of a Complex Immiscible Liquid

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Colleen M.; Johnson, Gwynn R.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult’s law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  14. Mixing and mass transfer considerations in highly viscous fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, M.A.; Flatt, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    Highly viscous microbial fermentations pose difficult scale-up challenges for the industrial biochemical engineer. Incomplete bulk mixing and poor oxygen mass transfer often limit fermentor titers and productivities. Lower heat transfer coefficients coupled with higher rates of heat generation through viscous dissipation further confound operational difficulties. Practical approaches to alleviating these factors will be discussed using examples from viscoelastic gellan, welan, and xanthan gum fermentations. In addition, a summary of the effects of power input, aeration, media manipulation, and genetic modifications will be discussed.

  15. Mass transfer at gas-evolving surfaces in electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, D.W.; Tobias, C.W.

    1983-09-01

    A novel micro-mosaic electrode was developed to resolve time-dependent, mass-transfer distribution in the close vicinity of bubble phenomena. The electrode, prepared on a silicon wafer using integrated circuit manufacturing technology, consists of a 10 by 10 matrix of coplanar, electrically isolated, square platinum segments on 100 micron centers, surrounded by a relatively large buffer segment. A computer-actuated data acquisition and control system was assembled and the software developed to monitor the current to each of the segments and control the potential of selected segments. The utility of the electrode to examine interfacial mass transport phenomena which have characteristic lengths as small as 100 microns has been clearly demonstrated. The effect of a single hydrogen bubble disengagement and of the coalescence of two bubbles, on the limiting current of the reduction of ferric to ferrous ion was measured using the micro-mosaic electrode in a horizontal: facing-up orientation. In the absence of gas evolution, large regular fluctuations in the limiting current to the segments with a period of 29 sec were observed. This periodic behavior is attributed to free convection: a cellular fluid motion moving across the electrode with a velocity of 40 microns/second. It was found that the mass-transfer enhancement due to bubble disengagement is small when compared to that due to coalescence. Increases in the mass-transfer rate of more than an order of magnitude over the free convection limiting current were observed for the coalescence phenomena. Two theoretical models were developed to account for the observed effect of a bubble disengagement on the mass transfer-rate to the surface.

  16. Mass transfer and magnetic braking in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-02-01

    Sco X-1 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that has one of the most precisely determined set of binary parameters such as the mass accretion rate, companions mass ratio and the orbital period. For this system, as well as for a large fraction of other well-studied LMXBs, the observationally-inferred mass accretion rate is known to strongly exceed the theoretically expected mass transfer (MT) rate. We suggest that this discrepancy can be solved by applying a modified magnetic braking prescription, which accounts for increased wind mass-loss in evolved stars compared to main sequence stars. Using our MT framework based on MESA, we explore a large range of binaries at the onset of the MT. We identify the subset of binaries for which the MT tracks cross the Sco X-1 values for the mass ratio and the orbital period. We confirm that no solution can be found for which the standard magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates, while wind-boosted magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates for many progenitor binaries that evolve to the observed orbital period and mass ratio.

  17. Chemical separations by bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Adleman, James R; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-04-01

    We show that when a small amount of heat is added close to a liquid-vapor interface of a captive gas bubble in a microchannel, interphase mass-transfer through the bubble can occur in a controlled manner with only a slight change in the temperature of the fluid. We demonstrate that this method, which we refer to as bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer (BAIM), can be applied to interphase chemical separations, e.g., simple distillation, without the need for high temperatures, vacuum, or active cooling. Although any source of localized heating could be used, we illustrate BAIM with an all-optical technique that makes use of the plasmon resonance in an array of nanoscale metal structures that are incorporated into the channel to produce localized heating of the fluid when illuminated by a stationary low-power laser. PMID:18321130

  18. Mass-transfer in close binary and their companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Zhu, Liying; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    Secular and/or cyclical orbital period variations of close binaries can be derived by analyzing the (O-C) diagram. The secular variations are usually explained as mass transfer between components, while the most plausible explanation of the cyclic period changes is the light-travel time effect (LTTE) through the presence of a third body. Mass transfer and additional companions in close binary systems are important for understanding the formation and evolution of the systems. Here, UV light curves of several close binaries based on the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) observations are presented and analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) method. Then, based on those light-curve solutions and new analysis of the orbital period variations, the multiplicity, geometrical structure and evolution state of targets are discussed.

  19. Conjugate mixed convection heat and mass transfer in brick drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, H. N.; Aswatha Narayana, P. A.; Seetharamu, K. N.

    In this study, a numerical methodology for the solution of conjugate heat and mass transfer problem is presented. Fluid flow, heat and mass transfer over a rectangular brick due to transient laminar mixed convection has been numerically simulated. The coupled non-linear partial differential equations, for both gas phase and solid are solved using finite element procedure. Flow is assumed to be incompressible, two-dimensional, laminar. Analysis has been carried out at a Reynolds number of 200 with Pr=0.71. The effect of buoyancy on the brick drying has been investigated. Velocity vectors, streamlines in the flow field and temperature and moisture contours and temperature distribution along the solid surface are presented. It is observed that there is considerable effect of buoyancy during drying. The results indicate a non-uniform drying of the brick with the leading edge drying faster than the rest of the brick.

  20. Heat and Mass Transfer in a Freezing Unsaturated Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jame, Yih-Wu; Norum, Donald I.

    1980-08-01

    A numerical simulation of a laboratory experiment involving coupled heat and mass transfer in a horizontal porous medium column with one end subjected to a temperature below 0°C has been carried out. The model is essentially that of Harlan (1973) and is solved numerically by the finite difference method using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The solution yields temperature, liquid water content, and ice content profiles along the column as a function of time. Comparison of the experimental results and the simulation analysis results shows that Harlan's model, with some modification in the hydraulic conductivity of the frozen medium, can be used successfully to simulate numerically the coupled heat and mass transfer processes when ice lensing does not occur.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of capillary instability with heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Agrawal, G. S.

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear capillary instability of the cylindrical interface between the vapor and liquid phases of a fluid is studied when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface, using viscous potential flow theory. The fluids are considered to be viscous and incompressible with different kinematic viscosities. Both asymmetric and axisymmetric disturbances are considered. The analysis is based on the method of multiple scale perturbation and the nonlinear stability is governed by first-order nonlinear partial differential equation. The stability conditions are obtained and discussed theoretically as well as numerically. Regions of stability and instability have been shown graphically indicating the effect of various parameters. It has been observed that the heat and mass transfer has stabilizing effect on the stability of the system in the nonlinear analysis for both axisymmetric as well as asymmetric disturbances.

  2. Geoelectrical inference of mass transfer parameters using temporal moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to infer mass transfer parameters based on (1) an analytical model that relates the temporal moments of mobile and bulk concentration and (2) a bicontinuum modification to Archie's law. Whereas conventional geochemical measurements preferentially sample from the mobile domain, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is sensitive to bulk electrical conductivity and, thus, electrolytic solute in both the mobile and immobile domains. We demonstrate the new approach, in which temporal moments of collocated mobile domain conductivity (i.e., conventional sampling) and ERT-estimated bulk conductivity are used to calculate heterogeneous mass transfer rate and immobile porosity fractions in a series of numerical column experiments. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. [Determination of sildenafil and vardenafil in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Kang, Shaoying; Xu, Minjie; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2005-07-01

    High performance liquid chromatography coupled with liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction was developed for the simultaneous determination of sildenafil and vardenafil in human plasma. The effects of extraction solvent, the volume of organic solvent, dropsize of acceptor phase, stirring rate and extraction time on the enrichment factors of analytes were investigated. The optimized experimental conditions, 300 microL toluene as the organic phase, 2 microL 0.2 mol/L HCl as the acceptor phase, 600 r/min of the stirring rate, and 40 min of the extraction time, were gotten. Under these conditions, high enrichment factors were obtained. The linear range of studied analytes was from 5 microg/L to 1.0 mg/L. The relative standard deviation was lower than 5%. The limits of detection were 1 microg/L for sildenafil and 0.5 microg/L for vardenafil at signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The method with little solvent consumption may provide high analyte preconcentration and excellent sample clean-up, and it is a sensitive and suitable method for simultaneous determination of the above two substances in human plasma. PMID:16250442

  4. Performance Characterization of a Microchannel Liquid/Liquid Heat Exchanger Throughout an Extended Duration Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Liquid/Liquid Heat Exchangers (L/L HX) are an integral portion of any spacecraft active thermal control system. For this study the X-38 L/L HX was used as a baseline. As detailed in a previous ICES manuscript, NASA paired with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a Microchannel L/L HX (MHX). This microchannel HX was designed to meet the same performance characteristics as the aforementioned X-38 HX. The as designed Microchannel HX has a 26% and 60% reduction in mass and volume, respectively. Due to the inherently smaller flow passages the design team was concerned about fouling affecting performance during extended missions. To address this concern, NASA has developed a test stand and is currently performing an 18 month life test on the MHX. This report will detail the up-to-date performance of the MHX during life testing.

  5. CFD simulation on the turbulent mixing flow performance of the liquid-liquid ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, W. Z.; Bie, H. Y.; Liu, C. C.; Hao, Z. R.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study the flow performance of the liquid-liquid ejector, 3D ejector simulation models were established to investigate the influences of suction angle, suction number and working condition on the ejector performance. The simulation results showed that when the suction angle was 60°, the total pressure was in equilibrium state. The double suction ejector would induced more vortexes in the suction chamber than that of the single suction ejector, and the turbulent intensity of the fluid inside the ejector was bigger, however, it also caused much more loss in energy. When the working pressure was lower than 0.6 MPa, the liquid entrainment ratio increased rapidly. Once the working pressure reached 0.6 MPa, the liquid entrainment ratio basically remained unchanged. The mass flow rate of the suction medium increased with the increasing of suction pressure, and the differential pressure between the suction pressure and the working pressure at the nozzle also increased simultaneously.

  6. Mass transfer ways of ultraviolet printing ink ingredients into foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Jung, T; Simat, T J; Altkofer, W

    2010-07-01

    The case of isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) showed conclusively that the ingredients of ultraviolet printing inks may migrate into packaged foodstuffs. For multilayered materials like beverage cartons, the only way that mass transfer can occur is by the so-called set-off effect. In contrast, in the case of rigid plastics like yoghurt cups, two other methods of mass transfer, permeation and gas phase, have to be considered. In cooperation with producers of ink, plastic cups and yoghurt, a project was conducted in order to elucidate the mass transfer of ink ingredients. In addition, the influence of storage time and the age of ultraviolet lamps on the migration level was examined. The suitability of 50% ethanol as a simulant for yoghurt was also tested. ITX was chosen as a model migrant, as it is easily detectable. Furthermore, the migration of two other substances, the photo-initiator 2-methyl-4'-(methylthio)-2-morpholinopropiophenone (MTMP) and the amine synergist ethyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDAB), which may be used in combination with ITX, was studied. Before being filled with yoghurt or 50% ethanol, the printed cups were stored under different contact conditions, with and without contact between the inner layer and the printed surfaces, in order to distinguish between the possible mass transfer ways. All analyses were performed by means of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array and fluorescence detection (HPLC-DAD/FLD). It was shown that contamination with ITX and EDAB occurs via set-off and that the degree of migration increases with lamp age and storage time of the unfilled cups. Migration of MTMP was not detectable. The results show that besides the careful selection of the appropriate raw materials for printing ink, a close monitoring of the process also plays a major role in migration control. In addition, the results proved that 50% ethanol is a suitable simulant for yoghurt. PMID:20432097

  7. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  9. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  10. Modelling mass transfer and agitator performance in multiturbine fermentors.

    PubMed

    Bader, F G

    1987-07-01

    A methodology for mathematically analyzing agitator performance and mass transfer in large multiturbine production fermentors is presented. The application of this approach provides a method for determining axial dissolved oxygen profiles under conditions of known mass transfer rates as a function of agitation-aeration characteristics. A stagewise approach is used which divides the fermentor into a series of mixing cells. This allows for each turbine and mixing cell to be individually optimized. The model also permits the determination of the mass transfer coefficient for each turbine based upon limited dissolved oxygen data. The primary limitation of this approach rests in the limited data and correlations available for multiturbine systems. The structure of the modelling approach can serve as a basis for testing single turbine correlations and adapting them to multiturbine systems. The step-by-step details of the mathematical analysis are presented and interpreted. A series of computer simulations demonstrate the effect of typical fermentor operating variables on the axial dissolved oxygen profile. Further simulations demonstrate the effect of modifying agitator blade numbers on the dissolved oxygen profile and agitator power requirement. PMID:18576581

  11. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  12. A Comparison of Stellar Mass-Transfer & Merger Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohline, Joel E.; Motl, P.; Diehl, S.; Even, W.; Clayton, G.; Fryer, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed comparisons of 3D stellar mass-transfer and merger simulations that have been carried out using two very different numerical hydrodynamic algorithms -- a finite-volume "grid" code (typically using 4M cylindrical grid cells) and a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code (typically using 1M particles). In all cases the initial binary models contain synchronously rotating, n = 3/2 polytropic stars of a specified mass ratio (q = Mdonor/Maccretor) that are in circular orbit with one star (the donor) marginally filling its Roche lobe. In our "base" set of 8 comparison simulations, we have followed the evolution of binaries having four different initial mass ratios (q0 = 1.3, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4) and each is evolved using two different equations of state: polytropic (P) and ideal-gas (I). In addition, some evolutions are repeated using a different numerical resolution and/or a different initial episode of "driving" to initiate mass-transfer. In the case of the binary systems with q0 = 1.3 and q0 = 0.7, the codes show a remarkable level of quantitative agreement; in the former case, the two stars merge and, in the latter case, the donor gets tidally disrupted. Binary systems with q0 = 0.5 or 0.4 enter a long phase (> 10-20 orbits) of stable mass-transfer during which the binary separation steadily increases; tidal disruption of the donor may ultimately occur if sufficiently deep contact is made between the Roche lobe and the donor during an initial episode of "driving." This work has been supported by grants AST-0708551 and DGE-0504507 from the U.S. National Science Foundation; by grants NNX07AG84G and NNX10AC72G from NASA's ATP program; and by grants of high-performance computing time on the TeraGrid, at LSU and across LONI (Louisiana Optical Network Initiative).

  13. 2D and 3D Mass Transfer Simulations in β Lyrae System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, V. V.; Glazunova, L. V.; Karetnikov, V. G.

    2001-12-01

    2D and 3D mass transfer simulations of the mass transfer in β Lyrae binary system. We have received that from a point L3 40 per cent of mass transfer from L1-point is lost.The structure of a gas envelope, around system is calculated.3-D mass transfer simulations has shown presence the spiral shock in the disk around primary star's and a jet-like structures (a mass flow in vertical direction) over a stream.

  14. Plasmonic ruler at the liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Turek, Vladimir A; Cecchini, Michael P; Paget, Jack; Kucernak, Anthony R; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Edel, Joshua B

    2012-09-25

    We report on a simple, fast, and inexpensive method to study adsorption and desorption of metallic nanoparticles at a liquid/liquid interface. These interfaces provide an ideal platform for the formation of two-dimensional monolayers of nanoparticles, as they form spontaneously and are defect-correcting, acting as 2D "nanoparticle traps". Such two-dimensional, self-assembled nanoparticle arrays have a vast range of potential applications in displays, catalysis, plasmonic rulers, optoelectronics, sensors, and detectors. Here, we show that 16 nm diameter gold nanoparticles can be controllably adsorbed to a water/1,2-dichloroethane interface, and that we can control the average interparticle spacing at the interface over the range 6-35 nm. The particle density and average interparticle spacing are experimentally assessed by measuring the optical plasmonic response of the nanoparticles in the bulk and at the interface and by comparing the experimental data with existing theoretical results. PMID:22900717

  15. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  16. Thermal energy storage with liquid-liquid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, E.A.; Stiel, L.I.

    1989-03-01

    The use of liquid-liquid mixtures for heat and cool storage applications has been investigated. Suitable mixtures exhibit large changes in the heat of mixing above and below the critical solution temperature of the system. Analytical procedures have been utilized to determine potential energy storage capabilities of systems with upper or lower critical solution temperatures. It has been found that aqueous systems with lower critical solution temperatures in a suitable range can result in large increases in the effective heat capacity in the critical region. For cool storage with a system of this type, the cooling process results in a transformation from two liquid phases to a single phase. Heats of mixing have been measured with a flow calorimeter system for a number of potential mixtures, and the results are summarized.

  17. Microrheology and Particle Dynamics at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yanmei

    The rheological properties at liquid-liquid interfaces are important in many industrial processes such as manufacturing foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and petroleum products. This dissertation focuses on the study of linear viscoelastic properties at liquid-liquid interfaces by tracking the thermal motion of particles confined at the interfaces. The technique of interfacial microrheology is first developed using one- and two-particle tracking, respectively. In one-particle interfacial microrheology, the rheological response at the interface is measured from the motion of individual particles. One-particle interfacial microrheology at polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oil-water interfaces depends strongly on the surface chemistry of different tracer particles. In contrast, by tracking the correlated motion of particle pairs, two-particle interfacial microrheology significantly minimizes the effects from tracer particle surface chemistry and particle size. Two-particle interfacial microrheology is further applied to study the linear viscoelastic properties of immiscible polymer-polymer interfaces. The interfacial loss and storage moduli at PDMS-polyethylene glycol (PEG) interfaces are measured over a wide frequency range. The zero-shear interfacial viscosity, estimated from the Cross model, falls between the bulk viscosities of two individual polymers. Surprisingly, the interfacial relaxation time is observed to be an order of magnitude larger than that of the PDMS bulk polymers. To explore the fundamental basis of interfacial nanorheology, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to investigate the nanoparticle dynamics. The diffusion of single nanoparticles in pure water and low-viscosity PDMS oils is reasonably consistent with the prediction by the Stokes-Einstein equation. To demonstrate the potential of nanorheology based on the motion of nanoparticles, the shear moduli and viscosities of the bulk phases and interfaces are calculated from single

  18. Mathematical modeling heat and mass transfer processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmed-Zaki, Darkhan

    2013-11-01

    On late development stages of oil-fields appears a complex problem of oil-recovery reduction. One of solution approaches is injecting of surfactant together with water in the form of active impurities into the productive layer - for decreasing oil viscosity and capillary forces between ``oil-water'' phases system. In fluids flow the surfactant can be in three states: dissolved in water, dissolved in oil and adsorbed on pore channels' walls. The surfactant's invasion into the reservoir is tracked by its diffusion with reservoir liquid and mass-exchange with two phase (liquid and solid) components of porous structure. Additionally, in this case heat exchange between fluids (injected, residual) and framework of porous medium has practical importance for evaluating of temperature influences on enhancing oil recovery. Now, the problem of designing an adequate mathematical model for describing a simultaneous flowing heat and mass transfer processes in anisotropic heterogeneous porous medium -surfactant injection during at various temperature regimes has not been fully researched. In this work is presents a 2D mathematical model of surfactant injections into the oil reservoir. Description of heat- and mass transfer processes in a porous media is done through differential and kinetic equations. For designing a computational algorithm is used modify version of IMPES method. The sequential and parallel computational algorithms are developed using an adaptive curvilinear meshes which into account heterogeneous porous structures. In this case we can evaluate the boundaries of our process flows - fronts (``invasion'', ``heat'' and ``mass'' transfers), according to the pressure, temperature, and concentration gradient changes.

  19. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Udrea, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    Impacts on planetary bodies can lead to both prompt secondary craters and projectiles that reimpact the target body or nearby companions after an extended period, producing so-called "sesquinary" craters. Here we examine sesquinary cratering on the moons of Mars. We model the impact that formed Voltaire, the largest crater on the surface of Deimos, and explore the orbital evolution of resulting high-velocity ejecta across 500 years using four-body physics and particle tracking. The bulk of mass transfer to Phobos occurs in the first 102 years after impact, while reaccretion of ejecta to Deimos is predicted to continue out to a 104 year timescale (cf. Soter, S. [1971]. Studies of the Terrestrial Planets. Cornell University). Relative orbital geometry between Phobos and Deimos plays a significant role; depending on the relative true longitude, mass transfer between the moons can change by a factor of five. Of the ejecta with a velocity range capable of reaching Phobos, 25-42% by mass reaccretes to Deimos and 12-21% impacts Phobos. Ejecta mass transferred to Mars is <10%. We find that the characteristic impact velocity of sesquinaries on Deimos is an order of magnitude smaller than those of background (heliocentric) hypervelocity impactors and will likely result in different crater morphologies. The time-averaged flux of Deimos material to Phobos can be as high as 11% of the background (heliocentric) direct-to-Phobos impactor flux. This relatively minor contribution suggests that spectrally red terrain on Phobos (Murchie, S., Erard, S. [1996]. Icarus 123, 63-86) is not caused by Deimos material. However the high-velocity ejecta mass reaccreted to Deimos from a Voltaire-sized impact is comparable to the expected background mass accumulated on Deimos between Voltaire-size events. Considering that the high-velocity ejecta contains only 0.5% of the total mass sent into orbit, sesquinary ejecta from a Voltaire-sized impact could feasibly resurface large parts of the Moon

  20. Restrained Ion Population Transfer: A Novel Ion Transfer Method for Mass Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Nathan K.; Skulason, Gunnar; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Wu, Si; Zhang, Kai; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-06-30

    With modern Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometers, ions are created and accumulated exterior to the mass analyzer. The ion accumulation event takes place in a region of higher pressure which allows ions to be thermally cooled before being given kinetic energy and accelerated toward the ICR cell where they are to be decelerated and re-trapped. When gated trapping is used to collect ions in the ICR cell for analysis, mass discrimination can occur due to time-of-flight effects. Also, trapping ions with large axial kinetic energy can decrease the performance of the ICR instrument when compared to the analysis of thermally-cooled ions located at the trap center. Therefore, it is desirable to limit the energy imparted in the ions within the ICR cell as well as minimize time-of-flight effects. The approach presented here for ion transfer called restrained ion population transfer or RIPT provides complete axial control of an ion population throughout the entire transfer sequence from the accumulation region to the ICR cell. This is accomplished by utilization of a number of quadrupole segments arranged in series with independent control of the dc bias voltage applied to each segment of the quadrupole ion guide. This approach circumvents problems associated with time-of-flight effects and minimizes the energy imparted to the ions allowing transfer of the cooled ion packet from the ion accumulation region to the ICR cell. Initial data are presented to illustrate feasibility of restrained ion population transfer. RIPT was also modeled with SIMION 7.0 and simulation results that support our feasibility studies of the ions transfer process are presented.

  1. Influence of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lima Neto, Iran E; Parente, Priscila A B

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an integral model to evaluate the impact of gas transfer on the hydrodynamics of bubble plumes. The model is based on the Gaussian type self-similarity and functional relationships for the entrainment coefficient and factor of momentum amplification due to turbulence. The impact of mass transfer on bubble plume hydrodynamics is investigated considering different bubble sizes, gas flow rates and water depths. The results revealed a relevant impact when fine bubbles are considered, even for moderate water depths. Additionally, model simulations indicate that for weak bubble plumes (i.e., with relatively low flow rates and large depths and slip velocities), both dissolution and turbulence can affect plume hydrodynamics, which demonstrates the importance of taking the momentum amplification factor relationship into account. For deeper water conditions, simulations of bubble dissolution/decompression using the present model and classical models available in the literature resulted in a very good agreement for both aeration and oxygenation processes. Sensitivity analysis showed that the water depth, followed by the bubble size and the flow rate are the most important parameters that affect plume hydrodynamics. Lastly, dimensionless correlations are proposed to assess the impact of mass transfer on plume hydrodynamics, including both the aeration and oxygenation modes. PMID:26840001

  2. Computation of liquid-liquid equilibria and phase stabilities: implications for RH-dependent gas/particle partitioning of organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Semivolatile organic and inorganic aerosol species partition between the gas and aerosol particle phases to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium. Liquid-liquid phase separation into an organic-rich and an aqueous electrolyte phase can occur in the aerosol as a result of the salting-out effect. Such liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) affect the gas/particle partitioning of the different semivolatile compounds and might significantly alter both particle mass and composition as compared to a one-phase particle. We present a new liquid-liquid equilibrium and gas/particle partitioning model, using as a basis the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008). This model allows the reliable computation of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve (binodal), corresponding tie-lines, the limit of stability/metastability (spinodal), and further thermodynamic properties of multicomponent systems. Calculations for ternary and multicomponent alcohol/polyol-water-salt mixtures suggest that LLE are a prevalent feature of organic-inorganic aerosol systems. A six-component polyol-water-ammonium sulphate system is used to simulate effects of relative humidity (RH) and the presence of liquid-liquid phase separation on the gas/particle partitioning. RH, salt concentration, and hydrophilicity (water-solubility) are identified as key features in defining the region of a miscibility gap and govern the extent to which compound partitioning is affected by changes in RH. The model predicts that liquid-liquid phase separation can lead to either an increase or decrease in total particulate mass, depending on the overall composition of a system and the particle water content, which is related to the hydrophilicity of the different organic and inorganic compounds. Neglecting non-ideality and liquid-liquid phase separations by assuming an ideal mixture leads to an overestimation of the total particulate mass by up to 30% for the composition and RH range considered in the six-component system

  3. Computation of liquid-liquid equilibria and phase stabilities: implications for RH-dependent gas/particle partitioning of organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Semivolatile organic and inorganic aerosol species partition between the gas and aerosol particle phases to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium. Liquid-liquid phase separation into an organic-rich and an aqueous electrolyte phase can occur in the aerosol as a result of the salting-out effect. Such liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) affect the gas/particle partitioning of the different semivolatile compounds and might significantly alter both particle mass and composition as compared to a one-phase particle. We present a new liquid-liquid equilibrium and gas/particle partitioning model, using as a basis the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008). This model allows the reliable computation of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve (binodal), corresponding tie-lines, the limit of stability/metastability (spinodal), and further thermodynamic properties of the phase diagram. Calculations for ternary and multicomponent alcohol/polyol-water-salt mixtures suggest that LLE are a prevalent feature of organic-inorganic aerosol systems. A six-component polyol-water-ammonium sulphate system is used to simulate effects of relative humidity (RH) and the presence of liquid-liquid phase separation on the gas/particle partitioning. RH, salt concentration, and hydrophilicity (water-solubility) are identified as key features in defining the region of a miscibility gap and govern the extent to which compound partitioning is affected by changes in RH. The model predicts that liquid-liquid phase separation can lead to either an increase or decrease in total particulate mass, depending on the overall composition of a system and the particle water content, which is related to the hydrophilicity of the different organic and inorganic compounds. Neglecting non-ideality and liquid-liquid phase separations by assuming an ideal mixture leads to an overestimation of the total particulate mass by up to 30% for the composition and RH range considered in the six-component system simulation

  4. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  5. Coarsening of sand ripples in mass transfer models.

    PubMed

    Hellén, E K O; Krug, J

    2002-07-01

    Coarsening of sand ripples is studied in a one-dimensional stochastic model, where neighboring ripples exchange mass with algebraic rates, Gamma(m) approximately m(gamma), and ripples of zero mass are removed from the system. For gamma<0, ripples vanish through rare fluctuations and the average ripple mass grows as (t) approximately -gamma(-1)ln(t). Temporal correlations decay as t(-1/2) or t(-2/3) depending on the symmetry of the mass transfer, and asymptotically the system is characterized by a product measure. The stationary ripple mass distribution is obtained exactly. For gamma>0, ripple evolution is linearly unstable, and the noise in the dynamics is irrelevant. For gamma=1, the problem is solved on the mean-field level, but the mean-field theory does not adequately describe the full behavior of the coarsening. In particular, it fails to account for the numerically observed universality with respect to the initial ripple size distribution. The results are not restricted to sand ripple evolution since the model can be mapped to zero range processes, urn models, exclusion processes, and cluster-cluster aggregation. PMID:12241351

  6. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-10-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  7. Characterizing Mass Transfer at the Hanford 300 Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    Aquifer remediation efforts in the Hanford 300 Area in Washington have presented substantial challenges for the Department of Energy. Since the early 1940s, this site has been a receptacle for radiological and chemical wastes from nuclear weapons production, including high concentrations of uranium. Employing techniques to estimate and measure mass transfer in-situ will improve understanding of contaminant fate and transport at this site, and perhaps others. A field experiment was conducted with a combination of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ionic tracer tests through a double-ring infiltrometer to quantify multirate mass-transfer and other transport parameters in the 300 Area. The tests included a series of injections into an infiltrating column of water. After saturating the column with fresh water at a constant head, bromide tracer solution with initial known concentration was injected for a specified amount of hours. This was followed by a continual fresh water injection during which time fluid samples were taken at varying depths along the probe to observe the tailing of the breakthrough curve during this purge. Throughout the experiment, ERT data collected along the column as well as along a transect perpendicular to the vertical sampling ports. These experiments will result in a model of the local vadose zone which will be calibrated using field data and modeled using HYDRUS 2D and its sequential inverse modeling feature. This program numerically solves the Richards equation for variably saturated water flow and advection-dispersion (AD) type equations for solute transport. It also considers dual-porosity type flow in the mobile and immobile domain. Additionally, mass transfer parameters will be modeled using a code which utilizes the AD equation and numerically solves for concentrations using Laplace Transforms. Analysis on governing processes and calibration of this code using field data will be used for additional verification on

  8. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  9. Heat and mass transfer intensification in coaxial reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, D. V.; Halitova, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    The work considers heat and mass transfer in the homophasic polymerization reactor. The reactor is a coaxial channel with internal tube in the form of a channel of confusor-diffuser type. The authors compared the degree of polymer transformation in the intensified coaxial reactor with internal tube of confusor-diffuser type and the reactor with constant rectilinear longitudinal section. It was found that in coaxial channels with internal tube of confusor-diffuser type, it is possible to reach high values of the transformation degree and to improve the quality of the obtained polymer.

  10. Increasing peritoneal contact area during dialysis improves mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Flessner, M F; Lofthouse, J; Williams, A

    2001-10-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that relatively large volumes in the peritoneal cavity made contact with only 40% of the anatomic peritoneum and that this contact area (A(contact)) could be increased with use of a surfactant, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS). To investigate the hypothesis that mass transfer rates during peritoneal dialysis are dependent on the area of peritoneum in contact with the dialysis solution, rats were dialyzed for 2 h with a solution that contained (14)C-mannitol, with or without 0.02% DSS. The mass transfer-area coefficients (MTAC) were determined to be (mean +/- SEM, ml/min): no DSS, 0.163 +/- 0.008; with DSS, 0.247 +/- 0.006 (P < 0.002). DSS also caused an increase in total protein loss over 2 h (mean +/- SEM, mg): no DSS, 83.8 +/- 15.8; DSS, 159.5 +/- 6.3 (P < 0.001). In a separate set of animals, the ratio (R) of A(contact) to anatomic area in each plane was measured as in the previous study R(mean) (mean +/- SEM) and equaled 0.466 +/- 0.075, no DSS; 0.837 +/- 0.074, with DSS. The ratio of MTAC (1.52) and protein loss (1.90) approximate the ratio of R(mean(S)) (1.78). Because MTAC = mass transfer coefficient (MTC) x A(contact), small peritoneal transport chambers were used to determine MTC for (14)C-mannitol and fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin. MTC(mannitol) did not change significantly with the addition of DSS. MTC(albumin) (cm/min x 10(4), mean +/- SEM) equaled 1.47 +/- 0.45 without DSS and 1.78 +/- 0.52 with DSS (P < 0.04). It was concluded that DSS increases the mass transfer rates of mannitol and protein by increasing A(contact), whereas protein transport is further augmented by an apparent increase in the barrier permeability to protein. PMID:11562413

  11. Modeling heat and mass transfer in catalytic wood gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.; Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

    1986-03-01

    Current research in the gasification of biomass materials includes production of a methanol synthesis gas catalytically. Previous experiments have indicated early deactivation of catalysts due primarily to carbon deposition. This study presents the results of efforts to model the heat and mass transfer within a spherical catalyst pellet using orthogonal collocation. Solutions are presented which predict temperature and concentration distributions and pellet effectiveness factors. These solutions are compared to a thermodynamic equilibrium model to predict regimes of carbon deposition and subsequent deactivation. Experimental data are presented which support conclusions drawn above. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  13. Collisional processes and transfer of mass among the planetary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Dell'Oro, A.; Paolicchi, P.; Barbieri, C.

    2001-08-01

    Several pairs of planetary satellites may have been involved, during the history of the Solar System, in mutual mass transfer processes. Such processes can be triggered by catastrophic collisions of a satellite (parent body) with a third object. As a consequence, the collision fragments are injected into independent orbits that can cross the trajectory of the another satellite (target). These swarms of secondary impacts may be of some importance influencing the properties of the target body. Even the formation of the atmosphere around some giant satellites may have been triggered by the gas released after the impacts of fragments onto the target's surface. Moreover, the different albedos and the different surface density of impact craters within the same satellite system may be connected to peculiar collisional phenomena, such as those we are dealing with. A quantitative modelling of the role of mass transfer processes obviously requires an estimate of how much material the parent bodies are able to supply, and under what circumstances the process may take place. A general analysis of the various pairs throughout the major satellite systems present in the Solar System has been performed in the present paper. Our analysis uses a statistical algorithm, computing, as a function of the initial properties of the fragments (masses and ejection velocities from their parent body), the mean intrinsic probability of impact, and then the mean lifetime of a fragment before impacting the target, as well as the distribution of the relative velocity. For an order-of-magnitude estimate of the available amount of mass, some simple analytical equations have been derived to evaluate the fraction of fragments from the parent body that can reach the target. These formulae allow a preliminary discrimination of the interesting cases. The pair Hyperion-Titan and the Uranus system have been analyzed in detail.

  14. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust

    PubMed Central

    Daczko, Nathan R.; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A.; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the ‘missing’ mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  15. Hornblendite delineates zones of mass transfer through the lower crust.

    PubMed

    Daczko, Nathan R; Piazolo, Sandra; Meek, Uvana; Stuart, Catherine A; Elliott, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical signatures throughout the layered Earth require significant mass transfer through the lower crust, yet geological pathways are under-recognized. Elongate bodies of basic to ultrabasic rocks are ubiquitous in exposures of the lower crust. Ultrabasic hornblendite bodies hosted within granulite facies gabbroic gneiss of the Pembroke Valley, Fiordland, New Zealand, are typical occurrences usually reported as igneous cumulate hornblendite. Their igneous features contrast with the metamorphic character of their host gabbroic gneiss. Both rock types have a common parent; field relationships are consistent with modification of host gabbroic gneiss into hornblendite. This precludes any interpretation involving cumulate processes in forming the hornblendite; these bodies are imposter cumulates. Instead, replacement of the host gabbroic gneiss formed hornblendite as a result of channeled high melt flux through the lower crust. High melt/rock ratios and disequilibrium between the migrating magma (granodiorite) and its host gabbroic gneiss induced dissolution (grain-scale magmatic assimilation) of gneiss and crystallization of mainly hornblende from the migrating magma. The extent of this reaction-replacement mechanism indicates that such hornblendite bodies delineate significant melt conduits. Accordingly, many of the ubiquitous basic to ultrabasic elongate bodies of the lower crust likely map the 'missing' mass transfer zones. PMID:27546342

  16. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  17. Pattern formation and mass transfer under stationary solutal Marangoni instability.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Karin; Köllner, Thomas; Linde, Hartmut; Boeck, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    According to the seminal theory by Sternling and Scriven, solutal Marangoni convection during mass transfer of surface-active solutes may occur as either oscillatory or stationary instability. With strong support of Manuel G. Velarde, a combined initiative of experimental works, in particular to mention those of Linde, Wierschem and coworkers, and theory has enabled a classification of dominant wave types of the oscillatory mode and their interactions. In this way a rather comprehensive understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the oscillatory instability could be achieved. A comparably advanced state-of-the-art with respect to the stationary counterpart seemed to be out of reach a short time ago. Recent developments on both the numerical and experimental side, in combination with assessing an extensive number of older experiments, now allow one to draw a more unified picture. By reviewing these works, we show that three main building blocks exist during the nonlinear evolution: roll cells, relaxation oscillations and relaxation oscillations waves. What is frequently called interfacial turbulence results from the interaction between these partly coexisting basic patterns which may additionally occur in different hierarchy levels. The second focus of this review lies on the practical importance of such convection patterns concerning their influence on mass transfer characteristics. Particular attention is paid here to the interaction between Marangoni and buoyancy effects which frequently complicates the pattern formation even more. To shed more light on these dependencies, new simulations regarding the limiting case of stabilizing density stratification and vanishing buoyancy are incorporated. PMID:24456800

  18. Gas Blowing: Mass Transfer in Gas and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortland, Øyvind Sunde; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Metallurgical routes for solar grade silicon production are being developed as alternatives to chemical processes for their potential to achieve cost reductions, increased production volume, and reduced environmental and safety concerns. An important challenge in the development of metallurgical routes relates to the higher impurity concentrations in the silicon product, particularly for boron and other elements that are not efficiently segregated in solidification techniques. The reactive gas refining process is studied for its potential to remove boron below the solar grade silicon target concentration in a single step by blowing steam and hydrogen gas jets onto the melt surface. Boron in a silicon melt is extracted to HBO gas in parallel to active oxidation of silicon. The literature is not unified regarding the rate determining step in this process. Relevant theories and equations for gas blowing in induction furnaces are combined and used to explain mass transfer in experiments. Mass transfer in the melt and gas is investigated by comparing resistance and induction heating of the melt, and varying gas flow rate, crucible diameter, diameter of the gas lance, and the position of the gas lance above the melt surface. The rate of boron removal is found to increase with increasing gas flow rate and crucible diameter. A relatively high fraction of the reactive gas is utilized in the process, and supply of steam in the bulk gas is the only identified rate determining step.

  19. A Simple and Universal Gel Permeation Chromatography Technique for Precise Molecular Weight Characterization of Well-Defined Poly(ionic liquid)s

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hongkun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Adzima, Brian; Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2013-03-20

    Poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) are an important class of technologically relevant materials. However, characterization of well-defined polyionic materials remains a challenge. Herein, we have developed a simple and versatile gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methodology for molecular weight (MW) characterization of PILs with a variety of anions. PILs with narrow MW distributions were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization, and the MWs obtained from GPC were further confirmed via nuclear magnetic resonance end group analysis.

  20. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  1. Generic mechanism for generating a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Malescio, Gianpietro; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-02-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus-a single-component system-can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order transition between two liquids of different densities is consistent with experimental data for a variety of materials, including single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon. Molecular dynamics simulations of very specific models for supercooled water, liquid carbon and supercooled silica predict a LDL-HDL critical point, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. Here we show that the presence of a LDL and a HDL can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and two characteristic short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state (in particular, liquid metals), and such potentials are often used to describe systems that exhibit a density anomaly. However, our results show that the LDL and HDL phases can occur in systems with no density anomaly. Our results therefore present an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of a density anomaly.

  2. Liquid-Liquid phase transition in a single component system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-06-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus, a single-component system, can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order LDL-HDL transition line ending in a critical point is consistent with experimental data and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for a variety of single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. By means of MD, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and with not one but `two' preferred short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state, in particular liquid metals. For the fisrt time, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can occur in systems with no density anomaly, opening an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly.

  3. Optimized Liquid-Liquid Extractive Rerefining of Spent Lubricants

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Muhammad Ashraf; Khan, Fasihullah

    2014-01-01

    Central composite design methodology has been employed to model the sludge yield data obtained during liquid-liquid extractive rerefining of spent lubricants using an alcohol (1-butanol) and a ketone (methyl ethyl ketone) as prospective solvents. The study has resulted in two reasonably accurate multivariate process models that relate the sludge yield (R2 = 0.9065 and 0.9072 for alcohol and ketone, resp.) to process variables (settling time t, operating temperature T, and oil to solvent ratio r). Construction of such models has allowed the maximization of the sludge yield (more than 8% and 3% in case of alcohol and ketone, resp.) so that the extraction of useable oil components from spent lubricants can economically be performed under extremely mild conditions (t = 16.7 h, T = 10°C, and r = 2) and fairly moderate conditions (t = 26.6 h, T = 10°C, and r = 5) established for the alcohol and ketone correspondingly. Based on these performance parameters alcohol appears to be superior over ketone for this extraction process. Additionally extractive treatment results in oil stocks with lesser quantity of environmentally hazardous polyaromatic hydrocarbons that are largely left in the separated sludge. PMID:24688388

  4. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of Oil Bodies from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Fundamentally, oil bodies are discrete storage organelles found in oilseeds, comprising a hydrophobic triacylglycerol core surrounded by a half-unit phospholipid membrane and an outer shell of specialized proteins known as oleosins. Oil bodies possess a number of attributes that were exploited by SemBioSys Genetics to isolate highly enriched fractions of oil bodies through liquid-liquid phase separation for a number of commercial applications. The current chapter provides a general guide for the isolation of oil bodies from Arabidopsis and/or safflower seed, from which protocols can be refined for different oilseed sources. For SemBioSys Genetic's recombinant technology, therapeutic proteins were covalently attached to oleosins or fused in-frame with ligands which bound oil bodies, facilitating their recovery to high levels of purity during "upstream processing" of transformed seed. Core to this technology was oil body isolation consisting of simple manipulation including homogenization of seeds to free the oil bodies, followed by the removal of insoluble fractions, and phase separation to recover the oil bodies. During oil body enrichment (an increase in oil body content concomitant with removal of impurities), a number of options and tips are provided to aid researchers in the manipulation and monitoring of these robust organelles. PMID:26614290

  5. Compartmentalized Droplets for Continuous Flow Liquid-Liquid Interface Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Huan; Du, Zhiping; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2016-08-17

    To address the limitations of batch organic-aqueous biphasic catalysis, we develop a conceptually novel method termed Flow Pickering Emulsion, or FPE, to process biphasic reactions in a continuous flow fashion. This method involves the compartmentalization of bulk water into micron-sized droplets based on a water-in-oil Pickering emulsion, which are packed into a column reactor. The compartmentalized water droplets can confine water-soluble catalysts, thus "immobilizing" the catalyst in the column reactor, while the interstices between the droplets allow the organic (oil) phase to flow. Key fundamental principles underpinning this method such as the oil phase flow behavior, the stability of compartmentalized droplets and the confinement capability of these droplets toward water-soluble catalysts are experimentally and theoretically investigated. As a proof of this concept, case studies including a sulfuric acid-catalyzed addition reaction, a heteropolyacid-catalyzed ring opening reaction and an enzyme-catalyzed chiral reaction demonstrate the generality and versatility of the FPE method. Impressively, in addition to the excellent durability, the developed FPE reactions exhibit up to 10-fold reaction efficiency enhancement in comparison to the existing batch reactions, indicating a unique flow interface catalysis effect. This study opens up a new avenue to allow conventional biphasic catalysis reactions to access more sustainable and efficient flow chemistry using an innovative liquid-liquid interface protocol. PMID:27429173

  6. Evolution of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Yamini, Yadollah; Faraji, Mohammad

    2010-04-16

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) has become a very popular environmentally benign sample-preparation technique, because it is fast, inexpensive, easy to operate with a high enrichment factor and consumes low volume of organic solvent. DLLME is a modified solvent extraction method in which acceptor-to-donor phase ratio is greatly reduced compared with other methods. In this review, in order to encourage further development of DLLME, its combination with different analytical techniques such as gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) will be discussed. Also, its applications in conjunction with different extraction techniques such as solid-phase extraction (SPE), solidification of floating organic drop (SFO) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) are summarized. This review focuses on the extra steps in sample preparation for application of DLLME in different matrixes such as food, biological fluids and solid samples. Further, the recent developments in DLLME are presented. DLLME does have some limitations, which will also be discussed in detail. Finally, an outlook on the future of the technique will be given. PMID:20005521

  7. Liquid-liquid equilibrium of aqueous two-polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors consider the thermodynamic description of the liquid-liquid phase behavior of dextran/polyethylene glycol/water systems which are suitable for the purification or isolation of biological materials. In this effort, they have used the Flory-Huggins and UNIQUAC models and developed a new numerical procedure to estimate the interaction parameters of the models. To test the predictive ability of the models for the phase behavior of the systems, the interaction parameters between each polymer and water were obtained from binary osmotic pressure data so that only the interaction parameters between the unlike polymers were estimated by fitting the ternary LLE data. Both of the models with the parameters obtained in this way gave reasonable predictions of the phase boundaries; the two-parameter UNIQUAC model appeared to be superior to the three-parameter Flory-Huggins model. The phase boundaries of polydisperse aqueous two-phase polymer systems were determined with pseudocomponents chosen based on the Gaussian quadrature methods, and the effects of polymer polydispersivity on the phase boundary were investigated. The predictive versions of Flory-Huggins and the UNIQUAC models were used for the thermodynamic description of these systems together with the assumption of continuous distributions for the molecular weight of the polydisperse species.

  8. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters using liquid-liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, N.E.

    1981-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated liquid-liquid extraction as a treatment method for biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW). Distribution coefficients for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were determined for the following solvents: methylisobutyl ketone (MIBK), n-butyl acetate, n-butanol, MIBK/n-butyl acetate (50:50 vol), MIBK/n-butanol (50:50 vol), tri-butyl phosphate, tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO)/MIBK (10:90 wt), TOPO/kerosene (10:90 wt), kerosene, and toluene. The best distribution coefficient of 1.3 was given by n-butanol. Chemical analysis of the wastewater by gas chromatography (GC) showed acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations of about 4000 mg/1. Methanol, ethanol, and acetone were identified in trace amounts. These five compounds accounted for 45% of the measured COD of 29,000 mg/1. Because of the presence of carboxylic acids, pH was expected to affect extraction of the wastewater. At low pH the acids should be in the acidic form, which increased extraction by MIBK. Extraction by n-butanol was increased at high pH, where the acids should be in the ionic form.

  9. Monitoring of antifungal drugs in biological samples using ultrasonic-assisted supramolecular dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet.

    PubMed

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Abdi, Khosrou

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of the three antifungal drugs using ultrasonic-assisted supramolecular dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of a floating organic droplet (UASMDLLME-SFO) was proposed. The supramolecular solvents produced from reversed micelles of 1-dodecanol (extraction solvent) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were injected into the aqueous sample solution. Reverse micelle coacervates were produced in situ through self-assembly processes. The antifungal drugs were extracted from the aqueous sample into a supramolecular solvent. Sonication accelerated the mass transfer of the target analytes into the supramolecular solvent phase and enhanced the dispersion process. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of the extraction solvent, pH, volume of the disperser solvent and ultrasound extraction time were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detections for ketoconazole, clotrimazole and miconazole ranged from 0.08 to 1.3μgL(-1) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5)<6% were obtained. The method was successfully applied for preconcentration of the three drugs in biological and water samples. PMID:27262083

  10. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments. PMID:26614355

  11. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  12. Code System to Calculate Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-05-26

    Version 00 This version is designated USINTC and was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as watermore » and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.« less

  13. Mass transfer of electron acceptor aross the capillary fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Piepenbrink, M.; Grathwohl, P.

    2005-12-01

    Transverse dispersion has been identified as a potentially limiting parameter controlling the mixing of electron donors and electron acceptors for natural attenuation of plumes originating from continuously emitting sources, however determining reactive transverse dispersion coefficients is not a simple task. The objective of this work is to elaborate the mass transfer of electron acceptor across the capillary fringe. A two-dimensional numerical reactive transport model and a fully controlled tank experiment are set up to investigate the mass transfer across the capillary and reactive fringe, where the oxygen supply is the limiting factor. The tank (77.9 times 14 times 0.8 cm) is made from acrylic-glass and filled with glass beads (0.5-0.75mm). Sodium dithionite, an easily oxidizable compound, is used as a surrogate for contaminants and is continuously injected from the inlets of the tank and reaches a steady state flow. Air circulates on the top of the glass beads. The oxygen concentrations as well as the reactive products (sulfate) are measured at the outlets of the tank with an oxygen sensor and via IC. In addition to that, resazurine, a redox indicator, is added to visualize the redox zones. These two-dimensional experimental results show quantitatively and qualitatively how the oxygen concentrations decrease at the plume fringe. Two dimensional numerical simulations with Min3P predicted oxygen distributions are compared with the experimental results. Acknowledgements: This work was funded by Helmholtz Association and Helmholtz Research Center UFZ; Project: `Virtual Institute for isotope biogeochemistry-biologically mediated processes at geochemical gradients and interfaces in soil - aquifer systems', Contract VH-VI-155.

  14. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  15. Thermodynamic consistency near the liquid-liquid critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-Sánchez, Germán; Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Troncoso, Jacobo; Romaní, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamic consistency of the isobaric heat capacity per unit volume at constant composition Cp,x and the density ρ near the liquid-liquid critical point is studied in detail. To this end, Cp,x(T), ρ(T ), and the slope of the critical line (dT /dp)c for five binary mixtures composed by 1-nitropropane and an alkane were analyzed. Both Cp,x(T) and ρ(T ) data were measured along various quasicritical isopleths with a view to evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in the critical composition value on the corresponding critical amplitudes. By adopting the traditionally employed strategies for data treatment, consistency within 0.01 K MPa-1 (or 8%) is attained, thereby largely improving the majority of previous results. From temperature range shrinking fits and fits in which higher-order terms in the theoretical expressions for Cp,x(T) and ρ(T ) are included, we conclude that discrepancies come mainly from inherent difficulties in determining the critical anomaly of ρ accurately: specifically, to get full consistency, higher-order terms in ρ(T ) are needed; however, the various contributions at play cannot be separated unambiguously. As a consequence, the use of Cp,x(T) and (dT /dp)c for predicting the behavior of ρ(T ) at near criticality appears to be the best choice at the actual experimental resolution levels. Furthermore, the reasonably good thermodynamic consistency being encountered confirms that previous arguments appealing to the inadequacy of the theoretical expression relating Cp,x and ρ for describing data in the experimentally accessible region must be fairly rejected.

  16. Mass balance model parameter transferability on a tropical glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Mölg, Thomas; Nicholson, Lindsey; Kaser, Georg

    2013-04-01

    The mass balance and melt water production of glaciers is of particular interest in the Peruvian Andes where glacier melt water has markedly increased water supply during the pronounced dry seasons in recent decades. However, the melt water contribution from glaciers is projected to decrease with appreciable negative impacts on the local society within the coming decades. Understanding mass balance processes on tropical glaciers is a prerequisite for modeling present and future glacier runoff. As a first step towards this aim we applied a process-based surface mass balance model in order to calculate observed ablation at two stakes in the ablation zone of Shallap Glacier (4800 m a.s.l., 9°S) in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. Under the tropical climate, the snow line migrates very frequently across most of the ablation zone all year round causing large temporal and spatial variations of glacier surface conditions and related ablation. Consequently, pronounced differences between the two chosen stakes and the two years were observed. Hourly records of temperature, humidity, wind speed, short wave incoming radiation, and precipitation are available from an automatic weather station (AWS) on the moraine near the glacier for the hydrological years 2006/07 and 2007/08 while stake readings are available at intervals of between 14 to 64 days. To optimize model parameters, we used 1000 model simulations in which the most sensitive model parameters were varied randomly within their physically meaningful ranges. The modeled surface height change was evaluated against the two stake locations in the lower ablation zone (SH11, 4760m) and in the upper ablation zone (SH22, 4816m), respectively. The optimal parameter set for each point achieved good model skill but if we transfer the best parameter combination from one stake site to the other stake site model errors increases significantly. The same happens if we optimize the model parameters for each year individually and transfer

  17. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  18. Combination of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry with a novel reagent gas and two immiscible organic solvent liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction for analysis of clomipramine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Bidgoli, Ali Akbar Hajialiakbari; Khayamian, Taghi; Moradmand, Ali

    2011-12-01

    A novel and sensitive method based on combination of two immiscible organic solvents hollow fiber-based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction and corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (HF-LLLME-CD-IMS) was employed for the analysis of clomipramine in human urine and plasma. The effect of formic, acetic and propionic acid as the reagent gas (dopant) on the corona discharge ion mobility signal was investigated. The influence of dopant amount was also studied. Optimum mass flow rates of the dopants were 3.7, 1.1 and 1.0 μmol min(-1) for formic, acetic and propionic acid, respectively. Experimental parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of HF-LLLME, such as NaOH concentration as donor solution, ionic strength of the sample, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, analytical parameters such as linearity, precision and limit of detection were also evaluated. The linear dynamic range was from 1 to 100 μg L(-1) (r(2)=0.9980) and the limit of detection was 0.35 μg L(-1). Intra- and inter-day precisions were satisfactory with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.9 and 6.7%, respectively. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of clomipramine in human plasma and urine. PMID:22041141

  19. Heat and mass transfer in multi-porous cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Saghir, M.Z.

    1998-10-01

    The study of heat and mass transfer in porous media has a large number of applications in the areas of environmental geothermal and petroleum engineering. Problems such as the disposal of waste material and groundwater contamination are only few applications of the present work. When heat and species transfer takes place within a fluid layer, the temperature and concentration gradients create a convection mode. This phenomenon is called double-diffusive convection. In this paper, two-dimensional non-linear double diffusive convection in a multiporous cavity is considered. The Darcy equation, including Brinkman term to account for the viscous effects, is used as the momentum equation. The model consists of two rectangular cavities filled with glass beads having a diameter d{sub 1} of either 5.25 mm (Case 1) or 3.25 mm (Case 2). The smaller cavity is located at the top left corner of the larger one. The larger cavity is filled initially with hot salty fluid while the smaller one contains initially cold fresh fluid. At the initial time, the obstacle between the two cavities was released and the double diffusive phenomena were studied in details. The momentum, solutal, energy and continuity equations are solved numerically using the finite element technique. This transient problem is solved for two different Darcy numbers. For each Darcy number, the influence of the solutal Rayleigh number on double diffusive convection was studied in details. The permeability in the horizontal and vertical direction was assumed identical. A comparison of the intruding force between this case and the open flow case studied by Saghir et al. showed that it is inversely proportional to the Darcy number. Finite element modeling results indicate that salinity induces stronger convection than the thermal ones.

  20. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  1. Vortex-assisted liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLLME) technique: A new microextraction approach for direct liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis analysis.

    PubMed

    Makahleh, Ahmad; Yap, Hui Fang; Saad, Bahruddin

    2015-10-01

    A new, rapid and sensitive microextraction technique named vortex-assisted liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLLME) is proposed. The complete extraction process involves two steps. First, a vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) procedure was used to extract the analytes from a relatively large volume of sample (donor phase) to a small volume of organic solvent (intermediate phase). Next, a micro-vortex-assisted liquid-liquid extraction (µ-VALLE) was used to extract the target analytes from the intermediate phase to a smaller volume of aqueous solution (acceptor phase). The final extract (acceptor phase) can be directly injected into the high performance liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis units without any further treatments. The selection of the intermediate phase and the manipulation of pH are key parameters that ensure good extraction efficiency of the technique. The proposed technique has been successfully applied for the determination of carvedilol (used as model analyte) in biological fluid samples. The optimum extraction conditions were: toluene as intermediate phase (150 μL); pH of the donor phase, 9.5; vortex time of the VALLME, 45 s (maximum speed, 2500 rpm); 0.1M HCl (15 μL) as acceptor phase; vortexing time of the µ-VALLME, 75 s (maximum stirring speed, 2500 rpm) and salt concentration in the donor phase, 5% (w/v). Under these conditions, enrichment factors of 51- and 418-fold for VALLME step and VALLLME procedure, respectively, were achieved. PMID:26078176

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Onset and Stability of Dynamical Mass Transfer in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Mario C. R.; Motl, Patrick M.; Tohline, Joel E.; Frank, Juhan

    2006-05-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of semidetached, polytropic binary stars are presented in an effort to study the onset and stability of dynamical mass transfer events. Initial, synchronously rotating equilibrium models are constructed using a self-consistent field technique and then evolved with an Eulerian hydrodynamics code in a fully self-consistent manner. We describe code improvements introduced over the past few years that permit us to follow dynamical mass transfer events through more than 30 orbits. Mass transfer evolutions are presented for two different initial configurations: a dynamically unstable binary with initial mass ratio (donor/accretor) q0=1.3 that leads to a complete merger in ~10 orbits, and a double-degenerate binary with initial mass ratio q0=0.5 that, after some initial unstable growth of mass transfer, tends to separate as the mass transfer rate levels off.

  3. Direct Geoelectrical Evidence of Mass Transfer at the Lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Keating, K.; Binley, A.; Clifford, J.; Haggerty, R.

    2011-12-01

    At many field sites, anomalous tailing behavior-- a long, slow decrease of solute concentration in time-- is observed yet cannot be explained with the advection-dispersion model. One explanation for this commonly observed behavior is the exchange of solute between mobile and immobile domains; however, direct experimental observations of this controlling process remain elusive. Circumstantial evidence for a less-mobile phase is typically inferred from tailing behavior observed in fluid samples of the mobile phase. Electrical methods provide a measure of the total solutes in both the immobile and mobile domain and therefore have been hypothesized to provide, in combination with fluid sampling, direct experimental evidence for a less-mobile and mobile model, yet experimental evidence is needed to support this claim. Here, we conduct column solute tracer tests and measure both electrical resistivity and fluid conductivity on unconsolidated, well-sorted sand in addition to fine and coarse fractions of the porous zeolite clinoptilolite. We examine nearly co-located time-lapse standard fluid conductivity and bulk apparent resistivity measurements to identify solute exchange between multiple domains at the lab scale. Our results show extensive tailing behavior in both fluid and bulk electrical conductivity measurements in the zeolite but not in sand, providing evidence for a mobile-immobile framework. Transport parameters are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the observed and simulated fluid conductivity in COMSOL Multiphysics. These best-fit parameters support our claims of mass transfer occurring in the zeolite columns and provide the first direct electrical evidence of dual-domain mass transport at the lab scale.

  4. Micro-scale mass-transfer variations during electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sutija, D.P.

    1991-08-01

    Results of two studies on micro-scale mass-transfer enhancement are reported: (1) Profiled cross-sections of striated zinc surfaces deposited in laminar channel flow were analyzed with fast-fourier transforms (FFT) to determine preferred striation wavelengths. Striation frequency increases with current density until a minimum separation between striae of 150 {mu}m is reached. Beyond this point, independent of substrate used, striae meld together and form a relatively smooth, nodular deposit. Substrates equipped with artificial micron-sized protrusions result in significantly different macro-morphology in zinc deposits. Micro-patterned electrodes (MPE) with hemispherical protrusions 5 {mu}m in diameter yield thin zinc striae at current densities that ordinarily produce random nodular deposits. MPEs with artificial hemi-cylinders, 2.5 {mu}m in height and spaced 250 {mu}m apart, form striae with a period which matches the spacing of micron-sized ridges. (2) A novel, corrosion-resistant micromosaic electrode was fabricated on a silicon wafer. Measurements of mass-transport enhancement to a vertical micromosaic electrode caused by parallel bubble streams rising inside of the diffusion boundary-layer demonstrated the presence of two co-temporal enhancement mechanisms: surface-renewal increases the limiting current within five bubble diameters of the rising column, while bubble-induced laminar flows cause weaker enhancement over a much broader swath. The enhancement caused by bubble curtains is predicted accurately by linear superposition of single-column enhancements. Two columns of smaller H{sub 2} bubbles generated at the same volumetric rate as a single column of larger bubbles cause higher peak and far-field enhancements. 168 refs., 96 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Microfluidic droplet-based liquid-liquid extraction: online model validation.

    PubMed

    Lubej, Martin; Novak, Uroš; Liu, Mingqiang; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Plazl, Igor

    2015-05-21

    Droplet-based liquid-liquid extraction in a microchannel was studied, both theoretically and experimentally. A full 3D mathematical model, incorporating convection and diffusion in all spatial directions along with the velocity profile, was developed to depict the governing transport characteristics of droplet-based microfluidics. The finite elements method, as the most common macroscale simulation technique, was used to solve the set of differential equations regarding conservation of moment, mass and solute concentration in a two-domain system coupled by interfacial surface of droplet-based flow pattern. The model was numerically verified and validated online by following the concentrations of a solute in two phases within the microchannel. The relative azobenzene concentration profiles in a methanol/n-octane two-phase system at different positions along the channel length were retrieved by means of a thermal lens microscopic (TLM) technique coupled to a microfluidic system, which gave results of high spatial and temporal resolution. Very good agreement between model calculations and online experimental data was achieved without applying any fitting procedure to the model parameters. PMID:25850663

  6. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  7. A Simple Organic Solvent-Free Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Method for the Determination of Potentially Toxic Metals as 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol Complex from Food and Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Rajabi, Maryam; Asghari, Alireza

    2016-04-01

    An organic solvent-free method was developed to extract some potentially toxic metals, as complexed with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol, from different real samples prior to their determination by microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The method, named ionic liquid-based ultrasound-enhanced air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-USE-AALLME), is based upon withdrawing and pushing out a mixture of an aqueous sample and an IL (as the extraction solvent) for several times into a conical test tube using a single syringe, placed in an ultrasound bath (as the enhancing mass transfer agent) during the extraction process. Different effective parameters were studied, and at the optimized conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, and enrichment factors were ranged from 0.9 to 2.2 μg L(-1), 3.0 to 1023 μg L(-1), and 20 ± 2 to 22 ± 2, respectively. After optimization, the method was successfully applied to determine Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cr(3+) in different biological (hair and nail), vegetable (coriander, parsley, and tarragon), fruit juice (apple, orange, and peach), and water (tap, mineral, and wastewater) samples. The proposed method was compared with two other IL-based and disperser solvent-free methods (i.e., IL-based air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and IL-based ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction) to demonstrate its performance. PMID:26329998

  8. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  9. Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

    1982-02-01

    A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

  10. Mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Manoj; Hathan, Bahadur Singh; Maske, Swati

    2011-01-01

    The mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils in osmotic solution of sucrose was studied to increase palatability and shelf life of arils. The freezing of the whole pomegranate at -18 °C was carried out prior to osmotic dehydration to increase the permeability of the outer cellular layer of the arils. The osmotic solution concentrations used were 40, 50, 60°Bx, osmotic solution temperatures were 35, 45, 55 °C. The fruit to solution ratio was kept 1:4 (w/w) during all the experiments and the process duration varied from 0 to 240 min. Azuara model and Peleg model were the best fitted as compared to other models for water loss and solute gain of pomegranate arils, respectively. Generalized Exponential Model had an excellent fit for water loss ratio and solute gain ratio of pomegranate arils. Effective moisture diffusivity of water as well as solute was estimated using the analytical solution of Fick's law of diffusion. For above conditions of osmotic dehydration, average effective diffusivity of water loss and solute gain varied from 2.718 × 10(-10) to 5.124 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 1.471 × 10(-10) to 5.147 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, respectively. The final product was successfully utilized in some nutritional formulations such as ice cream and bakery products. PMID:21535673

  11. Improved oxygen mass transfer modeling for diffused or subsurface aeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, J.R.; Hutter, J.C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    The mass transfer analysis of the oxygen transfer performance of diffused air or subsurface mechanical aeration systems has progressed very little over the past twenty years. The ASCE Standard Method for determination of the oxygen mass transfer performance as applied to a diffused or subsurface aeration systems is based on a greatly over-simplified mass transfer model. Although the ASCE Standard can be used to empirically evaluate point performance conditions, it is not suitable for prediction of the performance of diffused aeration systems under changing operating or environmental conditions. A new oxygen mass transfer model has been developed which is a fundamentally more rigorous description of the actual mass transfer process in diffused aeration systems. This model can be confidently used to predict aerator performance under changing operation and environmental conditions and is easily adapted to numerical solution on a computer for routing aeration system performance evaluation as well as process design. The model is presented in this book.

  12. Close binary systems before and after mass transfer. III - Spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansina, F.; De Greve, J. P.

    1982-10-01

    A method is presented, for the computation of absolute dimensions from spectroscopic data on binary systems, which has been adapted for use with the 7th Catalogue of Batten et al. (1978) and takes into account several results of close binary evolution, with emphasis on the phase of slow mass transfer during a case B mass transfer. Among the unevolved systems, the mass transfer case B is found to be the most abundant type of interaction. In the set of evolving systems, a subset of 18 interacting systems was found with mass ratio near unity, the first star being the mass loser as well as the brightest.

  13. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations.

    PubMed

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah J; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney J; Shilling, John E; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T; Bertram, Allan K

    2012-08-14

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric aerosol particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere and the water content of the particles correspondingly changes, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the reactive uptake of gas species on atmospheric particles may be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of liquid-liquid phase separation within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we present images that show the coexistence of two noncrystalline phases for real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, GA as well as for laboratory-generated samples under simulated atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations. To explore the implications of these findings, we carried out simulations of the Atlanta urban environment and found that liquid-liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO(3) and N(2)O(5) due to decreased particle uptake of N(2)O(5). PMID:22847443

  14. Operation with three liquid phases in a staged liquid-liquid contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.; Wigeland, R.A.; Bane, R.W.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Operation with three liquid phases was demonstrated in a staged liquid-liquid contactor. The possibility that three liquid phases could be handled in a liquid-liquid contactor normally used with two liquid phases was initially established using a laboratory batch test. Tht three liquid phases were obtained using a thorium flow sheet having high concentrations of both acid and thorium. To analyze the batch test, the concept of a dimensionless dispersion number for use with two liquid phases was extended so that it could be applied to three liquid phases. Based on the batch tests, continuous flow tests were run in a staged liquid-liquid contactor used for solvent extraction. A critical factor in the success of these tests was determining the position of the liquid-liquid interface in the contactor. Thus, a contactor was used which allows the position of the liquid-liquid interface to be adjusted. Actual three-phase operation was demonstrated using a 4-cm annular centrifugal contactor, albeit with a somewhat greater (3 to 4 vol. %) aqueous-phase contamination of the organic exit stream than normal (< 1 vol. %).

  15. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion. PMID:27486832

  16. Energy dispersive-EXAFS of Pd nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.-Y.; Booth, S. G.; Uehara, A.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Cibin, G.; Pham, V.-T.; Nataf, L.; Dryfe, R. A. W.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Energy dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EDE) has been applied to Pd nanoparticle nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface under control over the interfacial potential and thereby the driving force for nucleation. Preliminary analysis focusing on Pd K edge-step height determination shows that under supersaturated conditions the concentration of Pd near the interface fluctuate over a period of several hours, likely due to the continuous formation and dissolution of sub-critical nuclei. Open circuit potential measurements conducted ex-situ in a liquid/liquid electrochemical cell support this view, showing that the fluctuations in Pd concentration are also visible as variations in potential across the liquid/liquid interface. By decreasing the interfacial potential through inclusion of a common ion (tetraethylammonium, TEA+) the Pd nanoparticle growth rate could be slowed down, resulting in a smooth nucleation process. Eventually, when the TEA+ ions reached an equilibrium potential, Pd nucleation and particle growth were inhibited.

  17. Prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, E.; Monnerat, S.; Stragevitch, L.; Pina, C.G.; Goncalves, C.B.; Meirelles, A.J.A.

    1999-12-01

    Group interaction parameters for the UNIFAC and ASOG models were specially adjusted for predicting liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol at temperatures ranging from 20 to 45 C. Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for systems of triolein, oleic acid, and ethanol and of triolein, stearic acid, and ethanol were measured and utilized in the adjustment. The average percent deviation between experimental and calculated compositions was 0.79% and 0.52% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively. The prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol was quite successful, with an average deviation of 1.31% and 1.32% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively.

  18. Hybrid multiphase CFD simulation for liquid-liquid interfacial area prediction in annular centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, K.E.

    2013-07-01

    Liquid-liquid contacting equipment used in solvent extraction processes has the dual purpose of mixing and separating two immiscible fluids. Consequently, such devices inherently encompass a wide variety of multiphase flow regimes. A hybrid multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver which combines the Eulerian multi-fluid method with VOF (volume of fluid) sharp interface capturing has been developed for application to annular centrifugal contactors. This solver has been extended to enable prediction of mean droplet size and liquid-liquid interfacial area through a single moment population balance method. Simulations of liquid-liquid mixing in a simplified geometry and a model annular centrifugal contactor are reported with droplet breakup/coalescence models being calibrated versus available experimental data. Quantitative comparison is made for two different housing vane geometries and it is found that the predicted droplet size is significantly smaller for vane geometries which result in higher annular liquid holdup.

  19. Impact of kinetic mass transfer on free convection in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Shi, Liangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Xie, Yueqing; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate kinetic mass transfer effects on unstable density-driven flow and transport processes by numerical simulations of a modified Elder problem. The first-order dual-domain mass transfer model coupled with a variable-density-flow model is employed to describe transport behavior in porous media. Results show that in comparison to the no-mass-transfer case, a higher degree of instability and more unstable system is developed in the mass transfer case due to the reduced effective porosity and correspondingly a larger Rayleigh number (assuming permeability is independent on the mobile porosity). Given a constant total porosity, the magnitude of capacity ratio (i.e., immobile porosity/mobile porosity) controls the macroscopic plume profile in the mobile domain, while the magnitude of mass transfer timescale (i.e., the reciprocal of the mass transfer rate coefficient) dominates its evolution rate. The magnitude of capacity ratio plays an important role on the mechanism driving the mass flux into the aquifer system. Specifically, for a small capacity ratio, solute loading is dominated by the density-driven transport, while with increasing capacity ratio local mass transfer dominated solute loading may occur at later times. At significantly large times, however, both mechanisms contribute comparably to solute loading. Sherwood Number could be a nonmonotonic function of mass transfer timescale due to complicated interactions of solute between source zone, mobile zone and immobile zone in the top boundary layer, resulting in accordingly a similar behavior of the total mass. The initial assessment provides important insights into unstable density-driven flow and transport in the presence of kinetic mass transfer.

  20. Mass transfer in SCW extraction molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of ketones and alkenes in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F.

    1996-10-01

    The potential of sub- and supercritical water as extraction solvents has been demonstrated for the (reactive) extraction of coals, used car tires, organic species from residual aqueous solutions, and class selective extraction of organic pollutants with different polarities from solids. In addition, the potential of extraction of coal with supercritical aqueous solutions has been studied. However, physical transport in water at elevated temperature and pressures- and their impact on heterogenous reactions and (reactive) extraction -are not adequately understood. This situation is largely due to the limited data that is available for diffusion in high temperature, high pressure water mixture. Only the molecular diffusion of Iodine ions and hydroquinone in near-critical subcritical water and the self diffusion of coefficient of compressed supercritical water have been reported. In this paper, we present molecular diffusion coefficients of benzophenone, acetone, naphthalene, and anthracene in water at infinite dilution. Pressures ranged from 250 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 50{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C resulting in water densities ranging from 1000 to 150 kg/m{sup 3}. Diffusion coefficients were determined by the Taylor-Aris dispersion technique. The effects of increased diffusion on the mass transfer coefficients for emulsions and packed beds were quantified. Molecular division coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in supercritical water than in water at ambient conditions. Experimental results were correlated with hydrodynamic and kinetic theory. This study and results to be published elsewhere show that diffusion-limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in supercritical water than is commonly acknowledged.

  1. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses. PMID:21614201

  2. An inkjet-printed microfluidic device for liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi

    2011-04-01

    A microfluidic device for liquid-liquid extraction was quickly produced using an office inkjet printer. An advantage of this method is that normal end users, who are not familiar with microfabrication, can produce their original microfluidic devices by themselves. In this method, the printer draws a line on a hydrophobic and oil repellent surface using hydrophilic ink. This line directs a fluid, such as water or xylene, to form a microchannel along the printed line. Using such channels, liquid-liquid extraction was successfully performed under concurrent and countercurrent flow conditions. PMID:21290076

  3. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  4. Comparison between a spray column and a sieve tray column operating as liquid-liquid heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, A.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

    1980-12-01

    The performance of a spray column and a sieve tray column was compared as a liquid-liquid heat exchanger. In carrying out these studies a 15.2 cm (6.0 in.) diameter column, 183 cm (6.0 ft) tall was utilized. The performance of the spray column as a heat exchanger was shown to correlate with the model of Letan-Kehat which has as a basis that the heat transfer is dominated by the wakeshedding characteristics of the drops over much of the column length. This model defines several hydrodynamic zones along the column of which the wake formation zone at the bottom appears to have the most efficient heat transfer. The column was also operated with four perforated plates spaced two column diameters apart in order to take advantage of the wake formation zone heat transfer. The plates induce coalescence of the dispersed phase and reformation of the drops, and thus cause a repetition of the wake formation zone. It is shown that the overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient in a perforated plate column is increased by a minimum of eleven percent over that in a spray column. A hydrodynamic model that predicts the performance of a perforated plate column is suggested.

  5. Carbon monoxide mass transfer for syngas fermentation in a stirred tank reactor with dual impeller configurations.

    PubMed

    Ungerman, Andrew J; Heindel, Theodore J

    2007-01-01

    This study compares the power demand and gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient, kLa, in a stirred tank reactor (STR) (T = 0.211 m) using different impeller designs and schemes in a carbon monoxide-water system, which is applicable to synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation. Eleven different impeller schemes were tested over a range of operating conditions typically associated with the "after large cavity" region (ALC) of a Rushton-type turbine (D/T = 0.35). It is found that the dual Rushton-type impeller scheme exhibits the highest volumetric mass transfer rates for all operating conditions; however, it also displays the lowest mass transfer performance (defined as the volumetric mass transfer coefficient per unit power input) for all conditions due to its high power consumption. Dual impeller schemes with an axial flow impeller as the top impeller show improved mass transfer rates without dramatic increases in power draw. At high gas flow rates, dual impeller schemes with a lower concave impeller have kLa values similar to those of the Rushton-type dual impeller schemes but show improved mass transfer performance. It is believed that the mass transfer performance can be further enhanced for the bottom concave impeller schemes by operating at conditions beyond the ALC region defined for Rushton-type impellers because the concave impeller can handle higher gas flow rates prior to flooding. PMID:17326659

  6. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with HPLC for the determination of neonicotinoid pesticides.

    PubMed

    Vichapong, Jitlada; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2013-12-15

    A microextraction procedure based on vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) for preconcentration of neonicotinoid pesticides, including acetamiprid, clotianidin, nitenpyram, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam, has been developed. In VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could be enhance the mass-transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous by vortex process. Other experimental parameters affected the extraction efficiency, including the kind and concentration of salt, concentration and volume of HCl, kind and concentration of surfactant and its volume, kind and volume of extraction solvent, vortex time and the centrifugation extraction time, were also optimized. The optimum extraction conditions of VSLLME-SFO were 10.00 mL of sample, 0.3% (w/v) Na2SO4, 50 µL of 0.050 mol L(-1) SDS, 1.0 mol L(-1) HCl (400 µL), 150 µL of octanol, vortex time 1 min and centrifugation time 10 min. The sediment phase was analyzed by subjecting it to HPLC using a mobile phase of 25% acetonitrile in water, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1), and photodiode array detection at 254 nm. Under the optimum extraction conditions, high enrichment factors (20-100 fold) and low limit of detection (0.1-0.5 μg L(-1)) could be obtained. This method provided high sensitivity, low toxic organic solvents used, and simplicity of the extraction processes. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of neonicotinoids in fruit juice and water samples. PMID:24209333

  7. Fluorescent derivatization combined with aqueous solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of butyrobetaine, l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Chia-Ju; Feng, Chia-Hsien

    2016-09-16

    A novel aqueous solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (AS-DLLME) method was combined with narrow-bore liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection for the determination of hydrophilic compounds. A remover (non-polar solvent) and extractant (aqueous solution) were introduced into the derivatization system (acetonitrile) to obtain a water-in-oil emulsion state that increased the mass transfer of analytes. As a proof of concept, three quaternary ammonium substances, including butyrobetaine, l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine, were also used as analytes and determined in pharmaceuticals, personal care products, food and human plasma. The analytes were derivatized with 4-bromomethylbiphenyl for fluorescence detection and improved retention in the column. The linear response was 10-2000nM for l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine with a good determination coefficient (r(2)>0.998) in the standard solution. The detection limit for l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine was 4.5 fmol. The method was also successfully applied to a 1μL sample of human plasma. In the linearity calculations for determining butyrobetaine, l-carnitine and acetyl-l-carnitine in human plasma, the determination coefficients ranged from 0.996 to 0.999. Linear regression exhibited good reproducibility and a relative standard deviation better than 7.50% for the slope and 9.06% for the intercept. To characterize highly hydrophilic compounds in various samples, the proposed method provides good sensitivity for a small sample volume with a low consumption of toxic solvents. PMID:27562416

  8. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry applications in medical research.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Jens; Amann, Anton

    2009-06-01

    Gathering information about a subject's physiological and pathophysiological condition from the `smell' of breath is an idea that dates back to antiquity. This intriguing concept of non-invasive diagnosis has been revitalized by `exhaled breath analysis' in recent decades. A main driving force was the development of sensitive and versatile gas-chromatographic and mass-spectrometric instruments for trace gas analysis. Ironically, only non-smelling constituents of breath, such as O(2), CO(2), H(2), and NO have so far been included in routine clinical breath analysis. The `smell' of human breath, on the other hand, arises through a combination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of which several hundred have been identified to date. Most of these volatiles are systemic and are released in the gas-exchange between blood and air in the alveoli. The concentration of these compounds in the alveolar breath is related to the respective concentrations in blood. Measuring VOCs in exhaled breath allows for screening of disease markers, studying the uptake and effect of medication (pharmacokinetics), or monitoring physiological processes. There is a range of requirements for instruments for the analysis of a complex matrix, such as human breath. Mass-spectrometric techniques are particularly well suited for this task since they offer the possibility of detecting a large variety of interesting compounds. A further requirement is the ability to measure accurately in the concentration range of breath VOCs, i.e. between parts-per-trillion (pptv) and parts-per-million (ppmv) range. In the mid 1990's proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was developed as a powerful and promising tool for the analysis of VOCs in gaseous media. Soon thereafter these instruments became commercially available to a still growing user community and have now become standard equipment in many fields including environmental research, food and flavour science, as well as life sciences. Their

  9. Double-salting out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) HPLC method for estimation of temozolomide from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Jain, Darshana; Athawale, Rajani; Bajaj, Amrita; Shrikhande, Shruti

    2014-11-01

    The role of temozolomide (TMZ) in treatment of high grade gliomas, melanomas and other malignancies is being defined by the current clinical developmental trials. Temozolomide belongs to the group of alkylating agents and is prescribed to patients suffering from most aggressive forms of brain tumors. The estimation techniques for temozolomide from the extracted plasma or biological samples includes high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV), micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MKEC) and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). These methods suffer from disadvantages like low resolution, low sensitivity, low recovery or cost involvement. An analytical method possessing capacity to estimate low quantities of TMZ in plasma samples with high extraction efficiency (%) and high resolution with cost effectiveness needs to be developed. Cost effective, robust and low plasma component interfering HPLC method using salting out liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) technique was developed and validated for estimation of drug from plasma samples. The extraction efficiency (%) with conventional LLE technique with methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetonitrile was found to be 5.99±2.45, 45.39±4.56, 46.04±1.14 and 46.23±3.67 respectively. Extraction efficiency (%) improved with SALLE where sodium chloride was used as an electrolyte and was found to be 6.80±5.56, 52.01±3.13, 62.69±2.11 and 69.20±1.18 with methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetonitrile as organic solvent. Upon utilization of two salts for extraction (double salting liquid-liquid extraction) the extraction efficiency (%) was further improved and was twice of LLE. It was found that double salting liquid-liquid extraction technique yielded extraction efficiency (%) of 11.71±5.66, 55.62±3.44, 77.28±2.89 and 87.75±0.89. Hence a method based on double SALLE was developed for quantification of TMZ demonstrating linearity in the range of

  10. Immiscible liquid-liquid pressure-driven flow in capillary tubes: Experimental results and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Edson J.; Thompson, Roney L.; Niero, Debora C.

    2015-08-01

    The immiscible displacement of one viscous liquid by another in a capillary tube is experimentally and numerically analyzed in the low inertia regime with negligible buoyancy effects. The dimensionless numbers that govern the problem are the capillary number Ca and the viscosity ratio of the displaced to the displacing fluids Nμ. In general, there are two output quantities of interest. One is associated to the relation between the front velocity, Ub, and the mean velocity of the displaced fluid, U ¯ 2 . The other is the layer thickness of the displaced fluid that remains attached to the wall. We compute these quantities as mass fractions in order to make them able to be compared. In this connection, the efficiency mass fraction, me, is defined as the complement of the mass fraction of the displaced fluid that leaves the tube while the displacing fluid crosses its length. The geometric mass fraction, mg, is defined as the fraction of the volume of the layer that remains attached to the wall. Because in gas-liquid displacement, these two quantities coincide, it is not uncommon in the literature to use mg as a measure of the displacement efficiency for liquid-liquid displacements. However, as is shown in the present paper, these two quantities have opposite tendencies when we increase the viscosity of the displacing fluid, making this distinction a crucial aspect of the problem. Results from a Galerkin finite element approach are also presented in order to make a comparison. Experimental and numerical results show that while the displacement efficiency decreases, the geometrical fraction increases when the viscosity ratio decreases. This fact leads to different decisions depending on the quantity to be optimized. The quantitative agreement between the numerical and experimental results was not completely achieved, especially for intermediate values of Ca. The reasons for that are still under investigation. The experiments conducted were able to achieve a wide range

  11. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  12. MASS TRANSFER VARIATIONS IN UX MONOCEROTIS: EIGHT YEARS OF AUTOMATED PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edward C.; Henry, Gregory W.; ETZEL, PAUL B. E-mail: henry@schwab.tsuniv.edu

    2009-11-15

    We analyze eight years (1999-2007) of automated photometric observations of the active Algol binary UX Monocerotis to search for mass transfer bursts similar to those seen in U Cephei. The largest photometric anomaly is the mean gainer luminosity difference between the stream-impact hemisphere and the opposite hemisphere. We find an updated Wilson-Devinney solution for earlier six-color observations. The UX Mon donor star fills its Roche lobe and the gainer nearly fills its rotational lobe. Instead of isolated bursts of the U Cep type, we found nearly continuous brightness fluctuations likely produced by variable mass transfer. We discuss implications for mass transfer.

  13. Late Diagenesis and Mass Transfer in Sandstone Shale Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    , involving only compaction and dewatering of sedimentary materials. Detrital phases that survived weathering were seen as essentially inert to subsequent reaction during burial and prior to the onset of metamorphism. Metamorphism itself was viewed as isochemical and accomplished principally through solid-state reactions (see a brief summary in Ague, 1991). Notable exceptions to these views constitute the foundations of existing theory regarding the nature of late diagenesis. "Intrastratal solution" of chemically unstable detrital minerals (e.g., Pettijohn, 1941), apparent potassium metasomatism of shales (e.g., Weaver and Beck, 1971), and massive mineralogical changes during progressive burial (e.g., Coombs et al., 1959) are observations that established the directions of modern research in late diagenesis. Advances in petrographic imaging techniques (e.g., backscattered electron- and cathodoluminescence-imaging) and integration of petrographic observations with both bulk and spatially resolved chemical analyses have greatly accelerated the evolution of concepts about late diagenesis and early metamorphism.Today, basin-scale mass transfer of some materials (e.g., helium, water, and petroleum) is unquestioned (e.g., Hunt, 1996). Other materials (e.g., titanium and the REEs) are sufficiently mobile to appear within authigenic precipitates, but are likely to be "immobile" on the scale of a hand specimen. Mobilities of the major elements that make up sandstones and shales (silicon, aluminum, calcium, sodium, potassium) remain controversial. Conflicting notions about processes in rock suites across the wide range of burial conditions and alteration show that fundamental questions remain unanswered about the nature of the volumetrically significant processes within a major segment of the rock cycle. It is very likely that something is wrong, or at least inadequate, with the present concepts and/or data pertaining to the evolution of permeability, transport mechanisms, and timing

  14. Photophysics and photoredox processes at liquid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, S.E.

    1992-09-01

    This report is divided into four sections: (1) Recent work on polymers with covalently bound chromophores, primarily involving triplet state electron transfer quenching; (2) Pyrene and pyrene butyric acid adsorbed onto polystyrene latexes (microspheres); (3) Adsorption and micellization of amphiphilic block polymers with chromophores at the junction between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic part; (4) Adsorption of alternating polymers with grafted combs'' to improve adsorption onto a hydrophobic surface.

  15. Determination of Niacinamide in Lotions and Creams Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Karyn M.; Simmons, Carolyn R.; Keating, Daniel W.; Rossi, Henry F., III

    2015-01-01

    Chemical separations are an important part of an undergraduate chemistry curriculum. Sophomore students often get experience with liquid-liquid extraction in organic chemistry classes, but liquid-liquid extraction is not as often introduced as a quantitative sample preparation method in honors general chemistry or quantitative analysis classes.…

  16. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION OF TRACE LEVEL PESTICIDES FROM PROCESS STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the further resolution of the feasibility of a process (liquid-liquid extraction for the treatment of pesticide manufacturing wastewater) that had been shown by earlier research to be competitive with existing methods of treatment. Eight experiments were cond...

  17. METHOD OF LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION OF BLOOD SURROGATES FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A baseline method of liquid?liquid extraction for assessing human exposure to JP-8 jet fuel was established by extracting several representative compounds ranging from very volatile to semi-volatile organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, nonane, decane, undecane, tridec...

  18. Fabrication of Janus droplets by evaporation driven liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingquan; Xu, Meng; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Wenfeng; Zong, Chenghua; Yu, Yang; Wang, Qi; Gai, Hongwei

    2016-04-11

    We present a universal and scalable method to fabricate Janus droplets based on evaporation driven liquid-liquid phase separation. In this work, the morphologies and chemical properties of separate parts of the Janus droplets can be flexibly regulated, and more complex Janus droplets (such as core-shell Janus droplets, ternary Janus droplets, and multiple Janus droplets) can be constructed easily. PMID:26983706

  19. LSPR properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Shu; Fang, Pingping; Ren, Bin; Girault, Hubert H; Tian, Zhongqun

    2013-04-21

    Unlike the solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces, the optical properties of metal nanoparticles adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface have not been theoretically exploited to date. In this work, the three dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method is employed to clarify the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based optical properties of gold nanoparticles (NPs) adsorbed at the water-oil interface, including near field distribution, far field absorption and their relevance. The LSPR spectra of NPs located at a liquid-liquid interface are shown to differ significantly from those in a uniform liquid environment or at the other interfaces. The absorption spectra exhibit two distinct LSPR peaks, the positions and relative strengths of which are sensitive to the dielectric properties of each liquid and the exact positions of the NPs with respect to the interface. Precise control of the particles' position and selection of the appropriate wavelength of the excitation laser facilitates the rational design and selective excitation of localized plasmon modes for interfacial NPs, a necessary advance for the exploration of liquid-liquid interfaces via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). According to our calculations, the SERS enhancement factor for Au nanosphere dimers at the water-oil interface can be as high as 10(7)-10(9), implying significant promise for future investigations of interfacial structure and applications of liquid-liquid interfaces towards chemical analysis. PMID:23376970

  20. Luminescence screening of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin residues in swine liver after dispersive liquid - liquid microextraction cleanup

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid luminescence method was developed to screen residues of enrofloxacin (ENRO) and its metabolite, ciprofloxacin (CIPRO), in swine liver. Target analytes were extracted in acetonitrile-2.5% trifluoroacetic acid-NaCl, cleaned up by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), and finally de...

  1. Ultrastable Liquid-Liquid Interface as Viable Route for Controlled Deposition of Biodegradable Polymer Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Raffaele; Iaccarino, Giulia; Bianchini, Paolo; Marotta, Roberto; D'autilia, Francesca; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Diaspro, Alberto; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-01

    Liquid-liquid interfaces are highly dynamic and characterized by an elevated interfacial tension as compared to solid-liquid interfaces. Therefore, they are gaining an increasing interest as viable templates for ordered assembly of molecules and nanoparticles. However, liquid-liquid interfaces are more difficult to handle compared to solid-liquid interfaces; their intrinsic instability may affect the assembly process, especially in the case of multiple deposition. Indeed, some attempts have been made in the deposition of polymer multilayers at liquid-liquid interfaces, but with limited control over size and stability. This study reports on the preparation of an ultrastable liquid-liquid interface based on an O/W secondary miniemulsion and its possible use as a template for the self-assembly of polymeric multilayer nanocapsules. Such polymer nanocapsules are made of entirely biodegradable materials, with highly controlled size-well under 200 nm-and multi-compartment and multifunctional features enriching their field of application in drug delivery, as well as in other bionanotechnology fields. PMID:27060934

  2. A Guided Inquiry Liquid/Liquid Extractions Laboratory for Introductory Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raydo, Margaret L.; Church, Megan S.; Taylor, Zane W.; Taylor, Christopher E.; Danowitz, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    A guided inquiry laboratory experiment for teaching liquid/liquid extractions to first semester undergraduate organic chemistry students is described. This laboratory is particularly useful for introductory students as the analytes that are separated are highly colored dye molecules. This allows students to track into which phase each analyte…

  3. Solid-Liquid and Liquid-Liquid Mixing Laboratory for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pour, Sanaz Barar; Norca, Gregory Benoit; Fradette, Louis; Legros, Robert; Tanguy, Philippe A.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-liquid and liquid-liquid mixing experiments have been developed to provide students with a practical experience on suspension and emulsification processes. The laboratory focuses on the characterization of the process efficiency, specifically the influence of the main operating parameters and the effect of the impeller type. (Contains 2…

  4. General nature of liquid-liquid transition in aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2013-11-01

    The presence or absence of a liquid-liquid transition in water is one of the hot topics in liquid science, and while a liquid-liquid transition in water/glycerol mixtures is known, its generality in aqueous solutions has remained elusive. Here we reveal that 14 aqueous solutions of sugar and polyol molecules, which have an ability to form hydrogen bonding with water molecules, exhibit liquid-liquid transitions. We find evidence that both melting of ice and liquid-liquid transitions in all these aqueous solutions are controlled solely by water activity, which is related to the difference in the chemical potential between an aqueous solution and pure water at the same temperature and pressure. Our theory shows that water activity is determined by the degree of local tetrahedral ordering, indicating that both phenomena are driven by structural ordering towards ice-like local structures. This has a significant implication on our understanding of the low-temperature behaviour of water.

  5. Electroless deposition of palladium at bare and templated liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dryfe, Robert A W; Simm, Andrew O; Kralj, Brett

    2003-10-29

    A simple, electroless approach to metallize the liquid/liquid interface is reported. The method is illustrated with the deposition of Pd at the bare water/1,2-dichloroethane interface, and for the "templated" deposition of Pd within the 100 nm diameter pores of gamma-alumina membranes. PMID:14570460

  6. Liquid-Liquid Extraction of Insecticides from Juice: An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Samantha A.; Hunter, Ronald E., Jr.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Ryan, P. Barry

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to target analytical chemistry students and to teach them about insecticides in food, sample extraction, and cleanup. Micro concentrations (sub-microgram/mL levels) of 12 insecticides spiked into apple juice samples are extracted using liquid-liquid extraction and cleaned up using either a primary-secondary…

  7. Heat and mass transfer characteristics of absorption of R134a into DMAC in a horizontal tube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikrishnan, L.; Maiya, M. P.; Tiwari, S.; Wohlfeil, A.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a horizontal tube absorber for the mixture R134a/DMAC in terms of experimentally gained heat and mass transfer coefficients are presented. The heat transfer coefficient is mainly dependent on the solution’s mass flow rate. The mass transfer coefficient is strongly related to the subcooling of the solution. The data are compared to experimental absorption characteristics of water into aqueous lithium bromide in an absorption chiller. The mass transfer coefficients are of similar size whereas the heat transfer coefficients are about one order of magnitude smaller for R134a-DMAC.

  8. Optimization of ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of six antidepressants in human plasma using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P; Taboada, V; Regenjo, M; Morales, L; Alvarez, I; Carro, A M; Lorenzo, R A

    2016-05-30

    A simple Ultrasounds Assisted-Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction (UA-DLLME) method is presented for the simultaneous determination of six second-generation antidepressants in plasma by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detector (UPLC-PDA). The main factors that potentially affect to DLLME were optimized by a screening design followed by a response surface design and desirability functions. The optimal conditions were 2.5mL of acetonitrile as dispersant solvent, 0.2mL of chloroform as extractant solvent, 3min of ultrasounds stirring and extraction pH 9.8.Under optimized conditions, the UPLC-PDA method showed good separation of antidepressants in 2.5min and good linearity in the range of 0.02-4μgmL(-1), with determination coefficients higher than 0.998. The limits of detection were in the range 4-5ngmL(-1). The method precision (n=5) was evaluated showing relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 8.1% for all compounds. The average recoveries ranged from 92.5% for fluoxetine to 110% for mirtazapine. The applicability of DLLME/UPLC-PDA was successfully tested in twenty nine plasma samples from antidepressant consumers. Real samples were analyzed by the proposed method and the results were successfully submitted to comparison with those obtained by a Liquid Liquid Extraction-Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (LLE-GC-MS) method. The results confirmed the presence of venlafaxine in most cases (19 cases), followed by sertraline (3 cases) and fluoxetine (3 cases) at concentrations below toxic levels. PMID:26955756

  9. Hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer in a packed bed split-cylinder airlift reactor containing dilute alcoholic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz Moraveji, Mostafa; Ebrahimi Fakhari, Mona; Mohsenzadeh, Elmira; Davarnejad, Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the influences of alcohols on the hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer characteristics in an airlift reactor equipped with packing were investigated. The hydrodynamic parameters and mass transfer coefficient in 1 % (v/v) aqueous solutions of four aliphatic alcohols were tested. It was concluded that alcohols addition increased gas holdup and gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient. The packing installation increased mass transfer coefficient, gas holdup and liquid circulation velocity, as well.

  10. A mass transfer origin for blue stragglers in NGC 188 as revealed by half-solar-mass companions.

    PubMed

    Geller, Aaron M; Mathieu, Robert D

    2011-10-20

    In open star clusters, where all members formed at about the same time, blue straggler stars are typically observed to be brighter and bluer than hydrogen-burning main-sequence stars, and therefore should already have evolved into giant stars and stellar remnants. Correlations between blue straggler frequency and cluster binary star fraction, core mass and radial position suggest that mass transfer or mergers in binary stars dominates the production of blue stragglers in open clusters. Analytic models, detailed observations and sophisticated N-body simulations, however, argue in favour of stellar collisions. Here we report that the blue stragglers in long-period binaries in the old (7 × 10(9)-year) open cluster NGC 188 have companions with masses of about half a solar mass, with a surprisingly narrow mass distribution. This conclusively rules out a collisional origin, as the collision hypothesis predicts a companion mass distribution with significantly higher masses. Mergers in hierarchical triple stars are marginally permitted by the data, but the observations do not favour this hypothesis. The data are highly consistent with a mass transfer origin for the long-period blue straggler binaries in NGC 188, in which the companions would be white dwarfs of about half a solar mass. PMID:22012393

  11. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Jeremy C.; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  12. Metastable liquid-liquid transition in a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremy C; Martelli, Fausto; Liu, Yang; Car, Roberto; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-06-19

    Liquid water's isothermal compressibility and isobaric heat capacity, and the magnitude of its thermal expansion coefficient, increase sharply on cooling below the equilibrium freezing point. Many experimental, theoretical and computational studies have sought to understand the molecular origin and implications of this anomalous behaviour. Of the different theoretical scenarios put forward, one posits the existence of a first-order phase transition that involves two forms of liquid water and terminates at a critical point located at deeply supercooled conditions. Some experimental evidence is consistent with this hypothesis, but no definitive proof of a liquid-liquid transition in water has been obtained to date: rapid ice crystallization has so far prevented decisive measurements on deeply supercooled water, although this challenge has been overcome recently. Computer simulations are therefore crucial for exploring water's structure and behaviour in this regime, and have shown that some water models exhibit liquid-liquid transitions and others do not. However, recent work has argued that the liquid-liquid transition has been mistakenly interpreted, and is in fact a liquid-crystal transition in all atomistic models of water. Here we show, by studying the liquid-liquid transition in the ST2 model of water with the use of six advanced sampling methods to compute the free-energy surface, that two metastable liquid phases and a stable crystal phase exist at the same deeply supercooled thermodynamic condition, and that the transition between the two liquids satisfies the thermodynamic criteria of a first-order transition. We follow the rearrangement of water's coordination shell and topological ring structure along a thermodynamically reversible path from the low-density liquid to cubic ice. We also show that the system fluctuates freely between the two liquid phases rather than crystallizing. These findings provide unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in

  13. A multiscale modeling study for the convective mass transfer in a subsurface aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jahrul M.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative and realistic computer simulations of mass transfer associated with disposal in subsurface aquifers is a challenging endeavor. This article has proposed a novel and efficient multiscale modeling framework, and has examined its potential to study the penetrative mass transfer in a plume that migrates in an aquifer. Numerical simulations indicate that the migration of the injected enhances the vorticity generation, and the dissolution of has a strong effect on the natural convection mass transfer. The vorticity decays with the increase of the porosity. The time scale of the vertical migration of a plume is strongly dependent on the rate of dissolution. Comparisons confirm the near optimal performance of the proposed multiscale model. These primary results with an idealized computational model of the migration in an aquifer brings the potential of the proposed multiscale model to the field of heat and mass transfer in the geoscience.

  14. Mathematical model of quasistationary conditions of mass transfer in an electrodialysis cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmamedov, M. N.

    2000-07-01

    The author suggests a quasistationary mathematical model of the mass-transfer conditions in an electrodialysis cell in which the main operating parameters of the electrodialysis apparatus are expressed as a function of the dimensionless diluate concentration.

  15. Mass transfer in countercurrent packed columns: Application to supercritical CO[sub 2] extraction of terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, P.C.; Matos, H.A.; Carmelo, P.J.; Gomes de Azevedo, E.; Nunes da Ponte, M. . Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia)

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is an alternative separation method to more conventional processes such as liquid extraction and distillation. However, up to now, few works have been devoted to the investigation of the efficiency of countercurrent packed columns under supercritical conditions from a mass transfer point of view. Mass transfer in a countercurrent column, filled with structured gauze packing, was measured for the separation of a mixture of terpenes (d-limonene/1,8-cineole) by supercritical carbon dioxide, at 313 and 318 K and pressures up to 9 MPa. The extraction efficiency was determined in terms of the overall mass transfer coefficient. Operating lines for this process had an appreciable curvature due to a high miscibility of the two contacting phases. The real slope of these lines had to be estimated. Available mass transfer models for packed columns predicted efficiencies diverging to a great extent from the experimental results.

  16. Fluid-dynamic and mass-transfer behavior of static mixers and regular packings

    SciTech Connect

    Cavatorta, O.N.; Boehm, U.; Chiappori de del Giorgio, A.M.

    1999-05-01

    The fluid dynamics and liquid-to-wall mass transfer for spaced and stacked regular packings were studied for forced convection and fluidized beds. The behavior of these configurations in bubble columns and under natural convection conditions is also presented. Flow parameters characterizing structured packings, presented in the literature, were used in the evaluation of results. General equations to predict pressure drop and mass transfer are discussed, as well as the relationship between energy dissipation and mass transfer. In the presence of fluidized particles, single-phase flow or natural convection conditions, the mass-transfer behavior of a packing element stacked between other packs or separated from the neighboring elements by liquid layers is almost the same, but differs in bubble columns.

  17. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  18. OVERALL MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FOR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM SMALL WATER POOLS UNDER SIMULATED INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small chamber tests were conducted to experimentally determine the overall mass transfer coefficient for pollutant emissions from still water under simulated indoor-residential or occupational-environmental conditions. Fourteen tests were conducted in small environmental chambers...

  19. The mechanism of thermal-gradient mass transfer in the sodium hydroxide-nickel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Charles E

    1958-01-01

    "Thermal-gradient mass transfer" was investigated in the molten sodium hydroxide-nickel system. Possible mechanisms (physical, electrochemical, and chemical) are discussed in terms of experimental and theoretical evidence. Experimental details are included in appendixes.

  20. Calculation of Post-Closure Natural Convection Heat and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-03-16

    Natural convection heat and mass transfer under post-closure conditions has been calculated for Yucca Mountain drifts using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Calculations have been performed for 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 years after repository closure. Effective dispersion coefficients that can be used to calculate mass transfer in the drift have been evaluated as a function of time and boundary temperature tilt.

  1. Evaluation of vapor mass transfer in various membrane distillation configurations: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, G. A.; La Carrubba, V.; Brucato, V.

    2012-06-01

    Vapor mass transfer phenomena in four different membrane distillation (MD) configurations were examined through a self-built laboratory scale experimental apparatus: Air Gap MD, Sweeping Gas MD, Vacuum Sweeping Gas MD and Vacuum MD. Vapor fluxes were measured and compared with those predicted by various models, showing that MD performance under usual processing conditions is severely controlled by the permeate side resistance to mass transfer.

  2. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from a two-dimensional, partially liquid-covered surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.X.; Kaviany, M. )

    1991-11-01

    Simultaneous heat and mass transfer from partially liquid-covered surfaces is examined experimentally using a surface made of cylinders with the voids filled with liquid. The steady-state evaporation rate, surface temperature of the liquid and exposed solid, and location of meniscus are measured for various ambient air velocities and temperatures. Using these, the authors examine the effect of the extent to which the liquid covers the surface on the evaporation mass transfer rate resulting from the convective heat transfer from the ambient gas to this surface. The results show strong Bond and Reynolds number effects. For small Bond and Reynolds numbers, the presence of dry (exposed solid) surface does not influence the mass transfer rate. As the Bond or Reynolds number increases, a critical liquid coverage is found below which the mass transfer begins to decrease. Heat transfer from the exposed solid to the liquid is also examined using the measured surface temperature, a conduction model, and an estimate of the liquid and solid surface areas (using a static formation for the liquid meniscus). The results show that at the liquid surface an analogy between heat and mass transfer does not exist.

  3. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.

    1992-06-24

    In certain cases droplet direct contact heat transfer rates can be significantly enhanced by the application of an alternating electric field. This field can produce shape oscillations in a droplet which will enhance mixing. The theoretical evaluation of the effect of the interaction of the field with drop charge on the hydrodynamics has been completed for small amplitude oscillations. Previous work with a zero order perturbation method was followed up with a first order perturbation method to evaluate the effect of drop distortion on drop charge and field distribution. The first order perturbation results show secondary drop oscillations of four modes and two frequencies in each mode. The most significant secondary oscillation has the same mode and frequency as the second mode oscillation predicted from the first order perturbation work. The resonant frequency of all oscillations decrease with increasing electric field strength and drop charge. Work is currently underway to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement from an applied alternating electric field.

  4. Mass and Energy Transfer Between the Solar Photosphere and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of chromospheric and coronal heating is also a problem of mass supply to the corona. On average we see redshifts at transition region temperatures of the order of 10 km/s. If interpreted as downflows, this would quickly empty the corona, and fresh material has to be transported into the corona. Several models have been proposed to understand this mass cycle between the different atmospheric layers. However, as of yet all these proposals have serious shortcomings. On the observational side open questions remain, too. With the new IRIS mission we can observe the transition region at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, but the observational results are still puzzling. In particular the finding that the spatial distribution of line widths and Doppler shifts do not change with increasing resolution is against physical intuition. This shows that even with IRIS we still have significant velocity gradients along the line-of-sight, indicating that shocks might play a significant role. Likewise the temporal evolution might be a key for our understanding of the mass cycle. It might well be that the filling and draining of hot plasma occurs on significantly different time scales, which might be part of the difficulty to arrive at a conclusive observational picture. Considering the progress made for the quiet Sun, it seems clear that the processes responsible for the mass exchange are not resolved (yet). Therefore one might wonder to what extent one could use larger and resolved individual events in more active parts of the Sun to understand the details of the mass transport. In particular a common understanding of reconnection events such as Ellerman bombs in the photosphere, explosive events in the transition region and the recently discovered IRIS bombs in-between might provide the key to better understand the mass cycle throughout the atmospheric layers from the photosphere to the corona.

  5. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  6. Fluid flow and mass transfer over circular strands using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Shakhawath; Chen, X. B.; Bergstrom, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the fluid flow and mass transfer over circular strands is fundamental to the cell culture of tissue scaffolds in bio-reactors. This paper presents a study on the simulation of fluid flow and mass transfer over the circular strands of a tissue scaffold by using the multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method for the low Reynolds number regime, with Re D = 0.01 and 0.1, respectively. The mass transfer problem approximates the transport of a scalar nutrient from the bulk fluid to the strand surface, such as is encountered in the flow through tissue scaffolds placed in bio-reactors. The circular geometry of the scaffold strand is treated and implemented by means of the interpolated bounce-back boundary condition formulation. Our simulation illustrates that the flow accelerates around the strand, resulting in the maximum shear stress at the shoulder of the strand and that diffusion mass transfer plays the dominant role in the scalar transport. The local Sherwood number varies significantly over the surface of the strand, with a peak value located on the upstream surface. Increasing the Schmidt number of the scalar and decreasing the blockage ratio results in higher mass transfer rates on the surface of the stand. Overall, the simulation results provide one with the insight into the fluid flow and mass transfer over the circular strands of a tissue scaffold in a bio-reactor, which would be impractical to obtain by experiments.

  7. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. II. Secular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Finite eccentricities in mass-transferring eccentric binary systems can be explained by taking into account the mass loss and mass transfer processes that often occur in these systems. These processes can be treated as perturbations of the general two-body problem. The time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity derived from perturbative methods are generally phase-dependent. The osculating semimajor axis and eccentricity change over the orbital timescale and are not easy to implement in binary evolution codes like MESA. However, the secular orbital element evolution equations can be simplified by averaging over the rapidly varying true anomalies. In this paper, we derive the secular time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity for various mass loss/transfer processes using either the adiabatic approximation or the assumption of delta-function mass loss/transfer at periastron. We begin with the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. We continue with conservative and non-conservative non-isotropic mass ejection/accretion (including Roche-Lobe-Overflow) for both point-masses and extended bodies. We conclude with the case of phase-dependent mass accretion. Comparison of the derived equations with similar work in the literature is included and an explanation of the existing discrepancies is provided.

  8. Experimental Investigations of Heat and Mass Transfer in Microchannel Heat-Transfer Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    The present work seeks to develop and investigate experimentally microchannel heat-exchange apparatuses of two designs: with porous elements manufactured from titanium and copper, and also based on the matrix of filamentary silicon single crystals under operating conditions with high heat loads, unsteadiness, and nonlinear flow of the coolant. For experimental investigations, the authors have developed and manufactured a unique test bench allowing tests of the developed heat-transfer elements in unsteady operating regimes. The performed experimental investigations have made it possible to obtain criterial dependences of the heat-transfer coefficient on the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers and to refine the values of viscous and inertial coefficients. It has been established that microchannel heat-transfer elements based on silicon single crystals, which make it possible to remove a heat flux above 100 W/cm2, are the most efficient. For porous heat-transfer elements, the best result was attained for wedge-shaped copper samples. According to investigation results, the authors have considered the issues of optimization of thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the heat-transfer elements under study. In the work, the authors have given examples of practical use of the developed heat-transfer elements for cooling systems of radioelectronic equipment.

  9. Experimental Investigations of Heat and Mass Transfer in Microchannel Heat-Transfer Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    The present work seeks to develop and investigate experimentally microchannel heat-exchange apparatuses of two designs: with porous elements manufactured from titanium and copper, and also based on the matrix of filamentary silicon single crystals under operating conditions with high heat loads, unsteadiness, and nonlinear flow of the coolant. For experimental investigations, the authors have developed and manufactured a unique test bench allowing tests of the developed heat-transfer elements in unsteady operating regimes. The performed experimental investigations have made it possible to obtain criterial dependences of the heat-transfer coefficient on the Reynolds and Prandtl numbers and to refine the values of viscous and inertial coefficients. It has been established that microchannel heat-transfer elements based on silicon single crystals, which make it possible to remove a heat flux above 100 W/cm2, are the most efficient. For porous heat-transfer elements, the best result was attained for wedge-shaped copper samples. According to investigation results, the authors have considered the issues of optimization of thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the heat-transfer elements under study. In the work, the authors have given examples of practical use of the developed heat-transfer elements for cooling systems of radioelectronic equipment.

  10. Mathematical equivalence between time-dependent single-rate and multirate mass transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2015-05-01

    The often observed tailing of tracer breakthrough curves is caused by a multitude of mass transfer processes taking place over multiple scales. Yet, in some cases, it is convenient to fit a transport model with a single-rate mass transfer coefficient that lumps all the non-Fickian observed behavior. Since mass transfer processes take place at all characteristic times, the single-rate mass transfer coefficient derived from measurements in the laboratory or in the field vary with time ω>(t>). The literature review and tracer experiments compiled by Haggerty et al. (2004) from a number of sites worldwide suggest that the characteristic mass transfer time, which is proportional to ω>(t>)-1, scales as a power law of the advective and experiment duration. This paper studies the mathematical equivalence between the multirate mass transfer model (MRMT) and a time-dependent single-rate mass transfer model (t-SRMT). In doing this, we provide new insights into the previously observed scale-dependence of mass transfer coefficients. The memory function, g(t), which is the most salient feature of the MRMT model, determines the influence of the past values of concentrations on its present state. We found that the t-SRMT model can also be expressed by means of a memory function φ>(t,τ>). In this case, though the memory function is nonstationary, meaning that in general it cannot be written as φ>(t-τ>). Nevertheless, the full behavior of the concentrations using a single time-dependent rate ω>(t>) is approximately analogous to that of the MRMT model provided that the equality ω>(t>)=-dln⁡g>(t>)/dt holds and the field capacity is properly chosen. This relationship suggests that when the memory function is a power law, g>(t>)˜t1-k, the equivalent mass transfer coefficient scales as ω>(t>)˜t-1, nicely fitting without calibration the estimated mass transfer coefficients compiled by Haggerty et al. (2004).

  11. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3

  12. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  13. Mass Transfer Limited Enhanced Bioremediation at Dnapl Source Zones: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The success of enhanced bioremediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) relies on accelerating contaminant mass transfer from the organic to the aqueous phase, thus enhancing the depletion of DNAPL source zones compared to natural dissolution. This is achieved by promoting biological activity that reduces the contaminant's aqueous phase concentration. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated that high reaction rates are attainable by specialized microbial cultures in DNAPL source zones, field applications of the technology report lower reaction rates and prolonged remediation times. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that the reaction rates are limited by the rate at which the contaminant partitions from the DNAPL to the aqueous phase. In such cases, slow mass transfer to the aqueous phase reduces the bioavailability of the contaminant and consequently decreases the potential source zone depletion enhancement. In this work, the effect of rate limited mass transfer on bio-enhanced dissolution of DNAPL chlorinated ethenes is investigated through a numerical study. A multi-phase, multi-component groundwater transport model is employed to simulate DNAPL mass depletion for a range of source zone scenarios. Rate limited mass transfer is modeled by a linear driving force model, employing a thermodynamic approach for the calculation of the DNAPL - water interfacial area. Metabolic reductive dechlorination is modeled by Monod kinetics, considering microbial growth and self-inhibition. The model was utilized to identify conditions in which mass transfer, rather than reaction, is the limiting process, as indicated by the bioavailability number. In such cases, reaction is slower than expected, and further increase in the reaction rate does not enhance mass depletion. Mass transfer rate limitations were shown to affect both dechlorination and microbial growth kinetics. The complex dynamics between mass transfer, DNAPL transport and distribution, and

  14. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in an Ejection Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kologrivov, M. M.; Buzovskii, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in an ejection apparatus during condensation of vapor-gas mixture components on cold brine droplets are presented. The local parameters of working flows were determined by solving a system of differential heat transfer equations with account for the hydrodynamic pattern. Calculations were carried out on the assumption that the liquid spray is directed horizontally. The Stefan formula has been derived with reference to a spherical coordinate system. The results of calculation of heat and mass transfer rates with and without regard for steam condensation jointly with hydrocarbon vapors are compared and analyzed. Estimation of the effect exerted by the apparatus and drip pan walls on the general process of heat and mass transfer was carried out. The results of simulation made it possible to quantitatively estimate the influence of the adopted thickness of the diffusional boundary layer on the vapor-air mixture cooling effect.

  15. Gas-liquid mass transfer in filamentous slurries in airlift bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chisti, M.Y.; Moo-Young, M. )

    1988-01-01

    Biotechnology production processes are often critically dependent on oxygen transfer in gas-liquid-solid multiphase systems. Some of these biofluid slurries are composed of fibrous or filamentous, mycelial, solids suspended in a water-like medium. Examples are the broths of Aspergilli, Penicillia, Neurospora and Streptomyces, all of which are of commercial importance. This paper reports of the gas-liquid mass transfer behaviour of aqueous slurries of cellulose fibre solids (1-3 wt./vol. % solids in 0.15 kmol m/sup -3/ NaCl) which simulate the filamentous fermentation broths of interest. Fundamental investigations into the relationship between the mass transfer coefficient (k/sub L/) and bubble diameter (d/sub B/) are undertaken. The observations can be usefully employed for scale-up of bioreactors for gas-liquid mass transfer as demonstrated in the paper.

  16. Stability of coaxial jets confined in a tube with heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Lokanath; Cheung, Fan-Bill; Bajorek, Stephen M.

    2016-02-01

    A linear temporal stability of coaxial confined jets in a vertical tube involving heat and mass transfer at the interface is presented in this paper. A potential flow analysis that includes the effect of viscosity at the interface is performed in analyzing the stability of the system. Film boiling in a vertical tube gives rise to the flow configuration explored in this work. The effects of various non-dimensional parameters on the growth rate and the neutral curve are discussed. The heat transfer at the interface has been characterized by introducing a heat flux ratio between the conduction heat flux and the evaporation heat flux. Viscous forces and the heat and mass transfer at the interface are found to stabilize the flow both in the capillary instability region and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability region. Increasing heat and mass transfer at the interface stabilizes the flow to small as well as very large wave numbers.

  17. Effect of photosensitizer and hydrogen peroxide on desulfurization of light oil by photochemical reaction and liquid-liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Takayuki; Shiraishi, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Ken; Komasawa, Isao

    1997-03-01

    A desulfurization process for dibenzothiophene (DBT) by a combination of photochemical reaction and liquid-liquid extraction has been investigated. The DBT dissolved in tetradecane was photodecomposed by the use of a high-pressure mercury lamp and removed into the water phase at conditions of room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The addition of benzophenone (BZP), a triplet photosensitizer, enhanced the removal of DBT from tetradecane. This reaction, however, hardly proceeded in the presence of naphthalene (NP), probably because of triplet energy transfer from photoexcited DBT or BZP to ground-state NP. The addition of hydrogen peroxide enhanced the desulfurization of commercial light oil as well as the removal of DBT from tetradecane, since H{sub 2}O{sub 2} acted as a weak oxidizing agent for photoexcited DBT and interrupted the energy transfer from excited DBT to NP to some extent. In the case using a 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution, the desulfurization yield of commercial light oil was 75% following 24 h of photoirradiation and the sulfur content in the light oil was reduced from 0.2 wt % to less than 0.05 wt %.

  18. Rotating machinery heat and mass transfer research in the People's Republic of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.-H.; Ko, S.-Y.; Liu, D.; Shen, J.; Xu, J.-Z.

    A survey of research on rotating machinery heat and mass transfer in the People's Republic of China has been made. Since the later part of 1950's, considerable research and development work has been conducted in this field in China in order to improve the performance and prolong the life of rotating machinery. The emphasis of gas turbine heat transfer has been made in this survey. The water cooling of generator and the heat transfer of rotary piston engine are also included. Researches on the measuring technique of rotating machinery such as the temperature measurement, heat flux gauge, turbulence measurement, optical measurement and flow field visualization are discussed. The following topics of gas turbine heat and mass transfer are included: numerical analysis of air cooling of turbine blades, internal cooling passage heat transfer, impingment cooling, film cooling, transpiration cooling of turbine blades, cooling of blade root tenon, cooling of rotor disc, film cooling of flame tube and cooling of afterburner.

  19. Mass savings domain of plasma propulsion for LEO to GEO transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Choueiri, E.Y.; Kelly, A.J.; Jahn, R.G. )

    1993-01-20

    A parametric model is used to study the mass savings of plasma propulsion over advanced chemical propulsion for lower earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) transfer. Such savings are characterized by stringent requirements of massive payloads (O(10) metric tons) and high power levels (O(100) kW). Mass savings on the order of the payload mass are possible but at the expense of longer transfer times (8--20 months). Typical of the savings domain is the case of a self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster running quasi-steadily, at an [ital I][sub [ital s

  20. A Convergence Study of Mass Transfer in a Simulated Double White Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Tohline, J. E.; Frank, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present evolutions of a model double white dwarf binary with a low initial mass ratio (q = 0.4). We vary both the initial depth of contact (and hence the initial mass transfer rate) as well as the numerical resolution in our Eulerian hydrodynamics code. At the highest resolution of about 47 million grid cells we find that the binary has an initially growing mass transfer rate that then declines as the binary separates through the 50 orbital periods of the simulation. The lower resolution run (evolved with about 3 million cells) of the same binary also shows evidence for stable mass transfer though the mass transfer rate is significantly higher - emphasizing the importance of numerical resolution in these simulations. In this presentation we quantify the convergence of mass transfer between donor and accretor and measure the exchange of angular momentum through orbit-averaged equations. This work has been supported in part by NASA Astrophysics Theory Program grant number NNX10AC72G. The computations were performed on Teragrid and LONI facilities.

  1. Heat and mass transfer of submerged helium injection in liquid oxygen vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngsuk; Cho, Namkyung; Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-11-01

    The submerged helium injection process results in the heat and mass transfer between the helium bubble and the cryogenic liquid. The objective of this paper is to analyze the dynamics of the heat and mass transfer process. It is observed that during the helium injection process the dynamics of mass transfer is dominant and the transient heat transfer is negligible. The helium bubble shape and rising patterns are observed with a visualization device that helps to discern the dominant process between heat transfer and mass transfer. The clustering patterns such as coalescence of helium bubbles are observed with the visualization device. The visualization results indicate that, it is very difficult to determine the representative size of bubbles due to the irregular shape of the helium bubbles. The shape and size of the helium bubbles are important parameters for evaluating the overall mass transfer coefficient (kGA) which is the essential parameter for calculating the evaporation rate of the bulk liquid into the helium bubbles. In this paper, the simplified lumped model is considered to fairly approximate the evaporation rate of the cryogenic liquid into the bubbles and the cooling rate of helium injection. The empirical correlation for the average concentration (C‾A) of evaporated cryogenic liquid into the helium bubbles is presented and the overall mass transfer coefficients (kGA) are calculated as the result of the lumped model. The proposed model and empirical correlations are compared with the experimental results, and the comparison result shows good agreement with differences that are less than ±0.4 K.

  2. Heat and mass transfer in a steam-generating tube

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshchuk, V.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Reliable data on the distribution of phases of steam-water flow in a channel cross-section, on steam and water velocities, and on void fractions are almost non-existent. This paper reports that by assuming that u{sub 1}/u{sub 3} = square root {rho}{prime}/{rho}{prime}{prime} (where u{sub 1} and u{sub 3} are the velocities of steam in the flow core and of a liquid film near a wall, {rho}{prime}{prime} and {rho}{prime} are the densities of corresponding phases) and by using the limiting void fractions x{sup o}{sub lim}, the above-mentioned flow parameters can be determined analytically for the instant of onset of a heat transfer crisis of the second kind.

  3. Analysis of amantadine in biological fluids using hollow fiber-based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction followed by corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Khayamian, Taghi; Mirmahdieh, Shiva; Bidgoli, Ali Akbar Hajialiakbari

    2011-10-15

    A method based on liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction combined with corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for the analysis of amantadine in human urine and plasma samples. Amantadine was extracted from alkaline aqueous sample as donor phase through a thin phase of organic solvent (n-dodecane) filling the pores of the hollow fiber wall and then back extracted into the organic acceptor phase (methanol) located in the lumen of the hollow fiber. All variables affecting the extraction of analyte including acceptor organic solvent type, concentration of NaOH in donor phase, ionic strength of the sample and extraction time were studied. The linear range was 20-1000 and 5-250 ng/mL for plasma and urine, respectively (r(2)≥0.990). The limits of detection were calculated to be 7.2 and 1.6 ng/mL for plasma and urine, respectively. The relative standard deviation was lower than 8.2% for both urine and plasma samples. The enrichment factors were between 45 and 54. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of amantadine in urine and plasma samples. PMID:21956021

  4. Application of liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid-chromatography for the determination of sulfonamides in water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Yi; Huang, Shang-Da

    2008-03-31

    This work presents a novel liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (LLLME) technique for the extraction of sulfonamides from aqueous systems; it combines with high-performance liquid-chromatography-ultraviolet absorbance detection (HPLC/UV). In this experiment the sulfonamides were successively extracted from a donor phase (i.e., a water sample) into several microliters of an organic phase and then from the organic phase into an acceptor phase (i.e., an aqueous extract) by LLLME. The following separation and quantitative analyses were performed using HPLC/UV with 265 nm detection. Extraction condition such as solvent identity, agitation, extraction time, acceptor phase NaOH concentration, donor phase pH, and salt addition were optimized. Relative standard deviation (RSD, 2.6-5.3%), coefficient of estimation (R2, 0.9972-0.9999), and method detection limit (MDL, 0.11-0.77 ng mL(-1)) were achieved under the selected conditions. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analyses of three practical water samples and the relative recoveries of sulfonamides from the spiked water samples were in the range of 86.2-108.7%. The proposed method also confirms microextraction to be robust to monitoring trace levels of sulfacetamide, sulfadiazine, sulfathiazole, sulfamerazine, sulfadimidine, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfaquinoxaline in aqueous samples. PMID:18331856

  5. Ultra-hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate supported hollow-fiber membrane liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction of chlorophenols.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dandan; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-hydrophobic ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([HMIM][FAP]) was immobilized in the pores of a polypropylene hollow fiber for liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME) of chlorophenols (CPs) (4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol). The analytes were first extracted from 10 ml of water sample into the ionic liquid membrane, and then were extracted back into 5 μl of sodium hydroxide aqueous solution in the hollow fiber channel. After extraction, the acceptor solution was directly injected into a high-performance liquid chromatographic system for analysis. Extraction parameters such as extraction time, salt concentration in the sample, the pH of the sample and acceptor phase, and stirring rate during extraction were investigated. The relative standard deviations of the analytes varied from 4 to 6%. Limits of detection of <0.5 ng/ml were obtained for the three analytes. The squared regression coefficients relating to the calibration curve were ≥0.9941. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of CPs in canal water. PMID:25476289

  6. Automated dynamic hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction combined with capillary electrophoresis for speciation of mercury in biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingjing; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    A simple home-made automatic dynamic hollow fiber based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (AD-HF-LLLME) device was designed and constructed for the simultaneous extraction of organomercury and inorganic mercury species with the assistant of a programmable flow injection analyzer. With 18-crown-6 as the complexing reagent, mercury species including methyl-, ethyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury were extracted into the organic phase (chlorobenzene), and then back-extracted into the acceptor phase of 0.1% (m/v) 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (MPS) aqueous solution. Compared with automatic static (AS)-HF-LLLME system, the extraction equilibrium of target mercury species was obtained in shorter time with higher extraction efficiency in AD-HF-LLLME system. Based on it, a new method of AD-HF-LLLME coupled with large volume sample stacking (LVSS)-capillary electrophoresis (CE)/UV detection was developed for the simultaneous analysis of methyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury species in biological samples and environmental water. Under the optimized conditions, AD-HF-LLLME provided high enrichment factors (EFs) of 149-253-fold within relatively short extraction equilibrium time (25min) and good precision with RSD between 3.8 and 8.1%. By combining AD-HF-LLLME with LVSS-CE/UV, EFs were magnified up to 2195-fold and the limits of detection (at S/N=3) for target mercury species were improved to be sub ppb level. PMID:26363947

  7. Hollow fiber-based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction followed by flow injection analysis using column-less HPLC for the determination of phenazopyridine in plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Bidgoli, Ali Akbar Hajialiakbari; Farajmand, Bahman

    2011-07-01

    Hollow fiber-based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME) followed by flow injection analysis and diode array detection (FIA-DAD) was applied as a simple and sensitive quantitative method for the determination of phenazopyridine in urine and plasma samples. Flow injection system included a conventional HPLC system (without a chromatographic column) and a diode array detector. The extraction of phenazopyridine was carried out using diphenyl ether as the organic phase for filling the pores of the hollow fiber wall, and 0.1 M H(2)SO(4) solution as acceptor phase in the lumen of the fiber. The factors affecting the HF-LLLME and flow injection analysis including type of organic solvent, pH of donor phase, extraction temperature, extraction time, stirring rate, and pH of mobile phase were investigated and the optimal extraction conditions were established. With the consumption of 5 mL of sample solution, the enrichment factor was about 230. The limit of detection was 0.5 μg/L with inter- and intra-day precision being (RSD%) 6.9 and 4.9, respectively. Excellent linearity was found between 5 and 200 μg/L. PMID:21681956

  8. Fundamental mass transfer model for indoor air emissions from surface coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Guo, Z.; Sparks, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the work of researchers at the U.S. EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (Indoor Air Branch) who are evaluating mass transfer models based on fundamental principles to determine their effectiveness in predicting emissions from indoor architectural coatings. As a first step, a simple model based on Fick's Law of Diffusion has been developed. In the model, the mass transfer rate is assumed to be controlled by the boundary layer mass transfer coefficient, the saturation vapor pressure of the material being emitted, and the mass of volatile material remaining in the source at any point in time. Both static and dynamic chamber tests were conducted to obtain model validation data. Further validation experiments were conducted in a test house. Results of these tests are presented.

  9. Fuel cell collector plates with improved mass transfer channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Vladimir; Barbir, Frano; Neutzler, Jay K.

    2003-04-22

    A fuel cell collector plate can be provided with one or more various channel constructions for the transport of reactants to the gas diffusion layer and the removal of water therefrom. The outlet channel can be arranged to have a reduced volume compared to the inlet channel, in both interdigitated and discontinuous spiral applications. The land width between an inlet channel and outlet channel can be reduced to improved mass flow rate in regions of deleted reactant concentrations. Additionally or alternatively, the depth of the inlet channel can be reduced in the direction of flow to reduce the diffusion path as the concentration of reactant is reduced.

  10. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. I. Phase-dependent Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Observations reveal that mass-transferring binary systems may have non-zero orbital eccentricities. The time evolution of the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity of mass-transferring eccentric binary systems is an important part of binary evolution theory and has been widely studied. However, various different approaches to and assumptions on the subject have made the literature difficult to comprehend and comparisons between different orbital element time evolution equations not easy to make. Consequently, no self-consistent treatment of this phase has ever been included in binary population synthesis codes. In this paper, we present a general formalism to derive the time evolution equations of the binary orbital elements, treating mass loss and mass transfer as perturbations of the general two-body problem. We present the self-consistent form of the perturbing acceleration and phase-dependent time evolution equations for the orbital elements under different mass loss/transfer processes. First, we study the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. Then, we proceed with non-isotropic ejection and accretion in a conservative as well as a non-conservative manner for both point masses and extended bodies. We compare the derived equations with similar work in the literature and explain the existing discrepancies.

  11. Disentangling oil weathering using GC x GC. 2. Mass transfer calculations.

    PubMed

    Arey, J Samuel; Nelson, Robert K; Plata, Desiree L; Reddy, Christopher M

    2007-08-15

    Hydrocarbon mass transfers to the atmosphere and water column drive the early weathering of oil spills and also control the chemical exposures of many coastal wildlife species. However, in the field, mass transfer rates of individual hydrocarbons to air and water are often uncertain. In the Part 1 companion to this paper, we used comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) to identify distinct signatures of evaporation and dissolution encoded in the compositional evolution of weathered oils. In Part 2, we further investigate patterns of mass removal in GC x GC chromatograms using a mass transfer model. The model was tailored to conditions at a contaminated beach on Buzzards Bay, MA, after the 2003 Bouchard 120 oil spill. The model was applied to all resolved hydrocarbon compounds in the C11-C24 boiling range, based on their GC x GC-estimated vapor pressures and aqueous solubilities. With no fitted parameters, the model successfully predicted GC x GC chromatogram patterns of mass removal associated with evaporation, water-washing, and diffusion-limited transport. This enabled a critical field evaluation of the mass transfer model and also allowed mass apportionment estimates of hundreds of individual hydrocarbon compounds to air and water. Ultimately, this method should improve assessments of wildlife exposures to oil spill hydrocarbons. PMID:17874782

  12. Vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; Lu, Ying; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced-emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet (VSLLME-SFO) was developed for the fast, simple and efficient determination of cadmium (Cd) in water samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). In the VSLLME-SFO process, the addition of surfactant (as an emulsifier), could enhance the mass transfer from the aqueous solution into the extraction solvent. The extraction solvent could be dispersed into the aqueous phase under vigorous shaking with the vortex. In this paper, we investigated the influences of analytical parameters, including pH, extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and vortex time, on the extraction efficiency of Cd. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection was 0.16 μg/L. The analyte enrichment factor was 37.68. The relative standard deviation was 3.2% (10 μg/L, n = 10) and the calibration graph was linear, ranging from 0.5 to 30 μg/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of ultra-trace Cd in river water and wastewater samples. PMID:27232416

  13. Vortex- and CO2 -gas-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with salt addition for the high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of furanic compounds in concentrated juices and dried fruits.

    PubMed

    Abu-Bakar, Nur-Bahiyah; Makahleh, Ahmad; Saad, Bahruddin

    2016-03-01

    A novel microextraction method based on vortex- and CO2 -assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with salt addition for the isolation of furanic compounds (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furaldehyde, 2-furaldehyde, 3-furaldehyde, 2-furoic and 3-furoic acids) was developed. Purging the sample with CO2 was applied after vortexing to enhance the phase separation and mass transfer of the analytes. The optimum extraction conditions were: extraction solvent (volume), propyl acetate (125 μL); sample pH, 2.4; vortexing time, 45 s; salt concentration, 25% w/v and purging time, 5 min. The analytes were separated using an ODS Hypersil C18 column (250×4.6 mm i.d, 5 μm) under gradient flow. The proposed method showed good linearities (r(2) >0.999), low detection limits (0.08-1.9 μg/L) and good recoveries (80.7-122%). The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of the furanic compounds in concentrated juice (mango, date, orange, pomegranate, roselle, mangosteen and soursop) and dried fruit (prune, date and apricot paste) samples. PMID:26718308

  14. Liquid-liquid separation in solutions of normal and sickle cell hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Oleg; Chen, Kai; Nagel, Ronald L.; Elison Hirsch, Rhoda; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2002-06-01

    We show that in solutions of human hemoglobin (Hb)oxy- and deoxy-Hb A or Sof near-physiological pH, ionic strength, and Hb concentration, liquid-liquid phase separation occurs reversibly and reproducibly at temperatures between 35 and 40°C. In solutions of deoxy-HbS, we demonstrate that the dense liquid droplets facilitate the nucleation of HbS polymers, whose formation is the primary pathogenic event for sickle cell anemia. In view of recent results that shifts of the liquid-liquid separation phase boundary can be achieved by nontoxic additives at molar concentrations up to 30 times lower than the protein concentrations, these findings open new avenues for the inhibition of the HbS polymerization.

  15. Determination of liquid-liquid critical point composition using 90∘ laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, J. Charles; Brown, Allison M.; Helvie, Elise N.; Dean, Kevin M.

    2016-04-01

    Despite over a century of characterization efforts, liquid-liquid critical point compositions are difficult to identify with good accuracy. Reported values vary up to 10% for even well-studied systems. Here, a technique is presented for high-precision determination of the critical composition of a partially miscible binary liquid system. Ninety-degree laser light-scattering intensities from single-phase samples are analyzed using an equation derived from nonclassical power laws and the pseudospinodal approximation. Results are reported for four liquid-liquid systems (aniline + hexane, isobutyric acid + water, methanol + cyclohexane, and methanol + carbon disulfide). Compared to other methods, the 90∘ light-scattering approach has a strong dependence on composition near the critical point, is less affected by temperature fluctuations, and is insensitive to the presence of trace impurities in the samples. Critical compositions found with 90∘ light scattering are precise to the parts-per-thousand level and show long-term reproducibility.

  16. Laser capillary spectrophotometric acquisition of bivariate drop size and concentration data for liquid-liquid dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Bae, Jae-Heum

    1991-01-01

    A laser capillary spectrophotometric technique measures real time or near real time bivariate drop size and concentration distribution for a reactive liquid-liquid dispersion system. The dispersion is drawn into a precision-bore glass capillary and an appropriate light source is used to distinguish the aqueous phase from slugs of the organic phase at two points along the capillary whose separation is precisely known. The suction velocity is measured, as is the length of each slug from which the drop free diameter is calculated. For each drop, the absorptivity at a given wavelength is related to the molar concentration of a solute of interest, and the concentration of given drops of the organic phase is derived from pulse heights of the detected light. This technique permits on-line monitoring and control of liquid-liquid dispersion processes.

  17. Laser capillary spectrophotometric acquisition of bivariate drop size and concentration data for liquid-liquid dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Bae, J.H.

    1991-12-24

    A laser capillary spectrophotometric technique measures real time or near real time bivariate drop size and concentration distribution for a reactive liquid-liquid dispersion system. The dispersion is drawn into a precision-bore glass capillary and an appropriate light source is used to distinguish the aqueous phase from slugs of the organic phase at two points along the capillary whose separation is precisely known. The suction velocity is measured, as is the length of each slug from which the drop free diameter is calculated. For each drop, the absorptivity at a given wavelength is related to the molar concentration of a solute of interest, and the concentration of given drops of the organic phase is derived from pulse heights of the detected light. This technique permits on-line monitoring and control of liquid-liquid dispersion processes. 17 figures.

  18. Detachment of particles and particle clusters from liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sinn, N; Alishahi, M; Hardt, S

    2015-11-15

    The detachment of microspheres from a liquid/liquid interface triggered by body forces is studied experimentally, both for the case of single particles and for particle clusters. The values of the critical force required to detach particles from the interface are in agreement with the maximum values of the wetting force keeping a particles at the interface. In the case of particle clusters, a rearrangement of the cluster configuration from a raft to a more compact structure is observed when the body force is increased. Clusters detach from the liquid/liquid interface at smaller acceleration values than single particles. The critical accelerations required to detach particle clusters are consistent with models assuming that the wetting force acts at the circumference of a spherical or hemispherical densely packed particle cluster. These models predict that the critical acceleration for particle clusters scales as n(-2/3), where n is the number of particles in a cluster. PMID:26207586

  19. CFD simulation of liquid-liquid dispersions in a stirred tank bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelves, R.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper simulations were developed in order to allow the examinations of drop sizes in liquid-liquid dispersions (oil-water) in a stirred tank bioreactor using CFD simulations (Computational Fluid Dynamics). The effects of turbulence, rotating flow, drop breakage were simulated by using the k-e, MRF (Multiple Reference Frame) and PBM (Population Balance Model), respectively. The numerical results from different operational conditions are compared with experimental data obtained from an endoscope technique and good agreement is achieved. Motivated by these simulated and experimental results CFD simulations are qualified as a very promising tool for predicting hydrodynamics and drop sizes especially useful for liquid-liquid applications which are characterized by the challenging problem of emulsion stability due to undesired drop sizes.

  20. Analysis of turbulent heat transfer, mass transfer, and friction in smooth tubes at high Prandtl and Schmidt numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G

    1955-01-01

    The expression for eddy diffusivity from a previous analysis was modified in order to account for the effect of kinematic viscosity on the turbulence in the region close to a wall. By using the modified expression, good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental results for heat and mass transfer at Prandtl and Schmidt numbers between 0.5 and 3000. The effects of length-to-diameter ratio and of variable viscosity were also investigated for a wide range of Prandtl numbers.

  1. On the upscaling of mass transfer rate expressions for interpretation of source zone partitioning tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroumand, Ali; Abriola, Linda M.

    2015-02-01

    Analysis of partitioning tracer tests conducted in dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones relies on conceptual models that describe mass exchange between the DNAPL and aqueous phases. Such analysis, however, is complicated by the complex distribution of entrapped DNAPL mass and formation heterogeneity. Due to parameter uncertainty in heterogeneous regions and the desire to reduce model complexity, the effect of mass transfer limitations is often neglected, and an equilibrium-based model is typically used to interpret test results. This work explores the consequences of that simplifying assumption on test data interpretation and develops an alternative upscaled modeling approach to quantify effective mass transfer rates. To this end, a series of partitioning tracer tests is numerically simulated in heterogeneous two-dimensional PCE-DNAPL source zones, representative of a range of hydraulic conductivity and DNAPL mass distribution characteristics. The effective mass transfer coefficient corresponding to each test is determined by fitting an upscaled model to the simulated data, and regression analysis is performed to explore the correlation between various source zone metrics and the effective mass transfer coefficient. Results suggest that vertical DNAPL spreading, Reynolds number, pool fraction, and the effective organic phase saturation are the most significant parameters controlling tracer partitioning rates. Finally, a correlation for prediction of the effective (upscaled) mass transfer coefficient is proposed and verified using existing experimental data. The developed upscaled model incorporates the influence of physical heterogeneity on the rate of tracer partitioning and, thus, can be used for the estimation of source zone mass distribution characteristics from tracer test results.

  2. Upscaling transport with mass transfer models: Mean behavior and propagation of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernã Ndez-Garcia, D.; Llerar-Meza, G.; Gómez-HernáNdez, J. Jaime

    2009-10-01

    The choice of an adequate large-scale conceptual transport model constitutes a major challenge associated with the upscaling of solute transport. Among the different alternatives to the classical advection-dispersion model, the (multirate) mass transfer model has been proposed as a valuable and convenient alternative to model the large-scale behavior of solute transport. This paper evaluates the use of mass transfer models as a constitutive equation for upscaling solute transport. To achieve this, we compare Monte Carlo simulations of solute transport at two different support scales. Transport simulations performed at the smallest scale represent a set of reference transport solutions described at a high resolution, which are contrasted against transport simulations obtained using an upscaled model (low resolution). Several formulations of the multirate mass transfer model, which differ in the type of memory function (single rate, double rate, and truncated power law), are used as a constitutive transport equation. The large-scale scenario represents a simplified model obtained by partially homogenizing the reference solution. Results show that the double-rate and the truncated power law mass transfer models are capable of properly describing the ensemble average behavior of the main features associated with the integrated breakthrough curves. However, the uncertainty associated with the upscaled mass transfer models was substantially smaller than that attributed to the reference solution. Importantly, the cumulative distribution function of concentrations associated with the upscaled model follows a distribution similar to the reference solution but with smaller statistical dispersion. The reason is that while appropriate memory functions can be used to preserve the residence time distribution of mass particles during upscaling, the lack of memory in space prevents the model from reproducing mass fluxes in all directions. Specifically, the reproduction of mass

  3. Bridge Frost Prediction by Heat and Mass Transfer Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tina M.; Takle, Eugene S.

    2006-03-01

    Frost on roadways and bridges can present hazardous conditions to motorists, particularly when it occurs in patches or on bridges when adjacent roadways are clear of frost. To minimize materials costs, vehicle corrosion, and negative environmental impacts, frost-suppression chemicals should be applied only when, where, and in the appropriate amounts needed to maintain roadways in a safe condition for motorists. Accurate forecasts of frost onset times, frost intensity, and frost disappearance (e.g., melting or sublimation) are needed to help roadway maintenance personnel decide when, where, and how much frost-suppression chemical to use. A finite-difference algorithm (BridgeT) has been developed that simulates vertical heat transfer in a bridge based on evolving meteorological conditions at its top and bottom as supplied by a weather forecast model. BridgeT simulates bridge temperatures at numerous points within the bridge (including its upper and lower surface) at each time step of the weather forecast model and calculates volume per unit area (i.e., depth) of deposited, melted, or sublimed frost. This model produces forecasts of bridge surface temperature, frost depth, and bridge condition (i.e., dry, wet, icy/snowy). Bridge frost predictions and bridge surface temperature are compared with observed and measured values to assess BridgeT's skill in forecasting bridge frost and associated conditions.

  4. Volatile organic compound emission rate from diffused aeration systems. 1: Mass transfer modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.M.; Yu, C.F.

    1995-08-01

    The activated sludge process is one of the most commonly used biochemical oxidation process for the secondary treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. The release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants has recently caused great concern. In wastewater treatment plants, many operation units such s equalization and aeration involve oxygen transfer between wastewater and air. While oxygen is transferred from air to wastewater, VOCs are stripped from wastewater to air. Due to increasingly stringent environmental regulations, wastewater treatment operators have to do VOC inventory of their facilities. A mass transfer model for VOCs is therefore called for to assess VOC emission rates from wastewater treatment processes. Almost all existing methods adopt an oxygen mass transfer model standardized by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) to evaluate VOC emission rates. A new and more fundamental oxygen mass transfer model for diffused aeration systems was developed to assess the VOC emission rates. The new model provides better insight of the VOC mass transfer process and requires only aeration performance data to predict the VOC emission rates. The results and implications of both models were discussed and compared.

  5. Microfluidic bubbler facilitates near complete mass transfer for sustainable multiphase and microbial processing.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jordan J; Crivellari, Francesca; Gagnon, Zachary; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    A microfluidic device (channels <70 μm) was utilized to create micro-scale bubbles to significantly increase mass transfer efficiency at low flow rates. The convergence of one gas and two liquid channels at a Y-junction generates bubbles via cyclic changes in pressure. At low flow rates, the bubbles had an average diameter of 110 μm, corresponding to a volumetric mass transfer KL a of 1.43 h(-1) . Values of KL a normalized per flow rate showed that the microbubbler had a 100-fold increased transfer efficiency compared to four other commonly used bubblers. The calculated percentage of oxygen transferred was approximately 90%, which was consistent with a separate off-gas analysis. The improved mass transfer was also tested in an algae bioreactor in which the microbubbler absorbed approximately 90% of the CO2 feed compared to 2% in the culture with an alternative needle bubbling method. The microbubbler yielded a cell density 82% of the cell density for the alternative needle tip with an 800-fold lower flow rate (0.5 mL/min versus 400 mL/min) and a 700-fold higher ratio of biomass to fed carbon dioxide. The application of microfluidics may transform interfacial processing in order to increase mass transfer efficiencies, minimize gas feeding, and provide for more sustainable multiphase processes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1924-1933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928403

  6. Mathematical simulation of convective-radiative heat transfer in a ventilated rectangular cavity with consideration of internal mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, M. A.; Shishkin, N. I.

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical simulation of the nonstationary regimes of heat-and-mass transfer in a ventilated rectangular cavity with heat-conducting walls of finite thickness in the presence of a heat-generating element of constant temperature has been carried out with account for the radiative heat transfer in the Rosseland approximation. As mechanisms of energy transfer in this cavity, the combined convection and the thermal radiation in the gas space of the cavity and the heat conduction in the elements of its fencing solid shell were considered. The mathematical model formulated in the dimensionless stream function-vorticity vector-temperature-concentration variables was realized numerically with the use of the finite-difference method. The streamline, temperature-field, and concentration distributions reflecting the influence of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 104, 105, 106), the nonstationarity (0 < τ ≤ 1000), and the optical thickness of the medium (τλ = 50, 100, 200) on the regimes of the gas flow and the heat-and-mass transfer in the cavity have been obtained.

  7. Real Space Imaging of Nanoparticle Assembly at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces with Nanoscale Resolution.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luca; Li-Destri, Giovanni; Thomson, Neil H; Konovalov, Oleg; Pontoni, Diego

    2016-09-14

    Bottom up self-assembly of functional materials at liquid-liquid interfaces has recently emerged as method to design and produce novel two-dimensional (2D) nanostructured membranes and devices with tailored properties. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be seen as a "factory floor" for nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly, because NPs are driven there by a reduction of interfacial energy. Such 2D assembly can be characterized by reciprocal space techniques, namely X-ray and neutron scattering or reflectivity. These techniques have drawbacks, however, as the structural information is averaged over the finite size of the radiation beam and nonperiodic isolated assemblies in 3D or defects may not be easily detected. Real-space in situ imaging methods are more appropriate in this context, but they often suffer from limited resolution and underperform or fail when applied to challenging liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we study the surfactant-induced assembly of SiO2 nanoparticle monolayers at a water-oil interface using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) achieving nanoscale resolved imaging capabilities. Hitherto, AFM imaging has been restricted to solid-liquid interfaces because applications to liquid interfaces have been hindered by their softness and intrinsic dynamics, requiring accurate sample preparation methods and nonconventional AFM operational schemes. Comparing both AFM and grazing incidence X-ray small angle scattering data, we unambiguously demonstrate correlation between real and reciprocal space structure determination showing that the average interfacial NP density is found to vary with surfactant concentration. Additionally, the interaction between the tip and the interface can be exploited to locally determine the acting interfacial interactions. This work opens up the way to studying complex nanostructure formation and phase behavior in a range of liquid-liquid and complex liquid interfaces. PMID:27571473

  8. Redox-active cross-linkable poly(ionic liquid)s.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiaofeng; Hempenius, Mark A; Vancso, G Julius

    2012-03-01

    The synthesis of a new class of cross-linkable redox-responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane)-based poly(ionic liquid)s (PFS-PILs) is reported. PFS-PILs self-cross-link at low concentrations into nanogels or form macroscopic hydrogel networks at higher concentrations. PFS-PILs proved to be efficient dispersants in the microemulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate, producing stable PFS-poly(methyl methacrylate) latex suspensions. PMID:22353019

  9. Liquid-liquid distribution of B group vitamins in polyethylene glycol-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Zykov, A. V.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2011-05-01

    General regularities of the liquid-liquid distribution of B1, B2, B6, and B12 vitamins in aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG-2000, PEG-5000) solution-aqueous salt solution systems are studied. The influence of the salting-out agent, the concentration of the polymer, and its molecular weight on the distribution coefficients and recovery factors of the vitamins are considered. Equations relating the distribution coefficients (log D) to the polymer concentration are derived.

  10. Mass transfer and interfacial properties in two-phase microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Hudson, Steven D.

    2009-11-01

    Drop-based microfluidic devices are becoming more common, and molecular mass transfer and drop circulation are issues that often affect the performance of such devices. Moreover, interfacial properties and surfactant mass transfer rates govern emulsion behavior. Since these phenomena depend strongly on drop size, measurement methods using small drops and flow typical of applications are desired. Using mineral oil as a continuous phase, water droplets and an alcohol surfactant, we demonstrate here a microfluidic approach to measure the interrelated phenomena of dynamic interfacial tension, surfactant mass transfer and interfacial retardation that employs droplet flows in a microchannel with constrictions/expansions. Interfacial flow is influenced markedly by adsorption of surfactant: severe interfacial retardation (by a factor of 30) is observed at low surfactant concentrations and interface remobilization is observed at higher surfactant concentrations. The interfacial tension is described by Langmuir kinetics and the parameters for interfaces with mineral oil (studied here) compare closely with those previously found at air interfaces. For the conditions explored, the surfactant mass transfer is described well by a mixed kinetic-diffusion limited model, and the desorption rate coefficients are measured to be both approximately 70 s-1. The transition from a diffusion-controlled to mixed diffusion-kinetic mass transfer mechanism predicted with reducing drop size is verified. This experimental approach (i.e. adjustable geometry and drop size and height) can therefore probe interfacial dynamics in simple and complex flow.

  11. Mass transfer of VOCs in laboratory-scale air sparging tank.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Ong, Say Kee; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2008-04-15

    Volatilization of VOCs was investigated using a 55-gal laboratory-scale model in which air sparging experiments were conducted with a vertical air injection well. In addition, X-ray imaging of an air sparging sand box showed air flows were in the form of air bubbles or channels depending on the size of the porous media. Air-water mass transfer was quantified using the air-water mass transfer coefficient which was determined by fitting the experimental data to a two-zone model. The two-zone model is a one-dimensional lumped model that accounts for the effects of air flow type and diffusion of VOCs in the aqueous phase. The experimental air-water mass transfer coefficients, KGa, obtained from this study ranged from 10(-2) to 10(-3)1/min. From a correlation analysis, the air-water mass transfer coefficient was found to be directly proportional to the air flow rate and the mean particle size of soil but inversely proportional to Henry's constant. The correlation results implied that the air-water mass transfer coefficient was strongly affected by the size of porous media and the air flow rates. PMID:17804158

  12. Heat/Mass Transfer Measurement on The Tip Surface Of Rotor Blade With Squlear Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Su; Lee, Dong Hyun; Lee, Woo Jin; Cho, Hyung Hee; Rhee, Dong-Ho; Kang, Shin-Hyung

    2010-06-01

    The present study investigates local heat/mass transfer characteristics on blade tip surface with squealer rim. A linear cascade experimental setup consists of three large scale airfoils was used. The axial chord length and turning angle of test blade are 237 mm and 126°, respectively. Heat/mass transfer coefficients were measured with three different rim heights (3%, 6% and 9% of axial chord length) and fixed tip clearance (2% of axial chord length). Main flow Reynolds number based on axial chord length is 1.5×105. Naphthalene sublimation method is used to measure the detailed mass transfer coefficient on the blade tip surface. The heat/mass transfer results show that as the rim height increases, the peak values on the upstream region of the tip surface decreases and moves to the suction side rim. At the downstream region of the tip surface, the pitch-wise averaged heat/mass transfer coefficients increases as the rim height increases.

  13. Calculation of the mass transfer coefficient for the combustion of a carbon particle

    SciTech Connect

    Scala, Fabrizio

    2010-01-15

    In this paper we address the calculation of the mass transfer coefficient around a burning carbon particle in an atmosphere of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O. The complete set of Stefan-Maxwell equations is analytically solved under the assumption of no homogeneous reaction in the boundary layer. An expression linking the oxygen concentration and the oxygen flux at the particle surface (as a function of the bulk gas composition) is derived which can be used to calculate the mass transfer coefficient. A very simple approximate explicit expression is also given for the mass transfer coefficient, that is shown to be valid in the low oxygen flux limit or when the primary combustion product is CO{sub 2}. The results are given in terms of a correction factor to the equimolar counter-diffusion mass transfer coefficient, which is typically available in the literature for specific geometries and/or fluid-dynamic conditions. The significance of the correction factor and the accuracy of the different available expressions is illustrated for several cases of practical interest. Results show that under typical combustion conditions the use of the equimolar counter-diffusion mass transfer coefficient can lead to errors up to 10%. Larger errors are possible in oxygen-enriched conditions, while the error is generally low in oxy-combustion. (author)

  14. Effect of electric fields on mass transfer to droplets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Budwig, R.

    1994-02-01

    During the six year funding period, the effects of a direct and alternating field upon single drop hydrodynamics and mass transfer were evaluated both experimentally and theoretically. Direct current field effects upon drop size, velocity and mass transfer rates were also observed for multiple drops formed in a three stage sieve tray column. Drop size, velocity, and mass transfer rates were measured experimentally and compared to simple models for direct current electric fields. Agreement between theory and experiment was found for drop charge, size, and velocity. Drop mass transfer coefficients were substantially larger than theoretical predictions while extraction efficiencies were moderately higher. Drop distortion and oscillation were observed and are thought to result in the experimentally observed higher values. For alternating current fields, drop flow streamlines and oscillations were measured and found to compare well with predictions from a solved mathematical model. In addition, equipment was constructed to determine mass transfer rates to oscillating drops. Concentration profiles in still and oscillating drops were measured and qualitatively compared to theoretical predictions.

  15. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-22

    While developing dry sorbent duct injection flue gas desulfurization processes may offer significant improvement in capital cost and process simplicity compared to wet scrubbing systems, the economics of this technology can be improved significantly by an improvement in sorbent utilization. While a general understanding of the mechanism by which the sorbents operate is known, a much more detailed knowledge of reaction rate-controlling phenomena, the role of inherent reactivity, and mass transfer effects and their interaction in needed. Objectives of this project are threefold: 1. Mass transfer investigation--determine the controlling physical and chemical processes that limit sorbent utilization. In particular, determine whether mass transfer is a controlling factor in in-duct flue gas desulfurization and establish the relative contributions of gas- and liquid-phase mass transfer and inherent sorbent reactivity. 2. Field test support--evaluate various sorbents, operating conditions and process schemes to support large-scale field testings at Meredosia and Beverly. 3. Mass transfer enhancement--examine various techniques that will enable sorbent utilization rates of at least 75 percent to be achieved. Sorbents investigated were Ca(OH){sub 2}, Mississippi hydrate and Mississippi slaked lime. Epsom Salt was investigated as an additive. Agglomeration of Ca(OH){sub 2} solids was also investigated. 3 refs., 92 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Understanding and controlling airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment: mass transfer analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Xiong, J; Mo, J; Gong, M; Cao, J

    2016-02-01

    Mass transfer is key to understanding and controlling indoor airborne organic chemical contaminants (e.g., VVOCs, VOCs, and SVOCs). In this study, we first introduce the fundamentals of mass transfer and then present a series of representative works from the past two decades, focusing on the most recent years. These works cover: (i) predicting and controlling emissions from indoor sources, (ii) determining concentrations of indoor air pollutants, (iii) estimating dermal exposure for some indoor gas-phase SVOCs, and (iv) optimizing air-purifying approaches. The mass transfer analysis spans the micro-, meso-, and macroscales and includes normal mass transfer modeling, inverse problem solving, and dimensionless analysis. These representative works have reported some novel approaches to mass transfer. Additionally, new dimensionless parameters such as the Little number and the normalized volume of clean air being completely cleaned in a given time period were proposed to better describe the general process characteristics in emissions and control of airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment. Finally, important problems that need further study are presented, reflecting the authors' perspective on the research opportunities in this area. PMID:25740682

  17. Relationship between the liquid liquid phase transition and dynamic behaviour in the Jagla model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Ehrenberg, Isaac; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study a spherically symmetric 'two-scale' Jagla potential with both repulsive and attractive ramps. This potential displays a liquid-liquid phase transition with a positively sloped coexistence line ending at a critical point well above the equilibrium melting line. We study the dynamic behaviour in the vicinity of this liquid-liquid critical point. Below the critical point, we find that the dynamics in the more ordered high density liquid (HDL) are much slower then the dynamics in the less ordered low density liquid (LDL). Moreover, the behaviour of the diffusion constant and relaxation time in the HDL phase follows approximately an Arrhenius law, while in the LDL phase the slope of the Arrhenius fit increases upon cooling. Above the critical pressure, as we cool the system at constant pressure, the behaviour of the dynamics smoothly changes with temperature. It resembles the behaviour of the LDL at high temperatures and resembles the behaviour of the HDL at low temperatures. This dynamic crossover happens in the vicinity of the Widom line (the extension of the coexistence line into the one-phase region) which also has a positive slope. Our work suggests a possible general relation between a liquid-liquid phase transition and the change in dynamics.

  18. Fast Method for Computing Chemical Potentials and Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria of Macromolecular Solutions.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-08-25

    Chemical potential is a fundamental property for determining thermodynamic equilibria involving exchange of molecules, such as between two phases of molecular systems. Previously, we developed the fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based method for Modeling Atomistic Protein-crowder interactions (FMAP) to calculate excess chemical potentials according to the Widom insertion. Intermolecular interaction energies were expressed as correlation functions and evaluated via FFT. Here, we extend this method to calculate liquid-liquid phase equilibria of macromolecular solutions. Chemical potentials are calculated by FMAP over a wide range of molecular densities, and the condition for coexistence of low- and high-density phases is determined by the Maxwell equal-area rule. When benchmarked on Lennard-Jones fluids, our method produces an accurate phase diagram at 18% of the computational cost of the current best method. Importantly, the gain in computational speed increases dramatically as the molecules become more complex, leading to many orders of magnitude in speed up for atomistically represented proteins. We demonstrate the power of FMAP by reporting the first results for the liquid-liquid coexistence curve of γII-crystallin represented at the all-atom level. Our method may thus open the door to accurate determination of phase equilibria for macromolecular mixtures such as protein-protein mixtures and protein-RNA mixtures, that are known to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27327881

  19. Liquid-liquid transition in a strong bulk metallic glass-forming liquid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kaban, Ivan; Shuleshova, Olga; Meyer, Andreas; Busch, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic phase transitions are common in crystalline solids. Recent studies suggest that phase transitions may also exist between two liquid forms with different entropy and structure. Such a liquid-liquid transition has been investigated in various substances including water, Al2O3-Y2O3 and network glass formers. However, the nature of liquid-liquid transition is debated due to experimental difficulties in avoiding crystallization and/or measuring at high temperatures/pressures. Here we report the thermodynamic and structural evidence of a temperature-induced weak first-order liquid-liquid transition in a bulk metallic glass-forming system Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni10Be(22.5) characterized by non- (or weak) directional bonds. Our experimental results suggest that the local structural changes during the transition induce the drastic viscosity changes without a detectable density anomaly. These changes are correlated with a heat capacity maximum in the liquid. Our findings support the hypothesis that the 'strong' kinetics (low fragility) of a liquid may arise from an underlying lambda transition above its glass transition. PMID:23817404

  20. Fragile-to-strong crossover coupled to the liquid-liquid transition in hydrophobic solutions.

    PubMed

    Corradini, D; Gallo, P; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E

    2012-05-01

    Using discrete molecular dynamics simulations we study the relation between the thermodynamic and diffusive behaviors of a primitive model of aqueous solutions of hydrophobic solutes consisting of hard spheres in the Jagla particles solvent, close to the liquid-liquid critical point of the solvent. We find that the fragile-to-strong dynamic transition in the diffusive behavior is always coupled to the low-density-high-density liquid transition. Above the liquid-liquid critical pressure, the diffusivity crossover occurs at the Widom line, the line along which the thermodynamic response functions show maxima. Below the liquid-liquid critical pressure, the diffusivity crossover occurs when the limit of mechanical stability lines are crossed, as indicated by the hysteresis observed when going from high to low temperature and vice versa. These findings show that the strong connection between dynamics and thermodynamics found in bulk water persists in hydrophobic solutions for concentrations from low to moderate, indicating that experiments measuring the relaxation time in aqueous solutions represent a viable route for solving the open questions in the field of supercooled water. PMID:23004763

  1. Heat capacity singularity of binary liquid mixtures at the liquid-liquid critical point.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Castro, Pablo; Troncoso, Jacobo; Peleteiro, José; Romaní, Luis

    2013-10-01

    The critical anomaly of the isobaric molar heat capacity for the liquid-liquid phase transition in binary nonionic mixtures is explained through a theory based on the general assumption that their partition function can be exactly mapped into that of the Ising three-dimensional model. Under this approximation, it is found that the heat capacity singularity is directly linked to molar excess enthalpy. In order to check this prediction and complete the available data for such systems, isobaric molar heat capacity and molar excess enthalpy near the liquid-liquid critical point were experimentally determined for a large set of binary liquid mixtures. Agreement between theory and experimental results-both from literature and from present work-is good for most cases. This fact opens a way for explaining and predicting the heat capacity divergence at the liquid-liquid critical point through basically the same microscopic arguments as for molar excess enthalpy, widely used in the frame of solution thermodynamics. PMID:24229116

  2. On the phase-field modelling of a miscible liquid/liquid boundary.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruilin; Vorobev, Anatoliy

    2016-02-15

    Mixing of miscible liquids is essential for numerous processes in industry and nature. Mixing, i.e. interpenetration of molecules through the liquid/liquid boundary, occurs via interfacial diffusion. Mixing can also involve externally or internally driven hydrodynamic flows, and can lead to deformation or disintegration of the liquid/liquid boundary. At the moment, the mixing dynamics remains poorly understood. The classical Fick's law, generally accepted for description of the diffusion process, does not explain the experimental observations, in particular, the recent experiments with dissolution of a liquid solute by a liquid solvent within a horizontal capillary (Stevar and Vorobev, 2012). We present the results of the numerical study aimed at development of an advanced model for the dissolution dynamics of liquid/liquid binary mixtures. The model is based on the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach that is used as a physics-based model for the thermo- and hydrodynamic evolution of binary mixtures. Within this approach, the diffusion flux is defined through the gradient of chemical potential, and, in particular, includes the effect of barodiffusion. The dynamic interfacial stresses at the miscible interface are also taken into account. The simulations showed that such an approach can accurately reproduce the shape of the solute/solvent boundary, and some aspects of the diffusion dynamics. Nevertheless, all experimentally-observed features of the diffusion motion of the solute/solvent boundary, were not reproduced. PMID:26609922

  3. C. elegans uses Liquid-Liquid Demixing for the Assembly of Non-Membrane-Bound Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Juelicher, Frank; Diaz Delgadillo, Andres Felipe; Jawerth, Louise; Hyman, Anthony A.; Department Biological Physics Team; Hyman Lab Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    P granules are liquid cytoplasmic RNA/Protein condensates known to determine the germ lineage in Caenorhabditis elegans. They resemble striking similarities with liquid droplets, such as dripping, shearing and wetting. Assuming that P granules are liquid-like we consider how they form in the crowded cytoplasm. Using confocal and light-sheet microscopy, P granule formation in-vivo and in-vitro is shown to share all hallmarks with a liquid-liquid phase-separation. Specifically, demixing is determined by temperature and concentration, the droplet formation is reversible with respect to temperature quenches and there is evidence for droplet growth due to coalescence and Ostwald-ripening. Liquid-liquid demixing in-vivo breaks the paradigmatic view that a molecular machinery is necessary to build up organelles through complex biological pathways. Instead we propose that P granules form following a Flory-Huggins model. Liquid-liquid demixing could also serve as a mechanism for the assembly of non-membrane-bound compartments in other living organisms.

  4. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, John W.; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2014-08-01

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases.

  5. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium.

    PubMed

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT. PMID:27497564

  6. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT.

  7. A comparison of various modes of liquid-liquid based microextraction techniques: determination of picric acid.

    PubMed

    Burdel, Martin; Šandrejová, Jana; Balogh, Ioseph S; Vishnikin, Andriy; Andruch, Vasil

    2013-03-01

    Three modes of liquid-liquid based microextraction techniques--namely auxiliary solvent-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, auxiliary solvent-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with low-solvent consumption, and ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction--were compared. Picric acid was used as the model analyte. The determination is based on the reaction of picric acid with Astra Phloxine reagent to produce an ion associate easily extractable by various organic solvents, followed by spectrophotometric detection at 558 nm. Each of the compared procedures has both advantages and disadvantages. The main benefit of ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction is that no hazardous chlorinated extraction solvents and no dispersive solvent are necessary. Therefore, this procedure was selected for validation. Under optimized experimental conditions (pH 3, 7 × 10(-5) mol/L of Astra Phloxine, and 100 μL of toluene), the calibration plot was linear in the range of 0.02-0.14 mg/L and the LOD was 7 μg/L of picric acid. The developed procedure was applied to the analysis of spiked water samples. PMID:23381802

  8. Behavior of supercooled aqueous solutions stemming from hidden liquid-liquid transition in water.

    PubMed

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2014-08-21

    A popular hypothesis that explains the anomalies of supercooled water is the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid transition hidden below the line of homogeneous nucleation. If this transition exists and if it is terminated by a critical point, the addition of a solute should generate a line of liquid-liquid critical points emanating from the critical point of pure metastable water. We have analyzed thermodynamic consequences of this scenario. In particular, we consider the behavior of two systems, H2O-NaCl and H2O-glycerol. We find the behavior of the heat capacity in supercooled aqueous solutions of NaCl, as reported by Archer and Carter [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8563 (2000)], to be consistent with the presence of the metastable liquid-liquid transition. We elucidate the non-conserved nature of the order parameter (extent of "reaction" between two alternative structures of water) and the consequences of its coupling with conserved properties (density and concentration). We also show how the shape of the critical line in a solution controls the difference in concentration of the coexisting liquid phases. PMID:25149798

  9. Numerical studies on the separation performance of liquid- liquid Hydrocyclone for higher water-cut wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei, H.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Hashim, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid-liquid hydrocyclones have nowadays become very useful in the oil industry because of their numerous applications. They can be installed downhole in the case of a well that produces higher water-oil ratios. The design of a liquid-liquid hydrocyclone for such a task is critical and every geometric part of the hydrocyclone has a part to play as far as separation is concerned. This work, through validated numerical technique, investigated the liquid-liquid hydrocyclone performance for the cases of single-inlet and dual-inlets, with different upper cylindrical lengths, specifically, 30mm and 60mm.It was observed that the hydrocyclones with the 30mm upper cylindrical section perform better than the ones with 60 mm upper cylindrical section. It was again noted that, even though higher number of tangential inlets increases the swirl intensity, they have the tendency to break up the oil droplets within the hydrocyclone because of increasing shear and jet flow interaction.

  10. A NUMERICAL METHOD FOR STUDYING SUPER-EDDINGTON MASS TRANSFER IN DOUBLE WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcello, Dominic C.; Tohline, Joel E. E-mail: tohline@phys.lsu.edu

    2012-04-01

    We present a numerical method for the study of double white dwarf (DWD) binary systems at the onset of super-Eddington mass transfer. We incorporate the physics of ideal inviscid hydrodynamical flow, Newtonian self-gravity, and radiation transport on a three-dimensional uniformly rotating cylindrical Eulerian grid. Care has been taken to conserve the key physical quantities such as angular momentum and energy. Our new method conserves total energy to a higher degree of accuracy than other codes that are presently being used to model mass transfer in DWD systems. We present the results of verification tests and simulate the first 20 + orbits of a binary system of mass ratio q 0.7 at the onset of dynamically unstable direct impact mass transfer. The mass transfer rate quickly exceeds the critical Eddington limit by many orders of magnitude, and thus we are unable to model a trans-Eddington phase. It appears that radiation pressure does not significantly affect the accretion flow in the highly super-Eddington regime. An optically thick common envelope forms around the binary within a few orbits. Although this envelope quickly exceeds the spatial domain of the computational grid, the fraction of the common envelope that exceeds zero gravitational binding energy is extremely small, suggesting that radiation-driven mass loss is insignificant in this regime. It remains to be seen whether simulations that capture the trans-Eddington phase of such flows will lead to the same conclusion or show that substantial material gets expelled.

  11. Broad spectrum drug screening using electron-ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of drugs and internal standard (promazine) is performed by mixing urine at basic pH with 1-chlorobutane. There are no hydrolysis or derivatization steps. After centrifugation the organic (upper) layer is transferred to another tube and evaporated. The dried extract is reconstituted with ethyl acetate and 1 microL is injected onto the GCMS. Drugs are volatilized in the GC inlet and separated on a capillary column. In the EI source drugs become positively charged and fragment. Mass analysis of ionized fragments occurs with a single quadrupole. The resulting full scan mass spectra are automatically searched against three libraries. PMID:20077071

  12. Effect of impeller geometry on gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in filamentous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dronawat, S N; Svihla, C K; Hanley, T R

    1997-01-01

    Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients were measured in suspensions of cellulose fibers with concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 g/L. The mass transfer coefficients were measured using the dynamic method. Results are presented for three different combinations of impellers at a variety of gassing rates and agitation speeds. Rheological properties of the cellulose fibers were also measured using the impeller viscometer method. Tests were conducted in a 20 L stirred-tank fermentor and in 65 L tank with a height to diameter ratio of 3:1. Power consumption was measured in both vessels. At low agitation rates, two Rushton turbines gave 20% better performance than the Rushton and hydrofoil combination and 40% better performance than the Rushton and propeller combination for oxygen transfer. At higher agitation rates, the Rushton and hydrofoil combination gave 14 and 25% better performance for oxygen transfer than two Rushton turbines and the Rushton and hydrofoil combination, respectively. PMID:18576095

  13. Quantitative spatially resolved measurements of mass transfer through laryngeal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Unwin, P R; Winlove, C P

    1997-11-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is a scanned probe microscope that uses the response of a mobile ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip to determine the reactivity, topography, and mass transport characteristics of interfaces with high spatial resolution. SECM strategies for measuring the rates of solute diffusion and convection through samples of cartilage, using amperometric UMEs, are outlined. The methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of oxygen and ruthenium(III) hexamine [Ru(NH3)6(3+)] in laryngeal cartilage. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cartilage is found to be approximately 50% of that in aqueous electrolyte solution, assuming a partition coefficient of unity for oxygen between cartilage and aqueous solution. In contrast, diffusion of Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the cartilage sample cannot be detected on the SECM timescale, suggesting a diffusion coefficient at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in solution, given a measured partition coefficient for Ru(NH3)6(3+) between cartilage and aqueous solution, Kp = [Ru(NH3)6(3+)]cartilage/[RU(NH3)6(3+)]solution = 3.4 +/- 0.1. Rates of Ru(NH3)6(3+) osmotically driven convective transport across cartilage samples are imaged at high spatial resolution by monitoring the current response of a scanning UME, with an osmotic pressure of approximately 0.75 atm across the slice. A model is outlined that enables the current response to be related to the local flux. By determining the topography of the sample from the current response with no applied osmotic pressure, local transport rates can be correlated with topographical features of the sample surface, at much higher spatial resolution than has previously been achieved. PMID:9370471

  14. Quantitative spatially resolved measurements of mass transfer through laryngeal cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Unwin, P R; Winlove, C P

    1997-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is a scanned probe microscope that uses the response of a mobile ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip to determine the reactivity, topography, and mass transport characteristics of interfaces with high spatial resolution. SECM strategies for measuring the rates of solute diffusion and convection through samples of cartilage, using amperometric UMEs, are outlined. The methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of oxygen and ruthenium(III) hexamine [Ru(NH3)6(3+)] in laryngeal cartilage. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cartilage is found to be approximately 50% of that in aqueous electrolyte solution, assuming a partition coefficient of unity for oxygen between cartilage and aqueous solution. In contrast, diffusion of Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the cartilage sample cannot be detected on the SECM timescale, suggesting a diffusion coefficient at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in solution, given a measured partition coefficient for Ru(NH3)6(3+) between cartilage and aqueous solution, Kp = [Ru(NH3)6(3+)]cartilage/[RU(NH3)6(3+)]solution = 3.4 +/- 0.1. Rates of Ru(NH3)6(3+) osmotically driven convective transport across cartilage samples are imaged at high spatial resolution by monitoring the current response of a scanning UME, with an osmotic pressure of approximately 0.75 atm across the slice. A model is outlined that enables the current response to be related to the local flux. By determining the topography of the sample from the current response with no applied osmotic pressure, local transport rates can be correlated with topographical features of the sample surface, at much higher spatial resolution than has previously been achieved. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9370471

  15. A holographic interferometric method to study combined heat and mass transfer in film sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G.; Worek, W. M.

    1992-08-01

    Sorption by a liquid desiccant is a key process in open-cycle, liquid desiccant cooling systems. In order to study the absorption rates in a liquid desiccant, a fiber-optic, double-wavelength holographic interferometric method was developed and used to measure the combined heat and mass transfer processes that occurred during a regeneration process. In the experiment, the heat and mass transfer processes that occur at the interface between a dry air stream and either a liquid desiccant or a film of water are investigated. The temperature and concentration distribution were calculated and the results were used to determine the Lewis number Le and the local heat and mass transfer coefficients.

  16. Thermodynamics and mass transfer kinetics of phenol in reversed phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-05-01

    The thermodynamics and the mass transfer kinetics of the chromatographic system made of phenol, in a water-acetonitrile mobile phase, on a C18 RPLC column, were studied in the temperature range from 21 to 77 C and the interstitial velocity range of 0.021 to 1.27 cm/s. The equilibrium isotherm was accurately approximated by a multilayer model assuming lateral interactions between adsorbed molecules. The parameters of the kinetics of the phenol mass transfer in this column were measured by the method of moments. These data were analyzed using the available models and correlations. It was proven that the parameters of the mass transfer kinetics measured under linear conditions could be successfully used for the prediction of the concentration profiles obtained under overloaded conditions.

  17. Stagnation Point Flow and Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction past a Stretching/Shrinking Cylinder

    PubMed Central

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Ishak, Anuar

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, Schmidt number, velocity profiles as well as concentration profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Schmidt number on the flow and mass transfer characteristics are examined. The study indicates that dual solutions exist for the shrinking cylinder but for the stretching cylinder, the solution is unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and the mass transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases. PMID:24569547

  18. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. PMID:27233094

  19. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  20. Permanently reconfigured metamaterials due to terahertz induced mass transfer of gold.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, Andrew C; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Lorenzen, Dennis Lund; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-05-01

    We present a new technique for permanent metamaterial reconfiguration via optically induced mass transfer of gold. This mass transfer, which can be explained by field-emission induced electromigration, causes a geometric change in the metamaterial sample. Since a metamaterial's electromagnetic response is dictated by its geometry, this structural change massively alters the metamaterial's behavior. We show this by optically forming a conducting pathway between two closely spaced dipole antennas, thereby changing the resonance frequency by a factor of two. After discussing the physics of the process, we conclude by presenting an optical fuse that can be used as a sacrificial element to protect sensitive components, demonstrating the applicability of optically induced mass transfer for device design. PMID:25969252

  1. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  2. Measurements of airway dimensions and calculation of mass transfer characteristics of the human oral passage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K H; Cheng, Y S; Yeh, H C; Swift, D L

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the geometric shape, perimeter, and cross-sectional area of the human oral passage (from oral entrance to midtrachea) and relates them through dimensionless parameters to the depositional mass transfer of ultrafine particles. Studies were performed in two identical replicate oral passage models, one of which was cut orthogonal to the airflow direction into 3 mm elements for measurement, the other used intact for experimental measurements of ultrafine aerosol deposition. Dimensional data were combined with deposition measurements in two sections of the oral passage (the horizontal oral cavity and the vertical laryngeal-tracheal airway) to calculate the dimensionless mass transfer Sherwood number (Sh). Mass transfer theory suggests that Sh should be expressible as a function of the Reynolds number (Re) and the Schmidt number (Sc). For inhalation and exhalation through the oral cavity (O-C), an empirical relationship was obtained for flow rates from 7.5-30.0 1 min-1: Sh = 15.3 Re0.812 Sc-0.986 An empirical relationship was likewise obtained for the laryngeal-tracheal (L-T) region over the same range of flow rates: Sh = 25.9 Re0.861 Sc-1.37 These relationships were compared to heat transfer in the human upper airways through the well-known analogy between heat and mass transfer. The Reynolds number dependence for both the O-C and L-T relationships was in good agreement with that for heat transfer. The mass transfer coefficients were compared to extrathoracic uptake of gases and vapors and showed similar flow rate dependence. For gases and vapors that conform to the zero concentration boundary condition, the empirical relationships are applicable when diffusion coefficients are taken into consideration. PMID:9407288

  3. Heat and mass transfer in magnetohydrodynamic flow of micropolar fluid on a circular cylinder with uniform heat and mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M. A.; El-Hakiem, M. A.; El Kabeir, S. M.

    2000-10-01

    Steady laminar boundary layer analysis of heat and mass transfer characteristics in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a micropolar fluid on a circular cylinder maintained at uniform heat and mass flux has been conducted. The solution of the energy equation inside the boundary layer is obtained as a power series of the distance measured along the surface from the front stagnation point of the cylinder. The results of dimensionless temperature, Nusselt number, wall shear stress, wall couple stress and Sherwood number have been presented graphically for various values of the material parameters. The results indicate that the micropolar fluids display a reduction in drag as well as heat transfer rate when compared with Newtonian fluids.

  4. Tribological behavior of a friction couple functioning with selective mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Experimental researches on different lubricated friction couples, have confirmed that it is useful to investigate thermodynamic processes which are unstable in lubricant and on the friction couples surfaces in the first stage of the friction process. This presupposes that, in operating conditions, physical-chemical processes which are favourable to friction, such as: polymerization, formation of colloids, formation of other active substances at the contact surfaces and of other compounds with low resistance to shear take place. Friction in such conditions takes place with selective mass transfer, and it is used there where the friction of the mixed and adherence layers is not safe enough, or the durability of the friction couples is not assured. The selective mass transfer allows the transfer of some elements of the materials in contact from one surface to the other, covering them with a thin, superficial layer, with superior properties at minimal friction and wear. The aim of this paper is to analyse the physical-chemical factors and the proper processes for achieving the selective mass transfer for the couple steel/bronze, which in optimal conditions, forms a thin layer of copper on the contact surfaces areas. Also, it presents some studies and researches concerning the tribological behaviour of the surfaces of a friction couple with linear contact (roll/roll) which operates with selective mass transfer, tested on Amsler tribometer.

  5. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Kyle J.; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection (IMA) is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field, and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one would expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper, we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity, and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.

  6. Influence of drying air parameters on mass transfer characteristics of apple slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    To efficiently design both new drying process and equipment and/or to improve the existing systems, accurate values of mass transfer characteristics are necessary. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of drying air parameters (i.e. temperature, velocity and relative humidity) on effective diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient of apple slices. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the mass transfer characteristics. The obtained Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the apple slices was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient values obtained to be in the ranges of 7.13 × 10-11-7.66 × 10-10 and 1.46 × 10-7-3.39 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively and the both of them increased with increasing drying air temperature and velocity, and decreasing relative humidity. The validation of the model showed that the model predicted the experimental drying curves of the samples with a good accuracy.

  7. Mass transfer studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on rotating disk electrodes.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has received significant attention recently as a method to measure electrochemical parameters of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to demonstrate the effect of mass transfer processes on electron transfer by G. sulfurreducens biofilms grown in situ on an electrode that was subsequently rotated. By rotating the biofilms up to 530 rpm, we could control the microscale gradients formed inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms. A 24% increase above a baseline of 82 µA could be achieved with a rotation rate of 530 rpm. By comparison, we observed a 340% increase using a soluble redox mediator (ferrocyanide) limited by mass transfer. Control of mass transfer processes was also used to quantify the change in biofilm impedance during the transition from turnover to non-turnover. We found that only one element of the biofilm impedance, the interfacial resistance, changed significantly from 900 to 4,200 Ω under turnover and non-turnover conditions, respectively. We ascribed this change to the electron transfer resistance overcome by the biofilm metabolism and estimate this value as 3,300 Ω. Additionally, under non-turnover, the biofilm impedance developed pseudocapacitive behavior indicative of bound redox mediators. Pseudocapacitance of the biofilm was estimated at 740 µF and was unresponsive to rotation of the electrode. The increase in electron transfer resistance and pseudocapacitive behavior under non-turnover could be used as indicators of acetate limitations inside G. sulfurreducens biofilms. PMID:23996084

  8. Mass Transfer Studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms on Rotating Disk Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Babuta, Jerome T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has received significant attention recently as a method to measure electrochemical parameters of Geobacter sulfurreducens bio-films. Here, we use electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to demonstrate the effect of mass transfer processes on electron transfer by G.sulfurreducens biofilms grown in situ on an electrode that was subsequently rotated. By rotating the biofilms up to 530 rpm, we could control the microscale gradients formed inside G.sulfurreducens biofilms. A 24% increase above a baseline of 82 μA could be achieved with a rotation rate of 530 rpm. By comparison, we observed a 340% increase using a soluble redox mediator (ferrocyanide) limited by mass transfer. Control of mass transfer processes was also used to quantify the change in biofilm impedance during the transition from turnover to non-turnover. We found that only one element of the biofilm impedance, the interfacial resistance, changed significantly from 900 to 4,200 Ω under turnover and non-turnover conditions, respectively. We ascribed this change to the electron transfer resistance overcome by the biofilm metabolism and estimate this value as 3,300 Ω. Additionally, under non-turnover, the biofilm impedance developed pseudocapacitive behavior indicative of bound redox mediators. Pseudocapacitance of the biofilm was estimated at 740 μF and was unresponsive to rotation of the electrode. The increase in electron transfer resistance and pseudocapacitive behavior under non-turnover could be used as indicators of acetate limitations inside G.sulfurreducens biofilms. PMID:23996084

  9. Volatile organic compound emission rates from mechanical surface aerators: Mass-transfer modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.M.; Chou, S.R.

    1999-08-01

    In wastewater treatment plants, many operation units such as equalization and aeration involve oxygen transfer between wastewater and air. While oxygen is transferred from air to wastewater, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are stripped from wastewater to air. Because of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, wastewater treatment operators have to do VOC inventory of their facilities. A new mass-transfer model has been developed to predict the VOC emission rates from batch and continuous aeration tanks with mechanical surface aerators. The model takes into consideration that the VOC mass transfer occurs in two separate mass-transfer zones instead of lumping the overall VOC transfer in the whole aeration tank as is done in the conventional ASCE-based model. The predictive capabilities of the two-zone and the ASCE-based models were examined by calculating the emission rates of 10 priority pollutants from aeration tanks. The effects of the hydraulic retention time, the Henry`s law constant, gas-phase resistance, and the water and air environmental conditions on the VOC emission rates were predicted by the two models.

  10. Comparative study for determination of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ‘PAHs' by a new spectrophotometric method and multivariate calibration coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; El Kosasy, A. M.; El-Sayed Okeil, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    A modified dispersive liquid-liquid extraction (DLLE) procedure coupled with spectrophotometric techniques was adopted for simultaneous determination of naphthalene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, alpha-naphthol and beta-naphthol in water samples. Two different methods were used, partial least-squares (PLS) method and a new derivative ratio method, namely extended derivative ratio (EDR). A PLS-2 model was established for simultaneous determination of the studied pollutants in methanol, by using twenty mixtures as calibration set and five mixtures as validation set. Also, in methanol a novel (EDR) method was developed for determination of the studied pollutants, where each component in the mixture of the five PAHs was determined by using a mixture of the other four components as divisor. Chemometric and EDR methods could be also adopted for determination of the studied PAH in water samples after transferring them from aqueous medium to the organic one by utilizing dispersive liquid-liquid extraction technique, where different parameters were investigated using a full factorial design. Both methods were compared and the proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and successfully applied to determine these PAHs simultaneously in spiked water samples, where satisfactory results were obtained. All the results obtained agreed with those of published methods, where no significant difference was observed.

  11. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  12. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions. PMID:25216897

  13. The model of heat and mass transfer in rough and irrigated ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2015-07-01

    To determine the coefficients of the heat and mass transfer in the ducts with rough and irrigated walls the development of the classical hydrodynamic analogy of the momentum, mass, and energy transfer has been continued. The conservation properties of the skin-friction laws with respect to various disturbances are used for this purpose, and the "effective velocity" is found the value of which enables us to correct the hydrodynamic analogy. The examples of computations of the Nusselt, Sherwood, and Stanton numbers are shown for rough ducts, cooler, and film flow in the counter-flow. A comparison with the results of other researchers is given.

  14. Influence of Mass Transfer on Bioavailability and Kinetic Rate of Uranium(VI) Biotransformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chongxuan Liu; Zheming Wang; John M. Zachara; James K. Fredrickson

    2006-06-01

    This research is investigating the influence of mass transfer process on the rate and extent of microbial reduction of U(VI) associated with intragrain domains in the Hanford subsurface sediments. The project will develop instrumental techniques to characterize microscopic mass transfer process at the sediment grain scale and to develop kinetic data and process models that describe microbial reduction of intragrain U(VI). Scientific knowledge and process models developed from this research will enhance our understanding on the future behavior of in-ground U(VI) at Hanford and other DOE sites where sediments contain U(VI) in intragrain domains or fracture-matrix systems.

  15. Mass transfer effects in solvent-free fat interesterification reactions: influences on catalyst design.

    PubMed

    Ison, A P; Macrae, A R; Smith, C G; Bosley, J

    1994-01-20

    The use of solvent-free systems in the oil and fats industry is commonplace. Initial studies on interesterification were carried out in solvent systems because the lipase was immobilized solely by adsorption onto particles of diatomaceous earth. In this study, the mass transfer characteristics associated with the continuous interesterification of olive oil in a solvent-free system have been examined, for lipase immobilized on the three ion-exchange materials: Duolite ES562, Duolite ES568, and Spheroil DEA. The process of immobilization is influenced by the internal structure of the material and this in turn influences the interesterification activity of the catalyst. Individually prepared catalysts for the three support materials have shown that external mass transfer limitations are unlikely even at low flowrates.In the case of Spherosil DEA, with a mean pore diameter of 1480 A, the wide pores would be expected to reduce internal mass transfer limitations; however, it is more likely that the reduction in activity with increased catalyst loading is due to the lipase molecules being immobilized in a tightly packed monolayer. In such a situation, some active sites of the lipase molecules would become inaccessible to substrate molecules leading to an observed reduction in activity. For Duolite ES568, the observed results are very similar to those seen for Spherosil DEA, however, the pore structure of this support material indicate that some internal mass transfer limitations may also be occurring. Yet the contribution of the individual effects cannot be determined. The results observed for the support Duolite ES562 are different than those observed for the other materials and reflect the heterogeneity of Duolite ES562. The large proportion of narrow pores in the support mean that, for the catalysts examined, immobilization is most likely to have occurred in the external pores of the particles, and as such no internal mass transfer limitation is observed.It is clear

  16. Mass transfer across combustion gas thermal boundary layers - Power production and materials processing implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Soret diffusion (for vapors) and thermophoresis (for particles) are illustrated using recent optical experiments and boundary layer computations. Mass transfer rate augmentations of up to a factor of 1000 were observed and predicted for submicron-particle capture by cooled solid surfaces, while mass transfer suppressions of more than 10 to the -10th-fold were predicted for 'overheated' surfaces. It is noted that the results obtained are of interest in connection with such technological applications as fly-ash capture in power generation equipment and glass droplet deposition in optical-waveguide manufacture.

  17. Selective separation of hydroxide from alkaline nuclear tank waste by liquid-liquid extraction with weak hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Chambliss, C Kevin; Haverlock, Tamara I; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Moyer, Bruce A

    2002-04-15

    Recovery and recycle of caustic reagents in industrial processes offer potential means of pollution prevention, as investigated herein for particular needs related to the cleanup of alkaline nuclear waste. Specifically, the recovery of hydroxide from alkaline media by liquid-liquid extraction can be effected utilizing weak hydroxy acids, as demonstrated for NaOH utilizing a series of lipophilic fluorinated alcohols and alkylated phenols dissolved in 1-octanol. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the hydroxy acids, the phenols being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. After extraction, NaOH is effectively recoverable from the organic phase upon contact with water. The weakest hydroxy acids are the most efficiently stripped, NaOH recovery being nearly quantitative in a single contact. In competitive extraction experiments, good selectivity for hydroxide recovery over other anions such as nitrate and chloride was demonstrated. Since the order of extraction favors larger anions, the exceptional preference for hydroxide implies that the extraction occurs by deprotonation of the hydroxy acids in a cation-exchange process. Stripping therefore occurs by hydrolysis to regenerate the neutral hydroxy acid, liberating NaOH to the aqueous phase. Since hydroxide equivalents rather than actual hydroxide ions are transferred to the solvent, the process is termed "pseudohydroxide extraction." Hydroxide recovery from a simulant of alkaline nuclear tank waste (Hanford DSSF simulant) was also demonstrated in repeated extraction and stripping cycles. PMID:11993889

  18. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil samples using flotation-assisted homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad; Mashayekhi, Hossein Ali; Akbarian, Saeid; Mizani, Farhang; Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza

    2012-11-23

    In this study, flotation-assisted homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction (FA-HLLME) was developed as a fast, simple, and efficient method for extraction of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis. A special home-made extraction cell was designed to facilitate collection of the low-density extraction solvent without a need for centrifugation. In this method, PAHs were extracted from soil samples into methanol and water (1:1, v/v) using ultrasound in two steps followed by filtration as a clean-up step. The filtrate was added into the home-made extraction cell contained mixture of 1.0 mL methanol (homogenous solvent) and 150.0 μL toluene (extraction solvent). Using N(2) flotation, the dispersed extraction solvent was transferred to the surface of the mixture and was collected by means of a micro-syringe. Then, 2 μL of the collected organic solvent was injected into the GC-FID for subsequent analysis. Under optimal conditions, linearity of the method was in the range of 40-1000 μg kg(-1) soil (dry weight). The relative standard deviations in real samples varied from 5.9 to 15.2% (n=4). The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze the target PAHs in soil samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:23084825

  19. An Electrochemical Sensing Platform Based on Liquid-Liquid Microinterface Arrays Formed in Laser-Ablated Glass Membranes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez de Eulate, Eva; Strutwolf, Jörg; Liu, Yang; O'Donnell, Kane; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2016-03-01

    Arrays of microscale interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (μITIES) were formed using glass membranes perforated with microscale pores by laser ablation. Square arrays of 100 micropores in 130 μm thick borosilicate glass coverslips were functionalized with trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane on one side, to render the surface hydrophobic and support the formation of aqueous-organic liquid-liquid microinterfaces. The pores show a conical shape, with larger radii at the laser entry side (26.5 μm) than at the laser exit side (11.5 μm). The modified surfaces were characterized by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The organic phase was placed on the hydrophobic side of the membrane, enabling the array of μITIES to be located at either the wider or narrower pore mouth. The electrochemical behavior of the μITIES arrays were investigated by tetrapropylammonium ion transfer across water-1,6-dichlorohexane interfaces together with finite element computational simulations. The data suggest that the smallest microinterfaces (formed on the laser exit side) were located at the mouth of the pore in hemispherical geometry, while the larger microinterfaces (formed on the laser entry side) were flatter in shape but exhibited more instability due to the significant roughness of the glass around the pore mouths. The glass membrane-supported μITIES arrays presented here provide a new platform for chemical and biochemical sensing systems. PMID:26853853

  20. LUT Reveals a New Mass-transferring Semi-detached Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zejda, M.; Soonthornthum, B.; Zhao, E.-G.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Liao, W.-P.

    2015-12-01

    GQ Dra is a short-period eclipsing binary in a double stellar system that was discovered by Hipparcos. Complete light curves in the UV band were obtained with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope in 2014 November and December. Photometric solutions are determined using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is discovered that GQ Dra is a classical Algol-type semi-detached binary where the secondary component is filling the critical Roche lobe. An analysis of all available times of minimum light suggests that the orbital period is increasing continuously at a rate of \\dot{P}=+3.48(+/- 0.23)× {10}-7 days yr-1. This could be explained by mass transfer from the secondary to the primary, which is in agreement with the semi-detached configuration with a lobe-filling secondary. By assuming a conservation of mass and angular momentum, the mass transfer rate is estimated as \\dot{m}=9.57(+/- 0.63)× {10}-8 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. All of these results reveal that GQ Dra is a mass-transferring semi-detached binary in a double system that was formed from an initially detached binary star. After the massive primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration with two sub-giant or giant component stars.

  1. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  2. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (klN) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show klN for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60 d- 1. Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties.

  3. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (kl(N)) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show kl(N) for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60d(-1). Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties. PMID:26855386

  4. Hollow fiber based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction combined with sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography for the sensitive determination of second-generation antidepressants in human fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqing; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    An effective dual preconcentration method involving off-line hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME) and on-line sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) was proposed for the determination of five second-generation antidepressants, including fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine and citalopram. In HF-LLLME, the analytes were extracted from the sample solution into phenetole impregnated in the pores of the hollow fiber and then back-extracted into 10 μL 0.1 mol L(-1) HAc inside the hollow fiber. Then, the acceptor phase was spiked with 2.8 μL isopropanol (IPA) and introduced into CE for sweeping. In the sweeping-MEKC process, five target analytes were separated in less than 15 min with a background electrolyte consisting of 76% (v/v) 50 mmol L(-1) citric acid (pH 2.2) containing 100 mmol L(-1) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 24% (v/v) IPA. The hydrodynamic injection was performed at 50 mbar for 140 s. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.40-1.55 μg L(-1) with enrichment factors of 1897- to 5952-fold for target analytes, with a dynamic linear range of 0.6/5.0-200 μg L(-1). The developed method demonstrated excellent clean-up ability and high enrichment factors and was successfully applied to the analysis of target analytes in human urine and plasma samples. PMID:25620069

  5. Combination of counter current salting-out homogenous liquid-liquid extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a novel microextraction of drugs in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Akramipour, Reza; Fattahi, Nazir; Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Gheini, Simin

    2016-02-15

    The counter current salting-out homogenous liquid-liquid extraction (CCSHLLE) joined with the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) has been developed as a high preconcentration technique for the determination of different drugs in urine samples. Amphetamines were employed as model compounds to assess the extraction procedure and were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). In this method, initially, NaCl as a separation reagent is filled into a small column and a mixture of urine and acetonitrile is passed through the column. By passing the mixture, NaCl is dissolved and the fine droplets of acetonitrile are formed due to salting-out effect. The produced droplets go up through the remained mixture and collect as a separated layer. Then, the collected acetonitrile is removed with a syringe and mixed with 30.0μL 1-undecanol (extraction solvent). In the second step, the 5.00mLK2CO3 solution (2% w/v) is rapidly injected into the above mixture placed in a test tube for further DLLME-SFO. Under the optimum conditions, calibration curves are linear in the range of 1-3000μgL(-1) and limit of detections (LODs) are in the range of 0.5-2μgL(-1). The extraction recoveries and enrichment factors ranged from 78 to 84% and 157 to 168, respectively. Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 100μgL(-1) of amphetamines were in the range of 3.5-4.5% and 4-5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied for the determination of amphetamines in the actual urine samples. The relative recoveries of urine samples spiked with amphetamine and methamphetamine are 90-108%. PMID:26828152

  6. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  7. Transient, compressible heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit iteration procedure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Cox, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are solved in finite difference form with the aid of a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). Example numerical results demonstrate the characteristics of heat and mass transport in a porous matrix such as a charring ablator. It is emphasized that multidimensional flow must be considered when predicting the thermal response of a porous material subjected to nonuniform boundary conditions.

  8. On the stream-accretion disk interaction - Response to increased mass transfer rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dgani, Ruth; Livio, Mario; Soker, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent interaction between the stream of mass from the inner Lagrangian point and the accretion disk, resulting from an increasing mass transfer rate is calculated. The calculation is fully three-dimensional, using a pseudoparticle description of the hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the results of such calculations, when combined with specific observations, have the potential of both determining essential parameters, such as the viscosity parameter alpha, and can distinguish between different models of dwarf nova eruptions.

  9. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in polymer solutions exposed to intermittent infrared radiation heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Lin, J.D.

    1998-06-01

    Drying is one of the essential steps in a number of industrial applications, such as the preserving of food and the drying of paint, pulp, and paper. The quality of paper tubes is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer process. The drying of polymer solution plays a crucial role in the manufacturer of photographic film, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and a variety of other polymeric products. During drying of wet materials, simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs both inside the medium and in the boundary layer of the drying agent. Drying is one of the most energy-consuming processes in the industrial sector and can also be very time consuming as, for example, in conventional convective drying by hot air, while minimum cost and energy consumption and maximum product quality are among the main concerns in industry today. Here, a theoretical study is performed that describes heat transfer and moisture variation while a polymer solution is exposed to high-intensity infrared radiation flux and/or an airflow. While the intermittent heating is considered, the authors investigate the influences of various radiation and convection parameters on the transfer of heat and moisture variation of coated layers on an optically thick substrate. During the tempering stage in the intermittent heating process, the convective mass transfer is included to simulate the ambient air in reality. The effects of radiation and convection parameters on the transfer processes are presented in terms of the rate of water content removal, heat transfer, and moisture distributions. Numerical results show that the rate of water removal from the polymer solution is dominated by both the adsorbed radiative heat energy and the distributions of water mass fraction in the polymer solution.

  10. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  11. Effect of laminar and turbulent fluid flow on mass transfer in some electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian

    2000-10-01

    The influence of fluid flow on electrode-shape change that results from electrodeposition in the presence of a model leveling agent is simulated and discussed. The treatment is more rigorous than past studies in that flow and concentration fields are recalculated as the electrode shape changes. It is shown that uncertainties due to approximate treatments of fluid flow may be as significant as existing discrepancies between experiment and theory. The mass transfer characteristics of a turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a target wall are examined using numerical simulations. Fluid flow is modeled using the k-turbulence model of Wilcox [1]. The computations are validated against existing experimental fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer data. The range of Reynolds numbers examined is from 450 to 20,000 with Prandtl or Schmidt numbers from 1 to 2,400. The distance of the target plate from the slot jet varies between 2 to 8 times the slot jet width. The study reveals computational aspects that are unique to the solution of flow and mass transfer problems with the combination of high Schmidt numbers and turbulent flows. A low order "coherent structure" near-wall flow model first proposed by Chapman and Kuhn [2] is used to obtain the near-wall fluid flow field. This flow field is then used to compute high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent boundary layer flow. It is shown that useful insight can be obtained into high Schmidt number mass transfer for a turbulent fluid flow using this model. The boundary conditions for this near-wall field for more complicated flow or geometries may be obtained either from experimental turbulent velocity and frequency data or from a k-o type of turbulence model.

  12. Heat And Mass Transfer Analysis of a Film Evaporative MEMS Tunable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, William J.

    This thesis details the heat and mass transfer analysis of a MEMs microthruster designed to provide propulsive, attitude control and thermal control capabilities to a cubesat. This thruster is designed to function by retaining water as a propellant and applying resistive heating in order to increase the temperature of the liquid-vapor interface to either increase evaporation or induce boiling to regulate mass flow. The resulting vapor is then expanded out of a diverging nozzle to produce thrust. Because of the low operating pressure and small length scale of this thruster, unique forms of mass transfer analysis such as non-continuum gas flow were modeled using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method. Continuum fluid/thermal simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics have been applied to model heat and mass transfer in the solid and liquid portions of the thruster. The two methods were coupled through variables at the liquid-vapor interface and solved iteratively by the bisection method. The simulations presented in this thesis confirm the thermal valving concept. It is shown that when power is applied to the thruster there is a nearly linear increase in mass flow and thrust. Thus, mass flow can be regulated by regulating the applied power. This concept can also be used as a thermal control device for spacecraft.

  13. Light-Time Effect and Mass Transfer in the Triple Star SW Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey

    1999-06-01

    In this paper all the photoelectric times of minimum for the triple star SW Lyn have been analyzed in terms of light-time e ect due to the third-body and secular period decreases induced by mass transfer process. The light-time orbit determined recently by Ogloza et al.(1998) were modi ed and improved. And it is found that the orbital period of SW Lyn have been decreasing secularly. The third-body revolves around the mass center of triple stars every 5y.77 in a highly eccentric elliptical orbit(e=0.61). The third-body with a minimum mass of 1.13M may be a binary or a white dwarf. The rate of secular period-decrease were obtained as ¡âP/P = -12.45 x 10-11, implying the mass-transfer from the massive primary star to the secondary. The mass losing rate from the primary were calculated as about 1.24 x 10-8M /y. It is noticed that the mass-transfer in SW Lyn system is opposite in direction to that deduced from it's Roche geometry by previous investigators.

  14. Modeling the gas-particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol: the importance of liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds between the gas phase and aerosol particles is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Gas-particle partitioning of organic and inorganic species is influenced by the physical state and water content of aerosols, and therefore ambient relative humidity (RH), as well as temperature and organic loading levels. We introduce a novel combination of the thermodynamic models AIOMFAC (for liquid mixture non-ideality) and EVAPORATION (for pure compound vapor pressures) with oxidation product information from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) for the computation of gas-particle partitioning of organic compounds and water. The presence and impact of a liquid-liquid phase separation in the condensed phase is calculated as a function of variations in relative humidity, organic loading levels, and associated changes in aerosol composition. We show that a complex system of water, ammonium sulfate, and SOA from the ozonolysis of α-pinene exhibits liquid-liquid phase separation over a wide range of relative humidities (simulated from 30% to 99% RH). Since fully coupled phase separation and gas-particle partitioning calculations are computationally expensive, different simplified model approaches are tested with regards to computational costs and accuracy of predictions compared to the benchmark calculation. Both forcing a liquid one-phase aerosol considering non-ideal mixing or assuming an ideal mixture bear the potential for vastly incorrect partitioning predictions. Assuming an ideal mixture leads to substantial overestimation of the particulate organic mass, at high RH by more than 200%. Moreover, the simplified one-phase cases stress two key points for accurate gas-particle partitioning calculations: (1) non-ideality in the condensed phase needs to be considered and (2) liquid-liquid phase separation is a consequence of considerable deviations from ideal mixing in solutions containing inorganic ions and

  15. Modeling the gas-particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol: the importance of liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    The partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds between the gas phase and aerosol particles is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Gas-particle partitioning of organic and inorganic species is influenced by the physical state and water content of aerosols, and therefore ambient relative humidity (RH), as well as temperature and organic loading levels. We introduce a novel combination of the thermodynamic models AIOMFAC (for liquid mixture non-ideality) and EVAPORATION (for pure compound vapor pressures) with oxidation product information from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) for the computation of gas-particle partitioning of organic compounds and water. The presence and impact of a liquid-liquid phase separation in the condensed phase is calculated as a function of variations in relative humidity, organic loading levels, and associated changes in aerosol composition. We show that a complex system of water, ammonium sulfate, and SOA from the ozonolysis of α-pinene exhibits liquid-liquid phase separation over a wide range of relative humidities (simulated from 30% to 99% RH). Since fully coupled phase separation and gas-particle partitioning calculations are computationally expensive, several simplified model approaches are tested with regard to computational costs and accuracy of predictions compared to the benchmark calculation. It is shown that forcing a liquid one-phase aerosol with or without consideration of non-ideal mixing bears the potential for vastly incorrect partitioning predictions. Assuming an ideal mixture leads to substantial overestimation of the particulate organic mass, by more than 100% at RH values of 80% and by more than 200% at RH values of 95%. Moreover, the simplified one-phase cases stress two key points for accurate gas-particle partitioning calculations: (1) non-ideality in the condensed phase needs to be considered and (2) liquid-liquid phase separation is a consequence of considerable deviations from ideal

  16. Analysis of coupled mass transfer and sol-gel reaction in a two-phase system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelijns, H. J.; Huinink, H. P.; Pel, L.; Zitha, P. L. J.

    2006-07-01

    The coupled mass transfer and chemical reactions of a gel-forming compound in a two-phase system were studied in detail. Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate (TMOS) is often used as a precursor in sol-gel chemistry to produce silica gels in aqueous systems. TMOS can also be mixed with many hydrocarbons without chemical reaction, which allows for various applications in multiphase systems. In this study, TMOS was mixed with n-hexadecane and placed together with water in small cylinders. Upon contact of the mixture with the water, TMOS transfers completely to the aqueous phase where it forms a gel through a heterogeneous reaction. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurements were employed to monitor the mass transfer of TMOS from the oleic to the aqueous phase. The longitudinal relaxation time (T1) was calibrated and used to determine the concentration of TMOS in n-hexadecane during the transfer. The mass transfer rate was obtained at various temperatures (25-45°C) and for several initial concentrations of TMOS. In the aqueous phase a sharp decrease in the transversal relaxation time (T2) is observed which is attributed to the gel reaction, in particular the formation of methanol in the initial stage. The minimum in T2 indicates the gelation point, and was found to be strongly dependent on temperature and concentration.

  17. Diffusive transfer to membranes as an effective interface between gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Mitchell, Charles; Stevenson, Tracy I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Andrews, Philip C.

    1997-12-01

    Diffusive transfer was examined as a blotting method to transfer proteins from polyacrylamide gels to membranes for ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The method is well-suited for transfers from isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Spectra have been obtained for 11 pmol of 66 kDa albumin loaded onto an IEF gel and subsequently blotted to polyethylene. Similarly, masses of intact carbonic anhydrase and hemoglobin were obtained from 14 and 20 pmol loadings. This methodology is also compatible with blotting high molecular weight proteins, as seen for 6 pmol of the 150 kDa monoclonal antibody anti-[beta]-galactosidase transferred to Goretex. Polypropylene, Teflon, Nafion and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) also produced good spectra following diffusive transfer. Only analysis from PVDF required that the membrane be kept wet prior to application of matrix. Considerations in mass accuracy for analysis from large-area membranes with continuous extraction and delayed extraction were explored, as were remedies for surface charging. Vapor phase CNBr cleavage was applied to membrane-bound samples for peptide mapping.

  18. A novel procedure for phase separation in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Cerdà, V

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, an alternative for handling the organic phase after a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using organic solvents lighter than water is presented. It is based on solidification (at -18°C) of the aqueous phase obtained after centrifugation, and the decantation, collection and analysis of the liquid organic layer. The extraction of nicotine in toluene, and its determination in eggplant samples was conducted as a proof of concept. The study has been carried out using standards prepared in water and the formation of the dispersion was assisted by sonication. The organic extract was analysed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Satisfactory analytical figures of merit as: limit of detection (0.4µgL(-1), 2ngg(-1) wet sample), limit of quantification (1.2µgL(-1), 6.5ngg(-1) wet sample), within-day precision (RSD=7%), and linearity interval (up to 384µgL(-1) nicotine) were achieved. It constituted a contribution to the handling of organic extracts after microextraction processes. PMID:27260454

  19. Ionic liquid matrix-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for enhanced MALDI-MS analysis of phospholipids in soybean.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Tapadia, Kavita

    2015-09-15

    Ionic liquid matrix (ILM) is found to be a very versatile substance for analysis of broad range of organic molecules in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) due to good solubility for a variety of analytes, formation of homogenous crystals and high vacuum stability of the matrix. In the present work, an ILM, cyno-4-hydroxycinnamic acid-butylamine (CHCAB) was employed in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) as sample probe and matrix for extraction and ionization of phospholipids from food samples (soybean) prior to MALDI-MS analysis. With the employed technique, 8-125 fold improvement in signal intensity and limit of detection were achieved for the analysis of phospholipids. The best extraction efficiency of phospholipids in ILM-DLLME was obtained with 5min extraction time in presence 30mg/mL CHCAB and 1.2% NaCl using chloroform as an extracting solvent and methanol as a dispersing solvent. Further, the developed ILM-DLLME procedure has been successfully applied for the analysis of phospholipids in soybean samples in MALDI-MS. PMID:26276066

  20. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of silver nanoparticles in water using ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sha; Sun, Yuanjing; Chao, Jingbo; Cheng, Liping; Chen, Yun; Liu, Jingfu

    2016-03-01

    Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as the extractant and methanol as the dispersion solvent, a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method was developed to extract silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from environmental water samples. Parameters that influenced the extraction efficiency such as IL concentration, pH and extraction time were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the highest extraction efficiency for AgNPs was above 90% with an enrichment factor of >90. The extracted AgNPs in the IL phase were identified by transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave digestion, with a detection limit of 0.01μg/L. The spiked recovery of AgNPs was 84.4% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.8% (n=6) at a spiked level of 5μg/L, and 89.7% with a RSD of 2.2% (n=6) at a spiked level of 300μg/L, respectively. Commonly existed environmental ions had a very limited influence on the extraction efficiency. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of AgNPs in river water, lake water, and the influent and effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, with recoveries in the range of 71.0%-90.9% at spiking levels of 0.11-4.7μg/L. PMID:26969067

  1. Response surface methodology for the optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of chloropropanols in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Siso, Paula; Lorenzo, Rosa A; Regenjo, María; Fernández, Purificación; Carro, Antonia M

    2015-10-01

    Chloropropanols are processing toxicants with a potential risk to human health due to the increased intake of processed foods. A rapid and efficient method for the determination of three chloropropanols in human plasma was developed using ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The method involved derivatization and extraction in one step followed by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Parameters affecting extraction, such as sample pH, ionic strength, type and volume of dispersive and extraction solvents were optimized by response surface methodology using a pentagonal design. The linear range of the method was 5-200 ng/mL for 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol, 10-200 ng/mL for 2,3-dichloro-2-propanol and 10-400 ng/mL for 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol with the determination coefficients between 0.9989 and 0.9997. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.3-3.2 ng/mL. The precision varied from 1.9 to 10% relative standard deviation (n = 9). The recovery of the method was between 91 and 101%. Advantages such as low consumption of organic solvents and short time of analysis make the method suitable for the biomonitoring of chloropropanols. PMID:26205350

  2. Quantitation of tetrabromobisphenol-A from dust sampled on consumer electronics by dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Di Napoli-Davis, Gina; Owens, Janel E

    2013-09-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) is a brominated flame retardant used worldwide. Despite its widespread use, there are few data concerning environmental concentrations of TBBPA. Thus, the objective of this work was to optimize an ultrasound-assisted dispersed liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method to analyze swabbed surfaces of consumer electronics to determine TBBPA concentrations. Upon sample preparation with DLLME, TBBPA was derivatized with acetic anhydride and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using a (13)C12-TBBPA internal standard to improve precision and quantitation, a recovery study was performed. At concentrations of 250-1000 ng/mL, recoveries were 104-106%. Sample preparation with solid phase extraction had comparable recoveries, although overall, improved analyte recovery and precision were achieved with DLLME. In a small survey study, TBBPA concentrations in dust collected from 100 cm(2) areas on electronic surfaces (monitor, microwave, refrigerator, and TV) were determined to range from less than the LOQ to 523 ng/mL. PMID:23792388

  3. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  4. A mass transfer model of ethanol emission from thin layers of corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mass transfer model of ethanol emission from thin layers of corn silage was developed and validated. The model was developed based on data from wind tunnel experiments conducted at different temperatures and air velocities. Multiple regression analysis was used to derive an equation that related t...

  5. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (kt) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt147 and Pt55). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high kt conditions with simultaneous detection of H2O2. At low kt (0.02 to 0.12 cm s-1) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, neff, is 3.7 for Pt147 and 3.4 for Pt55. As kt is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H2O2 detected remains constant, such that neff barely changes over the entire kt range explored (0.02 cm s-1). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect neff, which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in neff for the two sizes of Pt DENs (neff = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt147 and Pt55, respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect. PMID:22665772

  6. Demonstrating the Effect of Interphase Mass Transfer in a Transparent Fluidized Bed Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saayman, Jean; Nicol, Willie

    2011-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is described that employs the ozone decomposition reaction at ambient conditions on Fe2O3 impregnated Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst. Using a two-dimensional see-through column the importance of interphase mass transfer is clearly illustrated by the significant difference in ozone conversion between the…

  7. A Laboratory Experiment for Measuring Solid-Liquid Mass Transfer Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dapia, Sonia; Vila, Carlos; Dominguez, Herminia; Parajo, Juan Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The lab experiment described starts from the principles developed by Sensel and Myers, but the experimental procedure are modified to provide a more reliable experiment assessment. The mass transfer equation is solved and all the involved parameters are calculated by a simple, numerical method.

  8. FUNDAMENTAL MASS TRANSFER MODEL FOR INDOOR AIR EMISSION FROM SURFACE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper, discusses the work of researchers at the U.S. EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (Indoor Air Branch) who are evaluating mass transfer models based on fundamental principles to determine their effectiveness in predicting emissions from indoor architect...

  9. Dissociation and ammonia mass transfer from ammonium solution and dairy cattle manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia (NH**3) emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficient for NH**3 volatilization from media of buffered ...

  10. Determination of Heat and Mass Transfer Efficiency on a Bubbling Plate with Account for Scale Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of heat and mass transfer in the bubbling bed on the plate has been investigated with the use of the method of combined physical and mathematical modeling based on the representation of the physical process in the form of a combination of elementary phenomena having a hierarchy of scales that permits realizing a scale transition in designing a contact device. The mathematical modeling of the heat and mass transfer in the above bed is based on the idea that the structure of this bed is invariant with its size and the interaction of the phases in it. A parametric investigation of the interaction of various effects in the process of heat and mass transfer in the bubbling bed on the plate and their conjugation has been carried out on the basis of the variational formulation of the conservation laws. Examples of calculating the efficiencies of the heat and mass transfer processes on bubbling plates are given. The results of calculations were compared with the corresponding experimental data.

  11. Mass transfer coefficient in ginger oil extraction by microwave hydrotropic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, Dwi; Ikhsan, Diyono; Yulianto, Mohamad Endy; Dwisukma, Mandy Ayulia

    2015-12-01

    This research aims to obtain mass transfer coefficient data on the extraction of ginger oil using microwave hydrotropic solvent as an alternative to increase zingiberene. The innovation of this study is extraction with microwave heater and hydrotropic solvent,which able to shift the phase equilibrium, and the increasing rate of the extraction process and to improve the content of ginger oil zingiberene. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Separation Techniques at Chemical Engineering Department of Diponegoro University. The research activities carried out in two stages, namely experimental and modeling work. Preparation of the model postulated, then lowered to obtain equations that were tested and validated using data obtained from experimental. Measurement of experimental data was performed using microwave power (300 W), extraction temperature of 90 ° C and the independent variable, i.e.: type of hydrotropic, the volume of solvent and concentration in order, to obtain zingiberen levels as a function of time. Measured data was used as a tool to validate the postulation, in order to obtain validation of models and empirical equations. The results showed that the mass transfer coefficient (Kla) on zingiberene mass transfer models ginger oil extraction at various hydrotropic solution attained more 14 ± 2 Kla value than its reported on the extraction with electric heating. The larger value of Kla, the faster rate of mass transfer on the extraction process. To obtain the same yields, the microwave-assisted extraction required one twelfth time shorter.

  12. Mass transfer coefficients developed from the air gasification of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Botts, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A convertible updraft/downdraft, fixed-bed gasifier was used in the gasification of 3/8-inch diameter wood pellets. The test data was used to develop mass transfer coefficients and describe the gasification process for each gasifier configuration. The results show that the production of the principal combustion gases, i.e., hydrogen (H{sub c}), carbon monozide (CO), and methane (CH{sub 4}), varies directly as to their mass transfer coefficient: H{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4} = k h{sub DA}. Factoring the Reynolds (Re{sub d}) and Schmidt (Sc) numbers with the influence of the noncombustible gases, i.e., nitrogen (N{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), is used to define the mass transfer coefficients. The general form describing this joint variation is: H{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4} = kx (the effect of the noncombustible gases) x Re x Sc where Re = Reynolds number and Sc = Schmidt number. The developments of these mass transfer coefficients are shown for updraft and downdraft gasification.

  13. Mass Transfer Testing of a 12.5-cm Rotor Centrifugal Contactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Meikrantz; T. G. Garn; J. D. Law; N. R. Mann; T. A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    TRUEX mass transfer tests were performed using a single stage commercially available 12.5 cm centrifugal contactor and stable cerium (Ce) and europium (Eu). Test conditions included throughputs ranging from 2.5 to 15 Lpm and rotor speeds of 1750 and 2250 rpm. Ce and Eu extraction forward distribution coefficients ranged from 13 to 19. The first and second stage strip back distributions were 0.5 to 1.4 and .002 to .004, respectively, throughout the dynamic test conditions studied. Visual carryover of aqueous entrainment in all organic phase samples was estimated at < 0.1 % and organic carryover into all aqueous phase samples was about ten times less. Mass transfer efficiencies of = 98 % for both Ce and Eu in the extraction section were obtained over the entire range of test conditions. The first strip stage mass transfer efficiencies ranged from 75 to 93% trending higher with increasing throughput. Second stage mass transfer was greater than 99% in all cases. Increasing the rotor speed from 1750 to 2250 rpm had no significant effect on efficiency for all throughputs tested.

  14. The ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient in the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Benyi; Lu, Yigang

    2008-10-01

    Based on several hypotheses about the process of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, the onflow around the solute granule is figured out by the Navier-Stocks equation. In combination with the Higbie’s solute infiltration model, the link between the mass-transfer coefficient and the velocity of flow is found. The mass-transfer coefficient with the ultrasonical effect is compared with that without the ultrasonical effect, and then a new parameter named the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient is brought forward, which describes the mathematical model of the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction process enhanced by ultrasonic. The model gives out the relationships among the ultrasonical power, the ultrasonical frequency, the radius of solute granule and the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient. The results calculated by this model fit well with the experimental data, including the extraction of Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Oil (CLSO) and Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Ester (CLSE) from coix seeds and the extraction of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) from the alga by means of the ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (USFE) and the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) respectively. This proves the rationality of the ultrasonic-enhanced factor model. The model provides a theoretical basis for the application of ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid extraction technique.

  15. Numerical Problems and Agent-Based Models for a Mass Transfer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthi, Manohar; Shea, Lonnie D.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2009-01-01

    Problems requiring numerical solutions of differential equations or the use of agent-based modeling are presented for use in a course on mass transfer. These problems were solved using the popular technical computing language MATLABTM. Students were introduced to MATLAB via a problem with an analytical solution. A more complex problem to which no…

  16. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  17. Measurement of mass-transfer rates for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.S.; Zhong, L.; Pope, G.A.

    1999-09-01

    Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual, non-aqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants is an emerging, subsurface remediation technology. The potential for nonequilibrium conditions is investigated for surfactant-enhanced solubilization of a NAPL, trichlorethylene (TCE), in a model porous medium. The surfactant formulation consists of an anionic surfactant, sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate, an alcohol, and an electrolyte in aqueous solution. Batch solubilization experiments are conducted to assess the significant of chemical rate limitations. Surfactant flood experiments are conducted in packed columns with residual TCE. Mass-transfer rate coefficients are determined as a function of aqueous-phase pore velocity, NAPL volumetric fraction, and surfactant concentration. A correlation for predicting mass-transfer rate coefficients as a function of system properties is developed. The mass-transfer rate coefficients and correlation are obtained by fitting a transport simulator to the column effluent concentration results. Significant differences are found between the correlation developed here and correlations developed for other NAPL--surfactant systems. The correlation predicts near-linear dependences of mass-transfer rates on the NAPL volumetric fraction and pore velocity. Using the Damkohler number, the degree of nonequilibrium behavior in surfactant-enhanced NAPL solubilization is analyzed for a range of conditions. Nonequilibrium conditions are found to be significant at relatively low NAPL volumetric fractions.

  18. Hydrodynamic characteristics and gas-liquid mass transfer in a biofilm airlift suspension reactor.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, C; van Loosdrecht, M C; van der Lans, R G; Heijnen, J J

    1998-12-01

    The hydrodynamics and mass transfer, specifically the effects of gas velocity and the presence and type of solids on the gas hold-up and volumetric mass transfer coefficient, were studied on a lab-scale airlift reactor with internal draft tube. Basalt particles and biofilm-coated particles were used as solid phase. Three distinct flow regimes were observed with increasing gas flow rate. The influence of the solid phase on the hydrodynamics was a peculiar characteristic of the regimes. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was found to decrease with increasing solid loading and particle size. This could be predominantly related to the influence that the solid has on gas hold-up. The ratio between gas hold-up and volumetric mass transfer coefficient was found to be independent of solid loading, size, or density, and it was proven that the presence of solids in airlift reactors lowers the number of gas bubbles without changing their size. To evaluate scale effects, experimental results were compared with theoretical and empirical models proposed for similar systems. PMID:10099471

  19. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. II. ECCENTRIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Despite numerous efforts to better understand binary star evolution, some aspects of it remain poorly constrained. In particular, the evolution of eccentric binaries has remained elusive mainly because the Roche lobe formalism derived for circular binaries does not apply. Here we report the results of our smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in eccentric binaries using an alternate method in which we model only the outermost layers of the stars with appropriate boundary conditions. Using this technique, along with properly relaxed model stars, we characterize the mass transfer episodes of binaries with various orbital parameters. In particular, we show that these episodes can be described by Gaussians with an FWHM of {approx}0.12P{sub orb} and that the peak rates occur after periastron, at an orbital phase of {approx}0.58, independently of the eccentricity and mass of the stars. The accreted material is observed to form a rather sparse envelope around either or both stars. Although the fate of this envelope is not modeled in our simulations, we show that a constant fraction ({approx}5%) of the material transferred is ejected from the systems. We discuss this result in terms of the non-conservative mass transfer scenario. We suggest that our results could be incorporated in analytical and binary population synthesis studies to help better understand the evolution of eccentric binaries and the formation of exotic stellar populations.

  20. The effects of recirculation flows on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Guidoin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Using a sudden tubular expansion as a model of an arterial stenosis, the effect of disturbed flow on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood was studied theoretically and tested experimentally by measuring the dissolution rate of benzoic acid disks forming the outer tube of a sudden tubular expansion. The study revealed that mass transfer from vessel wall to flowing fluid in regions of disturbed flow is independent of wall shear rates. The rate of mass transfer is significantly higher in regions of disturbed flow with a local maximum around the reattachment point where the wall shear rate is zero. The experimental study also revealed that the rate of mass transfer from the vessel wall to a flowing fluid is much higher in the presence of microspheres (as models of blood cells) in the flowing fluid and under the condition of pulsatile flow than in steady flow. These results imply that flow disturbance may enhance the transport of biochemicals and macromolecules, such as plasma proteins and lipoproteins synthesized within the blood vessel wall, from the blood vessel wall to flowing blood. PMID:18204314

  1. Local endwall heat/mass-transfer distributions in pin fin channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Kim, Y. S.; Han, J. C.

    1987-10-01

    Naphthalene sublimination experiments were conducted to study the effects of the pin configuration, the pin length-to-diameter ratio, and the entrance length on local endwall heat/mass transfer in a channel with short pin fins (pin length-to-diameter ratios of 0.5 and 1.0). The detailed distributions of the local endwall heat/mass-transfer coefficient were obtained for staggered and aligned arrays of pin fins, for the spanwise pin spacing-to-diameter ratio of 2.5, and for streamwise pin spacing-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 2.5. The Reynolds numbers were kept at about 33,000. Overall- and row-averaged Nusselt numbers compared very well with those from previous heat-transfer studies.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in Cork Lightweight Concretes Used in Building Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotehi, Nassima; Chaker, Abla

    A numerical study was carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of building envelopes made of lightweight concretes. In this work, we are particularly interested to the building envelopes which are consist of cement paste with incorporation of cork aggregates in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. The mathematical formulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in wet porous materials has been made using Luikov's model, the system describing temperature and moisture transfer processes within building walls is solved numerically with the finite elements method. The obtained results illustrate the temporal evolutions of the temperature and the moisture content, and the distributions of the temperature and moisture content inside the wall for several periods of time. They allow us to specify the effect of the nature and dosage of fibre on the heat and mass transfer.

  3. Freeze-drying in novel container system: Characterization of heat and mass transfer in glass syringes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal M; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing and understanding different modes of heat and mass transfer in glass syringes to develop a robust freeze-drying process. Two different holder systems were used to freeze-dry in syringes: an aluminum (Al) block and a plexiglass holder. The syringe heat transfer coefficient was characterized by a sublimation test using pure water. Mannitol and sucrose (5% w/v) were also freeze-dried, as model systems, in both the assemblies. Dry layer resistance was determined from manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and product temperature was measured using thermocouples, and was also determined from MTM. Further, freeze-drying process was also designed using Smart freeze-dryer to assess its application for freeze-drying in novel container systems. Heat and mass transfer in syringes were compared against the traditional container system (i.e., glass tubing vial). In the Al block, the heat transfer was via three modes: contact conduction, gas conduction, and radiation with gas conduction being the dominant mode of heat transfer. In the plexiglass holder, the heat transfer was mostly via radiation; convection was not involved. Also, MTM/Smart freeze-drying did work reasonably well for freeze-drying in syringes. When compared to tubing vials, product temperature decreases and hence drying time increases in syringes. PMID:20166199

  4. Mixed convection heat and mass transfer in radially rotating rectangular ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.T.; Yan, W.M.

    1998-11-27

    Heat transfer in rotating ducts is encountered in many engineering applications, such as cooling of turbomachinery, gas turbines, and other rotating systems. The present work investigates mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the entrance region of radially rotating rectangular ducts with water film evaporation along the porous duct walls. Mechanisms of secondary vortex development in the ducts under various conditions are examined by a vorticity-velocity numerical method. Emphasis is placed on the rotation effects, including both Coriolis and centrifugal buoyancy forces, and the mass diffusion effect on the flow structure and heat transfer characteristics. Results are presented in particular for an air-water vapor system under various conditions. Predicted results show that the effects of liquid film evaporation along the porous duct walls on the mixed convection heat transfer are rather substantial. The magnitude of the evaporative latent heat transfer may be 10 times greater than that of sensible heat transfer. The predictions also demonstrate that the distributions of Nu, Sh{sub z}, and fRe are closely related to the emergence, disappearance, growth, and decay of the rotating-induced secondary vortices. Additionally, a higher Nu{sub z} is found for a rectangular duct with a larger aspect ratio ({gamma} = 2) due to the relatively stronger secondary flows.

  5. Heat and mass transfer performances on plate fin and tube heat exchangers with dehumidification

    SciTech Connect

    Seshimo, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Marumoto, K.; Fujii, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors discuss how they conducted an experimental study on the air side performance of a single-row plate fin and tube heat exchanger in moist air where mass transfer exist under a relatively low driving potential. The results are as follows: The heat transfer with dehumidification is about 20% greater than that with only sensible heat transfer. Also the air side pressure drop is about 30-40% greater. The reason, as clarified by visual observations, comes from the condensate effect. To study how the condensate film affects performance, the presence of the stagnant condensate in the heat exchanger was modeled as an apparent change of the heat exchanger geometry, and the equivalent thickness of the condensate film was calculated from the increase in the air side pressure drop. As a result, if the presence of condensate in the heat exchanger is considered, then the heat transfer with dehumidification can be treated in the same way as with only sensible heat transfer. The analogy between heat and mass transfer does not strictly hold, the experimental results being closed to the Lewis Law.

  6. Pore Network Simulation to Develop Electrical Petrophysical Relations in the Presence of Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Haggerty, R.; Singha, K.; Binley, A.; Swanson, R. D.; Clifford, J.; Lane, J. W.; Ward, A. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    In both field and laboratory settings, time-lapse electrical measurements have indicated rate-limited mass transfer of ionic tracer between mobile and immobile (or less mobile) domains in porous media over a range of flow rates and time scales. In previous work, a simple bicontinuum extension of Archie's Law was used to relate direct-current bulk conductivity and fluid conductivity assuming that the mobile and immobile domains contribute as conductors in parallel with weights given by porosity fraction; however, other petrophysical models may account for the effect of internal connectivity of each domain on its relative contribution to bulk conductivity. Additional work is required to (1) evaluate the bicontinuum Archie formulation relative to these other models for bulk conductivity of multiphase (i.e., multidomain) media with application to mass-transfer problems, and (2) characterize the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer for porous media with different pore geometries and electrical properties. To address this long standing problem, we developed a coupled fluid flow, electrical conduction, and solute transport simulator for two-dimensional pore networks. The pore space is modeled as a pipe lattice where pipes are square in cross section with widths drawn from random distributions. Pipe conductances for the fluid flow problem are assigned according to Hagen-Pouseuille flow, and the conservation problem is solved. Alternative to computationally intensive simulation of transient advective-dispersive transport, we adopt a more efficient but approximate two-step approach. First, we find the zeroth and first temporal moments throughout the network by solving sequentially two steady-state transport problems; from these results we calculate mean arrival time for each node in the network. Second, we convert the calculated mean arrival times to mass-transfer rates for input to a semi-analytical multi-rate mass transfer model to simulate gross transport through a

  7. About Mass Transfer in Capillaries of Biological Systems under Influence of Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, K.

    Vibrations accompany the flight of the manned spacecraft both at a stage of a orbital injection to an orbit, and during long flights (as noise), rendering undesirable physiological influence on crew, reducing serviceability and creating constant discomfort. The report represents attempt to predict a state of the cosmonaut in conditions of influence of vibrations for the period of start and stay in Space, being based on researches of mass transfer processes in capillary systems. For this purpose the original researches on heat and mass transfer processes with evaporation of liquids in capillary - porous structures in conditions of vibration actions and changes of a direction of action of gravitation are generalized. Report demonstrates the existence of modes at which increased or lowered mass transfer is achieved on border of separation "liquid - gas". The possible mechanism of influence of vibrations on evaporation of a liquid in capillaries is examined. The magnitudes of frequencies and amplitudes are submitted at which minimax characteristics are observed. The opportunity of application of the developed mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in capillary - porous structures to forecasting influence of vibrations for biological processes in capillaries of alive essences is analyzed. Such approach is justified on the mechanical nature of harmful influence of vibrations on an organism of the person. In addition the range of vibration frequencies which arise during space flights, corresponds to own resonant frequencies of a human body and his separate organs. Comparison of these resonant frequencies of a body of the person (5-80 Hertz) with vibration frequencies of optimum modes of heat and mass transfer in capillary - porous structures (20-40 Hertz) is shown their ranges of coverage. It gives the basis to assume existence of similar effects in capillaries of human body. It is supposed, that the difficulty of breath, change of a rhythm of breath, the subsequent

  8. Effect of laminar unsteady fluid flows on mass transfer in electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Ahmed Kamal

    1999-11-01

    A numerical study of mass transfer in steady as well as unsteady two-dimensional laminar channel flows is investigated. When a circular cylinder is suspended in a steady flow stream, the flow becomes unsteady and oscillates periodically for Reynolds numbers, Re, between 200 and 800 (where Re is based on the channel height) due to the formation of the Karman vortex street. This well- characterized unsteady periodic flow is utilized to study mass transfer rates at different positions downstream of the blocking cylinder. The study consisted of mass transfer to a channel wall and mass transfer to the bottom surface of rectangular cavities, of different depth/width ratios. All investigated positions, including cavity position, are located downstream of the blocking cylinder. The study also included the mass transfer to a channel wall in a steady fully-developed flow when a hemi-cylindrical bump is located at the lower wall. The results of the numerical simulations are then compared to the experimental data. The numerical and experimental results are found to be generally in good agreement. Structured multi-block grids are utilized for the fluid flow simulations. It is shown that grids can be created differently with different block topologies. Solution accuracy is shown to be strongly affected by the shape as well as the densities of the resulting grids. The finite element method is used to simulate the fluid flow while for the concentration field a procedure based on the finite volume method is used. The strength of the flow at the cavity mouth was found to scale linearly with wall shear in the absence of the cavity for steady channel flow. The flow at the cavity mouth was also found to be independent of the cavity depth for both steady and unsteady flows. Based on these observations it is possible to predict cavity flows and cavity mass transfer without computing the flow in the entire channel plus cavity domain when studying different cavity aspect ratios. A

  9. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separation and flocculation for a charged colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lai, S K; Wu, K L

    2002-10-01

    We model the intercolloidal interaction by a hard-sphere Yukawa repulsion to which is added the long-range van der Waals attraction. In comparison with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsion, the Yukawa repulsion explicitly incorporates the spatial correlations between colloids and small ions. As a result, the repulsive part can be expressed analytically and has a coupling strength depending on the colloidal volume fraction. By use of this two-body potential of mean force and in conjunction with a second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, we construct the colloidal Helmholtz free energy and use it to calculate the thermodynamic quantities, pressure and chemical potential, needed in the determination of the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams. We examine, in an aqueous charged colloidal dispersion, the effects of the Hamaker constant and particle size on the conformation of a stable liquid-liquid phase transition calculated with respect to the liquid-solid coexistence phases. We find that there exists a threshold Hamaker constant or particle size whose value demarcates the stable liquid-liquid coexistence phases from their metastable counterparts. Applying the same technique and using the energetic criterion, we extend our calculations to study the flocculation phenomenon in aqueous charged colloids. Here, we pay due attention to determining the loci of a stability curve stipulated for a given temperature T0, and obtain the parametric phase diagram of the Hamaker constant vs the coupling strength or, at given surface potential, the particle size. By imposing T0 to be the critical temperature T(c), i.e., setting k(B)T0 (=k(B)T(c)) equal to a reasonable potential barrier, we arrive at the stability curve that marks the irreversible/reversible phase transition. The interesting result is that there occurs a minimum size for the colloidal particles below (above) which the colloidal dispersion is driven to an irreversible (reversible) phase

  10. Fine Drop Recovery in Batch Gas-Agitated Liquid-Liquid Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrokhi, H.; Shaw, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    The hydrodynamics of batch gas-agitated liquid-liquid dispersions has received comparatively little attention in the open literature1-5. Such systems arise in diverse contexts but operate on the same basic principle. Two immiscible liquids form stratified layers initially and return to this stratified state at the end of a batch. Liquid from the lower liquid phase is entrained and then dispersed by gas bubbles passing from the lower to the upper liquid phase. At the end of a batch, the liquids separate under the influence of gravity. Fine drops separate slowly. For industrial processes such as nickel conversion, long settling periods reduce equipment productivity. Metal drops entrained in the lower density slag phase also pose leaching problems in slag heaps. We assessed fine drop production in such batch systems previously5. In this work, we address fine drop recovery. The net rate of fine drop recovery can be up to five times greater than Standard Settling experiments if low speed recirculation loops are imposed within the upper liquid phase that are perpendicular to the liquid-liquid interface. The principal mechanism for enhanced fine drop recovery, in this case, arises from improving drop liquid-liquid interface coalescence. 1. Hatzikiriakos et al., A.I.Ch.E. J., 36, 677-684 (1990). 2. Hatzikiriakos et al., Chem. Eng. Sci., 45, 2349-2356 (1990). 3. Konduru & Shaw, Proc. Int. Symp. Materials Handling in Pyromet., Hamilton, Cda, 14-24 (1991). 4. ibid, Can. J. Chem. Eng., 70, 381-384 (1992). 5. Shahrokhi & Shaw, Chem. Eng. Sci., 49, 5203-5213 (1994).

  11. Modeling PAH mass transfer in a slurry of contaminated soil or sediment amended with organic sorbents.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-06-01

    A three-compartment kinetic partitioning model was employed to assess contaminant mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion in systems comprising dense slurries of polluted soil or aquifer sediment with or without sorbent amendments to sequester polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The model was applied to simulate temporal changes in aqueous and particle-bound PAH concentrations comparing different pollution sources (heavy oil or tar sludge) and various sorbent amendments (polyoxymethylene (POM), coke breeze, and activated carbon). For the model evaluation, all the parameters needed were directly measured from a series of experiments, allowing full calibration and verification of model predictions without parameter fitting. The numerical model reproduced two separate laboratory-scale experiments reasonably: PAH uptake in POM beads and PAH uptake by semipermeable membrane devices. PAH mass transfer was then simulated for various scenarios, considering different sorbent doses and mass transfer rates as well as biodegradation. Such model predictions provide a quick assessment tool for identifying mass transfer limitations during washing, stabilization, or bioslurry treatments of polluted soil or sediment in mixed systems. It appears that PAHs would be readily released from materials contaminated by small oil droplets, but not tar decanter sludge. Released PAHs would be sequestered rapidly by activated carbon amendment but to a much lesser extent by coke breeze. If sorbing black carbon is present in the slurries, POM pellets would not be effective as a sequestration amendment. High first-order biodegradation rates in the free aqueous phase, e.g., in the order of 0.001 s(-1) for phenanthrene, would be required to compete effectively with adsorption and mass transfer for strong sorbents. PMID:18456306

  12. Analysis of Effect of Gas-Liquid Interfacial Disturbance on Mass Transfer Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honda; Chung, Tsair-Wang

    In order to study the mass transfer phenomena for water vapor absorbed by triethylene glycol (TEG) solution and to elucidate effect of interfacial disturbance on absorption performance, the interfacial phenomena for water drop instilling on the surface of TEG solution and mass transfer process were observed and operated in this study. Besides liquid and gas flow rates, the interfacial disturbance can also affect the mass transfer performance in the absorption system with continuous liquid phase, and the advanced mass transfer phenomena must be discussed from the interface of matter. Therefore, the surface tensions of desiccant solutions were measured to analyze the disturbed phenomena of water drop instilling on the surface of TEG solution. Since the Marangoni-Index (MI) means the maximum surface tension difference on the surface of liquid layer, the values of MI were calculated and compared with the mass transfer performance of packed-bed absorber. Generally speaking, the interfacial disturbance, resulted from the surface tension difference, would promote the contacting area of gas and liquid phases. The observation of water drop instilling on surface of TEG solution found that the interfacial disturbance existed between water drop and TEG solution, and the interfacial instability was found in the peripheral region of the water drop. On the other hand, the values of MI were increased by the increased TEG concentrations, and it can be deduced that the surface tension effect should be significant in the higher concentration of TEG solution and the interfacial disturbance would be heavier above 95 wt.% TEG solutions. Finally, the absorption performance for 95 and 96 wt.% TEG solutions were much larger than that of 90 and 88.6 wt.% TEG solutions in the operation of packed-bed absorber.

  13. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online. PMID:23305831

  14. Bibliography on augmentation of convective heat and mass transfer-II

    SciTech Connect

    Bergles, A.E.; Nirmalan, V.; Junkhan, G.H.; Webb, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    Heat transfer augmentation has developed into a major specialty area in heat transfer research and development. This report presents and updated bibliography of world literature on augmentation. The literature is classified into passive augmentation techniques, which require no external power, and active techniques, which do require external power. The fifteen techniques are grouped in terms of their applications to the various modes of heat transfer. Mass transfer is included for completeness. Key words are included with each citation for technique/mode identification. The total number of publications cited is 3045, including 135 surveys of various techniques and 86 papers on performance evaluation of passive techniques. Patents are not included, as they are the subject of a separate bibliographic report.

  15. Reciprocal theorem for convective heat and mass transfer from a particle in Stokes and potential flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandadi, Vahid; Jafari Kang, Saeed; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    In the study of convective heat and mass transfer from a particle, key quantities of interest are usually the average rate of transfer and the mean distribution of the scalar (i.e., temperature or concentration) at the particle surface. Calculating these quantities using conventional equations requires detailed knowledge of the scalar field, which is available predominantly for problems involving uniform scalar and flux boundary conditions. Here we derive a reciprocal relation between two diffusing scalars that are advected by oppositely driven Stokes or potential flows whose streamline configurations are identical. This relation leads to alternative expressions for the aforementioned average quantities based on the solution of the scalar field for uniform surface conditions. We exemplify our results via two applications: (i) heat transfer from a sphere with nonuniform boundary conditions in Stokes flow at small Péclet numbers and (ii) extension of Brenner's theorem for the invariance of heat transfer rate to flow reversal.

  16. Numerical study on heat and mass transfer in hygroscopic rotor during sorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyun-Geun; Park, Il Seouk

    2016-06-01

    Recently, interest in hygroscopic dehumidifiers has rapidly increased in the indoor environment industry because of their potential contribution to the development of hybrid (refrigerating + hygroscopic) dehumidifiers. Heat and mass transport phenomena such as adsorption and desorption, and their complex interactions occur in a desiccant rotor, which comprises many small hygroscopic channels. This study numerically investigated the conjugated heat and mass transfers in a channel modeled with the flow and porous desiccant regions, where only ordinary and surface diffusions (excluding Knudsen diffusion) during the sorption processes were considered. The change in the dehumidification performance depending on operating conditions such as the rotor's rotating speed, air flow rate, and adsorption-desorption ratio, was examined under various working environments. The temporal and spatial variations in the temperature, vapor mass fraction, and liquid water mass fraction in the channel were considered in detail. The closely linked heat and mass transports were clarified for a better understanding of the sorption processes in the desiccant rotor.

  17. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transformation in Silicon: Evidence from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2007-11-01

    We report results of first principles molecular dynamics simulations that confirm early speculations on the presence of liquid-liquid phase transition in undercooled silicon. However, we find that structural and electronic properties of both low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) phases are quite different from those obtained by empirical calculations, the difference being more pronounced for the HDL phase. The discrepancy between quantum and classical simulations is attributed to the inability of empirical potentials to describe changes in chemical bonds induced by density and temperature variations.

  18. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  19. Tunable Liquid-Liquid Critical Point in an Ionic Model of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Recently, it was shown that the Woodcock-Angell-Cheeseman model for liquid silica [L. V. Woodcock, C. A. Angell, and P. Cheeseman, J. Chem. Phys. 65, 1565 (1976)] is remarkably close to having a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). We demonstrate that increasing the ion charge separates the global maxima of the response functions, while reducing the charge smoothly merges them into a LLCP, a phenomenon that might be experimentally observable with charged colloids. An analysis of the Si and O coordination numbers suggests that a sufficiently low Si /O coordination number ratio is needed to attain a LLCP.

  20. Tunable Liquid-Liquid Critical Point in an Ionic Model of Silica.

    PubMed

    Lascaris, Erik

    2016-03-25

    Recently, it was shown that the Woodcock-Angell-Cheeseman model for liquid silica [L. V. Woodcock, C. A. Angell, and P. Cheeseman, J. Chem. Phys. 65, 1565 (1976)] is remarkably close to having a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). We demonstrate that increasing the ion charge separates the global maxima of the response functions, while reducing the charge smoothly merges them into a LLCP, a phenomenon that might be experimentally observable with charged colloids. An analysis of the Si and O coordination numbers suggests that a sufficiently low Si/O coordination number ratio is needed to attain a LLCP. PMID:27058086