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Sample records for mass trapping scheme

  1. Evaluation of Pulse Counting for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) Ion Trap Detection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Amerom, Friso H.; Short, Tim; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Kleyner, Igor; Cotter, Robert J.; Pinnick, Veronica; Hoffman, Lars; Danell, Ryan M.; Lyness, Eric I.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Mass Analyzer is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to identify organics and possible biological compounds on Mars. In the process of characterizing mass spectrometer size, weight, and power consumption, the use of pulse counting was considered for ion detection. Pulse counting has advantages over analog-mode amplification of the electron multiplier signal. Some advantages are reduced size of electronic components, low power consumption, ability to remotely characterize detector performance, and avoidance of analog circuit noise. The use of pulse counting as a detection method with ion trap instruments is relatively rare. However, with the recent development of high performance electrical components, this detection method is quite suitable and can demonstrate significant advantages over analog methods. Methods A prototype quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer with an internal electron ionization source was used as a test setup to develop and evaluate the pulse-counting method. The anode signal from the electron multiplier was preamplified. The an1plified signal was fed into a fast comparator for pulse-level discrimination. The output of the comparator was fed directly into a Xilinx FPGA development board. Verilog HDL software was written to bin the counts at user-selectable intervals. This system was able to count pulses at rates in the GHz range. The stored ion count nun1ber per bin was transferred to custom ion trap control software. Pulse-counting mass spectra were compared with mass spectra obtained using the standard analog-mode ion detection. Prelin1inary Data Preliminary mass spectra have been obtained for both analog mode and pulse-counting mode under several sets of instrument operating conditions. Comparison of the spectra revealed better peak shapes for pulse-counting mode. Noise levels are as good as, or better than, analog-mode detection noise levels. To artificially force ion pile-up conditions, the ion trap was overfilled

  2. Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, Greg C.

    2005-09-01

    This chapter describes research conducted in a few research groups in the 1990s in which RF quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers were coupled to a powerful atomic ion source, the inductively coupled plasma used in conventional ICP-MS instruments. Major section titles for this chapter are: RF Quadrupole Ion Traps Features of RF Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Selective Ion Trapping methods Inductively Coupled Plasma Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

  3. Mass trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping has been found to be highly effective for control of pest fruit flies when populations are low and a highly effective lure is available for the target species. Successful population control through mass trapping is an indicator that attract-and-kill bait stations may be equally succes...

  4. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  5. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  6. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  7. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  8. Scheme for teleportation of unknown states of trapped ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Feng; Ma, Song-She

    2008-02-01

    A scheme is presented for teleporting an unknown state in a trapped ion system. The scheme only requires a single laser beam. It allows the trap to be in any state with a few phonons, e.g. a thermal motion. Furthermore, it works in the regime, where the Rabi frequency of the laser is on the order of the trap frequency. Thus, the teleportation speed is greatly increased, which is important for decreasing the decoherence effect. This idea can also be used to teleport an unknown ionic entangled state.

  9. Implementation schemes for unsharp measurements with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sujit K.; Konrad, T.; Uys, H.

    2013-01-01

    Unsharp positive operator-valued measurements allow a variety of measurement applications which minimally disrupt the state of the quantum system. Experimental schemes are proposed for implementing unsharp measurements on the qubit levels of a trapped ion. The schemes rely on introducing weak entanglement between the state of a target ion and that of an auxiliary ion, using standard ion-trap quantum logic operations, and then realizing an unsharp measurement through projective measurement on the auxiliary atom. We analyze common sources of error and their effect on different applications of unsharp measurements.

  10. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  11. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  12. Penning trap mass measurement of 72Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, A. A.; Bollen, G.; Cooper, K.; Eibach, M.; Gulyuz, K.; Izzo, C.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Villari, A. C. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) Penning trap mass spectrometer was used to perform an improved-precision mass measurement of 72Br and the low-lying isomeric state, Brm72, giving mass excesses of -59 062.2 (1.0 )keV and -58 960.9 (1.2 )keV , respectively. These values are consistent with the values from the 2012 atomic mass evaluation [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012), 10.1088/1674-1137/36/12/003] and the Nubase2012 evaluation of nuclear properties [Chin. Phys. C 36, 1157 (2012), 10.1088/1674-1137/36/12/001]. The uncertainties on the mass of the ground state and isomeric state have been reduced by a factor of seven.

  13. An electrostatic autoresonant ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, A. V.; Hinch, B. J.

    2010-01-15

    A new method for ion extraction from an anharmonic electrostatic trap is introduced. Anharmonicity is a common feature of electrostatic traps which can be used for small scale spatial confinement of ions, and this feature is also necessary for autoresonant ion extraction. With the aid of ion trajectory simulations, novel autoresonant trap mass spectrometers (ART-MSs) have been designed based on these very simple principles. A mass resolution {approx}60 is demonstrated for the prototypes discussed here. We report also on the pressure dependencies, and the (mV) rf field strength dependencies of the ART-MS sensitivity. Importantly the new MS designs do not require heavy magnets, tight manufacturing tolerances, introduction of buffer gases, high power rf sources, nor complicated electronics. The designs described here are very inexpensive to implement relative to other instruments, and can be easily miniaturized. Possible applications are discussed.

  14. Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap Mass Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Li, Ailin; Tian, Yuan; Zare, Richard N; Austin, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    We report a linear ion trap (LIT) in which the electric field is formed by fine wires held under tension and accurately positioned using holes drilled in two end plates made of plastic. The coordinates of the hole positions were optimized in simulation. The stability diagram and mass spectra using boundary ejection were compared between simulation and experiment and good agreement was found. The mass spectra from experiments show peak widths (fwhm) in units of mass-to-charge of around 0.38 Th using a scan rate of 3830 Th/s. The limits of detection are 137 ppbv and 401 ppbv for benzene and toluene, respectively. Different sizes of the wire ion trap can be easily fabricated by drilling holes in scaled positions. Other distinguishing features, such as high ion and photon transmission, low capacitance, high tolerance to mechanical and assembly error, and low weight, are discussed. PMID:27373557

  15. Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Vorobyev, G. K.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Eliseev, S.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Kluge, H.-J.

    2010-06-15

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a {sup 48}Ca beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

  16. Mass measurements with a Penning trap mass spectrometer at ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-21

    Penning trap mass measurements on radioactive isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended. The most recent measurements were carried out on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. An accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  17. Development of a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Joseph Ellis

    Because of its potential to be made portable the quadrupole ion trap (QPIT) is a prime candidate for specialized applications such as atmospheric studies, other field measurements, or measurements anywhere a laboratory instrument would be prohibitively inconvenient. To utilize the QPIT in such ways it is necessary to design and construct custom built instruments. A QPIT mass spectrometer was constructed as the foundation for such future development. Two ionization schemes were employed. Direct electron bombardment was used for in situ ion production, and UV photoionization was used to produce ions external to the trap. Calibration measurements determined that the system performed as theory dictated. It was also demonstrated that the system was capable of sampling the atmosphere and detecting the presence of an atmospheric contaminant. Finally, DC bias foils were invented as a novel approach to mass isolation in the trap. The use of DC bias foils was demonstrated to be an exceptionally easy and inexpensive method of controlling the contents of the QPIT.

  18. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  19. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  20. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  1. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  2. Efficacy of commercial traps and food odor attractants for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Lasa, Rodrigo; Velázquez, Olinda E; Ortega, Rafael; Acosta, Emilio

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important factors for the success of a mass trapping strategy to control a fruit fly involves the selection of an effective trap-lure combination. Because different species of fruit flies respond differently to the physical characteristics of a trap and to bait volatiles, the evaluation of commercial traps and lures that have proved useful against other tephtrids is necessary to determine their efficacy for mass trapping of Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Under caged conditions, a commercial hemispherical trap with lateral holes (Maxitrap Plus) proved more attractive to A. ludens (both sexes) than five other commercial traps that were all baited with hydrolyzed protein. Among these traps, bottom invaginated traps and traps with invaginated lateral holes constructed with transparent cylinders had the best physical retention properties. When evaluated under field conditions, the lure was critical for the efficacy of the trap, and one of the traps that performed poorly in attraction and retention cage tests (MS2) resulted as one of the most effective traps when baited with CeraTrap lure. Considering the use of different trap models under field conditions, CeraTrap liquid bait was more effective in A. ludens capture than Biolure dry synthetic bait, but both lures were not replaced during the entire course of the experiment. The percentage of captured females was also slightly higher using CeraTrap lure (67.2%) than using Biolure baits (54.5-58.8%). In field tests, 75-81% of females were mated and no significant differences were observed among trap-lure combinations. Trap selectivity against nontarget adult lacewings also differed among trap-lure combinations. PMID:24665702

  3. Mass trapping with MosquiTRAPs does not reduce Aedes aegypti abundance.

    PubMed

    Degener, Carolin Marlen; de Ázara, Tatiana Mingote Ferreira; Roque, Rosemary Aparecida; Rösner, Susanne; Rocha, Eliseu Soares Oliveira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; Nobre, Aline Araújo; Ohly, Jörg Johannes; Geier, Martin; Eiras, Álvaro Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Aedes aegypti mass trapping using the sticky trap MosquiTRAP (MQT) by performing a cluster randomised controlled trial in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. After an initial questionnaire and baseline monitoring of adult Ae. aegypti abundance with BG-Sentinel (BGS) traps in six clusters, three clusters were randomly assigned to the intervention arm where each participating household received three MQTs for mass trapping during 17 months. The remaining three clusters (control arm) did not receive traps. The effect of mass trapping on adult Ae. aegypti abundance was monitored fortnightly with BGS traps. During the last two months of the study, a serological survey was conducted. After the study, a second questionnaire was applied in the intervention arm. Entomological monitoring indicated that MQT mass trapping did not reduce adult Ae. aegypti abundance. The serological survey indicated that recent dengue infections were equally frequent in the intervention and the control arm. Most participants responded positively to questions concerning user satisfaction. According to the results, there is no evidence that mass trapping with MQTs can be used as a part of dengue control programs. The use of this sticky trap is only recommendable for dengue vector monitoring. PMID:25946154

  4. Mass trapping with MosquiTRAPs does not reduce Aedes aegypti abundance

    PubMed Central

    Degener, Carolin Marlen; de Ázara, Tatiana Mingote Ferreira; Roque, Rosemary Aparecida; Rösner, Susanne; Rocha, Eliseu Soares Oliveira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; Nobre, Aline Araújo; Ohly, Jörg Johannes; Geier, Martin; Eiras, Álvaro Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Aedes aegypti mass trapping using the sticky trap MosquiTRAP (MQT) by performing a cluster randomised controlled trial in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. After an initial questionnaire and baseline monitoring of adult Ae. aegypti abundance with BG-Sentinel (BGS) traps in six clusters, three clusters were randomly assigned to the intervention arm where each participating household received three MQTs for mass trapping during 17 months. The remaining three clusters (control arm) did not receive traps. The effect of mass trapping on adult Ae. aegypti abundance was monitored fortnightly with BGS traps. During the last two months of the study, a serological survey was conducted. After the study, a second questionnaire was applied in the intervention arm. Entomological monitoring indicated that MQT mass trapping did not reduce adult Ae. aegypti abundance. The serological survey indicated that recent dengue infections were equally frequent in the intervention and the control arm. Most participants responded positively to questions concerning user satisfaction. According to the results, there is no evidence that mass trapping with MQTs can be used as a part of dengue control programs. The use of this sticky trap is only recommendable for dengue vector monitoring. PMID:25946154

  5. A cooler Penning trap for the TITAN mass measurement facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, U.; Kootte, B.; Good, M.; Lascar, D.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J.; Gwinner, G.

    2015-01-09

    The TITAN facility at TRIUMF makes use of highly charged ions, charge-bred in an electron beam ion trap, to carry out accurate mass measurements on radioactive isotopes. We report on our progress to develop a cooler Penning trap, CPET, which aims at reducing the energy spread of the ions to ≈ 1 eV/charge prior to injection into the mass measurement trap. In off-line mode, we can now trap electron plasmas for minutes, and we observe the damping of the m = 1 diocotron plasma mode within ≈ 2 s.

  6. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  7. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  8. Ion trap array mass analyzer: structure and performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Gongyu; Luo, Chan; Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2009-06-15

    An ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer--a novel ion trap mass analyzer with multiple ion trapping and analyzing channels--was designed and constructed. Its property and performance were investigated and reported in this paper. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes including two parallel printed circuit board (PCB) plates. Each PCB plate was fabricated to several identical rectangular electric strips based on normal PCB fabrication technology and was placed symmetrically to those on the opposite plate. There is no electrode between any two adjacent strips. Every strip was supplied with an rf voltage while the polarity of the voltage applied to the adjacent two strips was opposite. So the electric potential at the central plane between two adjacent strips is zero. Multiple identical electric field regions that contain the dominant quadrupole plus some other high-order fields were produced between the two PCB plates. The multiple identical electric field regions will have the property of ion trapping, ion storage, and mass analysis functions. So an ITA could work as multiple ion trap mass analyzers. It could perform multiple sample ion storage, mass-selected ion isolation, ion ejection, and mass analysis simultaneously. The ITA was operated at both "digital ion trap mode" and "conventional rf mode" experimentally. A preliminary mass spectrum has been carried out in one of the ion trap channels, and it shows a mass resolution of over 1000. Additional functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and mass-selected ion ejection have also been tested. Furthermore, the ITA has a small size and very low cost. An ITA with four channels is less than 30 cm(3) in total volume, and it shows a great promise for the miniaturization of the whole mass spectrometer instrument and high-throughput mass analysis. PMID:19441854

  9. Recent developments and proposed schemes for trapped ion frequency standards. [trapped mercury ions for microwave and optical frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1982-01-01

    Ion traps are exciting candidates as future precision frequency sources. Recent developments demonstrate that mercury ion frequency standards are capable of a stability performance comparable to commercial cesium standards. There is, however, considerable room for improvement with regard to the signal to noise problem. The 40 GHz microwave frequency implies that a careful design should be implemented to ensure the elimination of the unwanted side bands in the microwave pump signal. A long life, high performance light source to be used in a trapped mercury ion microwave standard must be developed and the long term performance of a trapped mercury ion microwave standard must be investigated. While newly proposed two photon pumping schemes in conjuction with mercury ions promise exciting developments for both microwave and optical frequency standards, other ions that may be potential candidates should be evaluated for their usefulness.

  10. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  11. New analytical scheme for regular old ordinary mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.M.; Russell, D.

    1994-12-31

    A unified scheme was developed to define the composition, improve detection and qualitative identification of water soluble organics in heavy oil retort. Elements of the scheme included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), hybrid mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (EB-TOF) with electron impact (EI) and fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization and a computerized library search program. As part of the development of the process, each element of the analytical scheme was applied to complex samples of aqueous organic materials extracted from heavy oil retorts. Preliminary investigations have indicated that the heavy oil retort contains hundreds of compounds in ppm/ppb concentrations.

  12. Scheme for Quantum Cloning and Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhi-Ming

    In this paper, a scheme is presented to implement the 1→2 universal quantum cloning machine (UQCM) with trapped ions. In this way, we also show that quantum information can be directly transferred from one ion to another. The distinct advantage of the scheme lies in the fact that it does not use the vibrational mode as the data bus. The vibrational mode is only virtually excited, which makes our scheme insensitive to heating, provided the system remains in the Lamb-Dicke regime.

  13. Ion trap simulation program, ITSIM: A powerful heuristic and predictive tool in ion trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Huy Anh

    The multi-particle simulation program, ITSIM version 4.0, takes advantage of the enhanced performance of the Windows 95 and NT operating systems in areas such as memory management, user friendliness, flexibility of graphics and speed, to investigate the motion of ions in the quadrupole ion trap. The objective of this program is to use computer simulations based on mathematical models to improve the performance of the ion trap mass spectrometer. The simulation program can provide assistance in understanding fundamental aspects of ion trap mass spectrometry, precede and help to direct the course of experiments, as well as having didactic value in elucidating and allowing visualization of ion behavior under different experimental conditions. The program uses the improved Euler method to calculate ion trajectories as numerical solutions to the Mathieu differential equation. This Windows version can simultaneously simulate the trajectories of ions with a virtually unlimited number of different mass-to-charge ratios and hence allows realistic mass spectra, ion kinetic energy distributions and other experimentally measurable properties to be simulated. The large number of simulated ions allows examination of (i) the offsetting effects of mutual ion repulsion and collisional cooling in an ion trap and (ii) the effects of higher order fields. Field inhomogeneities arising from exit holes, electrode misalignment, imperfect electrode surfaces or new trap geometries can be simulated with the program. The simulated data are used to obtain mass spectra from mass-selective instability scans as well as by Fourier transformation of image currents induced by coherently moving ion clouds. Complete instruments, from an ion source through the ion trap mass analyzer to a detector, can now be simulated. Applications of the simulation program are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made between the simulations and experimental data. Fourier transformed experiments and a novel six

  14. The mass multiplet in Penning trap ion cyclotron resonance mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    A model for the behavior of closely spaced masses—the "mass multiplet"—in a Penning trap mass spectrometer is developed. The model shows how these species separate from each other (or not) following resonant excitation, and gives quantitative criteria for mass separation. More surprisingly, the model shows the species tend to drift to different mean cyclotron radii. This latter effect undoubtedly plays a role in the problem of abundance determinations in Penning trap mass spectrometers.

  15. First Penning Trap Mass Measurements beyond the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mukherjee, M.; Rahaman, S.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Chaudhuri, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Di, Z.; Plass, W. R.; Eliseev, S.; Vorobjev, G.; Habs, D.

    2008-01-11

    The masses of six neutron-deficient rare holmium and thulium isotopes close to the proton drip line were determined with the SHIPTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. For the first time the masses of the proton-unbound isotopes {sup 144,145}Ho and {sup 147,148}Tm were directly measured. The proton separation energies were derived from the measured mass values and compared to predictions from mass formulas. The new values of the proton separation energies are used to determine the location of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium more accurately.

  16. Accuracy studies with carbon clusters at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaer, J.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Smorra, C.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-05-01

    Extensive cross-reference measurements of well-known frequency ratios using various sizes of carbon cluster ions 12Cn + (10≤n≤23) were performed to determine the effects limiting the accuracy of mass measurements at the Penning-trap facility TRIGA-TRAP. Two major contributions to the uncertainty of a mass measurement have been identified. Fluctuations of the magnetic field cause an uncertainty in the frequency ratio due to the required calibration by a reference ion of uf(νref)/νref = 6(2) × 10-11/min × Δt. A mass-dependent systematic shift of the frequency ratio of epsilonm(r)/r = -2.2(2) × 10-9 × (m-mref)/u has been found as well. Finally, the nuclide 197Au was used as a cross-check since its mass is already known with an uncertainty of 0.6 keV.

  17. High-Precision Mass Measurements At TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Ketelaer, J.; Knuth, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-04-01

    In order to study neutron-rich nuclides far from the valley of stability as well as long-lived actinoids the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP has been recently installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz. Short-lived neutron-rich fission products are produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of an actinoid target installed close to the reactor core. A helium gas-jet system with carbon aerosol particles is used to extract the fission products to the experiment. The Penning trap system has already been commissioned. Off-line mass measurements are routinely performed using a recently developed laser ablation ion source, and the gas-jet system has been tested. An overview of the experiment and current status will be given.

  18. High-Precision Mass Measurements At TRIGA-TRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Smorra, C.; Eibach, M.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Eberhardt, K.; Ketelaer, J.; Knuth, K.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Nagy, Sz.

    2010-04-30

    In order to study neutron-rich nuclides far from the valley of stability as well as long-lived actinoids the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP has been recently installed at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz. Short-lived neutron-rich fission products are produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of an actinoid target installed close to the reactor core. A helium gas-jet system with carbon aerosol particles is used to extract the fission products to the experiment. The Penning trap system has already been commissioned. Off-line mass measurements are routinely performed using a recently developed laser ablation ion source, and the gas-jet system has been tested. An overview of the experiment and current status will be given.

  19. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  20. Design of a double Penning-trap mass spectrometer for high-precision mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnayake, Ishara; Bryce, Richard; Hawks, Paul; Hunt, Curtis; Redshaw, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    The mass of an atom plays an important role in various fields throughout science. As such, there is a need for precise mass determinations on a wide range of isotopes. At Central Michigan University we are developing a Penning trap to focus on ultra-high precision measurements of long-lived radioactive isotopes and isotopes that have low natural abundances. The Penning trap we are constructing will consist of a double precision measurement trap structure for simultaneous cyclotron frequency comparisons to eliminate the effect of magnetic field fluctuations. An additional, cylindrical Penning trap will be used to capture ions from external ion sources, eliminate contaminant ions and transfer the ions of interest to the precision traps. In this poster we will present the design of the Penning trap system, and report on the current status of the project. This work supported in part by NSF award no. 1307233.

  1. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  2. How might a statistical cloud scheme be coupled to a mass-flux convection scheme?

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Hannay, Cecile; Xu, Kuan-man

    2004-09-27

    The coupling of statistical cloud schemes with mass-flux convection schemes is addressed. Source terms representing the impact of convection are derived within the framework of prognostic equations for the width and asymmetry of the probability distribution function of total water mixing ratio. The accuracy of these source terms is quantified by examining output from a cloud resolving model simulation of deep convection. Practical suggestions for inclusion of these source terms in large-scale models are offered.

  3. Recent developments in Penning-trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M.

    2016-06-01

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry provides atomic masses with the highest precision. At accelerator-based on-line facilities it is applied to investigate exotic radionuclides in the context of tests of fundamental symmetries, nuclear structure studies, and nuclear astrophysics research. Recent progress in slowing down radioactive ion-beams in buffer-gas cells in combination with advanced ion-manipulation techniques has paved the way to reach nuclides ever-more far from stability. In this endeavor many efforts are underway to increase the sensitivity, the efficiency, and the precision of Penning-trap mass spectrometry. In this article some recent experimental developments are addressed with the focus on the phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance technique and the Fourier transform ion-cyclotron-resonance technique.

  4. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  5. Precision Penning Trap Mass Measurements for Nuclear Structure at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Dilling, J.; Andreoiu, C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Delheij, P.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Gwinner, G.; Lennarz, A.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.

    2013-03-01

    Precision determinations of ground state or even isomeric state masses reveal fingerprints of nuclear structure. In particular at the limits at existence for very neutron-rich or deficient isotopes, this allows one to find detailed information about nuclear structure from separation energies or binding energies. This is important to test theoretical predictions or to refine model approaches, for example for new "magic numbers," as predicted around N = 34, where strong indications exist that the inclusion of NNN forces in theoretical calculations for Ca isotopes leads to significantly better predictions for ground state binding energies. Similarly, halo nuclei present an excellent application for ab-initio theory, where ground state properties, like masses and radii, present prime parameters for testing our understanding of nuclear structure. Precision mass determinations at TRIUMF are carried out with the TITAN (TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science) system. It is an ion trap setup coupled to the on-line facility ISAC. TITAN has measured masses of isotopes as short-lived as 9 ms (almost an order of magnitude shorter-lived than any other Penning trap system) and the only one with charge breeding capabilities, a feature that allows us to boost the precision by almost 2 orders of magnitude. We recently were able to make use of this feature by measuring short-lived Rb-isotopes, up to 74Rb, and reaching the 12+ charge state, which together with other improvements lead to an increase in precision by a factor 36.

  6. Direct mass measurements of the heaviest elements with Penning traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M.

    2015-12-01

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry (PTMS) is a mature technique to provide atomic masses with highest precision. Applied to radionuclides it enables us to investigate their nuclear structure via binding energies and derived quantities such as nucleon separation energies. Recent progress in slowing down radioactive ion beams in buffer gas cells in combination with advanced ion-manipulation techniques has opened the door to access even the elements above fermium by PTMS. Such elements are produced in complete fusion-evaporation reactions of heavy ions with lead, bismuth, and actinide targets at very low rates. Pioneering high-precision mass measurements of nobelium and lawrencium isotopes have been performed with SHIPTRAP at the GSI Darmstadt, Germany. These have illustrated that direct mass measurements provide reliable anchor points to pin down decay chains and that they allow mapping nuclear shell effects, the reason for the very existence of the heaviest elements. Thus, accurate masses contribute to our understanding of these exotic nuclei with extreme proton numbers. In this article experimental challenges in mass measurements of the heaviest elements with Penning traps are discussed. Some illustrative examples of the nuclear structure features displayed based on the presently known masses are given.

  7. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Ames, F.; Schark, E.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Saint Simon, M. de; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Kohl, A.; Schwarz, S.; Moore, R. B.; Szerypo, J.

    1999-01-15

    Penning trap mass measurements on short-lived isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at the radioactive beam facility ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended by the installation of an RFQ trap ion beam buncher and a new cooler Penning trap, which is operated as an isobar separator. These improvements allowed for the first time measurements on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. In all cases an accuracy of {delta}m/m{approx_equal}1{center_dot}10{sup -7} was achieved.

  8. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Coulomb crystal mass spectrometry in a digital ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Nabanita; Pollum, Laura L.; Smith, Alexander D.; Keller, Matthias; Rennick, Christopher J.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    We present a mass spectrometric technique for identifying the masses and relative abundances of Coulomb-crystallized ions held in a linear Paul trap. A digital radio-frequency wave form is employed to generate the trapping potential, as this can be cleanly switched off, and static dipolar fields are subsequently applied to the trap electrodes for ion ejection. Close to 100% detection efficiency is demonstrated for Ca+ and CaF+ ions from bicomponent Ca+-CaF+ Coulomb crystals prepared by the reaction of Ca+ with CH3F . A quantitative linear relationship is observed between ion number and the corresponding integrated time-of-flight (TOF) peak, independent of the ionic species. The technique is applicable to a diverse range of multicomponent Coulomb crystals—demonstrated here for Ca+-NH 3+ -NH 4+ and Ca+-CaOH +-CaOD + crystals—and will facilitate the measurement of ion-molecule reaction rates and branching ratios in complicated reaction systems.

  10. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  11. Multiple mass analysis using an ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses. PMID:23797864

  12. Multiple Mass Analysis Using an Ion Trap Array (ITA) Mass Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yu; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses.

  13. High-precision masses of neutron-deficient rubidium isotopes using a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerbauer, A.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Weber, C.; Yazidjian, C.; Blaum, K.; Bollen, G.; Schwarz, S.; Herlert, A.; Schweikhard, L.

    2007-10-15

    The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient radioactive rubidium isotopes {sup 74-77,79,80,83}Rb have been measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. Using the time-of-flight cyclotron resonance technique, relative mass uncertainties ranging from 1.6x10{sup -8} to 5.6x10{sup -8} were achieved. In all cases, the mass precision was significantly improved as compared with the prior Atomic-Mass Evaluation; no significant deviations from the literature values were observed. The exotic nuclide {sup 74}Rb, with a half-life of only 65 ms, is the shortest-lived nuclide on which a high-precision mass measurement in a Penning trap has been carried out. The significance of these measurements for a check of the conserved-vector-current hypothesis of the weak interaction and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is discussed.

  14. Precision Penning Trap Mass Spectrometry of S, Kr and Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redshaw, Matthew

    2005-04-01

    Using a phase coherent technique to measure the cyclotron frequency of single ions in a Penning trap [1], we have performed mass measurements on ^32S and the two most abundant krypton and xenon isotopes ^84Kr, ^86Kr, ^ 129Xe and ^132Xe, to relative precisions of 0.1 ppb. This is a factor of ˜10-100 improvement in precision over current values [2]. [1] M.P. Bradley, J.V. Porto, S. Rainville, J.K. Thompson, and D.E. Pritchard, PRL 83, 4510 (1999). [2] G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl Phys A729, 337 (2003).

  15. Intrinsic charm in a matched general-mass scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Groth Merrild, Patrick; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The FONLL general-mass variable-flavour number scheme provides a framework for the matching of a calculation in which a heavy quark is treated as a massless parton to one in which the mass dependence is retained throughout. We describe how the usual formulation of FONLL can be extended in such a way that the heavy quark parton distribution functions are freely parameterized at some initial scale, rather than being generated entirely perturbatively. We specifically consider the case of deep-inelastic scattering, in view of applications to PDF determination, and the possible impact of a fitted charm quark distribution on F2c is assessed.

  16. Masses of doubly charmed baryons in the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi-Feng; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the mass corrections of the doubly charmed baryons up to N2L O in the extended-on-mass-shell (EOMS) renormalization scheme, comparing with the results of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. We find that the terms from the heavy baryon approach are a subset of those obtained in the EOMS scheme. By fitting the lattice data, we can determine the parameters m ˜, α , c1 and c7 from the Lagrangian, while in the heavy baryon approach no information on c1 can be obtained from the baryons mass. Correspondingly, the masses of mΞcc and mΩcc are predicted, in the EOMS scheme, extrapolating the results from different values of the charm quark and the pion masses of the lattice QCD calculations.

  17. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  18. First use of high charge states for mass measurements of short-lived nuclides in a Penning trap.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, S; Simon, M C; Gallant, A T; Brunner, T; Chowdhury, U; Simon, V V; Brodeur, M; Chaudhuri, A; Mané, E; Andreoiu, C; Audi, G; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Delheij, P; Gwinner, G; Lapierre, A; Lunney, D; Pearson, M R; Ringle, R; Ullrich, J; Dilling, J

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed β emitter 74Rb (T(1/2)=65  ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q(EC) value are presented. PMID:22243307

  19. Prolonging qubit coherence: dynamical decoupling schemes studied in a Penning ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J.; VanDevender, Aaron P.; Shiga, Nobuyasu; Itano, Wayne M.; Bollinger, John J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a study of dynamical decoupling schemes for the suppression of phase errors from various noise environments using ions in a Penning trap as a model ensemble of qubits. By injecting frequency noise we demonstrate that in an ohmic noise spectrum with a sharp, high-frequency cutoff the recently proposed UDD decoupling sequence gives noise suppression superior to the traditional CPMG technique. Under only the influence of ambient magnetic field fluctuations with a 1/ω4 power spectrum, we find little benefit from using the UDD sequence, consistent with theoretical predictions for dynamical decoupling performance in the presence of noise spectra with soft cutoffs. Finally, we implement an optimization algorithm using measurement feedback, demonstrating that local optimization of dynamical decoupling can further lead to significant gains in error suppression over known sequences.

  20. A comb-sampling method for enhanced mass analysis in linear electrostatic ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J. B.; Kelly, O.; Calvert, C. R.; Duffy, M. J.; King, R. B.; Belshaw, L.; Graham, L.; Alexander, J. D.; Williams, I. D.; Bryan, W. A.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Cacho, C. M.; Springate, E.

    2011-04-15

    In this paper an algorithm for extracting spectral information from signals containing a series of narrow periodic impulses is presented. Such signals can typically be acquired by pickup detectors from the image-charge of ion bunches oscillating in a linear electrostatic ion trap, where frequency analysis provides a scheme for high-resolution mass spectrometry. To provide an improved technique for such frequency analysis, we introduce the CHIMERA algorithm (Comb-sampling for High-resolution IMpulse-train frequency ExtRAaction). This algorithm utilizes a comb function to generate frequency coefficients, rather than using sinusoids via a Fourier transform, since the comb provides a superior match to the data. This new technique is developed theoretically, applied to synthetic data, and then used to perform high resolution mass spectrometry on real data from an ion trap. If the ions are generated at a localized point in time and space, and the data is simultaneously acquired with multiple pickup rings, the method is shown to be a significant improvement on Fourier analysis. The mass spectra generated typically have an order of magnitude higher resolution compared with that obtained from fundamental Fourier frequencies, and are absent of large contributions from harmonic frequency components.

  1. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  2. Profiling Reactive Metabolites via Chemical Trapping and Targeted Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Lee, Gihoon; Coukos, John S; Moellering, Raymond E

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic profiling studies aim to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and dynamic portrait of the endogenous metabolites in a biological system. While contemporary technologies permit routine profiling of many metabolites, intrinsically labile metabolites are often improperly measured or omitted from studies due to unwanted chemical transformations that occur during sample preparation or mass spectrometric analysis. The primary glycolytic metabolite 1,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid (1,3-BPG) typifies this class of metabolites, and, despite its central position in metabolism, has largely eluded analysis in profiling studies. Here we take advantage of the reactive acylphosphate group in 1,3-BPG to chemically trap the metabolite with hydroxylamine during metabolite isolation, enabling quantitative analysis by targeted LC-MS/MS. This approach is compatible with complex cellular metabolome, permits specific detection of the reactive (1,3-) instead of nonreactive (2,3-) BPG isomer, and has enabled direct analysis of dynamic 1,3-BPG levels resulting from perturbations to glucose processing. These studies confirmed that standard metabolomic methods misrepresent cellular 1,3-BPG levels in response to altered glucose metabolism and underscore the potential for chemical trapping to be used for other classes of reactive metabolites. PMID:27314642

  3. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  4. Fundamental studies of ion injection and trapping of electrosprayed ions on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, Scott Thomas

    The quadrupole ion trap is a highly versatile and sensitive analytical mass spectrometer. Because of the advantages offered by the ion trap, there has been intense interest in coupling it to ionization techniques such as electrospray which form ions externally to the ion trap. In this work, experiments and computer simulations were employed to study the injection of electrosprayed ions into the ion trap of a Finnigan MAT LCQ LC/MS n mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy distribution of the ion beam was characterized and found to be relatively wide, a result of the high pressures from the atmospheric pressure source. One of the most important experimental parameters which affects ion injection efficiency is the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode. A theoretical model was fit to experimental data allowing the optimum RF voltage for trapping a given m/z ion to be predicted. Computer simulations of ion motion were performed to study the effect of various instrumental parameters on trapping efficiency. A commercially available ion optics program, SIMION v6.0, was chosen because it allowed the actual ion trap electrode geometry including endcap holes to be simulated. In contrast to previous computer simulations, SIMION provided the ability to start ions outside the ion trap and to simulate more accurately the injection of externally formed ions. The endcap holes were found to allow the RF field to penetrate out of the ion trap and affect ions as they approached the ion trap. From these simulations, a model for the process by which injected ions are trapped was developed. Using these computer simulations, techniques of improving trapping efficiency were investigated. Most previous techniques perturb ions which are already in the ion trap and therefore cannot be used to accumulate ions; the ability to accumulate ions is a necessity with ionization sources such as electrospray which form ions continuously. One such novel technique for improving trapping efficiency

  5. Mass measurements on stable nuclides in the rare-earth region with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaer, J.; Audi, G.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Droese, C.; Dworschak, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Smorra, C.; Wang, M.

    2011-07-01

    The masses of 15 stable nuclides in the rare-earth region have been measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. This is the first series of absolute mass measurements linking these nuclides to the atomic-mass standard C12. Previously, nuclear reaction studies almost exclusively determined the literature values of these masses in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. The TRIGA-TRAP results show deviations on the order of 3-4 standard deviations from the latest published values of the Atomic-Mass Evaluation 2003 for some cases. However, the binding-energy differences that are important for nuclear structure studies have been confirmed and improved. The new masses are discussed in the context of valence proton-neutron interactions using double differences of binding energies, δVpn(Z,N).

  6. Mass measurements on stable nuclides in the rare-earth region with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelaer, J.; Audi, G.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Dworschak, M.; Herfurth, F.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Droese, C.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Smorra, C.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Nagy, Sz.; Neidherr, D.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Wang, M.

    2011-07-15

    The masses of 15 stable nuclides in the rare-earth region have been measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. This is the first series of absolute mass measurements linking these nuclides to the atomic-mass standard {sup 12}C. Previously, nuclear reaction studies almost exclusively determined the literature values of these masses in the Atomic-Mass Evaluation. The TRIGA-TRAP results show deviations on the order of 3-4 standard deviations from the latest published values of the Atomic-Mass Evaluation 2003 for some cases. However, the binding-energy differences that are important for nuclear structure studies have been confirmed and improved. The new masses are discussed in the context of valence proton-neutron interactions using double differences of binding energies, {delta}V{sub pn}(Z,N).

  7. Why is sideband mass spectrometry possible with ions in a Penning trap?

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G

    2009-05-01

    Many masses, particularly the masses of unstable nuclei, are measured with ions in Penning traps by determining the frequency of a driving force that most efficiently couples two of the three motions of trapped ions. A missing explanation of why such sideband mass spectroscopy works, contrary to simple estimates, begins with the established Brown-Gabrielse invariance theorem. PMID:19518777

  8. Why Is Sideband Mass Spectrometry Possible with Ions in a Penning Trap?

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.

    2009-05-01

    Many masses, particularly the masses of unstable nuclei, are measured with ions in Penning traps by determining the frequency of a driving force that most efficiently couples two of the three motions of trapped ions. A missing explanation of why such sideband mass spectroscopy works, contrary to simple estimates, begins with the established Brown-Gabrielse invariance theorem.

  9. Extending Penning trap mass measurements with SHIPTRAP to the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hofmann, S.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Eibach, M.; Eliseev, S.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Hessberger, F. P.; Ramirez, E. Minaya; Nesterenko, D.; and others

    2013-03-19

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides provides accurate mass values and absolute binding energies. Such mass measurements are sensitive indicators of the nuclear structure evolution far away from stability. Recently, direct mass measurements have been extended to the heavy elements nobelium (Z=102) and lawrencium (Z=103) with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The results probe nuclear shell effects at N=152. New developments will pave the way to access even heavier nuclides.

  10. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Lake, Joe E

    2012-01-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  11. An energy signature scheme for steam trap assessment and flow rate estimation using pipe-induced acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Lake, Joe E.

    2012-06-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  12. Efficacy of pheromone trapping of the sweetpotato weevil (Coleoptera: Brentidae): based on dose, septum age, attractive radius, and mass trapping.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gadi V P; Wu, Shaohui; Mendi, Robert C; Miller, Ross H

    2014-06-01

    Pheromone dose, effective trapping distance, and longevity of the rubber septa loaded with sex pheromone of Cylas formicarius (F.) (Coleoptera: Brentidae) were evaluated for their impact on the efficacy of mass trapping of the insect in sweet potato fields in Guam in 2012-2013. The number of adults caught at different distances (10-100 m) was significantly different. Catches declined with increasing release distance from the trap in both downwind and upwind directions. While the maximum radius of attraction of pheromone-baited trap for C. formicarius in the field was 80 m, the effective distance for recapturing marked adults in the pheromone-baited Unitraps was 60 m. Pheromone lures were able to capture adults of C. formicarius after being stored in the laboratory for up to 98 d. The number of catches per trap per week was highest when lures were 0-14- and 15-28-d-old, and longer storage of septa led to a progressive reduction of catches. Pheromone traps baited with 100-μg lures captured significantly more adults compared with those loaded with 10-μg lures. In addition, effectiveness of pheromone trapping on damage to sweet potato was tested at two locations. Number of trapped adults, damage level at different times after trap installation, and yield production were evaluated. The number of C. formicarius adults collected in traps at both locations fluctuated dramatically among sampling dates and peaked on 13 September 2013, after which time the number of captures noticeably declined. This decrease was correlated to the increasing age and depletion of the pheromone lures. Pheromone traps significantly reduced feeding damage caused by weevils (<1 feeding hole per root in treatment; up to 38 feeding holes per root in the control) at both locations. Being consistent with damage levels, sweet potato yields in fields with traps were higher than those in untreated controls. We conclude that pheromone-baited traps are effective in reducing damage due to C. formicarius

  13. Conception of PIPERADE: A high-capacity Penning-trap mass separator for high isobaric contamination at DESIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaya Ramirez, E.; Alfaurt, P.; Aouadi, M.; Ascher, P.; Blank, B.; Blaum, K.; Cam, J.-F.; Chauveau, P.; Daudin, L.; Delahaye, P.; Delalee, F.; Dupré, P.; El Abbeir, S.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Guérin, H.; Lunney, D.; Metz, F.; Naimi, S.; Perrot, L.; de Roubin, A.; Serani, L.; Thomas, B.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    The DESIR (decay, excitation and storage of radioactive ions) facility at GANIL-SPIRAL2 will receive a large variety of exotic nuclei at low energy (up to 60 keV) with high intensities. However, the production methods of radioactive beams are non selective, limiting the purity of the beams of interest. Moreover, the high precision needed for nuclear structure and astrophysics studies using beta decay spectroscopy, laser spectroscopy and trap-based experiments at DESIR requires highly pure samples of exotic nuclei. The aim of the double-Pennig-trap mass separator PIPERADE is to deliver large and very pure samples of exotic nuclei to the different experiments in DESIR. New excitation schemes and a large inner diameter of the first trap will mitigate space charge effects to attempt trapping of up to 105 ions per pulse. The purification cycle will be performed in a few milliseconds so that short-lived nuclei can be purified. To extract the nuclides of interest from the large amount of isobaric contaminants, a resolving power of 105 is mandatory. Afterwards the ions of interest will be accumulated in the second trap until they constitute a sufficiently pure sample for the measurements. The status of the project is presented.

  14. Resolution of nuclear ground and isomeric states by a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, G.; Kluge, H.; Koenig, M.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H. ); Moore, R.B.; Rouleau, G. ); Audi, G. )

    1992-12-01

    Ground and isomeric states of a nucleus have been resolved for the first time by mass spectrometry. Measurements on [sup 78]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] and [sup 84]Rb[sup [ital m],][ital g] were performed using a tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer on-line with the isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN. The effects of ion-ion interaction were investigated for two ion species differing in mass and stored simultaneously in the trap.

  15. Potential of mass trapping for long-term pest management and eradication of invasive species.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, A M; Suckling, D M; Wearing, C H; Byers, J A

    2006-10-01

    Semiochemical-based pest management programs comprise three major approaches that are being used to provide environmentally friendly control methods of insect pests: mass trapping, "lure and kill," and mating disruption. In this article, we review the potential of mass trapping in long-term pest management as well as in the eradication of invasive species. We discuss similarities and differences between mass trapping and other two main approaches of semiochemical-based pest management programs. We highlight several study cases where mass trapping has been used either in long-term pest management [e.g., codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.); pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders); bark beetles, palm weevils, corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.); and fruit flies] or in eradication of invasive species [e.g., gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.); and boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We list the critical issues that affect the efficacy of mass trapping and compare these with previously published models developed to investigate mass trapping efficacy in pest control. We conclude that mass trapping has good potential to suppress or eradicate low-density, isolated pest populations; however, its full potential in pest management has not been adequately realized and therefore encourages further research and development of this technology. PMID:17066782

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F.; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A.; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments.

  17. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments. PMID:26483183

  18. A quadrupole ion trap with cylindrical geometry operated in the mass-selective instability mode.

    PubMed

    Wells, J M; Badman, E R; Cooks, R G

    1998-02-01

    A cylindrical geometry ion trap is used to record mass spectra in the mass-selective instability mode. The geometry of the cylindrical ion trap has been optimized to maximize the quadrupole field component relative to the higher-order field content through field calculations using the Poisson/Superfish code and through experimental variation of the electrode structure. The results correspond well with predictions of the calculations. The trap has been used to record mass spectra with better than unit mass resolution, high sensitivity, and a mass/charge range of ∼600 Th. Multistage (MS(3)) experiments have been performed, and the Mathieu stability region has been experimentally mapped. The performance of this device compares satisfactorily with that of the hyperbolic ion trap. PMID:21644742

  19. Simulation of mating disruption and mass trapping with competitive attraction and camouflage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping and mating disruption of insects are similar methods that use semiochemical dispensers with and without traps, respectively, in the field to reduce mating by removing individuals and disrupting communication. Simulation models of these two methods were developed based on correlated ran...

  20. Laser-based studies with an ion-trap mass spectrometer: Ion tomography and analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. L.; Cisper, M. E.; Hemberger, P. H.; Nogar, N. S.; Williams, J. D.; Syka, J. E. P.

    The iron trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is an ion storage device which consists of two hyperbolic endcaps and a hyperbolic ring electrode. This forms a trapping cavity having a volume of several cm(sup 3). An RF potential applied to the ring electrode produces a time-varying potential which can be used to trap and/or manipulate ions under controlled conditions. This device has been used in ion trapping studies for a number of years. More recently, a commercial version has been produced and sold which allows for mass-selective ejection of trapped ions, with subsequent detection by an electron multiplier. In this mode, it operates as a compact, high efficiency, high resolution mass spectrometer. The instrument has found applications in GC/MS, in tandem mass spectroscopy and in portable mass spectral analysis. In this manuscript, we present a survey of recent results incorporating laser desorption, ionization, or photodissociation with ITMS. In one instance, we describe the use of laser photodissociation to map the spatial distribution of trapped ions in the ITMS. In this tomographic study, we have parameterized the effects of trapping potential, buffer gas pressure, supplementary RF-potential, and laser intensity. In separate studies, laser desorption was used to generate gas phase ions in the ITMS from a solid probe, by irradiation of both neat and matrix-dissolved samples. The latter experiment produced both high molecular weight ions and significant numbers of negative ions.

  1. A new scheme to accumulate positrons in a Penning-Malmberg trap with a linac-based positron pulsed source

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, P.

    2013-03-19

    The Gravitational Behaviour of Antimatter at Rest experiment (GBAR) is designed to perform a direct measurement of the weak equivalence principle on antimatter by measuring the acceleration of anti-hydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium (Ps) cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. The Ps target will be produced by a pulse of few 10{sup 10} positrons injected onto a positron-positronium converter. For this purpose, a slow positron source using an electron Linac has been constructed at Saclay. The present flux is comparable with that of {sup 22}Na-based sources using solid neon moderator. A new positron accumulation scheme with a Penning-Malmberg trap has been proposed taking advantage of the pulsed time structure of the beam. In the trap, the positrons are cooled by interaction with a dense electron plasma. The overall trapping efficiency has been estimated to be {approx}70% by numerical simulations.

  2. Novel sampling methods for use with thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-12-31

    Novel sampling approaches have been investigated to improve the analytical utility of thermal desorption Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). Because DSITMS involves the direct introduction of samples into an ion trap mass spectrometer, problems with detection capabilities (sensitivity and selectivity) can often occur when performing trace analysis in complex matrices. Various sampling approaches have been evaluated to improve thermal desorption detection capabilities and to extend the utilities of DSITMS methodologies without significantly increasing analysis times or the cost-effectiveness of DSITMS methods. Three sampling approaches have been investigated including solid phase microextraction (SPME), solid phase extraction columns (SPEC), and purge and trap.

  3. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong-Yang; Wen, Jing-Ji; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  4. An Electrically Compensated Trap Designed to 8th Order for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    We present the design, guided by theory to eighth order, and the first evaluation of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) compensated trap. The purpose of the new trap is to reduce effects of the non-linear components of the trapping electric field; those non-liner components introduce variations in the cyclotron frequency of an ion based on its spatial position (its cyclotron and trapping mode amplitudes). This frequency spread leads to decreased mass resolving power and signal-to-noise. The reduction of the spread of cyclotron frequencies, as explicitly modeled in theory, serves as the basis for our design. The compensated trap shows improved signal-to-noise and at least a three-fold increase in mass resolving power compared to the uncompensated trap at the same trapping voltage. Resolving powers (FWHH) as high as 1.7 × 107 for the [M + H]+ of vasopressin at m/z 1084.5 in a 7.0-Tesla induction can be obtained when using trap compensation. PMID:18599306

  5. Trapping planets in an evolving protoplanetary disk: preferred time, locations, and planet mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Pantin, E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Planet traps are necessary to prevent forming planets from falling onto their host star by type I inward migration. Surface mass density and temperature gradient irregularities favor the apparition of traps (planet accumulation region) and deserts (planet depletion zone). These features are found at the dust sublimation lines and heat transition barriers. Aims: We study how planets may remain trapped or escape these traps as they grow and as the disk evolves viscously with time. Methods: We numerically model the temporal viscous evolution of a protoplanetary disk by coupling its dynamics, thermodynamics, geometry, and composition. The resulting midplane density and temperature profiles allow the modeling of the interactions of this type of evolving disk with potential planets, even before the steady state is reached. Results: We follow the viscous evolution of a minimum mass solar nebula and compute the Lindblad and corotation torques that this type of disk would exert on potential planets of various masses that are located within the planetary formation region. We determine the position of planet traps and deserts in relationship with the sublimation lines, shadowed regions, and heat transition barriers. We notice that the planet mass affects the trapping potential of the mentioned structures through the saturation of the corotation torque. Planets that are a few tens of Earth masses can be trapped at the sublimation lines until they reach a certain mass while planets that are more massive than 100 M⊕ can only be trapped permanently at the heat transition barriers. They may also open gaps beyond 5 au and enter type II migration. Conclusions: Coupling a bimodal planetary migration model with a self-consistent evolved disk, we were able to distinguish several potential planet populations after five million years of evolution: two populations of giant planets that could stay trapped around 5.5 and 9 au and possibly open gaps, some super-Earths trapped

  6. Evaluation of ion trap mass spectrometry for the determination of ambient nicotine

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Ilgner, R.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    A thermal desorption unit has been interfaced directly with a Finnigan Ion Trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) for the identification and quantification of trace organics in air. No chromatographic separation of the desorbed constituents is performed prior to introduction into the mass spectrometer. Instead, positive identification of a compound is made based on its collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem (MS/MS) mass spectrum. Using this technique, as little as 50 pg of a constituent desorbed from resin trap can be characterized and quantified with a sample turnaround time of only 2--3 minutes. 3 refs.

  7. Electronics of an ion trap with integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Yu, Peter; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported an ion trap experiment with an integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) [Phys. Rev. Appl. 2, 034013 (2014)] focussing on the improvement of mass resolution and detection limit due to sample preparation at millikelvin temperatures. The system utilizes a radio-frequency (RF) ion trap with asymmetric drive for storing and manipulating laser-cooled ions and features radial extraction into a compact $275$ mm long TOF drift tube. The mass resolution exceeds $m / \\Delta m = 500$, which provides isotopic resolution over the whole mass range of interest in current experiments and constitutes an improvement of almost an order of magnitude over other implementations. In this manuscript, we discuss the experimental implementation in detail, which is comprised of newly developed drive electronics for generating the required voltages to operate RF trap and TOFMS, as well as control electronics for regulating RF outputs and synchronizing the TOFMS extraction.

  8. Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry: Photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; Booth, M.M.; Eyler, J.R.; Yost, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Photo-induced dissociation (PID) is the next most frequently used method (after collisional activation) for activation of Polyatomic ions in tandem mass spectrometry. The range of internal energies present after the photon absorption process are much narrower than those obtained with collisional energy transfer. Therefore, the usefulness of PID for the study of ion structures is greatly enhanced. The long storage times and instrumental configuration of the ion trap mass spectrometer are ideally suited for photodissociation experiments. This presentation will focus on both the fundamental and analytical applications of CO{sub 2} lasers in conjunction with ion trap mass spectrometry. The first portion of this talk will examine the fundamental issues of wavelength dependence, chemical kinetics, photoabsorption cross section, and collisional effects on photodissociation efficiency. The second half of this presentation will look at novel instrumentation for electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry, with the concurrent development of photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation of organic compounds and antibiotics.

  9. Frequency-scanning MALDI linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, I-Chung; Lin, Jung Lee; Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2011-11-01

    This study presents the first report on the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection by frequency scan. We designed, installed, and tested this radio frequency (RF) scan linear ion trap mass spectrometer and its associated electronics to dramatically extend the mass region to be detected. The RF circuit can be adjusted from 300 to 10 kHz with a set of operation amplifiers. To trap the ions produced by MALDI, a high pressure of helium buffer gas was employed to quench extra kinetic energy of the heavy ions produced by MALDI. The successful detection of the singly charged secretory immunoglobulin A ions indicates that the detectable mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of this system can reach ~385 000 or beyond. PMID:21932813

  10. Ion Sponge: A 3-Dimentional Array of Quadrupole Ion Traps for Trapping and Mass-Selectively Processing Ions in Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations. PMID:24758328

  11. ANALYSIS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY ION TRAP TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer with a wave board and tandem mass spectrometry software was used to analyze gas chromatographically separated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using collision-induced dissociation (CID). The nonresonant (multiple collision) mode was used to...

  12. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  13. Stevenson's optimized perturbation theory applied to factorization and mass scheme dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Politzer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The principles of the optimized perturbation theory proposed by Stevenson to deal with coupling constant scheme dependence are applied to the problem of factorization scheme dependence in inclusive hadron reactions. Similar considerations allow the optimization of problems with mass dependence. A serious shortcoming of the procedure, common to all applications, is discussed.

  14. Operational Parameters, Considerations, and Design Decisions for Resource-Constrained Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danell, Ryan M.; VanAmerom, Friso H. W.; Pinnick, Veronica; Cotter, Robert J.; Brickerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometers are increasingly finding applications in new and unique areas, often in situations where key operational resources (i.e. power, weight and size) are limited. One such example is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA). This instrument is a joint venture between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop an ion trap mass spectrometer for chemical analysis on Mars. The constraints on such an instrument are significant as are the performance requirements. While the ideal operating parameters for an ion trap are generally well characterized, methods to maintain analytical performance with limited power and system weight need to be investigated and tested. Methods Experiments have been performed on two custom ion trap mass spectrometers developed as prototypes for the MOMA instrument. This hardware consists of quadrupole ion trap electrodes that are 70% the size of common commercial instrumentation. The trapping RF voltage is created with a custom tank circuit that can be tuned over a range of RF frequencies and is driven using laboratory supplies and amplifiers. The entire instrument is controlled with custom Lab VIEW software that allows a high degree of flexibility in the definition of the scan function defining the ion trap experiment. Ions are typically generated via an internal electron ionization source, however, a laser desorption source is also in development for analysis of larger intact molecules. Preliminary Data The main goals in this work have been to reduce the power required to generate the radio frequency trapping field used in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Generally minimizing the power will also reduce the volume and mass of the electronics to support the instrument. In order to achieve optimum performance, commercial instruments typically utilize RF frequencies in the 1 MHz range. Without much concern for power usage, they simply generate the voltage required to access the mass range of interest. In order to reduce the

  15. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-03-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection.

  16. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-07-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection.

  17. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Dalton T; Pulliam, Christopher J; Wiley, Joshua S; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-07-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27032650

  18. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  19. Design of a Laser Ablation Ion Source for High-Precision Penning Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Curtis; Ratnayake, Ishara; Hawks, Paul; Bryce, Richard; Redshaw, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    High-precision atomic mass measurements provide important data for a wide range of fields including atomic, nuclear and neutrino physics, determination of fundamental constants, and metrology. At Central Michigan University we are building a Penning trap system that will utilize ions produced by external ion sources to allow access to a wide range of isotopes, including long-lived radioactive isotopes and isotopes with low natural abundances. The ions will be transported to a ``capture'' trap, before being transferred to double precision-measurement trap structure. In this poster we will present the design of a laser ablation ion source and the ion extraction and transport optics. We will report on the current status of the construction and operation of the ion source and the CMU Penning trap. This work supported in part by NSF award no. 1307233.

  20. Broad-Band FT-ICR MS for the Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer MATS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, D.; Cakirli, R. B.; Schweikhard, L.; Stahl, S.; Ubieto-Diaz, M.

    2010-08-04

    Ion traps are known as ideal tools for precision measurements of fundamental particle properties. In particular, traps have been set up at Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities to investigate exotic nuclei. During the last decade this field of research has constantly grown, with currently almost a dozen ion-trap systems at RIB facilities in Europe and North America and several more planned at future accelerators projects. One of these, the Advanced Trapping System MATS will be installed at the low-energy branch for radioactive-ion beams at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany). One of the MATS features will be non-destructive ion detection based on Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). A prototype of the system has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg (Germany) and recent results are outlined in this contribution.

  1. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  2. First Penning-Trap Mass Measurement of the Exotic Halo Nucleus {sup 11}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Brodeur, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Dilling, J.; Brunner, T.; Lapierre, A; Ringle, R.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Delheij, P.; Drake, G. W. F.; Lunney, D.

    2008-11-14

    In this Letter, we report a new mass for {sup 11}Li using the trapping experiment TITAN at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. This is by far the shortest-lived nuclide, t{sub 1/2}=8.8 ms, for which a mass measurement has ever been performed with a Penning trap. Combined with our mass measurements of {sup 8,9}Li we derive a new two-neutron separation energy of 369.15(65) keV: a factor of 7 more precise than the best previous value. This new value is a critical ingredient for the determination of the halo charge radius from isotope-shift measurements. We also report results from state-of-the-art atomic-physics calculations using the new mass and extract a new charge radius for {sup 11}Li. This result is a remarkable confluence of nuclear and atomic physics.

  3. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Whitten, William B.

    2015-11-01

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  4. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β} -plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  5. Modelling female mating success during mass trapping and natural competitive attraction of searching males or females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two types of simulation models of mass trapping were developed: (1) male-searching insects (e.g., moths and many insect species) and (2) female-searching insects (e.g., true bugs, beetles, and flies). The searching sex moved based on correlated random walks (CRW), while the opposite sex remained sta...

  6. Mass measurements of short-lived isotopes in a penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, F.; Egelhof, P.; Hilberath, T.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kluge, H.h.; Kunz, K.; Schweikhard, L.; Stolzenberg, H.; Moore, R.B.; Audi, G.; and others

    1987-12-10

    A mass spectrometer has been set up at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN/Geneva. Mass-separated radioactive ions are stored in a Penning trap. Their mass is determined by a measurement of the cyclotron frequency in the magnetic field of a superconducting magnet. A resolving power of up to 300.000 and a precision of some 10 keV were determined in case of mass measurements of neutron-deficient RB and Cs isotopes. The resonance of the isobars /sup 88/Sr and /sup 88/Rb were clearly resolved and evidence was obtained for an isomer in /sup 122/Cs.

  7. Computer Modeling of an Ion Trap Mass Analyzer, Part I: Low Pressure Regime.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Dragan; Madzunkov, Stojan M; Darrach, Murray R

    2015-12-01

    We present the multi-particle simulation program suite Computational Ion Trap Analyzer (CITA) designed to calculate the ion trajectories within a Paul quadrupole ion trap developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CITA uses an analytical expression of the electrodynamic field, employing up to six terms in multipole expansion and a modified velocity-Verlet method to numerically calculate ion trajectories. The computer code is multithreaded and designed to run on shared-memory architectures. CITA yields near real-time simulations with full propagation of 26 particles per second per core. As a consequence, a realistic numbers of trapped ions (100+ million) can be used and their trajectories modeled, yielding a representative prediction of mass spectrometer analysis of trace gas species. When the model is compared with experimental results conducted at low pressures using the conventional quadrupole and dipole excitation modes, there is an excellent agreement with the observed peak shapes. Owing to the program's efficiency, CITA has been used to explore regions of trapping stability that are of interest to experimental research. These results are expected to facilitate a fast and reliable modeling of ion dynamics in miniature quadrupole ion trap and improve the interpretation of observed mass spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26286456

  8. Computer Modeling of an Ion Trap Mass Analyzer, Part I: Low Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Dragan; Madzunkov, Stojan M.; Darrach, Murray R.

    2015-12-01

    We present the multi-particle simulation program suite Computational Ion Trap Analyzer (CITA) designed to calculate the ion trajectories within a Paul quadrupole ion trap developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CITA uses an analytical expression of the electrodynamic field, employing up to six terms in multipole expansion and a modified velocity-Verlet method to numerically calculate ion trajectories. The computer code is multithreaded and designed to run on shared-memory architectures. CITA yields near real-time simulations with full propagation of 26 particles per second per core. As a consequence, a realistic numbers of trapped ions (100+ million) can be used and their trajectories modeled, yielding a representative prediction of mass spectrometer analysis of trace gas species. When the model is compared with experimental results conducted at low pressures using the conventional quadrupole and dipole excitation modes, there is an excellent agreement with the observed peak shapes. Owing to the program's efficiency, CITA has been used to explore regions of trapping stability that are of interest to experimental research. These results are expected to facilitate a fast and reliable modeling of ion dynamics in miniature quadrupole ion trap and improve the interpretation of observed mass spectra.

  9. EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TRAPPED, ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS: THE ORIGIN OF THE OBSERVED MASS-PERIOD RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2012-12-01

    The large number of observed exoplanets ({approx}>700) provides important constraints on their origin as deduced from the mass-period diagram of planets. The most surprising features in the diagram are (1) the (apparent) pileup of gas giants at a period of {approx}500 days ({approx}1 AU) and (2) the so-called mass-period relation, which indicates that planetary mass is an increasing function of orbital period. We construct the evolutionary tracks of growing planets at planet traps in evolving protoplanetary disks and show that they provide a good physical understanding of how these observational properties arise. The fundamental feature of our model is that inhomogeneities in protoplanetary disks give rise to multiple (up to 3) trapping sites for rapid (type I) planetary migration of planetary cores. The viscous evolution of disks results in the slow radial movement of the traps and their cores from large to small orbital periods. In our model, the slow inward motion of planet traps is coupled with the standard core accretion scenario for planetary growth. As planets grow, type II migration takes over. Planet growth and radial movement are ultimately stalled by the dispersal of gas disks via photoevaporation. Our model makes a number of important predictions: that distinct sub-populations of planets that reflect the properties of planet traps where they have grown result in the mass-period relation, that the presence of these sub-populations naturally explains a pileup of planets at {approx}1 AU, and that evolutionary tracks from the ice line do put planets at short periods and fill an earlier claimed {sup p}lanet desert{sup -}a sparse population of planets in the mass-semimajor axis diagram.

  10. The on-line charge breeding program at TRIUMF's Ion Trap For Atomic and Nuclear Science for precision mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M. C.; Eberhardt, B.; Jang, F.; Luichtl, M.; Robertson, D.; Chaudhuri, A.; Delheij, P.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Mane, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Bale, J. C.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Lennarz, A.; Ma, T.; Andreoiu, C.; and others

    2012-02-15

    TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) constitutes the only high precision mass measurement setup coupled to a rare isotope facility capable of increasing the charge state of short-lived nuclides prior to the actual mass determination in a Penning trap. Recent developments around TITAN's charge breeder, the electron beam ion trap, form the basis for several successful experiments on radioactive isotopes with half-lives as low as 65 ms and in charge states as high as 22+.

  11. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances

  12. DIRECT TRACE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR USING ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETERS WITH FILTERED NOISE FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ion trap mass spectrometers and direct air sampling interfaces are being evaluated in the laboratory for monitoring toxic air pollutants in real time. he mass spectrometers are the large, laboratory-based Finnigan MAT ion trap (ITMS) and the compact, field-deployable Teledyne...

  13. Ion trap mass spectrometric detection of laser desorbed ions from derivatized fused silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.W.; Earl, W.L.; Cisper, M.E.; Nogar, N.S.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1994-12-31

    Solid-phase microextraction of analytes from complex matrices using fused silica fibers has many advantages over traditional chemical sample preparation technique. Microextraction requires small sample sizes little sample preparation (providing rapid sample turnaround time), and greatly reduces the amount of chemical waste generated in sample preparation. These advantages make fused silica fibers attractive for direct sampling and detection experiments using laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry (LITMS). The drawback is the very small area ({approximately}1 mm{sup 2}) exposed to laser irradiation, which limits the amount of material desorbed into the ion trap.

  14. Ion trap mass spectrometry on a comet nucleus: the Ptolemy instrument and the Rosetta space mission.

    PubMed

    Todd, John F J; Barber, Simeon J; Wright, Ian P; Morgan, Geraint H; Morse, Andrew D; Sheridan, Simon; Leese, Mark R; Maynard, Jon; Evans, Suzanne T; Pillinger, Colin T; Drummond, Duncan L; Heys, Samantha C; Huq, S Ejaz; Kent, Barry J; Sawyer, Eric C; Whalley, Martin S; Waltham, Nicholas R

    2007-01-01

    In May 2014, the Rosetta spacecraft is scheduled to rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko ('67P'). One of the instruments on board the 'Lander' which will descend on to the surface of the comet is a miniaturised GC/MS system that incorporates an ion trap mass spectrometer, specially developed for isotope ratio analysis. This article describes the development and optimisation of the ion trap for this unique application, and presents a summary of the range of pre-programmed experiments that will contribute to the characterisation of the solid and volatile cometary materials. PMID:17154436

  15. Numerical Compression Schemes for Proteomics Mass Spectrometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Teleman, Johan; Dowsey, Andrew W.; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F.; Perkins, Simon; Pratt, Brian; Röst, Hannes L.; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Jones, Andrew R.; Deutsch, Eric W.; Levander, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The open XML format mzML, used for representation of MS data, is pivotal for the development of platform-independent MS analysis software. Although conversion from vendor formats to mzML must take place on a platform on which the vendor libraries are available (i.e. Windows), once mzML files have been generated, they can be used on any platform. However, the mzML format has turned out to be less efficient than vendor formats. In many cases, the naïve mzML representation is fourfold or even up to 18-fold larger compared with the original vendor file. In disk I/O limited setups, a larger data file also leads to longer processing times, which is a problem given the data production rates of modern mass spectrometers. In an attempt to reduce this problem, we here present a family of numerical compression algorithms called MS-Numpress, intended for efficient compression of MS data. To facilitate ease of adoption, the algorithms target the binary data in the mzML standard, and support in main proteomics tools is already available. Using a test set of 10 representative MS data files we demonstrate typical file size decreases of 90% when combined with traditional compression, as well as read time decreases of up to 50%. It is envisaged that these improvements will be beneficial for data handling within the MS community. PMID:24677029

  16. Fluorescence imaging for visualization of the ion cloud in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Francis O; Sciuto, Stephen V; Jockusch, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize populations of gaseous ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Presented images include the first fluorescence image of molecular ions collected under conditions typically used in mass spectrometry experiments. Under these "normal" mass spectrometry conditions, the radial (r) and axial (z) full-width at half maxima (FWHM) of the detected ion cloud are 615 and 214 μm, respectively, corresponding to ~6% of r0 and ~3% of z0 for the QIT used. The effects on the shape and size of the ion cloud caused by varying the pressure of helium bath gas, the number of trapped ions, and the Mathieu parameter q z are visualized and discussed. When a "tickle voltage" is applied to the exit end-cap electrode, as is done in collisionally activated dissociation, a significant elongation in the axial, but not the radial, dimension of the ion cloud is apparent. Finally, using spectroscopically distinguishable fluorophores of two different m/z values, images are presented that illustrate stratification of the ion cloud; ions of lower m/z (higher qz) are located in the center of the trapping region, effectively excluding higher m/z (lower qz) ions, which form a surrounding layer. Fluorescence images such as those presented here provide a useful reference for better understanding the collective behavior of ions in radio frequency (rf) trapping devices and how phenomena such as collisions and space-charge affect ion distribution. PMID:24092629

  17. Fluorescence Imaging for Visualization of the Ion Cloud in a Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Francis O.; Sciuto, Stephen V.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2013-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize populations of gaseous ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Presented images include the first fluorescence image of molecular ions collected under conditions typically used in mass spectrometry experiments. Under these "normal" mass spectrometry conditions, the radial ( r) and axial ( z) full-width at half maxima (FWHM) of the detected ion cloud are 615 and 214 μm, respectively, corresponding to ~6 % of r 0 and ~3 % of z 0 for the QIT used. The effects on the shape and size of the ion cloud caused by varying the pressure of helium bath gas, the number of trapped ions, and the Mathieu parameter q z are visualized and discussed. When a "tickle voltage" is applied to the exit end-cap electrode, as is done in collisionally activated dissociation, a significant elongation in the axial, but not the radial, dimension of the ion cloud is apparent. Finally, using spectroscopically distinguishable fluorophores of two different m/ z values, images are presented that illustrate stratification of the ion cloud; ions of lower m/ z (higher q z ) are located in the center of the trapping region, effectively excluding higher m/ z (lower q z ) ions, which form a surrounding layer. Fluorescence images such as those presented here provide a useful reference for better understanding the collective behavior of ions in radio frequency (rf) trapping devices and how phenomena such as collisions and space-charge affect ion distribution.

  18. A New Framework to Compare Mass-Flux Schemes Within the AROME Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riette, Sébastien; Lac, Christine

    2016-08-01

    In the Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale (AROME) numerical weather forecast model used in operations at Météo-France, five mass-flux schemes are available to parametrize shallow convection at kilometre resolution. All but one are based on the eddy-diffusivity-mass-flux approach, and differ in entrainment/detrainment, the updraft vertical velocity equation and the closure assumption. The fifth is based on a more classical mass-flux approach. Screen-level scores obtained with these schemes show few discrepancies and are not sufficient to highlight behaviour differences. Here, we describe and use a new experimental framework, able to compare and discriminate among different schemes. For a year, daily forecast experiments were conducted over small domains centred on the five French metropolitan radio-sounding locations. Cloud base, planetary boundary-layer height and normalized vertical profiles of specific humidity, potential temperature, wind speed and cloud condensate were compared with observations, and with each other. The framework allowed the behaviour of the different schemes in and above the boundary layer to be characterized. In particular, the impact of the entrainment/detrainment formulation, closure assumption and cloud scheme were clearly visible. Differences mainly concerned the transport intensity thus allowing schemes to be separated into two groups, with stronger or weaker updrafts. In the AROME model (with all interactions and the possible existence of compensating errors), evaluation diagnostics gave the advantage to the first group.

  19. A New Framework to Compare Mass-Flux Schemes Within the AROME Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riette, Sébastien; Lac, Christine

    2016-03-01

    In the Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale (AROME) numerical weather forecast model used in operations at Météo-France, five mass-flux schemes are available to parametrize shallow convection at kilometre resolution. All but one are based on the eddy-diffusivity-mass-flux approach, and differ in entrainment/detrainment, the updraft vertical velocity equation and the closure assumption. The fifth is based on a more classical mass-flux approach. Screen-level scores obtained with these schemes show few discrepancies and are not sufficient to highlight behaviour differences. Here, we describe and use a new experimental framework, able to compare and discriminate among different schemes. For a year, daily forecast experiments were conducted over small domains centred on the five French metropolitan radio-sounding locations. Cloud base, planetary boundary-layer height and normalized vertical profiles of specific humidity, potential temperature, wind speed and cloud condensate were compared with observations, and with each other. The framework allowed the behaviour of the different schemes in and above the boundary layer to be characterized. In particular, the impact of the entrainment/detrainment formulation, closure assumption and cloud scheme were clearly visible. Differences mainly concerned the transport intensity thus allowing schemes to be separated into two groups, with stronger or weaker updrafts. In the AROME model (with all interactions and the possible existence of compensating errors), evaluation diagnostics gave the advantage to the first group.

  20. Systematic Comparison of a Two-dimensional Ion Trap and a Three-dimensional Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer in Proteomics*S

    PubMed Central

    Mayya, Viveka; Rezaul, Karim; Cong, Yu-Sheng; Han, David

    2006-01-01

    The utility and advantages of the recently introduced two-dimensional quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer in proteomics over the traditional three-dimensional ion trap mass spectrometer have not been systematically characterized. Here we rigorously compared the performance of these two platforms by using over 100,000 tandem mass spectra acquired with identical complex peptide mixtures and acquisition parameters. Specifically we compared four factors that are critical for a successful proteomic study: 1) the number of proteins identified, 2) sequence coverage or the number of peptides identified for every protein, 3) the data base matching SEQUEST Xcorr and Sp score, and 4) the quality of the fragment ion series of peptides. We found a 4–6-fold increase in the number of peptides and proteins identified on the two-dimensional ion trap mass spectrometer as a direct result of improvement in all the other parameters examined. Interestingly more than 70% of the doubly and triply charged peptides, but not the singly charged peptides, showed better quality of fragmentation spectra on the two-dimensional ion trap. These results highlight specific advantages of the two-dimensional ion trap over the conventional three-dimensional ion traps for protein identification in proteomic experiments. PMID:15608339

  1. Mass Measurement of Single Intact Nanoparticles in a Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Zhu, Kai; Xiong, Caiqiao; Jiang, Yurong; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-06-01

    Accurate nanoparticle mass characterization is a challenging task, especially at a single particle level. To solve this problem, a strategy for the mass measurement of single intact nanoparticle was proposed. A microscopy-based ion trap mass spectrometer was built up. To improve the detection sensitivity, a cylindrical ion trap with transparent conductive end-caps was used to increase the transmission of scattered light, and a vacuum ultraviolet lamp was used to increase the charge state of the isolated nanoparticle. By detecting the scattered light of the isolated nanoparticle, a series of secular frequencies were obtained, from which the corresponding mass-to-charge ratio of the nanoparticle was calculated. Finally, a Labview program was used to help deduce the charge state and absolute mass of the individual nanoparticle. Masses of gold nanoparticles with different sizes were accurately examined, which are (5.08 ± 0.44) × 10(7) Da for 20 nm, (3.55 ± 0.34) × 10(8) Da for 40 nm, and (1.22 ± 0.14) × 10(9) Da for 60 nm, respectively. The mass of MOFs with irregular shapes was also determined, which is (6.48 ± 1.08) × 10(9) Da. This method can provide the mass information on nanomaterials, thus opens up new possibility of characterizing nanoparticles at the single particle level. PMID:27167332

  2. New mass measurement of {sup 6}Li and ppb-level systematic studies of the Penning trap mass spectrometer TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Smith, M.; Dilling, J.; Brunner, T.; Champagne, C.; Lapierre, A.; Ringle, R.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Delheij, P.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.

    2009-10-15

    The frequency ratio of {sup 6}Li to {sup 7}Li was measured using the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. This measurement resolves a 16-ppb discrepancy between the {sup 6}Li mass of 6.015 122 795(16) u from the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 (AME03), which is based on a measurement by JILATRAP, and the more recent measurement of 6.015 122 890(40) u by SMILETRAP. Our measurement agrees with SMILETRAP and a more precise mass value for {sup 6}Li of 6.015 122 889(26) u is presented along with systematic evaluations of the measurement uncertainties. This result makes {sup 6}Li a solid anchor point for future mass measurements on highly charged ions with m/q{approx}6.

  3. Characterization of protonated phospholipids as fragile ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Timothy J.; Merves, Matthew; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Some ions exhibit “ion fragility” in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT-MS) during mass analysis with resonance ejection. In many cases, different ions generated from the same compound exhibit different degrees of ion fragility, with some ions (e.g., the [M+H]+ ion) stable and other ions (e.g., the [M+Na]+ ion) fragile. The ion fragility for quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometry (MS) for protonated and sodiated ions of three phospholipids, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PC (16:0/16:0), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophoethanolamine, PE (16:0/16:0), and N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine, SM (d18:1/16:0), was determined using three previously developed experiments: 1) the peak width using a slow scan speed, 2) the width of the isolation window for efficient isolation, and 3) the energy required for collision-induced dissociation. In addition, ion fragility studies were designed and performed to explore a correlation between ion fragility in QIT mass analysis and ion fragility during transport between the ion source and the ion trap. These experiments were: 1) evaluating the amount of thermal-induced dissociation as a function of heated capillary temperature, and 2) determining the extent of fragmentation occurring with increasing tube lens voltage. All phospholipid species studied exhibited greater ion fragility as protonated species in ion trap mass analysis than as sodiated species. In addition, the protonated species of both SM (d18:0/16:0) and PC (16:0/16:0) exhibited greater tendencies to fragment at higher heated capillary temperatures and high tube lens voltages, whereas the PE (16:0/16:0) ions did not appear to exhibit fragility during ion transport. PMID:22247650

  4. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  5. Can Mass Trapping Reduce Thrips Damage and Is It Economically Viable? Management of the Western Flower Thrips in Strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Clare; Kirk, William D. J.

    2013-01-01

    The western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is a cosmopolitan, polyphagous insect pest that causes bronzing to fruit of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). The main aim of this study was to test whether mass trapping could reduce damage and to predict whether this approach would be economically viable. In semi-protected strawberry crops, mass trapping of F. occidentalis using blue sticky roller traps reduced adult thrips numbers per flower by 61% and fruit bronzing by 55%. The addition of the F. occidentalis aggregation pheromone, neryl (S)-2-methylbutanoate, to the traps doubled the trap catch, reduced adult thrips numbers per flower by 73% and fruit bronzing by 68%. The factors affecting trapping efficiency through the season are discussed. Damage that would result in downgrading of fruit to a cheaper price occurred when bronzing affected about 10% of the red fruit surface. Cost-benefit analysis using this threshold showed that mass trapping of thrips using blue sticky roller traps can be cost-effective in high-value crops. The addition of blue sticky roller traps to an integrated pest management programme maintained thrips numbers below the damage threshold and increased grower returns by a conservative estimate of £2.2k per hectare. Further work is required to develop the F. occidentalis aggregation pheromone for mass trapping and to determine the best timing for trap deployment. Mass trapping of thrips is likely to be cost-effective in other countries and other high-value crops affected by F. occidentalis damage, such as cucumber and cut flowers. PMID:24282554

  6. Can mass trapping reduce thrips damage and is it economically viable? Management of the Western flower thrips in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Clare; Kirk, William D J

    2013-01-01

    The western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) is a cosmopolitan, polyphagous insect pest that causes bronzing to fruit of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). The main aim of this study was to test whether mass trapping could reduce damage and to predict whether this approach would be economically viable. In semi-protected strawberry crops, mass trapping of F. occidentalis using blue sticky roller traps reduced adult thrips numbers per flower by 61% and fruit bronzing by 55%. The addition of the F. occidentalis aggregation pheromone, neryl (S)-2-methylbutanoate, to the traps doubled the trap catch, reduced adult thrips numbers per flower by 73% and fruit bronzing by 68%. The factors affecting trapping efficiency through the season are discussed. Damage that would result in downgrading of fruit to a cheaper price occurred when bronzing affected about 10% of the red fruit surface. Cost-benefit analysis using this threshold showed that mass trapping of thrips using blue sticky roller traps can be cost-effective in high-value crops. The addition of blue sticky roller traps to an integrated pest management programme maintained thrips numbers below the damage threshold and increased grower returns by a conservative estimate of £2.2k per hectare. Further work is required to develop the F. occidentalis aggregation pheromone for mass trapping and to determine the best timing for trap deployment. Mass trapping of thrips is likely to be cost-effective in other countries and other high-value crops affected by F. occidentalis damage, such as cucumber and cut flowers. PMID:24282554

  7. Spherically Symmetric Trapping Horizons, the Misner-Sharp Mass and Black Hole Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Alex B.; Yeom, Dong-Han

    We discuss some of the issues relating to information loss and black hole thermodynamics in the light of recent work on local black hole horizons. Understood in terms of pure states evolving into mixed states, the possibility of information loss in black holes is closely related to the global causal structure of space-time, as is the existence of event horizons. However, black holes need not be defined by event horizons, and in fact we argue that in order to have a fully unitary evolution for black holes, they should be defined in terms of something else, such as a trapping horizon. The Misner-Sharp mass in spherical symmetry shows very simply how trapping horizons can give rise to black hole thermodynamics, Hawking radiation and singularities. We show how the Misner-Sharp mass can also be used to give insights into the process of collapse and evaporation of locally defined black holes.

  8. High-precision Penning-trap mass measurements of heavy xenon isotopes for nuclear structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neidherr, D.; Cakirli, R. B.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; Boehm, Ch.; George, S.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Casten, R. F.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Schwarz, S.

    2009-10-15

    With the double Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN the masses of the neutron-rich isotopes {sup 136-146}Xe were measured with a relative uncertainty of the order of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7}. In particular, the masses of {sup 144-146}Xe were measured for the first time. These new mass values allow one to extend calculations of the mass surface in this region. Proton-Neutron interaction strength, obtained from double differences of binding energies, relate to subtle structural effects, such as the onset of octupole correlations, the growth of collectivity, and its relation to the underlying shell model levels. In addition, they provide a test of density functional calculations.

  9. TITAN: An ion trap facility for on-line mass measurement experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Andreoiu, C.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Delheij, P.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Gwinner, G.; Jang, F.; Lennarz, A.; Ma, T.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2014-01-01

    Precision determinations of ground state or even isomeric state masses reveal fingerprints of nuclear structure. In particular, at the limits of existence for very neutron-rich or -deficient isotopes, one can extract detailed information about nuclear structure from separation energies or binding energies. Mass measurements are important to uncover new phenomena, to test new theoretical predictions, or to refine model approaches. For example, the N = 28 shell has proven more stable than previously expected; however, the predicted new "magic" number at N = 34 in the K and Ca isotopes has yet to be confirmed experimentally. For these neutron-rich nuclei, the inclusion of three-body forces leads to significantly better predictions of the ground-state mass. Similarly, halo nuclei present an excellent application for ab-initio theory, where ground state properties, like masses and radii, test our understanding of nuclear structure. Precision mass determinations at TRIUMF are carried out with the TITAN (TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science) facility. It is an ion-trap setup coupled to the on-line facility ISAC. TITAN has measured masses of isotopes as short-lived as 9 ms (almost an order of magnitude shorter-lived than any other Penning trap system), and it is the only one with charge breeding capabilities, which allow us to boost the precision by almost 2 orders of magnitude. We recently made use of this feature by measuring short-lived, proton-rich Rb-isotopes, up to 74Rb while reaching the 12 + charge state, which together with other improvements led to an increase in precision by a factor 36.

  10. Evaluation of the ion trap mass spectrometer for potential application in the space station

    SciTech Connect

    Glish, G.L.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes preliminary experiments with an ion trap mass spectrometer, which were done to evaluate its potential for use in the environmental monitoring system of the proposed space station. The first section of the report describes various modes of operation of the instrument, discusses some of the present limitations, and discusses some of the potential solutions to these limitations. The next section discusses the experimental results obtained on sixteen compounds with particular emphasis on comparing these data to that expected from a standard mass spectrometer. The last section consists of a conclusion and comments on suggested future work. 16 figs.

  11. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  12. Improved Scheme for Modeling Mass Transfer between Fracture and Matrix Continua with Particle Tracking Method

    SciTech Connect

    L. Pan; Y. Seol; G. Bodvarsson

    2004-04-29

    The dual-continuum random-walk particle tracking approach is an attractive simulation method for simulating transport in a fractured porous medium. In order to be truly successful for such a model, however, the key issue is to properly simulate the mass transfer between the fracture and matrix continua. In a recent paper, Pan and Bodvarsson (2002) proposed an improved scheme for simulating fracture-matrix mass transfer, by introducing the concept of activity range into the calculation of fracture-matrix particle-transfer probability. By comparing with analytical solutions, they showed that their scheme successfully captured the transient diffusion depth into the matrix without any additional subgrid (matrix) cells. This technical note presents an expansion of their scheme to cases in which significant water flow through the fracture-matrix interface exists. The dual-continuum particle tracker with this new scheme was found to be as accurate as a numerical model using a more detailed grid. The improved scheme can be readily incorporated into the existing particle-tracking code, while still maintaining the advantage of needing no additional matrix cells to capture transient features of particle penetration into the matrix.

  13. Evaluation of rock mass classification schemes: a case study from the Bowen Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin; Hebblewhite, Bruce; Mitra, Rudrajit

    2016-04-01

    The development of an accurate engineering geological model and adequate knowledge of spatial variation in rock mass conditions are important prerequisites for slope stability analyses, tunnel design, mine planning and risk management. Rock mass classification schemes such as Rock Mass Rating (RMR), Coal Mine Roof Rating (CMRR), Q-system and Roof Strength Index (RSI) have been used for a range of engineering geological applications, including transport tunnels, "hard rock" mining and underground and open-cut coal mines. Often, rock mass classification schemes have been evaluated on subaerial exposures, where weathering has affected joint characteristics and intact strength. In contrast, the focus of this evaluation of the above classification schemes is an underground coal mine in the Bowen Basin, central Queensland, Australia, 15 km east of the town of Moranbah. Rock mass classification was undertaken at 68 sites across the mine. Both the target coal seam and overlying rock show marked spatial variability in terms of RMR, CMRR and Q, but RSI showed limited sensitivity to changes in rock mass condition. Relationships were developed between different parameters with varying degrees of success. A mine-wide analysis of faulting was undertaken, and compared with in situ stress field and local-scale measurements of joint and cleat. While there are no unequivocal relationships between rock mass classification parameters and faulting, a central graben zone shows heterogeneous rock mass properties. The corollary is that if geological features can be accurately defined by remote sensing technologies, then this can assist in predicting rock mass conditions and risk management ahead of development and construction.

  14. Collisional and electric-field ionization of laser-prepared Rydberg states in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.; Whitten, W.B.; Goeringer, D.E.; Buckley, B.T.

    1990-01-01

    Rydberg states of rubidium are selectively generated by one and two photon laser excitation in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Collisional and electric-field ionization is investigated in trapping device. CCl{sub 4} is studied as a target for ionization of Rydberg states through electron attachment.

  15. Developments of multiplexed and miniature two-dimensional quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott A.

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT MS) is a powerful and commonly-employed method for the specific analysis of mass, composition, and structure of gas-phase ionic chemical species. Useful for a wide variety of tasks, applications of ion traps include environmental monitoring, surface analysis (including depth profiling and imaging), ion thermochemical property elucidation, protein and DNA sequencing, and high-resolution chemical separations (through ion soft-landing). Though the principles of QIT MS have been known for over half a century, innovations in instrumentation and applications continue. As new needs for specific and sensitive chemical analysis arise, so also do new and more efficient analytical devices and methods of analysis. Such a trend is exemplified through the construction of a dual-source QIT mass spectrometer (described herein) capable of multi-source chemical analyses for the purposes of enhanced proteomic sequence coverage and for the strictly-controlled comparison of the structural differences in ion populations generated by different ionization techniques. Furthermore, as mass spectrometry becomes increasingly commonplace outside the bounds of the analytical laboratory, demand for capable researcher equipment is also increasing. Advances in instrument performance, such as can be had through enhanced power efficiency and the enabling of chemical analysis of high mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) species (e.g., proteins), will open new doors to in situ chemical analysis hand-portable mass spectrometers. Hence, research into new mass analyzer designs and methods of fabrication using stereolithography apparatus (SLA) for the purpose of creating enhanced-performance mass spectrometers are accordingly described in the text of this dissertation.

  16. Triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer for the analysis of small molecules and macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Tschäppät, Viviane; Grivet, Chantal; Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Leuthold, Luc Alexis

    2004-08-01

    Recently, linear ion traps (LITs) have been combined with quadrupole (Q), time-of-flight (TOF) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). LITs can be used either as ion accumulation devices or as commercially available, stand-alone mass spectrometers with MSn capabilities. The combination of triple quadrupole MS with LIT technology in the form of an instrument of configuration QqLIT, using axial ejection, is particularly interesting, because this instrument retains the classical triple quadrupole scan functions such as selected reaction monitoring (SRM), product ion (PI), neutral loss (NL) and precursor ion (PC) while also providing access to sensitive ion trap experiments. For small molecules, quantitative and qualitative analysis can be performed using the same instrument. In addition, for peptide analysis, the enhanced multiply charged (EMC) scan allows an increase in selectivity, while the time-delayed fragmentation (TDF) scan provides additional structural information. Various methods of operating the hybrid instrument are described for the case of the commercial Q TRAP (AB/MDS Sciex) and applications to drug metabolism analysis, quantitative confirmatory analysis, peptides analysis and automated nanoelectrospray (ESI-chip-MS) analysis are discussed. PMID:15329837

  17. High-resolution methods for preserving the sum of mass fractions: improved χ-scheme and an alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Syamial, Madhava; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2013-11-20

    When high resolution convection schemes are used for discretizing chemical species mass balance equations, the mass fractions are not guaranteed to add to one. We show that a proposed remedy called χ-scheme (Darwish and Moukalled, Comput.Methods Appl.Mech. Engrg. 192 (2003): 1711) will degrade to a diffusive first-order scheme when a chemical species vanishes from the mixture, for example, because of chemical reactions. We propose an improvement to the χ-scheme to overcome this problem. Furthermore, a computationally efficient alternative scheme is proposed and evaluated with several examples, to quantify the improvements in the accuracy and the computational time.

  18. Precision Mass Measurements at the Canadian Penning Trap using a Phase-Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nystrom, Andrew; Aprahamian, A.; Marley, S. T.; Mumpower, M.; Paul, N.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S.; Surman, R.; Kuta, T.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Levand, A. F.; Perez Galvan, A.; Hirsh, T.; Rohrer, J.; Caldwell, S.; van Schelt, J.; Orford, R.; Buchinger, F.; Morgan, G.; Sharma, K.

    2015-10-01

    Precision mass measurements at Penning Trap facilities have traditionally used a time-of-flight (TOF) technique to measure the cyclotron frequency of ions and therefore determine their masses. At the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT), this technique is able to provide mass measurements to a precision of about δm/m = 10-8 with measurement times as low as 200ms. However, a new phase-imaging technique, which instead determines the cyclotron frequency by projecting the radial ion motion on a position-sensitive detector, is being implemented at the CPT. It provides at least a tenfold gain in resolving power while allowing for measurement times of less than 100 ms, allowing measurements of more exotic neutron-rich nuclei from CARIBU with respect to the TOF technique. Details of its commissioning at the CPT will be discussed alongside new neutron-rich mass measurements. This work is supported by the following: NSERC, Canada, appl. # 239591, the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357, and NSF Grants PHY-1419765 and PHY-1430152.

  19. Impenetrable mass-imbalanced particles in one-dimensional harmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkharghani, A. S.; Volosniev, A. G.; Zinner, N. T.

    2016-04-01

    Strongly interacting particles in one dimension subject to external confinement have become a topic of considerable interest due to recent experimental advances and the development of new theoretical methods to attack such systems. In the case of equal mass fermions or bosons with two or more internal degrees of freedom, one can map the problem onto the well-known Heisenberg spin models. However, many interesting physical systems contain mixtures of particles with different masses. Therefore, a generalization of the recent strong-coupling techniques would be highly desirable. This is particularly important since such problems are generally considered non-integrable and thus the hugely successful Bethe ansatz approach cannot be applied. Here we discuss some initial steps towards this goal by investigating small ensembles of one-dimensional harmonically trapped particles where pairwise interactions are either vanishing or infinitely strong with focus on the mass-imbalanced case. We discuss a (semi)-analytical approach to describe systems using hyperspherical coordinates where the interaction is effectively decoupled from the trapping potential. As an illustrative example we analyze mass-imbalanced four-particle two-species mixtures with strong interactions between the two species. For such systems we calculate the energies, densities and pair-correlation functions.

  20. MEMS Fabrication of Micro Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for CubeSats Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate arrays of micro Cylindrical Ion Traps (μCIT) which are integrated into a miniaturized mass spectrometer (MS). The micro μCITs are built from silicon wafers and requires high machining precision, smooth surface, and high dimensional uniformity across the array for optimum mass spectrometer performance. In order to build these 3D miniature structures several MEMS processing techniques were explored and a process was developed and tested. By using the developed MEMS process, the required μCIT 4 x 4 arrays were fabricated. This included a chip design variation in which mechanical locking pits and posts were machined in the Ring Electrode (RE) chip and End Plate (EP) chips respectively, for self-assembly. The size of the assembled μCIT is only 12 mm x 12 mm x 1.5 mm. It is a key component for the miniature mass spectrometer. The micro cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer has the advantages of low-power operation, simpler electronics and less-stringent vacuum system requirements. The MEMS batch production capabilities will also greatly lower the cost. It is a promising candidate for CubeSat and nanoSats applications for exploration of chemical distributions in space.

  1. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry vs. GC/MS for monitoring VOCs in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Merriweather, R.; Guerin, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS) has been under refinement and demonstration by this laboratory for several years. The general technology is applicable to a wide range of problems which would benefit from high sample throughput, fast availability of results, and relatively low cost per sample analysis when compared with conventional analytical methods. At the present time, DSITMS can be used to determine targeted analytes in air, water, soil, and other media. This is accomplished by equipping an ion trap with a direct inlet system which consists of a splitter, capillary restrictor, and a set of sample inlet modules. The capillary restrictor provides the interface between atmosphere and the vacuum in the ion trap while the splitter enables sampling modules which require high gas flow rates to be used with the system. The sampling modules consist of a purge module for analyzing VOCs in water or soil, a direct air sampling module, and a thermal desorber. These modules are designed to be easily interchanged by means of quick connect fittings and a single electrical cable. In general, the DSITMS sample inlet system works equally well on all of the commercially available ion traps with which it has been tested including the Finnigan MAT ITMS, Finnigan MAT Magnum, Varian Saturn, and the Teledyne 3D-Q. Both the Magnum and 3D-Q instruments have been utilized for field applications as well as laboratory analysis. This particular study is a comparison of DSITMS with a purge and trap GC/MS for compliance monitoring of VOC`s in groundwater.

  2. Mode-shape-based mass detection scheme using mechanically diverse, indirectly coupled microresonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glean, Aldo A.; Judge, John A.; Vignola, Joseph F.; Ryan, Teresa J.

    2015-02-01

    We explore vibration localization in arrays of microresonators used for ultrasensitive mass detection and describe an algorithm for identifying the location and amount of added mass using measurements of a vibration mode of the system. For a set of sensing elements coupled through a common shuttle mass, the inter-element coupling is shown to be proportional to the ratio of the element masses to the shuttle mass and to vary with the frequency mistuning between any two sensing elements. When any two elements have sufficiently similar frequencies, mass adsorption on one element can result in measurable changes to multiple modes of the system. We describe the effects on system frequencies and mode shapes due to added mass, in terms of mass ratio and frequency spacing. In cases in which modes are not fully localized, frequency-shift-based mass detection methods may give ambiguous results. The mode-shape-based detection algorithm presented uses a single measured mode shape and corresponding natural frequency to identify the location and amount of added mass. Mass detection in the presence of measurement noise is numerically simulated using a ten element sensor array. The accuracy of the detection scheme is shown to depend on the amplitude with which each element vibrates in the chosen mode.

  3. A cost-effective, community-based, mosquito-trapping scheme that captures spatial and temporal heterogeneities of malaria transmission in rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring mosquito population dynamics is essential to guide selection and evaluation of malaria vector control interventions but is typically implemented by mobile, centrally-managed teams who can only visit a limited number of locations frequently enough to capture longitudinal trends. Community-based (CB) mosquito trapping schemes for parallel, continuous monitoring of multiple locations are therefore required that are practical, affordable, effective, and reliable. Methods A CB surveillance scheme, with a monthly sampling and reporting cycle for capturing malaria vectors, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps (LT) and Ifakara Tent Traps (ITT), were conducted by trained community health workers (CHW) in 14 clusters of households immediately surrounding health facilities in rural south-east Zambia. At the end of the study, a controlled quality assurance (QA) survey was conducted by a centrally supervised expert team using human landing catch (HLC), LT and ITT to evaluate accuracy of the CB trapping data. Active surveillance of malaria parasite infection rates amongst humans was conducted by CHWs in the same clusters to determine the epidemiological relevance of these CB entomological surveys. Results CB-LT and CB-ITT exhibited relative sampling efficiencies of 50 and 7%, respectively, compared with QA surveys using the same traps. However, cost per sampling night was lowest for CB-LT ($13.6), followed closely by CB-ITT ($18.0), both of which were far less expensive than any QA survey (HLC: $138, LT: $289, ITT: $269). Cost per specimen of Anopheles funestus captured was lowest for CB-LT ($5.3), followed by potentially hazardous QA-HLC ($10.5) and then CB-ITT ($28.0), all of which were far more cost-effective than QA-LT ($141) and QA-ITT ($168). Time-trends of malaria diagnostic positivity (DP) followed those of An. funestus density with a one-month lag and the wide range of mean DP across clusters was closely associated with mean

  4. Human Biomonitoring of DNA Adducts by Ion Trap Multistage Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Turesky, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to hazardous chemicals in the environment. These chemicals or their electrophilic metabolites can form adducts with genomic DNA, which can lead to mutations and the initiation of cancer. The identification of DNA adducts is required for understanding exposure and the etiological role of a genotoxic chemical in cancer risk. The analytical chemist is confronted with a great challenge because the levels of DNA adducts generally occur at <1 adduct per 10(7) nucleotides, and the amount of tissue available for measurement is limited. Ion trap mass spectrometry has emerged as an important technique to screen for DNA adducts because of the high level sensitivity and selectivity, particularly when employing multi-stage scanning (MS(n) ). The product ion spectra provide rich structural information and corroborate the adduct identities even at trace levels in human tissues. Ion trap technology represents a significant advance in measuring DNA adducts in humans. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584705

  5. Silica-fiber microextraction for laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cisper, M.E.; Earl, W.L.; Nogar, N.S.; Hemberger, P.H. )

    1994-06-01

    We have coupled sample collection by solid-phase microextraction on disposable fused silica optical fibers with analysis by laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry for rapid screening of organic contaminants in complex matrices. Because the silica-fiber probe serves as both the sampling medium and the sample support for laser desorption, traditional methods of sample preparation are eliminated with the expected gains in speed and simplicity. Pyrene was the benchmark compound in these experiments but we show that the technique is also applicable to other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile compounds, laser dyes, pesticides, and peptides. Derivatizing the silica fiber improves the analyte collection efficiency, and firing the laser during a ring electrode rf ramp promotes dependable trapping of laser-desorbed ions. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  6. 40 CFR 75.15 - Special provisions for measuring Hg mass emissions using the excepted sorbent trap monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mass emissions using the excepted sorbent trap monitoring methodology. 75.15 Section 75.15 Protection... EMISSION MONITORING Monitoring Provisions § 75.15 Special provisions for measuring Hg mass emissions using... Federal Hg mass emission reduction program that adopts the provisions of subpart I of this part, if...

  7. Precision mass measurements of neutron halo nuclei using the TITAN Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Simon, V. V.; Smith, M.; Lapierre, A.; Mané, E.; Ringle, R.; Ryjkov, V. L.; Bacca, S.; Delheij, P.; Lunney, D.; Pearson, M.; Dilling, J.

    2011-07-01

    Precise atomic mass determinations play a key role in various fields of physics, including nuclear physics, testing of fundamental symmetries and constants and atomic physics. Recently, the TITAN Penning trap measured the masses of several neutron halos. These exotic systems have an extended, diluted, matter distribution that can be modelled by considering a nuclear core surrounded by a halo formed by one or more of loosely bound neutrons. Combined with laser spectroscopy measurements of isotopic shifts precise masses can be used to obtain reliable charge radii and two-neutron-seperation energies for these halo nuclei. It is shown that these results can be used as stringent tests of nuclear models and potentials providing an important metric for our understanding of the interactions in all nuclei.

  8. Development of an ion trap/multi-turn time-of-flight mass spectrometer with potential- lift.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Kenichi; Nagao, Hirofumi; Toyoda, Michisato

    2009-01-01

    An ion trap/multi-turn time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometer with potential-lift has been developed. This system consists of an external ion source, a lens system, an ion trap, a potential-lift, a multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer and a detector. The ion trap consists of hyperbolic electrode cross-sections (Paul trap) and is used as an ion storage device. The potential-lift, which is part of the flight tube, was attached between the ion trap and the multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer. The potential-lift is known to be useful for increasing the kinetic energy of the ions. In order to check the ability of the potential-lift, mass distributions of [(CsI)(n) Cs]+ clusters (n = 1-9) were measured. The relative intensity ratios of the [(CsI)(n)Cs]+ clusters were consistent with the results obtained using other apparatus. To check the properties of the new apparatus, Xe+ isotopes were analyzed using either a linear or multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer. In the linear mode, the mass resolution was 500. In the multi-turn mode, the resolution depended on the number of cycles of the multi-turn ToF mass spectrometer; the mass resolution was 4400 (FWHM) after nine cycles. This new apparatus with a high resolution will be useful for measurements of ion-molecule reactions and photodissociations. PMID:19423910

  9. Estimation of trapped mass by in-cylinder pressure resonance in HCCI engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luján, José Manuel; Guardiola, Carlos; Pla, Benjamín; Bares, Pau

    2016-01-01

    High pressure gradients at homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines heavily excite the pressure resonance. The pressure resonant frequency depends on speed of sound in the cylinder, and thus on the bulk gas temperature. Present paper profits this relation estimating the trapped mass inside the cylinder. In contrast to other estimation methods in the literature, the presented method is based on the trace of the in-cylinder pressure during the cycle; therefore, it permits a cycle-to-cycle mass estimation, and avoids errors associated with other assumptions, such as heat transfer during compression or initial temperature of the in-cylinder gases. The proposed strategy only needs the pressure signal, a volume estimation and a composition assumption to obtain several trapped mass estimates during one cycle. These estimates can be later combined for providing an error estimate of the measurement, with the assumption of negligible blow-by. The method is demonstrated in two HCCI engines of different size, showing good performance in steady operation and presenting great potential to control transient operation.

  10. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  11. Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides along the astrophysical rp- and νp- process paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jason

    2009-10-01

    X-ray bursters and supernovae are examples of explosive stellar phenomena in which nuclides are quickly produced in great quantities. Observed as x-ray bursts, thermonuclear runaways on the surface of neutron stars accreting material from its binary star companion create elements by a nucleosynthetic procoess which involves a series of rapid proton-capture reactions, termed the rp process. The timescale, nuclides produced, and energy released during the rp process are very sensitive to delays encountered at waiting-point nuclides, nuclides in which their slow β decay is more probable than net proton capture. A possible mechanism to bypass the waiting-point nuclides is through the νp process, in which (n,p) and (n,γ) reactions on the waiting-point nuclides, in addition to the proton-capture reactions, are possible. Supernovae are possible sites for the νp process as the proton-rich ejecta can absorb antineutrinos to produce the required free neutrons. It is this νp process which may resolve the long-standing discrepancy between the observed and predicted abundances of ^92Mo and ^94Mo. Proton-capture Q values of nuclides along the rp- and νp- process paths are required to accurately model the nucleosynthesis, especially at the waiting-point nuclides. In recent years, Penning traps have become the preferred tool to make precise mass measurements of stable and unstable nuclides. To make the best use of these devices in measuring the masses of radioactive nuclides, systems have been developed to quickly, cleanly, and efficiently transport the short-lived, weakly produced nuclides to the Penning traps. This talk will discuss the rp and νp nucleosynthetic processes and will highlight the precise Penning trap mass measurements of nuclides along these process paths.

  12. Broad spectrum drug screening using liquid chromatography-hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Centrifuged urine, internal standard (promazine), and ammonium formate buffer are mixed in an autosampler vial to achieve a 10-fold dilution of the specimen. Without additional pretreatment, 10 microL of the sample is injected onto a C18 reverse phase column for gradient analysis with ammonium formate/acetonitrile mobile phases. Drugs in the column eluent become charged in the ion source using positive electrospray atmospheric pressure ionization. Pseudomolecular drug ions are analyzed by a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer operated with a 264-drug selected ion monitoring (SRM) acquisition method that includes an information-dependant acquisition (IDA) algorithm. PMID:20077072

  13. Design and performance of an instrument for electron impact tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy of mass/charge selected macromolecular ions stored in RF ion trap*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, Milos Lj.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.

    2016-06-01

    A new apparatus was designed, coupling an electron gun with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, to perform m/ z (mass over charge) selected ion activation by electron impact for tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy. We present in detail electron tracing simulations of a 300 eV electron beam inside the ion trap, design of the mechanical parts, electron optics and electronic circuits used in the experiment. We also report examples of electron impact activation tandem mass spectra for Ubiquitin protein, Substance P and Melittin peptides, at incident electron energies in the range from 280 eV to 300 eV.

  14. Automated Gain Control Ion Funnel Trap for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) is increasingly used in proteomics research. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of a TOF MS instrument with improved sensitivity equipped with an electrodynamic ion funnel trap (IFT) that employs an automated gain control (AGC) capability. The IFT-TOF MS was coupled to a reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation and evaluated in experiments with complex proteolytic digests. When applied to a global tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis proteins, an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to that of the conventional continuous mode of operation was achieved due to efficient ion accumulation prior to TOF MS analysis. As a result of this sensitivity improvement and related improvement in mass measurement accuracy, the number of unique peptides identified in the AGC-IFT mode was 5-fold greater than that obtained in the continuous mode. PMID:18512944

  15. On the structural denaturation of biological analytes in trapped ion mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanny C; Kirk, Samuel R; Bleiholder, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Key to native ion mobility/mass spectrometry is to prevent the structural denaturation of biological molecules in the gas phase. Here, we systematically assess structural changes induced in the protein ubiquitin during a trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiment. Our analysis shows that the extent of structural denaturation induced in ubiquitin ions is largely proportional to the amount of translational kinetic energy an ion gains from the applied electric field between two collisions with buffer gas particles. We then minimize the efficiency of the structural denaturation of ubiquitin ions in the gas phase during a TIMS experiment. The resulting "soft" TIMS spectra of ubiquitin are found largely identical to those observed on "soft" elevated-pressure ion mobility drift tubes and the corresponding calibrated cross sections are consistent with structures reported from NMR experiments for the native and A-state of ubiquitin. Thus, our analysis reveals that TIMS is useful for native ion mobility/mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26998732

  16. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry (DSITMS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the cost, performance, and other key characteristics of an innovative technology for determining the presence or absence, and measuring the concentration, of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in groundwater and soil, and in gaseous remediation process streams at hazardous waste sites. This new technology is Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). DSITMS introduces sample materials directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer by means of a very simple interface, such as a capillary restrictor or a polymer membrane. There is typically very little, if any, sample preparation and no chromatographic separation of the sample constituents. This means that the response of the instrument to the analytes or contaminants in a sample is nearly instantaneous, and that analytical methods based on DSITMS are fast. Analyses are typically completed in less than five minutes, and the analysis cost is generally 50% or less than the amount charged by commercial laboratories using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis methods.

  17. Augmenting Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Using a Frequency Modulated Drift Tube Ion Mobility Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kelsey A; Siems, William F; Clowers, Brian H

    2016-03-15

    Historically, high pressure ion mobility drift tubes have suffered from low ion duty cycles and this problem is magnified when such instrumentation is coupled with ion trap mass spectrometers. To significantly alleviate these issues, we outline the result from coupling an atmospheric pressure, dual-gate drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LIT-MS) via modulation of the ion beam with a linear frequency chirp. The time-domain ion current, once Fourier transformed, reveals a standard ion mobility drift spectrum that corresponds to the standard mode of mobility analysis. By multiplexing the ion beam, it is possible to successfully obtain drift time spectra for an assortment of simple peptide and protein mixtures using an LIT-MS while showing improved signal intensity versus the more common signal averaging technique. Explored here are the effects of maximum injection time, solution concentration, total experiment time, and frequency swept on signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolving power. Increased inject time, concentration, and experiment time all generally led to an improvement in SNR, while a greater frequency swept increases the resolving power at the expense of SNR. Overall, chirp multiplexing of a dual-gate IMS system coupled to an LIT-MS improves ion transmission, lowers analyte detection limits, and improves spectral quality. PMID:26854901

  18. Reactions of vinyl chloride and methanol in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer during VOC analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, L.; Alley, E.G.; Lynn, B.C. Jr.

    1999-05-01

    A reaction between vinyl chloride and the solvent (methanol) was observed during volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis on a gas chromatograph/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (GC/MS). A chromatographic peak at a retention time consistent with vinyl chloride produced a mass spectrum without the characteristic chlorine isotope ions m/z 62 and 64 but instead contained an apparent molecular ion, m/z 58. The m/z 58 ion is not found in the reference spectrum of vinyl chloride. This spectrum was observed when methanol was used as solvent in internal standard, surrogate standard, or analyte solutions. Subsequent VOC standard analysis indicated that the abundance of the m/z 58 ion was directly proportional to the amount of vinyl chloride in the water samples. The correct spectrum for vinyl chloride was observed when no methanol was added. From these experiments, the authors concluded that a reaction was occurring between the vinyl chloride and methanol in the ion trap producing a new species with a molecular ion at m/z 58. When ethanol was used as the solvent for the internal standard solution or surrogate standard, a correct spectrum of vinyl chloride was obtained.

  19. Hybrid quadrupole mass filter/quadrupole ion trap/time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyuz, Kerim; Stedwell, Corey N.; Wang Da; Polfer, Nick C.

    2011-05-15

    We present a laboratory-constructed mass spectrometer optimized for recording infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass-selected ions using a benchtop tunable infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/A). The instrument is equipped with two ionization sources, an electrospray ionization source, as well as an electron ionization source for troubleshooting. This hybrid mass spectrometer is composed of a quadrupole mass filter for mass selection, a reduced pressure ({approx}10{sup -5} Torr) quadrupole ion trap (QIT) for OPO irradiation, and a reflectron time-of-flight drift tube for detecting the remaining precursor and photofragment ions. A helium gas pulse is introduced into the QIT to temporarily increase the pressure and hence enhance the trapping efficiency of axially injected ions. After a brief pump-down delay, the compact ion cloud is subjected to the focused output from the continuous wave OPO. In a recent study, we implemented this setup in the study of protonated tryptophan, TrpH{sup +}, as well as collision-induced dissociation products of this protonated amino acid [W. K. Mino, Jr., K. Gulyuz, D. Wang, C. N. Stedwell, and N. C. Polfer, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 299 (2011)]. Here, we give a more detailed account on the figures of merit of such IRMPD experiments. The appreciable photodissociation yields in these measurements demonstrate that IRMPD spectroscopy of covalently bound ions can be routinely carried out using benchtop OPO setups.

  20. Energy trapping in high-frequency vibrations of piezoelectric plates with partial mass layers under lateral electric field excitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Jiang, Qing; Xie, Huimin; Yang, Jiashi

    2011-04-01

    We study coupled face-shear (FS) and thickness-twist (TT) motions of a piezoelectric plate of monoclinic crystals with mass layers on the central parts of the plate surfaces. The plate is driven by a lateral electric field. Mindlin's first-order theory of piezoelectric plates is used. An analytical solution is obtained. Numerical results are presented for an AT-cut quartz plate, including the motional capacitance of the plate as a resonator and the vibration modes trapped under the mass layers in the central portion of the plate. The relationship between the dimension of the mass layers and the number of trapped modes is examined. PMID:21145572

  1. Design and Performance Evaluation of a Linear Ion Trap Mass Analyzer Featuring Half Round Rod Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yao, Rujiao; He, Yang; Zhu, Yongyong; Qian, Jie

    2015-05-01

    A novel linear ion trap mass analyzer featuring half round rod electrodes (HreLIT) has been built. It is mainly composed of two pairs of stainless steel electrodes which have a cross-section of half round rod and a pair of end electrodes. The HreLIT has a simple structure and so it could be assembled by hand with relatively high mechanical accuracy. The external dimension of HreLIT is 50 mm × 29.5 mm × 28 mm (length × width × height) and its internal volume is about 3.8 cm3. A home-made HreLIT mass spectrometer with three-stage vacuum system was built and the performance of HreLIT was characterized using reserpine solution and PPG standard solution. When the scan rate was 254 u/s, mass peak with FWHM of 0.14 u was achieved for ions with m/z 609, which corresponds to a mass resolution of 4350. The HreLIT was also operated at a low q value of 0.28 to extend its mass range. The experiment result showed a mass range of over 2800 u and the amplitude of radio frequency (rf) signal was only 1560 V (0-p). Three-stage tandem mass spectrometry was successfully performed in the HreLIT, and the collision-induced dissociation (CID) efficiencies of MS2 (CID of ions with m/z 609) and MS3 (CID of ions with m/z 448) were 78% and 59%, respectively.

  2. Design and performance of an atmospheric pressure sampling interface for ion-trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Setz, Patrick D.; Schmitz, Thomas A.; Zenobi, Renato

    2006-02-15

    An ion-trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometer in combination with an atmospheric pressure sampling interface was developed in order to simultaneously profit from the ease of sample handling at ambient pressure, from the storage and accumulation capabilities of an ion trap, and from the acquisition speed and sensitivity of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The sampling interface is an intermediate-pressure vacuum manifold that serves to enrich sampled analytes by jet separation with respect to the carrier gas (air) and simultaneously maintain vacuum conditions inside the ion-trap/time-of-flight instrument. Neutral analyte molecules are sampled and later ionized either by electron impact or chemical ionization. Ion accumulation is performed with a rf-only quadrupole ion trap with ground potential on the end caps during storage. For mass analysis, the trap's electrodes serve as a pulsed ion source for the attached linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In addition, laser desorbed molecules can also be sampled with this kind of instrument. Successful operation is shown by analyzing volatile substances (aniline, bromobenzene, styrene, and perfluorotributylamine), as well as laser-desorbed organic solids. Figures of merit include a sensitivity of 10 ppm, resolving power of 300 and demonstration of a mass spectrum of laser-desorbed anthracene with a signal-to-noise ratio of 270.

  3. Shedding light on the mercury mass discrepancy by weighing Hg 52+ ions in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritioff, T.; Bluhme, H.; Schuch, R.; Bergström, I.; Björkhage, M.

    2003-07-01

    In their nuclear tables Audi and Wapstra have pointed out a serious mass discrepancy between their extrapolated values for the mercury isotopes and those from a direct measurement by the Manitoba group. The values deviate by as much as 85 ppb from each other with claimed uncertainties of about 16 and 7 ppb, respectively. In order to decide which values are correct the masses of the 198Hg and 204Hg isotopes have been measured in the Stockholm Penning trap mass spectrometer SMILETRAP using 52+ ions. This charge state corresponds to a filled Ni electron configuration for which the electron binding energy can be accurately calculated. The mass values obtained are 197.966 768 44(43) u for 198Hg and 203.973 494 10(39) u for 204Hg. These values agree with those measured by the Manitoba group, with a 3 times lower uncertainty. This measurement was made possible through the implementation of a cooling technique of the highly charged mercury ions during charge breeding in the electron beam ion source used for producing the Hg 52+ ions.

  4. Characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry of an ion trap mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector using a tandem mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R; Harper, Jason D; Lukow, Stefan R; Lareau, Richard T; Boudries, Hacene; Lai, Hanh; Brauer, Carolyn S

    2012-09-15

    A commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) based explosive trace detector (ETD) has been interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS) for the purpose of characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry intrinsic to the ITMS instrument. The overall objective of the research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas phase ionization processes in the ITMS based ETD to facilitate the advancement of its operational effectiveness as well as guide the development of next generation ETDs. Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values measured by the ITMS/MS/MS configuration for a suite of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide containing explosives are reported. Molecular formulas, molecular structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions are inferred using the mass and mobility data in conjunction with density functional theory. The predominant product ions are identified as follows: [TNT-H](-) for trinitrotoluene (TNT), [RDX+Cl](-) for cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX), [NO(3)](-) for ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN), [NG+NO(3)](-) for nitroglycerine (NG), [PETN+NO(3)](-) for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), [HNO(3)+NO(3)](-) for ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)), [HMTD-NC(3)H(6)O(3)+H+Cl](-) for hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), and [(CH(3))(2)CNH(2)](+) for triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The predominant ionization pathways for the formation of the various product ions are determined to include proton abstraction, ion-molecule attachment, autoionization, first-order and multi-order thermolysis, and nucleophilic substitution. The ion trapping scheme in the reaction region of the ITMS instrument is shown to increase predominant ion intensities relative to the secondary ion intensities when compared to non-ion trap operation. PMID:22967626

  5. Development of a Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) Investigation for Future Planetary Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W.; Danell, R.; Van Ameron, F.; Pinnick, V.; Li, X.; Arevalo, R.; Glavin, D.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P.; Chu, P.; Zacny, K.; Rogacki, S.; Grubisic, A.; Cornish, T.

    2014-01-01

    Future surface missions to Mars and other planetary bodies will benefit from continued advances in miniature sensor and sample handling technologies that enable high-performance chemical analyses of natural samples. Fine-scale (approx.1 mm and below) analyses of rock surfaces and interiors, such as exposed on a drill core, will permit (1) the detection of habitability markers including complex organics in association with their original depositional environment, and (2) the characterization of successive layers and gradients that can reveal the time-evolution of those environments. In particular, if broad-based and highly-sensitive mass spectrometry techniques could be brought to such scales, the resulting planetary science capability would be truly powerful. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) investigation is designed to conduct fine-scale organic and inorganic analyses of short (approx.5-10 cm) rock cores such as could be acquired by a planetary lander or rover arm-based drill. LITMS combines both pyrolysis/gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GCMS) of sub-sampled core fines, and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of the intact core surface, using a common mass analyzer, enhanced from the design used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument on the 2018 ExoMars rover. LITMS additionally features developments based on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and recent NASA-funded prototype efforts in laser mass spectrometry, pyrolysis, and precision subsampling. LITMS brings these combined capabilities to achieve its four measurement objectives: (1) Organics: Broad Survey Detect organic molecules over a wide range of molecular weight, volatility, electronegativity, concentration, and host mineralogy. (2) Organic: Molecular Structure Characterize internal molecular structure to identify individual compounds, and reveal functionalization and processing. (3) Inorganic Host Environment Assess the local chemical

  6. Automated measurement of permethylated serum N-glycans by MALDI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Maïlys; Gloerich, Jolein; Wessels, Hans J C T; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2009-08-17

    The use of N-glycan mass spectrometry for clinical diagnostics requires the development of robust high-throughput profiling methods. Still, structural assignment of glycans requires additional information such as MS(2) fragmentation or exoglycosidase digestions. We present a setting which combines a MALDI ionization source with a linear ion trap analyzer. This instrumentation allows automated measurement of samples thanks to the crystal positioning system, combined with MS(n) sequencing options. 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic acid, commonly used for the analysis of glycans, failed to produce the required reproducibility due to its non-homogeneous crystallization properties. In contrast, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid provided a homogeneous crystallization pattern and reproducibility of the measurements. Using serum N-glycans as a test sample, we focused on the automation of data collection by optimizing the instrument settings. Glycan structures were confirmed by MS(2) analysis. Although sample processing still needs optimization, this method provides a reproducible and high-throughput approach for measurement of N-glycans using a MALDI-linear ion trap instrument. PMID:19577739

  7. Direct Monitoring of Trace Atmospheric Species via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, P. T.; Pearson, Richard; Saimonson, Jay D.; Wong, Carla M.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing emphasis on the part of government agencies, academia, and industry on enhancing our understanding of atmospheric processes and assessing the impact of human activities on these processes. While issues such as the ozone hole and rising levels of greenhouse gases have received major attention. relatively little is known about the types, concentrations, sources, and sinks of hydrocarbons in the troposphere and stratosphere. Such information would be of tremendous utility in assessing the roles of various anthropogenic and biogenic processes on global carbon cycles. An ion trap mass spectrometer has been developed for monitoring trace levels of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere on NASA's DC-8 "flying laboratory". This aircraft is used to provide measurements in support of a number of "Mission to Planet Earth" activities and tropospheric chemistry experiments. In past missions, specific compounds have been monitored via highly specialized instrumentation, fast GO, or collection of whole air samples for subsequent ground-based analysis. The ion trap has several features. including small size. excellent sensitivity, and broad applicability, which make it highly atttrat:ive for atmospheric monitoring. The design of this instrument, its air sampling interface. and the various complications associated with aircraft-deployment will be described. Data showing the sensitivity of the instrument for detecting hydrocarbons at mixing ratios below one part-per-billion, and the use of MS/MS for direct, on-line, real-time monitoring will be presented.

  8. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ??? in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) ??2H reproducibility (1?? standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ??? to 0.58 ???. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  9. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  10. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coplen, Tyler B; Qi, Haiping

    2010-09-15

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ(2)H reproducibility (1σ standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1 ‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN(2) is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen. PMID:20718408

  11. Trapping and dispersion of coral eggs around Bowden Reef, Great Barrier Reef, following mass coral spawning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; Burrage, Derek; King, Brian

    1989-05-01

    Bowden Reef is a 5 km long kidney-shaped coral reef with a lagoon, located on the mid-shelf of the central region of the Great Barrier Reef. Field studies were carried out, in November 1986, at the time of mass coral spawning, of the water circulation around Bowden Reef and in the surrounding inter-reefal waters. The near-reef water circulation was strongly three-dimensional although the stratification was weak. In calm weather, coral eggs were aggregated in slicks along topographically controlled fronts. In the absence of a longshore current, water and coral eggs were trapped in the lagoon and in a boundary layer around Bowden Reef, by tidally driven recirculating motions. In the presence of a longshore current, some trapping occurred in the lagoon, but the bulk of the coral eggs was advected away from Bowden Reef and reached downstream reefs in a few days. This implies a likelihood of both self-seeding of reefs, and connectivity between reefs.

  12. An expert system/ion trap mass spectrometry approach for life support systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, Carla M.; Yost, Richard A.; Johnson, Jodie V.; Yates, Nathan A.; Story, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Efforts to develop sensor and control system technology to monitor air quality for life support have resulted in the development and preliminary testing of a concept based on expert systems and ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). An ITMS instrument provides the capability to identify and quantitate a large number of suspected contaminants at trace levels through the use of a variety of multidimensional experiments. An expert system provides specialized knowledge for control, analysis, and decision making. The system is intended for real-time, on-line, autonomous monitoring of air quality. The key characteristics of the system, performance data and analytical capabilities of the ITMS instrument, the design and operation of the expert system, and results from preliminary testing of the system for trace contaminant monitoring are described.

  13. Quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate in plasma by liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Kim, D H

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in human plasma. Plasma samples (1.0 mL) were simply extracted with pentane and the extracts were analyzed by HPLC with the detection of the analyte in the selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The determination of MPA was accurate and reproducible, with a limit of quantitation of 0.05 ng/mL in plasma. The standard calibration curve for MPA was linear (r = 0.998) over the concentration range 0.05-6.0 ng/mL in human plasma. Analysis precision over the concentration range of MPA was lower than 18.8% (relative standard deviation, RSD) and accuracy was between 96.2 and 108.7%. PMID:11675672

  14. Two-loop matching factors for light quark masses and three-loop mass anomalous dimensions in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Leandro G.; Sturm, Christian

    2010-09-01

    Light quark masses can be determined through lattice simulations in regularization invariant momentum-subtraction (RI/MOM) schemes. Subsequently, matching factors, computed in continuum perturbation theory, are used in order to convert these quark masses from a RI/MOM scheme to the MS scheme. We calculate the two-loop corrections in QCD to these matching factors as well as the three-loop mass anomalous dimensions for the RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }schemes. These two schemes are characterized by a symmetric subtraction point. Providing the conversion factors in the two different schemes allows for a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties. The two-loop expansion coefficients of the matching factors for both schemes turn out to be small compared to the traditional RI/MOM schemes. For n{sub f}=3 quark flavors they are about 0.6%-0.7% and 2%, respectively, of the leading order result at scales of about 2 GeV. Therefore, they will allow for a significant reduction of the systematic uncertainty of light quark mass determinations obtained through this approach. The determination of these matching factors requires the computation of amputated Green's functions with the insertions of quark bilinear operators. As a by-product of our calculation we also provide the corresponding results for the tensor operator.

  15. Two-loop matching factors for light quark masses and three-loop mass anomalous dimensions in the RI/SMOM schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, C.; Almeida, L.

    2010-04-26

    Light quark masses can be determined through lattice simulations in regularization invariant momentum-subtraction (RI/MOM) schemes. Subsequently, matching factors, computed in continuum perturbation theory, are used in order to convert these quark masses from a RI/MOM scheme to the {ovr MS} scheme. We calculate the two-loop corrections in QCD to these matching factors as well as the three-loop mass anomalous dimensions for the RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{mu}} schemes. These two schemes are characterized by a symmetric subtraction point. Providing the conversion factors in the two different schemes allows for a better understanding of the systematic uncertainties. The two-loop expansion coefficients of the matching factors for both schemes turn out to be small compared to the traditional RI/MOM schemes. For n{sub f} = 3 quark flavors they are about 0.6%-0.7% and 2%, respectively, of the leading order result at scales of about 2 GeV. Therefore, they will allow for a significant reduction of the systematic uncertainty of light quark mass determinations obtained through this approach. The determination of these matching factors requires the computation of amputated Green's functions with the insertions of quark bilinear operators. As a by-product of our calculation we also provide the corresponding results for the tensor operator.

  16. On the combination of a linear field free trap with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Alfonz; Schlemmer, Stephan; Čermák, Ivo; Gerlich, Dieter

    2001-07-01

    A new instrument has been developed which combines a rf ring electrode trap and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The wide field free storage volume of such a trap enables the study of low temperature ion-molecule collisions; however it is not straightforward to match the nonlocalized ion cloud to the TOF-MS. For obtaining sufficient mass resolution, a special pulse sequence has been developed to transfer the ions from the whole trap volume to a small region in the vicinity of the exit electrode. Additional compression is achieved via buffer gas relaxation prior to extracting the ions. Using a linear flight path of 57 cm, a mass resolution of about 50 is routinely achieved. The mass range of the whole instrument, which is determined by the operating conditions both of the trap and the TOF-MS, has been estimated to be 3-700 u. The actual characteristics of the instrument such as mass range, resolution, and dynamical range have been determined and the results have been analyzed. As a typical application of the new instrument, the growth of (CO)n+ cluster ions is investigated at 80 K. The simultaneous detection of all masses of interest as a function of storage time allows one to follow in detail the kinetics of the reaction and loss processes involved. Limitations of the method are discussed together with ways to overcome them in an improved setup.

  17. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  18. Miniaturized system of a gas chromatograph coupled with a Paul ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Miniature gas chromatography (GC) and miniature mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation has been developed to identify and quantify the chemical compounds present in complex mixtures of gases. The design approach utilizes micro-GC components coupled with a Paul quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Inherent to the system are high sensitivity, good dynamic range, good QIT resolution, low GC flow-rates to minimize vacuum requirements and the need for consumables; and the use of a modular approach to adapt to volatile organic compounds dissolved in water or present in sediment. Measurements are reported on system response to gaseous species at concentrations varying over four orders of magnitude. The ability of the system to deal with complicated mixtures is demonstrated, and future improvements are discussed. The GC/QIT system described herein has a mass, volume and power that are, conservatively, one-twentieth of those of commercial off-the-shelf systems. Potential applications are to spacecraft cabin-air monitoring, robotic planetary exploration and trace-species detection for residual gas analysis and environmental monitoring.

  19. Effects of Various Interventions, Including Mass Trapping with Passive Pitfall Traps, on Low-Level Bed Bug Populations in Apartments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richard; Wang, Changlu; Singh, Narinderpal

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of various interventions on low-level bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., populations in occupied apartments. The first experiment was conducted in occupied apartments under three intervention conditions: never treated (Group I), recently treated with no further treatment (Group II), and recently treated with continued treatment (Group III). Each apartment was monitored with pitfall-style traps (interceptors) installed at beds and upholstered furniture (sleeping and resting areas) along with ∼18 additional interceptors throughout the apartment. The traps were inspected every 2 wk. After 22 wk, bed bugs had been eliminated (zero trap catch for eight consecutive weeks and none detected in visual inspections) in 96, 87, and 100% of the apartments in Groups I, II, and III, respectively. The second experiment investigated the impact of interceptors as a control measure in apartments with low-level infestations. In the treatment group, interceptors were continuously installed at and away from sleeping and resting areas and were inspected every 2 wk for 16 wk. In the control group, interceptors were placed in a similar fashion as the treatment group but were only placed during 6–8 and 14–16 wk to obtain bed bug counts. Bed bug counts were significantly lower at 8 wk in the treatment group than in the control group. At 16 wk, bed bugs were eliminated in 50% of the apartments in the treatment group. The implications of our results in the development of bed bug management strategies and monitoring protocols are discussed. PMID:26637535

  20. A new and fast image feature selection method for developing an optimal mammographic mass detection scheme

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting optimal features from a large image feature pool remains a major challenge in developing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of medical images. The objective of this study is to investigate a new approach to significantly improve efficacy of image feature selection and classifier optimization in developing a CAD scheme of mammographic masses. Methods: An image dataset including 1600 regions of interest (ROIs) in which 800 are positive (depicting malignant masses) and 800 are negative (depicting CAD-generated false positive regions) was used in this study. After segmentation of each suspicious lesion by a multilayer topographic region growth algorithm, 271 features were computed in different feature categories including shape, texture, contrast, isodensity, spiculation, local topological features, as well as the features related to the presence and location of fat and calcifications. Besides computing features from the original images, the authors also computed new texture features from the dilated lesion segments. In order to select optimal features from this initial feature pool and build a highly performing classifier, the authors examined and compared four feature selection methods to optimize an artificial neural network (ANN) based classifier, namely: (1) Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework, (2) A sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method, (3) A genetic algorithm (GA), and (4) A sequential forward selection (SFS) method. Performances of the four approaches were assessed using a tenfold cross validation method. Results: Among these four methods, SFFS has highest efficacy, which takes 3%–5% of computational time as compared to GA approach, and yields the highest performance level with the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.864 ± 0.034. The results also demonstrated that except using GA, including the new texture features computed from the dilated mass segments improved the AUC

  1. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  2. Buffer-Gas Cooling of a Single Ion in a Multipole Radio Frequency Trap Beyond the Critical Mass Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Weckesser, Pascal; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of a trapped ion immersed in a spatially localized buffer gas. For a homogeneous buffer gas, the ion's energy distribution reaches a stable equilibrium only if the mass of the buffer gas atoms is below a critical value. This limitation can be overcome by using multipole traps in combination with a spatially confined buffer gas. Using a generalized model for elastic collisions of the ion with the buffer-gas atoms, the ion's energy distribution is numerically determined for arbitrary buffer-gas distributions and trap parameters. Three regimes characterized by the respective analytic form of the ion's equilibrium energy distribution are found. Final ion temperatures down to the millikelvin regime can be achieved by adiabatically decreasing the spatial extension of the buffer gas and the effective ion trap depth (forced sympathetic cooling).

  3. Stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) ion excitation in trapped-ion mass spectometry: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Marshall, Alan G.

    1996-12-01

    Stored waveform excitation produced by inverse Fourier transformation of a specified magnitude/phase excitation spectrum offers the most general and versatile means for broadband mass-selective excitation and ejection in Penning (FT-ICR) and Paul (quadrupole) ion trap mass spectrometry. Since the last comprehensive review of SWIFT excitation in 1987, the technique has been adopted, modified, and extended widely in both the ICR and quadrupole ion trap communities. Here, we review the principles, variations, algorithms, hardware implementation, and some applications of SWIFT for both ICR and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. We show that the most desirable SWIFT waveform is that optimized to reduce both the time-domain SWIFT maximum amplitude and the amplitude near the start and end of the SWIFT waveform. We examine the "true" magnitude excitation spectrum, obtained by zero-filling and forward Fourier transforming the SWIFT time-domain waveform, in order to evaluate the trade-off between spectral magnitude uniformity and frequency (mass) selectivity. Apodization of the SWIFT waveform is optimally conducted by smoothing the excitation magnitude spectrum prior to generation of the SWIFT waveform by inverse FT. When (as for broadband ejection in a quadrupole ion trap) it is important that ions be excited near-simultaneously over a wide mass range, the phase spectrum (before inverse FT to generate the SWIFT waveform) may be overmodulated or randomly modulated ("filtered noise field"), with the recognition that very substantial non-uniformity in the "true" excitation magnitude spectrum will result.

  4. Real-Time Quantitative Analysis of H2, He, O2, and Ar by Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Harrison, W. W.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The use of a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for quantitative analysis of hydrogen and helium as well as other permanent gases is demonstrated. The customized instrument utilizes the mass selective instability mode of mass analysis as with commercial instruments; however, this instrument operates at a greater RF trapping frequency and without a buffer gas. With these differences, a useable mass range from 2 to over 50 Da is achieved, as required by NASA for monitoring the Space Shuttle during a launch countdown. The performance of the ion trap is evaluated using part-per-million concentrations of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon mixed into a nitrogen gas stream. Relative accuracy and precision when quantitating the four analytes were better than the NASA-required minimum of 10% error and 5% deviation, respectively. Limits of detection were below the NASA requirement of 25-ppm hydrogen and 100-ppm helium; those for oxygen and argon were slightly higher than the requirement. The instrument provided adequate performance at fast data recording rates, demonstrating the utility of an ion trap mass spectrometer as a real-time quantitative monitoring device for permanent gas analysis.

  5. New Evidence links Deccan Traps to the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Mass Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, T.; Keller, G.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that Deccan Trap volcanism began with a relatively minor eruption phase (~6% of total volume) during the late Maastrichtian magnetic polarity C30n. The main eruption phase (~80%) occurred over a short period in C29r just below the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) and the last Deccan phase (~14%) erupted in the early Danian C29n. Multiproxy studies from sections in Meghalaya (NE India), Jhilmili in central India (Madhya Pradesh), 6 quarry outcrops from Rajahmundry (SE India), 10 deep wells from the Krishna-Godavari Basin (K-G) (Andhra Pradesh) place the KTB mass extinction near the end of the main Deccan phase coincident with the mass extinction. These studies show that the second and third phase of eruptions each produced the world's largest and longest lava megaflows ~1500 km across India through the K-G Basin into the Bay of Bengal. These megaflows are separated by sand, silt and shale which record the mass extinction across an interval that spans zones CF1-CF2 and most of the nannofossil Micula prinsii zone and is correlative with the rapid global warming and subsequent cooling near the end of the Maastrichtian. The mass extinction began preceding the first of the four mega-flows in C29r. Planktic foraminifera suffered a 50% drop in species richness. Survivors suffered another 50% drop after the first mega-flow, leaving just 7 to 8 survivor species. No recovery occurred between the next three mega-flows and the mass extinction was complete with the last phase-2 megaflow at the KTB. The last phase of Deccan volcanism and its 3 to 4 megaflows in the early Danian C29n (zone P1b) delayed biotic recovery of marine plankton. Correlative with these intense volcanic phases, climate changed from humid/tropical to arid conditions and returned to normal tropical humidity after the last phase of volcanism. Similar environmental conditions, mass extinction and delayed recovery patterns are observed in Meghalaya, NE India.The mass extinction was

  6. A stable second-order scheme for fluid-structure interaction with strong added-mass effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Gurugubelli, Pardha S.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a stable second-order time accurate scheme for solving fluid-structure interaction problems. The scheme uses so-called Combined Field with Explicit Interface (CFEI) advancing formulation based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach with finite element procedure. Although loosely-coupled partitioned schemes are often popular choices for simulating FSI problems, these schemes may suffer from inherent instability at low structure to fluid density ratios. We show that our second-order scheme is stable for any mass density ratio and hence is able to handle strong added-mass effects. Energy-based stability proof relies heavily on the connections among extrapolation formula, trapezoidal scheme for second-order equation, and backward difference method for first-order equation. Numerical accuracy and stability of the scheme is assessed with the aid of two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems of increasing complexity. We confirm second-order temporal accuracy by numerical experiments on an elastic semi-circular cylinder problem. We verify the accuracy of coupled solutions with respect to the benchmark solutions of a cylinder-elastic bar and the Navier-Stokes flow system. To study the stability of the proposed scheme for strong added-mass effects, we present new results using the combined field formulation for flexible flapping motion of a thin-membrane structure with low mass ratio and strong added-mass effects in a uniform axial flow. Using a systematic series of fluid-structure simulations, a detailed analysis of the coupled response as a function of mass ratio for the case of very low bending rigidity has been presented.

  7. Degradation study of enniatins by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A B; Meca, G; Font, G; Ferrer, E

    2013-12-15

    Enniatins A, A1, B and B1 (ENs) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. and are normal contaminants of cereals and derivate products. In this study, the stability of ENs was evaluated during food processing by simulation of pasta cooking. Thermal treatments at different incubation times (5, 10 and 15 min) and different pH (4, 7 and 10) were applied in an aqueous system and pasta resembling system (PRS). The concentrations of the targeted mycotoxins were determined using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. High percentages of ENs reduction (81-100%) were evidenced in the PRS after the treatments at 5, 10 and 15 min of incubation. In contrast to the PRS, an important reduction of the ENs was obtained in the aqueous system after 15 min of incubation (82-100%). In general, no significant differences were observed between acid, neutral and basic solutions. Finally, several ENs degradation products were identified using the technique of liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry. PMID:23993608

  8. A new sheathless electrospray interface for coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bendahl, Lars; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Olsen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    A simple laboratory-made sheathless electrospray interface for coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ion-trap mass spectrometry (CE/MS) was developed. The interface was machined in-house and it was designed to be freely interchangeable with the commercially available ionization sources for the mass spectrometer. Sharpened fused-silica capillaries were coated with nickel by a simple electrodeless plating procedure and were used as all-in-one columns/emitters. The electrodeless plating produced a 2-5- micro m thick smooth nickel layer that lasted for more than 8 h of continuous electrospraying. The performance of the CE/MS interface was examined by using four cationic imipramine derivatives as test substances. Relative detection limits were calculated on the basis of the extracted ion electrophorograms and were in the range 6-130 nmol/L, corresponding to absolute detection limits in the range of 20-400 amol. The system was applied for analysis of impurities in an impure imipramine N-oxide preparation, and two of the impurities could be identified on the basis of online-MS(MS) spectra recorded in scan-dependent mode. PMID:12478579

  9. Planetary populations in the mass-period diagram: A statistical treatment of exoplanet formation and the role of planet traps

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2013-11-20

    The rapid growth of observed exoplanets has revealed the existence of several distinct planetary populations in the mass-period diagram. Two of the most surprising are (1) the concentration of gas giants around 1 AU and (2) the accumulation of a large number of low-mass planets with tight orbits, also known as super-Earths and hot Neptunes. We have recently shown that protoplanetary disks have multiple planet traps that are characterized by orbital radii in the disks and halt rapid type I planetary migration. By coupling planet traps with the standard core accretion scenario, we showed that one can account for the positions of planets in the mass-period diagram. In this paper, we demonstrate quantitatively that most gas giants formed at planet traps tend to end up around 1 AU, with most of these being contributed by dead zones and ice lines. We also show that a large fraction of super-Earths and hot Neptunes are formed as 'failed' cores of gas giants—this population being constituted by comparable contributions from dead zone and heat transition traps. Our results are based on the evolution of forming planets in an ensemble of disks where we vary only the lifetimes of disks and their mass accretion rates onto the host star. We show that a statistical treatment of the evolution of a large population of planetary cores caught in planet traps accounts for the existence of three distinct exoplanetary populations—the hot Jupiters, the more massive planets around r = 1 AU, and the short-period super-Earths and hot Neptunes. There are very few populations that feed into the large orbital radii characteristic of the imaged Jovian planet, which agrees with recent surveys. Finally, we find that low-mass planets in tight orbits become the dominant planetary population for low-mass stars (M {sub *} ≤ 0.7 M {sub ☉}).

  10. Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: A case study of the Deccan Traps and its global effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G.

    2012-12-01

    The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether one, or several large bolide impacts, the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) or a combination of the two were the primary mechanisms driving the environmental changes that are universally regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Recent years have seen a revolution in our understanding of interplanetary environments, LIP eruptions and their environmental effects such that the simple impact-kill scenario no longer seems an adequate explanation for the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) or any other mass extinction. The KTB is the only mass extinction associated with both impact (Chixculub) and flood basalts (Deccan Traps) and therefore an excellent case study to evaluate the potential causes and effects. Deccan eruptions likely occurred as "pulses", with some gigantic megaflows 1500 km across India and with estimated volumes >10,000 km3 that may have erupted over very short time intervals. For comparison, the largest historical basalt eruption in 1783 in Iceland (Laki) ejected some 15 km3 of lava in about a year. A single Deccan megaflow would have been equivalent to 667 Laki. The vast amount of carbon and sulphur dioxides injected into the atmosphere from just one Deccan megaflow would have been on the same order of magnitude as those estimated for the Chicxulub impact. Deccan Traps erupted in three main phases with 6% total Deccan volume in phase-1 (base C30n), 80% in phase-2 (C29r) and 14% in phase-3 (C29n). Phase-2 and phase-3 each produced four giant megaflows leading to the KTB mass extinction and the long delayed biotic recovery, respectively. Data from infra- and intertrappean sediments of these megaflows drilled in the Krishna-Godavari Basin by India's Oil and Natural Gas Corporation reveal swift and devastating

  11. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  12. Ion/molecule reactions performed in a miniature cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Riter, Leah S; Meurer, Eduardo C; Handberg, Eric S; Laughlin, Brian C; Chen, Hao; Patterson, Garth E; Eberlin, Marcos N; Cooks, R Graham

    2003-09-01

    A recently constructed miniature mass spectrometer, based on a cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer, is used to perform ion/molecule reactions in order to improve selectivity for in situ analysis of explosives and chemical warfare agent simulants. Six different reactions are explored, including several of the Eberlin reaction type (M. N. Eberlin and R. G. Cooks, Org. Mass Spectrom., 1993, 28, 679-687) as well as novel gas-phase Meerwein reactions. The reactions include (1) Eberlin transacetalization of the benzoyl, 2,2-dimethyloximinium, and 2,2-dimethylthiooximinium cations with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane to form 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolanylium cations, 2,2-dimethylamine-1,3-dioxolanylium cations and the 2,2-dimethylamin-1,3-oxathiolanylium cations, respectively; (2) Eberlin reaction of the phosphonium ion CH3P(O)OCH3+, formed from the chemical warfare agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), with 1,4-dioxane to yield the 1,3,2-dioxaphospholanium ion, a new characteristic reaction for phosphate ester detection; (3) the novel Meerwein reaction of the ion CH3P(O)OCH3+ with propylene sulfide forming 1,3,2-oxathionylphospholanium ion; (4) the Meerwein reaction of the benzoyl cation with propylene oxide and propylene sulfide to form 4-methyl-2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolane and its thio analog, respectively; (5) ketalization of the benzoyl cation with ethylene glycol to form the 2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolanylium cation; (6) addition/NO2 elimination involving benzonitrile radical cation in reaction with nitrobenzene to form an arylated nitrile, a diagnostic reaction for explosives detection and (7) simple methanol addition to the C7H7+ ion, formed by NO2 loss from the molecular ion of p-nitrotoluene to form an intact adduct. Evidence is provided that these reactions occur to give the products described and their potential analytical utility is discussed. PMID:14529016

  13. Stability and accuracy of a semi-implicit Godunov scheme for mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott F.

    2004-06-01

    Semi-implicit, Godunov-type models are adapted for solving the two-dimensional, time-dependent, mass transport equation on a geophysical scale. The method uses Van Leer's MUSCL reconstruction in conjunction with an explicit, predictor-corrector method to discretize and integrate the advection and lateral diffusion portions of the governing equation to second-order spatial and temporal accuracy. Three classical schemes are investigated for computing advection: Lax-Wendroff, Warming-Beam, and Fromm. The proposed method uses second order, centred finite differences to spatially discretize the diffusion terms. In order to improve model stability and efficiency, vertical diffusion is implicitly integrated with the Crank-Nicolson method and implicit treatment of vertical diffusion in the predictor is also examined. Semi-discrete and Von Neumann analyses are utilized to compare the stability as well as the amplitude and phase accuracy of the proposed method with other explicit and semi-implicit schemes. Some linear, two-dimensional examples are solved and predictions are compared with the analytical solutions. Computational effort is also examined to illustrate the improved efficiency of the proposed model.

  14. Design and performance of an instrument for electron impact tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy of mass/charge selected macromolecular ions stored in RF ion trap*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, Milos Lj.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.

    2016-05-01

    A new apparatus was designed, coupling an electron gun with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, to perform m/z (mass over charge) selected ion activation by electron impact for tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy. We present in detail electron tracing simulations of a 300 eV electron beam inside the ion trap, design of the mechanical parts, electron optics and electronic circuits used in the experiment. We also report examples of electron impact activation tandem mass spectra for Ubiquitin protein, Substance P and Melittin peptides, at incident electron energies in the range from 280 eV to 300 eV. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  15. Reduction of Quark Mass Scheme Dependence in B bar -> Xs gamma at the NNLL Level

    SciTech Connect

    Asatrian, H.M.; Greub, C.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurth, T.; Poghosyan, V.; /Yerevan Phys. Inst.

    2005-06-20

    The uncertainty of the theoretical prediction of the B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} branching ratio at NLL level is dominated by the charm mass renormalization scheme ambiguity. In this paper we calculate those NNLL terms which are related to the renormalization of m{sub c}, in order to get an estimate of the corresponding uncertainty at the NNLL level. We find that these terms significantly reduce (by typically a factor of two) the error on BR(B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}) induced by the definition of m{sub c}. Taking into account the experimental accuracy of around 10% and the future prospects of the B factories, we conclude that a NNLL calculation would increase the sensitivity of the observable B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} to possible new degrees of freedom beyond the SM significantly.

  16. Development of mass trapping technique for control of brinjal shoot and fruit borer, Leucinodes orbonalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Cork, A; Alam, S N; Rouf, F M A; Talekar, N S

    2005-12-01

    Locally-produced clear plastic water traps (12 cm x 14 cm base and 21 cm height) were optimized for use in large-scale mass trapping trials for control of brinjal fruit and shoot borer, Leucinodes orbonalis Guenée. Changing the shape (square and triangular) and number (two and four) of entry holes in the water trap had no significant effect on trap catch. Significantly more male moths were caught in traps treated with water containing powdered detergent than liquid detergent, light gear oil or insecticide. All water traps tested caught significantly higher numbers of moths than sticky delta traps with open sides under farmers' field conditions. Trap catches per 100 m2 were found to increase with increasing number of traps from 3 to 6 but the difference in catch between 4 and 6 traps per 100 m2 was not significant. Two small-scale replicated integrated pest management (IPM) trials were conducted consisting of the optimized water trap placed out with 10 m spacing (4 per 100 m2) and infested shoots pruned and destroyed. The first season trial had two treatments, IPM and farmers' practice in which farmers applied insecticide every two days in the peak harvest period. Overall, the percentage of healthy fruit and yields in both treatments were comparable at 53.8 and 49.6% and 20 and 19.4 tonnes per ha in the IPM and farmers' practice plots respectively. However, the initial infestations in the IPM plots (68%) were significantly higher than in farmers' practice plots (16%) due to the proximity of the nurseries used for the IPM plots to stacks of brinjal crop residues from the previous season that acted as a source of infestation. The second season's trials contained a third treatment in which IPM and farmers' practice were combined. The percent total healthy fruits harvested were 46.1, 58.6 and 69.1% respectively for the farmers' practice, farmers' practice plus IPM and IPM alone. Averaged total fruit yields were approximately 12 tonnes per ha for the farmers' practice

  17. Glass buildings on river banks as ``polarized light traps'' for mass-swarming polarotactic caddis flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriska, György; Malik, Péter; Szivák, Ildikó; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-05-01

    The caddis flies Hydropsyche pellucidula emerge at dusk from the river Danube and swarm around trees and bushes on the river bank. We document here that these aquatic insects can also be attracted en masse to the vertical glass surfaces of buildings on the river bank. The individuals lured to dark, vertical glass panes land, copulate, and remain on the glass for hours. Many of them are trapped by the partly open, tiltable windows. In laboratory choice experiments, we showed that ovipositing H. pellucidula are attracted to highly and horizontally polarized light stimulating their ventral eye region and, thus, have positive polarotaxis. In the field, we documented that highly polarizing vertical black glass surfaces are significantly more attractive to both female and male H. pellucidula than weakly polarizing white ones. Using video polarimetry, we measured the reflection-polarization characteristics of vertical glass surfaces of buildings where caddis flies swarmed. We propose that after its emergence from the river, H. pellucidula is attracted to buildings by their dark silhouettes and the glass-reflected, horizontally polarized light. After sunset, this attraction may be strengthened by positive phototaxis elicited by the buildings’ lights. The novelty of this visual ecological phenomenon is that the attraction of caddis flies to vertical glass surfaces has not been expected because vertical glass panes do not resemble the horizontal surface of waters from which these insects emerge and to which they must return to oviposit.

  18. Simulation of lean NOx trap performance with microkinetic chemistry and without mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Rich; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Chakravarthy, V. Kalyana

    2011-08-01

    A microkinetic chemical reaction mechanism capable of describing both the storage and regeneration processes in a fully formulated lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) is presented. The mechanism includes steps occurring on the precious metal, barium oxide (NO{sub x} storage), and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites of the catalyst. The complete reaction set is used in conjunction with a transient plug flow reactor code to simulate not only conventional storage/regeneration cycles with a CO/H{sub 2} reductant, but also steady flow temperature sweep experiments that were previously analyzed with just a precious metal mechanism and a steady state code. The results show that NO{sub x} storage is not negligible during some of the temperature ramps, necessitating a re-evaluation of the precious metal kinetic parameters. The parameters for the entire mechanism are inferred by finding the best overall fit to the complete set of experiments. Rigorous thermodynamic consistency is enforced for parallel reaction pathways and with respect to known data for all of the gas phase species involved. It is found that, with a few minor exceptions, all of the basic experimental observations can be reproduced with these purely kinetic simulations, i.e., without including mass-transfer limitations. In addition to accounting for normal cycling behavior, the final mechanism should provide a starting point for the description of further LNT phenomena such as desulfation and the role of alternative reductants.

  19. Glass buildings on river banks as "polarized light traps" for mass-swarming polarotactic caddis flies.

    PubMed

    Kriska, György; Malik, Péter; Szivák, Ildikó; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-05-01

    The caddis flies Hydropsyche pellucidula emerge at dusk from the river Danube and swarm around trees and bushes on the river bank. We document here that these aquatic insects can also be attracted en masse to the vertical glass surfaces of buildings on the river bank. The individuals lured to dark, vertical glass panes land, copulate, and remain on the glass for hours. Many of them are trapped by the partly open, tiltable windows. In laboratory choice experiments, we showed that ovipositing H. pellucidula are attracted to highly and horizontally polarized light stimulating their ventral eye region and, thus, have positive polarotaxis. In the field, we documented that highly polarizing vertical black glass surfaces are significantly more attractive to both female and male H. pellucidula than weakly polarizing white ones. Using video polarimetry, we measured the reflection-polarization characteristics of vertical glass surfaces of buildings where caddis flies swarmed. We propose that after its emergence from the river, H. pellucidula is attracted to buildings by their dark silhouettes and the glass-reflected, horizontally polarized light. After sunset, this attraction may be strengthened by positive phototaxis elicited by the buildings' lights. The novelty of this visual-ecological phenomenon is that the attraction of caddis flies to vertical glass surfaces has not been expected because vertical glass panes do not resemble the horizontal surface of waters from which these insects emerge and to which they must return to oviposit. PMID:18253711

  20. Evaluation of a sheathless capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionization interface on an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kriger, M.S.; Cook, K.D.; Ramsey, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    The use of small diameter fused silica capillaries has proven advantageous in several electrospray (ES) mass spectrometric (MS) applications. Enhanced sensitivity and reduced background provide very low limits of detection. Prompted by these findings, the authors have developed an improved capillary electrophoresis (CE)/ES interface and evaluated its performance on a quadrupole ion trap MS using specially prepared fused silica capillary columns. The capillary tip is tapered, then gold-coated using a proprietary process that provides physical and chemical stability. (This process will be described in a subsequent publication, following determination of its patent status by the University of Tennessee Research Corporation). Tapering focuses the electric field, enabling electrospray of highly conductive aqueous solutions prior to the onset of a corona discharge. These capillaries have been used for CE/ES without a sheath solvent, thus avoiding dilution and increased background. The gold coating is not removed from the capillary by application and removal of cellophane adhesive tape, demonstrating excellent physical adhesion. Microscopic inspection has revealed that the coating remains uncompromised when sonicated in water, methanol, ethanol, propanol, acetic acid buffer (10 mM; pH 3.5), concentrated HCl (12.1 M), or potassium hydroxide (1 M). The coating did not survive sonication in aqua regia or piranha solution (30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 1:4).

  1. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  2. Rapid determination of nicotine in urine by direct thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Ilgner, R.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of nicotine and cotinine in physiological fluids (urine, blood serum, and saliva) is widely used as a means of assessing human exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Although numerous analytical methods exist for these measurements, they generally involve extensive sample preparation which increases cost and decreases sample throughput. We report the use of thermal desorption directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) for the rapid determination of nicotine and cotinine in urine. A 1{mu}L aliquot of urine is injected into a specially designed inlet and flash vaporized directly into an ITMS through an open-split capillary restrictor interface. Isobutane chemical ionization is used to generate (M+H){sup +} ions of the analytes and collision induced dissociation is used to generate characteristic fragment ions which are used to confirm their identity. Quantification is achieved by integrating the ion current for the characteristic ions and comparing with an external working curve. Detection limits are approximately 50 pg per analyte and the sample turnaround time is approximately 3 minutes without the need for extensive sample preparation. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Characterization of impurities in tylosin using dual liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shruti; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2013-03-15

    Investigation of unknown impurities in a tylosin sample was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Separation was performed according to the recently described LC-UV method of Ashenafi et al. (2011) [14]. This method was reported to have a good selectivity as it was able to separate the four main components of tylosin from the already known and 23 unknown impurities. However, as this method uses a mobile phase with non-volatile constituents, direct characterization of these impurities using LC/MS was not possible. The impurity fractions were therefore first collected and then desalted before sending them to the MS. Identification of the impurities in the tylosin sample was performed with a quadruple ion trap (IT) MS, with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The structure of the impurities was deduced by comparing their fragmentation pattern with those of the main components of tylosin. As several peaks in the LC-UV method contained multiple compounds, using this method in total 41 new impurities were (partly) characterized. PMID:23598092

  4. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanya, Reika; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C6H12+ stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C5Hn+ (n = 7, 9), C4Hn+ (n = 5-8), C3Hn+ (n = 3-7), C2Hn+ (n = 2-6), and CH3+, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C6H12+ proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated.

  5. Electrospray liquid chromatography quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry determination of phenyl urea herbicides in water.

    PubMed

    Draper, W M

    2001-06-01

    Phenyl urea herbicides were determined in water by electrospray quadrupole ion trap liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (ES-QIT-LC-MS). Over a wide concentration range [M - H](-) and MH(+) ions were prominent in ES spectra. At high concentrations dimer and trimer ions appeared, and sodium, potassium, and ammonium adducts also were observed. In the case of isopturon, source collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation with low offset voltages increased the ion current associated with MH(+) and diminished dimer and trimer ion abundance. In the mass analyzer CID involved common pathways, for example, daughter ions of [M - H](-) resulted from loss of R(2)NH in N',N'-dialkyl ureas or loss of C(3)H(5)NO(2) (87 amu) in N'-methoxy ureas. A 2 mm (i.d.) x 15 cm C(18) reversed phase column was used for LC-MS with a linear methanol/water gradient and 0.5 mL/min flow rate. Between 1 and 100 pg/microg/L the response was highly linear with instrument detection limits ranging from <10 to 50 pg injected. Whereas the positive ES signal intensity was greater for each of the compounds except fluometuron, negative ion monitoring gave the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Analysis of spiked Colorado River water, a source high in total dissolved solids and total organic carbon, demonstrated that ES-QIT-LC-MS was routinely capable of quantitative analysis at low nanogram per liter concentrations in conjunction with a published C(18) SPE method. Under these conditions experimental method detection limits were between 8.0 and 36 ng/L, and accuracy for measurements in the 20-50 parts per trillion range was from 77 to 96%. Recoveries were slightly lower in surface water (e.g., 39-76%), possibly due to suppression of ionization. PMID:11409961

  6. Use of Early Ripening Cultivars to Avoid Infestation and Mass Trapping to Manage Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Vaccinium corymbosum (Ericales: Ericaceae).

    PubMed

    Hampton, Emily; Koski, Carissa; Barsoian, Olivia; Faubert, Heather; Cowles, Richard S; Alm, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    Use of early ripening highbush blueberry cultivars to avoid infestation and mass trapping were evaluated for managing spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura). Fourteen highbush blueberry cultivars were sampled for spotted wing drosophila infestation. Most 'Earliblue', 'Bluetta', and 'Collins' fruit were harvested before spotted wing drosophila oviposition commenced, and so escaped injury. Most fruit from 'Bluejay', 'Blueray', and 'Bluehaven' were also harvested before the first week of August, after which spotted wing drosophila activity led to high levels of blueberry infestation. In a separate experiment, damage to cultivars was related to the week in which fruit were harvested, with greater damage to fruit observed as the season progressed. Attractant traps placed within blueberry bushes increased nearby berry infestation by 5%, irrespective of cultivar and harvest date. The significant linear reduction in infestation with increasing distance from the attractant trap suggests that traps are influencing fly behavior to at least 5.5 m. Insecticides applied to the exterior of traps, compared with untreated traps, revealed that only 10-30% of flies visiting traps enter the traps and drown. Low trap efficiency may jeopardize surrounding fruits by increasing local spotted wing drosophila activity. To protect crops, traps for mass trapping should be placed in a perimeter outside fruit fields and insecticides need to be applied to the surface of traps or on nearby fruit to function as an attract-and-kill strategy. PMID:26309275

  7. Rapid screening and characterization of drug metabolites using a new quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Husser, Christophe; Zell, Manfred

    2003-02-01

    The application of a new hybrid RF/DC quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer to support drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is described. The instrument is based on a quadrupole ion path and is capable of conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as well as several high-sensitivity ion trap MS scans using the final quadrupole as a linear ion trap. Several pharmaceutical compounds, including trocade, remikiren and tolcapone, were used to evaluate the capabilities of the system with positive and negative turbo ionspray, using either information-dependent data acquisition (IDA) or targeted analysis for the screening, identification and quantification of metabolites. Owing to the MS/MS in-space configuration, quadrupole-like CID spectra with ion trap sensitivity can be obtained without the classical low mass cutoff of 3D ion traps. The system also has MS(3) capability which allows fragmentation cascades to be followed. The combination of constant neutral loss or precursor ion scan with the enhanced product ion scan was found to be very selective for identifying metabolites at the picogram level in very complex matrices. Owing to the very high cycle time and, depending on the mass range, up to eight different MS experiments could be performed simultaneously without compromising chromatographic performance. Targeted product ion analysis was found to be complementary to IDA, in particular for very low concentrations. Comparable sensitivity was found in enhanced product ion scan and selected reaction monitoring modes. The instrument is particularly suitable for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. PMID:12577280

  8. Penning trap mass measurements of {sup 99-109}Cd with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer, and implications for the rp process

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenfeldt, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Neidherr, D.; Schatz, H.; Schwarz, S.

    2009-09-15

    Penning trap mass measurements of neutron-deficient Cd isotopes {sup 99-109}Cd have been performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN, all with relative mass uncertainties below 3{center_dot}10{sup -8}. A new mass evaluation has been performed. The mass of {sup 99}Cd has been determined for the first time, which extends the region of accurately known mass values toward the doubly magic nucleus {sup 100}Sn. The implication of the results on the reaction path of the rp process in stellar x-ray bursts is discussed. In particular, the uncertainty of the abundance and the overproduction created by the rp-process for the mass A=99 are demonstrated by reducing the uncertainty of the proton-separation energy of {sup 100}InS{sub p}({sup 100}In) by a factor of 2.5.

  9. Towards the hand-held mass spectrometer: design considerations, simulation, and fabrication of micrometer-scaled cylindrical ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Riter, Leah S.; Cruz, Dolores; Austin, Daniel E.; Wu, Guangxiang; Plass, Wolfgang R.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2004-08-01

    Breakthrough improvements in simplicity and reductions in the size of mass spectrometers are needed for high-consequence fieldable applications, including error-free detection of chemical/biological warfare agents, medical diagnoses, and explosives and contraband discovery. These improvements are most likely to be realized with the reconceptualization of the mass spectrometer, rather than by incremental steps towards miniaturization. Microfabricated arrays of mass analyzers represent such a conceptual advance. A massively parallel array of micrometer-scaled mass analyzers on a chip has the potential to set the performance standard for hand-held sensors due to the inherit selectivity, sensitivity, and universal applicability of mass spectrometry as an analytical method. While the effort to develop a complete micro-MS system must include innovations in ultra-small-scale sample introduction, ion sources, mass analyzers, detectors, and vacuum and power subsystems, the first step towards radical miniaturization lies in the design, fabrication, and characterization of the mass analyzer itself. In this paper we discuss design considerations and results from simulations of ion trapping behavior for a micrometer scale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer (internal radius r0 = 1 [mu]m). We also present a description of the design and microfabrication of a 0.25 cm2 array of 106 one-micrometer CITs, including integrated ion detectors, constructed in tungsten on a silicon substrate.

  10. Single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals in an ion trap: charge and mass determination and photophysics evolution with changing mass, charge, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Howder, Collin R; Johnson, Ryan C; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-03-25

    We report measurements of fluorescence intermittency (blinking) and spectral behavior for single semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) isolated in the gas phase and discuss the effects on fluorescence of the QD charge state and heating to the point of sublimation. Core-shell CdSe/ZnS QDs were trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The mass (M) and charge (Q) were determined nondestructively, and both were followed continuously over the course of hours or days. Emission spectra of the trapped QDs are significantly red-shifted relative to the solution-phase emission from the same particles. The temperature of the trapped QDs is determined by the balance between laser heating and collisional cooling and thermal emission, and it is possible to heat the particles to remove ligands or to the point of sublimation. QDs are observed to be emissive during sublimation, for up to 85% mass loss, with emission intensity roughly proportional to the surface area. Eventually, the fluorescence quantum yield drops suddenly, and the QDs begin to blink. The method used is versatile and will allow studies of quantum dot optical properties as a function of size, ligand removal, heating, surface oxidation, and other manipulations, where these properties are continuously correlated with the mass and charge. PMID:24410129

  11. An efficient light trapping scheme based on textured conductive photonic crystal back reflector for performance improvement of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu; Fan, QiHua; Huang, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jianjun; Ni, Jian; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying

    2014-08-01

    An efficient light trapping scheme named as textured conductive photonic crystal (TCPC) has been proposed and then applied as a back-reflector (BR) in n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell. This TCPC BR combined a flat one-dimensional photonic crystal and a randomly textured surface of chemically etched ZnO:Al. Total efficiency enhancement was obtained thanks to the sufficient conductivity, high reflectivity and strong light scattering of the TCPC BR. Unwanted intrinsic losses of surface plasmon modes are avoided. An initial efficiency of 9.66% for a-Si:H solar cell was obtained with short-circuit current density of 14.74 mA/cm2, fill factor of 70.3%, and open-circuit voltage of 0.932 V.

  12. An efficient light trapping scheme based on textured conductive photonic crystal back reflector for performance improvement of amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu Huang, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jianjun Ni, Jian; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying; Fan, QiHua

    2014-08-18

    An efficient light trapping scheme named as textured conductive photonic crystal (TCPC) has been proposed and then applied as a back-reflector (BR) in n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell. This TCPC BR combined a flat one-dimensional photonic crystal and a randomly textured surface of chemically etched ZnO:Al. Total efficiency enhancement was obtained thanks to the sufficient conductivity, high reflectivity and strong light scattering of the TCPC BR. Unwanted intrinsic losses of surface plasmon modes are avoided. An initial efficiency of 9.66% for a-Si:H solar cell was obtained with short-circuit current density of 14.74 mA/cm{sup 2}, fill factor of 70.3%, and open-circuit voltage of 0.932 V.

  13. Implicit and explicit schemes for mass consistency preservation in hybrid particle/finite-volume algorithms for turbulent reactive flows

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Pavel P. Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-15

    This work addresses the issue of particle mass consistency in Large Eddy Simulation/Probability Density Function (LES/PDF) methods for turbulent reactive flows. Numerical schemes for the implicit and explicit enforcement of particle mass consistency (PMC) are introduced, and their performance is examined in a representative LES/PDF application, namely the Sandia–Sydney Bluff-Body flame HM1. A new combination of interpolation schemes for velocity and scalar fields is found to better satisfy PMC than multilinear and fourth-order Lagrangian interpolation. A second-order accurate time-stepping scheme for stochastic differential equations (SDE) is found to improve PMC relative to Euler time stepping, which is the first time that a second-order scheme is found to be beneficial, when compared to a first-order scheme, in an LES/PDF application. An explicit corrective velocity scheme for PMC enforcement is introduced, and its parameters optimized to enforce a specified PMC criterion with minimal corrective velocity magnitudes.

  14. Mass Spectrometry Parameters Optimization for the 46 Multiclass Pesticides Determination in Strawberries with Gas Chromatography Ion-Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Virgínia C.; Vera, Jose L.; Domingues, Valentina F.; Silva, Luís M. S.; Mateus, Nuno; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Multiclass analysis method was optimized in order to analyze pesticides traces by gas chromatography with ion-trap and tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of some analytical parameters on pesticide signal response was explored. Five ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS) operating parameters, including isolation time (IT), excitation voltage (EV), excitation time (ET), maximum excitation energy or " q" value (q), and isolation mass window (IMW) were numerically tested in order to maximize the instrument analytical signal response. For this, multiple linear regression was used in data analysis to evaluate the influence of the five parameters on the analytical response in the ion trap mass spectrometer and to predict its response. The assessment of the five parameters based on the regression equations substantially increased the sensitivity of IT-MS/MS in the MS/MS mode. The results obtained show that for most of the pesticides, these parameters have a strong influence on both signal response and detection limit. Using the optimized method, a multiclass pesticide analysis was performed for 46 pesticides in a strawberry matrix. Levels higher than the limit established for strawberries by the European Union were found in some samples.

  15. Linear ion-trap mass spectrometric characterization of human pituitary nitrotyrosine-containing proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xianquan; Desiderio, Dominic M.

    2007-01-01

    The nitric oxide-mediated Tyr-nitration of endogenous proteins is associated with several pathological and physiological processes. In order to investigate the presence - and potential roles - of Tyr-nitration in the human pituitary, a large-format two-dimensional gel separation plus a Western blot against a specific anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody were used to separate and detect nitroproteins from a human pituitary proteome. The nitroproteins were subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion, and high-sensitivity vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (vMALDI) linear ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry was used to analyze the tryptic peptides. Those MS/MS data were used to determine the amino acid sequence and the specific nitration site of each tryptic nitropeptide, and were matched to corresponding proteins with Bioworks TuboSEQUEST software. Compared to our previous study, 16 new nitrotyrosine-immunoreactive positive Western blot spots were found within the area pI 3.0-10 and Mr 10-100 kDa. Four new nitroproteins were discovered: the stanniocalcin 1 precursor--involved in calcium and phosphate metabolism; mitochondrial co-chaperone protein HscB, which might act as a co-chaperone in iron-sulfur cluster assembly in mitochrondria; progestin and adipoQ receptor family member III--a seven-transmembrane receptor; proteasome subunit alpha type 2--involved in an ATP/ubiquitin-dependent non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway. Those data demonstrate that nitric oxide-mediated Tyr-nitration might participate in various biochemical, metabolic, and pathological processes in the human pituitary.

  16. Characterization of the chemical composition of white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou by using high-performance ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiahui; Chen, Xiaocheng; Wu, Xin; Cao, Gang; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with amaZon SL high-performance ion trap mass spectrometry was used to analyze the target components in white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou. Twenty-one components were detected and identified in both white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou samples by using target compound analysis. Furthermore, seven new compounds in white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou were found and identified by analyzing the fragment ion behavior in the mass spectra. The established method can be expedient for the global quality investigation of complex components in herbal medicines and food. PMID:26843262

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence of Ba+ ions trapped and mass-selected in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, G Z; Vining, B A; Guan, S; Marshall, A G

    1996-01-01

    We present the design and preliminary results from a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometer developed for the direct detection of UV/visible laser-induced fluorescence of trapped, mass-selected, gas-phase ions. A 3 T superconducting magnet and an open-ended multi-section cylindrical Penning trap capture and confine ions created by electron impact or laser desorption. Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation in the presence of ion/neutral collisions cools, axializes and mass selects ions as they fill the trap. A pulsed dye laser pumped by an Nd:YAG laser provides electronic energy excitation. A Brewster window and baffles on each side of the vacuum chamber reduce the scattered light from the excitation laser. Laser-induced fluorescence is collected from mirrors and lenses and directed through a quartz window and fiber-optic bundle to a photomultiplier. The ICR and optical events are controlled by a modular ICR data station and GPIB and RS-232 interfaces. An excitation spectrum is demonstrated for atomic Ba+ ions, and should extend to laser-induced fluorescence of virtually any stable positive or negative gas-phase ions of arbitrary molecular weight: molecular or quasimolecular ions, fragment ions, adduct ions, and ions formed from ion/molecule reactions. PMID:8953788

  18. A Novel Dual-Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer Improves the Analysis of Complex Protein Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Pekar, Tonya; Blethrow, Justin D.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Russell, Jason D.; Coon, Joshua J.; Zabrouskov, Vlad

    2009-01-01

    The considerable progress in high throughput proteomics analysis via liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry over the last decade has been fueled to a large degree by continuous improvements in instrumentation. High throughput identification experiments are based on peptide sequencing and are largely accomplished through the use of tandem mass spectrometry, with ion trap and trap-based instruments having become broadly adopted analytical platforms. To satisfy increasingly demanding requirements for depth of characterization and throughput, we present a newly developed dual-pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos) that features increased sensitivity, afforded by a new source design, and demonstrates practical cycle times two times shorter than that of an LTQ XL, while improving or maintaining spectral quality for MS/MS fragmentation spectra. These improvements resulted in a substantial increase in the detection and identification of both proteins and unique peptides from the complex proteome of Caenorhabditis elegans, as compared to existing platforms. The greatly increased ion flux into the mass spectrometer in combination with improved isolation of low-abundance precursor ions resulted in increased detection of low-abundance peptides. These improvements cumulatively resulted in a substantially greater penetration into the baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) proteome compared to LTQ XL. Alternatively, faster cycle times on the new instrument allowed for higher throughput for a given depth of proteome analysis, with more peptides and proteins identified in 60 min using an LTQ Velos than in 180 min using an LTQ XL. When mass analysis was carried out with resolution in excess of 25,000 FWHM, it became possible to isotopically resolve a small intact protein and its fragments, opening possibilities for top down experiments. PMID:19689114

  19. Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Mass Spectrometer Flight Model and Future Ion Trap-Based Planetary Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R.; Pinnick, V. T.; Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Li, X.; Grubisic, A.; Getty, S.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars rover will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. MOMA combines pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) of bulk powder samples and Mars ambient laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) surface analysis, using a single ion trap MS. This dual source design enables MOMA to detect compounds over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. The structure of any detected organics may be further examined using MOMA's tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) mode. The flight model (FM) ion trap sensor and electronics have been assembled under the extremely clean and sterile conditions required by ExoMars, and have met or exceeded all performance specifications during initial functional tests. After Mars ambient thermal cycling and calibration, the FM will be delivered as a subsystem of MOMA to rover integration in mid-2016. There MOMA will join complementary rover instruments such as the Raman and MicrOmega spectrometers designed to analyze common drill samples. Following the MOMA design, linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LITMS)-based instruments are under development for future missions. LITMS adds enhanced capabilities such as precision (point-by-point) analysis of drill cores, negative ion detection, a wider mass range, and higher temperature pyrolysis with precision evolved gas analysis, while remaining highly compact and robust. Each of the capabilities of LITMS has been demonstrated on breadboard hardware. The next phase will realize an end-to-end brassboard at flight scale that will meet stringent technology readiness level (TRL) 6 criteria, indicating readiness for development toward missions to Mars, comets, asteroids, outer solar system moons, and beyond.

  20. Inclusive B-meson production at the LHC in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Kniehl, B. A.; Kramer, G.; Schienbein, I.

    2011-11-01

    We calculate the next-to-leading-order cross section for the inclusive production of B mesons in pp collisions in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach that takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e{sup +}e{sup -} data and compare our results for the transverse-momentum and rapidity distributions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with recent data from the CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC. We find good agreement, in particular, at large values of p{sub T}.

  1. Precise MS light-quark masses from lattice QCD in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbahn, Martin; Jaeger, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    We compute the conversion factors needed to obtain the MS and renormalization-group-invariant (RGI) up, down, and strange quark masses at next-to-next-to-leading order from the corresponding parameters renormalized in the recently proposed RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }renormalization schemes. This is important for obtaining the MS masses with the best possible precision from numerical lattice QCD simulations, because the customary RI{sup (')}/MOM scheme is afflicted with large irreducible uncertainties both on the lattice and in perturbation theory. We find that the smallness of the known one-loop matching coefficients is accompanied by even smaller two-loop contributions. From a study of residual scale dependences, we estimate the resulting perturbative uncertainty on the light-quark masses to be about 2% in the RI/SMOM scheme and about 3% in the RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }scheme. Our conversion factors are given in fully analytic form, for general covariant gauge and renormalization point. We provide expressions for the associated anomalous dimensions.

  2. Detection and structural characterization of glutathione-trapped reactive metabolites using liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry and mass defect filtering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshe; Ma, Li; Zhang, Haiying; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2007-11-01

    The present study was designed to apply the mass defect filter (MDF) approach to the screening and identification of reactive metabolites using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Glutathione (GSH)-trapped reactive metabolites of acetaminophen, diclofenac, carbamazepine, clozapine, p-cresol, 4-ethylphenol, and 3-methylindole in human liver microsomes (HLM) were analyzed by HPLC coupled with Orbitrap or Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Through the selective removal of all ions that fall outside of the GSH adduct MDF template windows, the processed full scan MS chromatograms displayed GSH adducts as major components with no or a few interference peaks. The accurate mass LC-MS data sets were also utilized for the elimination of false positive peaks, detection of stable oxidative metabolites with other MDF templates, and determination of metabolite molecular formulas. Compared to the neutral loss scan by a triple quadrupole instrument, the MDF approach was more sensitive and selective in screening for GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in HLM and rat bile and far more effective in detecting GSH adducts that do not afford the neutral loss of 129 Da as a significant fragmentation pathway. The GSH adduct screening capability of the MDF approach, together with the utility of accurate mass MS/MS information in structural elucidation, makes high-resolution LC-MS a useful tool for analyzing reactive metabolites. PMID:17918967

  3. A Tuning Method for Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Traps

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for tuning electrically compensated ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) traps by tracking the observed cyclotron frequency of an ion cloud at different oscillation mode amplitudes. Although we have used this method to tune the compensation voltages of a custom-built electrically compensated trap, the approach is applicable to other designs that incorporate electrical compensation. To evaluate the effectiveness of tuning, we examined the frequency shift as a function of cyclotron orbit size at different z-mode oscillation amplitudes. The cyclotron frequencies varied by ~ 12 ppm for ions with low z-mode oscillation amplitudes compared to those with high z-mode amplitudes. This frequency difference decreased to ~1 ppm by one iteration of trap tuning. PMID:20060743

  4. A differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer: a mass spectrometer capable of MS(n) experiments free from interfering reactions.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Schwartz, Jae C; Oglesbee, Rob; Carlsen, Mark; Archibold, Enada F; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2013-12-01

    A novel differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer was designed and built to facilitate tandem MS experiments free from interfering reactions. The instrument consists of two differentially pumped Thermo Scientific linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) systems that have been connected via an ion transfer octupole encased in a machined manifold. Tandem MS experiments can be performed in the front trap and then the resulting product ions can be transferred via axial ejection into the back trap for further, independent tandem MS experiments in a differentially pumped area. This approach allows the examination of consecutive collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and ion-molecule reactions without unwanted side reactions that often occur when CAD and ion-molecule reactions are examined in the same space. Hence, it greatly facilitates investigations of ion structures. In addition, the overall lower pressure of the DLQIT, as compared to commercial LQIT instruments, results in a reduction of unwanted side reactions with atmospheric contaminants, such as water and oxygen, in CAD and ion-molecule experiments. PMID:24171553

  5. Determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula by liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Han, Chao; Liu, Bin; Lin, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Xiujin; Wang, Chengjun; Zhu, Zhenou

    2014-02-01

    A simple, precise, accurate, and validated liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula samples. Following ultrasonic extraction with methanol/water (1:1, vol/vol), and clean-up on an HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge (Waters Corp., Milford, MA), samples were separated on a Waters XSelect HSS T3 column (150 × 2.1-mm i.d., 5-μm film thickness; Waters Corp.), with 0.1% formic acid solution-acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. Quantification of the target was performed by the internal standard approach, using isotopically labeled compounds for each chemical group, to correct matrix effects. Data acquisition was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring transitions mode, monitoring 2 multiple reaction monitoring transitions to ensure an accurate identification of target compounds in the samples. Additional identification and confirmation of target compounds were performed using the enhanced product ion modus of the linear ion trap. The novel liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry platform offers the best sensitivity and specificity for characterization and quantitative determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula and fulfills the quality criteria for routine laboratory application. PMID:24359823

  6. U-Pb geochronology of the Deccan Traps and relation to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, Blair; Samperton, Kyle M.; Eddy, Michael P.; Keller, Gerta; Adatte, Thierry; Bowring, Samuel A.; Khadri, Syed F. R.; Gertsch, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Despite the growing number of mass extinction events correlated with large igneous provinces, the mechanisms by which volcanic eruptions can lead to ecosystem collapse and biologic turnover remain poorly understood. A better understanding of these events requires high-resolution timelines for volcanic outpourings, geochemical and isotopic proxy records, and biostratigraphic data that cover the extinction and recovery intervals. It has long been known that the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event broadly correlates with the eruption of the Deccan Traps, but high-precision geochronology from these basalts has remained elusive, despite the role the traps could have played in ecosystem decline and recovery and the importance of assessing their timing relative to the Chicxulub impact event. We have applied high-precision U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS geochronology to rocks from within the Deccan Traps that constrain the onset and termination of the main phase of volcanism. Because of the rarity of zircon in basalt, dated material includes both in situ zircon-bearing segregation veins within basalt flows and also volcanic ash beds found between individual basalt flows. The latter likely derive from distant, higher-Si explosive volcanic vents during periods of basaltic quiescence. We show that the duration of the main phase of the Deccan, which included >1.1 million cubic km of basalt, erupted in ~750 kyr and began ~250 kyr prior to recently published dates [1] for the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event. When combined with published paleomagnetic data from the Deccan traps [2,3], our data place the main phase of Deccan eruptions precisely within the geomagnetic polarity timescale and thus permit correlation of their onset with other stratigraphic records that lack geochronology. Our ages improve on the precision of existing geochronology for the Deccan Traps by 1-2 orders of magnitude and are a crucial starting point for more quantitative estimates of volcanic gas

  7. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-06-14

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets [I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas [2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study [3] has been

  8. An online FT-ICR Penning-trap mass spectrometer for the DPS2-F section of the KATRIN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, M.; Ascher, P.; Cakirli, R. B.; Golzke, H.; Rodríguez, D.; Stahl, S.; Ubieto-Díaz, M.; Blaum, K.

    2014-09-01

    Two Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) Penning-trap mass spectrometers will be installed in the pumping section of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment. This experiment aims at determining the electron anti-neutrino mass m(νebar) with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV (90% C.L.) by high-resolution tritium β-spectroscopy. The tritium source creates various types of ions, which have to be reduced in order to reach the required low background level. The purpose of the FT-ICR mass spectrometers is the identification of the ion flux components as well as their abundance. Furthermore, the pumping efficiency of the differential pumping section DPS2-F can be determined since these Penning traps will be installed one at the entrance and one at the exit. In this paper the operation of the FT-ICR system is described. Experimental results are presented concerning the cryogenic broad-band amplifier system for the FT-ICR detection as well as the characterisation of the mass spectrometer with respect to, e.g., noise density and detection limit.

  9. ANALYSIS FOR B-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS IN KIDNEY TISSUE BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION AND SELECTIVE REACTION MONITORING/TANDEM ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven B-lactams antibiotics were analyzed in fortified and incurred beef kidney tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography/selective reaction monitoring/tandem ion trap mass spectrometry. The analytes included: deacetylcephapirin, amoxicillin, cephapirin, desfuroylceftiofur cysteine disul...

  10. Early detection and mass trapping of frankliniella occidentalis and thrips tabaci in vegetable crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande and onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman, are economic pest insects of head lettuce, Lactuca sativa L. and dehydrator onions, Allium cepa L., in the Imperial Valley, California. Sticky traps were evaluated as potential detection and monitor...

  11. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Scheme for Distinguishing Between Benign and Malignant Masses in Breast DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Honda, Emi; Nakayama, Ryohei; Koyama, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Akiyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for distinguishing between benign and malignant breast masses in dynamic contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Our database consisted 90 DCE-MRI examinations, each of which contained four sequential phase images; this database included 28 benign masses and 62 malignant masses. In our CAD scheme, we first determined 11 objective features of masses by taking into account the image features and the dynamic changes in signal intensity that experienced radiologists commonly use for describing masses in DCE-MRI. Quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) was employed to distinguish between benign and malignant masses. As the input of the QDA, a combination of four objective features was determined among the 11 objective features according to a stepwise method. These objective features were as follows: (i) the change in signal intensity from 2 to 5 min; (ii) the change in signal intensity from 0 to 2 min; (iii) the irregularity of the shape; and (iv) the smoothness of the margin. Using this approach, the classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were shown to be 85.6 % (77 of 90), 87.1 % (54 of 62), and 82.1 % (23 of 28), respectively. Furthermore, the positive and negative predictive values were 91.5 % (54 of 59) and 74.2 % (23 of 31), respectively. Our CAD scheme therefore exhibits high classification accuracy and is useful in the differential diagnosis of masses in DCE-MRI images. PMID:26691512

  12. Earth history. U-Pb geochronology of the Deccan Traps and relation to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Schoene, Blair; Samperton, Kyle M; Eddy, Michael P; Keller, Gerta; Adatte, Thierry; Bowring, Samuel A; Khadri, Syed F R; Gertsch, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Chicxulub asteroid impact (Mexico) and the eruption of the massive Deccan volcanic province (India) are two proposed causes of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, which includes the demise of nonavian dinosaurs. Despite widespread acceptance of the impact hypothesis, the lack of a high-resolution eruption timeline for the Deccan basalts has prevented full assessment of their relationship to the mass extinction. Here we apply uranium-lead (U-Pb) zircon geochronology to Deccan rocks and show that the main phase of eruptions initiated ~250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary and that >1.1 million cubic kilometers of basalt erupted in ~750,000 years. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Deccan Traps contributed to the latest Cretaceous environmental change and biologic turnover that culminated in the marine and terrestrial mass extinctions. PMID:25502315

  13. U-Pb geochronology of the Deccan Traps and relation to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, Blair; Samperton, Kyle M.; Eddy, Michael P.; Keller, Gerta; Adatte, Thierry; Bowring, Samuel A.; Khadri, Syed F. R.; Gertsch, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Chicxulub asteroid impact (Mexico) and the eruption of the massive Deccan volcanic province (India) are two proposed causes of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, which includes the demise of nonavian dinosaurs. Despite widespread acceptance of the impact hypothesis, the lack of a high-resolution eruption timeline for the Deccan basalts has prevented full assessment of their relationship to the mass extinction. Here we apply uranium-lead (U-Pb) zircon geochronology to Deccan rocks and show that the main phase of eruptions initiated ~250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary and that >1.1 million cubic kilometers of basalt erupted in ~750,000 years. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Deccan Traps contributed to the latest Cretaceous environmental change and biologic turnover that culminated in the marine and terrestrial mass extinctions.

  14. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  15. Incorporation of the Mass Concentration and the New Snow Albedo Schemes into the Global Forecasting Model, GEOS-5 and the Impact of the New Schemes over Himalayan Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasunari, Teppei

    2012-01-01

    Recently the issue on glacier retreats comes up and many factors should be relevant to the issue. The absorbing aerosols such as dust and black carbon (BC) are considered to be one of the factors. After they deposited onto the snow surface, it will reduce snow albedo (called snow darkening effect) and probably contribute to further melting of glacier. The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) has developed at NASA/GSFC. However, the original snowpack model used in the land surface model in the GEOS-5 did not consider the snow darkening effect. Here we developed the new snow albedo scheme which can consider the snow darkening effect. In addition, another scheme on calculating mass concentrations on the absorbing aerosols in snowpack was also developed, in which the direct aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model in the GEOS-5 were used. The scheme has been validated with the observed data obtained at backyard of the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, by Dr. Teruo Aoki (Meteorological Research Institute) et aL including me. The observed data was obtained when I was Ph.D. candidate. The original GEOS-5during 2007-2009 over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau region showed more reductions of snow than that of the new GEOS-5 because the original one used lower albedo settings. On snow cover fraction, the new GEOS-5 simulated more realistic snow-covered area comparing to the MODIS snow cover fraction. The reductions on snow albedo, snow cover fraction, and snow water equivalent were seen with statistically significance if we consider the snow darkening effect comparing to the results without the snow darkening effect. In the real world, debris cover, inside refreezing process, surface flow of glacier, etc. affect glacier mass balance and the simulated results immediately do not affect whole glacier retreating. However, our results indicate that some surface melting over non debris covered parts of the glacier would be

  16. Collection method for chemical particulates on surfaces with detection using thermal desorption-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing, K J; Gibson, D; Sanghera, J; Miklos, F

    2013-05-01

    Successful analysis of particulate/low vapor pressure analytes such as explosives and toxic chemicals, and commercial pesticides require new sampling tools that enable detection of these analytes using current vapor phase detection instruments. We describe a sampling approach that uses stainless steel screens coated with a sticky polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) coating to capture particulates from surfaces. Preliminary results for the collection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) sorbed onto silica gel (SG) particulates (DMMP/SG) from a surface with subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometry (TD-CITMS) are reported. PMID:23601282

  17. Precision Penning Trap Mass Spectrometry of ^32S, ^84,86Kr and ^129,132Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redshaw, Matthew

    2005-05-01

    Using a phase coherent technique to measure the cyclotron frequency of single ions in a Penning trap [1], we have performed mass measurements on ^32S and the two most abundant krypton and xenon isotopes ^84Kr, ^86Kr, ^ 129Xe and ^132Xe, to relative precisions of 0.1 ppb. This is a factor of ˜10-100 improvement in precision over current values [2]. [1] M.P. Bradley, J.V. Porto, S. Rainville, J.K. Thompson, and D.E. Pritchard, PRL 83, 4510 (1999). [2] G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl Phys A729, 337 (2003).

  18. High Pressure Mass Spectrometry: The Generation of Mass Spectra at Operating Pressures Exceeding 1 Torr in a Microscale Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Kenion H; Wolfe, Derek W; Cavanaugh, Craig A; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    We present the first demonstration of high pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS), which we define as mass spectrometry performed at pressures greater than 100 mTorr. Mass analysis is shown at operational pressures exceeding 1 Torr of helium buffer gas. A differentially pumped MS system was constructed for HPMS development consisting of two chambers. The first chamber (mass analysis chamber) was operated at pressures up to 1.2 Torr and contained the ionization source and a microscale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. The CIT had critical dimensions of r0 = 500 μm and z0 = 650 μm. The second chamber was held at a lower pressure (≤10 mTorr) and contained an electron multiplier for detection. Mass spectra for xenon, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and octane were acquired with helium buffer gas pressures ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 Torr in the mass analysis chamber. Full-width at half-maximum of mass spectral peaks was found to increase 143% for xenon, 40% for CEES, and 77% for octane over this pressure range, with maximum peak widths of 1.19, 1.26, and 0.82 Da, respectively. Data were fitted with an algebraic model that factors in ion-neutral collision peak broadening effects at high pressures. Experimental and theoretical peak broadening slopes showed good agreement at buffer gas pressures greater than 0.2 Torr. Experiments presented here demonstrate mass spectrometry at pressures orders of magnitude higher than conventionally practiced with any type of mass analyzer. The use of HPMS provides a way to eliminate turbo pumping requirements, leading to significant reduction in MS system size, weight, and power and facilitating a path toward compact/hand-held mass spectrometers with numerous potential applications. PMID:27109864

  19. A Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Quantitative Analysis of Nitrogen-Purged Compartments within the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Helms, William R.; Yost, Richard A.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To enter orbit, the Space Shuttle burns 1.8 million liters of liquid hydrogen combined with 0.8 million liters of liquid oxygen through three rocket engines mounted in the aft. NASA monitors the nitrogen-purged aft compartment for increased levels of hydrogen or oxygen in order to detect and determine the severity of a cryogenic fuel leak. Current monitoring is accomplished with a group of mass spectrometer systems located as much as 400 feet away from the Shuttle. It can take up to 45 seconds for gas to reach the mass spectrometer, which precludes monitoring for leaks in the final moments before liftoff (the orbiter engines are started at T-00:06 seconds). To remedy the situation, NASA is developing a small rugged mass spectrometer to be used as point-sensors around the Space Shuttle. As part of this project, numerous mass analyzer technologies are being investigated. Presented here are the preliminary results for one such technology, quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QITMS). A compact QITMS system has been developed in-house at the University of Florida for monitoring trace levels of four primary gases, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and argon, all in a nitrogen background. Since commercially available QITMS systems are incapable of mass analysis at m/z(exp 2), the home-built system is preferred for the evaluation of QITMS technology.

  20. Comparison of liquid chromatography using triple quadrupole and quadrupole ion trap mass analyzers to determine pesticide residues in oranges.

    PubMed

    Soler, Carla; Mañes, Jordi; Picó, Yolanda

    2005-03-01

    Liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole/mass spectrometry (LC-TQ/MS) and liquid chromatography-quadrupole ion trap/mass spectrometry (LC-QIT/MS) for determining bupirimate, hexaflumuron, tebufenpyrad, buprofezin, pyriproxyfen, and fluvalinate in fruits have been compared. The differences in the mass spectra obtained by triple and ion trap quadrupoles are discussed, showing how both of them provide interesting features. The evaluation of the two instruments was carried out by ethyl acetate extraction of oranges spiked with the studied pesticides at LOQ and 10 times the LOQ. Results obtained by LC-TQ/MS correlated well with those obtained by LC-QIT/MS. Recoveries were 70-94% by LC-TQ/MS and 72-92% by LC-QIT/MS with the R.S.D. from five replicate analysis 4-14% and 8-18%, respectively. Matrix effects were tested for both techniques by standard addition to blank extracts. Although the matrix effects are not originated in mass analyzer but in the LC/MS interface, they were, generally, more marked by LC-QIT-MS than by LC-TQ/MS. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.005-0.2 mg kg(-1) by both equipments--appropriate values for determining these pesticides in orange from the regulatory point of view. The results indicate that the TQ provides higher precision, better linearity, it is more robust, and when the purpose of the analysis is quantitative determination, preferable over the QIT. However, the application of both mass spectrometers to analyze orange samples conventionally treated showed that any can be used for qualitative and quantitative purposes. PMID:15844516

  1. A new Fourier transform based CBIR scheme for mammographic mass classification: a preliminary invariance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Tan, Maxine; Qui, Yuchen; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a new content-based image retrieval (CBIR) scheme that enables to achieve higher reproducibility when it is implemented in an interactive computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system without significantly reducing lesion classification performance. This is a new Fourier transform based CBIR algorithm that determines image similarity of two regions of interest (ROI) based on the difference of average regional image pixel value distribution in two Fourier transform mapped images under comparison. A reference image database involving 227 ROIs depicting the verified soft-tissue breast lesions was used. For each testing ROI, the queried lesion center was systematically shifted from 10 to 50 pixels to simulate inter-user variation of querying suspicious lesion center when using an interactive CAD system. The lesion classification performance and reproducibility as the queried lesion center shift were assessed and compared among the three CBIR schemes based on Fourier transform, mutual information and Pearson correlation. Each CBIR scheme retrieved 10 most similar reference ROIs and computed a likelihood score of the queried ROI depicting a malignant lesion. The experimental results shown that three CBIR schemes yielded very comparable lesion classification performance as measured by the areas under ROC curves with the p-value greater than 0.498. However, the CBIR scheme using Fourier transform yielded the highest invariance to both queried lesion center shift and lesion size change. This study demonstrated the feasibility of improving robustness of the interactive CAD systems by adding a new Fourier transform based image feature to CBIR schemes.

  2. Determination of pesticides associated with suspended sediments in the San Joaquin River, California, USA, using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Baston, D.S.; Crepeau, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical method useful for the quantification of a range of pesticides and pesticide degradation products associated with suspended sediments was developed by testing a variety of extraction and cleanup schemes. The final extraction and cleanup methods chosen for use are suitable for the quantification of the listed pesticides using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and the removal of interfering coextractable organic material found in suspended sediments. Methylene chloride extraction followed by Florisil cleanup proved most effective for separation of coextractives from the pesticide analytes. Removal of elemental sulfur was accomplished with tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfite. The suitability of the method for the analysis of a variety of pesticides was evaluated, and the method detection limits (MDLs) were determined (0.1-6.0 ng/g dry weight of sediment) for 21 compounds. Recovery of pesticides dried onto natural sediments averaged 63%. Analysis of duplicate San Joaquin River suspended-sediment samples demonstrated the utility of the method for environmental samples with variability between replicate analyses lower than between environmental samples. Eight of 21 pesticides measured were observed at concentrations ranging from the MDL to more than 80 ng/g dry weight of sediment and exhibited significant temporal variability. Sediment-associated pesticides, therefore, may contribute to the transport of pesticides through aquatic systems and should be studied separately from dissolved pesticides.

  3. Tandem-in-space and tandem-in-time mass spectrometry: Triple quadrupoles and quadrupole ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.V.; Yost, R.A. ); Kelley, P.E.; Bradford, D.C. )

    1990-10-15

    Tandem-in-time and tandem-in-space MS/MS on quadrupole ion trap (ITMS) and triple quadrupole (TQMS) tandem mass spectrometers, respectively, were compared by evaluating the MS/MS daughter spectra, efficiencies of collision-induced dissociation (CID), limits of detection, and dynamic ranges obtained for the methane positive chemical ionization (PCI)-CID of two alkylphosphonates. Although the yield of daughter ions is dependent upon a number of instrumental parameters on both instruments, with judicious selection of parameters the ITMS and TQMS both yielded daughter ions of similar relative abundances. The ITMS had greater efficiencies of fragmentation, collection, and mass selection and transmission of the daughter ions to the detector. With PCI-MS/MS analysis of diisopropyl methylphosphonate standards introduced via capillary gas chromatography, full daughter spectra could be obtained for as little as 15 pg and 1.5 ng injected for the ITMS and the TQMS, respectively.

  4. Analysis of environmental contaminates in hair using an ion trap mass spectrometer with a filtered noise field waveboard

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Hulsey, S.S.; Frantz, C.E.; Andresen, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    A variety of methods have been established using mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of chemicals in hair. Much of this past work has been focused on the detection of drugs of abuse. Human hair has been analyzed either directly by probe distillation (DIP) with some preliminary clean-up using HPLC or solid phase extraction (SPE). However, established drug analysis methods do not apply for the detection of some environmental contaminates. In this study, the authors selected 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and malathion as the target compounds. In addition two types of hair samples were analyzed: (1) human hair fortified with either TNT or malathion and (2) hair from mice who ingested the same analytes. The analytical method was DIP-EI-MS/MS with an ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a filtered noise field wave board.

  5. Direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry for aroma analysis: Speed, sensitivity and resolution of isobaric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jublot, Lionel; Linforth, Robert S. T.; Taylor, Andrew J.

    2005-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) sources were developed for real time analysis of volatile release from foods using an ion trap (IT) mass spectrometer (MS). Key objectives were spectral simplicity (minimal fragmentation), response time and signal to noise ratio. The benefits of APCI-IT-MS were assessed by comparing the performance for in vivo and headspace analyses with that obtained using APCI coupled to a quadrupole mass analyser. Using MS-MS, direct APCI-IT-MS was able to differentiate mixtures of some C6 and terpene isobaric aroma compounds. Resolution could be achieved for some compounds by monitoring specific secondary ions. Direct resolution was also achieved with two of the three isobaric compounds released from chocolate with time as the sample was eaten.

  6. Rapid analysis of animal drug residues by microcolumn solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption-ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-11-01

    A new approach was developed for the rapid and quantitative determination of an anthelmintic drug, phenothiazine, in milk. The technique involves a simple extraction procedure using a C{sub 18} microcolumn disc, followed by thermal desorption of the analyte from the disc directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer. The compounds are selectively ionized by isobutane chemical ionization and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. With this approach, 10 ppb detection limits were achieved with as little as 100 {mu}L mild and only 10 min of analysis time. This approach was used to analyze samples of milk taken from a cow administered a one-time therapeutic dose of phenothiazine. The target compound could be detected at 56 post-dosage, corresponding to a concentration of 30 ppb. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. An electrodynamic ion funnel interface for greater sensitivity and higher throughput with linear ion trap mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-09-01

    An electrospray ionization interface incorporating an electrodynamic ion funnel has been designed and implemented on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, LTQ). We found ion transmission to be greatly improved by replacing the standard capillary-skimmer interface with the capillary-ion funnel interface. An infusion study using a serial dilution of a reserpine solution showed that ion injection (accumulation) times to fill the ion trap at a given automatic gain control (AGC) target value were reduced by ~90% which resulted in an ~10-fold increase in peak intensities. In liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) experiments performed using a global protein digest sample from the bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis, more peptides and proteins were identified when the ion funnel interface was used in place of the standard interface. This improvement was most pronounced at lower sample concentrations, where extended ion accumulation times are required, resulting in an ~2-fold increase in the number of protein identifications. Implementation of the ion funnel interface on a LTQ Fourier transform (FT) mass spectrometer showed a ~25-50% reduction in spectrum acquisition time. The duty cycle improvement in this case was due to the ion accumulation event contributing a larger portion to the total spectrum acquisition time.

  8. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  9. Sympathetic cooling of a mass-mismatched two-ion chain in a double-well trap potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro

    2011-05-15

    Sympathetic cooling of two-ion system, in which one is laser-cooled and the other is sympathetically cooled and their masses are mismatched, in a linear rf trap with a double-well potential is proposed. The double-well potential consists of two wells, and there is one ion in each well. The axial frequencies of the two wells and the spatial interval between them are experimentally controllable. By theoretical analysis, the normal modes of the small oscillations around the equilibrium are derived, and a measure of the sympathetic cooling rate is obtained. As a result, it is found that the sympathetic cooling rate is fast when the frequency of the axial motion of the sympathetically cooled ion is close to that of the laser-cooled ion. In the double-well potential, the sympathetic cooling rate of the ion species whose mass is much heavier or lighter than that of the laser-cooled ion can be fast. The sympathetic cooling rate of C{sub 60}{sup +} by the laser-cooled Ba{sup +} in the double-well potential is estimated to be about 80 times faster than in the conventional setup. The double-well potential may be made by the microfabricated electrode configuration or by the optical dipole force trap.

  10. Potential of needle trap microextraction-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for measurement of atmospheric volatile compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijó Barreira, Luís Miguel; Xue, Yu; Duporté, Geoffroy; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Hartonen, Kari; Jussila, Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a key role in atmospheric chemistry and physics. They participate in photochemical reactions in the atmosphere, which have direct implications on climate through, e.g. aerosol particle formation. Forests are important sources of VOCs, and the limited resources and infrastructures often found in many remote environments call for the development of portable devices. In this research, the potential of needle trap microextraction and portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the study of VOCs at forest site was evaluated. Measurements were performed in summer and autumn 2014 at the Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations (SMEAR II) in Hyytiälä, Finland. During the first part of the campaign (summer) the applicability of the developed method was tested for the determination of monoterpenes, pinonaldehyde, aldehydes, amines and anthropogenic compounds. The temporal variation of aerosol precursors was determined, and evaluated against temperature and aerosol number concentration data. The most abundant monoterpenes, pinonaldehyde and aldehydes were successfully measured, their relative amounts being lower during days when particle number concentration was higher. Ethylbenzene, p- and m-xylene were also found when wind direction was from cities with substantial anthropogenic activity. An accumulation of VOCs in the snow cover was observed in the autumn campaign. Results demonstrated the successful applicability of needle trap microextraction and portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid in situ determination of organic gaseous compounds in the atmosphere.