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Sample records for mass-spectrometry pipeline identifies

  1. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    The comprehensive MS analysis of the peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and its utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation and related platforms, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however, an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we began by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines, including MS-GF+, SEQUEST, and MS-Align+, for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our results demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing data for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage. Taken together, we propose an optimized informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT tag) approaches for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  2. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-26

    Comprehensive MS analysis of peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and their utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we set off by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines including MS-GF+, SEQUEST and MS-Align+ for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our result demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from the MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing value for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage than AMT. Taken together, we propose an optimal informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT) for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  3. From Raw Data to Biological Discoveries: A Computational Analysis Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development.

  4. From raw data to biological discoveries: a computational analysis pipeline for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26002791

  5. Mass spectrometry identifies multiple organophosphorylated sites on tubulin

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, Hasmik Schopfer, Lawrence M. Peeples, Eric S. Duysen, Ellen G. Grigoryan, Marine Thompson, Charles M. Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-10-15

    Acute toxicity of organophosphorus poisons (OP) is explained by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in nerve synapses. Low-dose effects are hypothesized to result from modification of other proteins, whose identity is not yet established. The goal of the present work was to obtain information that would make it possible to identify tubulin as a target of OP exposure. Tubulin was selected for study because live mice injected with a nontoxic dose of a biotinylated organophosphorus agent appeared to have OP-labeled tubulin in brain as determined by binding to avidin beads and mass spectrometry. The experiments with live mice were not conclusive because binding to avidin beads could be nonspecific. To be convincing, it is necessary to find and characterize the OP-labeled tubulin peptide. The search for OP-labeled tubulin peptides was begun by identifying residues capable of making a covalent bond with OP. Pure bovine tubulin (0.012 mM) was treated with 0.01-0.5 mM chlorpyrifos oxon for 24 h at 37 {sup o}C in pH 8.3 buffer. The identity of labeled amino acids and percent labeling was determined by mass spectrometry. Chlorpyrifos oxon bound covalently to tyrosines 83, 103, 108, 161, 224, 262, 272, 357, and 399 in bovine alpha tubulin, and to tyrosines 50, 51, 59, 106, 159, 281, 310, and 340 in bovine beta tubulin. The most reactive were tyrosine 83 in alpha and tyrosine 281 in beta tubulin. In the presence of 1 mM GTP, percent labeling increased 2-fold. Based on the crystal structure of the tubulin heterodimer (PDB 1jff) tyrosines 83 and 281 are well exposed to solvent. In conclusion seventeen tyrosines in tubulin have the potential to covalently bind chlorpyrifos oxon. These results will be useful when searching for OP-labeled tubulin in live animals.

  6. Mass spectrometry identifies multiple organophosphorylated sites on tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Hasmik; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Peeples, Eric S.; Duysen, Ellen G.; Grigoryan, Marine; Thompson, Charles M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    Acute toxicity of organophosphorus poisons (OP) is explained by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in nerve synapses. Low dose effects are hypothesized to result from modification of other proteins, whose identity is not yet established. The goal of the present work was to obtain information that would make it possible to identify tubulin as a target of OP exposure. Tubulin was selected for study because live mice injected with a nontoxic dose of a biotinylated organophosphorus agent appeared to have OP-labeled tubulin in brain as determined by binding to avidin beads and mass spectrometry. The experiments with live mice were not conclusive because binding to avidin beads could be nonspecific. To be convincing, it is necessary to find and characterize the OP-labeled tubulin peptide. The search for OP-labeled tubulin peptides was begun by identifying residues capable of making a covalent bond with OP. Pure bovine tubulin (0.012 mM) was treated with 0.01–0.5 mM chlorpyrifos oxon for 24 h at 37 °C in pH 8.3 buffer. The identity of labeled amino acids and percent labeling was determined by mass spectrometry. Chlorpyrifos oxon bound covalently to tyrosines 83, 103, 108, 161, 224, 262, 272, 357, and 399 in bovine alpha tubulin, and to tyrosines 50, 51, 59, 106, 159, 281, 310, and 340 in bovine beta tubulin. The most reactive were tyrosine 83 in alpha and tyrosine 281 in beta tubulin. In the presence of 1 mM GTP, percent labeling increased 2-fold. Based on the crystal structure of the tubulin heterodimer (PDB 1jff) tyrosines 83 and 281 are well exposed to solvent. In conclusion seventeen tyrosines in tubulin have the potential to covalently bind chlorpyrifos oxon. These results will be useful when searching for OP-labeled tubulin in live animals. PMID:19632257

  7. Identifying Metabolic Subpopulations from Population Level Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism underlies many important cellular decisions, such as the decisions to proliferate and differentiate, and defects in metabolic signaling can lead to disease and aging. In addition, metabolic heterogeneity can have biological consequences, such as differences in outcomes and drug susceptibilities in cancer and antibiotic treatments. Many approaches exist for characterizing the metabolic state of a population of cells, but technologies for measuring metabolism at the single cell level are in the preliminary stages and are limited. Here, we describe novel analysis methodologies that can be applied to established experimental methods to measure metabolic variability within a population. We use mass spectrometry to analyze amino acid composition in cells grown in a mixture of 12C- and 13C-labeled sugars; these measurements allow us to quantify the variability in sugar usage and thereby infer information about the behavior of cells within the population. The methodologies described here can be applied to a large range of metabolites and macromolecules and therefore have the potential for broad applications. PMID:26986964

  8. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes. PMID:27408918

  9. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  10. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, André C; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[(18)O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  11. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  12. Identifying mutated proteins secreted by colon cancer cell lines using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mathivanan, Suresh; Ji, Hong; Tauro, Bow J; Chen, Yuan-Shou; Simpson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Secreted proteins encoded by mutated genes (mutant proteins) are a particularly rich source of biomarkers being not only components of the cancer secretome but also actually implicated in tumorigenesis. One of the challenges of proteomics-driven biomarker discovery research is that the bulk of secreted mutant proteins cannot be identified directly and quantified by mass spectrometry due to the lack of mutated peptide information in extant proteomics databases. Here we identify, using an integrated genomics and proteomics strategy (referred to iMASp - identification of Mutated And Secreted proteins), 112 putative mutated tryptic peptides (corresponding to 57 proteins) in the collective secretomes derived from a panel of 18 human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Central to this iMASp was the creation of Human Protein Mutant Database (HPMD), against which experimentally-derived secretome peptide spectra were searched. Eight of the identified mutated tryptic peptides were confirmed by RT-PCR and cDNA sequencing of RNA extracted from those CRC cells from which the mutation was identified by mass spectrometry. The iMASp technology promises to improve the link between proteomics and genomic mutation data thereby providing an effective tool for targeting tryptic peptides with mutated amino acids as potential cancer biomarker candidates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22796352

  13. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verrastro, Ivan; Pasha, Sabah; Tveen Jensen, Karina; Pitt, Andrew R.; Spickett, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs) of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease. PMID:25874603

  14. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-01

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. PMID:27543028

  15. New partners and phosphorylation sites of focal adhesion kinase identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Maria del Mar; Armendáriz, Beatriz G; Soriano, Eduardo; Ureña, Jesús Mariano; Burgaya, Ferran

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) involves phosphorylation and multiple interactions with other signaling proteins. Some of these pathways are relevant for nervous system functions such as branching, axonal guidance, and plasticity. In this study, we screened mouse brain to identify FAK-interactive proteins and phosphorylatable residues as a first step to address the neuronal functions of this kinase. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified new phosphorylated sites (Thr 952, Thr 1048, and Ser 1049), which lie in the FAT domain; and putative new partners for FAK, which include cytoskeletal proteins such as drebrin and MAP 6, adhesion regulators such as neurabin-2 and plakophilin 1, and synapse-associated proteins such as SynGAP and a NMDA receptor subunit. Our findings support the participation of brain-localized FAK in neuronal plasticity. PMID:27033120

  16. Combinatorial Library Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Valuable Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia A; Giudicessi, Silvana L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Saavedra, Soledad L; Acosta, Gerardo; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial library screening coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is a practical approach to identify useful peptides. Cyclic peptides can have high biological activity, selectivity, and affinity for target proteins, and high stability against proteolytic degradation. Here we describe two strategies to prepare combinatorial libraries suitable for MS analysis to accelerate the discovery of cyclic peptide structures. Both approaches use ChemMatrix resin and the linker 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid. One strategy involves the synthesis of a one-bead-two-peptides library in which each bead contains both the cyclic peptide and its linear counterpart to facilitate MS analysis. The other protocol is based on the synthesis of a cyclic depsipeptide library in which a glycolamidic ester group is incorporated by adding glycolic acid. After library screening, the ring is opened and the peptide is released simultaneously for subsequent MS analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27258690

  17. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  18. Proteins that bind regulatory regions identified by histone modification chromatin immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Erik; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Moen, Maaike J.; Signorile, Luca; Dekkers, Dick H. W.; Demmers, Jeroen; Kockx, Christel E. M.; Ozgür, Zehila; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; van den Berg, Debbie L. C.; Poot, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    The locations of transcriptional enhancers and promoters were recently mapped in many mammalian cell types. Proteins that bind those regulatory regions can determine cell identity but have not been systematically identified. Here we purify native enhancers, promoters or heterochromatin from embryonic stem cells by chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP) for characteristic histone modifications and identify associated proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). 239 factors are identified and predicted to bind enhancers or promoters with different levels of activity, or heterochromatin. Published genome-wide data indicate a high accuracy of location prediction by ChIP-MS. A quarter of the identified factors are important for pluripotency and includes Oct4, Esrrb, Klf5, Mycn and Dppa2, factors that drive reprogramming to pluripotent stem cells. We determined the genome-wide binding sites of Dppa2 and find that Dppa2 operates outside the classical pluripotency network. Our ChIP-MS method provides a detailed read-out of the transcriptional landscape representative of the investigated cell type. PMID:25990348

  19. A versatile mass spectrometry-based method to both identify kinase client-relationships and characterize signaling network topology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While more than a thousand protein kinases (PK) have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, relatively little progress has been made towards identifying their individual client proteins. Herein we describe use of a mass spectrometry-based in vitro phosphorylation strategy, termed Kinase...

  20. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging identifies markers of ageing and osteoarthritic cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cartilage protein distribution and the changes that occur in cartilage ageing and disease are essential in understanding the process of cartilage ageing and age related diseases such as osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the peptide profiles in ageing and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage sections using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Methods The distribution of proteins in young, old and OA equine cartilage was compared following tryptic digestion of cartilage slices and MALDI-MSI undertaken with a MALDI SYNAPT™ HDMS system. Protein identification was undertaken using database searches following multivariate analysis. Peptide intensity differences between young, ageing and OA cartilage were imaged with Biomap software. Analysis of aggrecanase specific cleavage patterns of a crude cartilage proteoglycan extract were used to validate some of the differences in peptide intensity identified. Immunohistochemistry studies validated the differences in protein abundance. Results Young, old and OA equine cartilage was discriminated based on their peptide signature using discriminant analysis. Proteins including aggrecan core protein, fibromodulin, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein were identified and localised. Fibronectin peptides displayed a stronger intensity in OA cartilage. Age-specific protein markers for collectin-43 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein were identified. In addition potential fibromodulin and biglycan peptides targeted for degradation in OA were detected. Conclusions MALDI-MSI provided a novel platform to study cartilage ageing and disease enabling age and disease specific peptides in cartilage to be elucidated and spatially resolved. PMID:24886698

  1. Tandem mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy as a tool to identify peptide oxidized residues.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, D; Ignasiak, M T; Serfaty, X; de Oliveira, P; Houée Levin, C

    2015-10-21

    The final products obtained by the oxidation of small model peptides containing the thioether function, either methionine or S-methyl cysteine, have been characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and IR Multiple Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The modified positions have been clearly identified by the CID-MS(2) fragmentation mass spectra with or without loss of sulfenic acid, as well as by the vibrational signature of the sulfoxide bond at around 1000 cm(-1). The oxidation of the thioether function did not lead to the same products in these model peptides. The sulfoxide and sulfone (to a lesser extent) have been clearly identified as final products of the oxidation of S-methyl-glutathione (GS-Me). Decarboxylation or hydrogen loss are the major oxidation pathways in GS-Me, while they have not been observed in tryptophan-methionine and methionine-tryptophan (Trp-Met and Met-Trp). Interestingly, tryptophan is oxidized in the dipeptide Met-Trp, while that is not the case in the reverse sequence (Trp-Met). PMID:26292724

  2. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Ricin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Schieltz, David M.; Becher, François; Astot, Crister; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Ricin is a protein toxin produced by the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) together with a related protein known as R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Mass spectrometric (MS) assays have the capacity to unambiguously identify ricin and to detect ricin’s activity in samples with complex matrices. These qualitative and quantitative assays enable detection and differentiation of ricin from the less toxic RCA120 through determination of the amino acid sequence of the protein in question, and active ricin can be monitored by MS as the release of adenine from the depurination of a nucleic acid substrate. In this work, we describe the application of MS-based methods to detect, differentiate and quantify ricin and RCA120 in nine blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. Overall, MS-based assays successfully identified all samples containing ricin or RCA120 with the exception of the sample spiked with the lowest concentration (0.414 ng/mL). In fact, mass spectrometry was the most successful method for differentiation of ricin and RCA120 based on amino acid determination. Mass spectrometric methods were also successful at ranking the functional activities of the samples, successfully yielding semi-quantitative results. These results indicate that MS-based assays are excellent techniques to detect, differentiate, and quantify ricin and RCA120 in complex matrices. PMID:26610568

  3. A NEW HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING PHARMACEUTICALS AND POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS IN DRINKING WATER SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A New High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Technique for Identifying Pharmaceuticals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors in Drinking Water Sources

    Andrew H. Grange and G. Wayne Sovocool U.S.EPA, ORD, NERL, ESD, ECB, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, NV 891933478

    Mass spectra...

  4. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics Identifies Longitudinal Urinary Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Radiation-Induced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cook, John A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Anver, Miriam R; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Krausz, Kristopher W; Gonzalez, Frank J; Mitchell, James B; Patterson, Andrew D

    2016-03-15

    Nonlethal exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) is a public concern due to its known carcinogenic effects. Although latency periods for IR-induced neoplasms are relatively long, the ability to detect cancer as early as possible is highly advantageous for effective therapeutic intervention. Therefore, we hypothesized that metabolites in the urine from mice exposed to total body radiation (TBI) would predict for the presence of cancer before a palpable mass was detected. In this study, we exposed mice to 0 or 5.4 Gy TBI, collected urine samples periodically over 1 year, and assayed urine metabolites by using mass spectrometry. Longitudinal data analysis within the first year post-TBI revealed that cancers, including hematopoietic, solid, and benign neoplasms, could be distinguished by unique urinary signatures as early as 3 months post-TBI. Furthermore, a distinction among different types of malignancies could be clearly delineated as early as 3 months post-TBI for hematopoietic neoplasms, 6 months for solid neoplasms, and by 1 year for benign neoplasms. Moreover, the feature profile for radiation-exposed mice 6 months post-TBI was found to be similar to nonirradiated control mice at 18 months, suggesting that TBI accelerates aging. These results demonstrate that urine feature profiles following TBI can identify cancers in mice prior to macroscopic detection, with important implications for the early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26880804

  5. Quantitative mass spectrometry of diabetic kidney tubules identifies GRAP as a novel regulator of TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Timothy D.; Barati, Michelle T.; Coventry, Susan C.; Salyer, Sarah A.; Klein, Jon B.; Powell, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define novel mediators of tubule injury in diabetic kidney disease. For this, we used state-of-the-art proteomic methods combined with a label-free quantitative strategy to define protein expression differences in kidney tubules from transgenic OVE26 type 1 diabetic and control mice. The analysis was performed with diabetic samples that displayed a pro-fibrotic phenotype. We have identified 476 differentially expressed proteins. Bioinformatic analysis indicated several clusters of regulated proteins in relevant functional groups such as TGF-β signaling, tight junction maintenance, oxidative stress, and glucose metabolism. Mass spectrometry detected expression changes of four physiologically relevant proteins were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Of these, the Grb2-related adaptor protein (GRAP) was up-regulated in kidney tubules from diabetic mice and fibrotic kidneys from diabetic patients, and subsequently confirmed as a novel component of TGF-β signaling in cultured human renal tubule cells. Thus, indicating a potential novel role for GRAP in TGF-β-induced tubule injury in diabetic kidney disease. Although we targeted a specific disease, this approach offers a robust, high-sensitivity methodology that can be applied to the discovery of novel mediators for any experimental or disease condition. PMID:19836472

  6. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  7. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily I.; Crew, Katherine D.; Trivedi, Meghna; Awad, Danielle; Maurer, Mathew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Koller, Antonius; Patel, Purvi; Kim Kim, Jenny; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS) for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9) and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8). MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2) suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  8. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Emily I; Crew, Katherine D; Trivedi, Meghna; Awad, Danielle; Maurer, Mathew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Koller, Antonius; Patel, Purvi; Kim Kim, Jenny; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS) for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9) and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8). MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2) suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  9. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  10. Leptospira species and serovars identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after database implementation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a spirochaetal zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution, endemic in Europe, has been recognized as an important emerging infectious disease, though yet it is mostly a neglected disease which imparts its greatest burden on impoverished populations from developing countries. Leptospirosis is caused by the infection with any of the more than 230 serovars of pathogenic Leptospira sp. In this study we aimed to implement the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) database currently available in our laboratory with Leptospira reference pathogenic (L. interrogans, L. borgpetersenii, L. kirschneri, L. noguchii), intermediate (L. fainei) and saprophytic (L. biflexa) strains of our collection in order to evaluate its possible application to the diagnosis of leptospirosis and to the typing of strains. This was done with the goal of understanding whether this methodology could be used as a tool for the identification of Leptospira strains, not only at species level for diagnostic purposes, but also at serovar level for epidemiological purposes, overcoming the limits of serological and molecular conventional methods. Twenty Leptospira reference strains were analysed by MALDI-TOF MS. Statistical analysis of the protein spectra was performed by ClinProTools software. Results The spectra obtained by the analysis of the reference strains tested were grouped into 6 main classes corresponding to the species analysed, highlighting species-specific protein profiles. Moreover, the statistical analysis of the spectra identified discriminatory peaks to recognize Leptospira strains also at serovar level extending previously published data. Conclusions In conclusion, we confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS could be a powerful tool for research and diagnostic in the field of leptospirosis with broad applications ranging from the detection and identification of pathogenic leptospires for diagnostic purposes to the typing of pathogenic and non-pathogenic leptospires for

  11. A comparative protein profile of mammalian erythrocyte membranes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Savita; Punjabi, Vinny; Zingde, Surekha M; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2014-11-01

    A comparative analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins of economically important animals, goat (Capra aegagrus hircus), buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), pig (Sus scrofa), cow (Bos tauras), and human (Homo sapiens) was performed. Solubilized erythrocyte membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), visualized by staining the gels with Commassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), and identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Emerging results show that all major erythrocyte membrane proteins present in human are also seen in all the animals except for band 4.5 which could not be identified. Band 3 is seen as more intense and compact, band 4.1 appears as a doublet in all the animal erythrocyte membranes, band 4.2 exhibits a slightly higher molecular weight (Mr) in buffalo, and cow and band 4.9 has a higher Mr in all the animals relative to the human protein. In addition, there are two new bands in the goat membrane, band G1, identified as HSP 90α, and band G2 identified as HSP 70. A new band C2 identified as HSP 70 is also seen in cow membranes. Peroxiredoxin II is of lower intensity and/or higher Mr in the animals. The difference in size of the proteins possibly indicates the variations in the composition of the amino acids. The difference in intensity of the proteins among these mammalians highlights the presence of less or more number of copies of that protein per cell. This data complement the earlier observations of differences in the sialoglycoprotein profile and effect of proteases and neuraminidase on agglutination among the mammalian erythrocytes. This study provides a platform to understand the molecular architecture of the individual erythrocytes, and in turn the dependent disorders, their phylogenetic relationship and also generates a database of erythrocyte membrane proteins of mammals. The animals selected for this study are of economic importance as

  12. The detection of androstenedione abuse in sport: a mass spectrometry strategy to identify the 4-hydroxyandrostenedione metabolite.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Adam T; Trout, Graham J; Kazlauskas, Rymantas; George, Adrian V

    2008-12-01

    Studies have shown that the administration of androstenedione (ADIONE) significantly increases the urinary ratio of testosterone glucuronide to epitestosterone glucuronide (T/E) - measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) - in subjects with a normal ( approximately 1) or naturally high (>1) initial values. However, the urinary T/E ratio has been shown not to increase in subjects with naturally low (<1) initial values. Such cases then rely on the detection of C(6)-hydroxylated metabolites shown to be indicative of ADIONE administration. While these markers may be measured in the routine GC/MS steroid profile, their relatively low urinary excretion limits the use of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to specifically confirm ADIONE administration based on depleted (13)C content. A mass spectrometry strategy was used in this study to identify metabolites of ADIONE with the potential to provide compound-specific detection. C(4)-hydroxylation was subsequently shown to be a major metabolic pathway following ADIONE administration, thereby resulting in urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4OH-ADIONE). Complementary analysis of 4OH-ADIONE by GC/MS and GC/C/IRMS was used to confirm ADIONE administration. PMID:19025884

  13. Combination of HPLC and 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry for identifying composition of ginseng tinctures.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Y N; Makhankov, V V; Uvarova, N L; Bondarenko, P V; Zubarev, R A; Knysh, A N

    1993-03-01

    The 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (252-Cf PDMS) determination or confirmation of the ginsenoside saponins has been proposed to investigate the composition of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peaks of ginseng tinctures and galenic preparations. That ionization technique is well suitable for the analysis of natural mixtures of these saponins. The 252-Cf PD mass spectra of standard ginsenosides Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Re, Rg1, Rd, NG-R2, Z-R1 contain the peaks of two types of ions, namely, molecular adduct ions (MAI) and aglycone ions. By mass the latter may be referred to either protopanaxadiol or protopanaxatriol. The masses of MAI and aglycone ions are determined by the carbohydrate chains. The collected HPLC fractions of P ginseng tincture can be tested for content of ginsenosides. After studying two MAI peaks from the 252-Cf PD mass spectra of the basic ginsenosides, an example of distinction between two galenic preparations from different Panax has been shown. PMID:8352021

  14. Toward atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry to visualize and identify lipid rafts in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Naulin, Pamela A.; Alveal, Natalia A.; Barrera, Nelson P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell-to-cell communication is mediated by nanopores called plasmodesmata (PDs) which are complex structures comprising plasma membrane (PM), highly packed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous membrane proteins. Although recent advances on proteomics have led to insights into mechanisms of transport, there is still an inadequate characterization of the lipidic composition of the PM where membrane proteins are inserted. It has been postulated that PDs could be formed by lipid rafts, however no structural evidence has shown to visualize and analyse their lipid components. In this perspective article, we discuss proposed experiments to characterize lipid rafts and proteins in the PDs. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) of purified PD vesicles it is possible to determine the presence of lipid rafts, specific bound proteins and the lipidomic profile of the PD under physiological conditions and after changing transport permeability. In addition, MS can determine the stoichiometry of intact membrane proteins inserted in lipid rafts. This will give novel insights into the role of membrane proteins and lipid rafts on the PD structure. PMID:24910637

  15. Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burlingame, A.L.; Baillie, T.A.; Derrick, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It is the intention of the review to bring together in one source the direction of major developments in mass spectrometry and to illustrate these by citing key contributions from both fundamental and applied research. The Review is intended to provide the reader with a sense of the main currents, their breadth and depth, and probable future directions. It is also intended to provide the reader with a glimpse of the diverse discoveries and results that underpin the eventual development of new methods and instruments - the keys to obtaining new insights in all the physical, chemical, and biological sciences which depend on mass spectrometry at various levels of sophistication. Focal points for future interdisciplinary synergism might be selective quantitative derivatization of large peptides, which would convey properties that direct fragmentation providing specific sequence information, or optimization of LCMS for biooligomer sequencing and mixture analysis, or the perfect way to control or enhance the internal energy of ions of any size, or many others. 1669 references.

  16. Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Targeted Mode to Identify Activators of Class IA PI3K in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuemei; Turke, Alexa B.; Qi, Jie; Song, Youngchul; Rexer, Brent N.; Miller, Todd W.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Asara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    PI3K is activated in some cancers by direct mutation, but it is activated more commonly in cancer by mutation of upstream acting receptor tyrosine kinases (TKs). At present, there is no systematic method to determine which TK signaling cascades activate PI3K in certain cancers, despite the likely utility of such information to help guide selection of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drug strategies for personalized therapy. Here we present a quantitative tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) approach that identifies upstream activators of PI3K both in vitro and in vivo. Using non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to illustrate this approach, we demonstrate a correct identification of the mechanism of PI3K activation in several models, thereby identifying the most appropriate TKI to down-regulate PI3K signaling. This approach also determined the molecular mechanisms and adaptors required for PI3K activation following inhibition of the mTOR kinase TORC1. We further validated the approach in breast cancer cells with mutational activation of PIK3CA, where tandem mass spectrometry detected and quantitatively measured the abundance of a helical domain mutant (E545K) of PIK3CA connected to PI3K activation. Overall, our findings establish a mass spectrometric approach to identify functional interactions that govern PI3K regulation in cancer cells. Using this technique to define the pathways which activate PI3K signaling in a given tumor could help inform clinical decision making by helping guide personalized therapeutic strategies for different patients. PMID:21775521

  17. New HDAC6-mediated deacetylation sites of tubulin in the mouse brain identified by quantitative mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Xiong, Yun; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; He, Qianqian; Gao, Siqi; Zhou, Jun; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring on microtubules have been implicated in the regulation of microtubule properties and functions. Acetylated K40 of α-tubulin, a hallmark of long-lived stable microtubules, is known to be negatively controlled by histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). However, the vital roles of HDAC6 in microtubule-related processes such as cell motility and cell division cannot be fully explained by the only known target site on tubulin. Here, we attempt to comprehensively map lysine acetylation sites on tubulin purified from mouse brain tissues. Furthermore, mass spectrometry-based quantitative comparison of acetylated peptides from wild-type vs HDAC6 knockout mice allowed us to identify six new deacetylation sites possibly mediated by HDAC6. Thus, adding new sites to the repertoire of HDAC6-mediated tubulin deacetylation events would further our understanding of the multi-faceted roles of HDAC6 in regulating microtubule stability and cellular functions. PMID:26581825

  18. A generic method to identify plant viruses by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry of their coat proteins.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Arnaud G; Greenwood, David R; Chavan, Ramesh R; Pearson, Michael N; Clover, Gerard R G; MacDiarmid, Robin M; Cohen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Although a number of protocols have been developed for detection of viruses at the genus or family level, universal approaches to detect and identify unknown viruses are still required. High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify accurately peptide masses and their constituent sequences from partially purified plant virus preparations. Analysis of the peptide fragment masses against a virus database using pattern-matching algorithms identified sequences with homology to known virus peptides and also predicted peptides using de novo sequence analysis. This method provided sufficient information to confirm the identity of two known viruses that were included as controls (Cucumber mosaic virus and Tomato spotted wilt virus) and to identify unknown viruses in six viral isolates. The unknown viruses have been identified as four common viruses (Alfalfa mosaic virus, Tobacco streak virus, Citrus leaf blotch virus and Ribgrass mosaic virus), and two novel viruses (a potexvirus and a vitivirus). The identification of viruses from five distinct families by the tandem mass spectrometric determination of their coat protein demonstrates that this is a useful method for initial virus identification. This method, complemented with molecular or immunological procedures, provides a rapid and convenient way to identify both known and novel plant viruses. PMID:19712699

  19. Altered Retinoic Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Mouse Kidney Identified by 18O Isotopic Labeling and 2D Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jonathan M.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; LeJeune, Wanda S.; Dey, Nilay; Luxon, Bruce A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Denner, Larry; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous metabolic pathways have been implicated in diabetes-induced renal injury, yet few studies have utilized unbiased systems biology approaches for mapping the interconnectivity of diabetes-dysregulated proteins that are involved. We utilized a global, quantitative, differential proteomic approach to identify a novel retinoic acid hub in renal cortical protein networks dysregulated by type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Total proteins were extracted from renal cortex of control and db/db mice at 20 weeks of age (after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia in the diabetic mice). Following trypsinization, 18O- and 16O-labeled control and diabetic peptides, respectively, were pooled and separated by two dimensional liquid chromatography (strong cation exchange creating 60 fractions further separated by nano-HPLC), followed by peptide identification and quantification using mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis identified 53 proteins with fold change ≥1.5 and p≤0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment (out of 1,806 proteins identified), including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH1/ALDH1A1). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified altered retinoic acid as a key signaling hub that was altered in the diabetic renal cortical proteome. Western blotting and real-time PCR confirmed diabetes-induced upregulation of RALDH1, which was localized by immunofluorescence predominantly to the proximal tubule in the diabetic renal cortex, while PCR confirmed the downregulation of ADH identified with mass spectrometry. Despite increased renal cortical tissue levels of retinol and RALDH1 in db/db versus control mice, all-trans-retinoic acid was significantly decreased in association with a significant decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that retinoic acid metabolism is significantly dysregulated in diabetic kidneys, and suggest that a shift in all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism is a novel feature in

  20. Oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates in rainwater identified by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, K. E.; Turpin, B. J.; Seitzinger, S. P.

    2008-09-01

    Wet deposition is an important removal mechanism for atmospheric organic matter, and a potentially important input for receiving ecosystems, yet less than 50% of rainwater organic matter is considered chemically characterized. Precipitation samples collected in New Jersey, USA, were analyzed by negative ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Elemental compositions of 552 unique molecular species were determined in the mass range 50 500 Da in the rainwater. Three main groups of organic compounds were identified: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (CHO) only, sulfur (S) containing CHOS compounds, and S- and nitrogen containing CHONS compounds. Organic acids commonly identified in precipitation were detected, as well as linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, which are persistent pollutants commonly measured in river water, seawater, and sediments, but to our knowledge, not previously documented in atmospheric samples. Within the three main groups of compounds detected in the rainwater, oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy-organosulfates were identified. The majority of the compounds identified are products of atmospheric reactions and are known contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from gas phase, aerosol phase, and in-cloud reactions in the atmosphere. It is suggested that the large uncharacterized component of SOA is the main contributor to the large uncharacterized component of rainwater organic matter.

  1. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  2. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  3. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Identifies Novel Host Binding Partners for Pathogenic Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Effectors.

    PubMed

    Law, Robyn J; Law, Hong T; Scurll, Joshua M; Scholz, Roland; Santos, Andrew S; Shames, Stephanie R; Deng, Wanyin; Croxen, Matthew A; Li, Yuling; de Hoog, Carmen L; van der Heijden, Joris; Foster, Leonard J; Guttman, Julian A; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli cause enteric diseases resulting in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These pathogens remain extracellular and translocate a set of type III secreted effector proteins into host cells to promote bacterial virulence. Effectors manipulate host cell pathways to facilitate infection by interacting with a variety of host targets, yet the binding partners and mechanism of action of many effectors remain elusive. We performed a mass spectrometry screen to identify host targets for a library of effectors. We found five known effector targets and discovered four novel interactions. Interestingly, we identified multiple effectors that interacted with the microtubule associated protein, ensconsin. Using co-immunoprecipitations, we confirmed that NleB1 and EspL interacted with ensconsin in a region that corresponded to its microtubule binding domain. Ensconsin is an essential cofactor of kinesin-1 that is required for intracellular trafficking, and we demonstrated that intracellular trafficking was severely disrupted during wild type EPEC infections but not during infections with ΔnleB1 or ΔespL mutants. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of quantitative proteomics for identifying effector-host protein interactions and suggest that vesicular trafficking is a crucial cellular process that may be targeted by NleB1 and EspL through their interaction with ensconsin. PMID:27018634

  4. A versatile mass spectrometry-based method to both identify kinase client-relationships and characterize signaling network topology

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Nagib; Huang, Yadong; Tovar-Mendez, Alejandro; Swatek, Kirby N.; Zhang, Jingfen; Miernyk, Ján A.; Xu, Dong; Thelen, Jay J.

    2013-01-01

    While more than a thousand protein kinases (PK) have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, relatively little progress has been made towards identifying their individual client proteins. Herein we describe the use of a mass spectrometry-based in vitro phosphorylation strategy, termed Kinase Client assay (KiC assay), to study a targeted-aspect of signaling. A synthetic peptide library comprising 377 in vivo phosphorylation sequences from developing seed was screened using 71 recombinant A. thaliana PK. Among the initial results, we identified 23 proteins as putative clients of 17 PK. In one instance protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 (AtPPI-2) was phosphorylated at multiple-sites by three distinct PK, casein kinase 1-like 10, AME3, and a Ser PK-like protein. To confirm this result, full-length recombinant AtPPI-2 was reconstituted with each of these PK. The results confirmed multiple distinct phosphorylation sites within this protein. Biochemical analyses indicate that AtPPI-2 inhibits type 1 protein phosphatase (TOPP) activity, and that the phosphorylated forms of AtPPI-2 are more potent inhibitors. Structural modeling revealed that phosphorylation of AtPPI-2 induces conformational changes that modulate TOPP binding. PMID:23270405

  5. Identifying Carbohydrate Ligands of a Norovirus P Particle using a Catch and Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N.; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis, recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are present as free oligosaccharides in bodily fluid or glycolipids and glycoproteins on the surfaces of cells. The subviral P particle formed by the protruding (P) domain of the NoV capsid protein serves as a useful model for the study NoV-HBGA interactions. Here, we demonstrate the application of a catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against the P particle to rapidly identify NoV ligands and potential inhibitors. Carbohydrate libraries of 50 and 146 compounds, which included 18 and 24 analogs of HBGA receptors, respectively, were screened against the P particle of VA387, a member of the predominant GII.4 NoVs. Deprotonated ions corresponding to the P particle bound to carbohydrates were isolated and subjected to collision-induced dissociation to release the ligands in their deprotonated forms. The released ligands were identified by ion mobility separation followed by mass analysis. All 13 and 16 HBGA ligands with intrinsic affinities >500 M-1 were identified in the 50 and the 146 compound libraries, respectively. Furthermore, screening revealed interactions with a series of oligosaccharides with structures found in the cell wall of mycobacteria and human milk. The affinities of these newly discovered ligands are comparable to those of the HBGA receptors, as estimated from the relative abundance of released ligand ions.

  6. Tandem Affinity Purification Combined with Mass Spectrometry to Identify Components of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Peter; Meierhofer, David; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Most biological processes are governed by multiprotein complexes rather than individual proteins. Identification of protein complexes therefore is becoming increasingly important to gain a molecular understanding of cells and organisms. Mass spectrometry–based proteomics combined with affinity-tag-based protein purification is one of the most effective strategies to isolate and identify protein complexes. The development of tandem-affinity purification approaches has revolutionized proteomics experiments. These two-step affinity purification strategies allow rapid, effective purification of protein complexes and, at the same time, minimize background. Identification of even very low-abundant protein complexes with modern sensitive mass spectrometers has become routine. Here, we describe two general strategies for tandem-affinity purification followed by mass spectrometric identification of protein complexes. PMID:18370112

  7. Affinity purification-mass spectrometry analysis of bcl-2 interactome identified SLIRP as a novel interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Trisciuoglio, D; Desideri, M; Farini, V; De Luca, T; Di Martile, M; Tupone, M G; Urbani, A; D'Aguanno, S; Del Bufalo, D

    2016-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 protein family share regions of sequence similarity, the bcl-2 homology (BH) domains. Bcl-2, the most studied member of this family, has four BH domains, BH1-4, and has a critical role in resistance to antineoplastic drugs by regulating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Moreover, it is also involved in other relevant cellular processes such as tumor progression, angiogenesis and autophagy. Deciphering the network of bcl-2-interacting factors should provide a critical advance in understanding the different functions of bcl-2. Here, we characterized bcl-2 interactome by mass spectrometry in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In silico functional analysis associated most part of the identified proteins to mitochondrial functions. Among them we identified SRA stem-loop interacting RNA-binding protein, SLIRP, a mitochondrial protein with a relevant role in regulating mitochondrial messenger RNA (mRNA) homeostasis. We validated bcl-2/SLIRP interaction by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments in cancer cell lines from different histotypes. We showed that, although SLIRP is not involved in mediating bcl-2 ability to protect from apoptosis and oxidative damage, bcl-2 binds and stabilizes SLIRP protein and regulates mitochondrial mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that the BH4 domain of bcl-2 has a role in maintaining this binding. PMID:26866271

  8. Identifying uranium particles using fission tracks and microsampling individual particles for analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Daisuke; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of isotope ratios in individual particles found in the environment is important to clarify the origins of the particles. In particular, the analysis of uranium particles in environmental samples from nuclear facilities is useful for detecting undeclared nuclear activities related to the production of nuclear weapons. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) combined with a fission track technique is an efficient method for determining the isotope ratios of individual uranium particles, but has a drawback called "particle-mixing". When some uranium particles are measured as a single particle and an average isotope ratio for the particles is obtained, it is called "particle mixing". This may lead to erroneous conclusions in terms of the particle sources that are identified. In the present study, microsampling using a scanning electron microscope was added to the fission track-TIMS procedure. The analysis of a mixture of SRM 950a and CRM U100 reference materials containing uranium particles indicated that particle mixing was almost completely avoided using the proposed technique. The performance of the proposed method was sufficient for obtaining reliable data for the sources of individual particles to be identified reliably. PMID:25680068

  9. Affinity purification-mass spectrometry analysis of bcl-2 interactome identified SLIRP as a novel interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Trisciuoglio, D; Desideri, M; Farini, V; De Luca, T; Di Martile, M; Tupone, M G; Urbani, A; D'Aguanno, S; Del Bufalo, D

    2016-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 protein family share regions of sequence similarity, the bcl-2 homology (BH) domains. Bcl-2, the most studied member of this family, has four BH domains, BH1–4, and has a critical role in resistance to antineoplastic drugs by regulating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Moreover, it is also involved in other relevant cellular processes such as tumor progression, angiogenesis and autophagy. Deciphering the network of bcl-2-interacting factors should provide a critical advance in understanding the different functions of bcl-2. Here, we characterized bcl-2 interactome by mass spectrometry in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In silico functional analysis associated most part of the identified proteins to mitochondrial functions. Among them we identified SRA stem–loop interacting RNA-binding protein, SLIRP, a mitochondrial protein with a relevant role in regulating mitochondrial messenger RNA (mRNA) homeostasis. We validated bcl-2/SLIRP interaction by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments in cancer cell lines from different histotypes. We showed that, although SLIRP is not involved in mediating bcl-2 ability to protect from apoptosis and oxidative damage, bcl-2 binds and stabilizes SLIRP protein and regulates mitochondrial mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that the BH4 domain of bcl-2 has a role in maintaining this binding. PMID:26866271

  10. ASSESSMENT OF MARKER PROTEINS IDENTIFIED IN WHOLE CELL EXTRACTS FOR BACTERIAL SPECIATION USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Kooken, Jennifer; Fox, Karen; Fox, Alvin; Wunschel, David

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal strains (CoNS) were speciated in this study. Digests of proteins released from whole cells were converted to tryptic peptides for analysis. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS, Orbitrap) was employed for peptide analysis. Data analysis was performed employing the open-source software X!Tandem which uses sequenced genomes to generate a virtual peptide database for comparison to experimental data. The search database was modified to include the genomes of the 11 Staphylococcus species most commonly isolated from man. The number of total peptides matching each protein along with the number of peptides specifically matching to the homologue (or homologues) for strains of the same species were assesed. Any peptides not matching to the species examined were considered conflict peptides. The proteins typically identified with the largest percentage of sequence coverage, number of matched peptides and number of peptides corresponding to only the correct species were elongation factor Tu (EF Tu) and enolase (Enol). Additional proteins with consistently observed peptides as well as peptides matching only homologues from the same species were citrate synthase (CS) and 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (1P5CD). Protein markers, previously identified from gel slices, (aconitate hydratase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) were found to provide low confidence scores when employing whole cell digests. The methodological approach described here provides a simple yet elegant way of identification of staphylococci. However, perhaps more importantly the technology should be applicable universally for identification of any bacterial species. PMID:23994725

  11. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Botulinum Neurotoxin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Baudys, Jakub; Wang, Dongxia; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease called botulism, which can be lethal. BoNTs are proteins secreted by some species of clostridia and are known to cause paralysis by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Although the human lethal dose of BoNT is not accurately known, it is estimated to be between 0.1 μg to 70 μg, so it is important to enable detection of small amounts of these toxins. Our laboratory previously reported on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass-spectrometric‑based endopeptidase method to detect, differentiate, and quantify BoNT immunoaffinity purified from complex matrices. In this work, we describe the application of Endopep-MS for the analysis of thirteen blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. This method successfully identified the presence or absence of BoNT in all thirteen samples and was able to successfully differentiate the serotype of BoNT present in the samples, which included matrices such as buffer, milk, meat extract, and serum. Furthermore, the method yielded quantitative results which had z-scores in the range of −3 to +3 for quantification of BoNT/A containing samples. These results indicate that Endopep-MS is an excellent technique for detection, differentiation, and quantification of BoNT in complex matrices. PMID:25996606

  12. Recommended mass spectrometry-based strategies to identify botulinum neurotoxin-containing samples.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Wang, Dongxia; Barr, John R

    2015-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease called botulism, which can be lethal. BoNTs are proteins secreted by some species of clostridia and are known to cause paralysis by interfering with nerve impulse transmission. Although the human lethal dose of BoNT is not accurately known, it is estimated to be between 0.1 μg to 70 μg, so it is important to enable detection of small amounts of these toxins. Our laboratory previously reported on the development of Endopep-MS, a mass-spectrometric‑based endopeptidase method to detect, differentiate, and quantify BoNT immunoaffinity purified from complex matrices. In this work, we describe the application of Endopep-MS for the analysis of thirteen blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. This method successfully identified the presence or absence of BoNT in all thirteen samples and was able to successfully differentiate the serotype of BoNT present in the samples, which included matrices such as buffer, milk, meat extract, and serum. Furthermore, the method yielded quantitative results which had z-scores in the range of -3 to +3 for quantification of BoNT/A containing samples. These results indicate that Endopep-MS is an excellent technique for detection, differentiation, and quantification of BoNT in complex matrices. PMID:25996606

  13. A lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Penelope M.; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K.; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D.; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M.; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Griffith, Obi L.; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M.; Cusack, Michael P.; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Gray, Joe W.; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n = 5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ~90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNAseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were upregulated in triple negative vs. luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype. PMID:22309216

  14. Identifying transient protein-protein interactions in EphB2 signaling by Blue Native PAGE and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Darie, Costel C.; Deinhardt, Katrin; Zhang, Guoan; Cardasis, Helene S.; Chao, Moses V.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are proteins that upon ligand stimulation undergo dimerization and autophosphorylation. Eph receptors (EphRs) are RTKs that are found in different cell types, from both tissues that are developing and from mature tissues and play important roles in the development of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. EphRs also play roles in synapse formation, neural crest formation, angiogenesis and in remodeling the vascular system. Interaction of EphRs with their ephrin ligands leads to activation of signal transduction pathways and to formation of many transient protein-protein interactions that ultimately leads to cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the sequence of events at the molecular level is not well-understood. We used Blue Native PAGE (BN-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS) to analyze the transient protein-protein interactions that resulted from stimulation of EphB2 receptors by their ephrinB1-Fc ligands. We analyzed the phosphotyrosine-containing protein complexes immunoprecipitated (pY-IPs) from the cell lysates of both unstimulated (−) and ephrinB1-Fc-stimulated (+) NG108 cells. Our experiments allowed us to identify many signaling proteins, either known to be part of EphB2 signaling or new for this pathway, which are involved in transient protein-protein interactions upon ephrinB1-Fc stimulation. These data led us to investigate the roles in EphB2 signaling of proteins such as FAK, WAVEs, and Nischarin. PMID:21932443

  15. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  16. Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry to Identify Drug Resistant Staphylococcal Isolates from Nonhospital Environments in Brunei Darussalam.

    PubMed

    Chong, Ko S; Shazali, Siti A; Xu, Zhen; Cutler, Ronald R; Idris, Adi

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistant bacteria have been a growing threat to the community and hospitals due to the misuse of antibiotics by humans, industrialization, and lack of novel antimicrobials currently available. Little is known about the prevalence of drug resistant bacteria in nonhealthcare environments in Brunei Darussalam and about how antibiotic resistant genes are transferred within these environments. Human contact points from different types of environments in Brunei Darussalam, varying from urban to jungle settings, were swabbed and cultured onto selective media to isolate staphylococci bacteria before performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the isolates. The identity of the isolates was determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Staphylococci isolates resistant to oxacillin were further tested for their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). PCR analysis of the mecA gene, a gene that confers resistance to oxacillin, is done to determine the level of resistance to oxacillin. Ten different staphylococcal species were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Out of the 36 staphylococci isolates, 24 were resistant to multiple antibiotics including two isolates which were oxacillin resistant. Some staphylococci isolates had similar antibiotic resistance profiles to other staphylococci isolates of different species in the same location. This work provides the first-ever evidence of drug resistant staphylococci in the nonhospital environment in Brunei Darussalam. PMID:27127505

  17. Coupled two-step microextraction devices with derivatizations to identify hydroxycarbonyls in rain samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2006-06-23

    Coupling a two-step liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine/bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (PFBHA)/(BSTFA) derivatization was developed to detect hydroxycarbonyls in rainwater samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). LPME provides a fast and inexpensive pre-concentration, and miniaturized extraction to analyze the target compounds rainwater samples. Derivatization techniques offer a clear method to identify target compounds. The hydroxycarbonyls were determined using two-step derivatizations. Dynamic-LPME was applied in the first derivatization, and head-space single drop derivatization was employed in the second reaction. The LODs varied from 0.023 to 4.75 microg/l. The calibration curves were linear for at least two orders of magnitude with R2>or=0.994. The precision was within 6.5-12%, and the relative recoveries in rainwater were more than 89% (the amount added ranged from 0.3 to 15 microg/l). A field sample was found to contain 2.54 microg/l of hydroxyacetone and 0.110 microg/l of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone. Hydroxyacetone was also detected in one of the tested samples at a concentration of 2.39 microg/l. PMID:16643930

  18. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  19. Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry to Identify Drug Resistant Staphylococcal Isolates from Nonhospital Environments in Brunei Darussalam

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ko S.; Shazali, Siti A.; Xu, Zhen; Cutler, Ronald R.; Idris, Adi

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistant bacteria have been a growing threat to the community and hospitals due to the misuse of antibiotics by humans, industrialization, and lack of novel antimicrobials currently available. Little is known about the prevalence of drug resistant bacteria in nonhealthcare environments in Brunei Darussalam and about how antibiotic resistant genes are transferred within these environments. Human contact points from different types of environments in Brunei Darussalam, varying from urban to jungle settings, were swabbed and cultured onto selective media to isolate staphylococci bacteria before performing antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the isolates. The identity of the isolates was determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Staphylococci isolates resistant to oxacillin were further tested for their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). PCR analysis of the mecA gene, a gene that confers resistance to oxacillin, is done to determine the level of resistance to oxacillin. Ten different staphylococcal species were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Out of the 36 staphylococci isolates, 24 were resistant to multiple antibiotics including two isolates which were oxacillin resistant. Some staphylococci isolates had similar antibiotic resistance profiles to other staphylococci isolates of different species in the same location. This work provides the first-ever evidence of drug resistant staphylococci in the nonhospital environment in Brunei Darussalam. PMID:27127505

  20. Preserved Proteins from Extinct Bison latifrons Identified by Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Hydroxylysine Glycosides are a Common Feature of Ancient Collagen.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ryan C; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Barrett, Alexander; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C

    2015-07-01

    Bone samples from several vertebrates were collected from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, in Snowmass Village, Colorado, and processed for proteomics analysis. The specimens come from Pleistocene megafauna Bison latifrons, dating back ∼ 120,000 years. Proteomics analysis using a simplified sample preparation procedure and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was applied to obtain protein identifications. Several bioinformatics resources were used to obtain peptide identifications based on sequence homology to extant species with annotated genomes. With the exception of soil sample controls, all samples resulted in confident peptide identifications that mapped to type I collagen. In addition, we analyzed a specimen from the extinct B. latifrons that yielded peptide identifications mapping to over 33 bovine proteins. Our analysis resulted in extensive fibrillar collagen sequence coverage, including the identification of posttranslational modifications. Hydroxylysine glucosylgalactosylation, a modification thought to be involved in collagen fiber formation and bone mineralization, was identified for the first time in an ancient protein dataset. Meta-analysis of data from other studies indicates that this modification may be common in well-preserved prehistoric samples. Additional peptide sequences from extracellular matrix (ECM) and non-ECM proteins have also been identified for the first time in ancient tissue samples. These data provide a framework for analyzing ancient protein signatures in well-preserved fossil specimens, while also contributing novel insights into the molecular basis of organic matter preservation. As such, this analysis has unearthed common posttranslational modifications of collagen that may assist in its preservation over time. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001827. PMID:25948757

  1. Preserved Proteins from Extinct Bison latifrons Identified by Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Hydroxylysine Glycosides are a Common Feature of Ancient Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan C.; Wither, Matthew J.; Nemkov, Travis; Barrett, Alexander; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone samples from several vertebrates were collected from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, in Snowmass Village, Colorado, and processed for proteomics analysis. The specimens come from Pleistocene megafauna Bison latifrons, dating back ∼120,000 years. Proteomics analysis using a simplified sample preparation procedure and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was applied to obtain protein identifications. Several bioinformatics resources were used to obtain peptide identifications based on sequence homology to extant species with annotated genomes. With the exception of soil sample controls, all samples resulted in confident peptide identifications that mapped to type I collagen. In addition, we analyzed a specimen from the extinct B. latifrons that yielded peptide identifications mapping to over 33 bovine proteins. Our analysis resulted in extensive fibrillar collagen sequence coverage, including the identification of posttranslational modifications. Hydroxylysine glucosylgalactosylation, a modification thought to be involved in collagen fiber formation and bone mineralization, was identified for the first time in an ancient protein dataset. Meta-analysis of data from other studies indicates that this modification may be common in well-preserved prehistoric samples. Additional peptide sequences from extracellular matrix (ECM) and non-ECM proteins have also been identified for the first time in ancient tissue samples. These data provide a framework for analyzing ancient protein signatures in well-preserved fossil specimens, while also contributing novel insights into the molecular basis of organic matter preservation. As such, this analysis has unearthed common posttranslational modifications of collagen that may assist in its preservation over time. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001827. PMID:25948757

  2. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry applied to identifying species of insect-pathogenic fungi from the Metarhizium anisopliae complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be a powerful tool for taxonomic resolution of microorganisms. In this proof-of-concept study, we assessed the effectiveness of this technique to track the current gene sequence-based phylogenet...

  3. Identifying Gel-Separated Proteins Using In-Gel Digestion, Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching: Consider the Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Jessica C.; Dassenko, David J.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important bioanalytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. This is an especially powerful tool when combined with gel separation of proteins and database mining using the mass spectral data. Currently, few hands-on…

  4. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  5. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry applied to identifying species of insect-pathogenic fungi from the Metarhizium anisopliae complex.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rogério Biaggioni; Faria, Marcos; Souza, Daniela Aguiar; Bloch, Carlos; Silva, Luciano P; Humber, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be a powerful tool for taxonomic resolution of microorganisms. In this proof-of-concept study, we assessed the effectiveness of this technique to track the current gene sequence-based phylogenetic classification of species in the Metarhizium anisopliae complex. Initially the phylogenetic analysis of 5' strains by sequencing of the 59' end of the TEF-1α gene region revealed seven species within M. anisopliae sensu lato and two varieties outside this complex. Because initial studies on MS profiles from different cell types showed that mycelial fragments or conidia produced on nutrient-poor medium may yield too much background noise, all subsequent spectrometric analyses were performed with acidhydrolyzed conidia from 10-12 d old PDA cultures. The initial MALDI-TOF reference library included protein spectral profiles from nine taxonomically distinct, molecularly identified isolates sharing high genetic homology with the ex-type or ex-epitype isolates of these taxa in Metarhizium. A second reference library added one isolate each for M. anisopliae sensu stricto and M. robertsii. The second, larger reference library (including 11 taxa) allowed nearly perfect MALDI-TOF matching of DNA-based species identification for the 40 remaining isolates molecularly recognized as M. anisopliae sensu stricto (n = 19), M. robertsii (n = 6), M. majus (n = 3), M. lepidiotae (n = 1), M. acridum (n = 3), M. flavoviride var. pemphigi (n = 1), plus seven unidentified strains (six of them phylogenetically close to M. anisopliae sensu stricto and one outside the Metarhizium pingshaense-anisopliae-robertsii-brunneum clade). Due to the increasing frequency of phylogenetically (genomically) based taxonomic revisions of fungi, this approach is especially useful for culture collections, because once the protein profiles of Metarhizium isolates are obtained taxonomic updating of MALDI

  6. Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiuxia; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Wu, Si; Mayer, M. Uljana; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry provides a powerful method for identifying protein-protein interactions and probing the structure of protein complexes. A number of strategies have been reported that take advantage of the high sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometers. Approaches typically include synthesis of novel cross-linking compounds, and/or isotopic labelling of the cross-linking reagent and/or protein, and label-free methods. We report Xlink-Identifier, a comprehensive data analysis platform that has been developed to support label-free analyses. It can identify inter-peptide, intra-peptide, and deadend cross-links as well as underivatized peptides. The software streamlines data pre-processing, peptide scoring, and visualization and provides an overall data analysis strategy for studying protein-protein interactions and protein structure using mass spectrometry. The software has been evaluated using a custom synthesized cross-linking reagent that features an enrichment tag. Xlink-Identifier offers the potential to perform large-scale identifications of protein-protein interactions using tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:21175198

  7. Bioaffinity Mass Spectrometry Screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ben; Feng, Yun Jiang; Vu, Hoan; McCormick, Brendan; Rowley, Jessica; Pedro, Liliana; Crowther, Gregory J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Forster, Paul I; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS or ESI-FTMS) was used to screen 192 natural product extracts and a 659-member natural product-based fragment library for bindings to a potential malaria drug target, Plasmodium falciparum Rab11a (PfRab11a, PF13_0119). One natural product extract and 11 fragments showed binding activity. A new natural product, arborside E, was identified from the active extract of Psydrax montigena as a weak binder. Its binding activity and inhibitory activity against PfRab11a were confirmed by ESI-FTMS titration experiments and an orthogonal enzyme assay. PMID:26773071

  8. Collisionally activated dissociation and electron capture dissociation of several mass spectrometry-identifiable chemical cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saiful M; Munske, Gerhard R; Tang, Xiaoting; Bruce, James E

    2006-12-15

    One of the challenges in protein interaction studies with chemical cross-linking stems from the complexity of intra-, inter-, and dead-end cross-linked peptide mixtures. We have developed new cross-linkers to study protein-protein interactions with mass spectrometry to improve the ability to deal with this complexity. Even the accurate mass capabilities of FTICR-MS alone cannot unambiguously identify cross-linked peptides from cell-labeling experiments due to the complexity of these mixtures resultant from the enormous number of possible cross-linked species. We have developed novel cross-linkers that have unique fragmentation features in the gas phase. The characteristics of these cross-linkers combined with the accurate mass capability of FTICR-MS can help distinguish cross-linking reaction products and assign protein identities. These cross-linkers that we call protein interaction reporters (PIRs) have been constructed with two reactive groups attached through two bonds that can be preferentially cleaved by low-energy CID of the respective protonated precursor ions. After cleavage of the labile bonds, the middle part of the linker serves as a reporter ion to aid identification of cross-linked peptides. This report highlights three new PIRs with new features that have been developed to improve the efficiency of release of reporter ions. The new cross-linkers reported here were tuned with the addition of an affinity tag, a hydrophilic group, a photocleavable group, and new low-energy MS/MS cleavable bonds. This report presents our investigation of the MSMS fragmentation behavior of selected protonated ions of the new compounds. The comprehensive fragmentation of these PIRs and PIR-labeled cross-linked peptides with low-energy collisions and an example of electron capture dissociation in FTICR-MS is presented. These new cross-linkers will contribute to current systems biology research by allowing acquisition of global or large-scale data on protein

  9. Novel Phenol-soluble Modulin Derivatives in Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Identified through Imaging Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David J.; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Hollands, Andrew; Kersten, Roland; Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Pence, Morgan A.; Malone, Cheryl L.; Derieux, Jaclyn; Moore, Bradley S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Dixon, Jack E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nizet, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of human disease ranging from localized skin and soft tissue infections to potentially lethal systemic infections. S. aureus has the biosynthetic ability to generate numerous virulence factors that assist in circumventing the innate immune system during disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have uncovered a set of extracellular peptides produced by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) with homology to the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) from Staphylococcus epidermidis. CA-MRSA PSMs contribute to skin infection and recruit and lyse neutrophils, and truncated versions of these peptides possess antimicrobial activity. In this study, novel CA-MRSA PSM derivatives were discovered by the use of microbial imaging mass spectrometry. The novel PSM derivatives are compared with their parent full-length peptides for changes in hemolytic, cytolytic, and neutrophil-stimulating activity. A potential contribution of the major S. aureus secreted protease aureolysin in processing PSMs is demonstrated. Finally, we show that PSM processing occurs in multiple CA-MRSA strains by structural confirmation of additional novel derivatives. This work demonstrates that IMS can serve as a useful tool to go beyond genome predictions and expand our understanding of the important family of small peptide virulence factors. PMID:22371493

  10. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Reveals Elevated Glomerular ATP/AMP in Diabetes/obesity and Identifies Sphingomyelin as a Possible Mediator.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Satoshi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Hamm, Gregory; Darshi, Manjula; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie; Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Slater, Larkin; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Stauber, Jonathan; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Sharma, Kumar

    2016-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is suppressed in diabetes and may be due to a high ATP/AMP ratio, however the quantitation of nucleotides in vivo has been extremely difficult. Via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) to localize renal nucleotides we found that the diabetic kidney had a significant increase in glomerular ATP/AMP ratio. Untargeted MALDI-MSI analysis revealed that a specific sphingomyelin species (SM(d18:1/16:0)) accumulated in the glomeruli of diabetic and high-fat diet-fed mice compared with wild-type controls. In vitro studies in mesangial cells revealed that exogenous addition of SM(d18:1/16:0) significantly elevated ATP via increased glucose consumption and lactate production with a consequent reduction of AMPK and PGC1α. Furthermore, inhibition of sphingomyelin synthases reversed these effects. Our findings suggest that AMPK is reduced in the diabetic kidney due to an increase in the ATP/AMP ratio and that SM(d18:1/16:0) could be responsible for the enhanced ATP production via activation of the glycolytic pathway. PMID:27322466

  11. Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry Identifies Preferred Non-Icosahedral Polymorphs in the Self-Assembly of Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Kukreja, Alexander A; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Zlotnick, Adam; Jarrold, Martin F

    2016-01-29

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is prone to aberrant assembly in vitro and can form a broad distribution of oversized particles. Characterizing aberrant assembly products is challenging because they are both large and heterogeneous. In this work, charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is used to measure the distribution of WHV assembly products. CDMS is a single-particle technique where the masses of individual ions are determined from simultaneous measurement of each ion's charge and m/z (mass-to-charge) ratio. Under relatively aggressive, assembly promoting conditions, roughly half of the WHV assembly products are T=4 capsids composed of exactly 120 dimers while the other half are a broad distribution of larger species that extends to beyond 210 dimers. There are prominent peaks at around 132 dimers and at 150 dimers. In part, the 150 dimer complex can be attributed to elongating a T=4 capsid along its 5-fold axis by adding a ring of hexamers. However, most of the other features cannot be explained by existing models for hexameric defects. Cryo-electron microscopy provides evidence of elongated capsids. However, image analysis reveals that many of them are not closed but have "spiral-like" morphologies. The CDMS data indicate that oversized capsids have a preference for growth by addition of 3 or 4 dimers, probably by completion of hexameric vertices. PMID:26151485

  12. Identifying an interaction site between MutH and the C-terminal domain of MutL by crosslinking, affinity purification, chemical coding and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahrends, Robert; Kosinski, Jan; Kirsch, Dieter; Manelyte, Laura; Giron-Monzon, Luis; Hummerich, Lars; Schulz, Oliver; Spengler, Bernhard; Friedhoff, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To investigate protein-protein interaction sites in the DNA mismatch repair system we developed a crosslinking/mass spectrometry technique employing a commercially available trifunctional crosslinker with a thiol-specific methanethiosulfonate group, a photoactivatable benzophenone moiety and a biotin affinity tag. The XACM approach combines photocrosslinking (X), in-solution digestion of the crosslinked mixtures, affinity purification via the biotin handle (A), chemical coding of the crosslinked products (C) followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (M). We illustrate the feasibility of the method using a single-cysteine variant of the homodimeric DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Moreover, we successfully applied this method to identify the photocrosslink formed between the single-cysteine MutH variant A223C, labeled with the trifunctional crosslinker in the C-terminal helix and its activator protein MutL. The identified crosslinked MutL-peptide maps to a conserved surface patch of the MutL C-terminal dimerization domain. These observations are substantiated by additional mutational and chemical crosslinking studies. Our results shed light on the potential structures of the MutL holoenzyme and the MutH-MutL-DNA complex. PMID:16772401

  13. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  14. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G

    2015-07-31

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter(-1) of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter(-1) for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:26055719

  15. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline*

    PubMed Central

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter−1 of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter−1 for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:26055719

  16. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  17. New evidences on efficacy of boronic acid-based derivatization method to identify sugars in plant material by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Faraco, Marianna; Fico, Daniela; Pennetta, Antonio; De Benedetto, Giuseppe E

    2016-10-01

    This work presents an analytical procedure based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry which allows the determination of aldoses (glucose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, xylose, fucose, rhamnose) and chetoses (fructose) in plant material. One peak for each target carbohydrate was obtained by using an efficient derivatization employing methylboronic acid and acetic anhydride sequentially, whereas the baseline separation of the analytes was accomplished using an ionic liquid capillary column. First, the proposed method was optimized and validated. Successively, it was applied to identify the carbohydrates present in plant material. Finally, the procedure was successfully applied to samples from a XVII century painting, thus highlighting the occurrence of starch glue and fruit tree gum as polysaccharide materials. PMID:27474277

  18. Psoriasin, one of several new proteins identified in nasal lavage fluid from allergic and non-allergic individuals using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bryborn, Malin; Adner, Mikael; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Background Extravasation and luminal entry of plasma occurs continuously in the nose. This process is markedly facilitated in patients with symptomatic allergic rhinitis, resulting in an increased secretion of proteins. Identification of these proteins is an important step in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms in allergic diseases. DNA microarrays have recently made it possible to compare mRNA profiles of lavage fluids from healthy and diseased patients, whereas information on the protein level is still lacking. Methods Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 11 patients with symptomatic allergic rhinitis and 11 healthy volunteers. 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to separate proteins in the lavage fluids. Protein spots were picked from the gels and identified using mass spectrometry and database search. Selected proteins were confirmed with western blot. Results 61 spots were identified, of which 21 were separate proteins. 6 of these proteins (psoriasin, galectin-3, alpha enolase, intersectin-2, Wnt-2B and hypothetical protein MGC33648) had not previously been described in nasal lavage fluids. The levels of psoriasin were markedly down-regulated in allergic individuals. Prolactin-inducible protein was also found to be down-regulated, whereas different fragments of albumin together with Ig gamma 2 chain c region, transthyretin and splice isoform 1 of Wnt-2B were up-regulated among the allergic patients. Conclusion The identification of proteins in nasal lavage fluid with 2-dimensional gelelectrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry is a novel tool to profile protein expression in allergic rhinitis and it might prove useful in the hunt for new therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers for allergic diseases. Psoriasin is a potent chemotactic factor and its down-regulation during inflammation might be of importance for the outcome of the disease. PMID:16236163

  19. Single-cell mass spectrometry with multi-solvent extraction identifies metabolic differences between left and right blastomeres in the 8-cell frog (Xenopus) embryo.

    PubMed

    Onjiko, Rosemary M; Morris, Sydney E; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Single-cell metabolic mass spectrometry enables the discovery (untargeted) analysis of small molecules in individual cells. Using single-cell capillary electrophoresis high-resolution mass spectrometry (CE-HRMS), we recently uncovered small-molecule differences between embryonic cells located along the animal-vegetal and dorsal-ventral axes of the 16-cell frog (Xenopus laevis) embryo, raising the question whether metabolic cell heterogeneity also exists along the left-right body axis. To address this question, we here advance single-cell CE-HRMS for identifying and quantifying metabolites in higher analytical sensitivity, and then use the methodology to compare metabolite production between left and right cells. Our strategy utilizes multiple solvents with complementary physicochemical properties to extract small molecules from single cells and improve electrophoretic separation, increasing metabolite ion signals for quantification and tandem HRMS. As a result, we were able to identify 55 different small molecules in D1 cells that were isolated from 8-cell embryos. To quantify metabolite production between left and right cells, we analyzed n = 24 different D1 cells in technical duplicate-triplicate measurements. Statistical and multivariate analysis based on 80 of the most repeatedly quantified compounds revealed 10 distinct metabolites that were significantly differentially accumulated in the left or right cells (p < 0.05 and fold change ≥1.5). These metabolites were enriched in the arginine-proline metabolic pathway in the right, but not the left D1 cells. Besides providing analytical benefits for single-cell HRMS, this work provides new metabolic data on the establishment of normal body asymmetry in the early developing embryo. PMID:27004603

  20. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques. PMID:26070716

  1. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  2. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  3. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  4. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  5. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27067900

  6. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  7. Comparison of N-linked Glycoproteins in Human Whole Saliva, Parotid, Submandibular, and Sublingual Glandular Secretions Identified using Hydrazide Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Prasanna; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Pang, Eric; Yan, Weihong; Wong, David T; Loo, Joseph A

    2008-12-01

    INTRODUCTION: Saliva is a body fluid that holds promise for use as a diagnostic fluid for detecting diseases. Salivary proteins are known to be heavily glycosylated and are known to play functional roles in the oral cavity. We identified N-linked glycoproteins in human whole saliva, as well as the N-glycoproteins in parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glandular fluids. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We employed hydrazide chemistry to affinity enrich for N-linked glycoproteins and glycopeptides. PNGase F releases the N-peptides/proteins from the agarose-hydrazide resin, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the salivary N-glycoproteins. RESULTS: A total of 156 formerly N-glycosylated peptides representing 77 unique N-glycoproteins were identified in salivary fluids. The total number of N-glycoproteins identified in the individual fluids was: 62, 34, 44, and 53 in whole saliva, parotid fluid, submandibular fluid, and sublingual fluid, respectively. The majority of the N-glycoproteins were annotated as extracellular proteins (40%), and several of the N-glycoproteins were annotated as membrane proteins (14%). A number of glycoproteins were differentially found in submandibular and sublingual glandular secretions. CONCLUSIONS: Mapping the N-glycoproteome of parotid, submandibular, and sublingual saliva is important for a thorough understanding of biological processes occurring in the oral cavity and to realize the role of saliva in the overall health of human individuals. Moreover, identifying glycoproteins in saliva may also be valuable for future disease biomarker studies. PMID:21960768

  8. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  9. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  10. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  11. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry and indicator species analysis to identify marker components of soil- and plant biomass-derived organic matter fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemical properties of organic matter affect important soil processes such as speciation, solubilization, and transport of plant nutrients and metals. This work uses ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to determine the molecula...

  12. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  13. Hydrocarbons identified in extracts from estuarine water accommodated no. 2 fuel oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Walker, A. L.; Bieri, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented on a computerized gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analysis of methylene chloride and n-heptane extracts of a No. 2 fuel oil accommodated estuarine water sample. The analytical method is briefly described, and the limitations on the identifications are categorized. Some attempt was made to determine major and trace constituents in the water accommodate. Altogether 66 hydrocarbon compounds were identified specifically, and 75 compounds were partially identified. Seven compounds could be recognized as major constituents of the water accommodated oil and ten were present only as traces. The aromatic compounds found were alkyl benzenes, naphthalene, tetralin, indane, biphenyl, fluorene, anthracene, and some of their alkyl substituted isomers in the range of carbon numbers C7 to C15. Four n-alkanes, C10 to C13, were found along with four other assorted hydrocarbons.

  14. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza is one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases known to man. Reassorted strains of the virus pose the greatest risk to both human and animal health and have been associated with all pandemics of the past century, with the possible exception of the 1918 pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible. These algorithms enable reassorted influenza, and other, viruses to be rapidly identified to allow prevention strategies and treatments to be more efficiently implemented. Results The FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms were tested with both experimental and simulated mass spectra of whole virus digests. FluShuffle considers different combinations of viral protein identities that match the mass spectral data using a Gibbs sampling algorithm employing a mixed protein Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. FluResort utilizes those identities to calculate the weighted distance of each across two or more different phylogenetic trees constructed through viral protein sequence alignments. Each weighted mean distance value is normalized by conversion to a Z-score to establish a reassorted strain. Conclusions The new FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms can correctly identify the origins of influenza viral proteins and the number of reassortment events required to produce the strains from the high resolution mass spectral data of whole virus proteolytic digestions. This has been demonstrated in the case of constructed vaccine strains as well as common human seasonal strains of the virus. The algorithms significantly improve the capability of the proteotyping approach to identify reassorted viruses that pose the greatest pandemic risk. PMID:22906155

  15. Using Variable Ionization Energy Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with Comprehensive GC×GC To Identify Isomeric Species.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Stark, Christopher; Harrison, Roy M

    2016-04-19

    Although GC×GC-ToF-MS allows the separation of thousands of peaks, many of these peaks are not positively identified owing to the lack of mass spectral library data and/or standard materials, leading to a substantial amount of information being inaccessible. The fragmentation patterns of molecules in mass spectrometers using electron impact ionization at 70 eV can be useful for molecule identification, provided a match is available in a published EI MS library, but are indistinguishable for many isomeric organic compounds (for example, linear and branched alkanes). Lower ionization energies have been exploited leading to organic compounds being ionized with lower excess internal energy and less fragmentation, retaining the molecular ion and maximizing its relative signal. This has enabled the identification of a large number of isomeric organic compounds, both aliphatic and aromatic, between C12-C36, in the previously unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of two motor oil samples. This technique also demonstrates problems associated with separation of coeluting isomers, particularly for the n-alkanes, which are routinely measured by 1D GC/MS and may be overestimated, due to coelution. As a consequence retention times in 2 dimensions and mass spectra at variable ionization energies are shown to give unparalleled power to identify specific isomers. PMID:26981641

  16. Nontargeted Screening of Food Matrices: Development of a Chemometric Software Strategy To Identify Unknowns in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Knolhoff, Ann M; Zweigenbaum, Jerry A; Croley, Timothy R

    2016-04-01

    The ability to identify contaminants or adulterants in diverse, complex sample matrixes is necessary in food safety. Thus, nontargeted screening approaches must be implemented to detect and identify unexpected, unknown hazardous compounds that may be present. Molecular formulas can be generated for detected compounds from high-resolution mass spectrometry data, but analysis can be lengthy when thousands of compounds are detected in a single sample. Efficient data mining methods to analyze these complex data sets are necessary given the inherent chemical diversity and variability of food matrixes. The aim of this work is to determine necessary requirements to successfully apply data analysis strategies to distinguish suspect and control samples. Infant formula and orange juice samples were analyzed with one lot of each matrix containing varying concentrations of a four compound mixture to represent a suspect sample set. Small molecular differences were parsed from the data, where analytes as low as 10 ppb were revealed. This was accomplished, in part, by analyzing a quality control standard, matrix spiked with an analytical standard mixture, technical replicates, a representative number of sample lots, and blanks within the sample sequence; this enabled the development of a data analysis workflow and ensured that the employed method is sufficient for mining relevant molecular features from the data. PMID:26938581

  17. A simple and rapid method to identify and quantitatively analyze triterpenoid saponins in Ardisia crenata using ultrafast liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Li, Wei; Wang, Hanqing; Kuang, Xinzhu; Li, Qin; Wang, Yinghua; Xie, Peng; Koike, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Ardisia plant species have been used in traditional medicines, and their bioactive constituents of 13,28-epoxy triterpenoid saponins have excellent biological activities for new drug development. In this study, a fast and simple method based on ultrafast liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS) was developed to simultaneously identify and quantitatively analyze triterpenoid saponins in Ardisia crenata extracts. In total, 22 triterpenoid saponins, including two new compounds, were identified from A. crenata. The method exhibited good linearity, precision and recovery for the quantitative analysis of eight marker saponins. A relative quantitative method was also developed using one major saponin (ardisiacrispin B) as the standard to break through the choke-point of the lack of standards in phytochemical analysis. The method was successfully applied to quantitatively analyze saponins in commercially available plant samples. This study describes the first systematic analysis of 13,28-epoxy-oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins in the genus Ardisia using LC-ESI-MS. The results can provide the chemical support for further biological studies, phytochemotaxonomical studies and quality control of triterpenoid saponins in medicinal plants of the genus Ardisia. PMID:25459939

  18. Identifying the metabolic perturbations in earthworm induced by cypermethrin using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Ch, Ratnasekhar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Pandey, Pathya; Saxena, Prem Narain; Reddy Mudiam, Mohana Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Globally, cypermethrin is one of the most widely used synthetic pyrethroid for agricultural and domestic purposes. Most part of the pesticides used in the agriculture ends up as residues in the soil, making soil dwelling organisms, especially earthworms more susceptible to pesticide intoxication. Cypermethrin is known to be a neurotoxicant to many model organisms, including mammals and insects, but such type of toxicity evidence is not available for invertebrate systems like earthworms. In the present work, metabolomics based approach was utilized to identify the toxic mechanism of action of cypermethrin on earthworm (Metaphire posthuma) and these were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cypermethrin such as 2.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg (1/40th, 1/20th, 1/10th and 1/5th of LC50, respectively) for fourteen days. The results revealed that 22 metabolites (mainly fatty acids, sugars and amino acids) were shown significant responses in the exposed earthworms and these responses are dose dependent. It is proposed that mainly carbohydrate and fatty acids in neural system metabolism was disturbed. Overall, the results provided that metabolomics can be an effective tool to understand the effects of cypermethrin on the metabolic responses of earthworm Metaphire posthuma. PMID:26514086

  19. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  20. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  1. Novel glutathione conjugates of phenyl isocyanate identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Johansson Mali'n, Tove; Lindberg, Sandra; Åstot, Crister

    2014-01-01

    Phenyl isocyanate is a highly reactive compound that is used as a reagent in organic synthesis and in the production of polyurethanes. The potential for extensive occupational exposure to this compound makes it important to elucidate its reactivity towards different nucleophiles and potential targets in the body. In vitro reactions between glutathione and phenyl isocyanate were studied. Three adducts of glutathione with phenyl isocyanate were identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Mass spectrometric data for these adducts have not previously been reported. Nucleophilic attack on phenyl isocyanate occurred via either the cysteinyl thiol group or the glutamic acid α-amino group of glutathione. In addition, a double adduct was formed by the reaction of both these moieties. NMR analysis confirmed the proposed structure of the double adduct, which has not previously been described. These results suggest that phenyl isocyanate may react with free cysteines, the α-amino group and also with lysine residues whose side chain contains a primary amine. PMID:24446265

  2. Use of chemical modification and mass spectrometry to identify substrate-contacting sites in proteinaceous RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tien-Hao; Tanimoto, Akiko; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Wysocki, Vicki; Gopalan, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    Among all enzymes in nature, RNase P is unique in that it can use either an RNA- or a protein-based active site for its function: catalyzing cleavage of the 5′-leader from precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). The well-studied catalytic RNase P RNA uses a specificity module to recognize the pre-tRNA and a catalytic module to perform cleavage. Similarly, the recently discovered proteinaceous RNase P (PRORP) possesses two domains – pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) and metallonuclease (NYN) – that are present in some other RNA processing factors. Here, we combined chemical modification of lysines and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to identify putative substrate-contacting residues in Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1), and subsequently validated these candidate sites by site-directed mutagenesis. Using biochemical studies to characterize the wild-type (WT) and mutant derivatives, we found that AtPRORP1 exploits specific lysines strategically positioned at the tips of it's V-shaped arms, in the first PPR motif and in the NYN domain proximal to the catalytic center, to bind and cleave pre-tRNA. Our results confirm that the protein- and RNA-based forms of RNase P have distinct modules for substrate recognition and cleavage, an unanticipated parallel in their mode of action. PMID:27166372

  3. Use of chemical modification and mass spectrometry to identify substrate-contacting sites in proteinaceous RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Hao; Tanimoto, Akiko; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Wysocki, Vicki; Gopalan, Venkat

    2016-06-20

    Among all enzymes in nature, RNase P is unique in that it can use either an RNA- or a protein-based active site for its function: catalyzing cleavage of the 5'-leader from precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). The well-studied catalytic RNase P RNA uses a specificity module to recognize the pre-tRNA and a catalytic module to perform cleavage. Similarly, the recently discovered proteinaceous RNase P (PRORP) possesses two domains - pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) and metallonuclease (NYN) - that are present in some other RNA processing factors. Here, we combined chemical modification of lysines and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to identify putative substrate-contacting residues in Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1), and subsequently validated these candidate sites by site-directed mutagenesis. Using biochemical studies to characterize the wild-type (WT) and mutant derivatives, we found that AtPRORP1 exploits specific lysines strategically positioned at the tips of it's V-shaped arms, in the first PPR motif and in the NYN domain proximal to the catalytic center, to bind and cleave pre-tRNA. Our results confirm that the protein- and RNA-based forms of RNase P have distinct modules for substrate recognition and cleavage, an unanticipated parallel in their mode of action. PMID:27166372

  4. Correlation of mass spectrometry identified bacterial biomarkers from a fielded pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry biodetector with the microbiological gram stain classification scheme.

    PubMed

    Snyder, A Peter; Dworzanski, Jacek P; Tripathi, Ashish; Maswadeh, Waleed M; Wick, Charles H

    2004-11-01

    A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (Py-GC-IMS) briefcase system has been shown to detect and classify deliberately released bioaerosols in outdoor field scenarios. The bioaerosols included Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, MS-2 coliphage virus, and ovalbumin protein species. However, the origin and structural identities of the pyrolysate peaks in the GC-IMS data space, their microbiological information content, and taxonomic importance with respect to biodetection have not been determined. The present work interrogates the identities of the peaks by inserting a time-of-flight mass spectrometry system in parallel with the IMS detector through a Tee connection in the GC module. Biological substances producing ion mobility peaks from the pyrolysis of microorganisms were identified by their GC retention time, matching of their electron ionization mass spectra with authentic standards, and the National Institutes for Standards and Technology mass spectral database. Strong signals from 2-pyridinecarboxamide were identified in Bacillus samples including Bacillus anthracis, and its origin was traced to the cell wall peptidoglycan macromolecule. 3-Hydroxymyristic acid is a component of lipopolysaccharides in the cell walls of Gram-negative organisms. The Gram-negative Escherichia coli organism showed significant amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid derivatives and degradation products in Py-GC-MS analyses. Some of the fatty acid derivatives were observed in very low abundance in the ion mobility spectra, and the higher boiling lipid species were absent. Evidence is presented that the Py-GC-ambient temperature and pressure-IMS system generates and detects bacterial biochemical information that can serve as components of a biological classification scheme directly correlated to the Gram stain reaction in microorganism taxonomy. PMID:15516146

  5. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  6. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry as an Alternative to 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Identification of Difficult-To-Identify Bacterial Strains▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bizzini, A.; Jaton, K.; Romo, D.; Bille, J.; Prod'hom, G.; Greub, G.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional methods are sometimes insufficient to identify human bacterial pathogens, and alternative techniques, often molecular, are required. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified with a valid score 45.9% of 410 clinical isolates from 207 different difficult-to-identify species having required 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MALDI-TOF MS might represent an alternative to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:21106794

  7. A Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Data Management Platform*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Riffle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are “organically” distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/. PMID:22611296

  8. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Wruck, Colin D; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript (As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10(-9) M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26174364

  9. Size-exclusion chromatography as a stand-alone methodology identifies novel markers in mass spectrometry analyses of plasma-derived vesicles from healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Sáez, María José Fidalgo; Lozano-Ramos, Inés; Segui-Barber, Joan; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Ullate, Josep M. Estanyol; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Borrás, Francesc E.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma-derived vesicles hold a promising potential for use in biomedical applications. Two major challenges, however, hinder their implementation into translational tools: (a) the incomplete characterization of the protein composition of plasma-derived vesicles, in the size range of exosomes, as mass spectrometric analysis of plasma sub-components is recognizably troublesome and (b) the limited reach of vesicle-based studies in settings where the infrastructural demand of ultracentrifugation, the most widely used isolation/purification methodology, is not available. In this study, we have addressed both challenges by carrying-out mass spectrometry (MS) analyses of plasma-derived vesicles, in the size range of exosomes, from healthy donors obtained by 2 alternative methodologies: size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) on sepharose columns and Exo-Spin™. No exosome markers, as opposed to the most abundant plasma proteins, were detected by Exo-Spin™. In contrast, exosomal markers were present in the early fractions of SEC where the most abundant plasma proteins have been largely excluded. Noticeably, after a cross-comparative analysis of all published studies using MS to characterize plasma-derived exosomes from healthy individuals, we also observed a paucity of “classical exosome markers.” Independent of the isolation method, however, we consistently identified 2 proteins, CD5 antigen-like (CD5L) and galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP), whose presence was validated by a bead-exosome FACS assay. Altogether, our results support the use of SEC as a stand-alone methodology to obtain preparations of extracellular vesicles, in the size range of exosomes, from plasma and suggest the use of CD5L and LGALS3BP as more suitable markers of plasma-derived vesicles in MS. PMID:26154623

  10. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konop, Christopher J.; Knickelbine, Jennifer J.; Sygulla, Molly S.; Wruck, Colin D.; Vestling, Martha M.; Stretton, Antony O. W.

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript ( As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10-9 M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level.

  11. Secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and a novel statistical bioinformatic approach identifies a cancer-related profile in exhaled breath of breast cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; Landoni, Elena; Miceli, Rosalba; Dibari, Vincenza F; Dugo, Matteo; Agresti, Roberto; Tagliabue, Elda; Cristoni, Simone; Orlandi, Rosaria

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis represents a new frontier in medical diagnosis and a powerful tool for cancer biomarker discovery due to the recent development of analytical platforms for the detection and identification of human exhaled volatile compounds. Statistical and bioinformatic tools may represent an effective complement to the technical and instrumental enhancements needed to fully exploit clinical applications of breath analysis. Our exploratory study in a cohort of 14 breast cancer patients and 11 healthy volunteers used secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) to detect a cancer-related volatile profile. SESI-MS full-scan spectra were acquired in a range of 40-350 mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), converted to matrix data and analyzed using a procedure integrating data pre-processing for quality control, and a two-step class prediction based on machine-learning techniques, including a robust feature selection, and a classifier development with internal validation. MS spectra from exhaled breath showed an individual-specific breath profile and high reciprocal homogeneity among samples, with strong agreement among technical replicates, suggesting a robust responsiveness of SESI-MS. Supervised analysis of breath data identified a support vector machine (SVM) model including 8 features corresponding to m/z 106, 126, 147, 78, 148, 52, 128, 315 and able to discriminate exhaled breath from breast cancer patients from that of healthy individuals, with sensitivity and specificity above 0.9.Our data highlight the significance of SESI-MS as an analytical technique for clinical studies of breath analysis and provide evidence that our noninvasive strategy detects volatile signatures that may support existing technologies to diagnose breast cancer. PMID:26390050

  12. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  13. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  14. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FATTY ALDEHYDES

    PubMed Central

    Berdyshev, Evgeny V.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty aldehydes are important components of the cellular lipidome. Significant interest has been developed towards the analysis of the short chain α,β-unsaturated and hydroxylated aldehydes formed as a result of oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Multiple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and subsequently liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) approaches have been developed to identify and quantify short-chain as well as long-chain fatty aldehydes. Due to the ability to non-enzymaticaly form Schiff bases with amino groups of proteins, lipids, and with DNA guanidine, free aldehydes are viewed as a marker or metric of fatty acid oxidation and not the part of intracellular signaling pathways which has significantly limited the overall attention this group of molecules have received. This review provides an overview of current GC/MS and LC/MS approaches of fatty aldehyde analysis as well as discusses technical challenges standing in the way of free fatty aldehyde quantitation. PMID:21930240

  15. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  16. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  17. Clinical significance of coryneform Gram-positive rods from blood identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and their susceptibility profiles - a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Ammara; Chen, Derrick J; Strand, Gregory J; Dylla, Brenda L; Cole, Nicolynn C; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Patel, Robin

    2016-07-01

    With the advent of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), most Gram-positive rods (GPRs) are readily identified; however, their clinical relevance in blood cultures remains unclear. Herein, we assessed the clinical significance of GPRs isolated from blood and identified in the era of MALDI-TOF MS. A retrospective chart review of patients presenting to the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, from January 1, 2013, to October 13, 2015, was performed. Any episode of a positive blood culture for a GPR was included. We assessed the number of bottles positive for a given isolate, time to positivity of blood cultures, patient age, medical history, interpretation of culture results by the healthcare team and whether infectious diseases consultation was obtained. We also evaluated the susceptibility profiles of a larger collection of GPRs tested in the clinical microbiology laboratory of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN from January 1, 2013, to October 31, 2015. There were a total of 246 GPRs isolated from the blood of 181 patients during the study period. 56% (n = 101) were deemed contaminants by the healthcare team and were not treated; 33% (n = 59) were clinically determined to represent true bacteremia and were treated; and 8% (n = 14) were considered of uncertain significance, with patients prescribed treatment regardless. Patient characteristics associated with an isolate being treated on univariate analysis included younger age (P = 0.02), identification to the species level (P = 0.02), higher number of positive blood culture sets (P < 0.0001), lower time to positivity (P < 0.0001), immunosuppression (P = 0.03), and recommendation made by an infectious disease consultant (P = 0.0005). On multivariable analysis, infectious diseases consultation (P = 0.03), higher number of positive blood culture sets (P = 0.0005) and lower time to positivity (P = 0.03) were associated with an isolate being treated. 100, 83, 48 and 34% of GPRs

  18. Microorganism characterization by single particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a major effort by several groups has been undertaken to identify bacteria by mass spectrometry at the single cell level. The intent of this review is to highlight the recent progress made in the application of single particle mass spectrometry to the analysis of microorganisms. A large portion of the review highlights improvements in the ionization and mass analysis of bio-aerosols, or particles that contain biologically relevant molecules such as peptides or proteins. While these are not direct applications to bacteria, the results have been central to a progression toward single cell mass spectrometry. Developments in single particle matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are summarized. Recent applications of aerosol laser desorption/ionization (LDI) to the analysis of single microorganisms are highlighted. Successful applications of off-line and on-the-fly aerosol MALDI to microorganism detection are discussed. Limitations to current approaches and necessary future achievements are also addressed. PMID:18949817

  19. Clinical and microbiological features of a cystic fibrosis patient chronically colonized with Pandoraea sputorum identified by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Olmos, A; Morosini, M I; Lamas, A; García-Castillo, M; García-García, L; Cantón, R; Máiz, L

    2012-03-01

    Clonal isolates identified as various nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli over a 5-year period from sputum cultures of a 30-year-old cystic fibrosis patient were successfully reidentified as Pandoraea sputorum by combining 16S rRNA sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Decreased lung function improved after 1 year of azithromycin and inhaled 7%-hypertonic saline treatment. PMID:22170922

  20. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  1. High Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoliter Volumes of Volatile and Nonvolatile Compounds using Matrix Assisted Ionization (MAI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopmann, Michael R.; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W.; Shteynberg, David; Moritz, Robert L.

    2016-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important element in the understanding of protein function, and chemical cross-linking shotgun mass spectrometry is rapidly becoming a routine approach to identify these specific interfaces and topographical interactions. Protein cross-link data analysis is aided by dozens of algorithm choices, but hindered by a lack of a common format for representing results. Consequently, interoperability between algorithms and pipelines utilizing chemical cross-linking remains a challenge. pepXML is an open, widely-used format for representing spectral search algorithm results that has facilitated information exchange and pipeline development for typical shotgun mass spectrometry analyses. We describe an extension of this format to incorporate cross-linking spectral search results. We demonstrate application of the extension by representing results of multiple cross-linking search algorithms. In addition, we demonstrate adapting existing pepXML-supporting software pipelines to analyze protein cross-linking results formatted in pepXML.

  2. High Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoliter Volumes of Volatile and Nonvolatile Compounds using Matrix Assisted Ionization (MAI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopmann, Michael R.; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W.; Shteynberg, David; Moritz, Robert L.

    2016-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important element in the understanding of protein function, and chemical cross-linking shotgun mass spectrometry is rapidly becoming a routine approach to identify these specific interfaces and topographical interactions. Protein cross-link data analysis is aided by dozens of algorithm choices, but hindered by a lack of a common format for representing results. Consequently, interoperability between algorithms and pipelines utilizing chemical cross-linking remains a challenge. pepXML is an open, widely-used format for representing spectral search algorithm results that has facilitated information exchange and pipeline development for typical shotgun mass spectrometry analyses. We describe an extension of this format to incorporate cross-linking spectral search results. We demonstrate application of the extension by representing results of multiple cross-linking search algorithms. In addition, we demonstrate adapting existing pepXML-supporting software pipelines to analyze protein cross-linking results formatted in pepXML.

  3. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    DOEpatents

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  4. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  5. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Frenchette, Layne; Moon, Wooyoung; Pruitt, Cole; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter; Stein, Derek

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterization of a nanopore-based ion source for mass spectrometry. Our goal is to field-extract ions directly from solution into the high vacuum to enable unit collection efficiency and temporal resolution of sequential ion emissions for DNA sequencing. The ion source features a capillary whose tip, measuring tens to hundreds of nanometers in inner diameter, is situated in the vacuum ~ 1.5 cm away from an extractor electrode. The capillary was filled with conductive solution and voltage-biased relative to the extractor. Applied voltages of hundreds of volts extracted tens to hundreds of nA of current from the tip. A mass analysis of the extracted ions showed primarily singly charged clusters comprising the cation or anion solvated by several solvent molecules. Our interpretation of these results, based on the works of Taylor and of de la Mora, is that the applied electric stresses distort the fluid meniscus into a Taylor cone, where electric fields reach ~ 1V/nm and induce significant ion evaporation. Accordingly, the abundances of extracted ionic clusters resemble a Boltzmann distribution. This work was supported by NIH grant NHGRI 1R21HG005100-01.

  6. Possible isomers in ligand protected Ag11 cluster ions identified by ion mobility mass spectrometry and fragmented by surface induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Baksi, Ananya; Harvey, Sophie R; Natarajan, Ganapati; Wysocki, Vicki H; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-03-01

    This communication reports the identification of gas phase isomers in monolayer-protected silver clusters. Two different isomers of Ag11(SG)7(-) (SG-gulathione thiolate) with different drift times have been detected using combined electrospray ionization (ESI) and ion mobility (IM) mass spectrometry (MS). Surface induced dissociation (SID) of the 3(-) charge state of such clusters shows charge stripping to give the 1(-) charged ion with some sodium attachment, in addition to fragmentation. SID and collision induced dissociation (CID) for Ag11(SG)7(-) suggest different pathways being accessed with each method. SID was introduced for the first time for the study of monolayer-protected clusters. PMID:26864967

  7. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction. PMID:26778144

  8. The value of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in identifying clinically relevant bacteria: a comparison with automated microbiology system

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunmei; Huang, Shenglei; Shan, Yuzhang; Ye, Xiangru

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been developed as a new-type soft ionization mass spectrometry in the recent year. Increasing number of clinical microbiological laboratories consider it as an innovate approach for bacterial identification. Methods A total of 876 clinical strains, comprising 52 species in 27 genus, were obtained from Fudan University Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital. We compared the identification accuracy of the Vitek MS system (bioMerieux, Marcy l’Etoile) to other conventional methods for bacterial identification. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed as a reference identification method in cases of discrepant results. Results The Vitek MS system consistently produced accurate results within minutes of loading, while conventional methods required several hours to produce identification results. Among the 876 isolates, the overall performance of Vitek MS was significantly better than the conventional method both for correct species identification (830, 94.7% vs. 746, 85.2%, respectively, P=0.000). Conclusions Compared to traditional identification methods, MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, accurate and economical technique to enhance the clinical value of microorganism identification. PMID:24822117

  9. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  10. Targeted and non-targeted boron complex formation followed by electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry: a novel approach for identifying boron esters with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Andras; Lucio, Marianna; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of boron esters was investigated in peat-soluble humified materials with a detailed molecular-level description of boron-organic interactions. Thousands of individually baseline separated signals were obtained from the analysis of natural organic matter of peat samples, using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. This technique offers unsurpassed isotope-specific mass resolution that can lead to precise molecular formula assignments by means of mathematical data analysis and visualisation techniques, such as mass defect (Kendrick) or elemental ratio (van Krevelen) plots. The analysis of potential boron binding structures within the sample of natural organic matter was described based on prior results. Herein, we describe an algorithm that can be used to effectively distinguish and filter complexes through data obtained from boron-enriched systems with highly intricate mass spectra, such as natural organic matter. PMID:21719921

  11. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic. PMID:26553791

  12. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  13. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  14. Mass spectrometry in natural product chemistry.

    PubMed

    Clayton, E; Hill, H C; Reed, R I

    1966-01-01

    Some mass spectrometric techniques are described which seem applicable to investigating problems in natural product chemistry. One example is of a sample of 5 mcg of a compound being identified by comparison with an authentic sample of prostaglandin derivative. Compared were mass, ion content, and structure. In the prostaglandin/unknown substance comparison, high-resolution mass spectrometry resolved a quandary: apparent additional ions present in the unknown substance were shown to be an impurity. PMID:12262324

  15. The use of 18O-exchange and base-catalyzed N-dealkylation with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to identify carbinolamide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bessire, Andrew J; Vaz, Alfin D N; Walker, Gregory S; Wang, Wei Wei; Sharma, Raman

    2010-07-30

    Oxidation of N-alkyl-substituted amides is a common transformation observed in metabolism studies of drugs and other chemicals. Metabolism at the alpha carbon atom can produce stable carbinolamide compounds, which may be abundant enough to require complete confidence in structural assignments. In a drug discovery setting, rapid structural elucidation of test compounds is critical to inform the compound selection process. Traditional approaches to the analysis of carbinolamides have relied upon the time-consuming synthesis of authentic standards or purification of large enough quantities for characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We describe a simple technique used in conjunction with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) which demonstrates the chemical identity of a carbinolamide by its distinctive ability to reversibly exchange [(18)O]water through an imine intermediate. A key advantage of the technique is that the chromatographic retention times of metabolites are preserved, allowing direct comparisons of mass chromatograms from non-treated and [(18)O]water-treated samples. Metabolites susceptible to the treatment are clearly indicated by the addition of 2 mass units to their original mass. An additional test which can be used in conjunction with (18)O-exchange is base-catalyzed N-dealkylation of N-(alpha-hydroxy)alkyl compounds. The use of the technique is described for carbinolamide metabolites of dirlotapide, loperamide, and a proprietary compound. PMID:20552706

  16. FPLC and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry identify candidate necrosis-inducing proteins from culture filtrates of the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Ben M'Barek, Sarrah; Cordewener, Jan H G; Tabib Ghaffary, Seyed M; van der Lee, Theo A J; Liu, Zhaohui; Mirzadi Gohari, Amir; Mehrabi, Rahim; America, Antoine H P; Robert, Olivier; Friesen, Timothy L; Hamza, Sonia; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Kema, Gerrit H J

    2015-06-01

    Culture filtrates (CFs) of the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici were assayed for necrosis-inducing activity after infiltration in leaves of various wheat cultivars. Active fractions were partially purified and characterized. The necrosis-inducing factors in CFs are proteinaceous, heat stable and their necrosis-inducing activity is temperature and light dependent. The in planta activity of CFs was tested by a time series of proteinase K (PK) co-infiltrations, which was unable to affect activity 30min after CF infiltrations. This suggests that the necrosis inducing proteins (NIPs) are either absent from the apoplast and likely actively transported into mesophyll cells or protected from the protease by association with a receptor. Alternatively, plant cell death signaling pathways might be fully engaged during the first 30min and cannot be reversed even after PK treatment. Further fractionation of the CFs with the highest necrosis-inducing activity involved fast performance liquid chromatography, SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. This revealed that most of the proteins present in the fractions have not been described before. The two most prominent ZtNIP encoding candidates were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris and subsequent infiltration assays showed their differential activity in a range of wheat cultivars. PMID:26092790

  17. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  18. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  19. An efficient approach to identify different chemical markers between fibrous root and rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Xu; Yuan, Jian-Chao; Kang, Li-Ping; Pang, Xu; Yan, Ren-Yi; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Xin-Guang; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2016-09-10

    An ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was established and applied to rapidly distinguish the chemical differences between fibrous root and rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. The datasets of tR-m/z pairs, ion intensity and sample code were processed by principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis. Chemical markers could be identified based on their exact mass data, fragmentation characteristics, and retention times. And the new compounds among chemical markers could be isolated rapidly guided by the ultra high-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and their definitive structures would be further elucidated by NMR spectra. Using this approach, twenty-four markers were identified on line including nine new saponins and five new steroidal saponins of them were obtained in pure form. The study validated this proposed approach as a suitable method for identification of the chemical differences between various medicinal parts in order to expand medicinal parts and increase the utilization rate of resources. PMID:27416524

  20. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  1. A quick and easy method to identify bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pennanec, Xaviera; Dufour, Alain; Haras, Dominique; Réhel, Karine

    2010-02-01

    Concerns with water quality have increased in recent years, in part due to the more frequent contamination of water by pathogens like E. coli and L. pneumophila. Current methods for the typing of bacteria in water samples are based on culture of samples on specific media. These techniques are time-consuming, subject to the impact of interferents and do not totally meet all the requirements of prevention. There is a need for accurate and rapid identification of these microorganisms. This report deals with the detection of bacteria, more precisely of Legionella spp., and the development of an analytical strategy for a rapid and unambiguous identification of these pathogens in water from diverse origins. Therefore, a protein mass mapping using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) of whole bacteria combined with a home-made database of bacteria spectra is applied. A large variety of different bacteria and microorganisms is used to approach the actual composition of samples with numerous interferents. The objective is to propose a universal method for sampling preparation before MALDI MS analysis and optimised spectrometric conditions for reproducible intense peaks. Several experimental factors known to influence signal quality such as time and media of culture have been studied. The proposed method gives promising results for a sure differentiation of Legionella species and subspecies and a rapid identification of bacteria which are the most dangerous or difficult to eradicate. This method is easy to perform with an excellent reproducibility. The analytical protocol and the corresponding database were validated on samples from different origins (cooling tower, plumbing hot water). PMID:20049880

  2. Polysialylated N-Glycans Identified in Human Serum Through Combined Developments in Sample Preparation, Separations and Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kronewitter, Scott R.; Marginean, Ioan; Cox, Jonathan T.; Zhao, Rui; Hagler, Clay D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Carlson, Timothy S.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-09-02

    The N-glycan diversity of human serum glycoproteins, i.e. the human blood serum N-glycome, is complex due to the range of glycan structures potentially synthesizable by human glycosylation enzymes. The reported glycome, however, is limited by methods of sample preparation, available analytical platforms, e.g., based upon electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and software tools for data analysis. In this report, several improvements have been implemented in sample preparation and analysis to extend ESI-MS glycan characterization and to provide an improved view of glycan diversity. Sample preparation improvements include acidified, microwave-accelerated, PNGase F N-glycan release, and sodium borohydride reduction were optimized to improve quantitative yields and conserve the number of glycoforms detected. Two-stage desalting (during solid phase extraction and on the analytical column) increased the sensitivity by reducing analyte signal division between multiple reducing-end-forms or cation adducts. On-line separations were improved by using extended length graphitized carbon columns and adding TFA as an acid modifier to a formic acid/reversed phase gradient which provides additional resolving power and significantly improved desorption of both large and heavily sialylated glycans. To improve MS sensitivity and provide gentler ionization conditions at the source-MS interface, subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has been utilized. When method improvements are combined together with the Glycomics Quintavariate Informed Quantification (GlyQ-IQ) recently described1 these technologies demonstrate the ability to significantly extend glycan detection sensitivity and provide expanded glycan coverage. We demonstrate application of these advances in the context of the human serum glycome, and for which our initial observations include detection of a new class of heavily sialylated N-glycans, including polysialylated N-glycans.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection coupled to electrospray time-of-flight and ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry to identify phenolic compounds from a lemon verbena extract.

    PubMed

    Quirantes-Piné, R; Funes, L; Micol, V; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2009-07-10

    High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection was used to carry out the comprehensive characterization of a lemon verbena extract with demonstrated antioxidant and antiinflammatory activity. Two different MS techniques have been coupled to HPLC: on one hand, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and on the other hand, tandem mass spectrometry on an ion-trap. The use of a small particle size C18 column (1.8 microm) provided a great resolution and made possible the separation of several isomers. The UV-visible spectrophotometry was used to delimit the class of phenolic compound and the accurate mass measurements on time-of-flight spectrometer enabled to identify the compounds present in the extract. Finally, the fragmentation pattern obtained in MS-MS experiments confirmed the proposed structures. This procedure was able to determine many well-known phenolic compounds present in lemon verbena such as verbascoside and its derivatives, diglucuronide derivatives of apigenin and luteolin, and eukovoside. Also gardoside, verbasoside, cistanoside F, theveside, campneoside I, chrysoeriol-7-diglucuronide, forsythoside A and acacetin-7-diglucuronide were found for the first time in lemon verbena. PMID:19500792

  4. Automated Validation of Results and Removal of Fragment Ion Interferences in Targeted Analysis of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (MS) using SWATHProphet*

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andrew; Bader, Samuel L.; Shteynberg, David; Hood, Leroy; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics by mass spectrometry technology is widely used for identifying and quantifying peptides and proteins. The breadth and sensitivity of peptide detection have been advanced by the advent of data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry. Analysis of such data, however, is challenging due to the complexity of fragment ion spectra that have contributions from multiple co-eluting precursor ions. We present SWATHProphet software that identifies and quantifies peptide fragment ion traces in data-independent acquisition data, provides accurate probabilities to ensure results are correct, and automatically detects and removes contributions to quantitation originating from interfering precursor ions. Integration in the widely used open source Trans-Proteomic Pipeline facilitates subsequent analyses such as combining results of multiple data sets together for improved discrimination using iProphet and inferring sample proteins using ProteinProphet. This novel development should greatly help make data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry accessible to large numbers of users. PMID:25713123

  5. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  6. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  7. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  8. Mass spectrometry of large complexes.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is becoming a more and more powerful tool for investigating protein complexes. Recent developments, based on different ionization techniques, electrospray, desorption/ionization and others are contributing to the usefulness of MS to describe the organization and structure of large non-covalent assemblies. PMID:19782560

  9. JUMPg: An Integrative Proteogenomics Pipeline Identifying Unannotated Proteins in Human Brain and Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuxin; Wang, Xusheng; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Shaw, Timothy I; Wu, Zhiping; Bai, Bing; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Suiping; Beach, Thomas G; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Peng, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    Proteogenomics is an emerging approach to improve gene annotation and interpretation of proteomics data. Here we present JUMPg, an integrative proteogenomics pipeline including customized database construction, tag-based database search, peptide-spectrum match filtering, and data visualization. JUMPg creates multiple databases of DNA polymorphisms, mutations, splice junctions, partially trypticity, as well as protein fragments translated from the whole transcriptome in all six frames upon RNA-seq de novo assembly. We use a multistage strategy to search these databases sequentially, in which the performance is optimized by re-searching only unmatched high-quality spectra and reusing amino acid tags generated by the JUMP search engine. The identified peptides/proteins are displayed with gene loci using the UCSC genome browser. Then, the JUMPg program is applied to process a label-free mass spectrometry data set of Alzheimer's disease postmortem brain, uncovering 496 new peptides of amino acid substitutions, alternative splicing, frame shift, and "non-coding gene" translation. The novel protein PNMA6BL specifically expressed in the brain is highlighted. We also tested JUMPg to analyze a stable-isotope labeled data set of multiple myeloma cells, revealing 991 sample-specific peptides that include protein sequences in the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, the JUMPg program is an effective proteogenomics tool for multiomics data integration. PMID:27225868

  10. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  11. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  12. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  13. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  14. Study of CPP Mechanisms by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sagan, Sandrine; Bechara, Chérine; Burlina, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms of entry of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) requires reliable methods to measure their cellular uptake efficiency, monitor their metabolic stability, and identify their intracellular localization. We describe here a protocol based on the direct detection of peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), which allows the absolute quantification of the intact internalized species and the analysis of their intracellular degradation. This protocol can be easily applied to the simultaneous quantification of different species, for example mixtures of CPPs. PMID:26202265

  15. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  16. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  17. Mass spectrometry and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Sisu, I; Sisu, E

    2010-01-01

    The present review represents a concise and complete survey of the literature covering 2004–2009, concerning the mass spectrometric techniques involved in the structural investigation of renal calculi. After a short presentation of the fundamental mass spectrometric techniques (MALDI–TOF, QTOF, MS–MS) as well as hyphenated methods (GC–MS, LC–MS, CE–MS), an extensive study of the urinary proteome analysis as well as the detection and quantification by mass spectrometry of toxins, drugs and metabolites from renal calculi is presented. PMID:20968197

  18. Glycosaminoglycan Glycomics Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The fact that sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary for the functioning of all animal physiological systems drives the need to understand their biology. This understanding is limited, however, by the heterogeneous nature of GAG chains and their dynamic spatial and temporal expression patterns. GAGs have a regulated structure overlaid by heterogeneity but lack the detail necessary to build structure/function relationships. In order to provide this information, we need glycomics platforms that are sensitive, robust, high throughput, and information rich. This review summarizes progress on mass-spectrometry-based GAG glycomics methods. The areas covered include disaccharide analysis, oligosaccharide profiling, and tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. PMID:23325770

  19. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  20. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  1. Predicting direct protein interactions from affinity purification mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry identification (AP-MS) is an increasingly popular approach to observe protein-protein interactions (PPI) in vivo. One drawback of AP-MS, however, is that it is prone to detecting indirect interactions mixed with direct physical interactions. Therefore, the ability to distinguish direct interactions from indirect ones is of much interest. Results We first propose a simple probabilistic model for the interactions captured by AP-MS experiments, under which the problem of separating direct interactions from indirect ones is formulated. Then, given idealized quantitative AP-MS data, we study the problem of identifying the most likely set of direct interactions that produced the observed data. We address this challenging graph theoretical problem by first characterizing signatures that can identify weakly connected nodes as well as dense regions of the network. The rest of the direct PPI network is then inferred using a genetic algorithm. Our algorithm shows good performance on both simulated and biological networks with very high sensitivity and specificity. Then the algorithm is used to predict direct interactions from a set of AP-MS PPI data from yeast, and its performance is measured against a high-quality interaction dataset. Conclusions As the sensitivity of AP-MS pipeline improves, the fraction of indirect interactions detected will also increase, thereby making the ability to distinguish them even more desirable. Despite the simplicity of our model for indirect interactions, our method provides a good performance on the test networks. PMID:21034440

  2. LESA FAIMS Mass Spectrometry for the Spatial Profiling of Proteins from Tissue.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Rian L; Creese, Andrew J; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2016-07-01

    We have shown previously that coupling of high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility, with liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry of tissue results in significant improvements in the resulting protein mass spectra. Here, we demonstrate LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging of proteins in sections of mouse brain and liver tissue. The results are compared with LESA mass spectrometry images obtained in the absence of FAIMS. The results show that the number of different protein species detected can be significantly increased by incorporating FAIMS into the workflow. A total of 34 proteins were detected by LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging of mouse brain, of which 26 were unique to FAIMS, compared with 15 proteins (7 unique) detected by LESA mass spectrometry imaging. A number of proteins were identified including α-globin, 6.8 kDa mitochondrial proteolipid, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, ubiquitin, β-thymosin 4, and calmodulin. A total of 40 species were detected by LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging of mouse liver, of which 29 were unique to FAIMS, compared with 24 proteins (13 unique) detected by LESA mass spectrometry imaging. The spatial distributions of proteins identified in both LESA mass spectrometry imaging and LESA FAIMS mass spectrometry imaging were in good agreement indicating that FAIMS is a suitable tool for inclusion in mass spectrometry imaging workflows. PMID:27228471

  3. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  4. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Fungi and the Effects of Database Composition on Protein Inferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry has shown potential for identifying and detecting plant pathogens. Unlike antibody-based assays like ELISA, mass spectrometry does not require the use of pathogen-specific reagents for the detection of pathogen-specific proteins and peptides. However, the mass spectrometry appro...

  5. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Palop-Borrás, Begoña; Domingo, Diego; Tudó, Griselda

    2016-06-01

    To date, more than 170 species of mycobacteria have been described, of which more than one third may be pathogenic to humans, representing a significant workload for microbiology laboratories. These species must be identified in clinical practice, which has long been a major problem due to the shortcomings of conventional (phenotypic) methods and the limitations and complexity of modern methods largely based on molecular biology techniques. The aim of this review was to briefly describe different aspects related to the use of MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of mycobacteria. Several difficulties are encountered with the use of this methodology in these microorganisms mainly due to the high pathogenicity of some mycobacteria and the peculiar structure of their cell wall, requiring inactivation and special protein extraction protocols. We also analysed other relevant aspects such as culture media, the reference methods employed (gold standard) in the final identification of the different species, the cut-off used to accept data as valid, and the databases of the different mass spectrometry systems available. MS has revolutionized diagnosis in modern microbiology; however, specific improvements are needed to consolidate the use of this technology in mycobacteriology. PMID:27389290

  6. Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, Joshua F.; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wang, Zihao; Camp, David G.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Stanley, Pamela; Hart, Gerald W.; Hunt, Donald F.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-08

    O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a reversible post-translational modification of Ser and Thr residues on cytosolic and nuclear proteins found in all higher eukaryotes. Aberrant O-GlcNAc modification of brain proteins has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, understanding specific functions of O-GlcNAcylation in AD has been impeded by the difficulty in characterization of O-GlcNAc sites on proteins. In this study, we modified a chemical/enzymatic photochemical cleavage approach for enriching O-GlcNAcylated peptides in samples containing {approx}100 {micro}g of tryptic peptides from mouse cerebrocortical brain tissue. A total of 274 O-GlcNAcylated proteins were identified. Of these 168 were not previously known to be modified by O-GlcNAc. Overall, 458 O-GlcNAc sites on Ser and Thr residues in 195 proteins were identified. Many of the modified residues are either known phosphorylation sites or located in close proximity to known phosphorylation sites. These findings support the proposed regulatory crosstalk between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation. This study produced the most comprehensive O-GlcNAc proteome of mammalian brain tissue with both protein identification and O-GlcNAc site assignment. Interestingly, we observed O-{beta}-GlcNAc on EGF-like repeats in the extracellular domains of five membrane proteins, thus representing the first evidence for extracellular O-GlcNAcylation in mammalian systems by the ER-resident O-GlcNAc transferase (EOGT). We also report a GlcNAc-{beta}-1,3-Fuc-{alpha}-1-O-Thr modification on the EGF-like repeat of the Versican core protein, a novel substrate of Fringe {beta}1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases.

  7. Identifying the provenance of Leach's storm petrels in the North Atlantic using polychlorinated biphenyl signatures derived from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Megson, David; Brown, Thomas A; Johnson, Glenn W; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Bicknell, Anthony W J; Votier, Stephen C; Lohan, Maeve C; Comber, Sean; Kalin, Robert; Worsfold, Paul J

    2014-11-01

    PCB signatures can be used for source identification, exposure studies, age dating and bio-monitoring. This study uses comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS) to produce a PCB signature comprised of over 80 PCBs for individual Leach's storm petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa). The Leach's storm petrel is a relatively small, elusive, understudied pelagic bird, which only returns to remote islands under darkness during the breeding season. Samples were obtained from 25 Leach's storm petrels found dead in Canada and the UK following storm events in 2006 and 2009. Tissue samples were extracted and analysed by GCxGC-ToFMS and results showed that 83 PCB congeners were present in >60% of samples. An assessment of the PCB signature in four different tissue types showed that it did not vary greatly in samples obtained from the gut, heart, liver and stomach. Multivariate statistical analysis identified a distinctive PCB signature in birds from Canada and Europe which was used to identify the regional provenance and transatlantic movement of individual birds. The findings showcase the ability of GCxGC-ToFMS to provide the high quality congener specific analysis that is necessary for PCB fingerprinting, as well as highlighting the potential of PCB signatures for use in ecological studies of movement, foraging and behaviour. PMID:25113202

  8. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  9. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26510657

  10. Fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, using time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eades, D.; Wruck, D.; Gregg, H.

    1996-11-11

    MALDI MS was developed as a way of getting molecular weight information on small quantities (picomole to femtomole levels) of high-mass, thermally labile macromolecules. While most other analytical MS ionization techniques cause fragmentation, decomposition, or multiple charging, MALDI efficiently places intact macromolecules into the gas phase with little fragmentation or rearrangement. This project had 3 objectives: establish the MALDI capability at LLNL, perform fundamental studies of analyte-matrix interactions, and apply the technique for biochemical research. A retired time-of-flight instrument was adapted for MALDI analyses, relevant parameters influencing the MALDI process were identified for further study (matrix molar absorptivity, sample crystal preparation), and collaborations were established with research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. In MALDI, the macromolecule of interest is mixed with a high-molar excess (1:100 to 1:10,000) of an organic matrix which readily absorbs energy at the wavelength corresponding to a UV laser. Upon laser irradiation, the matrix absorbs the majority of the energy, causing it to desorb from the surface and gently release the macromolecule into the gas phase with little or no fragmentation. Once in the gas phase, ion-molecule reactions between excited matrix and neutral macromolecules generated ionized analyte species which then can be focused into a MS for detection.

  11. The life sciences mass spectrometry research unit.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry (LSMS) research unit focuses on the development of novel analytical workflows based on innovative mass spectrometric and software tools for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, peptides and proteins in complex biological matrices. The present article summarizes some of the recent work of the unit: i) the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of drug of abuse in hair, ii) the use of high resolution mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative/quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and metabolomics, and iii) the absolute quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry using the selected reaction monitoring mode. PMID:22867547

  12. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  13. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  14. Mass Spectrometry Based Identifications of LMW Glutenin Subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is routinely used to identify wheat endosperm proteins. In this method, peptide fragmentation patterns generated by MS/MS are identified using a ‘search engine’ to compare the spectra to those generated in silico from protein sequence databases. Trypsin is a commonly...

  15. Microorganisms in cryopreserved semen and culture media used in the in vitro production (IVP) of bovine embryos identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS).

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Dávila; Santos, Vanessa G; Braga, Patrícia A C; Ferreira, Christina R; Ballottin, Daniela; Tasic, Ljubica; Basso, Andréa C; Sanches, Bruno V; Pontes, José H F; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Garboggini, Fabiana Fantinatti; Eberlin, Marcos N; Tata, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Commercial cattle breeders produce their own herd offspring for the dairy and beef market using artificial insemination. The procedure involves sanitary risks associated with the collection and commercialization of the germplasm, and the in vitro production and transfer of the bovine embryos must be monitored by strict health surveillance. To avoid the spreading of infectious diseases, one must rely on using controlled and monitored germplasm, media, and reagents that are guaranteed free of pathogens. In this article, we investigated the use of a new mass spectrometric approach for fast and accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in bovine semen and in culture media employed in the embryo in vitro production process. The microorganisms isolated from samples obtained in a commercial bovine embryo IVP setting were identified in a few minutes by their conserved peptide/protein profile, obtained applying matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), matched against a commercial database. The successful microorganisms MS identification has been confirmed by DNA amplification and sequencing. Therefore, the MS technique seems to offer a powerful tool for rapid and accurate microorganism identification in semen and culture media samples. PMID:23756041

  16. Application of linear multivariate calibration techniques to identify the peaks responsible for the antioxidant activity of Satureja hortensis L. and Oliveria decumbens Vent. essential oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Naser; Masoum, Saeed; Mehrara, Bahare; Hosseini, Hossein

    2015-09-15

    Satureja hortensis L. and Oliveria decumbens Vent. are known for their diverse effects in drug therapy and traditional medicine. One of the most interesting properties of their essential oils is good antioxidant activity. In this paper, essential oils of aerial parts of S. hortensis L. and O. decumbens Vent. from different regions were obtained by hydrodistillation and were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Essential oils were tested for their free radical scavenging activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay to identify the peaks potentially responsible for the antioxidant activity from chromatographic fingerprints by numerous linear multivariate calibration techniques. Because of its simplicity and high repeatability, orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS) model had the best performance in indicating the potential antioxidant compounds in S. hortensis L. and O. decumbens Vent. essential oils. In this study, P-cymene, carvacrol and β-bisabolene for S. hortensis L. and P-cymene, Ç-terpinen, thymol, carvacrol, and 1,3-benzodioxole, 4-methoxy-6-(2-propenyl) for O. decumbens Vent. are suggested as the potentially antioxidant compounds. PMID:26262598

  17. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  18. IDENTIFYING IMPORTANT ALLERGENS USING MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA's mission is to protect human health and the environment. Fungal allergens are major potential source of allergy based disease like asthma which is now increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at epidemic rates. The Cooperative Agreemen...

  19. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  20. Automated protein-ligand interaction screening by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maple, Hannah J; Garlish, Rachel A; Rigau-Roca, Laura; Porter, John; Whitcombe, Ian; Prosser, Christine E; Kennedy, Jeff; Henry, Alistair J; Taylor, Richard J; Crump, Matthew P; Crosby, John

    2012-01-26

    Identifying protein-ligand binding interactions is a key step during early-stage drug discovery. Existing screening techniques are often associated with drawbacks such as low throughput, high sample consumption, and dynamic range limitations. The increasing use of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) demands that these techniques also detect very weak interactions (mM K(D) values). This paper presents the development and validation of a fully automated screen by mass spectrometry, capable of detecting fragment binding into the millimolar K(D) range. Low sample consumption, high throughput, and wide dynamic range make this a highly attractive, orthogonal approach. The method was applied to screen 157 compounds in 6 h against the anti-apoptotic protein target Bcl-x(L). Mass spectrometry results were validated using STD-NMR, HSQC-NMR, and ITC experiments. Agreement between techniques suggests that mass spectrometry offers a powerful, complementary approach for screening. PMID:22148839

  1. Source-Identifying Biomarker Ions between Environmental and Clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei Using Whole-Cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    PubMed Central

    Srisanga, Kitima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which is an endemic disease in Northeast Thailand and Northern Australia. Environmental reservoirs, including wet soils and muddy water, serve as the major sources for contributing bacterial infection to both humans and animals. The whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been applied as a rapid, accurate, and high-throughput tool for clinical diagnosis and microbiological research. In this present study, we employed a whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS approach for assessing its potency in clustering a total of 11 different B. pseudomallei isolates (consisting of 5 environmental and 6 clinical isolates) with respect to their origins and to further investigate the source-identifying biomarker ions belonging to each bacterial group. The cluster analysis demonstrated that six out of eleven isolates were grouped correctly to their sources. Our results revealed a total of ten source-identifying biomarker ions, which exhibited statistically significant differences in peak intensity between average environmental and clinical mass spectra using ClinProTools software. Six out of ten mass ions were assigned as environmental-identifying biomarker ions (EIBIs), including, m/z 4,056, 4,214, 5,814, 7,545, 7,895, and 8,112, whereas the remaining four mass ions were defined as clinical-identifying biomarker ions (CIBIs) consisting of m/z 3,658, 6,322, 7,035, and 7,984. Hence, our findings represented, for the first time, the source-specific biomarkers of environmental and clinical B. pseudomallei. PMID:24914956

  2. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  3. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  4. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  5. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  6. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  7. Analysis of intact bacteria using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Jones, Emrys A; Veselkov, Kirill A; Rebec, Monica; Bundy, Jacob G; Takats, Zoltan

    2013-07-14

    An identification system for microorganisms based on recently developed rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) is presented. Nine bacterial species cultured on various growth media were correctly identified to family-, genus-, and species-level based on their different mass spectral fingerprints using a cross-validated maximum margin criterion model. PMID:23736664

  8. Phase I and II metabolites of speciogynine, a diastereomer of the main Kratom alkaloid mitragynine, identified in rat and human urine by liquid chromatography coupled to low- and high-resolution linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Anika A; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Weber, Armin A; Zapp, Josef; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-11-01

    Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom in Thai), a Thai medical plant, is misused as herbal drug of abuse. Besides the most abundant alkaloids mitragynine (MG) and paynantheine (PAY), several other alkaloids were isolated from Kratom leaves, among them the third abundant alkaloid is speciogynine (SG), a diastereomer of MG. The aim of this present study was to identify the phase I and II metabolites of SG in rat urine after the administration of a rather high dose of the pure alkaloid and then to confirm these findings using human urine samples after Kratom use. The applied liquid chromatography coupled to low- and high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS-MS) provided detailed information on the structure in the MS(n) mode particularly with high resolution. For the analysis of the human samples, the LC separation had to be improved markedly allowing the separation of SG and its metabolites from its diastereomer MG and its metabolites. In analogy to MG, besides SG, nine phase I and eight phase II metabolites could be identified in rat urine, but only three phase I and five phase II metabolites in human urine. These differences may be caused by the lower SG dose applied by the user of Kratom preparations. SG and its metabolites could be differentiated in the human samples from the diastereomeric MG and its metabolites comparing the different retention times determined after application of the single alkaloids to rats. In addition, some differences in MS(2) and/or MS(3) spectra of the corresponding diastereomers were observed. PMID:20967737

  9. Nanotip Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel C; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    A method called nanotip ambient ionization mass spectrometry (NAIMS) is described, which applies high voltage between a tungsten nanotip and a metal plate to generate a plasma in which ionized analytes on the surface of the metal plate are directed to the inlet and analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The dependence of signal intensity is investigated as a function of the tip-to-plate distance, the tip size, the voltage applied at the tip, and the current. These parameters are separately optimized to achieve sensitivity or high spatial resolution. A partially observable Markov decision process is used to achieve a stabilized plasma as well as high ionization efficiency. As a proof of concept, the NAIMS technique has been applied to phenanthrene and caffeine samples for which the limits of detection were determined to be 0.14 fmol for phenanthrene and 4 amol for caffeine and to a printed caffeine pattern for which a spatial resolution of 8 ± 2 μm, and the best resolution of 5 μm, was demonstrated. The limitations of NAIMS are also discussed. PMID:27087600

  10. Spatial Autocorrelation in Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Alberto; Ellis, Shane R; Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina; Burgermeister, Elke; Ebert, Matthias; Walch, Axel; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; McDonnell, Liam A; Heeren, Ron M A; Balluff, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful molecular imaging technique. In microprobe MSI, images are created through a grid-wise interrogation of individual spots by mass spectrometry across a surface. Classical statistical tests for within-sample comparisons fail as close-by measurement spots violate the assumption of independence of these tests, which can lead to an increased false-discovery rate. For spatial data, this effect is referred to as spatial autocorrelation. In this study, we investigated spatial autocorrelation in three different matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MSI data sets. These data sets cover different molecular classes (metabolites/drugs, lipids, and proteins) and different spatial resolutions ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Significant spatial autocorrelation was detected in all three data sets and found to increase with decreasing pixel size. To enable statistical testing for differences in mass signal intensities between regions of interest within MSI data sets, we propose the use of Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models. We show that, by accounting for spatial autocorrelation, discovery rates (i.e., the ratio between the features identified and the total number of features) could be reduced between 21% and 69%. The reliability of this approach was validated by control mass signals based on prior knowledge. In light of the advent of larger MSI data sets based on either an increased spatial resolution or 3D data sets, accounting for effects due to spatial autocorrelation becomes even more indispensable. Here, we propose a generic and easily applicable workflow to enable within-sample statistical comparisons. PMID:27180608

  11. Simulation of Two Dimensional Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Teaching Proteomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Amanda; Sekera, Emily; Payne, Jill; Craig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are separated (usually by chromatography or electrophoresis) and identified by mass spectrometry. We have created 2DE Tandem MS, a computer program designed for use in the biochemistry, proteomics, or bioinformatics classroom. It contains two simulations--2D electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry.…

  12. Following the Biochemical and Morphological Changes of Bacillus atrophaeus during Sporulation using Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, H J; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Horn, J; Frank, M; Gard, E E

    2006-05-03

    The overall objective of this report is to develop a real-time single-particle mass spectrometry technique called Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) in order to efficiently screen and identify bioaerosols and single cells of national security and public health concern.

  13. An Inducible Retroviral Expression System for Tandem Affinity Purification Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Identifies Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-like Protein (MLKL) as an Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Client.

    PubMed

    Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Fauster, Astrid; Rebsamen, Manuele; Kandasamy, Richard K; Scorzoni, Stefania; Vladimer, Gregory I; Müller, André C; Gstaiger, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is a popular strategy for the identification of protein-protein interactions, characterization of protein complexes, and entire networks. Its employment in cellular settings best fitting the relevant physiology is limited by convenient expression vector systems. We developed an easy-to-handle, inducible, dually selectable retroviral expression vector allowing dose- and time-dependent control of bait proteins bearing the efficient streptavidin-hemagglutinin (SH)-tag at their N- or C termini. Concomitant expression of a reporter fluorophore allows to monitor bait-expressing cells by flow cytometry or microscopy and enables high-throughput phenotypic assays. We used the system to successfully characterize the interactome of the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) Gly12Asp (G12D) mutant and exploited the advantage of reporter fluorophore expression by tracking cytokine-independent cell growth using flow cytometry. Moreover, we tested the feasibility of studying cytotoxicity-mediating proteins with the vector system on the cell death-inducing mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) Ser358Asp (S358D) mutant. Interaction proteomics analysis of MLKL Ser358Asp (S358D) identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a high-confidence interacting protein. Further phenotypic characterization established MLKL as a novel HSP90 client. In summary, this novel inducible expression system enables SH-tag-based interaction studies in the cell line proficient for the respective phenotypic or signaling context and constitutes a valuable tool for experimental approaches requiring inducible or traceable protein expression. PMID:26933192

  14. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context. PMID:25980644

  15. GlycoMob: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry collision cross section database for glycomics.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Benesch, Justin L P; Harvey, David J; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a promising analytical technique for glycomics that separates glycan ions based on their collision cross section (CCS) and provides glycan precursor and fragment masses. It has been shown that isomeric oligosaccharide species can be separated by IM and identified on basis of their CCS and fragmentation. These results indicate that adding CCSs information for glycans and glycan fragments to searchable databases and analysis pipelines will increase identification confidence and accuracy. We have developed a freely accessible database, GlycoMob ( http://www.glycomob.org ), containing over 900 CCSs values of glycans, oligosaccharide standards and their fragments that will be continually updated. We have measured the absolute CCSs of calibration standards, biologically derived and synthetic N-glycans ionized with various adducts in positive and negative mode or as protonated (positive ion) and deprotonated (negative ion) ions. PMID:26314736

  16. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  17. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  19. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  20. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  1. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  2. Characterization of Enterobacteria using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pribil, Patrick; Fenselau, Catherine

    2005-09-15

    A method is proposed for the rapid classification of Gram-negative Enterobacteria using on-slide solubilization and trypsin digestion of proteins, followed by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Peptides were identified from tryptic digests using microsequencing by tandem mass spectrometry and database searches. Proteins from the outer membrane family (OMP) were consistently identified in the Enterobacteria Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Erwinia herbicola, and Salmonella typhimurium. Database searches indicate that these OMP peptides observed are unique to the Enterobacteria order. PMID:16159146

  3. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated.

  4. Identification of metabolites of hexazinone by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiser, R W; Belasco, I J; Rhodes, R C

    1983-11-01

    The metabolites of hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione ] obtained in the rat and in plants were identified by mass spectrometry. Rat urine metabolites were identified from direct probe spectra obtained on metabolites separated by thin-layer chromatography. Sugarcane metabolites were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry of the trimethylsilyl derivatives. The major metabolic routes were found to be hydroxylation of the cyclohexyl group and demethylation. All identifications were confirmed by synthesis and direct comparison of chromatographic data and mass spectra. Hexazinone is metabolized quickly and extensively in the biological systems studied, and is relatively nonpersistent in the environment. PMID:6661503

  5. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  6. Signatures for Mass Spectrometry Data Quality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring data quality and proper instrument functionality is a prerequisite for scientific investigation. Manual quality assurance is time-consuming and subjective. Metrics for describing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) data have been developed; however, the wide variety of LC–MS instruments and configurations precludes applying a simple cutoff. Using 1150 manually classified quality control (QC) data sets, we trained logistic regression classification models to predict whether a data set is in or out of control. Model parameters were optimized by minimizing a loss function that accounts for the trade-off between false positive and false negative errors. The classifier models detected bad data sets with high sensitivity while maintaining high specificity. Moreover, the composite classifier was dramatically more specific than single metrics. Finally, we evaluated the performance of the classifier on a separate validation set where it performed comparably to the results for the testing/training data sets. By presenting the methods and software used to create the classifier, other groups can create a classifier for their specific QC regimen, which is highly variable lab-to-lab. In total, this manuscript presents 3400 LC–MS data sets for the same QC sample (whole cell lysate of Shewanella oneidensis), deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000320–PXD000324. PMID:24611607

  7. Application of electrospray and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry to the identification of post-translational and other chemical modifications of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouach, M; Belaïche, D; Jaquinod, M; Couppez, M; Kmiecik, D; Ricart, G; Van Dorsselaer, A; Sautière, P; Briand, G

    1994-05-01

    Mass spectrometry is a very powerful tool in the identification of chemical modifications of proteins and peptides. Often these modifications cannot be determined by conventional techniques. This report describes the combined use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry to complete the primary structure of proteins and peptides. Examples illustrate how mass spectrometry is used to locate sites of phosphorylation, methylation and acetylation, and identify blocking groups and unexpected side reactions such as deamidation or alkylation. PMID:8204685

  8. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFONATED AZO DYES USING LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight monosulfonated and disulfonated azo dyes were analyzed using liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry, in the negative ion mode, under low-energy conditions (110-150 eV). any structurally characteristic fragment ions were obtained, several of which ha...

  9. Schottky Mass Spectrometry on 152Sm Projectile Fragments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knöbel, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Münzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Plass, W. R.; Sanjari, M. S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Tu, X. L.; Wang, M.; Weick, H.; Winckler, N.; Winkler, M.; Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.

    Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient 152Sm projectile fragments were conducted at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI by employing the time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry. 311 different nuclides were identified by means of their revolution frequencies. Charge-dependent systematic differences between the fitted mass values and the literature mass values are observed in the data analysis. The origin of this systematic deviation is still under discussion. The latest progress on the data analysis is presented.

  10. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  11. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  12. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  13. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Severs, J.C.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an analyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for identifying polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking water. This method offe...

  15. Analysis of Electroblotted Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is crucial for better understanding of many biological, biochemical, and biomedical processes. Here we describe two methods for the identification of electroblotted proteins by on-membrane digestion prior to analysis by mass spectrometry. These on-membrane methods take approximately half the time of in-gel digestion and provide better digestion efficiency, due to the better accessibility of the protease to the proteins adsorbed onto the nitrocellulose, and better protein sequence coverage, especially for membrane proteins where large and hydrophobic peptides are commonly present. PMID:26139272

  16. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  17. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  18. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  19. Development of Gas Chromatographic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hites, Ronald A

    2016-07-19

    Gas chromatographic mass spectrometry is now widely used for the quantitation and identification of organic compounds in almost any imaginable sample. These applications include the measurement of chlorinated dioxins in soil samples, the identification of illicit drugs in human blood, and the quantitation of accelerants in arson investigations, to name just a few. How did GC/MS get so popular? It turns out that it required parallel developments in mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and computing and that no one person "invented" the technique. This Perspective traces this history from the 1950s until today. PMID:27384908

  20. Characterization of plant materials by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry: high-resolution mass spectrometry, time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry, and Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of spruce needles

    SciTech Connect

    Schulten, H.F.; Simmleit, N.; Mueller, R.

    1989-02-01

    In the course of a forest damage research project spruce needles are analyzed, without pretreatment except drying and milling, by in-source pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry. The mass signals are assigned by using high-resolution mass measurements and thermal degradation products identified by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography. It is demonstrated that the thermal degradation products characterize the main chemical constituents of spruce needs such as polysaccharides and lignin. Furthermore, thermostable constituents such as lipids, steroids, and flavons are detected. The thermal degradation process is studied by temperature-programmed microfurnace pyrolysis in combination with time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry. The integrated interpretation of results achieved by the presented methods can be applied for the universal characterization of complex and in particular nonsoluble, polydisperse biological and geochemical materials.

  1. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org . PMID:21063949

  2. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  3. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  4. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  5. Mass spectrometry and the environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hites, Ronald A.

    1992-09-01

    Research in environmental mass spectrometry focuses on two broad areas: development of new methods for a wide range of pollutants; and using existing methods to understand the fate of pollutants in nature. This paper will present examples of both types of research. In some environmental settings it is important to have rapid analytical turnaround, which suggests that samples should be analyzed in the field rather than in a remote laboratory. Thus, there has been considerable interest in "fieldable" mass spectrometers. Volatile and water soluble analytes can be introduced into a mass spectrometer by passing the water sample over a semi-permeable membrane. The analytes of interest pass through the membrane, but the water does not. This method may be useful in situations that require a continuous readout of concentration. Like mass spectrometrists everywhere, environmental scientists have explored the many facets of liquid chromatographic mass spectrometry. Work in our laboratory has centered on continuous flow fast atom bombardment (CF-FAB) as the LCMS interface. In addition, flow injection analysis is possible using CF-FAB. By avoiding chromatographic separation, the throughput of the analytical system is increased. Frequently, tandem mass spectrometry is necessary to unscramble the chemical signals produced by this technique. Electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry can achieve sensitivities of a few attomoles for selected compounds; furthermore, the technique can be remarkably specific. These features make it ideal for the analysis of highly chlorinated environmental contaminants such as chlorinated dioxins. Such an application will be presented in detail.

  6. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstock, Günther; Heinzl, Johann; Korschinek, Gunther; Morinaga, Haruhiko; Nolte, Eckehart; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Kato, Kazuo; Wolf, Manfred

    1986-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry measurements with fully stripped 36Cl ions have been performed at the Munich accelerator laboratory in order to date groundwaters and palaeontological samples, to study anthropogenic 36Cl produced through nuclear tests and to determine the fast neutron flux of the Hiroshima A-bomb.

  8. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different aspects of the proteome can be explored by choosing the right combination of sample preparation, MS instrumentation and data processing. This chapter gives an outline for some of these commonly used setups and some of the key concepts, many of which are explored in greater depth in later chapters. PMID:23666720

  9. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  10. Liquid chromatography-thermospray mass spectrometry of DNA adducts formed with mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa.

    PubMed

    Musser, S M; Pan, S S; Callery, P S

    1989-07-14

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thermospray mass spectrometry were combined for the analysis of DNA adducts formed from the interaction of the anticancer drugs mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa with calf thymus DNA. The adducts formed from reaction of mitomycin C and porfiromycin with DNA were separated from unmodified nucleosides by HPLC on a C18 column and identified by thermospray mass spectrometry. Thiotepa DNA adducts readily depurinated from DNA and were chromatographed and identified by thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as the modified bases without the ribose moiety attached. The utility of thermospray mass spectrometry for the identification of microgram quantities of nucleoside adducts and depurinated base adducts of these anticancer drugs was demonstrated. PMID:2504760

  11. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Devary, Brooks J.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.

    2007-09-03

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane, (C6H6N12O12, MW 438) {CL-20}, is a high-energy propellent that has been recently developed and successfully tested (Nielsen et al. 1998). CL-20 releases more energy on ignition and is more stable to accidental detonation than currently used energetic materials. It is expected to replace many of the energetic materials currently being used by the Department of Defense (DoD). The EPA method 8330 (EPA 1997) for the analysis of explosives and metabolites in soils calls for the use of UV/Vis detection. High performance liquid chromatography has been used to quantify CL-20 and precursor concentration (Bazaki et al. 1998`) at relatively high concentrations. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to identify different crystal forms of CL-20 (4 isomers; Kim et al. 1998). Campbell et al. (1997) utilized particle beam mass spectrometry for the analysis of enzymatic degradation of explosives. Introduction and recent improvements of ionization techniques such as electrospray (ES) have allowed the mass spectrometer to become more widely used in liquid chromatography. Schilling(1996) also examined explosive components and metabolites using electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Schilling’s results showed that compared to thermospray LC/MS, APCI and ES were more sensitive than thermospray by at least an order of magnitude. 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), 10 nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water have been analyzed using solid phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-APCI mass spectrometry (Cassada et al. 1999). The method detection limits indicate that nitramine and nitroaromatic compounds can be routinely determined in ground water samples using electrospray LC/MS with concentration techniques utilizing solid-phase extraction. Miller et al. (1996) studied nitrated explosives with mobile phase

  12. Mass Spectrometry for Translational Proteomics: Progress and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-08-31

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics measurements have become increasingly utilized in a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, and have significantly enhanced the understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of the proteome and its connections to biology and diseases. While some MS techniques such as those for targeted analysis are increasingly applied with great success, others such as global quantitative analysis (for e.g. biomarker discovery) are more challenging and continue to be developed and refined to provide the desired throughput, sensitivity and/ or specificity. New MS capabilities and proteomics-based pipelines/strategies also keep enhancing for the advancement of clinical proteomics applications such as protein biomarker discovery and validation. Herein, we provide a brief review to summarize the current state of MS-based proteomics with respect to its advantages and present limitations, while highlighting its potential in future clinical applications.

  13. Use of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-time of flight-mass spectrometry to identify the elemental composition of vanilla and determine the geographic origin by discriminant function analysis.

    PubMed

    Hondrogiannis, Ellen M; Ehrlinger, Erin; Poplaski, Alyssa; Lisle, Meredith

    2013-11-27

    A total of 11 elements found in 25 vanilla samples from Uganda, Madagascar, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea were measured by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS) for the purpose of collecting data that could be used to discriminate among the origins. Pellets were prepared of the samples, and elemental concentrations were obtained on the basis of external calibration curves created using five National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards and one Chinese standard with (13)C internal standardization. These curves were validated using NIST 1573a (tomato leaves) as a check standard. Discriminant analysis was used to successfully classify the vanilla samples by their origin. Our method illustrates the feasibility of using LA-ICP-TOF-MS with an external calibration curve for high-throughput screening of spice screening analysis. PMID:24219644

  14. Tandem mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry for the analysis of molecular sequence and architecture of hyperbranched glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiumin; Cool, Lydia R.; Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional mass spectrometry techniques, combining matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) or electrospray ionization (ESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS2), multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) or ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), have been employed to gain precise structural insight on the compositions, sequences and architectures of small oligomers of a hyperbranched glycopolymer, prepared by atom transfer radical copolymerization of an acrylate monomer (A) and an acrylate inimer (B), both carrying mannose ester pendants. The MS data confirmed the incorporation of multiple inimer repeat units, which ultimately lead to the hyperbranched material. The various possible structures of n-mers with the same composition were subsequently elucidated based on MS2 and MSn studies. The characteristic elimination of bromomethane molecule provided definitive information about the comonomer connectivity in the copolymeric AB2 trimer and A2B2 tetramer, identifying as present only one of the three possible trimeric isomers (viz. sequence BBA) and only two of the six possible tetrameric isomers (viz. sequences BBA2 and BABA). Complementary IM-MS studies confirmed that only one of the tetrameric structures is formed. Comparison of the experimentally determined collision cross-section of the detected isomer with those predicted by molecular simulations for the two possible sequences ascertained BBA2 as the predominant tetrameric architecture. The multidimensional MS approaches presented provide connectivity information at the atomic level without requiring high product purity (due to the dispersive nature of MS) and, hence, should be particularly useful for the microstructure characterization of novel glycopolymers and other types of complex copolymers. PMID:25519163

  15. Automatic generic registration of mass spectrometry imaging data to histology using nonlinear stochastic embedding.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula, Walid M; Škrášková, Karolina; Balluff, Benjamin; Carreira, Ricardo J; Tolner, Else A; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; van der Maaten, Laurens; Morreau, Hans; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Heeren, Ron M A; McDonnell, Liam A; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2014-09-16

    The combination of mass spectrometry imaging and histology has proven a powerful approach for obtaining molecular signatures from specific cells/tissues of interest, whether to identify biomolecular changes associated with specific histopathological entities or to determine the amount of a drug in specific organs/compartments. Currently there is no software that is able to explicitly register mass spectrometry imaging data spanning different ionization techniques or mass analyzers. Accordingly, the full capabilities of mass spectrometry imaging are at present underexploited. Here we present a fully automated generic approach for registering mass spectrometry imaging data to histology and demonstrate its capabilities for multiple mass analyzers, multiple ionization sources, and multiple tissue types. PMID:25133861

  16. Analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oil of Polygonum minus Huds. using two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ghani, Ma'aruf Abd; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Noor, Normah Mohd

    2010-01-01

    The essential oil in leaves of Polygonum minus Huds., a local aromatic plant, were identified by a pipeline of gas chromatography (GC) techniques coupled with mass-spectrometry (MS), flame ionization detector (FID) and two dimensional gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOF MS). A total of 48 compounds with a good match and high probability values were identified using this technique. Meanwhile, 42 compounds were successfully identified in this study using GC-MS, a significantly larger number than in previous studies. GC-FID was used in determining the retention indices of chemical components in P. minus essential oil. The result also showed the efficiency and reliability were greatly improved when chemometric methods and retention indices were used in identification and quantification of chemical components in plant essential oil. PMID:20944520

  17. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies of the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and receptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, William E.; Leavell, Michael D.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr

    2005-03-01

    Membrane proteins make up a diverse and important subset of proteins for which structural information is limited. In this study, chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to explore the structure of the G-protein-coupled photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin in the dark-state conformation. All experiments were performed in rod outer segment membranes using amino acid 'handles' in the native protein sequence and thus minimizing perturbations to the native protein structure. Cysteine and lysine residues were covalently cross-linked using commercially available reagents with a range of linker arm lengths. Following chemical digestion of cross-linked protein, cross-linked peptides were identified by accurate mass measurement using liquid chromatography-fourier transform mass spectrometry and an automated data analysis pipeline. Assignments were confirmed and, if necessary, resolved, by tandem MS. The relative reactivity of lysine residues participating in cross-links was evaluated by labeling with NHS-esters. A distinct pattern of cross-link formation within the C-terminal domain, and between loop I and the C-terminal domain, emerged. Theoretical distances based on cross-linking were compared to inter-atomic distances determined from the energy-minimized X-ray crystal structure and Monte Carlo conformational search procedures. In general, the observed cross-links can be explained by re-positioning participating side-chains without significantly altering backbone structure. One exception, between C3 16 and K325, requires backbone motion to bring the reactive atoms into sufficient proximity for cross-linking. Evidence from other studies suggests that residues around K325 for a region of high backbone mobility. These findings show that cross-linking studies can provide insight into the structural dynamics of membrane proteins in their native environment.

  18. Continuous Simultaneous Detection in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-10-15

    In mass spectrometry, several advantages can be derived when multiple mass-to-charge values are detected simultaneously. One such advantage is an improved duty cycle, which leads to superior limits of detection, better precision, shorter analysis times, and reduced sample sizes. A second advantage is the ability to reduce correlated noise by taking the ratio of two or more simultaneously collected signals, enabling greatly enhanced isotope ratio data. A final advantage is the elimination of spectral skew, leading to more accurate transient signal analysis. Here, these advantages are demonstrated by means of a novel Faraday-strip array detector coupled to a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph. The same system is used to monitor elemental fractionation phenomena in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  19. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  20. Mass spectrometry in the home and garden.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Bain, Ryan M; Wiley, Joshua S; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application. PMID:25510934

  1. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to present an overview of the current status of the MS imaging with different sampling ionization methods and to discuss the 3D imaging and quantitative imaging capabilities needed to be further developed, the importance of the multi-modal imaging, and a balance between the pursuit of the high imaging resolution and the practical application of MS imaging in biomedicine. PMID:23539099

  2. Antibodies as means for selective mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boström, Tove; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia

    2016-05-15

    For protein analysis of biological samples, two major strategies are used today; mass spectrometry (MS) and antibody-based methods. Each strategy offers advantages and drawbacks. However, combining the two using an immunoenrichment step with MS analysis brings together the benefits of each method resulting in increased sensitivity, faster analysis and possibility of higher degrees of multiplexing. The immunoenrichment can be performed either on protein or peptide level and quantification standards can be added in order to enable determination of the absolute protein concentration in the sample. The combination of immunoenrichment and MS holds great promise for the future in both proteomics and clinical diagnostics. This review describes different setups of immunoenrichment coupled to mass spectrometry and how these can be utilized in various applications. PMID:26565067

  3. Biomarker Signature Discovery from Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ao; Gupta, Chinmaya; Ferrari, Mauro; Agostini, Marco; Bedin, Chiara; Bouamrani, Ali; Tasciotti, Ennio; Azencott, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based high throughput proteomics are used for protein analysis and clinical diagnosis. Many machine learning methods have been used to construct classifiers based on mass spectrometry data, for discrimination between cancer stages. However, the classifiers generated by machine learning such as SVM techniques typically lack biological interpretability. We present an innovative technique for automated discovery of signatures optimized to characterize various cancer stages. We validate our signature discovery algorithm on one new colorectal cancer MALDI-TOF data set, and two well-known ovarian cancer SELDI-TOF data sets. In all of these cases, our signature based classifiers performed either better or at least as well as four benchmark machine learning algorithms including SVM and KNN. Moreover, our optimized signatures automatically select smaller sets of key biomarkers than the black-boxes generated by machine learning, and are much easier to interpret. PMID:26356346

  4. Spatial neuroproteomics using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew G

    2015-07-01

    The nervous system constitutes arguably the most complicated and least understood cellular network in the human body. This consequently manifests itself in the fact that the molecular bases of neurodegenerative diseases remain unknown. The limited understanding of neurobiological mechanisms relates directly to the lack of appropriate bioanalytical technologies that allow highly resolved, sensitive, specific and comprehensive molecular imaging in complex biological matrices. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an emerging technique for molecular imaging. The technique is characterized by its high chemical specificity allowing comprehensive, spatial protein and peptide profiling in situ. Imaging MS represents therefore a powerful approach for investigation of spatio-temporal protein and peptide regulations in CNS derived tissue and cells. This review aims to provide a concise overview of major developments and applications concerning imaging mass spectrometry based protein and peptide profiling in neurobiological and biomedical research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology. PMID:25582083

  5. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  6. Mass Spectrometry in Plant-omics.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, Erin; Keller, Caitlin; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Plant-omics is rapidly becoming an important field of study in the scientific community due to the urgent need to address many of the most important questions facing humanity today with regard to agriculture, medicine, biofuels, environmental decontamination, ecological sustainability, etc. High-performance mass spectrometry is a dominant tool for interrogating the metabolomes, peptidomes, and proteomes of a diversity of plant species under various conditions, revealing key insights into the functions and mechanisms of plant biochemistry. PMID:26889688

  7. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  8. Dissecting SUMO Dynamics by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drabikowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Protein modification by SUMO proteins is one of the key posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes. Here, we describe a workflow to analyze SUMO dynamics in response to different stimuli, purify SUMO conjugates, and analyze the changes in SUMOylation level in organisms, tissues, or cell culture. We present a protocol for lysis in denaturing conditions that is compatible with downstream IMAC and antibody affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and data analysis. PMID:27613044

  9. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  10. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS. PMID:16787159