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Sample records for massachusetts health study

  1. Massachusetts health reform and disparities in joint replacement use: difference in differences study

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Alok; Katz, Jeffrey N; McCormick, Danny; Lasser, Karen E; Feng, Chen; Manze, Meredith G; Kressin, Nancy R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the impact of the insurance expansion in 2006 on use of knee and hip replacement procedures by race/ethnicity, area income, and the use of hospitals that predominantly serve poor people (“safety net hospitals”). Design Quasi-experimental difference in differences study examining change after reform in the share of procedures performed in safety net hospitals by race/ethnicity and area income, with adjustment for patients’ residence, demographics, and comorbidity. Setting State of Massachusetts, United States. Participants Massachusetts residents aged 40-64 as the target beneficiaries of reform and similarly aged residents of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania as the comparison (control) population. Main outcomes measures Number of knee and hip replacement procedures per 10 000 population and use of safety net hospitals. Procedure counts from state discharge data for 2.5 years before and after reform, and multivariate difference in differences. Poisson regression was used to adjust for demographics, economic conditions, secular time, and geographic factors to estimate the change in procedure rate associated with health reform by race/ethnicity and area income. Results Before reform, the number of procedures (/10 000) in Massachusetts was lower among Hispanic people (12.9, P<0.001) than black people (28.1) and white people (30.1). Overall, procedure use increased 22.4% during the 2.5 years after insurance expansion; reform in Massachusetts was associated with a 4.7% increase. The increase associated with reform was significantly higher among Hispanic people (37.9%, P<0.001) and black people (11.4%, P<0.05) than among white people (2.8%). Lower income was not associated with larger increases in procedure use. The share of knee and hip replacement procedures performed in safety net hospitals in Massachusetts decreased by 1.0% from a level of 12.7% before reform. The reduction was larger among Hispanic people (−6.4%, P<0.001) than white

  2. Cancer increase study methodology: A review and discussion of the ``Southeastern Massachusetts Health Study 1978--1986``

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Baker, D.A.; Gilbert, E.S.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    In October 1990 the Massachusetts Department of Public Health released a report of an epidemiologic study of adult leukemia occurring in the vicinity of the Pilgrim 1 Nuclear Power Plant near Plymouth, Massachusetts. The study used a case-control design in which adult leukemia cases occurring between 1978 and 1986 in 22 towns were compared with persons without leukemia (controls) selected from the same study population. Exposure scores, used to estimate potential for exposure to radioactive emissions from Pilgrim, were calculated for all cases and controls. When the exposure scores of cases were compared with those of controls, the analyses showed the scores to be higher for the leukemia cases, suggesting that individuals with the highest potential for exposure to Pilgrim emissions had a significantly increased risk of leukemia. This association was found only for cases diagnosed before 1984; for cases diagnosed during 1984, 1985, or 1986, no association was observed between leukemia case status and potential for exposure to emissions from the plant. Our review of the report and supporting documents shows no major methodologic problems that would account for the finding of an association between leukemia risk and the Pilgrim plant. Examination of the study findings in relation to what is known about leukemia risks associated with radiation exposure, however, indicates that the results of the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Study are inconsistent with a large body of evidence from a number of other studies.

  3. Massachusetts health care reform: is it working?

    PubMed

    McAdoo, Joshua; Irving, Julian; Deslich, Stacie; Coustasse, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Before 2006, Massachusetts had more than 500 000 residents who lacked health insurance. Governor Mitt Romney enacted landmark legislation requiring all residents to obtain health insurance. Also, the legislation established a health insurance exchange for the purpose of broadening the choices of insurance plans made available to individuals in the state. The purpose of this research was to assess the Massachusetts health care reform in terms of access, cost, and sustainability. The methodology used was a literature review from 2006 to 2013; a total of 43 references were used. Health reform resulted in additional overall state spending of $2.42 billion on Medicaid for Massachusetts. Since the 2006 reform, 401 000 additional residents have obtained insurance. The number of Massachusetts residents who had access to health care increased substantially after the health care reform was enacted, to 98.1% of residents. The Massachusetts health care reform has not saved money for the state; its funding has been covered by Federal spending. However, reform has been sustained over time because of the high percentage of state residents who have supported the state mandate to obtain health care coverage. PMID:24168866

  4. A Case Study of Environmental, Health and Safety Issues Involving the Burlington, Massachusetts Public School System. "Tips, Suggestions, and Resources for Investigating and Resolving EHS Issues in Schools."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Todd H.

    An investigation was initiated concerning the environmental health within the Burlington, Massachusetts public school system to determine what specific environmental hazards were present and determine ways of eliminating them. This report presents 20 case studies that detail the environmental health issues involved, the approaches taken in…

  5. Developing School Health Services in Massachusetts: A Public Health Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheetz, Anne H.

    2003-01-01

    In 1993 the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) began defining essential components of school health service programs, consistent with the public health model. The MDPH designed and funded the Enhanced School Health Service Programs to develop 4 core components of local school health services: (a) strengthening the administrative…

  6. Health and Risk Behaviors of Massachusetts Youth, 2007: The Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two coordinated surveys of Massachusetts adolescents, the 2007 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ESE) and the Massachusetts Youth Health Survey (DPH). These two surveys were supported by funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and administered in a random selection of 124 public…

  7. Physician Tiering by Health Plans in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Wadgaonkar, Ajay D.; Schneider, Eric C.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Background: Physician tiering is an emerging health-care strategy that purports to grade physicians on the basis of cost-efficiency and quality-performance measures. We investigated the consistency of tiering of orthopaedic surgeons by examining tier agreement between health plans and physician factors associated with top-tier ranking. Methods: Health plan tier, demographic, and training data were collected on 615 licensed orthopaedic surgeons who accepted one or more of three health plans and practiced in Massachusetts. We then computed the concordance of physician tier rankings between the health plans. We further examined the factors associated with top-tier ranking, such as malpractice claims and socioeconomic conditions of the practice area. Results: The concordance of physician tiering between health plans was poor to fair (range, 8% to 28%, κ = 0.06 to 0.25). The percentage of physicians ranked as top-tier varied widely among the health plans, from 21% to 62%. Thirty-eight percent of physicians were not rated top-tier by any of the health plans, whereas only 5.2% of physicians were rated top-tier by all three health plans. Multivariate analysis showed that board certification, accepting Medicaid, and practicing in a suburban location were the independent factors associated with being ranked in the top tier. More years in practice or fewer malpractice claims were not related to tier. Conclusions: Current methods of physician tiering have low consistency and manifest evidence of geographic and demographic biases. PMID:20844163

  8. What Health Care Reform Means for Immigrants: Comparing the Affordable Care Act and Massachusetts Health Reforms.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Tiffany D

    2016-02-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed to provide more affordable health coverage to Americans beginning in 2014. Modeled after the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform, the ACA includes an individual mandate, Medicaid expansion, and health exchanges through which middle-income individuals can purchase coverage from private insurance companies. However, while the ACA provisions exclude all undocumented and some documented immigrants, Massachusetts uses state and hospital funds to extend coverage to these groups. This article examines the ACA reform using the Massachusetts reform as a comparative case study to outline how citizenship status influences individuals' coverage options under both policies. The article then briefly discusses other states that provide coverage to ACA-ineligible immigrants and the implications of uneven ACA implementation for immigrants and citizens nationwide. PMID:26567382

  9. Legislating fear and the public health in gilded age Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Philip M

    2007-04-01

    Between 1876 and 1881 Massachusetts experienced an outbreak of human rabies (hydrophobia). The entire state--the Governor, the legislature, the State Board of Health, newspapers, and the citizenry and elected officials of every town and city--reacted to the disease. Central to the response was the Commonwealth's legislature--called the General Court. Through public hearings, their own debates, and the passage of legislation, it resolved widespread fear and anger, mediated conflicting concepts of disease, and promoted social solidarity in the face of an epidemic. This article first narrates the General Court's legislative actions; it then examines the conflicting understandings of disease causality; finally, it explores the social and political rituals the legislature drew upon to deal with this public health crisis. Arguing that public health legislation is simultaneously instrumental and symbolic, this article demonstrates that attention to both enriches the study of epidemics, historical and yet to come. PMID:16980330

  10. Health Care Reform in Massachusetts: Implementation of Coverage Expansions and a Health Insurance Mandate

    PubMed Central

    Doonan, Michael T; Tull, Katharine R

    2010-01-01

    Context: Much can be learned from Massachusetts's experience implementing health insurance coverage expansions and an individual health insurance mandate. While achieving political consensus on reform is difficult, implementation can be equally or even more challenging. Methods: The data in this article are based on a case study of Massachusetts, including interviews with key stakeholders, state government, and Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority officials during the first three years of the program and a detailed analysis of primary and secondary documents. Findings: Coverage expansion and an individual mandate led Massachusetts to define affordability standards, establish a minimum level of insurance coverage, adopt insurance market reforms, and institute incentives and penalties to encourage coverage. Implementation entailed trade-offs between the comprehensiveness of benefits and premium costs, the subsidy levels and affordability, and among the level of mandate penalties, public support, and coverage gains. Conclusions: National lessons from the Massachusetts experience come not only from the specific decisions made but also from the process of decision making, the need to keep stakeholders engaged, the relationship of decisions to existing programs and regulations, and the interactions among program components. PMID:20377758

  11. Does universal coverage improve health? The Massachusetts experience.

    PubMed

    Courtemanche, Charles J; Zapata, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, Massachusetts passed health care reform legislation designed to achieve nearly universal coverage through a combination of insurance market reforms, mandates, and subsidies that later served as the model for national reform. Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we provide evidence that health care reform in Massachusetts led to better overall self-assessed health. Various robustness checks and placebo tests support a causal interpretation of the results. We also document improvements in several determinants of overall health: physical health, mental health, functional limitations, joint disorders, and body mass index. Next, we show that the effects on overall health were strongest among those with low incomes, nonwhites, near-elderly adults, and women. Finally, we use the reform to instrument for health insurance and estimate a sizeable impact of coverage on health. PMID:24358528

  12. Vulnerability-Based Spatial Sampling Stratification for the National Children’s Study, Worcester County, Massachusetts: Capturing Health-Relevant Environmental and Sociodemographic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Timothy J.; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Yelena; Aupont, Onesky; Wang, Yangyang; Raj, Ann; Zimmerman, Paula; Goble, Robert; Taylor, Octavia; Churchill, Linda; Lemay, Celeste; McLaughlin, Thomas; Felice, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Background The National Children’s Study is the most ambitious study ever attempted in the United States to assess how environmental factors impact child health and development. It aims to follow 100,000 children from gestation until 21 years of age. Success requires breaking new interdisciplinary ground, starting with how to select the sample of > 1,000 children in each of 105 study sites; no standardized protocol exists for stratification of the target population by factoring in the diverse environments it inhabits. Worcester County, Massachusetts, like other sites, stratifies according to local conditions and local knowledge, subject to probability sampling rules. Objectives We answer the following questions: How do we divide Worcester County into viable strata that represent its health-relevant environmental and sociodemographic heterogeneity, subject to sampling rules? What potential does our approach have to inform stratification at other sites? Results We developed a multivariable, vulnerability-based method for spatial sampling consisting of two descriptive indices: a hazards/stressors exposure index (comprising three proxy variables), and an adaptive capacity/sociodemographic character index (five variables). Multivariable, health-relevant stratification at the start of the study may improve detection power for environment–child health associations down the line. Eighteen strata capture countywide heterogeneity in the indices and have optimal relative homogeneity within each. They achieve comparable expected birth counts and conform to local concepts of space. Conclusion The approach offers moderate to high potential to inform other sites, limited by intersite differences in data availability, geodemographics, and technical capacity. Energetic community engagement from the start promotes local stratification coherence, plus vital researcher–community trust and co-ownership for sustainability. PMID:20211802

  13. The Massachusetts Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector: structure and functions.

    PubMed

    Lischko, Amy M; Bachman, Sara S; Vangeli, Alyssa

    2009-05-01

    The Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority is the centerpiece of Massachusetts' ambitious health care reforms, which were implemented beginning in 2006. The Connector is an independent quasi-governmental agency created by the Massachusetts legislature to facilitate the purchase of affordable, high-quality health insurance by small businesses and individuals without access to employer-sponsored coverage. This issue brief describes the structure and functions of the Connector, providing a primer to policymakers interested in exploring similar reforms at the state and national level. The authors describe how the Connector works to promote administrative ease, eliminate paperwork, offer portability of coverage, and provide some standardization and choice of plans. National policymakers looking to achieve similar policy goals may find some of the structural components and functions of the Connector to be transferable to a national health reform model, say the authors. PMID:19492496

  14. Designing and regulating health insurance exchanges: lessons from Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Keith M Marzilli; Starc, Amanda

    The Massachusetts health care reform provides preliminary evidence on the function of health insurance exchanges and individual insurance markets. This paper describes the type of products consumers choose and the dynamics of consumer choice. Evidence shows that choice architecture, including product standardization and the use of heuristics (rules of thumb), affects choice. In addition, while consumers often choose less generous plans in the exchange than in traditional employer-sponsored insurance, there is considerable heterogeneity in consumer demand, as well as some evidence of adverse selection. We examine the role of imperfect competition between insurers, and document the impact of pricing and product regulation on the level and distribution of premiums. Given our extensive choice data, we synthesize the evidence of the Massachusetts exchange to inform the design and regulation on other exchanges. PMID:23469676

  15. Occupational health profile of Brazilian immigrant housecleaners in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, C Eduardo; Roche, Andrea Gouveia

    2013-01-01

    The occupational health and safety conditions of a sample of Brazilian housecleaners in Massachusetts are examined in this article. We administered a main survey to a convenience sample of 626 Brazilian immigrant workers of all trades and a supplemental survey to 163 Brazilian housecleaners in Massachusetts in 2005 and 2006. Survey questions addressed housecleaner demographics, socioeconomic status, working conditions, and hazards of housecleaning work. Housecleaners are exposed to a variety of ergonomic, chemical, and biological hazards. Professional housecleaners' work is fast-paced, requires awkward postures, and involves repetitive movements, use of force, and heavy lifting. The most common symptoms reported include back pain, and pain in the muscles, arms, legs, neck, shoulder, hands, fingers, and feet. To reduce exposures to occupational hazards, we propose the substitution of green cleaners for toxic chemical cleaning products, the use of ergonomic equipment, the use of personal protective equipment, and changes in work organization. PMID:24401486

  16. The Impacts of State Health Reform Initiatives on Adults in New York and Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sharon K; Stockley, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effects of health reform efforts in two large states—New York and Massachusetts. Data Sources/Study Setting National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 1999 to 2008. Study Design We take advantage of the “natural experiments” that occurred in New York and Massachusetts to compare health insurance coverage and health care access and use for adults before and after the implementation of the health policy changes. To control for underlying trends not related to the reform initiatives, we subtract changes in the outcomes over the same time period for comparison groups of adults who were not affected by the policy changes using a differences-in-differences framework. The analyses are conducted using multiple comparison groups and different time periods as a check on the robustness of the findings. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Nonelderly adults ages 19–64 in the NHIS. Principal Findings We find evidence of the success of the initiatives in New York and Massachusetts at expanding insurance coverage, with the greatest gains reported by the initiative that was broadest in scope—the Massachusetts push toward universal coverage. There is no evidence of improvements in access to care in New York, reflecting the small gains in coverage under that state's reform effort and the narrow focus of the initiative. In contrast, there were significant gains in access to care in Massachusetts, where the impact on insurance coverage was greater and a more comprehensive set of reforms were implemented to improve access to a full array of health care services. The estimated gains in coverage and access to care reported here for Massachusetts were achieved in the early period under health reform, before the state's reform initiative was fully implemented. Conclusions Comprehensive reform initiatives are more successful at addressing gaps in coverage and access to care than are narrower efforts, highlighting the potential gains under national

  17. What will become of the medical mecca? Health care spending in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Massachusetts has been called a "medical mecca." It has also been called the world's most expensive health care market. This paper concludes that claims of excess costs in Massachusetts are overstated. Massachusetts hospitals have lower inpatient costs than peer institutions in other states, yet the state's concentration of academic hospitals tilts the system toward higher spending. In markets like Massachusetts, there is growing pressure to demonstrate tangible benefits to justify the additional costs of academic health centers (AHCs). Applying new information technologies to proactively manage patients with expensive chronic illnesses is a critical area for future collaboration between payers and AHCs. PMID:14649440

  18. Exploring Massachusetts Health Care Reform Impact on Fee-for-Service-Funded Substance Use Disorder Treatment Providers.

    PubMed

    Fields, Dail; Pruett, Jana; Roman, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is forecast to increase the demand for and utilization of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Massachusetts implemented health reforms similar to the ACA in 2006-2007 that included expanding coverage for SUD treatment. This study explored the impact of Massachusetts health reforms from 2007 to 2010 on SUD treatment providers in Massachusetts, who relied on fee-for-service billings for more than 50% of their revenue. The changes across treatment facilities located in Massachusetts were compared to changes in other similar fee-for-service-funded SUD treatment providers in Northeast states bordering Massachusetts and in all other states across the US. From 2007-2010, the percentage changes for Massachusetts based providers were significantly different from the changes among providers located in the rest of the US for admissions, outpatient census, average weeks of outpatient treatment, residential/in-patient census, detoxification census, length of average inpatient and outpatient stays, and provision of medication-assisted treatment. Contrary to previous studies of publicly funded treatment providers, the results of this exploratory study of providers dependent on fee-for-service revenues were consistent with some predictions for the overall effects of the ACA. PMID:26514378

  19. Industry-Education Partnerships: Massachusetts Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Quincy. Office of Community Education.

    This document consists largely of descriptions of 15 industry-education partnerships in Massachusetts, selected on the basis of their creativity; the range of partnership organizations and activity they represent; the diversity of students, teachers, businesses, and communities they affect; and their innovative and efficient coordination and…

  20. Community-wide Implementation of Health Information Technology: The Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative Experience

    PubMed Central

    Goroll, Allan H.; Simon, Steven R.; Tripathi, Micky; Ascenzo, Carl; Bates, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative (MAeHC) was formed to improve patient safety and quality of care by promoting the use of health information technology through community-based implementation of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchange. The Collaborative has recently implemented EHRs in a diverse set of competitively selected communities, encompassing nearly 500 physicians serving over 500,000 patients. Targeting both EHR implementation and health information exchange at the community level has identified numerous challenges and strategies for overcoming them. This article describes the formation and implementation phases of the Collaborative, focusing on barriers identified, lessons learned, and policy issues. PMID:18952937

  1. A Model of Objectives for a Program of Continuing Education for Psychiatric Nurses in Community Mental Health Work in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Lillian Rachel

    The purpose of this study was (1) to develop a model of required functions and effective behaviors of psychiatric nurses in mental health programs in Massachusetts and (2) to construct a model of objectives of a continuing education program for them. Perceptual data concerning functions of nurses were gathered by interviews with authorities,…

  2. Winning Policy Change to Promote Community Health Workers: Lessons From Massachusetts in The Health Reform Era

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Terry; Wilkinson, Geoffrey W.; Nannini, Angela; Martin, Cindy Marti; Fox, Durrell J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a national movement among community health workers (CHWs) to improve compensation, working conditions, and recognition for the workforce through organizing for policy change. As some of the key advocates involved, we describe the development in Massachusetts of an authentic collaboration between strong CHW leaders of a growing statewide CHW association and their public health allies. Collaborators worked toward CHW workforce and public health objectives through alliance building and organizing, legislative advocacy, and education in the context of opportunities afforded by health care reform. This narrative of the path to policy achievements can inform other collaborative efforts attempting to promote a policy agenda for the CHW workforce across the nation. PMID:22021281

  3. Mandate-based health reform and the labor market: Evidence from the Massachusetts reform.

    PubMed

    Kolstad, Jonathan T; Kowalski, Amanda E

    2016-05-01

    We model the labor market impact of the key provisions of the national and Massachusetts "mandate-based" health reforms: individual mandates, employer mandates, and subsidies. We characterize the compensating differential for employer-sponsored health insurance (ESHI) and the welfare impact of reform in terms of "sufficient statistics." We compare welfare under mandate-based reform to welfare in a counterfactual world where individuals do not value ESHI. Relying on the Massachusetts reform, we find that jobs with ESHI pay $2812 less annually, somewhat less than the cost of ESHI to employers. Accordingly, the deadweight loss of mandate-based health reform was approximately 8 percent of its potential size. PMID:27037897

  4. Massachusetts Health Reform At Ten Years: Great Progress, But Coverage Gaps Remain.

    PubMed

    Long, Sharon K; Skopec, Laura; Shelto, Audrey; Nordahl, Katharine; Walsh, Kaitlyn Kenney

    2016-09-01

    Massachusetts's 2006 health reform legislation was intended to move the state to near-universal health insurance coverage and to improve access to affordable health care. Ten years on, a large body of research demonstrates sustained gains in coverage. But many vulnerable populations and communities in the state have high uninsurance rates, and among those with coverage, gaps in access and affordability persist. PMID:27605643

  5. New state insurance exchanges should follow the example of Massachusetts by simplifying choices among health plans.

    PubMed

    Day, Rosemarie; Nadash, Pamela

    2012-05-01

    Although the Affordable Care Act requires states to establish health insurance exchanges, states have considerable discretion in the exchanges' design and in the range of products offered. We argue for a more activist approach, based on the Massachusetts experience, which found that consumers want the exchange to act as a trusted adviser and to offer a reasonable set of choices, but not too many. These findings are reflected in the Medicare prescription drug, Advantage, and Medigap markets and in the Dutch and Swiss experiences, which validate the evolving approach of Massachusetts of limiting the number of options, standardizing products, and providing consumer supports. PMID:22566437

  6. Massachusetts' post-traumatic stress disorder program: a public health treatment model for Vietnam veterans.

    PubMed Central

    Forman, S I; Havas, S

    1990-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be a serious aftermath of catastrophic events such as war. The incidence of PTSD appears to be high among Vietnam veterans. PTSD can be extremely disruptive to a person's physical and mental well-being, family life, social relationships, and employment status. Yet, for a variety of reasons, many Vietnam veterans suffering from PTSD have remained undiagnosed or insufficiently treated. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services, initiated a hospital-based treatment and rehabilitation program for Vietnam veterans who have PTSD. As of November 1989, 150 Vietnam veterans had been admitted to this program. PMID:2108464

  7. What Can Massachusetts Teach Us about National Health Insurance Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Kenneth A., Ed.; Joyce, Theodore J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the most significant health policy legislation since Medicare in 1965. The need to address rising health care costs and the lack of health insurance coverage is widely accepted. Health care spending is approaching 17 percent of gross domestic product and yet 45 million Americans remain…

  8. Manifold Restraints: Liberty, Public Health, and the Legacy of Jacobson v Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Colgrove, James; Bayer, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    February 2005 marks the centenary of one of the most important pieces of public health jurisprudence, the US Supreme Court case of Jacobson v Massachusetts, which upheld the authority of states to pass compulsory vaccination laws. The Court’s decision articulated the view that the freedom of the individual must sometimes be subordinated to the common welfare. We examined the relationship between the individual and society in 20th-century public health practice and law and the ways that compulsory measures have been used to constrain personal liberty for the sake of protecting the public health. (Am J Public Health. PMID:15798111

  9. Health Literacy, Acculturation, and the Use of Preventive Oral Health Care by Somali Refugees Living in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Hunter Adams, Jo; Penrose, Katherine L.; Cochran, Jennifer; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Henshaw, Michelle; Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the impact of English health literacy and spoken proficiency and acculturation on preventive dental care use among Somali refugees in Massachusetts. Methods 439 adult Somalis in the U.S. ≤ 10 years ago were interviewed. English functional health literacy, dental word recognition, and spoken proficiency were measured using STOFHLA, REALD, and BEST Plus. Logistic regression tested associations of language measures with preventive dental care use. Results Without controlling for acculturation, participants with higher health literacy were 2.0 times more likely to have had preventive care (p=0.02). Subjects with higher word recognition were 1.8 times as likely to have had preventive care (p=0.04). Controlling for acculturation, these were no longer significant, and spoken proficiency was not associated with increased preventive care use. Discussion English health literacy and spoken proficiency were not associated with preventive dental care. Other factors, like acculturation, were more predictive of care use than language skills. PMID:23748902

  10. The Early Impact Of The 'Alternative Quality Contract' On Mental Health Service Use And Spending In Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Barry, Colleen L; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Donohue, Julie M; Greenfield, Shelly F; Kouri, Elena; Duckworth, Kenneth; Song, Zirui; Mechanic, Robert E; Chernew, Michael E; Huskamp, Haiden A

    2015-12-01

    Accountable care using global payment with performance bonuses has shown promise in controlling spending growth and improving care. This study examined how an early model, the Alternative Quality Contract (AQC) established in 2009 by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBSMA), has affected care for mental illness. We compared spending and use for enrollees in AQC organizations that did and did not accept financial risk for mental health with enrollees not participating in the contract. Compared with BCBSMA enrollees in organizations not participating in the AQC, we found that enrollees in participating organizations were slightly less likely to use mental health services and, among mental health services users, small declines were detected in total health care spending, but no change was found in mental health spending. The declines in probability of use of mental health services and in total health spending among mental health service users attributable to the AQC were concentrated among enrollees in organizations that accepted financial risk for behavioral health. Interviews with AQC organization leaders suggested that the contractual arrangements did not meaningfully affect mental health care delivery in the program's initial years, but organizations are now at varying stages of efforts to improve mental health integration. PMID:26643628

  11. Assessment of fish health in Ashumet and Johns Ponds adjacent to the Massachusetts Military Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Adams, S.M.; Hinton, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Ashumet and Johns Ponds are located adjacent to the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, and lie in or near the paths of several plumes of groundwater contamination flowing from the MMR. This study had the objective of documenting the present status of fish in both ponds in efforts to establish base-line conditions for any future biological monitoring activities and to determine whether evidence exists for current contaminant impacts. This objective was addressed through three complimentary approaches, including the determination of Health Assessment Index (HAI) scores for fish sampled from Ashumet and Johns Ponds and several reference ponds in the area, measurement of various biochemical and physiological indicators in fish tissues and fluids and histopathological examinations of fish organs. For each of the three primary fish species examined in this study, largemouth bass, brown bullhead catfish, and yellow perch, many similarities were noted in the physiological, biochemical and histopathological condition of fish in all the study ponds. However, mean HAIs tended to be slightly higher (indicative of poorer health) in Ashumet and Johns Ponds, due in part to pathologies related to a higher incidence of parasitic infection at these sites. The most striking differences between the ponds were very high prevalences of oral and body surface papillomas in brown bullhead catfish from Johns Pond (59%) and Ashumet Pond (34%). Although pesticides, PCBs, and other chemical contaminants were present in fish from all of ponds, there was no obvious relationship between chemical body burdens and the responses of any of the measured indicator parameters, nor was there any conclusive evidence of current impacts on fish from the contaminant plumes.

  12. Jacobson v Massachusetts: it's not your great-great-grandfather's public health law.

    PubMed

    Mariner, Wendy K; Annas, George J; Glantz, Leonard H

    2005-04-01

    Jacobson v Massachusetts, a 1905 US Supreme Court decision, raised questions about the power of state government to protect the public's health and the Constitution's protection of personal liberty. We examined conceptions about state power and personal liberty in Jacobson and later cases that expanded, superseded, or even ignored those ideas. Public health and constitutional law have evolved to better protect both health and human rights. States' sovereign power to make laws of all kinds has not changed in the past century. What has changed is the Court's recognition of the importance of individual liberty and how it limits that power. Preserving the public's health in the 21st century requires preserving respect for personal liberty. PMID:15798113

  13. Jacobson v Massachusetts: It’s Not Your Great-Great-Grandfather’s Public Health Law

    PubMed Central

    Mariner, Wendy K.; Annas, George J.; Glantz, Leonard H.

    2005-01-01

    Jacobson v Massachusetts, a 1905 US Supreme Court decision, raised questions about the power of state government to protect the public’s health and the Constitution’s protection of personal liberty. We examined conceptions about state power and personal liberty in Jacobson and later cases that expanded, superseded, or even ignored those ideas. Public health and constitutional law have evolved to better protect both health and human rights. States’ sovereign power to make laws of all kinds has not changed in the past century. What has changed is the Court’s recognition of the importance of individual liberty and how it limits that power. Preserving the public’s health in the 21st century requires preserving respect for personal liberty. PMID:15798113

  14. Sediment quality assessment studies in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Long, E.R.; Thursby, G.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends program, a bioeffects assessment study was conducted in the vicinity of Boston Harbor, Massachusetts. Surficial sediment samples were collected at 55 sites and subsamples were tested for toxicity using (1) the 10-day whole sediment test with Ampelisca abdita, (2) the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development assays with sediment pore water, and (3) Microtox{trademark} assay with organic sediment extracts. Eleven percent of the samples were significantly toxic in the amphipod test, only 4% were toxic in the sea urchin fertilization test whereas all of the samples were highly toxic in the sea urchin embryological development assay; the Microtox assay determined 56% of the organic sediment extracts to be significantly toxic. Sediment chemical analyses for metals, AVS/SEM, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides were performed on 30 of the 55 samples. Twenty-seven of the 30 samples exceeded at least one probable effects level (PEL) value. For the 20 samples that exceeded 5 or more PELS, the concordance between the predicted and observed toxicity was 20% for the amphipod test, 60% for the Microtox test, and 100% for the sea urchin embryological development assay. There were no significant correlations among the different toxicity tests or between the tests and the contaminant concentrations in the bulk sediment. Possible explanations for the apparent lack of correlation between the sediment chemistry and the toxicity tests will be discussed.

  15. Massachusetts Health Reform was Cost Saving for Individuals with New Venous Thromboembolism: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Alok; Shaffer, Nicholas; Hanchate, Amresh; Roberts, Mark; Smith, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) require access to comprehensive physician and pharmacy benefits to prevent recurrence and hemorrhage. Prior to 2006, Massachusetts provided these benefits through a program restricted to safety net hospitals called Free Care. Providing portable health insurance through Massachusetts health reform could improve outcomes for uninsured with VTE but its cost-effectiveness is unknown. Methods and Results We constructed a Markov decision analysis model comparing our conceptualization of the Massachusetts health reform (“health reform strategy”) to no health reform strategy for a patient beginning warfarin for new episode of VTE. In the model, a patient may develop recurrent VTE or develop hemorrhage or stop warfarin after 6 months if no event occurs. To measure effectiveness, we analyzed laboratory data from Boston Medical Center, the largest safety net hospital in Massachusetts. Specifically, we measured the probability of having a subtherapeutic warfarin level for patients newly insured compared to those on Free Care pre-reform adjusting for secular trends. To calculate inpatient costs, we used the Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP). We then calculated the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the health reform strategy adjusted to 2014 USD per quality adjusted life year (QALY) and performed sensitivity analyses. The health reform strategy cost less and gained more QALYS than the no health reform strategy. Our result was most sensitive to the odds that Health Reform protected against a subtherapeutic warfarin level, the cost of Health Reform, and the percentage of total health care costs attributable to VTE in Massachusetts. Conclusions The health reform strategy cost less and was more effective than the no health reform strategy for patients with VTE. PMID:26908086

  16. Design of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Rachel E.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven; Anand, Shikha; Falbe, Jennifer; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Perkins, Meghan; Giles, Catherine; Criss, Shaniece; Colchamiro, Rachel; Woo Baidal, Jennifer; Land, Thomas; Smith, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Childhood obesity is highly prevalent, is associated with both short- and long-term adverse outcomes, disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minority and economically deprived children, and represents a major threat to public health. Among the most promising approaches for its prevention and management are multilevel, multisector strategies. Methods/Design: The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study was a comprehensive, systematic intervention to prevent and reduce childhood obesity among low-income children ages 2–12 years in two selected cities in Massachusetts. Building on the Obesity Chronic Care Model, MA-CORD expanded a state public health department community-level obesity prevention initiative that incorporated evidence-based interventions in primary healthcare, the Women, Infants, and Children program, early care and education, schools/afterschool programs, as well as community-wide programs to improve food, beverage, physical activity (PA), and messaging environments. The study used a combination of pre– and post–time series and quasi-experimental designs to examine the extent to which the intervention resulted in changes in BMI, individual-level lifestyle behaviors, satisfaction with healthcare services, and quality of life among children, as well as changes in health policies, programs, and environments in the two intervention cities, compared to a comparison city. The intervention period was 2 years. Conclusions: MA-CORD will determine the extent to which a multisetting, multilevel intervention that integrates activities in primary care with broader public health interventions in schools, early care and education, and the community at large can improve children's dietary and PA behaviors and ultimately reduce obesity in low-income children. PMID:25469676

  17. Student Power at The University of Massachusetts. A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, John H.; Gleason, Gail

    This essay, describing events surrounding a student demonstration at the University of Massachusetts, provides an understanding of the mechanics by which the confrontation came into being, and analyzes relevant opinions and attitudes of students. In 1968, the university's student majority supported radical student leaders in a tactical switch from…

  18. Massachusetts Study of Teacher Supply and Demand: Trends and Projections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Jesse; Berg-Jacobson, Alex; Atchison, Drew; Lee, Katelyn; Vontsolos, Emily

    2015-01-01

    In April 2015, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) commissioned American Institutes for Research (AIR) to develop a comprehensive set of 10-year projections of teacher supply and demand in order to inform planning for future workforce needs. This included state-level projections both in the aggregate, as well…

  19. Support for National Health Insurance Seven Years Into Massachusetts Healthcare Reform: Views of Populations Targeted by the Reform.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sonali; Zallman, Leah; Nardin, Rachel; Bor, David; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U; McCormick, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Before the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many surveys showed majority support for national health insurance (NHI), also known as single payer; however, little is currently known about views of the ACA's targeted population. Massachusetts residents have had seven years of experience with state health care reform that became the model for the ACA. We surveyed 1,151 adults visiting safety-net emergency departments in Massachusetts in late 2013 on their preference for NHI or the Massachusetts reform and on their experiences with insurance. Most of the patients surveyed were low-income and non-white. The majority of patients (72.0%) preferred NHI to the Massachusetts reform. Support for NHI among those with public insurance, commercial insurance, and no insurance was 68.9%, 70.3%, and 86.3%, respectively (p < .001). Support for NHI was higher among patients dissatisfied with their insurance plan (83.3% vs. 68.9%, p = .014), who delayed medical care (81.2% vs. 69.6%, p < .001) or avoided purchasing medications due to cost (87.3% vs. 71.4%; p = .01). Majority support for NHI was observed in every demographic subgroup. Given the strong support for NHI among disadvantaged Massachusetts patients seven years after state health reform, a reappraisal of the ACA's ability to meet the needs of underserved patients is warranted. PMID:26536912

  20. Behavioral Health Services Following Implementation of Screening in Massachusetts Medicaid Children

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Robert B.; Arsenault, Lisa N.; Zhang, Fang; Murphy, Michael; Wissow, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship of child behavioral health (BH) screening results to receipt of BH services in Massachusetts Medicaid (MassHealth) children. METHODS: After a court decision, Massachusetts primary care providers were mandated to conduct BH screening at well-child visits and use a Current Procedural Terminology code along with a modifier indicating whether a BH need was identified. Using MassHealth claims data, a cohort of continuously enrolled (July 2007–June 2010) children was constructed. The salient visit (first use of the modifier, screening code, or claim in fiscal year 2009) was considered a reference point to examine BH history and postscreening BH services. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of postscreening BH services. RESULTS: Of 261 160 children in the cohort, 45% (118 464) were screened and 37% had modifiers. Fifty-seven percent of children screening positive received postscreening BH services compared with 22% of children screening negative. However, only 30% of newly identified children received BH services. The strongest predictors of postscreening BH services for children without a BH history were being in foster care (odds ratio, 10.38; 95% confidence interval, 9.22–11.68) and having a positive modifier (odds ratio, 3.79; 95% confidence interval, 3.53–4.06). CONCLUSIONS: Previous BH history, a positive modifier, and foster care predicted postscreening BH services. Only one-third of newly identified children received services. Thus although screening is associated with an increase in BH recognition, it may be insufficient to improve care. Additional strategies may be needed to enhance engagement in BH services. PMID:25225135

  1. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Brenner, Alina V; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy -0.023; 95% CI -0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95% CI -0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy -0.077; 95% CI -0.130, -0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95% CI -0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95% CI, -0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation-associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95% CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data. PMID:26255039

  2. Health Risk Behaviors in a Representative Sample of Bisexual and Heterosexual Female High School Students in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White Hughto, Jaclyn M.; Biello, Katie B.; Reisner, Sari L.; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Heflin, Katherine J.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differences in sexual health-related outcomes by sexual behavior and identity remain underinvestigated among bisexual female adolescents. Methods: Data from girls (N?=?875) who participated in the Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance survey were analyzed. Weighted logistic regression models were fit to examine sexual and…

  3. HARVARD'S INDOOR AIR POLLUTION/HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An indoor air pollution/acute respiratory health study is being conducted by researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health. Upper and lower respiratory symptoms of 300 children living in Watertown, Massachusetts, have been recorded on a daily diary by a parent. Ev...

  4. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvain, D.C.

    1996-10-01

    In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

  5. Understanding the Basic Bargain: A Study of Charter School Accountability in Massachusetts and Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herdman, Paul A.

    This paper examines the balance between autonomy and accountability in education from the perspective of Massachusetts and Texas charter schools and their state authorizers. By analyzing national survey data, interviews with key policymakers, and case studies of six low, medium, and high performing schools, the paper examines the organizational…

  6. A Systems Approach for Massachusetts Schools. Study of School Building Costs. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul, Ed.

    This report details a method by which the cost of school building construction in Massachusetts could be substantially reduced. A special study committee concluded that a systems approach to school building would cut costs and produce buildings of better quality and greater flexibility. It recommended the creation of a Statewide corporation to…

  7. An Empirical Study of the School Zone Law in Three Cities in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownsberger, William N.; Aromaa, Susan

    This study of the 1989 Massachusetts' School Anti-Drug law reviewed 443 drug dealing cases in three cities. After selecting cities and drug dealing cases, researchers reviewed District Attorney case files and extracted selected data items (primarily from police reports). They mapped incident locations, schools, and parks in the cities; computed…

  8. TESTOSTERONE, DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE, AND PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE IN OLDER MEN: RESULTS FROM THE MASSACHUSETTS MALE AGING STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript examines the relationships of total testosterone (T), bioavailable T, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) to measures of physical performance in a large, population-based, random sample of men. In the most recent wave of the Massachusetts Male Aging Study, measur...

  9. Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies: Massachusetts Family Child Care Study. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ann; Goodson, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Massachusetts Family Child Care study, a two-year evaluation designed to examine the impacts on providers and children of an early childhood education program aimed at improving the development and learning opportunities in the care settings and, as a consequence, the outcomes for children in care. The early…

  10. The Impact of Functional Health Literacy and Acculturation on the Oral Health Status of Somali Refugees Living in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jo Hunter; Cochran, Jennifer; Doros, Gheorghe; Rybin, Denis; Henshaw, Michelle; Barnes, Linda L.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the impact of health literacy and acculturation on oral health status of Somali refugees in Massachusetts. Methods. Between December 2009 and June 2011, we surveyed 439 adult Somalis who had lived in the United States 10 years or less. Assessments included oral examinations with decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) counts and measurement of spoken English and health literacy. We tested associations with generalized linear regression models. Results. Participants had means of 1.4 decayed, 2.8 missing, and 1.3 filled teeth. Among participants who had been in the United States 0 to 4 years, lower health literacy scores correlated with lower DMFT (rate ratio [RR] = 0.78; P = .016). Among participants who had been in the country 5 to 10 years, lower literacy scores correlated with higher DMFT (RR = 1.37; P = .012). Literacy was not significantly associated with decayed teeth. Lower literacy scores correlated marginally with lower risk of periodontal disease (odds ratio = 0.22; P = .047). Conclusions. Worsening oral health of Somali refugees over time may be linked to less access to preventive care and less utilization of beneficial oral hygiene practices. PMID:23327248

  11. The Impact of Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Immigrant Health: Perceptions of Immigrants in Everett, Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Karen; Chu, Jocelyn; Leung, Carolyn; Marra, Robert; Pirie, Alex; Brahimi, Mohamed; English, Margaret; Beckmann, Joshua; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores; Marlin, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    U.S. immigrants have faced a changing landscape with regard to immigration enforcement over the last two decades. Following the passage of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996, and the creation of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency after the attacks of September 11, 2001, detention and deportation activity increased substantially. As a result, immigrants today are experiencing heightened fear of profiling and deportation. Little research exists on how these activities affect the health and well-being of U.S. immigrant communities. This study sought to address this gap by using community-based participatory research to investigate the impact of enhanced immigration enforcement on immigrant health in Everett, Massachusetts, USA, a city with a large and diverse immigrant population. Community partners and researchers conducted 6 focus groups with 52 immigrant participants (documented and undocumented) in five languages in May 2009. The major themes across the groups included: 1) Fear of deportation, 2) Fear of collaboration between local law enforcement and ICE and perception of arbitrariness on the part of the former and 3) Concerns about not being able to furnish documentation required to apply for insurance and for health care. Documented and undocumented immigrants reported high levels of stress due to deportation fear, which affected their emotional well-being and their access to health services. Recommendations from the focus groups included improving relationships between immigrants and local police, educating immigrants on their rights and responsibilities as residents, and holding sessions to improve civic engagement. Immigration enforcement activities and the resulting deportation fear are contextual factors that undermine trust in community institutions and social capital, with implications for health and effective integration processes. These factors should be considered by any community seeking to

  12. Rates of Insurance for Injured Patients Before and After Health Care Reform in Massachusetts: A Possible Case of Double Jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E.; Wiseman, Jason T.; Psoinos, Charles M.; Flahive, Julie M.; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined how preinjury insurance status and injury-related outcomes among able-bodied, community-dwelling adults treated at a Level I Trauma Center in central Massachusetts changed after health care reform. Methods. We compared insurance status at time of injury among non-Medicare-eligible adult Massachusetts residents before (2004–2005) and after (2009–2010) health care reform, adjusted for demographic and injury covariates, and modeled associations between insurance status and trauma outcomes. Results. Among 2148 patients before health care reform and 2477 patients after health care reform, insurance rates increased from 77% to 84% (P < .001). Younger patients, men, minorities, and penetrating trauma victims were less likely to be insured irrespective of time period. Uninsured patients were more likely to be discharged home without services (adjusted odds ratio = 3.46; 95% confidence interval = 2.65, 4.52) compared with insured patients. Conclusions. Preinjury insurance rates increased for trauma patients after health care reform but remained lower than in the general population. Certain Americans may be in “double jeopardy” of both higher injury incidence and worse outcomes because socioeconomic factors placing them at risk for injury also present barriers to compliance with an individual insurance mandate. PMID:24825208

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF CONTAMINATED WELL WATER AND HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOBURN, MASSACHUSETTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1979, two of the eight municipal wells servicing Woburn, Massachusetts, were discovered to be contaminated with several chlorinated organics. hortly afterwards, the town was found to have an elevated rate of childhood leukemia. sing recent information about the space-time dist...

  14. The Visiting Specialist Model of Rural Health Care Delivery: A Survey in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Jacob; Cashman, Suzanne B.; Savageau, Judith A.; Stenger, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals in rural communities may seek to increase specialty care access by establishing clinics staffed by visiting specialists. Purpose: To examine the visiting specialist care delivery model in Massachusetts, including reasons specialists develop secondary rural practices and distances they travel, as well as their degree of…

  15. Impact of School Staff Health on Work Productivity in Secondary Schools in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alker, Heather J.; Wang, Monica L.; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school…

  16. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources. PMID:19940570

  17. Public health assessment for Re-Solve, Incorporated, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Region 1: CERCLIS number MAD980520621. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-05-25

    The Re-Solve National Priorities List (NPL) site is a 6-acre area situated in the town of Dartmouth, Massachusetts. During the years 1956-1980 the Re-Solve Company distilled industrial solvents on-site. Waste materials from this process were disposed of by burning solvents in four on-site lagoons and spreading waste oils in various portions of the site. Elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in soils throughout the site in 1981, and it was added to the NPL in December 1982. This site is characterized as a past and present public health hazard primarily due to the likely past and present exposure to PCBs through the consumption of PCB contaminated fish and eels from area water bodies. Based upon results of fish sampling that detected PCBs in area eel, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health issued and updated an advisory in 1986 and 1994 recommending that people not eat the fish and eel caught in these affected waters. The potentially exposed population; therefore, include area fishers who may be consuming contaminated fish or eel.

  18. A health impact assessment of proposed public transportation service cuts and fare increases in Boston, Massachusetts (U.S.A.).

    PubMed

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Buonocore, Jonathan J; Levy, Jonathan I; Arcaya, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Transportation decisions have health consequences that are often not incorporated into policy-making processes. Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a process that can be used to evaluate health effects of transportation policy. We present a rapid HIA, conducted over eight weeks, evaluating health and economic effects of proposed fare increases and service cuts to Boston, Massachusetts' public transportation system. We used transportation modeling in concert with tools allowing for quantification and monetization of multiple pathways. We estimated health and economic costs of proposed public transportation system changes to be hundreds of millions of dollars per year, exceeding the budget gap the public transportation authority was required to close. Significant health pathways included crashes, air pollution, and physical activity. The HIA enabled stakeholders to advocate for more modest fare increases and service cuts, which were eventually adopted by decision makers. This HIA was among the first to quantify and monetize multiple pathways linking transportation decisions with health and economic outcomes, using approaches that could be applied in different settings. Including health costs in transportation decisions can lead to policy choices with both economic and public health benefits. PMID:25105550

  19. Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine (OBOT-B): Statewide Implementation of the Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model in Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, Colleen T; Han, Steve Choongheon; Bergeron, Alexis; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services' (BSAS) initiative to disseminate the office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine (OBOT-B) Massachusetts Model from its development at Boston Medical Center (BMC) to its implementation at fourteen community health centers (CHCs) beginning in 2007. The Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model for the delivery of opioid agonist therapy with buprenorphine, in which nurses working with physicians play a central role in the evaluation and monitoring of patients, holds promise for the effective expansion of treatment for opioid use disorders. The training of and technical assistance for the OBOT nurses as well as a limited program assessment are described. Data spanning 6years (2007-2013) report patient demographics, prior treatment for opioid use disorders, history of overdose, housing, and employment. The expansion of OBOT to the fourteen CHCs increased the number of physicians who were "waivered" (i.e., enabling their prescribing of buprenorphine) by 375%, from 24 to 114, within 3years. During this period the annual admissions of OBOT patients to CHCs markedly increased. Dissemination of the Massachusetts Model of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine employing a collaborative care model with a central role for nursing enabled implementation of effective treatment for patients with an opioid use disorder at community health centers throughout Massachusetts while effectively engaging primary care physicians in this endeavor. PMID:26233698

  20. Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Assisted Reproductive Technology: the Massachusetts Outcomes Study of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (MOSART)

    PubMed Central

    Declercq, Eugene; Luke, Barbara; Belanoff, Candice; Cabral, Howard; Diop, Hafsatou; Gopal, Daksha; Hoang, Lan; Kotelchuck, Milton; Stern, Judy E.; Hornstein, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare on a population basis the birth outcomes of women treated with Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART), women with indicators of subfertility but without ART, and fertile women. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting Massachusetts Participants 334,628 births and fetal deaths to Massachusetts mothers giving birth in a Massachusetts hospital between July 1, 2004-December 31, 2008, subdivided into three subgroups for comparison: ART 11,271, subfertile 6,609, and fertile 316,748. Intervention None Main Outcome Measures Four outcomes: preterm birth, low birthweight, small for gestational age and perinatal death, were modeled separately for singletons and twins using logistic regression with the primary comparison between ART births and those to the newly created population based subgroup of births to women with indicators of subfertility but no ART. Results Singletons: The risks for both preterm birth and low birthweight were higher for the ART group (AOR 1.23 and 1.26, respectively) compared to the subfertile group and risks in both the ART and subfertile groups were higher than those among fertile births. Twins: the risk of perinatal death was significantly lower among ART births than fertile (AOR 0.55) or subfertile (AOR 0.15) births. Conclusions The use of a population based comparison group of subfertile births without ART demonstrated significantly higher rates of preterm birth and low birthweight in ART singleton births, but these differences are smaller than differences between ART and fertile births. Further refinement of the measurement of subfertile births and examination of the independent risks of subfertile births is warranted. PMID:25660721

  1. Low-income Renewable Energy Programs: Case Studies of State Policy in California and Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kaitlin

    Energy policies aimed at reducing the burden of monthly utility costs on low-income families have been established since the 1970s. Energy use impacts low-income families and organizations through housing specific costs, health and wellness, and opportunity costs. States have begun to run renewable energy installation programs aimed at reducing costs for low-income communities. This thesis examines two of these programs, the solar photovoltaic policies in California as part of the Single Family Affordable Solar Housing and Multi-family Affordable Solar Housing programs, and the Low-income Solar Housing program in Massachusetts. Lessons learned from reviewing these programs are that renewable energy programs are an effective strategy for reducing utility costs for low-income communities, but that the total effectiveness of the program is dependent on removing cost barriers, implementing energy efficiency improvements, and increasing consumer education through established community networks and relationships.

  2. The Cultural Basis for Oral Health Practices among Somali Refugees Pre- and Post-Resettlement in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jo Hunter; Young, Samorga; Laird, Lance D.; Geltman, Paul L.; Cochran, Jennifer J.; Hassan, Ahmed; Egal, Fadumo; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Barnes, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral health disparities related to socioeconomic status have been well described in the U.S., but oral health among refugee groups has not been well characterized. This article examines oral health among Somali refugees in Massachusetts. Methods Eighty-three (83) participants were purposively selected for an in-depth, open-ended interview related to oral health. Results Older individuals associated use of the stick brush with the Islamic practice of cleansing before prayer. When unable to find stick brushes in the U.S., many adopted the Western toothbrush. Parents expressed concern that their children had adopted U.S. practices of brushing with a toothbrush only once or twice a day. Conclusions/implications Somali oral health practices have changed following arrival to the U.S., but the underlying model for oral health care remains rooted in Islam. By acknowledging the value of traditional practices, dentists may communicate the value of Western preventive and restorative dentistry, and recommend approaches to integrating the two. PMID:24185145

  3. Acculturation and sociocultural influences on dietary intake and health status among Puerto Rican adults in Massachusetts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown negative consequences of acculturation on lifestyle factors, health status, and dietary intake of Hispanic immigrants in the US. Despite prevalent type 2 diabetes and low socioeconomic status (SES) among Puerto Rican adults living on the US mainland, little is known about...

  4. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 82-212-1553, Screen Printing Shops, Boston, Massachusetts and Denton, Maryland areas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.; Smith, T.; Quinn, M.

    1985-01-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for organic solvents at five small printing shops (SIC-2751) in the Boston, Massachusetts and Denton, Maryland areas. The evaluation was requested by the union because of complaints of headache, nausea, dizziness, and other symptoms among silk screen printing workers. Nineteen exposed and four unexposed workers were interviewed. Urine samples were obtained and analyzed for methyl-hippuric-acid (2198643) and hippuric-acid (495692), metabolites of xylene (1330207) and toluene (108883). Exposed workers reported a prevalence of symptoms such as headache, trouble remembering, and disorientation. These did not differ significantly, however, from the prevalence of such symptoms among the unexposed workers. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard due to solvent exposures at the facilities exists. Recommendations include using gloves to reduce skin exposure and performing environmental and medical monitoring.

  5. MASSACHUSETTS BAYS 1996 COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Massachusetts Bays Program (MBP) was launched 1988 to actively address the mounting environmental threats to the health of Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays (the Massachusetts Bays). Initial funding of $1.6 million from the Massachusetts Environmental Trust was the result of se...

  6. Evaluation of the Massachusetts Expanded Learning Time (ELT) Initiative: Final Study Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checkoway, Amy; Gamse, Beth; Velez, Melissa; Linkow, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    The Massachusetts Expanded Learning Time (ELT) initiative provides grants to selected schools to redesign their schedules by adding 300-plus instructional hours to the school year to improve outcomes, broaden enrichment opportunities, and provide teachers with more planning and professional development time. The Massachusetts Department of…

  7. Homemaker Reaction to EFNEP/Food Stamp Pilot Nutrition Education Project. A 1983 Pennsylvania and Massachusetts Survey. Extension Studies 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Polly P.; And Others

    Between 1982 and 1983, more than 750 homemakers from Pennsylvania and Massachusetts participated in a national study to test selected methods of delivering nutrition education to low-income families. The study, the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Food Stamp Pilot Project, was conducted through the EFNEP in 10 states. At the…

  8. Flooding and Emergency Room Visits for Gastrointestinal Illness in Massachusetts: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Timothy J.; Lin, Cynthia J.; Jagai, Jyotsna S.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Floods and other severe weather events are anticipated to increase as a result of global climate change. Floods can lead to outbreaks of gastroenteritis and other infectious diseases due to disruption of sewage and water infrastructure and impacts on sanitation and hygiene. Floods have also been indirectly associated with outbreaks through population displacement and crowding. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study to investigate the association between flooding and emergency room visits for gastrointestinal illness (ER-GI) in Massachusetts for the years 2003 through 2007. We obtained ER-GI visits from the State of Massachusetts and records of floods from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s Storm Events Database. ER-GI visits were considered exposed if a flood occurred in the town of residence within three hazard periods of the visit: 0–4 days; 5–9 days; and 10–14 days. A time-stratified bi-directional design was used for control selection, matching on day of the week with two weeks lead or lag time from the ER-GI visit. Fixed effect logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of ER-GI visits following the flood. Results and Conclusions A total of 270,457 ER-GI visits and 129 floods occurred in Massachusetts over the study period. Across all counties, flooding was associated with an increased risk for ER-GI in the 0–4 day period after flooding (Odds Ratio: 1.08; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.03–1.12); but not the 5–9 days (Odds Ratio: 0.995; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.955–1.04) or the 10–14 days after (Odds Ratio: 0.966, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.927–1.01). Similar results were observed for different definitions of ER-GI. The effect differed across counties, suggesting local differences in the risk and impact of flooding. Statewide, across the study period, an estimated 7% of ER-GI visits in the 0–4 days after a flood event were attributable to flooding. PMID:25329916

  9. Workforce Characteristics of Infant and Toddler Caregivers in Centers, Family Child Care Homes and Early Head Start Programs: A Massachusetts Capacity Study Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennehy, Julie; Marshall, Nancy L.

    2005-01-01

    This research brief is part of the Massachusetts Capacity Study and focuses on the characteristics of the workforce caring for infants and toddlers in licensed or regulated early care and education in Massachusetts. The brief reviews the latest information on workforce education, staff-child ratios, group size, teacher tenure and turnover, and…

  10. Characterizing submarine groundwater discharge: A seepage meter study in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Holly A.; Lubetsky, Jonathan S.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2003-03-01

    A seepage meter study was performed in Waquoit Bay on Cape Cod, Massachusetts to characterize the amount, pattern, and origin of submarine groundwater discharge. Measurements from grids of 40 seepage meters provide a detailed representation of groundwater flux in both space and time. At the head of the bay, a distinct band of high, saline discharge was observed between 25 and 45 m from the shoreline. Slug tests indicated no pattern of permeability to explain the band of discharge, and the band was not observed offshore of an island where freshwater discharge is negligible. Experiments using clusters of seepage meters showed large variability in discharge at the meter scale and similar temporal variation throughout the domain, reflecting tidal influence primarily near shore. The small-scale variability challenges the assumption of locally homogeneous flow used in many models, and the band of discharge contradicts predictions that total outflow is largely fresh and decreases monotonically from shore.

  11. Franchising Public Education: A Study of the Linkage of Charter Schools and Private Education Management Companies in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    School franchising (defined as the replication of a particular product or service across a wide geographic region) marks a radical departure from the traditional view of the community-based neighborhood school. This paper reports on a study of a growing niche of charter school private management contracts in Massachusetts. The focus is on the…

  12. Working conditions of Brazilian immigrants in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Eduardo Siqueira, C; Jansen, Tiago

    2012-06-01

    Brazilian immigration to Massachusetts and other states in the US grew significantly in the last two decades. There is a lack of data about the working conditions and health and safety hazards faced by Brazilian immigrant workers. We surveyed over 500 workers in Eastern Massachusetts through a community-based participatory research project to explore occupational and immigration factors that may represent a risk to the health of Brazilian immigrant workers, who mostly work in the construction, housecleaning, and food services segments of the state labor force. Our pilot study suggests that Brazilian immigrant workers are exposed to chemical, ergonomic, physical, and psychosocial job hazards and have experienced a variety of health symptoms that may be associated with these work environment exposures. Since most Brazilian workers have not received proper training to recognize the hazards, there is an urgent need for the implementation of culturally adequate training programs and enforcement of safety and health regulations to prevent occupational injuries and fatalities. PMID:21643725

  13. Using Satellite-Based Spatiotemporal Resolved Air Temperature Exposure to Study the Association between Ambient Air Temperature and Birth Outcomes in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Melly, Steven J.; Coull, Brent A.; Nordio, Francesco; Schwartz, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies looking at air temperature (Ta) and birth outcomes are rare. Objectives We investigated the association between birth outcomes and daily Ta during various prenatal exposure periods in Massachusetts (USA) using both traditional Ta stations and modeled addresses. Methods We evaluated birth outcomes and average daily Ta during various prenatal exposure periods in Massachusetts (USA) using both traditional Ta stations and modeled address Ta. We used linear and logistic mixed models and accelerated failure time models to estimate associations between Ta and the following outcomes among live births > 22 weeks: term birth weight (≥ 37 weeks), low birth weight (LBW; < 2,500 g at term), gestational age, and preterm delivery (PT; < 37 weeks). Models were adjusted for individual-level socioeconomic status, traffic density, particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), random intercept for census tract, and mother’s health. Results Predicted Ta during multiple time windows before birth was negatively associated with birth weight: Average birth weight was 16.7 g lower (95% CI: –29.7, –3.7) in association with an interquartile range increase (8.4°C) in Ta during the last trimester. Ta over the entire pregnancy was positively associated with PT [odds ratio (OR) = 1.02; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.05] and LBW (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.13). Conclusions Ta during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight and shorter gestational age in our study population. Citation Kloog I, Melly SJ, Coull BA, Nordio F, Schwartz JD. 2015. Using satellite-based spatiotemporal resolved air temperature exposure to study the association between ambient air temperature and birth outcomes in Massachusetts. Environ Health Perspect 123:1053–1058; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1308075 PMID:25850104

  14. Health in Day Care: A Guide for Day Care Providers in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro, Ed.; Messenger, Katherine P., Ed.

    This reference manual and resource guide describes high standards for health policies and day care procedures that reflect current research and recommendations of experts. Chapters 1 and 2, which concern day care's role in health, cover health education in day care and the basics relating to policies, providers, and records. Chapters 3-5 concern…

  15. Ecosystem-based management and refining governance of wind energy in the Massachusetts coastal zone: A case study approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumin, Enid C.

    While there are as yet no wind energy facilities in New England coastal waters, a number of wind turbine projects are now operating on land adjacent to the coast. In the Gulf of Maine region (from Maine to Massachusetts), at least two such projects, one in Falmouth, Massachusetts, and another on the island of Vinalhaven, Maine, began operation with public backing only to face subsequent opposition from some who were initially project supporters. I investigate the reasons for this dynamic using content analysis of documents related to wind energy facility development in three case study communities. For comparison and contrast with the Vinalhaven and Falmouth case studies, I examine materials from Hull, Massachusetts, where wind turbine construction and operation has received steady public support and acceptance. My research addresses the central question: What does case study analysis of the siting and initial operation of three wind energy projects in the Gulf of Maine region reveal that can inform future governance of wind energy in Massachusetts state coastal waters? I consider the question with specific attention to governance of wind energy in Massachusetts, then explore ways in which the research results may be broadly transferable in the U.S. coastal context. I determine that the change in local response noted in Vinalhaven and Falmouth may have arisen from a failure of consistent inclusion of stakeholders throughout the entire scoping-to-siting process, especially around the reporting of environmental impact studies. I find that, consistent with the principles of ecosystem-based and adaptive management, design of governance systems may require on-going cycles of review and adjustment before the implementation of such systems as intended is achieved in practice. I conclude that evolving collaborative processes must underlie science and policy in our approach to complex environmental and wind energy projects; indeed, collaborative process is fundamental to

  16. The MOSART Database: Linking the SART CORS Clinical Database to the Population-Based Massachusetts PELL Reproductive Public Health Data System

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Lan; Stern, Judy E.; Diop, Hafsatou; Belanoff, Candice; Declercq, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Although Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) births make up 1.6 % of births in the US, the impact of ART on subsequent infant and maternal health is not well understood. Clinical ART treatment records linked to population data would be a powerful tool to study long term outcomes among those treated or not by ART. This paper describes the development of a database intended to accomplish this task. We constructed the Massachusetts Outcomes Study of Assisted Reproductive Technology (MOSART) database by linking the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technologies Clinical Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS) and the Massachusetts (MA) Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal (PELL) data systems for children born to MA resident women at MA hospitals between July 2004 and December 2008. PELL data representing 282,971 individual women and their 334,152 deliveries and 342,035 total births were linked with 48,578 cycles of ART treatment in SART CORS delivered to MA residents or women receiving treatment in MA clinics, representing 18,439 eligible women of whom 9,326 had 10,138 deliveries in this time period. A deterministic five phase linkage algorithm methodology was employed. Linkage results, accuracy, and concordance analyses were examined. We linked 9,092 (89.7 %) SART CORS outcome records to PELL delivery records overall, including 95.0 % among known MA residents treated in MA clinics; 70.8 % with full exact matches. There were minimal differences between matched and unmatched delivery records, except for unknown residency and out-of-state ART site. There was very low concordance of reported use of ART treatment between SART CORS and PELL (birth certificate) data. A total of 3.4 % of MA children (11,729) were identified from ART assisted pregnancies (6,556 singletons; 5,173 multiples). The MOSART linked database provides a strong basis for further longitudinal ART outcomes studies and supports the continued development of potentially powerful linked clinical-public health

  17. New Whole-House Case Study: Transformations, Inc. Net Zero Energy Communities, Devens, Easthampton, Townsend, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    In 2009, Transformations, Inc. partnered with Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to build new net zero energy houses in three developments in Massachusetts. The company has been developing strategies for cost-effective super-insulated homes in the New England market since 2006. After years of using various construction techniques, it has developed a specific set of assemblies and specifications that achieve a 44.9% reduction in energy use compared with a home built to the 2009 International Residential Code, qualifying the houses for the DOE’s Challenge Home. The super-insulated houses provide data for several research topics in a cold climate. BSC studied the moisture risks in double stud walls insulated with open cell spray foam and cellulose. The mini-split air source heat pump (ASHP) research focused on the range of temperatures experienced in bedrooms as well as the homeowners’ perceptions of equipment performance. BSC also examined the developer’s financing options for the photovoltaic (PV) systems, which take advantage of Solar Renewable Energy Certificates, local incentives, and state and federal tax credits.

  18. Groundwater flow delineation study at the Massachusetts Military Reservation using the colloidal borescope

    SciTech Connect

    Kearl, P.M.; Gardner, F.G.; Gunderson, M.J.

    1993-02-01

    Observations of colloidal movement under natural conditions using the colloidal borescope were conducted at several sites in the vicinity of the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MM) located on Cape Cod. The purpose of the study was to assess the reliability of the colloidal borescope and provide additional hydrogeologic data for site-characterization work. Because of the variability observed in groundwater flow at other sites, a well-characterized site was needed to test the borescope. Results of this work indicate that existing hydrologic information specific to the various sites tested at the MM compares favorably with the borehole velocity data collected with the colloidal borescope. Direction measurements at the MM, however, appear to be less reliable than at other sites tested. Most significant among factors potentially affecting direction measurements is the relatively flat hydraulic gradient at the MM, which is an order of magnitude less than at other sites. This is due to the gentle topography and the relatively high permeability of the aquifer. Under these conditions, the geometric alignment of preferential flow paths could dominate flow direction. If the gradient is increased, flow will tend to parallel the hydraulic gradient. This report describes the field site and the colloidal borescope and discusses the results and conclusions of the field investigations.

  19. Building America Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency. Efficient operation of the heating system faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68 degrees F) than day (73 degrees F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency, which faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68°F) than day (73° F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  1. Health Impact Assessment(HIA)of Building Renovations at Gerena Community School, Springfield, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has conducted an HIA at the German Gerena Community School in Springfield, MA. HIA is a six-step systematic process that uses an array of data sources, analytic methods and stakeholder input to determine the potential health effects of...

  2. Inventory 1967: Massachusetts Health Manpower Training at Less than a Baccalaureate Level. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training Center for Comprehensive Care, Jamaica Plain, MA.

    Of 379 institutions receiving a questionnaire on their paramedical training programs, 369 replied. They supplied data on 465 courses in 56 job categories. Those conducting the courses include hospitals, nursing homes, high schools, colleges, universities, technical schools, community service agencies, the State Department of Public Health, and an…

  3. A Systems Approach for Massachusetts Schools. A Study of School Building Costs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Nelson W.

    This report provides a survey of existing policies and procedures for Massachusetts school planning and construction processes; and explains systems building as a set of procedures, the most important of which procedures are market aggregation and component prebidding. The importance of systems building in reducing construction costs and improving…

  4. Understanding Pediatricians' Views toward School-Based BMI Screening in Massachusetts: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietras, Stefanie A.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Meyers, Alan; Goodman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background: Massachusetts (MA) mandated body mass index (BMI) screening in schools in 2010. However, little is known about pediatricians' views on school-based screening or how the pediatricians' perspectives might affect the school-based screening process. We assessed MA pediatricians' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices…

  5. Touching Hearts, Touching Minds: Using Emotion-Based Messaging to Promote Healthful Behavior in the Massachusetts WIC Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colchamiro, Rachel; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Hause, Judith

    2010-01-01

    The "Touching Hearts, Touching Minds" initiative was funded through a 2003 United States Department of Agriculture Special Projects grant to revitalize nutrition education and services in the Massachusetts Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program. The 30 nutrition education materials and facilitated…

  6. Parents' supportive reactions to sexual orientation disclosure associated with better health: results from a population-based survey of LGB adults in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Emily F; Sullivan, Mairead; Keyes, Susan; Boehmer, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated associations between coming out to parents, experiences of parental support, and self-reported health behaviors and conditions among a population-based sample of LGB individuals using data collected via the 2002 Massachusetts Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS; N = 177). We explored the following two hypotheses: 1) Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals who had never disclosed their sexual orientation to a parent would report higher levels of risk behaviors and poorer health conditions than those who had come out; and 2) among LGB respondents who had come out to their parents, the individuals whose parents had reacted unsupportively would report higher levels of risk behaviors and poorer health conditions than those who had come out to parents who were supportive. Approximately two thirds of gay and bisexual (GB) males and lesbian and bisexual (LB) females reported receiving adequate social and emotional support from the parent to whom they first disclosed their sexual orientation. Among LB females, no disclosure of sexual orientation to a parent was associated with significantly elevated levels of past-month illicit drug use (AOR 12.16, 95% CI 2.87-51.54), fair or poor self-reported health status (AOR 5.71, 95% CI 1.45-22.51), and >15 days of depression in the past month (AOR 5.95, 95% CI 1.78-19.90), controlling for potential confounders. However, nondisclosure to a parent by GB males was not associated with greater odds of any of the health indicators assessed. Among GB males, those with unsupportive parents were significantly more likely to report current binge drinking (AOR 6.94, 95% CI 1.70-28.35) and >15 days depression in the past month (AOR 6.08, 95% CI 1.15-32.15), and among LB females, those with unsupportive parents were significantly more likely to report lifetime illicit drug use (AOR 11.43, 95% CI 2.50-52.30), and >15 days depression in the past month (AOR 5.51, 95% CI 1.36-22.36). We conclude that coming

  7. Aggregating QECB Allocations & Using QECBs to Support the Private Sector. A Case Study on Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark; Borgeson, Merrian

    2012-08-01

    Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) are federally-subsidized bonds that enable state, tribal, and local government issuers to borrow money to fund a range of energy conservation projects at very attractive interest rates and long terms. While small allocation sizes have deterred some local governments from pursuing issuances, state agencies in Massachusetts have partnered with local governments to aggregate QECBs to support a range of public and private projects. In most states, QECBs have been utilized primarily to fund energy conservation projects for public entities, but Massachusetts has facilitated over $10 million of private activity QECB issuances to support three privately-owned renewable energy projects—with more projects in the pipeline.

  8. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. In this project, Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent).

  9. A Health Impact Assessment of a Proposed Bill to Decrease Speed Limits on Local Roads in Massachusetts (U.S.A.)

    PubMed Central

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Banay, Rachel F.; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Wood, Benjamin; Arcaya, Mariana C.

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing traffic speeds increases the amount of time drivers have to react to road hazards, potentially averting collisions, and makes crashes that do happen less severe. Boston’s regional planning agency, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), conducted a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) that examined the potential health impacts of a proposed bill in the state legislature to lower the default speed limits on local roads from 30 miles per hour (mph) to 25 mph. The aim was to reduce vehicle speeds on local roads to a limit that is safer for pedestrians, cyclists, and children. The passage of this proposed legislation could have had far-reaching and potentially important public health impacts. Lower default speed limits may prevent around 18 fatalities and 1200 serious injuries to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians each year, as well as promote active transportation by making local roads feel more hospitable to cyclists and pedestrians. While a lower speed limit would increase congestion and slightly worsen air quality, the benefits outweigh the costs from both a health and economic perspective and would save the state approximately $62 million annually from prevented fatalities and injuries. PMID:25279544

  10. A health impact assessment of a proposed bill to decrease speed limits on local roads in Massachusetts (U.S.A.).

    PubMed

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Banay, Rachel F; Buonocore, Jonathan J; Wood, Benjamin; Arcaya, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing traffic speeds increases the amount of time drivers have to react to road hazards, potentially averting collisions, and makes crashes that do happen less severe. Boston's regional planning agency, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), conducted a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) that examined the potential health impacts of a proposed bill in the state legislature to lower the default speed limits on local roads from 30 miles per hour (mph) to 25 mph. The aim was to reduce vehicle speeds on local roads to a limit that is safer for pedestrians, cyclists, and children. The passage of this proposed legislation could have had far-reaching and potentially important public health impacts. Lower default speed limits may prevent around 18 fatalities and 1200 serious injuries to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians each year, as well as promote active transportation by making local roads feel more hospitable to cyclists and pedestrians. While a lower speed limit would increase congestion and slightly worsen air quality, the benefits outweigh the costs from both a health and economic perspective and would save the state approximately $62 million annually from prevented fatalities and injuries. PMID:25279544

  11. Public health assessment for Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump, Ashland, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Region 1. Cerclis No. MAD990685422. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-29

    The Nyanza site is located in Ashland, Massachusetts, approximately 22 miles west of Boston. More than 100 different chemicals (mainly dyes, but additionally a number of semi-volatiles including benzidine, dianisidine, o-tolidine, and 2-napthylamine) have been detected at the site, which encompasses a 35-acre area. Liquid wastes from Nyanza have been discharged into the environment in several different ways including into the underground vault, unlined lagoons, and nearby brooks and wetlands. Surface water and soil on-site are known to have been contaminated. Groundwater beneath and downgradient of the site is known to be contaminated. Releases into the ambient air are known to have occurred historically. These releases have included oleum, bromine, and nitric acid. Opportunity for human exposure in the past was high and included exposures to children playing in the soils and lagoons on-site as well as in the Chemical Brook.

  12. Pathways of Thriving and Resilience: Growth Responses to Adversity and Trauma in Two Cambodian Communities: A Comparative Study between Lowell, Massachusetts and Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Cheryl D.

    This qualitative study investigated individual, contextual, and cultural factors that promote trauma-related resilience and positive growth among Cambodian survivors of the Pol Pot regime who reside in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and Lowell, Massachusetts. A thriving paradigm framed semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 21 Cambodians in…

  13. Technology Solutions Case Study: Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast, Devens, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    Double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. In this project, Building Science Corporation monitored moisture conditions in double-stud walls from 2011 through 2014 at a new production house located in Devens, Massachusetts. The builder, Transformations, Inc., has been using double-stud walls insulated with 12 in. of open cell polyurethane spray foam (ocSPF); however, the company has been considering a change to netted and blown cellulose insulation for cost reasons. Cellulose is a common choice for double-stud walls because of its lower cost (in most markets). However, cellulose is an air-permeable insulation, unlike spray foams, which increases interior moisture risks. The team compared three double-stud assemblies: 12 in. of ocSPF, 12 in. of cellulose, and 5-½ in. of ocSPF at the exterior of a double-stud wall (to approximate conventional 2 × 6 wall construction and insulation levels, acting as a control wall). These assemblies were repeated on the north and south orientations, for a total of six assemblies.

  14. Overview of causes and costs of injuries in Massachusetts: a methodology for analysis of state data.

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, M; Cohen, B B; Rodgers, C G; Walker, D K; Friedman, D J; Ozonoff, V V

    1995-01-01

    Massachusetts has developed the first State profile of the causes and costs of injury based on the national study, "Cost of Injury in the United States: A Report to Congress." Incidence of fatal injuries is based on Massachusetts data; nonfatal hospitalized injuries, on Massachusetts age and sex rates and U.S. cause data; and nonhospitalized injuries, on U.S. rates applied to Massachusetts census data. Lifetime costs per injured person are based on national data adjusted for higher personal health care expenditures and for higher mean annual earnings in Massachusetts. The estimated total lifetime cost for the 1.4 million injuries that occurred in 1989 is $4.4 billion--$1.7 billion for health care and $2.7 billion for lost earnings. Injuries attributed to motor vehicles and falls account for more than half of the total cost. The other cause categories are poisonings, fire-burns, firearms, drowings-near drownings, and other. For every person who dies from an injury, 17 people are hospitalized, and an estimated 535 people require outpatient treatment, consultation, or restricted activity. Development of a State-based cost report can be useful in monitoring the contribution of injuries to health status and in planning effective injury prevention strategies in a community-based health care system. The methodology described in this paper can be replicated by other States through accessing their State-specific mortality and hospital discharge data bases. PMID:7610211

  15. Health Care Reform: America's Dilemma. Report on the National Meeting (Boston, Massachusetts, November 28-29, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labor/Higher Education Council, Washington, DC.

    Health care reform's direct effect on higher education and labor is the subject of this conference report. Individual, panel, and interactive work group presentations addressing the values and options on health care issues are included. Following an introduction, three papers discuss the U.S. health care system: (1) "National Health Care Reform:…

  16. Conservation Commissions in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffey, Andrew J. W.

    The Conservation Foundation reported on the experience of a resource development specialist in the state of Massachusetts on the public's growing concern for environmental quality. After tracing the origins of the Massachusetts movement, the report draws upon a variety of specific state experiences to illustrate the commission's growing pains and…

  17. Food Insecurity and Body Mass Index: A Longitudinal Mixed Methods Study, Chelsea, Massachusetts, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Aileen; Oo, Sarah; Tilahun, Hailu; Cohen, Marya J.; Berkowitz, Seth A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cross-sectional studies show an association between food insecurity and higher body mass index (BMI), but this finding has not been evaluated longitudinally. Patient perspectives on food choice in resource-constrained environments are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal association between food insecurity and BMI. Methods This mixed methods study used both a retrospective matched cohort and focus groups. For the quantitative analysis, all patients in a community health center who reported food insecurity from October 2009 through March 2010 (n = 457) were followed through August 2013 and compared with controls matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity (n = 1,974). We evaluated the association between food insecurity and change in BMI by using linear, mixed effects longitudinal models. The qualitative analysis included patients with food insecurity, stratified by BMI. Qualitative data were analyzed by using open coding and grounded theory. Results The mean age of participants was 51 years; 61% were women, and 73% were Hispanic. Baseline BMI was similar in food insecure participants and matched controls. After adjustment in longitudinal analyses, food insecurity was associated with greater increase in BMI (0.15 kg/m2 per year more than controls, P < .001). Themes identified in 4 focus groups included attitudes and knowledge about food, food access, and food practices. Participants with BMI of 30 kg/m2 or less highlighted skills such as budgeting and portion control. Conclusion Food insecurity is associated with increase in BMI. The skills of food insecure participants who were not obese, such as portion control and budgeting, may be useful in weight management interventions for vulnerable patients. PMID:26247425

  18. The Enough Abuse Campaign: Building the Movement to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schober, Daniel J.; Fawcett, Stephen B.; Bernier, Jetta

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes the Enough Abuse Campaign, a multidisciplinary, statewide effort to prevent child sexual abuse in Massachusetts. The study uses the Institute of Medicine's Framework for Collaborative Community Action on Health to provide a systematic description of the campaign's process of implementation, which includes: (a) developing…

  19. Massachusetts health reform’s effect on hospitals’ racial mix of patients and on patients’ use of safety-net hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Lasser, Karen E.; Hanchate, Amresh D.; McCormick, Danny; Chu, Chieh; Xuan, Ziming; Kressin, Nancy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to residential segregation and a lack of health insurance, minorities often receive care in different facilities than whites. Massachusetts (MA) health reform provided insurance to previously uninsured patients, which enabled them to potentially shift inpatient care to non-minority-serving or non-safety-net hospitals. Objectives Examine whether MA health reform affected hospitals’ racial mix of patients, and individual patients’ use of safety-net hospitals. Research design Difference-in-differences analysis of 2004–2009 inpatient discharge data from MA, compared to New York (NY), and New Jersey (NJ), to identify post-reform changes, adjusting for secular changes. Subjects (1) Hospital-level analysis (discharges): 345 MA, NY, and NJ hospitals; (2) patient-level analysis (patients): 39,921 patients with ≥ 2 hospitalizations at a safety-net hospital in the pre-reform period Measures Pre- to post-reform changes in percentage of discharges that are minority (black and Hispanic) at minority-serving hospitals; adjusted odds of patient movement from safety-net hospitals (pre-reform) to non-safety-net hospitals (post-reform) by age group and state. Results Treating NJ as the comparison state, MA reform was associated with an increase of 5.8% (95% CI 1.4% to 10.3%) in the percentage of minority discharges at MA minority-serving hospitals; with NY as the comparison state, the change was 2.1% (95% CI −0.04% to 4.3%). Patient movement from safety-net to non-safety-net hospitals was slightly greater in MA than comparison states (difference-in-differences adjusted OR 1.1, 95% CI, 1.0–1.2, p=0.04). Conclusions Following MA health reform, the safety-net remains an important component of the healthcare system. PMID:27261638

  20. Vulnerability, Risk Perception, and Health Profile of Marginalized People Exposed to Multiple Built-Environment Stressors in Worcester, Massachusetts: A Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Timothy J.; Ross, Laurie; Goble, Robert; Subedi, Rajendra; Greenberg, Sara; Taylor, Octavia

    2011-01-01

    Millions of low-income people of diverse ethnicities inhabit stressful old urban industrial neighborhoods. Yet we know little about the health impacts of built-environment stressors and risk perceptions in such settings; we lack even basic health profiles. Difficult access is one reason (it took us 30 months to survey 80 households); the lack of multifaceted survey tools is another. We designed and implemented a pilot vulnerability assessment tool in Worcester, Massachusetts. We answer: (1) How can we assess vulnerability to multiple stressors? (2) What is the nature of complex vulnerability—including risk perceptions and health profiles? (3) How can findings be used by our wider community, and what lessons did we learn? (4) What implications arise for science and policy? We sought a holistic picture of neighborhood life. A reasonably representative sample of 80 respondents captured data for 254 people about: demographics, community concerns and resources, time-activity patterns, health information, risk/stress perceptions, and resources/capacities for coping. Our key findings derive partly from the survey data and partly from our experience in obtaining those data. Data strongly suggest complex vulnerability dominated by psychosocial stress. Unexpected significant gender and ethnic disease disparities emerged: notably, females have twice the disease burden of males, and white females twice the burden of females of color (p < 0.01). Self-reported depression differentiated by gender and age is illustrative. Community based participatory research (CBPR) approaches require active engagement with marginalized populations, including representatives as funded partners. Complex vulnerability necessitates holistic, participatory approaches to improve scientific understanding and societal responses. PMID:21175719

  1. Massachusetts fluoridation update 2006.

    PubMed

    Allukian, Myron

    2006-01-01

    Massachusetts has a long history of activity with community water fluoridation. Although the state has 3.8 million people living in 137 fluoridated communities, there are more than 2 million people who do not have these benefits. The Bay State is ranked 35th in the country regarding the percent of people on public water supplies with fluoridation. We can do better than that. We have more than 60 years of experience receiving the health and economic benefits of fluoridation in our country; however, there is still a lot of misinformation about fluoridation, and the unreliable nature of information posted on the Internet exacerbates much of this misinformation. Dental professionals, their patients, and decision-makers must be continuously educated about the safety, health, and economic benefits of community water fluoridation. Patients from 6 months to 16 years of age living in nonfluoridated communities should be prescribed supplemental fluoride. Dental professionals in nonfluoridated communities should assist them to become fluoridated. All dental professionals need to become more involved in the leadership of their communities. PMID:16683510

  2. Media Competition Implementation for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD): Adoption and Reach.

    PubMed

    Criss, Shaniece; Cheung, Lilian; Giles, Catherine; Gortmaker, Steven; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Davison, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD) was a multi-level, multi-sector community intervention with a media competition component to provide an overarching synergy and promote awareness of target behaviors to reduce childhood obesity. Students participating in the media competition were tasked with developing videos, song/rap lyrics, and artwork that reflected the goals. The aim of this study is to document the process used to develop and implement the media competition along with its reach and adoption. An adapted version of Neta and colleagues' 2015 framework on dissemination and implementation was used to summarize the process by which the media competition was developed and implemented. Adoption was defined by whether eligible schools or afterschool programs decided to implement the media competition. Reach was defined by student participation rates within schools/programs and the number of votes cast for the finalists on the coalition website and students' paper ballots. A total of 595 students participated in the media competition from 18 school and afterschool programs in two communities. Adoption of the media competitions ranged from 22% to 100% in programs and reach ranged from 3% to 33% of the student population. The documentation of the implementation should contribute to the replication of the media competition. PMID:27058549

  3. Media Competition Implementation for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD): Adoption and Reach

    PubMed Central

    Criss, Shaniece; Cheung, Lilian; Giles, Catherine; Gortmaker, Steven; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Davison, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study (MA-CORD) was a multi-level, multi-sector community intervention with a media competition component to provide an overarching synergy and promote awareness of target behaviors to reduce childhood obesity. Students participating in the media competition were tasked with developing videos, song/rap lyrics, and artwork that reflected the goals. The aim of this study is to document the process used to develop and implement the media competition along with its reach and adoption. An adapted version of Neta and colleagues’ 2015 framework on dissemination and implementation was used to summarize the process by which the media competition was developed and implemented. Adoption was defined by whether eligible schools or afterschool programs decided to implement the media competition. Reach was defined by student participation rates within schools/programs and the number of votes cast for the finalists on the coalition website and students’ paper ballots. A total of 595 students participated in the media competition from 18 school and afterschool programs in two communities. Adoption of the media competitions ranged from 22% to 100% in programs and reach ranged from 3% to 33% of the student population. The documentation of the implementation should contribute to the replication of the media competition. PMID:27058549

  4. Public health assessment for Iron Horse Park, Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Region 1. Cerclis No. MAD051787323. Addendum

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-11

    The initial health assessment and related amendment for Iron Horse Park were completed in December of 1988 and amended in April of 1990 (PB90-136128 and PB92-963707), respectively. These health assessments identified numerous data gaps which were addressed in subsequent investigations released by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Health concerns detailed in this addendum are based on findings of these monitoring activities conducted on or near the Shaffer Landfill at Iron Horse Park.

  5. A Health Impact Assessment of Proposed Public Transportation Service Cuts and Fare Increases in Boston, Massachusetts (U.S.A.)

    PubMed Central

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Levy, Jonathan I.; Arcaya, Mariana C.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation decisions have health consequences that are often not incorporated into policy-making processes. Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a process that can be used to evaluate health effects of transportation policy. We present a rapid HIA, conducted over eight weeks, evaluating health and economic effects of proposed fare increases and service cuts to Boston, Massachusetts’ public transportation system. We used transportation modeling in concert with tools allowing for quantification and monetization of multiple pathways. We estimated health and economic costs of proposed public transportation system changes to be hundreds of millions of dollars per year, exceeding the budget gap the public transportation authority was required to close. Significant health pathways included crashes, air pollution, and physical activity. The HIA enabled stakeholders to advocate for more modest fare increases and service cuts, which were eventually adopted by decision makers. This HIA was among the first to quantify and monetize multiple pathways linking transportation decisions with health and economic outcomes, using approaches that could be applied in different settings. Including health costs in transportation decisions can lead to policy choices with both economic and public health benefits. PMID:25105550

  6. Nutrition Counts. Massachusetts Nutrition Surveillance System. FY90 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiecha, Jean L.; And Others

    "Nutrition Counts," the pediatric portion of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's (MDPH) Nutrition Surveillance System, monitors and describes aspects of nutritional status among groups of young children in the state. This report presents cross-sectional data describing 5,176 infants and young children in Massachusetts. Of these, 3,181…

  7. Active Bodies, Active Minds: A Case Study on Physical Activity and Academic Success in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Understanding Boston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacheck, Jennifer; Wright, Catherine; Chomitz, Virginia; Chui, Kenneth; Economos, Christina; Schultz, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This case study addresses two major priorities of the Boston Foundation--health and education. Since the 2007 publication of the "Understanding Boston" report "The Boston Paradox: Lots of Health Care, Not Enough Health," the Boston Foundation has worked to draw attention to the epidemic of preventable chronic disease that not…

  8. DETROIT CHILDREN'S HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Children's Health Study will consist of health questionnaires for 15,000 children enrolled in the fourth- and fifth-grades of selected elementary schools, and measurements of lung function and exhaled breath in a subset of 3,500 of these children. Participation in bo...

  9. Simmons Hall, Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amelar, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of Simmons Hall, an undergraduate dormitory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, as well as floor plans and photographs. (EV)

  10. Toward universal coverage in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Linda J; Holahan, John; Weil, Alan; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Buettgens, Matthew; Blavin, Fredric; Zuckerman, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents several options designed to help the Commonwealth of Massachusetts move to universal health insurance coverage. The alternatives all build upon a common base that includes an expansion of the Medicaid program, income-related tax credits, a purchasing pool, and government-sponsored reinsurance. These measures in themselves would not yield universal coverage, nor would an employer mandate by itself. We show that an individual mandate, and an employer mandate combined with an individual mandate, both would yield universal coverage with a relatively small increase in government costs relative to state gross domestic product and current health spending. The cost of an employer mandate--with a "pay or play" design--is sensitive to the payroll tax rate and base, the number and kind of exemptions, and whether workers whose employers "pay" receive discounts when they purchase health insurance. The development of these alternatives and their analyses contributed to the eventual health care compromise that emerged in Massachusetts in April 2006. PMID:17004641

  11. Great Teachers Are Not Born, They Are Made: Case Study Evidence from Massachusetts Charters. White Paper No. 130

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candal, Cara Stillings

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has implemented reforms aimed at improving and controlling the quality of the teaching workforce in public schools. Among those reforms are tests for licensure that assess both general and content-area specific knowledge, requirements for ongoing teacher professional development, and procedures…

  12. Preliminary design study of a central solar heating plant with seasonal storage at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, D. S.; Sunderland, J. E.

    1991-04-01

    This report documents the design development and selection of the final preliminary design of a Central Solar Heating Plant with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) for the University of Massachusetts in Amherst (UMass). The effort has been performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UMass under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy. Phase 1 of this project was directed at site selection for the CSHPSS project and was reported earlier. This report focuses on the Phase 2 development of the site conditions and analytical study of project design, performance, and cost. The UMass site presents an excellent opportunity of a CSHPSS project in terms of land availability for a large collector array, a 100 foot deep deposit of soft, saturated clay for seasonal thermal energy storage, and appropriate low temperature heating loads. The project under study represents the first implementation of this solar technology in the United States and results from the International Energy Agency collaboration on CSHPSS since 1979. The preliminary design calls for a large 10,000 m(exp 2) parabolic trough collector array, 70,000 m(exp 3) storage volume in clay with heat transfer through 900 boreholes. Design optimization is based on computer simulations using MINSUN and TRNSYS. The design is expected to provide 95 percent of the 3500 MWh heating and hot water load. A project cost of $3.12 million (plus $240,000 for HVAC load retrofit) is estimated, which provides an annualized cost of $66.2/MWh per unit solar energy delivered. The project will proceed into an engineering phase in Spring 1991.

  13. [Documents make a difference: the case of Brazilian domestic workers in Massachusetts, USA].

    PubMed

    Siqueira, C Eduardo; Soares, Gabriella Barreto; Araújo, Pedro Luiz de; Tracy, Maria Natalicia

    2016-07-21

    Brazilian immigrants in the United States experience various social, labor, and health challenges. This study aimed to analyze the profile of female Brazilian domestic workers in Massachusetts, USA, through a description of their working conditions and self-rated health. This was a cross-sectional study of 198 domestic workers in Massachusetts, recruited with "snowball" sampling. The instrument addressed participants' demographic characteristics, work conditions, and self-rated health. Data were analyzed with SPSS 21.0. Among the interviewees, 95.5% were women, 62.1% were 30 to 49 years of age, and 55.6% were undocumented. Documented and undocumented participants showed statistically significant differences in demographics, work conditions, and health. Irregular immigrant status appears to have a negative impact on domestic workers' living and health conditions. PMID:27462853

  14. 21 CFR 808.71 - Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Massachusetts. 808.71 Section 808.71 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions §...

  15. Massachusetts Coverage Expansion Associated with Reduction in Primary Care Utilization among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Amelia M; White, Chapin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether expanding coverage for the nonelderly affects primary care utilization among Medicare beneficiaries. Data Source. Zip code–level files from Dartmouth Atlas for Massachusetts and surrounding states, including Medicare utilization for 2005 (pre expansion) and 2007 (post expansion), and health insurance coverage for 2005. Study Design. We use two zip code–level outcomes: arc percent change in primary care visits per Medicare beneficiary per year, and percentage point change in the share of beneficiaries with one or more primary care visits. We use a regression-based difference-in-difference analysis that compares Massachusetts with surrounding states, and zip codes with high, medium, and low uninsurance rates in 2005. The 2005 uninsurance rates correspond to the size of Massachusetts' coverage expansion. We use propensity scores for identification of comparable zip codes and for weighting. Principal Findings. In areas of Massachusetts with the highest uninsurance rates—where insurance expansion had the largest impact—visits per beneficiary fell 6.9 percent (p < .001) relative to areas of Massachusetts with the smallest uninsurance rates. Conclusions. The expansion of coverage for the nonelderly reduced primary care visits, but it did not reduce the percent of beneficiaries with at least one visit. These results could imply restricted access, increased efficiency, or some blend. PMID:24117239

  16. Pilot study of dredging and disposal alternatives for the New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Bottom sediments in New Bedford Harbor are contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and heavy metals to the extent that the site is considered one of the Nation's worst hazardous waste sites and is being studied by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Federal Superfund program. At the request of EPA, the Corps of Engineers has evaluated the feasibility of dredging and disposal alternatives for the upper estuary of New Bedford, an area where PCB concentrations in the percent levels have been detected in the sediments. Between May 1988 and February 1989 a pilot study was performed as part of this effort. This study involved the evaluation of three hydraulic pipeline dredges with the contaminated sediments being placed in a confined disposal facility and a contained aquatic disposal cell. This paper provides a comprehensive discussion of our approach and the results of this $6.5 million effort. The study provided for a site-specific technical evaluation of the methods used which has allowed the Corps of Engineers to make recommendations to EPA which will be critical in their final evaluation of remedial alternatives for the site.

  17. Building College Access with Families in New Bedford, Massachusetts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Sue Anne

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study was an investigation into improving college access through family engagement with minority and low-income students in an urban school district. Critical theory concepts of cultural capital, field, and habitus, as well as organizational communication theory, formed the theoretical framework that guided a literature review and…

  18. A Study of the Music, Academic, Leadership, and Extracurricular Achievements of Massachusetts All-State Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, R. Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have noted that the personal attributes of high school all-state participants have not been probed and have expressed surprise at this void in the music education literature (Cole, 1986; Fuller, 1989; Welker, 1997). The purpose of this study was to ascertain, through participant self-report data, the activities and accomplishments of…

  19. Building America Case Study: Monitoring of Double Stud Wall Moisture Conditions in the Northeast, Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    Double-stud walls insulated with cellulose or low-density spray foam can have R-values of 40 or higher. However, double stud walls have a higher risk of interior-sourced condensation moisture damage, when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. Moisture conditions in double stud walls were monitored in Zone 5A (Massachusetts); three double stud assemblies were compared.

  20. A Methology for Assessing the Regional Transportation Energy Demands of Different Spatial Residential Development Scenarios: a Case Study for the Upper Housatonic River Basin, Massachusetts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oski, J. A.; Fabos, J. G.; Gross, M.

    1982-01-01

    A method is suggested whereby regional landscape planning efforts can be aided by the use of a geographic information system to determine sites for more energy efficient residential and mixed use developments within a study area. The location of land parcels suited for residential and mixed land use developments in the Upper Housatonic River Basin Study Area in Berkshire County, Massachusetts is described as well as the three development options. Significant steps in the procedure are discussed and the computation of the transportation energy requirement is elaborated.

  1. Study downplays health concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-13

    A government-funded study has concluded that reformulated gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) does not increase short-term health risks when compared with gasoline that does not contain the additive. The study, performed by the Health Effects Institute (Cambridge, MA), compared data from dozens of animal, human, and epidemiological studies of health effects linked to oxygenates, including MTBE and ethanol, but did not find enough evidence to warrant an immediate reduction in oxygenate use. However, the study did recommend that additional research be conducted on possible health consequences associated with the gasoline additives, including neurotoxic effects, if oxygenates continue to be used long term. Oxygenates have been used in gasoline since 1992, when EPA mandated that several municipalities use MTBE or other oxygenates in reformulated gasoline to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and meet Clean Air Act requirements. Shortly after the program began, residents in areas where the oxygenates were used complained of nausea, headaches, and dizziness. The institute says the study--funded by EPA and the Centers for Disease Control--will be used for a broader review of gasoline oxygenates by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  2. AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study is a large cohort of 90,000 licensed pesticide applicators, plus 30,000 spouses and 20,000 children who are exposed either directly or indirectly. Exposure to pesticides is widespread and is important beyond the agricultural community. Other exposure...

  3. Biomanufacturing in Massachusetts: An Assessment and Educational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School, Lexington, MA.

    A study examined the nature and requirements of biomanufacturing work force development in Massachusetts. The jobs created by biotechnology and skill requirements for the different levels of biotechnology jobs were analyzed. Next, study task force members visited 23 companies throughout Massachusetts and interviewed a wide selection of personnel,…

  4. Use of intensive care services and associated hospital mortality after Massachusetts healthcare reform

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Sarah M.; Wunsch, Hannah; Asch, David A.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use the natural experiment of health insurance reform in Massachusetts to study the impact of increased insurance coverage on ICU utilization and mortality Design Population based cohort study Setting Massachusetts and 4 states (New York, Washington, Nebraska, and North Carolina) that did not enact reform Participants All non-pregnant, non-elderly adults (age 18–64), admitted to non-federal, acute-care hospitals in one of the five states of interest were eligible, excluding patients who were not residents of a respective state at the time of admission. Measurements We used a difference-in-differences approach to compare trends in ICU admissions and outcomes of in-hospital mortality and discharge destination for ICU patients. Main Result Healthcare reform in Massachusetts was associated with a decrease in ICU patients without insurance from 9.3% to 5.1%. There were no significant changes in adjusted ICU admission rates, mortality, or discharge destination. In a sensitivity analysis excluding a state that enacted Medicaid reform prior to the study period, our difference-in differences analysis demonstrated a significant increase in mortality of 0.38% per year (95% CI 0.12 – 0.64%) in Massachusetts, attributable to a greater per-year decrease in mortality post-reform in comparison states (−0.37%, 95% CI −0.52 – −0.21%) compared to Massachusetts (0.01%, 95% CI −0.20% – 0.11%). Conclusion Massachusetts healthcare reform increased the number of ICU patients with insurance but was not associated with significant changes in ICU use or discharge destination among ICU patients. Reform was also not associated with changed in-hospital mortality for ICU patients; however, this association was dependent upon the comparison states chosen in the analysis. PMID:24275512

  5. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This view of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.0W) is a detailed look at the national seashore recreation area with its many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago.

  6. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This view of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.5W) is a detailed look at the national seashore recreation area with its many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago.

  7. MASSACHUSETTS DEP EELGRASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field verified points showing presence or absence of submerged rooted vascular plants along Massachusetts coastline. In addition to the photo interpreted eelgrass coverage (EELGRASS), this point coverage (EGRASVPT) was generated based on field-verified sites as well as all field...

  8. MASSACHUSETTS TOWNS WITH COASTLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The political boundary datalayer is a 1:25,000 scale datalayer containing the boundaries of the 351 communities in Massachusetts. The seaward boundary of coastal communities has been defined at mean high water in this datalayer. The datalayer is named TOWNS, and it is stored as ...

  9. MASSACHUSETTS LOBSTER HARVEST ZONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This datalayer consists of 25 distinct "staistical reporting areas" covering a large portion of the Gulf of Maine and south, including the territorial waters of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Fourteen of the areas compose the territorial waters, while the other 11 ...

  10. Collaborations in population-based health research: the 17th annual HMO Research Network Conference, March 23-25, 2011, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Tracy A; Hinrichsen, Virginia L; Moreira, Andrea; Platt, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The HMO Research Network (HMORN) is a consortium of 16 health care systems with integrated research centers. Approximately 475 people participated in its 17(th) annual conference, hosted by the Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and Harvard Medical School. The theme, "Collaborations in Population-Based Health Research," reflected the network's emphasis on collaborative studies both among its members and with external investigators. Plenary talks highlighted the initial phase of the HMORN's work to establish the NIH-HMO Collaboratory, opportunities for public health collaborations, the work of early career investigators, and the state of the network. Platform and poster presentations showcased a broad spectrum of innovative public domain research in areas including disease epidemiology and treatment, health economics, and information technology. Special interest group sessions and ancillary meetings provided venues for informal conversation and structured work among ongoing groups, including networks in cancer, cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases, medical product safety, and mental health. PMID:22090515

  11. The Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed Central

    Alavanja, M C; Sandler, D P; McMaster, S B; Zahm, S H; McDonnell, C J; Lynch, C F; Pennybacker, M; Rothman, N; Dosemeci, M; Bond, A E; Blair, A

    1996-01-01

    The Agricultural Health Study, a large prospective cohort study has been initiated in North Carolina and Iowa. The objectives of this study are to: 1) identify and quantify cancer risks among men, women, whites, and minorities associated with direct exposure to pesticides and other agricultural agents; 2) evaluate noncancer health risks including neurotoxicity reproductive effects, immunologic effects, nonmalignant respiratory disease, kidney disease, and growth and development among children; 3) evaluate disease risks among spouses and children of farmers that may arise from direct contact with pesticides and agricultural chemicals used in the home lawns and gardens, and from indirect contact, such as spray drift, laundering work clothes, or contaminated food or water; 4) assess current and past occupational and nonoccupational agricultural exposures using periodic interviews and environmental and biologic monitoring; 5) study the relationship between agricultural exposures, biomarkers of exposure, biologic effect, and genetic susceptibility factors relevant to carcinogenesis; and 6) identify and quantify cancer and other disease risks associated with lifestyle factors such as diet, cooking practices, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption, and hair dye use. In the first year of a 3-year enrollment period, 26,235 people have been enrolled in the study, including 19,776 registered pesticide applicators and 6,459 spouses of registered farmer applicators. It is estimated that when the total cohort is assembled in 1997 it will include approximately 75,000 adult study subjects. Farmers, the largest group of registered pesticide applicators comprise 77% of the target population enrolled in the study. This experience compares favorably with enrollment rates of previous prospective studies. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8732939

  12. CETA in Eastern Massachusetts. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barocci, Thomas A.; Myers, Charles A.

    A study regarding the implementation of the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) in four eastern Massachusetts prime sponsor areas (Cambridge, Lowell, New Bedford, and the Balance of State) was done to (1) examine the impact of the decisions made during the implementation of CETA on manpower services and institutions, program…

  13. Teacher Contracts in Massachusetts. White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Dale

    This report is an initial effort to provide systematic information on teacher contracts in Massachusetts. In 1999, the Pioneer Institute solicited copies of the current contract from all districts in the state. Forty districts were selected to reflect the makeup of the Commonwealth. This study confirms that teacher compensation is determined by…

  14. Nurses' Perceptions of Barriers and Facilitators Affecting the Shaken Baby Syndrome Education Initiative: An Exploratory Study of a Massachusetts Public Policy.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess nurses' perceptions of barriers to and facilitators of implementation of the shaken baby syndrome (SBS)/abusive head trauma (AHT) public policy. A legislative Act providing for the prevention of SBS/AHT was passed in Massachusetts in November 2006. A stipulation of this Act was the provision of a program to educate parents/guardians of newborns about SBS/AHT prevention. A quantitative, cross-sectional research design with a qualitative component was used for this study. Nurses in 13 Massachusetts birthing hospitals were surveyed using a Web-based questionnaire (hosted by Qualtrics, Provo, Utah). Hospital nurses' responses (N = ∼ 922; 155 responded) revealed barriers to and facilitators of SBS/AHT guideline implementation. The disadvantage of Web-based surveys as they relate to the challenges of enlisting cooperation and a lack of direct access to the nurses may have attributed to the low response rate (17%) for this study. The outcomes of logistic regression analyses and themes from the qualitative analysis revealed a lack of SBS/AHT brochures and an inability to provide SBS/AHT education for non-English-speaking parents/guardians as barriers to SBS/AHT education. An atmosphere of supportive leadership facilitated implementation of the SBS/AHT education guidelines by nurses. It is imperative that nurse leadership support be sustained so that nurses have SBS/AHT education resources, an understanding of the SBS/AHT education guidelines, and feedback about the impact of their SBS/AHT education interventions. PMID:27163220

  15. Economic Efficiency and Equity in Dams Removal: Case studies in Northeastern Massachusetts Doina Oglavie, Ellen Douglas, David Terkla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglavie, D. R.; Douglas, E. M.; Terkla, D.

    2009-12-01

    According to American Rivers (www.americanrivers.org), Massachusetts has almost 3,000 dams under state regulation, 296 of which have been classified as high hazard, meaning they pose a serious threat to human life if they should fail. Most of these dams, however, are low head, “run-of-the-river” dams that no longer serve the purpose for which they were built. The presence of these dams has fragmented aquatic and riparian ecosystems, impeded fish passage and generally impacted the natural ecological and hydrological functioning of the streams in which they reside. Dam removal should be considered when a dam no longer serves its function. Although in many cases, the removal of a dam is environmentally beneficial (at least over the long term), sometimes the removal of a dam can incur environmental costs, such as release of contaminants that were sequestered behind the dam. Dam removal is a complex issue especially with respect to privately owned dams. In many cases, dam removal is less costly than dam maintenance or upgrade, hence dam removal decisions tend to be based on purely monetary considerations, and the environmental costs or benefits associated with the dam are not considered. Typically, the main objective for the dam owner is to incur the lowest possible cost (private cost), whether it be operating and maintenance or removal; external costs (environmental degradation) are rarely, if ever, considered, hence the true cost to society is not included in the economic analysis. If dam operation and removal decisions are to be economically efficient, then they have to include both the private costs as well as the external (environmental) costs. The purpose of this work is to 1) attempt to quantify the externalities associated with the maintenance and the removal of dams, 2) assess whether or not the current dam removal evaluation process maximizes social welfare (efficiency and equity) and 3) suggest ways in which this process can be improved by including the

  16. Opportunities and Challenges for Payment Reform: Observations from Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Policy makers and private health plans are expanding their efforts to implement new payment models that will encourage providers to improve quality and deliver health care more efficiently. Over the past five years, payment reforms have progressed faster in Massachusetts than in any other state. The reasons include a major effort by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts to implement global payment, the presence of large integrated systems willing to take on financial risk, and a supportive state policy environment. By 2014, thirty-seven percent of Massachusetts's residents enrolled in health plans were covered under risk-based payment models tied to global budgets. But the expansion of payment reform in Massachusetts slowed between 2012 and 2015 because some commercial enrollment shifted from risk-based health maintenance organization products to fee-for-service preferred provider organization (PPO) plans, and the state Medicaid program fell short of its payment reform goals. Provider groups will not fully commit to population-based clinical models if they believe it will result in large reductions in fee-for-service revenue. The use of alternative payment models will accelerate in 2016 when Blue Cross begins implementing PPO payment reforms, but it is unknown how quickly other payers will follow. Massachusetts's experience illustrates the complexity of payment reform in pluralistic health care markets and the need for complementary efforts by public and private stakeholders. PMID:27127259

  17. Effectiveness of highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt, Route 25, southeastern Massachusetts; description of study area, data collection programs, and methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, P.E.; Armstrong, D.S.; Granato, G.E.; Stone, V.J.; Smith, K.P.; Provencher, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Four test sites along a 7-mile section of Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts, each representing a specific highway-drainage system, were instrumented to determine the effectiveness of the drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt. One of the systems discharges highway runoff onsite through local drainpipes. The other systems use trunkline drainpipes through which runoff from highway surfaces, shoulders, and median strips is diverted and discharged into either a local stream or a coastal waterway. Route 25 was completed and opened to traffic in the summer of 1987. Road salt was first applied to the highway in the winter of 1987-88. The study area is on a thick outwash plain composed primarily of sand and gravel. Water-table depths range from 15 to 60 feet below land surface at the four test sites. Ground-water flow is in a general southerly direction, approximately perpendicular to the highway. Streamflow in the study area is controlled primarily by ground-water discharge. Background concentrations of dissolved chloride, sodium, and calcium-the primary constituents of road salt-are similar in ground water and surface water and range from 5 to 20, 5 to 10, and 1 to 5 milligrams per liter, respectively. Data-collection programs were developed for monitoring the application of road salt to the highway, the quantity of road-salt water entering the ground water, diverted through the highway-drainage systems, and entering a local stream. The Massachusetts Highway Department monitored road salt applied to the highway and reported these data to the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. Geological Survey designed and operated the ground-water, highway- drainage, and surface-water data-collection programs. A road-salt budget will be calculated for each test site so that the effectiveness of the different highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt can be determined.

  18. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.5W) is a national seashore recreation area with many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago. The through canal at the base of the cape is a manmade feature for waterborne traffic and is part of the Intercoastal Canal network. The cape actually begins south of the canal.

  19. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects, and was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  20. Hydrogeochemical cycling and chemical denudation in the Fort River watershed, central Massachusetts: an appraisal of mass-balance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yuretich, R.F.; Batchelder, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Fort River watershed in central Massachusetts receives precipitation with a composition similar to that in Hubbard Brook (New Hampshire), yet the average stream water chemistry is substantially different, showing higher pH and TDS. This is largely a function of bedrock and surficial geology, and chemical differences among small streams within the Fort River watershed are apparently controlled by the composition and thickness of the prevailing surficial cover. The surficial deposits determine ground water and surface water flow paths, thereby affecting the resultant contact time with mineral matter and the chemistry of the runoff. Despite the rural setting, over 95% of the annual sodium and chloride in the streams comes from road salt; after correcting for this factor, cation denudation rates are about equal to those at Hubbard Brook. However, silica removal is occurring at a rate more than 30% greater in the Fort River. When climatic conditions in Hubbard Brook and Fort River are normalized, weathering rates appear consistently higher in the Fort River, reflecting differences in weathering processes (i.e., cation exchange and silicate breakdown) and hydrogeology. Because of uncertainties in mechanisms of cation removal from watersheds, the silica denudation rate may be a better index of weathering intensity.

  1. Phytochelatin production by marine phytoplankton at low free metal ion concentrations: laboratory studies and field data from Massachusetts Bay.

    PubMed

    Ahner, B A; Price, N M; Morel, F M

    1994-08-30

    Phytochelatins are small metal-binding polypeptides synthesized by algae in response to high metal concentrations. Using a very sensitive HPLC method, we have quantified phytochelatins from phytoplankton in laboratory cultures at environmentally relevant metal concentrations and in marine field samples. Intracellular concentrations of phytochelatin, in the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, exhibit a distinct dose-response relation with free Cd2+ concentration in the medium--not with total Cd(2+)--and are detectable even when the free Cd2+ concentration is less than 1 pM. In Massachusetts Bay, phytochelatin levels (normalized to chlorophyll a) in the particulate fraction are similar to those measured in laboratory cultures exposed to picomolar free Cd2+ concentrations and exhibit a decreasing seaward trend. Incubations of natural samples with added Cd2+ confirmed the induction of the peptides by this metal. Ambient phytochelatin concentrations thus appear to provide a measure of the metal stress resulting from the complex mixture of trace metals and chelators in natural waters. PMID:8078899

  2. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  3. Resource scarcity, energy use and environmental impact: A case study of the New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Catherine; Cleveland, Cutler J.

    1993-05-01

    The commercial fishing fleet in New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, harvests seafood on George’s Bank, home of one of the nation’s most productive fisheries. We calculated the energy return on investment (EROI) and carbon intensity of protein harvest in the New Bedford fisheries from 1968 to 1988. EROI is the ratio of the energy content of the edible fish protein harvested to the quantity of fossil fuel energy used directly in the harvesting process. Carbon intensity is the quantity of carbon dioxide (CO2) released (from the burning of fossil fuels) per calorie of edible fish protein harvested. The results show that the EROI of protein harvest declined from 0.18 to 0.028 from 1968 to 1988, indicating that the energy used to harvest seafood increased from about 6 to 36 kcal of fuel for each kilocalorie of protein harvested. The quantity of CO2 released per calorie of edible fish protein is a linear function of energy use and therefore increased in a similar manner. During this period there was a large increase in fishing effort (caused by the increase in the real price of seafood products, favorable tax treatment for new vessel construction, and low interest loans from the government), and a decline in several important species of fish. The results suggest that fishing pressure could be managed effectively by the regulation of fuel use by the fleet. Despite the increase in the price of many seafood products, fishermen absorbed many of the costs of increasing scarcity in the form of longer working hours and fewer men per vessel.

  4. Delineation and Characterization of Furnace Brook Watershed in Marshfield, Massachusetts: A Study of Effects upon Conjunctive Water Use within a Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, E. D.; Enright, R.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of conjunctive use between surface and ground water is essential to resource management both for sustained public use and watershed conservation practices. The Furnace Brook watershed in Marshfield, Massachusetts supplies a coastal community of 25,132 residents with nearly 50% of the town water supply. As with many other coastal communities, development pressure has increased creating a growing demand for freshwater extraction. It has been observed, however, that portions of the stream and Furnace Pond disappear entirely. This has created a conflict between protection of the designated wetland areas and meeting public pressure for water resources, even within what is traditionally viewed as a humid region. Questions have arisen as to whether the town water extraction is influencing this losing behavior by excessively lowering water-table elevations and potentially endangering the health of the stream. This study set out to initially characterize these behaviors and identify possible influences of anthropogenic and natural sources acting upon the watershed including stream flow obstructions, water extraction, and geologic conditions. The initial characterization was conducted utilizing simple, low-cost and minimally intrusive methods as outlined by Lee and Cherry (1978), Rosenberry and LaBaugh (2008) and others during a six week period. Five monitoring stations were established along a 3.0 mile reach of the basin consisting of mini-piezometers, seepage meters, survey elevation base-lines, and utilizing a Marsh-McBirney flow velocity meter. At each station stream discharge, seepage flux rates and hydraulic gradients were determined to develop trends of stream behavior. This methodology had the benefit of demonstrating the efficacy of an intrinsically low-expense, minimally intrusive initial approach to characterizing interactions between surface and ground water resources. The data was correlated with town pumping information, previous geologic

  5. Statewide air medical transports for Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Garthe, Elizabeth; Mango, Nicholas K; Prenney, Brad

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) established a process to centralize air medical transport information. This database is one of the first statewide, population-based sources for civilian rotary-wing air medical transports (U.S. Coast Guard, police, and military missions are not included). The purpose of this database is to facilitate MDPH review of air medical transport service utilization, with input from a multidisciplinary committee. This article discusses the challenges in producing uniform data from multiple service submissions and presents aggregate "baseline" utilization information for 1996. These data served as a starting point for later studies using data linkage. This indexed article is the first to report statewide, population-based data for all types of air medical helicopter transports. The only other indexed "statewide air medical transport" paper focused on scene transports to trauma centers in Pennsylvania. A previous article by the authors in the July-September 2000 Air Medical Journal provided an overview of air medical transports for fatal motor vehicle crashes for 1 region of the state. PMID:12585073

  6. 77 FR 36404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Massachusetts; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... significant regulatory actions based on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885...; Determination of Attainment of the 1997 Ozone Standard for the Western Massachusetts Nonattainment Area AGENCY... Massachusetts) moderate 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour National Ambient...

  7. Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Satchwell, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

    2010-08-06

    Increased interest by state (and federal) policymakers and regulatory agencies in pursuing aggressive energy efficiency efforts could deliver significant utility bill savings for customers while having long-term implications for ratepayers (e.g. potential rate impacts). Equity and distributional concerns associated with the authorized recovery of energy efficiency program costs may necessitate the pursuit of alternative program funding approaches. In 2008, Massachusetts passed the Green Communities Act which directed its energy efficiency (EE) program administrators to obtain all cost-effective EE resources. This goal has translated into achieving annual electric energy savings equivalent to a 2.4% reduction in retail sales from energy efficiency programs in 2012. Representatives of electricity consumer groups supported the new portfolio of EE programs (and the projected bill savings) but raised concerns about the potential rate impacts associated with achieving such aggressive EE goals, leading policymakers to seek out alternative funding sources which can potentially mitigate these effects. Utility administrators have also raised concerns about under-recovery of fixed costs when aggressive energy efficiency programs are pursued and have proposed ratemaking policies (e.g. decoupling) and business models that better align the utility's financial interests with the state's energy efficiency public policy goals. Quantifying these concerns and identifying ways they can be addressed are crucial steps in gaining the support of major stakeholder groups - lessons that can apply to other states looking to significantly increase savings targets that can be achieved from their own ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs. We use a pro-forma utility financial model to quantify the bill and rate impacts on electricity customers when very aggressive annual energy efficiency savings goals ({approx}2.4%) are achieved over the long-term and also assess the impact of different

  8. EL PASO CHILDREN'S HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The El Paso Childrens Health Study consisted of two waves of exposure monitoring, respiratory health questionnaires, and lung function examinations. The exposure assessment began with a pilot study using passive samplers for nitrogen dioxide in February, 1999 and was followed b...

  9. Study Guide in Health Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, George; Jablon, Bert

    Prepared to assist students at Empire State College in developing learning contracts for the study of the economics of health care delivery, this study guide discusses various aspects of the topic, suggests student projects, and provides an extensive bibliography. First, introductory material discusses the relationship of economics to health care…

  10. Massachusetts's experience suggests coverage alone is insufficient to increase addiction disorders treatment.

    PubMed

    Capoccia, Victor A; Grazier, Kyle L; Toal, Christopher; Ford, James H; Gustafson, David H

    2012-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act is aimed at extending health insurance to more than thirty million Americans, including many with untreated substance use disorders. Will those who need addiction treatment receive it once they have insurance? To answer that question, we examined the experience of Massachusetts, which implemented its own universal insurance law in 2007. As did the Affordable Care Act, the Massachusetts reform incorporated substance abuse services into the essential benefits to be provided all residents. Prior to the law's enactment, the state estimated that a half-million residents needed substance abuse treatment. Our mixed-methods exploratory study thus asked whether expanded coverage in Massachusetts led to increased addiction treatment, as indicated by admissions, services, or revenues. In fact, we observed relatively stable use of treatment services two years before and two years after the state enacted its universal health care law. Among other factors, our study noted that the percentage of uninsured patients with substance abuse issues remains relatively high--and that when patients did become insured, requirements for copayments on their care deterred treatment. Our analysis suggests that expanded coverage alone is insufficient to increase treatment use. Changes in eligibility, services, financing, system design, and policy may also be required. PMID:22566439

  11. HEALTH AND RETIREMENT STUDY (HRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    HRS is a national panel study based on biennial interviews. The study provides a portrait of an aging America's physical and mental health, insurance coverage, financial status, family support systems, labor market status, and retirement planning.

  12. Examining Climate Influences and Economic Impacts of Harmful Algal Blooms in Massachusetts: 1993 and 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, N.

    2005-12-01

    Although the potential causes of harmful algal blooms (HABs), or red tides, have been studied extensively, the relationships between the environmental drivers and economic impacts have not been fully explored. This paper examined the environmental-economic link by investigating similarities in the environmental conditions leading to the 1993 and 2005 HABs (caused by the dinoflagellate Alexandirum) along the Massachusetts coast, and the resulting effects on shellfish, public health, recreation, tourism, and the commercial shellfish industry in Massachusetts. Environmental influences including sea surface temperature (SST), salinity, precipitation, streamflow, and shellfish toxicity levels were examined for the years 1990 to 2005. Economic impacts on commercial fishery landings (Massachusetts mussel commercial fishery landings and Gloucester commercial fishery landings) were assessed for the years1990 to 2003. The Plume Advection hypothesis was studied and results showed that runoff from the five major rivers that contribute to the Western Maine Coastal Current, the current that carried these cells, peaked in April 1993 and 2005 relative to the mean which varied from river to river. The most intense wind stress coming from the North occurred in April 1993 and May 2005 with speeds of 15-20 m/s. A large decrease in salinity off the Massachusetts coast occurred in May 1993 and measured outside the 68% of 1993 salinity data recorded, and from the information available, in April and May 2005 waters were also less saline. Peaks in shellfish toxicity occurred in early June 1993 at approximately 400 μg toxicity/g shellfish meat and in 2005 at 700 μg toxicity/g shellfish meat. This indicated a lag time between peaks in runoff and toxicity of approximately one month and similarly with decreases in salinity. Runoff also corresponded to a large decrease in salinity during May 1993. Coincidentally, there was also a significant decrease in commercial fishery landings between

  13. Master environmental plan for Fort Devens, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Biang, C.A.; Peters, R.W.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y. . Energy Systems Div.)

    1991-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a master environmental plan (MEP) for Fort Devens, Massachusetts, for the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. The MEP is an assessment based on environmental laws and regulations of both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MEP assess the physical and environmental status of 58 potential hazardous waste sites, including 54 study areas (SAs) that pose a potential for releasing contamination into the environment and 4 areas of concern (AOCs) that are known to have substantial contamination. For each SA or AOC, this MEP describes the known history and environment, identifies additional data needs, and proposes possible response actions. Most recommended response actions consist of environmental sampling and monitoring and other characterization studies. 74 refs., 63 figs., 50 tabs.

  14. The recovery of Bay State Health Care.

    PubMed

    Maltz, D L

    1994-03-01

    Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Massachusetts acquired Bay State Health Care after the HMO's tumultuous downturn. The case study described herein provides a useful lesson in the moves that must be made, particularly in an era of health care consolidation and intensive competition, to maintain health plan stability and reinforce its position in the marketplace. PMID:10133054

  15. Agricultural Health Study

    Cancer.gov

    A prospective cohort study of commercial pesticide applicators, farmers and farmers' spouses in Iowa and North Carolina conducted in collaboration between the NIH and the U.S. Evironmental Protection Agency

  16. Access and use of information resources by Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the way in which the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection uses risk assessment to implement the state`s environmental laws. It focuses on the Office of Research and Standards, which was created to provide information on adverse health effects of environmental contaminants, to recommend exposure levels, and to direct and manage research programs.

  17. An Exploratory Research Study of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP): The Impact of Student-Supervisor Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Nancy Y. J.

    2004-01-01

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program has been around for over 30 years and is seen as "one of the most important means for students to foster mentoring relationships with faculty and research staff." By analyzing data obtained through semi-structured interviews and survey results, a typology of…

  18. AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY/PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a prospective epidemiologic study of a large cohort of pesticide applicators and their spouses in Iowa and North Carolina. The Pesticide Exposure Study is a sub-study to evaluate exposure factors and to provide data to assess exposure cla...

  19. Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On the night of April 18/19, 1775, Paul Revere rode from Boston to Lexington, Mass., to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams that the British were coming. On April 19, there was a skirmish on the Battle Green, with shots being fired both from the Battle Green and the nearby Buckman Tavern. After the rout, the British marched on toward Concord. The battle in Lexington allowed the Concord militia time to organize at the Old North Bridge, where they were able to turn back the British and prevent them from capturing and destroying the militia's arms stores.

    This image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer instrument on NASA's Terra satellite, acquired in October 2006, depicts this area of great importance in U.S. history. These two small Massachusetts towns are now dwarfed by Hanscom Air Force Base between them.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science

  20. The Impact of Study Tours in Developing Global-Mindedness among PK-12 Educators in Southeastern Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMello, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    College and career readiness requires that PK-12 educators provide a global education, yet many educators have had insufficient professional training to address this need. This mixed methods study investigated the impact of international study tours in the development of global-mindedness among educators participating in a Southeastern…

  1. MASSACHUSETTS DEP EELGRASS VERIFIED POINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field verified points showing presence or absence of submerged rooted vascular plants along Massachusetts coastline. In addition to the photo interpreted eelgrass coverage (EELGRASS), this point coverage (EGRASVPT) was generated based on field-verified sites as well as all field...

  2. Censorship in Massachusetts: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.; O'Brien, Jane E.

    This report updates a 1979 article from the Bay State Librarian about censorship in Massachusetts libraries from 1966 through 1975. Compiled using data from the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF), the report provides information about censorship attempts and actions between 1976 and 1982. The definition of…

  3. Massachusetts Special Olympics Poly Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Jim

    Poly Hockey is featured in this manual of instructions for coaches and teachers to use with mentally retarded boys and girls of all ages and ability levels. It is noted that the sport has been supported by the Board of Directors of the Special Olympics and has been used in Massachusetts for over 7 years. Explained is use of the game indoors, and…

  4. Student and Teacher Perspectives on Channel One: A Qualitative Study of Participants in Massachusetts and Florida Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Janice M.

    A study of Channel One, the 10 minutes of television news programs and 2 minutes of commercials in classrooms, described the opinions and evaluative comments of participant teachers, librarians, administrators, and students. Individual interviews and focus group discussions were conducted at eight secondary schools (four in Florida and four in…

  5. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  6. Multidisciplinary Studies of the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Ground Water at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program Research Site, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts multidisciplinary research on the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes affecting ground-water contaminants of global concern at its Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program site in Massachusetts, USA. The work centers on a 6-kilometer-long plume of treated wastewater in a glacial sand and gravel aquifer. The plume is characterized by distinct geochemical zones caused by the biodegradation of organic materials in treated wastewater that was disposed to the aquifer by rapid infiltration during the period 1936-95. A core group of hydrogeologists, geochemists, microbiologists, and geophysicists has been involved in the research effort for more than two decades. The effort has been enhanced by stable funding, a readily accessible site, a relatively simple hydrologic setting, and logistical support from an adjacent military base. The research team uses a three-part approach to plan and conduct research at the site. First, detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of the plume since the late 1970s provides field evidence of important contaminant-transport processes and provides the basis for multidisciplinary, process-oriented studies. Second, ground-water tracer experiments are conducted in various geochemical zones in the plume to study factors that control the rate and extent of contaminant transport. Several arrays of multilevel sampling devices, including an array with more than 15,000 individual sampling points, are used to conduct these experiments. Plume-scale (kilometers) and tracer-test-scale (1- 100 meters) studies are complemented by laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling of flow and reactive transport. Third, results are applied to the treated-wastewater plume, other contaminant plumes at the military base, and other sites nationally to evaluate the applicability of the findings and to point toward further research. Examples of findings to date include that (1) macrodispersivity can be related to

  7. Building America Case Study: Field Performance of Inverter-Driven Heat Pumps in Cold Climates - Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    New inverter-driven ASHPs are gaining ground in colder climates. These systems operate at sub-zero temperatures without the use of electric resistance backup. There are still uncertainties, however, about cold-climate capacity and efficiency in cold weather and questions such as measuring: power consumption, supply, return, and outdoor air temperatures, and air flow through the indoor fan coil. CARB observed a wide range of operating efficiencies and outputs from site to site. Maximum capacities were found to be generally in line with manufacturer's claims as outdoor temperatures fell to -10 degrees F. The reasons for the wide range in heating performance likely include: low indoor air flow rates, poor placement of outdoor units, relatively high return air temperatures, thermostat set back, integration with existing heating systems, and occupants limiting indoor fan speed. Even with lower efficiencies than published in other studies, most of the heat pumps here still provide heat at lower cost than oil, propane, or certainly electric resistance systems.

  8. Rates of Femicide in Women of Different Races, Ethnicities, and Places of Birth: Massachusetts, 1993-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; McKeown, Loreta; Melvin, Patrice; Dang, Quynh; Reed, Joan

    2011-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of intimate partner violence (IPV) homicide in Massachusetts, an IPV mortality data set developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health was analyzed. The rates of death were estimated by dividing the number of decedents over the aged-matched population and Poisson regression was used to estimate the…

  9. A vehicle health monitoring system for the Space Shuttle Reaction Control System during reentry. M.S. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosello, Anthony David

    1995-01-01

    A general two tier framework for vehicle health monitoring of Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system actuators, effectors, and propulsion devices is presented. In this context, a top level monitor that estimates jet thrust is designed for the Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) during the reentry phase of flight. Issues of importance for the use of estimation technologies in vehicle health monitoring are investigated and quantified for the Shuttle RCS demonstration application. These issues include rate of convergence, robustness to unmodeled dynamics, sensor quality, sensor data rates, and information recording objectives. Closed loop simulations indicate that a Kalman filter design is sensitive to modeling error and robust estimators may reduce this sensitivity. Jet plume interaction with the aerodynamic flowfield is shown to be a significant effect adversely impacting the ability to accurately estimate thrust.

  10. The Massachusetts Community Colleges Developmental Education Best Policy and Practice Audit: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperling, Charmian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study, funded by Jobs for the Future through a grant to the Massachusetts Community Colleges Executive Office, was to: (1) provide an update on the status of developmental education within Massachusetts community colleges; (2) shed light on the alignment between research-based best practices to advance success among…

  11. New Teachers and the Massachusetts Signing Bonus: The Limits of Inducements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Edward; Johnson, Susan Moore; Peske, Heather G.

    2004-01-01

    In 1998, Massachusetts instituted a $20,000 Signing Bonus to address concerns about the supply of quality teachers. This article reports on a longitudinal, qualitative study of the experiences of 13 of the original 59 recipients of the Signing Bonus, and analyzes their responses to various incentives embedded within the Massachusetts Signing Bonus…

  12. Education Funding in Massachusetts: The Effects of Aid Modifications on Vertical and Horizontal Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Public school funding in Massachusetts is based on foundation budget principles. However, funding formula modifications often create disparities between district foundation budgets and actual required spending levels. This study provides an in-depth look at Massachusetts' state aid formulas used between 2004 and 2009 and utilizes two approaches to…

  13. Best of Both Worlds: How Massachusetts Vocational Schools Are Preparing Students for College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayerl, Katie

    2015-01-01

    "Best of Both Worlds: How Massachusetts Vocational Schools are Preparing Students for College and Careers," highlights the state's policies that promote strong programming. Massachusetts encourages the completion of MassCore, the state's college- and career-ready course of study, incentivizes rigorous academic standards through school…

  14. Increased Percentage of Passing Grades on the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System after Implementation of Block Scheduling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Eric D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined one public school system's change in its bell scheduling format from a seven period day to block scheduling. The data collected was from a three year period of the grade 10 students passing the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System exam. Students in Massachusetts must pass the mathematics and English/language arts…

  15. Character, Civility, and the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks: A Collection of Sample Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston.

    Educating students about character development and responsibility can and should be an integral part of the academic curriculum. This collection contains units of study that were written to exemplify some of the many ways that these themes might be taught in preK-12 Massachusetts classrooms. Using the standards of the Massachusetts Curriculum…

  16. Trauma-Informed Care in the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jessica Dym; Barto, Beth; Griffin, Jessica L; Fraser, Jenifer Goldman; Hodgdon, Hilary; Bodian, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Child maltreatment is a serious public health concern, and its detrimental effects can be compounded by traumatic experiences associated with the child welfare (CW) system. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a promising strategy for addressing traumatized children's needs, but research on the impact of TIC in CW is limited. This study examines initial findings of the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project, a statewide TIC initiative in the CW system and mental health network. After 1 year of implementation, Trauma-Informed Leadership Teams in CW offices emerged as key structures for TIC systems integration, and mental health providers' participation in evidence-based treatment (EBT) learning collaboratives was linked to improvements in trauma-informed individual and agency practices. After approximately 6 months of EBT treatment, children had fewer posttraumatic symptoms and behavior problems compared to baseline. Barriers to TIC that emerged included scarce resources for trauma-related work in the CW agency and few mental providers providing EBTs to young children. Future research might explore variations in TIC across service system components as well as the potential for differential effects across EBT models disseminated through TIC. PMID:26564909

  17. Household and family factors related to weight status in first through third graders: a cross-sectional study in Eastern Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early environmental influences have been linked to child weight status, however further understanding of associations in diverse populations is needed. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of household and family factors associated with overweight was conducted on a culturally diverse, urban dwelling sample of 820 first through third graders (mean age 7.6 ± 1.0 years) residing in three eastern Massachusetts cities. Overweight was defined as BMI > 85th percentile, based on measured height and weight, and the CDC growth reference. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify demographic, behavioral, and social environmental variables significantly related to weight status. Independent variables included race-ethnicity, age, sex, servings of sugar-sweetened beverages/week, hours of screen time/week, parent overweight, (calculated from self-reported weight/height), parent education, household food restriction rules regarding snacking and/or kitchen access, frequency of having dinner as a family (reported as “a lot” vs. “sometimes/rarely/never”) and child vitamin/mineral supplement use. Selected interactions were explored based on prior studies. Results Prevalence of overweight was 35.5% in girls and 40.8% in boys. In the final, adjusted model, compared to white children, the odds of overweight were higher in children of Hispanic race-ethnicity (odds ratio (OR) = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.4 - 4.1). In the same adjusted model, compared to children with no household food restriction rules, the odds of overweight were 2.6 (95% CI = 1.3-5.1) times higher and 3.5 (95% CI = 1.9-6.4) times higher for children having one rule or two rules, respectively. Parent report of frequent family dinner and child vitamin use were protective, with a halving of risk for overweight for each behavior (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31-0.71 and OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.37-0.78, respectively). Conclusions In the presence of other factors, frequent

  18. The effects of a health promotion-health protection intervention on behavior change: the WellWorks Study.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, G; Stoddard, A; Hunt, M K; Hebert, J R; Ockene, J K; Avrunin, J S; Himmelstein, J; Hammond, S K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effects of a 2-year integrated health promotion-health protection work-site intervention on changes in dietary habits and cigarette smoking. METHODS: A randomized, controlled intervention study used the work site as the unit of intervention and analysis; it included 24 predominantly manufacturing work sites in Massachusetts (250-2500 workers per site). Behaviors were assessed in self-administered surveys (n = 2386; completion rates = 61% at baseline, 62% at final). Three key intervention elements targeted health behavior change: (1) joint worker-management participation in program planning and implementation, (2) consultation with management on work-site environmental changes, and (3) health education programs. RESULTS: Significant differences between intervention and control work sites included reductions in the percentage of calories consumed as fat (2.3% vs 1.5% kcal) and increases in servings of fruit and vegetables (10% vs 4% increase). The intervention had a significant effect on fiber consumption among skilled and unskilled laborers. No significant effects were observed for smoking cessation. CONCLUSIONS: Although the size of the effects of this intervention are modest, on a populationwide basis effects of this size could have a large impact on cancer-related and coronary heart disease end points. PMID:9807537

  19. Geological Interpretation of the Sea Floor Offshore of Edgartown, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Foster, D.S.; Blackwood, D.S.; Williams, S.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Moser, M.S.; Glomb, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Gridded bathymetry and sidescan-sonar imagery together cover approximately 37.3 square kilometers of sea floor in the vicinity of Edgartown Harbor, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11346, these acoustic data, and the sea-floor stations and seismic-reflection lines subsequently occupied to verify them, 1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, 2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and 3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management (for example, windfarms, pipelines, and dredging) activities along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf.

  20. [DHS: The Dortmund health study].

    PubMed

    Berger, K

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the population-based Dortmund health study (DHS) is the assessment of the prevalence and incidence of different headache types as well as other chronic conditions and to analyse their consequences on daily activities of those affected. From 2003 to 2004 overall 2,291 participants were recruited into the study, 1,312 attended the study centre and the others participated by answering a mailed questionnaire. In 2006 a follow-up by mailed questionnaire was performed for 77.8% of the survivors. The influence of social factors was specifically considered in the analysis and interpretation of disease consequences. The following manuscript describes the study design, method of participant recruitment, data assessment and examinations performed in the study and reports the results of the association between neighbourhood unemployment and the prevalence of cardiac risk factors as well as the prevalence of several chronic diseases. PMID:22736161

  1. Education Finance Reform, Local Behavior, and Student Performance in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong; Yinger, John

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact on student performance of the education finance reform enacted in 1993 in Massachusetts and of school districts' institutional structure. Estimating education expenditure and demand functions, this study presents evidence that changes in the state education aid following the education reform resulted in significantly…

  2. Generativity, Stuckness, and Insulation: Community College Faculty in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Michael Clifford Todd

    This study examines the psychosocial conditions of generativity and stagnation and personal characteristics related to these conditions among senior faculty at five community colleges in Massachusetts. Chapter I outlines the problem and purpose of the study; defines "stuckness" as a lack of challenge or career options, contrasting it with burnout;…

  3. Transgender Health Disparities: Comparing Full Cohort and Nested Matched-Pair Study Designs in a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; White, Jaclyn M.; Bradford, Judith B.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose U.S. health surveillance systems infrequently include measures to identify transgender respondents or monitor the health of this underserved and marginalized population. Methods From 2001–2002, transgender and non-transgender adults were sampled at a Massachusetts clinic. Health differences were formatively examined by transgender identity using a cross-sectional, clinic-based sample (n=2,653); and a nested matched-pair subsample (n=155). Results Both designs produced virtually identical findings: (1) the prevalence of HIV, substance abuse, and smoking did not differ significantly for transgender and non-transgender patients; (2) transgender patients were more likely to endorse a lifetime suicide attempt and ideation compared to non-transgender patients (p<0.05); (3) transgender patients disproportionately reported social stressors (violence, discrimination, childhood abuse) relative to non-transgender patients (p<0.05). Conclusion Findings suggest that a nested design may provide an effective methodology for using clinical data to study transgender health, and underscore the need for routine collection of gender identity in clinical settings. PMID:25379511

  4. Health communication in primary health care -A case study of ICT development for health promotion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Developing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) supported health communication in PHC could contribute to increased health literacy and empowerment, which are foundations for enabling people to increase control over their health, as a way to reduce increasing lifestyle related ill health. However, to increase the likelihood of success of implementing ICT supported health communication, it is essential to conduct a detailed analysis of the setting and context prior to the intervention. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of health communication for health promotion in PHC with emphasis on the implications for a planned ICT supported interactive health channel. Methods A qualitative case study, with a multi-methods approach was applied. Field notes, document study and focus groups were used for data collection. Data was then analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Health communication is an integral part of health promotion practice in PHC in this case study. However, there was a lack of consensus among health professionals on what a health promotion approach was, causing discrepancy in approaches and practices of health communication. Two themes emerged from the data analysis: Communicating health and environment for health communication. The themes represented individual and organizational factors that affected health communication practice in PHC and thus need to be taken into consideration in the development of the planned health channel. Conclusions Health communication practiced in PHC is individual based, preventive and reactive in nature, as opposed to population based, promotive and proactive in line with a health promotion approach. The most significant challenge in developing an ICT supported health communication channel for health promotion identified in this study, is profiling a health promotion approach in PHC. Addressing health promotion values and principles in the design of ICT supported health

  5. Family Support: A New Approach to Child Well-Being [and] Health Care for All Our Children: We Can Make It Happen [and] Massachusetts Families: Working and Still Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts KIDS COUNT, Boston.

    These three brochures discuss important issues related to child welfare. The first, "Family Support: A New Approach to Child Well-Being," summarizes this philosophy of community service. Family support is defined and differentiated from traditional services; its advantages are outlined; and specific family support programs in Massachusetts are…

  6. Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere.

  7. Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative. Year 3 Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Paula; And Others

    An evaluation of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative brings together three phases: (1) a pilot outcome study conducted with a sample of six local workplace education programs and featuring the perspectives of workers, labor, and management; (2) program profiles for seven federally funded workplace education programs coordinated by the…

  8. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Massachusetts. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

  9. Gun Possession among Massachusetts Batterer Intervention Program Enrollees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Emily F.; Johnson, Renee M.; Hemenway, David

    2006-01-01

    Batterers with access to firearms present a serious lethal threat to their partners. The purpose of this exploratory study is to estimate the prevalence of and risk markers for gun possession among Massachusetts men enrolled in batterer intervention programs. The authors found that 1.8% of the men reported having a gun in or around their home.…

  10. Tracking and Detracking: High Achievers in Massachusetts Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This study examines tracking--the practice of grouping students into separate classes or courses based on their prior academic achievement--at the middle-school level, and the percentage of high-achieving students in tracked and untracked schools. It focuses on Massachusetts, a leader in "reforming" tracking, and the changes that have…

  11. A future without health? Health dimension in global scenario studies.

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Pim; Huynen, Maud

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the health dimension and sociocultural, economic, and ecological determinants of health in existing global scenario studies. Not even half of the 31 scenarios reviewed gave a good description of future health developments and the different scenario studies did not handle health in a consistent way. Most of the global driving forces of health are addressed adequately in the selected scenarios, however, and it therefore would have been possible to describe the future developments in health as an outcome of these multiple driving forces. To provide examples on how future health can be incorporated in existing scenarios, we linked the sociocultural, economic, and environmental developments described in three sets of scenarios (special report on emission scenarios (SRES), global environmental outlook-3 (GEO3), and world water scenarios (WWS)) to three potential, but imaginary, health futures ("age of emerging infectious diseases", "age of medical technology", and "age of sustained health"). This paper provides useful insights into how to deal with future health in scenarios and shows that a comprehensive picture of future health evolves when all important driving forces and pressures are taken into account. PMID:14997242

  12. ADDHEALTH - NATIONAL LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study provides a comprehensive view of the health and health behaviors of adolescents and the antecedents - personal, interpersonal, familial, and environmental of these outcomes. The study features a longitudinal, multi-level design with independent measurement at the indiv...

  13. Linking student performance in Massachusetts elementary schools with the "greenness" of school surroundings using remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Cedeño-Laurent, J G; Pan, Wen-Chi; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Dominici, Francesca; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Su, Huey-Jen; Spengler, John D

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have reported the physical and mental health benefits from exposure to "green" neighborhoods, such as proximity to neighborhoods with trees and vegetation. However, no studies have explicitly assessed the association between exposure to "green" surroundings and cognitive function in terms of student academic performance. This study investigated the association between the "greenness" of the area surrounding a Massachusetts public elementary school and the academic achievement of the school's student body based on standardized tests with an ecological setting. Researchers used the composite school-based performance scores generated by the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to measure the percentage of 3rd-grade students (the first year of standardized testing for 8-9 years-old children in public school), who scored "Above Proficient" (AP) in English and Mathematics tests (Note: Individual student scores are not publically available). The MCAS results are comparable year to year thanks to an equating process. Researchers included test results from 2006 through 2012 in 905 public schools and adjusted for differences between schools in the final analysis according to race, gender, English as a second language (proxy for ethnicity and language facility), parent income, student-teacher ratio, and school attendance. Surrounding greenness of each school was measured using satellite images converted into the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in March, July and October of each year according to a 250-meter, 500-meter, 1,000-meter, and 2000-meter circular buffer around each school. Spatial Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMMs) estimated the impacts of surrounding greenness on school-based performance. Overall the study results supported a relationship between the "greenness" of the school area and the school-wide academic performance. Interestingly, the results showed a consistently positive significant association between the

  14. Massachusetts After 3PM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their afternoons. The 2009 report, conducted…

  15. Employment outcomes in Massachusetts Clubhouses.

    PubMed

    McKay, Colleen; Johnsen, Mathew; Stein, Reva

    2005-01-01

    Employment outcomes of individuals participating in 17 Massachusetts Clubhouses certified by the International Center for Clubhouse Development were examined through an annual survey. Major components of employment programs in contemporary clubhouses are identified and individual employment outcomes are described. Within contemporary practice in ICCD clubhouses in this sample, clubhouses provided a three-pronged approach to employment. Between 1998-2001, 1702 individuals worked in 2714 separate job placements, employed in Transitional (TE), Supported (SE), and Independent Employment (IE). Forty percent of members with more than one job (N = 385) participated in at least one TE. Individuals with longer memberships tended to work longer and had higher job earnings. PMID:16075694

  16. 40 CFR 81.322 - Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Massachusetts. 81.322 Section 81.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.322 Massachusetts. Massachusetts—TSP Designated...

  17. A Decade of "Sex Equity" in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Elinor

    1981-01-01

    Looks at how effective state and federal sex equity mandates (Chapter 622 and Title IX) have been in reducing bias and sex segregation in Massachusetts schools, particularly in the areas of physical education, athletics, home economics, and industrial arts. (Condensed from "The Massachusetts Teacher," April 1981, p6-12.) (Editor/SJL)

  18. Linguicism and Racism in Massachusetts Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viesca, Kara Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a frame analysis of Massachusetts state policy regarding the education of multilingual learners and their teachers through the lens of critical race theory (CRT). My analysis suggests that even though current policy in Massachusetts is framed in terms of the overarching goals of educational quality and equality, in reality it…

  19. 77 FR 76585 - Massachusetts Disaster # MA-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts dated 12/11/2012. Incident: Natural Gas Explosion. Incident Period: 11/23/2012. Effective Date:...

  20. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Massachusetts, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Massachusetts for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Massachusetts showed across-the-board gains--improvements in both reading and math at the basic, proficient and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low…

  1. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes that were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms.

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast, Devens and Easthampton, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Transformations, Inc., has extensive experience building high-performance homes - production and custom - in a variety of Massachusetts locations and uses mini-split heat pumps (MSHPs) for space conditioning in most of its homes. The use of MSHPs for simplified space-conditioning distribution provides significant first-cost savings, which offsets the increased investment in the building enclosure. In this project, the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation evaluated the long-term performance of MSHPs in 8 homes during a period of 3 years. The work examined electrical use of MSHPs, distributions of interior temperatures and humidity when using simplified (two-point) heating systems in high-performance housing, and the impact of open-door/closed-door status on temperature distributions.

  3. Sexual orientation and sexual behavior: results from the Massachusetts Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2002-2006.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Susan M; Rothman, Emily F; Zhang, Zi

    2007-01-01

    Few population-based surveys in the United States include sexual orientation as a demographic variable. As a result, estimating the proportion of the U.S. population that is gay, lesbian, or bisexual (GLB) is a substantial challenge. Prior estimates vary widely, from 1-21%. In 2001, questions on sexual orientation and sexual behavior were added to the Massachusetts Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (MA BRFSS) and have been asked continually since that time. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of adults in Massachusetts identifying as GLB and providing a demographic description of this group. The study also examined the correlation of reported sexual behavior and sexual identity within this group. Overall, 1.9% of Massachusetts adults identified as gay or lesbian and 1.0% of Massachusetts adults identified as bisexual. Of those identifying as gay or lesbian, 95.4% reported sexual behavior concordant with this identification, and 99.4% of respondents identifying as heterosexual reported behavior concordant with heterosexual sexual orientation. Among those reporting a GLB sexual orientation, men were more likely than women to identify as gay, and women were more likely than men to identify as bisexual. Younger adults (18-25 years old) were more likely than people in other age groups to identify as bisexual. Respondents with 4 or more years of education were more likely to identify as gay or lesbian than those in all other education categories. The addition of sexual orientation to population-based surveys will allow for research on the health of GLB adults and provide critical information for those charged with the creation of public policy regarding sexual orientation. PMID:19042901

  4. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  5. A Report of the Senate Committee on Post Audit and Oversight Relative to Massachusetts' Financial Commitment to Public Education in the Eighties: A Multi-State Comparative Study. Senate No. 2080.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Legislature, Boston. Senate Committee on Post Audit and Oversight.

    During the 1980s, Massachusetts' public commitment to increase educational funding was not carried through. To determine state educational funding for the decade, the Senate Committee on Post Audit and Oversight compared Massachusetts with nine other comparable states in expenditures per pupil, expenditures per capita, and expenditures per $1,000…

  6. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  7. Sediment quality and polychlorinated biphenyls in the Lower Neponset River, Massachusetts, and implications for urban river restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Cooke, Matthew G.; Merrill, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to restore fish passage, habitat, and recreational use of the Neponset River, a tributary to Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, have raised concerns about the sediment, water, and biota quality of the river. Consequently, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs Department of Fish and Game Riverways Program and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, studied sediment and water quality, with a specific focus on polychlorinated biphenyls, in the Neponset River. Sediment samples were collected throughout the Neponset River and tested for elements and organic compounds including polyaromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Although enriched compared to background concentrations, sediment quality in the Neponset River was generally better than that of other urban rivers in the United States, except with respect to one constituent, polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations of lead, some polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls in the sediment may be toxic to aquatic organisms and may pose a risk to human health. The sediment quality also fails to meet the minimum requirements set by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for lined landfill disposal. The locations of the source(s) of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Neponset River were determined by means of congener analysis from PISCES passive water-column samplers. The PISCES data indicate a sharp increase in polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and a substantial shift in congener pattern downstream of one PISCES sampling location near Fairmont Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts. This result indicates that the area upstream of this sampling location may be the location of a historical source of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Neponset River. The present (2003) source to the water column may likely be PCB contaminated sediment.

  8. Shallow geology, sea-floor texture, and physiographic zones of Vineyard and western Nantucket Sounds, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, Wayne E.; Foster, David S.; Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Schwab, William C.; Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic, sediment texture, and physiographic zone maps characterize the sea floor of Vineyard and western Nantucket Sounds, Massachusetts. These maps were derived from interpretations of seismic-reflection profiles, high-resolution bathymetry, acoustic-backscatter intensity, bottom photographs/video, and surficial sediment samples collected within the 494-square-kilometer study area. Interpretations of seismic stratigraphy and mapping of glacial and Holocene marine units provided a foundation on which the surficial maps were created. This mapping is a result of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to characterize the surface and subsurface geologic framework offshore of Massachusetts.

  9. Overweight and obesity in Massachusetts: epidemic, hype or policy opportunity?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Katharine Kranz; Man, Lynne H

    2007-01-23

    In 2005, more than 56 percent of Massachusetts adults were overweight, a 40 percent increase from rates reported in 1990. Overall, nearly 21 percent of Massachusetts adults are obese. Both Blacks and Hispanics in the state are more likely than whites to be both overweight and obese, whereas Asians are the least likely to be overweight or obese. Nationally, rates of overweight and obesity are even higher. Obesity is a risk factor for multiple serious health problems in adults, including heart disease, hardening of the arteries, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, certain types of cancer, stroke, diabetes, muscle and bone disorders and gallbladder disease. In Massachusetts, it is estimated that direct costs for obesity-related medical expenditures came to a total of $1.8 billion (4.7% of total medical expenditures) in 2003. Medical expenditures for obese people are estimated to be 25-27% higher than normal weight people, and 44% higher among people who are very obese. Costs are largely attributed to higher rates of coronary heart disease, hypertension and diabetes, and longer hospital stays. Indirect costs associated with obesity approached $3.9 billion in 1995 reflecting 39.2 million lost workdays, 239 million restricted activity days, 89.5 million hospital bed-days, and 62.6 million physician visits. Causes of obesity include the wide availability of unhealthy foods, increased consumption, changing eating habits, high-calorie beverages, advertising and lack of physical activity. Although a number federal, state and local programs, policies and initiatives aimed at curbing the obesity epidemic have been implemented, more needs to be done. What is the responsibility of government in curbing the obesity epidemic, and how much of the burden should be left up to the individual? These important questions will be discussed at the Massachusetts Health Policy Forum on January 23, 2007. Overweight and obesity continue to climb steadily in the United States among both

  10. Evaluating OSHA's ethylene oxide standard: exposure determinants in Massachusetts hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    LaMontagne, A D; Kelsey, K T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to identify determinants of workplace exposures to ethylene oxide to assess the effect of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) 1984 ethylene oxide standard. METHODS: An in-depth survey of all hospitals in Massachusetts that used ethylene oxide from 1990 through 1992 (96% participation, N = 90) was conducted. Three types of exposure events were modeled with logistic regression: exceeding the 8-hour action level, exceeding the 15-minute excursion limit, and worker exposures during unmeasured accidental releases. Covariates were drawn from data representing an ecologic framework including direct and indirect potential exposure determinants. RESULTS: After adjustment for frequencies of ethylene oxide use and exposure monitoring, a significant inverse relation was observed between exceeding the action level and the use of combined sterilizer-aerators, an engineering control technology developed after the passage of the OSHA standard. Conversely, the use of positive-pressure sterilizers that employ ethylene oxide gas mixtures was strongly related to both exceeding the excursion limit and the occurrence of accidental releases. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide evidence of a positive effect of OSHA's ethylene oxide standard and specific targets for future prevention and control efforts. PMID:11236406

  11. Reorganization of craniofacial/cleft care delivery: the Massachusetts experience.

    PubMed

    Borah, G L; Hagberg, N; Jakubiak, C; Temple, J

    1993-05-01

    Until 1989, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts operated a mandated care program known as Services for Handicapped Children (SHC) for children with cleft lip/palate or craniofacial anomalies. During the mid 1980s, the federal government reduced its block grant funds and encouraged the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to develop Project SERVE to address this changing fiscal reality. The principal outcome of Project SERVE was the recommendation that the SHC direct care programs, including all craniofacial and cleft palate clinics, should be dismantled over a number of years. However, due to the economic recession, all government funding was suddenly withdrawn from cleft palate teams and the state-run SHC clinics were abruptly dissolved. To treat patients left without coordinated care, former team members reassembled and began a new craniofacial team based at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Difficulties with the transition of the clinic included recruiting and retaining team members; remuneration procedures for team members; maintenance of patient records previously kept by the state; coordination of clinical/clerical responsibilities; identifying a physical locale to hold the clinics; and solicitation of referring health care provider referrals and follow-up. All these issues required specific interventions that are presented in this paper. Project SERVE, begun under federal auspices, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, has recently been promoted as a model for a new and improved approach to the management of cleft palate and craniofacial care delivery nationwide. Awareness of the potential for abrupt, radical change in funding for federally mandated cleft/craniofacial care is essential, and a successful transition to a medical center-based model is possible using the procedures established at our center. PMID:8338866

  12. Professional Nursing in State Service: Needs and Recommendations. A Skills Inventory of Registered Nurses Employed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Barbara

    This study analyzed factors in attracting and recruiting professional nurses into Massachusetts state service. Although Massachusetts had relatively many registered nurses (RN), 45% were inactive. Resulting shortages were great, especially in state hospitals. All agencies had high turnover, with impending staffing crises in some agencies because…

  13. The State Dollar and the Schools. A Discussion of State Aid Programs in Massachusetts and Promising Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charlotte

    This report discusses the history and nature of State aid to education in Massachusetts. The report is both a summary and an update of information contained in four earlier studies that analyzed the economics of education in Massachusetts and the State's new equalizing education aid formula. The report recommends that the State adopt an…

  14. Initial Teacher Certification Testing in Massachusetts: What Has Been Going On? Reflections of a College Professor and a College President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flippo, Rona F.; Riccards, Michael P.

    Massachusetts is a newcomer to teacher testing, and prospective teachers in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts were not tested until April 1998. The unintended consequences of the state's teacher testing policy are examined through a qualitative case study and a document review of media reports, higher education institution reports, in-house…

  15. Bullying among middle school and high school students--Massachusetts, 2009.

    PubMed

    2011-04-22

    Multiple studies have documented the association between substance use, poor academic achievement, mental health problems, and bullying. A small but growing body of research suggests that family violence also is associated with bullying. To assess the association between family violence and other risk factors and being involved in or affected by bullying as a bully, victim, or bully-victim (those who reported being both bullies and victims of bullying), the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and CDC analyzed data from the 2009 Massachusetts Youth Health Survey. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which showed significant differences in risk factors for persons in all three bullying categories, compared with persons who reported being neither bullies nor victims. The adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for middle school students for being physically hurt by a family member were 2.9 for victims, 4.4 for bullies, and 5.0 for bully-victims, and for witnessing violence in the family were 2.6, 2.9, and 3.9, respectively, after adjusting for potential differences by age group, sex, and race/ethnicity. For high school students, the AORs for being physically hurt by a family member were 2.8 for victims, 3.8 for bullies, and 5.4 for bully-victims, and for witnessing violence in the family were 2.3, 2.7, and 6.8, respectively. As schools and health departments continue to address the problem of bullying and its consequences, an understanding of the broad range of associated risk factors is important for creating successful prevention and intervention strategies that include involvement by families. PMID:21508922

  16. Type of disinfectant in drinking water and patterns of mortality in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Zierler, S.; Danley, R.A.; Feingold, L.

    1986-11-01

    Chlorination has been the major strategy for disinfection of drinking water in the United States. Concern about the potential health effects of the reaction by-products of chlorine has prompted use of alternative strategies. One such method is chloramination, a treatment process that does not appear to have carcinogenic by-product, but may have less potent biocidal activity than chlorination. The authors examined the patterns of mortality of residents in Massachusetts who died between 1969 and 1983 and lived in communities using drinking water that was disinfected either by chlorine or chloramine. Comparison of type of disinfectant among 51,645 cases of deaths due to selected cancer sites and 214,998 controls who died from cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or pulmonary disease, or from lymphatic cancer showed small variation in the patterns of mortality. Bladder cancer was moderately associated with residence at death in a chlorinated community in a logistic regression analysis using controls who die from lymphatic cancer. A slight excess of deaths from pneumonia and influenza was observed in communities whose residents drink chloraminated water compared to residents from chlorinated communities, as well as to all Massachusetts residents. These results are intended to be preliminary and crude descriptions of the relationship under study. The serious potential for misclassification of exposure status and errors in death certificate classification of cause of death affect the interpretability of the overall evidence that patterns of mortality are similar according to disinfectant in drinking water.

  17. Campus Health and Its Implications for Quality of Life for Bridgewater State College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgewater State Coll., MA.

    An exploratory study was conducted to investigate the impact of health state on academic achievement, attrition, and quality of life satisfaction in a population of students at Bridgewater State College (Massachusetts). The study also explored the impact of specific health factors such as alienation, stress, and general physical/emotional health…

  18. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  19. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES...

  20. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND...

  1. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES...

  2. Libraries in Massachusetts: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... php Webster Chester C. Corbin Public Library 2 Lake Street Webster, MA 01570-2699 508-949-3880 ... of Massachusetts Medical Center Lamar Soutter Library 55 Lake Avenue North Worcester, MA 01655-0001 508-856- ...

  3. CHALLENGES OF HEALTH MEASUREMENT IN STUDIES OF HEALTH DISPARITIES

    PubMed Central

    Burgard, Sarah A.; Chen, Patricia V.

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities are increasingly studied in and across a growing array of societies. While novel contexts and comparisons are a promising development, this commentary highlights four challenges to finding appropriate and adequate health measures when making comparisons across groups within a society or across distinctive societies. These challenges affect the accuracy with which we characterize the degree of inequality, limiting possibilities for effectively targeting resources to improve health and reduce disparities. First, comparisons may be challenged by different distributions of disease and second, by variation in the availability and quality of vital events and census data often used to measure health. Third, the comparability of self-reported information about specific health conditions may vary across social groups or societies because of diagnosis bias or diagnosis avoidance. Fourth, self-reported overall health measures or measures of specific symptoms may not be comparable across groups if they use different reference groups or interpret questions or concepts differently. We explain specific issues that make up each type of challenge and show how they may lead to underestimates or inflation of estimated health disparities. We also discuss approaches that have been used to address them in prior research, note where further innovation is needed to solve lingering problems, and make recommendations for improving future research. Many of our examples are drawn from South Africa or the United States, societies characterized by substantial socioeconomic inequality across ethnic groups and wide disparities in many health outcomes, but the issues explored throughout apply to a wide variety of contexts and inquiries. PMID:24561776

  4. Building the new schoolhouse: the Massachusetts school building authority.

    PubMed

    Ames, Jennifer; Levenstein, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In a 2010 special issue of New Solutions on school health and environment, Paulson and Barnett asked who is responsible for the environmental health of schools. The Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA), the product of liberals trying to bring organization and efficiency to school construction, is an "off-label" and only partial answer to the question. The MSBA, established in 2004, lent its ear to health and safety advocates who seized an opportunity to implement regulations, guidelines, and education reforms at the level of school construction. The MSBA's progressiveness is a model to localities and states across the United States facing the dual crisis of attacks on public education and financial inefficiency. However, the MSBA is still in its infancy. Time will tell whether the MSBA, viewed as a limited state pilot program, can survive and expand its environmental health programs or whether its initiative is only as good as its current leadership. PMID:23896077

  5. Cohort studies in health sciences librarianship

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Question: What are the key characteristics of the cohort study design and its varied applications, and how can this research design be utilized in health sciences librarianship? Data Sources: The health, social, behavioral, biological, library, earth, and management sciences literatures were used as sources. Study Selection: All fields except for health sciences librarianship were scanned topically for either well-known or diverse applications of the cohort design. The health sciences library literature available to the author principally for the years 1990 to 2000, supplemented by papers or posters presented at annual meetings of the Medical Library Association. Data Extraction: A narrative review for the health, social, behavioral, biological, earth, and management sciences literatures and a systematic review for health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000, with three exceptions, were conducted. The author conducted principally a manual search of the health sciences librarianship literature for the years 1990 to 2000 as part of this systematic review. Main Results: The cohort design has been applied to answer a wide array of theoretical or practical research questions in the health, social, behavioral, biological, and management sciences. Health sciences librarianship also offers several major applications of the cohort design. Conclusion: The cohort design has great potential for answering research questions in the field of health sciences librarianship, particularly evidence-based librarianship (EBL), although that potential has not been fully explored. PMID:12398244

  6. CANCER INCIDENCE IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) was undertaken to ascertain the etiology of cancers observed to be elevated in agricultural populations. Methods: The AHS is a large prospective, cohort study of private applicators and commercial applicators licensed to apply restricted use ...

  7. Gun possession among Massachusetts batterer intervention program enrollees.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Emily F; Johnson, Renee M; Hemenway, David

    2006-06-01

    Batterers with access to firearms present a serious lethal threat to their partners. The purpose of this exploratory study is to estimate the prevalence of and risk markers for gun possession among Massachusetts men enrolled in batterer intervention programs. The authors found that 1.8% of the men reported having a gun in or around their home. Those most likely to report having a gun were White, earned 25,000 US dollars or more per year, had served in the military, engaged in problem gambling, and had attempted homicide or threatened their partner with a firearm. Recommendations for strengthening relevant gun laws both within and outside of Massachusetts are discussed. PMID:16679497

  8. Shoaling of nonlinear internal waves in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Beardsley, R.C.; Butman, B.; Pineda, J.

    2008-01-01

    The shoaling of the nonlinear internal tide in Massachusetts Bay is studied with a fully nonlinear and nonhydrostatic model. The results are compared with current and temperature observations obtained during the August 1998 Massachusetts Bay Internal Wave Experiment and observations from a shorter experiment which took place in September 2001. The model shows how the approaching nonlinear undular bore interacts strongly with a shoaling bottom, offshore of where KdV theory predicts polarity switching should occur. It is shown that the shoaling process is dominated by nonlinearity, and the model results are interpreted with the aid of a two-layer nonlinear but hydrostatic model. After interacting with the shoaling bottom, the undular bore emerges on the shallow shelf inshore of the 30-m isobath as a nonlinear internal tide with a range of possible shapes, all of which are found in the available observational record. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Factors influencing riverine fish assemblages in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Richards, Todd A.; Levin, Sara B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, and the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, conducted an investigation of fish assemblages in small- to medium-sized Massachusetts streams. The objective of this study was to determine relations between fish-assemblage characteristics and anthropogenic factors, including impervious cover and estimated flow alteration, relative to the effects of environmental factors, including physical-basin characteristics and land use. The results of this investigation supersede those of a preliminary analysis published in 2010. Fish data were obtained for 669 fish-sampling sites from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife fish-community database. A review of the literature was used to select fish metrics - species richness, abundance of individual species, and abundances of species grouped on life history traits - responsive to flow alteration. The contributing areas to the fish-sampling sites were delineated and used with a geographic information system to determine a set of environmental and anthropogenic factors that were tested for use as explanatory variables in regression models. Reported and estimated withdrawals and return flows were used together with simulated unaltered streamflows to estimate altered streamflows and indicators of flow alteration for each fish-sampling site. Altered streamflows and indicators of flow alteration were calculated on the basis of methods developed in a previous U.S. Geological Survey study in which unaltered daily streamflows were simulated for a 44-year period (water years 1961-2004), and streamflow alterations were estimated by use of water-withdrawal and wastewater-return data previously reported to the State for the 2000-04 period and estimated domestic-well withdrawals and septic-system discharges. A variable selection process, conducted using principal

  10. Spatial analysis of gastroschisis in Massachusetts and Texas

    PubMed Central

    Yazdy, Mahsa M.; Werler, Martha M.; Anderka, Marlene; Langlois, Peter H.; Vieira, Veronica M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous research has suggested gastroschisis, a congenital malformation, may be linked to environmental or infectious factors and cases can occur in clusters. The objective of this study was to identify geographic areas of elevated gastroschisis risk. Methods Cases of gastroschisis were identified from birth defect registries in Massachusetts and Texas. Random samples of live births were selected as controls. Generalized additive models were used to create a continuous map surface of odds ratios (OR) by smoothing over latitude and longitude. Maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, cigarette smoking, and insurance status (MA only) were assessed for confounding. We used permutation tests to identify statistically significant areas of increased risk. Results An area of increased risk was identified in north-central Massachusetts, but was not significant after adjustment (p-value=0.07; OR=2.0). In Texas, two statistically significant areas of increased risk were identified after adjustment (p-value=0.02; OR=1.3 and 1.2). Texas had sufficient data to assess the combination of space and time, which identified an increased risk in 2003 and 2004. Conclusion This study suggests there were areas of elevated gastroschisis risk in Massachusetts and Texas that cannot be explained by the risk factors we assessed. Additional exploration of underlying artifactual, environmental, infectious, or behavioral factors may further our understanding of gastroschisis. PMID:25454289

  11. Risk of breast cancer following exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water in Cape Cod, Massachusetts: reanalysis of a case-control study using a modified exposure assessment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is an important occupational chemical used in metal degreasing and drycleaning and a prevalent drinking water contaminant. Exposure often occurs with other chemicals but it occurred alone in a pattern that reduced the likelihood of confounding in a unique scenario on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. We previously found a small to moderate increased risk of breast cancer among women with the highest exposures using a simple exposure model. We have taken advantage of technical improvements in publically available software to incorporate a more sophisticated determination of water flow and direction to see if previous results were robust to more accurate exposure assessment. Methods The current analysis used PCE exposure estimates generated with the addition of water distribution modeling software (EPANET 2.0) to test model assumptions, compare exposure distributions to prior methods, and re-examine the risk of breast cancer. In addition, we applied data smoothing to examine nonlinear relationships between breast cancer and exposure. We also compared a set of measured PCE concentrations in water samples collected in 1980 to modeled estimates. Results Thirty-nine percent of individuals considered unexposed in prior epidemiological analyses were considered exposed using the current method, but mostly at low exposure levels. As a result, the exposure distribution was shifted downward resulting in a lower value for the 90th percentile, the definition of "high exposure" in prior analyses. The current analyses confirmed a modest increase in the risk of breast cancer for women with high PCE exposure levels defined by either the 90th percentile (adjusted ORs 1.0-1.5 for 0-19 year latency assumptions) or smoothing analysis cut point (adjusted ORs 1.3-2.0 for 0-15 year latency assumptions). Current exposure estimates had a higher correlation with PCE concentrations in water samples (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.65, p < 0.0001) than estimates

  12. The new era of payment reform, spending targets, and cost containment in Massachusetts: early lessons for the nation.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, Robert E; Altman, Stuart H; McDonough, John E

    2012-10-01

    As its 2012 session drew to a close, the Massachusetts legislature passed a much-anticipated cost control bill. The bill sets annual state spending targets, encourages the formation of accountable care organizations, and establishes an independent commission to oversee health care system performance. It is Massachusetts's third law to address health spending since the state's landmark health insurance coverage reforms in 2006. The 2012 legislation is a notable step beyond other recent cost control efforts. Although it lacks strong mechanisms to enforce the new spending goals, it creates a framework for increased regulation if spending trends fail to moderate. Massachusetts's experience provides several lessons for state and federal policy makers. First, implementing near-universal coverage, as is planned under the Affordable Care Act for 2014, will increase pressure on government to begin controlling overall health care spending. Second, introduction of cost control measures takes time: Massachusetts enacted a series of incremental but increasingly strong laws over the past six years that have gradually increased its ability to influence health spending. Finally, the effectiveness of new cost control laws will depend on changes in providers' and insurers' behavior; in Massachusetts, private market activity has had a complementary impact on the pace of health system change. PMID:22993207

  13. Health parties for African American study recruitment.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; York, Crystal; Madlensky, Lisa; Gibson, Kathi; Wasserman, Linda; Rosenthal, Eric; Barbier, Leslie; Newman, Vicky A; Tso, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    Innovative strategies are needed to increase minorities' research participation. Using existing social networks within the African American community, "home health parties" were tested as a way to recruit African American women to a breast cancer control study. Parties included social, educational, and recruitment components. All women attending health parties consented, completed a survey, and received the study's preliminary breast cancer risk assessment. There were no differences in rates of participation for subsequent study components between women recruited via parties versus other methods. Health parties are viable recruitment strategies, reduce barriers to participation, provide a supportive environment, and are relatively inexpensive. PMID:17020516

  14. Integration of Oral Health Into the Well-Child Visit at Federally Qualified Health Centers: Study of 6 Clinics, August 2014–March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Christina; Vargas, Clemencia; Geltman, Paul; Walter, Ashley; Garcia, Raul I.; Tinanoff, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early childhood caries, the most common chronic childhood disease, affects primary dentition and can impair eating, sleeping, and school performance. The disease is most prevalent among vulnerable populations with limited access to pediatric dental services. These same children generally receive well-child care at federally qualified health centers. The objective of this study was to identify facilitators and barriers to the integration of oral health into pediatric primary care at health centers to improve problem recognition, delivery of preventive measures, and referral to a dentist. Methods We collected and analyzed background data and data from structured observations and 39 interviews with administrators and staff at 6 clinics in 2 states, Maryland and Massachusetts. Results Participants valued oral health across professional roles but cited limited time, lack of training and expertise, low caregiver literacy, and lack of shared medical and dental electronic records as barriers to cooperation. Facilitators included an upper-level administration with the vision to see the value of integration, designated team leaders, and champions. An administration’s vision, not structural determinants, patient characteristics, or geographic location, predicted the level of integration. Interviewees generated multilevel recommendations to promote delivery of oral health preventive measures and services during a well-child visit. Conclusion Poor oral health contributes to health care disparities. Barriers to integrating dental care into pediatric medical practice at health centers must be overcome to improve oral health for children living in poverty, with a disability, at a rural address, or any combination of these. Implementation will require adapting delivery systems to support multidisciplinary collaboration. Strategies suggested here may point the way to enhancing children’s oral health. PMID:27126556

  15. Establishing a Practice-Based Research Network: Lessons from the Massachusetts Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulcini, Joyce; Sheetz, Anne; DeSisto, Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the recently established Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN) which has a mission of establishing a practice-based research network (PBRN) comprised of a representative, collaborative group of professional school nurses, nurse academicians, and other interested parties for whom school health is a priority.…

  16. Evaluation Report for the Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium. National Workplace Literacy Program Wave 6, Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperazi, Laura; DePascale, Charles A.

    The Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium sought to upgrade work-related literacy skills at 22 partner sites in the state. Members included manufacturers, health care organizations, educational institutions, and labor unions. In its third year, the consortium served 1,179 workers with classes in English for speakers of other languages, adult…

  17. A community participatory study of cardiovascular health and exposure to near-highway air pollution: study design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Allison P.; Lane, Kevin; Laws, M. Barton; Marden, Aaron; Carrasco, Edna; Spengler, John; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Durant, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Current literature is insufficient to make causal inferences or establish dose-response relationships for traffic-related ultrafine particles (UFPs) and cardiovascular (CV) health. The Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health (CAFEH) is a cross-sectional study of the relationship between UFP and biomarkers of CV risk. CAFEH uses a community-based participatory research framework that partners university researchers with community groups and residents. Our central hypothesis is that chronic exposure to UFP is associated with changes in biomarkers. The study enrolled more than 700 residents from three near-highway neighborhoods in the Boston metropolitan area in Massachusetts, USA. All participants completed an in-home questionnaire and a subset (440 +) completed an additional supplemental questionnaire and provided biomarkers. Air pollution monitoring was conducted by a mobile laboratory equipped with fast-response instruments, at fixed sites, and inside the homes of selected study participants. We seek to develop improved estimates of UFP exposure by combining spatiotemporal models of ambient UFP with data on participant time-activity and housing characteristics. Exposure estimates will then be compared with biomarker levels to ascertain associations. This article describes our study design and methods and presents preliminary findings from east Somerville, one of the three study communities. PMID:23612527

  18. Massachusetts high court supports use of civil rights law to bar blockades.

    PubMed

    1994-04-15

    In a 4-3 opinion issued on April 11, the Supreme Judicial Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts affirmed a lower court order preventing anti-choice activists from blocking access to a facility providing abortion counseling or services. Granted under the Massachusetts Civil Rights Act, the injunction also prohibits using force against anyone entering, leaving, or working at such a location (see RFN II/22). Several health care providers and pro-choice organizations obtained a preliminary injunction in 1989 against trespassing or blockading at specific clinics. The following year, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts intervened in the case and was granted a similar statewide order by Superior Court Judge Peter Lauriat. Upholding application of the civil rights statute in this context, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court found that the trial court "properly concluded that the defendants' conduct constituted threats, intimidation, and coercion" of women seeking to exercise their constitutional right to choose abortion. Moreover, the state High Court held that the trial court "did not abuse its discretion in denying disclosure of the identities of the women affected by the defendants' conduct." Anti-choice activists had claimed they needed to question patients to show that blockades--not threats, intimidation, or coercion--caused them to delay their abortion procedures. Congratulations to John Henn of Foley, Hoag and Eliot of Boston, who represented plaintiffs in Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts v. Blake. CRLP's Janet Benshoof, Catherine Albisa, and Priscilla Smith filed an amicus brief in the case (see RFN II/22). PMID:12318701

  19. Studying health in Greenland: obligations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Mulvad, Gert; Olsen, Jørn

    2003-03-01

    Health research in Greenland has contributed with several findings of interest for the global scientific community and has documented health problems and risk factors of importance for planning the local health care system. The study of how health develops in small, scattered communities during rapid epidemiological transition carries prospects of global significance. The Inuit are a genetically distinct people living under extreme physical conditions. Their traditional living conditions and diet are currently undergoing a transformation, which may approach their disease pattern to that of the industrialized world, while still including local outbreaks of tuberculosis. Health research in Greenland is logistically difficult and costly, but offers opportunities not found elsewhere in the world. A long tradition of registration enhances the possibilities for research. A number of research institutions in Denmark and Greenland have conducted health research in Greenland for many years in cooperation with, among others, researchers in Canada and Alaska. National and international cooperation is supported by the Danish/Greenlandic Society for Circumpolar Health, the International Union for Circumpolar Health, and the Commission for Research in Greenland. Health news are regularly reported to international and local congresses and to the scientific journals. PMID:12725338

  20. Contributions of the Nurses’ Health Studies to Reproductive Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Farland, Leslie V.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Zhang, Cuilin; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the Nurses’ Health Study’s (NHS’s) contribution to identifying risk factors and long-term health consequences of reproductive events. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the NHS I, NHS II, NHS3, and Growing Up Today Study (GUTS) publications between 1976 and 2016. Results. Collection of detailed reproductive history to identify breast cancer risk factors allowed the NHS to document an association between menstrual irregularities, a proxy for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The NHS II found that infertility associated with ovulation problems and gestational diabetes are largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modification. It also identified developmental and nutritional risk factors for pregnancy loss, endometriosis, and uterine leiomyomata. As women in NHS II age, it has become possible to address questions regarding long-term health consequences of pregnancy complications and benign gynecologic conditions on chronic disease risk. Furthermore, the NHS3 and GUTS are allowing new lines of research into human fertility, PCOS, and transgenerational effects of environmental exposures. Conclusions. The multigenerational resources of the NHSs and GUTS, including linkages of related individuals across cohorts, can improve women’s health from preconception through late adulthood and onto the next generation. PMID:27459445

  1. Evaluating Occupational Education in Massachusetts and New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, William G.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the Massachusetts and New York Evaluation Service Center for Occupational Education at Amherst, Massachusetts, which seeks to develop a mechanism to provide a continuous feedback of program evaluation information to local education agencies offering occupational education. (Author)

  2. [Ecological studies in environmental health: Beyond epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Blanco-Becerra, Luis C; Pinzón-Flórez, Carlos E; Idrovo, Álvaro J

    2015-08-01

    Ecological studies provide important and frequent sources of evidence of environmental health, since their unit of analysis is populations. This review summarizes the foundations of ecological studies with the premise that they can be performed using quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods. It presents the logic behind their design, their role in exploring causality, the variables and categories of analysis and the design principles and techniques used to collect data. Examples of ecological studies performed in Latin America are then presented, as well as some common methodological problems and options to address them. Lastly, the relevance of quantitative and qualitative ecological studies to environmental health as a way to overcome the dominance of conceptual and methodological individualism is highlighted, though ecological studies alone do not suffice for studying population health. PMID:26535754

  3. 40 CFR 282.71 - Massachusetts State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... U.S.C. 6991c and 40 CFR Part 281 EPA approved the Massachusetts program on March 3, 1995, which was... with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR Part 281, subpart E. If Massachusetts obtains... Environmental Protection, 1 Winter Street, Boston, MA 02108 or Massachusetts Department of Fire Services,...

  4. 40 CFR 282.71 - Massachusetts State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... U.S.C. 6991c and 40 CFR Part 281 EPA approved the Massachusetts program on March 3, 1995, which was... with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR Part 281, subpart E. If Massachusetts obtains... Environmental Protection, 1 Winter Street, Boston, MA 02108 or Massachusetts Department of Fire Services,...

  5. 40 CFR 282.71 - Massachusetts State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... U.S.C. 6991c and 40 CFR Part 281 EPA approved the Massachusetts program on March 3, 1995, which was... with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR Part 281, subpart E. If Massachusetts obtains... Environmental Protection, 1 Winter Street, Boston, MA 02108 or Massachusetts Department of Fire Services,...

  6. 40 CFR 282.71 - Massachusetts State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... U.S.C. 6991c and 40 CFR Part 281 EPA approved the Massachusetts program on March 3, 1995, which was... with Section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR Part 281, subpart E. If Massachusetts obtains... Environmental Protection, 1 Winter Street, Boston, MA 02108 or Massachusetts Department of Fire Services,...

  7. Jacobson v Massachusetts at 100 years: police power and civil liberties in tension.

    PubMed

    Gostin, Lawrence O

    2005-04-01

    A century ago, the US Supreme Court in Jacobson v Massachusetts upheld the exercise of the police power to protect the public's health. Despite intervening scientific and legal advances, public health practitioners still struggle with Jacobson's basic tension between individual liberty and the common good. In affirming Massachusetts' compulsory vaccination law, the Court established a floor of constitutional protections that consists of 4 standards: necessity, reasonable means, proportionality, and harm avoidance. Under Jacobson, the courts are to support public health matters insofar as these standards are respected. If the Court today were to decide Jacobson once again, the analysis would likely differ--to account for developments in constitutional law--but the outcome would certainly reaffirm the basic power of government to safeguard the public's health. PMID:15798112

  8. Integrated solid waste management of Springfield, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1993 cost of the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for Municipal Solid Waste management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of managing MSW in Springfield; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

  9. Eleven-year descriptive analysis of closed court verdicts on medical errors in Spain and Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Priscila; Sato, Luke; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Comas, Mercè; Dwyer, Kathy; Sala, Maria; Castells, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and compare the characteristics of court verdicts on medical errors allegedly harming patients in Spain and Massachusetts from 2002 to 2012. Design, setting and participants We reviewed 1041 closed court verdicts obtained from data on litigation in the Thomson Reuters Aranzadi Westlaw databases in Spain (Europe), and 370 closed court verdicts obtained from the Controlled Risk and Risk Management Foundation of Harvard Medical Institutions (CRICO/RMF) in Massachusetts (USA). We included closed court verdicts on medical errors. The definition of medical errors was based on that of the Institute of Medicine (USA). We excluded any agreements between parties before a judgement. Results Medical errors were involved in 25.9% of court verdicts in Spain and in 74% of those in Massachusetts. The most frequent cause of medical errors was a diagnosis-related problem (25.1%; 95% CI 20.7% to 31.1% in Spain; 35%; 95% CI 29.4% to 40.7% in Massachusetts). The proportion of medical errors classified as high severity was 34% higher in Spain than in Massachusetts (p=0.001). The most frequent factors contributing to medical errors in Spain were surgical and medical treatment (p=0.001). In Spain, 98.5% of medical errors resulted in compensation awards compared with only 6.9% in Massachusetts. Conclusions This study reveals wide differences in litigation rates and the award of indemnity payments in Spain and Massachusetts; however, common features of both locations are the high rates of diagnosis-related problems and the long time interval until resolution. PMID:27577585

  10. Long-Term Oceanographic Observations in Western Massachusetts Bay Offshore of Boston, Massachusetts: Data Report for 1989-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Bothner, Michael H.; Alexander, P. Soupy; Lightsom, Frances L.; Martini, Marianna A.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Strahle, William S.

    2004-01-01

    This data report presents long-term oceanographic observations made in western Massachusetts Bay at two locations: (1) 42 deg 22.6' N., 70 deg 47.0' W. (Site A, 33 m water depth) from December 1989 through December 2002 (figure 1), and (2) 42 deg 9.8' N., 70 deg 38.4' W. (Site B, 21 m water depth) from October 1997 through December 2002. Site A is approximately 1 km south of the new ocean outfall that began discharging treated sewage effluent from the Boston metropolitan area into Massachusetts Bay on September 6, 2000. These long-term oceanographic observations have been collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in partnership with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and with logistical support from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG - http://www.uscg.mil). This report presents time series data through December 2002, updating a similar report that presented data through December 2000 (Butman and others, 2002). In addition, the Statistics and Mean Flow sections include some new plots and tables and the format of the report has been streamlined by combining yearly figures into single .pdfs. Figure 1 (PDF format) The long-term measurements are planned to continue at least through 2005. The long-term oceanographic observations at Sites A and B are part of a USGS study designed to understand the transport and long-term fate of sediments and associated contaminants in the Massachusetts bays. (See http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/bostonharbor/ and Butman and Bothner, 1997.) The long-term observations document seasonal and inter-annual changes in currents, hydrography, and suspended-matter concentration in western Massachusetts Bay, and the importance of infrequent catastrophic events, such as major storms or hurricanes, in sediment resuspension and transport. They also provide observations for testing numerical models of circulation. This data report presents a description of the field program and instrumentation, an overview of the data through