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Sample records for masses trilinear couplings

  1. Trilinear gauge couplings at DELPHI

    SciTech Connect

    McCubbin, Martin

    1997-06-15

    Preliminary measurements of trilinear gauge couplings are presented using data taken by DELPHI at 161 GeV and 172 GeV. Values for the couplings WWV (V=Z,{gamma}) are determined from a study of the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} using differential distributions from the WW final state in which one W decays hadronically and the other leptonically, and total cross-section data from all WW final states. Limits are also derived on neutral ZV{gamma} couplings from an analysis of the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}+invisible particles.

  2. Trilinear gauge boson couplings in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyres, E. N.; Lahanas, A. B.; Papadopoulos, C. G.; Spanos, V. C.

    1996-02-01

    We study the C and P even WWγ and WWZ trilinear gauge boson vertices (TGV's), in the context of the MSSM assuming that the external W's are on their mass shell. We find that for energies s  q 2 ⩽ 200 GeV squark and slepton contributions to the aforementioned couplings are two orders of magnitude smaller than those of the Standard Model (SM). In the same energy range the bulk of the supersymmetric Higgs corrections to the TGV's is due to the lightest neutral Higgs, h0, whose contribution is like that of a Standard Model Higgs of the same mass. The contributions of the neutralinos and charginos are sensitive to the input value for the soft gaugino mass M {1}/{2}, being more pronounced for values M {1}/{2} < 100 GeV. In this case and in the unphysical region, 0 < s < 2M W, their contributions are substantially enhanced resulting in large corrections to the static quantities of the W boson. However, such an enhancement is not observed in the physical region. In general for 2M W < s < 200 GeV the MSSM predictions differ from those of the SM but they are of the same order of magnitude. To be detectable deviations from the SM require sensitivities reaching the per mille level and hence unlikely to be observed at LEP200. For higher energies SM and MSSM predictions exhibit a fast fall-off behaviour, in accord with unitarity requirements, getting smaller, in most cases, by almost an order of magnitude already at energies s ≈ 0.5 TeV.

  3. Measurements of trilinear gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.

    1997-10-01

    Direct measurements of the trilinear gauge boson couplings by the D0 collaboration at Fermilab are reported. Limits on the anomalous couplings were obtained at a 95% CL from four diboson production processes: W{gamma} production with the W boson decaying to e{nu} or {mu}{nu}, WW production with both of the W bosons decaying to e{nu} or {mu}{nu}, WW/WZ production with one W boson decaying to e{nu} and the other W or Z boson decaying to two jets, and Z{gamma} production with the Z boson decaying to ee, {mu}{mu}, or {nu}{nu}. Limits were also obtained from a combined fit to W{gamma}, WW {yields} dileptons and WW/WZ {yields} e{nu}jj data samples.

  4. Trilinear gauge boson couplings in the gauge—Higgs unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yuki; Maru, Nobuhito

    2016-07-01

    We examine trilinear gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the context of the SU(3)_W⊗ U(1)' gauge-Higgs unification scenario. The TGCs play important roles in probes of the physics beyond the standard model, since they are highly restricted by the experiments. We discuss the mass spectrum of the neutral gauge boson with brane-localized mass terms carefully and find that the TGCs and ρ parameter may deviate from standard model predictions. Finally, we put a constraint on these observables and discuss the possible parameter space.

  5. Trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings in effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, F.; Pérez, M. A.; Tavares-Velasco, G.; Toscano, J. J.

    2001-06-01

    We list all the lowest dimension effective operators inducing off-shell trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings ZZγ, Zγγ, and ZZZ within the effective Lagrangian approach, both in the linear and nonlinear realizations of SU(2)L × U(1)Y gauge symmetry. In the linear scenario we find that these couplings can be generated only by dimension-8 operators necessarily including the Higgs boson field, whereas in the nonlinear case they are induced by dimension-6 operators. We consider the impact of these couplings on some precision measurements such as the magnetic and electric dipole moments of fermions, as well as the Z boson rare decay Z-->νν¯γ. If the underlying new physics is of a decoupling nature, it is not expected that trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings may affect considerably any of these observables. On the contrary, it is just in the nonlinear scenario where these couplings have the more promising prospects of being perceptible through high precision experiments.

  6. The order O({α}_t{α}_s) corrections to the trilinear Higgs self-couplings in the complex NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlleitner, Margarete; Nhung, Dao Thi; Ziesche, Hanna

    2015-12-01

    A consistent interpretation of the Higgs data requires the same precision in the Higgs boson masses and in the trilinear Higgs self-couplings, which are related through their common origin from the Higgs potential. In this work we provide the two-loop corrections at O({α}_t{α}_s) in the approximation of vanishing external momenta to the trilinear Higgs self-couplings in the CP-violating Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (NMSSM). In the top/stop sector two different renormalization schemes have been implemented, the OS and the overline{DR} scheme. The two-loop corrections to the self-couplings are of the order of 10% in the investigated scenarios. The theoretical error, estimated both from the variation of the renormalization scale and from the change of the top/stop sector renormalization scheme, has been shown to be reduced due to the inclusion of the two-loop corrections.

  7. CP Violation in Trilinear Neutral Gauge Boson Couplings Via the Anomalous tcZ Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyotl, A.; Tavares-Velasco, G.

    2008-07-01

    Trilinear Neutral Gauge Boson Couplings (TNGBCs), namely ZZZ, ZZγ, and Zγγ may be highly sensitive to any new physics effects as their amplitude is extremely suppressed in any renormalizable theory such as the standard model (SM), where these class of couplings arise up to the one-loop level. Even more, in the SM, CP-odd TNGBCs are more suppressed than CP-even ones as the former are absent at the one loop level. This opens up the window to examine CP-violating effects on TNGBCs induced by new sources of CP-violation. Along these lines, we analyze the possible CP-violation on TNGBCS induced by the most general renormalizable tcZ coupling.

  8. The measurement of tri-linear gauge boson couplings at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Gilles; Gintner, Mikuláš; Godfrey, Stephen

    1995-11-01

    We describe a detailed study of the process e+e-→lvlqq¯ and the measurement of tri-linear gauge boson couplings (TGV's) at LEP200 and at a 500 GeV and 1 TeV NLC. We included all tree level Feynman diagrams contributing to the four-fermion final states including gauge boson widths and non-resonance contributions. We employed a maximum likelihood analysis of a five dimensional differential cross section of angular distributions. This approach appears to offer an optimal strategy for measurement of TGV's. LEP200 will improve existing measurements of TGV's but not enough to see loop contributions of new physics. Measurements at the NLC will be roughly 2 orders of magnitude more precise which would probe the effects of new physics at the loop level.

  9. Trilinearity deviation ratio: a new metric for chemometric analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, David K; Parsons, Brendon A; Anderson, Todd J; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-04-29

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) is a well-established instrumental platform for complex samples. However, chemometric data analysis is often required to fully extract useful information from the data. We demonstrate that retention time shifting from one modulation to the next, Δ(2)tR, is not sufficient alone to quantitatively describe the trilinearity of a single GC×GC-TOFMS run for the purpose of predicting the performance of the chemometric method parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). We hypothesize that analyte peak width on second dimension separations, (2)Wb, also impacts trilinearity, along with Δ(2)tR. The term trilinearity deviation ratio, TDR, which is Δ(2)tR normalized by (2)Wb, is introduced as a quantitative metric to assess accuracy for PARAFAC of a GC×GC-TOFMS data cube. We explore how modulation ratio, MR, modulation period, PM, temperature programming rate, Tramp, sampling phase (in-phase and out-of-phase), and signal-to-noise ratio, S/N, all play a role in PARAFAC performance in the context of TDR. Use of a PM in the 1-2 s range provides an optimized peak capacity for the first dimension separation (500-600) for a 30 min run, with an adequate peak capacity for the second dimension separation (12-15), concurrent with an optimized two-dimensional peak capacity (6000-7500), combined with sufficiently low TDR values (0-0.05) to facilitate low quantitative errors with PARAFAC (0-0.5%). In contrast, use of a PM in the 5s or greater range provides a higher peak capacity on the second dimension (30-35), concurrent with a lower peak capacity on the first dimension (100-150) for a 30 min run, and a slightly reduced two-dimensional peak capacity (3000-4500), and furthermore, the data are not sufficiently trilinear for the more retained second dimension peaks in order to directly use PARAFAC with confidence. PMID:25847163

  10. Measuring the trilinear neutral Higgs boson couplings in the minimal supersymmetric standard model at e+e‑ colliders in the light of the discovery of a Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosa, Charanjit K.; Pandita, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the measurement of the trilinear couplings of the neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) at a high energy e+e‑ linear collider in the light of the discovery of a Higgs boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We identify the state observed at the LHC with the lightest Higgs boson (h0) of the MSSM, and impose the constraints following from this identification, as well as other experimental constraints on the MSSM parameter space. In order to measure trilinear neutral Higgs couplings, we consider different processes where the heavier Higgs boson (H0) of the MSSM is produced in electron-positron collisions, which subsequently decays into a pair of lighter Higgs boson. We identify the regions of the MSSM parameter space where it may be possible to measure the trilinear couplings of the Higgs boson at a future electron-positron collider. A measurement of the trilinear Higgs couplings is a crucial step in the construction of the Higgs potential, and hence in establishing the phenomena of spontaneous symmetry breaking in gauge theories.

  11. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  12. [Simultaneous resolution and determination of tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine by alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm coupled with 3D emission-excitation matrix fluorometry].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Ren, Feng-lian; Song, Ge; Liao, Lü; Yu, Wen-feng; Zeng, Tao

    2007-10-01

    A new method using alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm coupled with excitation-emission matrix fluorometry has been developed for simultaneous resolution and determination of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan. Their correlation coefficients were 0.9987, 0.9995 and 0.9993 respectively. The contents of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in Hibiscus syriacus L. leaves were also be determined by this method after being extracted by ultrasonic. The coefficients of variation and the recoveries of the three amino acids were 0.84%, 0.36%, 1.59% and 101.0%-92.7%, 106.5%-93.0%, 103.0%-95.0% respectively. All these show that this is a simple, fast and cridible method. PMID:18306802

  13. Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $Z\\gamma$ Events from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    Using Z{gamma} candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. At the hard scatter energies typical of the Tevatron, standard model Z{gamma} couplings are too weak to be detected by current experiments; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay channel and 5.1 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = {mu}, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Z{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of {Lambda} = 1.5 TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Z{gamma} couplings to be |h{sub 3}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.017 and |h{sub 4}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.0006. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  14. Measurement of the Zγ → ν ν ‾ γ production cross section in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ trilinear gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Neveu, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. 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M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Kumar, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    An inclusive measurement of the Zγ → ν ν ‾ γ production cross section in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV is presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. This measurement is based on the observation of events with large missing energy and with a single photon with transverse momentum above 145GeV and absolute pseudorapidity in the range | η | < 1.44. The measured Zγ → ν ν ‾ γ production cross section, 52.7 ± 2.1 (stat) ± 6.4 (syst) ± 1.4 (lumi) fb, agrees well with the standard model prediction of 50.0-2.2+2.4 fb. A study of the photon transverse momentum spectrum yields the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ trilinear gauge boson couplings.

  15. Metastability bounds on flavor-violating trilinear soft terms in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-hyeon

    2011-03-01

    The vacuum stability bounds on flavor-violating trilinear soft terms are revisited from the viewpoint that one should not ban a standard-model-like false vacuum as long as it is long-lived on a cosmological time scale. The vacuum transition rate is evaluated numerically by searching for the bounce configuration. Like stability, a metastability bound does not decouple even if sfermion masses grow. Apart from being more generous than stability, the new bounds are largely independent of Yukawa couplings except for the stop trilinears. With vacuum longevity imposed on otherwise arbitrary LR insertions, it is found that a super flavor factory has the potential to probe sparticle masses up to a few TeV through B and {tau} physics whereas the MEG experiment might cover a far wider range. In the stop sector, metastability is more restrictive than any existing experimental constraint such as from electroweak precision data. Also discussed are dependency on other parameters and reliability under radiative corrections.

  16. An Excel macro for generating trilinear plots.

    PubMed

    Shikaze, Steven G; Crowe, Allan S

    2007-01-01

    This computer note describes a method for creating trilinear plots in Microsoft Excel. Macros have been created in MS Excel's internal language: Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). A simple form has been set up to allow the user to input data from an Excel worksheet. The VBA macro is used to convert the triangular data (which consist of three columns of percentage data) into X-Y data. The macro then generates the axes, labels, and grid for the trilinear plot. The X-Y data are plotted as scatter data in Excel. By providing this macro in Excel, users can create trilinear plots in a quick, inexpensive manner. PMID:17257347

  17. Trilinear hamiltonian with trapped ions and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shiqian; Maslennikov, Gleb; Hablutzel, Roland; Matsukevich, Dzmitry

    2016-05-01

    The model of three harmonic oscillators coupled by the trilinear Hamiltonian of the form a† bc + ab†c† can describe wide range of physical processes. We experimentally realize such interaction between three modes of motion in the system of 3 trapped Yb ions. We discuss several application of this coupling, including implementation of the quantum absorption refrigerator, simulation of the interaction between light and atoms described by a Tavis-Cummings model, simulation of the non-degenerate parametric down conversion process in the fully quantum regime and studies of a simple model of Hawking radiation.

  18. Solving signal instability to maintain the second-order advantage in the resolution and determination of multi-analytes in complex systems by modeling liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data using alternating trilinear decomposition method assisted with piecewise direct standardization.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hui-Wen; Wu, Hai-Long; Yin, Xiao-Li; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Ya-Juan; Xia, Hui; Xie, Li-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Lu, Hao-Jie

    2015-08-14

    The application of calibration transfer methods has been successful in combination with near-infrared spectroscopy or other tools for prediction of chemical composition. One of the developed methods that can provide accurate performances is the piecewise direct standardization (PDS) method, which in this paper is firstly applied to transfer from one day to another the second-order calibration model based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) method built for the interference-free resolution and determination of multi-analytes in complex systems by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in full scan mode. This is an example of LC-MS analysis in which interferences have been found, making necessary the use of second-order calibration because of its capacity for modeling this phenomenon, which implies analytes of interest can be resolved and quantified even in the presence of overlapped peaks and unknown interferences. Once the second-order calibration model based on ATLD method was built, the calibration transfer was conducted to compensate for the signal instability of LC-MS instrument over time. This allows one to reduce the volume of the heavy works for complete recalibration which is necessary for later accurate determinations. The root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) and average recovery were used to evaluate the performances of the proposed strategy. Results showed that the number of calibration samples used on the real LC-MS data was reduced by using the PDS method from 11 to 3 while producing comparable RMSEP values and recovery values that were statistically the same (F-test, 95% confidence level) to those obtained with 11 calibration samples. This methodology is in accordance with the highly recommended green analytical chemistry principles, since it can reduce the experimental efforts and cost with regard to the use of a new calibration model built in modified conditions. PMID:26141270

  19. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim

    2008-02-15

    We construct a class of scalar field models coupled to matter that lead to the dependence of masses and coupling constants on the ambient matter density. Such models predict a deviation of couplings measured on the Earth from values determined in low-density astrophysical environments, but do not necessarily require the evolution of coupling constants with the redshift in the recent cosmological past. Additional laboratory and astrophysical tests of {delta}{alpha} and {delta}(m{sub p}/m{sub e}) as functions of the ambient matter density are warranted.

  1. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well. PMID:22280705

  2. Measurement of the W Gamma --> mu nu gamma Cross-Section, Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings, and the Radiation Amplitude Zero in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew Warren

    2004-11-01

    This thesis details the measurement of the p{bar p} {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} + X cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab, in 134.5 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. From the photon E{sub T} spectrum limits on anomalous couplings of the photon to the W are obtained. At 95% confidence level, limits of -1.05 < {Delta}{kappa} < 1.04 for {lambda} = 0 and -0.28 < {lambda} < 0.27 for {Delta}{kappa} = 0 are obtained on the anomalous coupling parameters. The charge signed rapidity difference from the data is displayed, and its significance discussed.

  3. Spectroscopy of masses and couplings during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, Razieh

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we extend the idea of Quasi Single Field inflation [1] to the case of multiple isocurvaton fields with masses of order of Hubble, which are coupled kinetically to the inflaton field and have some interactions among themselves. We consider the effects of these massive modes in both the size and the shape of the bispectrum. We show that the shape of the bispectrum in the squeezed limit is dominated by the lightest field and is the same as in Quasi Single Field inflation. This is a generic feature of multiple isocurvaton fields and is independent of the details of the interactions among the massive fields. When the isocurvaton fields have similar masses, we can potentially distinguish two different shapes in the squeezed limit so that the shape of the bispectrum can act as a particle detector. However, in the presence of hierarchy among the massive fields, the dominant effect is due to the lightest field.

  4. Higgs self-coupling in γγ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Jikia, G.

    2004-10-01

    To establish the Higgs mechanism experimentally, one has to determine the Higgs self-interaction potential responsible for the electroweak symmetry breaking. This requires a measurement of the trilinear and quadrilinear self-couplings of the Higgs particle, as predicted by the standard model. We propose that the trilinear Higgs self-coupling be measured in the process γγ→HH just above the kinematic threshold of 2MH, where MH is the Higgs mass. Our calculation shows that the statistical sensitivity of the cross section σγγ→HH to the Higgs self-coupling is maximal near the 2MH threshold for MH between 115 and 150GeV, and is larger than the statistical sensitivities of σe+e-→ZHH and σe+e-→νν¯HH to this coupling for 2Ee≤700 GeV.

  5. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  6. Probing trilinear gauge boson interactions via single electroweak gauge boson production at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.

    2004-10-01

    We analyze the potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to study anomalous trilinear vector-boson interactions W{sup +}W{sup -}{gamma} and W{sup +}W{sup -}Z through the single production of electroweak gauge bosons via the weak boson fusion processes qq{yields}qqW({yields}l{sup {+-}}{nu}) and qq{yields}qqZ({yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}) with l=e or {mu}. After a careful study of the standard model backgrounds, we show that the single production of electroweak bosons at the LHC can provide stringent tests on deviations of these vertices from the standard model prediction. In particular, we show that single gauge-boson production exhibits a sensitivity to the couplings {delta}{kappa}{sub Z,{gamma}} similar to that attainable from the analysis of electroweak boson pair production.

  7. Sensitivity of optical mass sensor enhanced by optomechanical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yong

    2015-03-23

    Optical mass sensors based on cavity optomechanics employ radiation pressure force to drive mechanical resonator whose mechanical susceptibility can be described by nonlinear optical transmission spectrum. In this paper, we present an optical mass sensor based on a two-cavity optomechanical system where the mechanical damping rate can be decreased by adjusting a pump power so that the mass sensitivity which depends on the mechanical quality factor has been enhanced greatly. Compared with that of an optical mass sensor based on single-cavity optomechanics, the mass sensitivity of the optical mass sensor is improved by three orders of magnitude. This is an approach to enhance the mass sensitivity by means of optomechanical coupling, which is suitable for all mass sensor based on cavity optomechanics. Finally, we illustrate the accurate measurement for the mass of a few chromosomes, which can be achieved based on the current experimental conditions.

  8. Self-excited coupled-microcantilevers for mass sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Daichi; Yabuno, Hiroshi; Higashino, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Sohei

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports ultrasensitive mass detection based on the relative change in the amplitude ratio of the first mode oscillation using self-excited coupled microcantilevers. The method proposed and demonstrated using the macrocantilevers in the previous study can measure eigenstate shifts caused by objects with high accuracy without being affected by the viscous damping effect of measurement environments. In this study, moving towards the use of this method for small mass measurements, we established the self-excited coupled microcantilevers and we have achieved in measurements of very small mass (about 1 ng) with 1% order of error.

  9. Ultrasensitive mass sensing using mode localization in coupled microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Matthew; Raman, Arvind; Wu, Alexander Q.; Xu Xianfan; Reifenberger, Ron

    2006-06-19

    We use Anderson or vibration localization in coupled microcantilevers as an extremely sensitive method to detect the added mass of a target analyte. We focus on the resonance frequencies and eigenstates of two nearly identical coupled gold-foil microcantilevers. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the relative changes in the eigenstates due to the added mass can be orders of magnitude greater than the relative changes in resonance frequencies. Moreover this sensing paradigm possesses intrinsic common mode rejection characteristics thus providing an alternate way to achieve ultrasensitive mass detection under ambient conditions.

  10. Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Alan J.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Ferreira de Lima, Enoque Danilo; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-02-03

    An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. We focus on the bb¯γγ final state, including possible enhancements in sensitivity by exploiting dihiggs recoils against a hard jet. In conclusion, we find that it should be possible to measure the trilinear self-coupling with 40% accuracy given 3/ab and 12% with 30/ab of data.

  11. Mass-imbalanced Fermi gases with spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Iskin, M.; Subasi, A. L.

    2011-10-15

    We use the mean-field theory to analyze the ground-state phase diagrams of spin-orbit-coupled mass-imbalanced Fermi gases throughout the BCS-BEC evolution, including both the population-balanced and -imbalanced systems. Our calculations show that the competition between the mass and population imbalance and the Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling gives rise to very rich phase diagrams, involving normal, superfluid, and phase-separated regions. In addition, we find quantum phase transitions between the topologically trivial gapped superfluid and the nontrivial gapless superfluid phases, opening the way for the experimental observation of exotic phenomena with cold atom systems.

  12. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  13. Ion deposition by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, K.; Houk, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is used with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) for ion deposition. The deposited element is introduced as a nebulized aqueous solution. Modifications to the ICP-MS device allow generation and deposition of a mass-resolved beam of {sup 165}Ho{sup +} at 5{times}10{sup 12} ions s{sup {minus}1}. The ICP is a universal, multielement ion source that can potentially be used for applications such as deposition of mixtures of widely varying stoichiometry or of alternating layers of different elements. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  14. Large mass hierarchies from strongly-coupled dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athenodorou, Andreas; Bennett, Ed; Bergner, Georg; Elander, Daniel; Lin, C.-J. David; Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Besides the Higgs particle discovered in 2012, with mass 125 GeV, recent LHC data show tentative signals for new resonances in diboson as well as diphoton searches at high center-of-mass energies (2 TeV and 750 GeV, respectively). If these signals are confirmed (or other new resonances are discovered at the TeV scale), the large hierarchies between masses of new bosons require a dynamical explanation. Motivated by these tentative signals of new physics, we investigate the theoretical possibility that large hierarchies in the masses of glueballs could arise dynamically in new strongly-coupled gauge theories extending the standard model of particle physics. We study lattice data on non-Abelian gauge theories in the (near-)conformal regime as well as a simple toy model in the context of gauge/gravity dualities. We focus our attention on the ratio R between the mass of the lightest spin-2 and spin-0 resonances, that for technical reasons is a particularly convenient and clean observable to study. For models in which (non-perturbative) large anomalous dimensions arise dynamically, we show indications that this mass ratio can be large, with R>5. Moreover,our results suggest that R might be related to universal properties of the IR fixed point. Our findings provide an interesting step towards understanding large mass ratios in the non-perturbative regime of quantum field theories with (near) IR conformal behaviour.

  15. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  16. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS COUPLED ON-LINE WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR ELEMENTAL SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel interface to connect a capillary electrophoresis (CE) system with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) detector is reported here. The interface was built using a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) system. In this interface, the CE capillary was placed co...

  17. High-frequency search for mass-coupled mesoscopic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haiyang; Otto, Hans; Weisman, Evan; Khatiwada, Rakshya; Long, Josh

    2014-03-01

    The possible existence of unobserved interactions of nature with ranges of mesoscopic scale (microns to millimeters) and very weak couplings to matter has attracted a great deal of scientific attention. We report on an experimental search for exotic mass-coupled in this range. Our technique uses a planar, double-torsional tungsten oscillator as a test mass, a similar oscillator as a source mass, and a stiff conducting shield in between them to suppress backgrounds. This method affords operation at the limit of instrumental thermal noise, which we have we have recently demonstrated with a measurement of the noise kinetic energy of a detector prototype in thermal equilibrium at room temperature. The fluctuations of the oscillator in a high-Q torsional mode with a resonant frequency near 1 kHz are detected with capacitive transducers coupled to a sensitive differential amplifier. The apparatus is calibrated by means of a known electrostatic force and input from a finite-element model of the selected mode. The measured kinetic energy is in agreement with the expected value of 1/2 kT.

  18. Inductively Coupled Plasma Zoom-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    A zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source. Zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS) combines two complementary types of velocity-based mass separation. Specifically, zoom-TOFMS alternates between conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and energy-focused, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) (zoom) TOFMS. The CMA mode provides a mass-resolution enhancement of 1.5-1.7× over CEA-TOFMS in the current, 35-cm ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument geometry. The maximum resolving power (full-width at half-maximum) for the ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument is 1200 for CEA-TOFMS and 1900 for CMA-TOFMS. The CMA mode yields detection limits of between 0.02 and 0.8 ppt, depending upon the repetition rate and integration time—compared with single ppt detection limits for CEA-TOFMS. Isotope-ratio precision is shot-noise limited at approximately 0.2% relative-standard deviation (RSD) for both CEA- and CMA-TOFMS at a 10 kHz repetition rate and an integration time of 3-5 min. When the repetition rate is increased to 43.5 kHz for CMA, the shot-noise limited, zoom-mode isotope-ratio precision is improved to 0.09% RSD for the same integration time.

  19. Mass eigenstates in bimetric theory with matter coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-May, Angnis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the ghost-free bimetric action extended by a recently proposed coupling to matter through a composite metric. The equations of motion for this theory are derived using a method which avoids varying the square-root matrix that appears in the matter coupling. We make an ansatz for which the metrics are proportional to each other and find that it can solve the equations provided that one parameter in the action is fixed. In this case, the proportional metrics as well as the effective metric that couples to matter solve Einstein's equations of general relativity including a matter source. Around these backgrounds we derive the quadratic action for perturbations and diagonalize it into generalized mass eigenstates. It turns out that matter only interacts with the massless spin-2 mode whose equation of motion has exactly the form of the linearized Einstein equations, while the field with Fierz-Pauli mass term is completely decoupled. Hence, bimetric theory, with one parameter fixed such that proportional solutions exist, is degenerate with general relativity up to linear order around these backgrounds.

  20. Running coupling and fermion mass in strong coupling QED3+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Vladimír

    2004-06-01

    A simple toy model is used in order to exhibit the technique of extracting the non-perturbative information about Green's functions in Minkowski space. The effective charge and the dynamical electron mass are calculated in strong coupling 3+1 QED by solving the coupled Dyson-Schwinger equations for electron and photon propagators. The minimal Ball-Chiu vertex was used for simplicity and we impose the Landau gauge fixing on QED action. The solutions obtained separately in Euclidean and Minkowski space were compared. The latter one was extracted with the help of spectral technique.

  1. A neural mass model of phase-amplitude coupling.

    PubMed

    Chehelcheraghi, Mojtaba; Nakatani, Chie; Steur, Erik; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2016-06-01

    Brain activity shows phase-amplitude coupling between its slow and fast oscillatory components. We study phase-amplitude coupling as recorded at individual sites, using a modified version of the well-known Wendling neural mass model. To the population of fast inhibitory interneurons of this model, we added external modulatory input and dynamic self-feedback. These two modifications together are sufficient to let the inhibitory population serve as a limit-cycle oscillator, with frequency characteristics comparable to the beta and gamma bands. The frequency and power of these oscillations can be tuned through the time constant of the dynamic and modulatory input. Alpha band activity is generated, as is usual in such models, as a result of interactions of pyramidal neurons and a population of slow inhibitory interneurons. The slow inhibitory population activity directly influences the fast oscillations via the synaptic gain between slow and fast inhibitory populations. As a result, the amplitude envelope of the fast oscillation is coupled to the phase of the slow activity; this result is consistent with the notion that phase-amplitude coupling is effectuated by interactions between inhibitory interneurons. PMID:27241189

  2. Measurement of the W mass with the DELPHI detector at LEP.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Chris

    1997-04-01

    In 1996 LEP ran at centre of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. An integrated luminosity of approx. 10 pb-1 was collected by the DELPHI experiment at each energy. These data are used to measure the cross-section for the doubly resonant WW process at these energies. At 161 GeV this cross-section may be interpreted, within the Standard Model, as a measurement of the W mass. The method of direct reconstruction is used to obtain a W mass using the 172 GeV data. Results on trilinear gauge couplings are also given.

  3. Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

    2009-11-01

    Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

  4. The Successive Projections Algorithm for interval selection in trilinear partial least-squares with residual bilinearization.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Adriano de Araújo; Alcaraz, Mirta Raquel; Goicoechea, Hector C; Araújo, Mario Cesar U

    2014-02-01

    In this work the Successive Projection Algorithm is presented for intervals selection in N-PLS for three-way data modeling. The proposed algorithm combines noise-reduction properties of PLS with the possibility of discarding uninformative variables in SPA. In addition, second-order advantage can be achieved by the residual bilinearization (RBL) procedure when an unexpected constituent is present in a test sample. For this purpose, SPA was modified in order to select intervals for use in trilinear PLS. The ability of the proposed algorithm, namely iSPA-N-PLS, was evaluated on one simulated and two experimental data sets, comparing the results to those obtained by N-PLS. In the simulated system, two analytes were quantitated in two test sets, with and without unexpected constituent. In the first experimental system, the determination of the four fluorophores (l-phenylalanine; l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine; 1,4-dihydroxybenzene and l-tryptophan) was conducted with excitation-emission data matrices. In the second experimental system, quantitation of ofloxacin was performed in water samples containing two other uncalibrated quinolones (ciprofloxacin and danofloxacin) by high performance liquid chromatography with UV-vis diode array detector. For comparison purpose, a GA algorithm coupled with N-PLS/RBL was also used in this work. In most of the studied cases iSPA-N-PLS proved to be a promising tool for selection of variables in second-order calibration, generating models with smaller RMSEP, when compared to both the global model using all of the sensors in two dimensions and GA-NPLS/RBL. PMID:24456589

  5. Cold Mass Issues in the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2011-01-19

    I have identified two potential issues in the design of the attachments to the MICE coupling magnet cold mass. One of these attachment issues may extend into the cold mass. Both issues came to light during the analysis of what happened to the spectrometer solenoids. We must not make the same mistakes that were made on the spectrometer solenoids. The two questions that result from the identified issues are; 1) Are the superconducting low temperature superconducting leads between the coupling coil and the lower end of the high temperature superconducting (LTS) leads robust enough not quench and burn out? In the spectrometer solenoid one part of the LTS lead was not robust enough to prevent quenching and a burn out of the LTS lead and ; 2) Will there be problems with the quench protection resistors and diodes when the magnet quenches as a result of an HTS lead burning out or a disconnect of the magnet from its power supply? The second question is very important because the coupling coil has a large stored energy and inductance. As result, when current flows through the diodes and the resistors, both can be over heated. We observed resistor overheating in spectrometer magnet 2. This heating probably happened when the HTS lead the LTS lead burned out during the tests of magnet 2A and 2B respectively. (See MICE Note 324.) The answer to the first question is simple and straightforward. This is the issue that is primarily dealt with in MICE Note 324. If the resistance across the coil sub-divisions is high enough, the whole magnet will turn normal through quench-back. Making the resistance across a coil sub-division high enough is not simple.

  6. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Uranium Error Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Maclean, S; Shepley, D; Shaw, R K

    2001-07-01

    The Hazards Control Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP/MS) technology to analyze uranium in urine. The ICP/MS used by the Hazards Control Department is a Perkin-Elmer Elan 6000 ICP/MS. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program requires that the total error be assessed for bioassay measurements. A previous evaluation of the errors associated with the ICP/MS measurement of uranium demonstrated a {+-} 9.6% error in the range of 0.01 to 0.02 {micro}g/l. However, the propagation of total error for concentrations above and below this level have heretofore been undetermined. This document is an evaluation of the errors associated with the current LLNL ICP/MS method for a more expanded range of uranium concentrations.

  7. Paper-Based Electrochemical Cell Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Min; Perry, Richard H

    2015-10-01

    On-line coupling of electrochemistry (EC) to mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful approach for identifying intermediates and products of EC reactions in situ. In addition, EC transformations have been used to increase ionization efficiency and derivatize analytes prior to MS, improving sensitivity and chemical specificity. Recently, there has been significant interest in developing paper-based electroanalytical devices as they offer convenience, low cost, versatility, and simplicity. This report describes the development of tubular and planar paper-based electrochemical cells (P-EC) coupled to sonic spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (P-EC/SSI-MS). The EC cells are composed of paper sandwiched between two mesh stainless steel electrodes. Analytes and reagents can be added directly to the paper substrate along with electrolyte, or delivered via the SSI microdroplet spray. The EC cells are decoupled from the SSI source, allowing independent control of electrical and chemical parameters. We utilized P-EC/SSI-MS to characterize various EC reactions such as oxidations of cysteine, dopamine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and diphenyl sulfide. Our results show that P-EC/SSI-MS has the ability to increase ionization efficiency, to perform online EC transformations, and to capture intermediates of EC reactions with a response time on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. The short response time allowed detection of a deprotonated diphenyl sulfide intermediate, which experimentally confirms a previously proposed mechanism for EC oxidation of diphenyl sulfide to pseudodimer sulfonium ion. This report introduces paper-based EC/MS via development of two device configurations (tubular and planar electrodes), as well as discusses the capabilities, performance, and limitations of the technique. PMID:26311335

  8. Paper-Based Electrochemical Cell Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao-Min; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-08-01

    On-line coupling of electrochemistry (EC) to mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful approach for identifying intermediates and products of EC reactions in situ. In addition, EC transformations have been used to increase ionization efficiency and derivatize analytes prior to MS, improving sensitivity and chemical specificity. Recently, there has been significant interest in developing paper-based electroanalytical devices as they offer convenience, low cost, versatility, and simplicity. This report describes the development of tubular and planar paper-based electrochemical cells (P-EC) coupled to sonic spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (P-EC/SSI-MS). The EC cells are composed of paper sandwiched between two mesh stainless steel electrodes. Analytes and reagents can be added directly to the paper substrate along with electrolyte, or delivered via the SSI microdroplet spray. The EC cells are decoupled from the SSI source, allowing independent control of electrical and chemical parameters. We utilized P-EC/SSI-MS to characterize various EC reactions such as oxidations of cysteine, dopamine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and diphenyl sulfide. Our results show that P-EC/SSI-MS has the ability to increase ionization efficiency, to perform online EC transformations, and to capture intermediates of EC reactions with a response time on the order of hundreds of milliseconds. The short response time allowed detection of a deprotonated diphenyl sulfide intermediate, which experimentally confirms a previously proposed mechanism for EC oxidation of diphenyl sulfide to pseudodimer sulfonium ion. This report introduces paper-based EC/MS via development of two device configurations (tubular and planar electrodes), as well as discusses the capabilities, performance, and limitations of the technique.

  9. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the {open_quotes}Fassel{close_quotes} TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  10. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  11. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  12. Gold fingerprinting by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watling, R. John; Herbert, Hugh K.; Delev, Dianne; Abell, Ian D.

    1994-02-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the characterization of the trace element composition "fingerprint" of selected gold samples from Western Australia and South Africa. By comparison of the elemental associations it is possible to relate gold to a specific mineralizing event, mine or bullion sample. This methodology facilitates identification of the provenance of stolen gold or gold used in salting activities. In this latter case, it is common for gold from a number of sources to be used in the salting process. Consequently, gold in the prospect being salted will not come from a single source and identification of multiple sources for this gold will establish that salting has occurred. Preliminary results also indicate that specific elemental associations could be used to identify the country of origin of gold. The technique has already been applied in 17 cases involving gold theft in Western Australia, where it is estimated that up to 2% of gold production is "relocated" each year as a result of criminal activities.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry with a coupled tandem-linac system

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    A coupled system provides higher energies, which allows one to extend AMS to hitherto untouched mass regions. Another important argument is that the complexity, although bothersome for the operation, increases the selectivity of detecting a particular isotope. The higher-energy argument holds for any heavy-ion accelerator which is capable of delivering higher energy than a tandem. The present use of tandem-linac combinations for AMS, rather than cyclotrons, linacs or combinations of these machines, has mainly to do with the fact that this technique was almost exclusively developed around tandem accelerators. Therefore the tandem-linac combination is a natural extension to higher energies. The use of negative ions has some particular advantages in suppressing background from unwanted elements that do not form stable negative ions (e.g., N, Mg, Ar). On the other hand, this limits the detection of isotopes to elements which do form negative ions. For particular problems it may therefore be advantageous to use a positive-ion machine. What really matters most for choosing one or the other machine is to what extent the entire accelerator system can be operated in a truly quantiative way from the ion source to the detection system. 20 references, 4 figures.

  14. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Todor I; Ejnik, John W; Guandalini, Gustavo; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Centeno, Jose A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4-7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97-100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n=10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans' semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments. PMID:22944582

  15. Quantum simulations with a trilinear Hamiltonian in trapped-ion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shiqian; Maslennikov, Gleb; Hablutzel, Roland; Matsukevich, Dzmitry

    2016-05-01

    A non-degenerate parametric oscillator, described by a trilinear Hamiltonian, is one of the most fundamental models in quantum optics. We experimentally realize this kind of interaction in fully quantum regime with three motional modes of three trapped ytterbium ions. This interaction is induced by the intrinsic anharmonicity of Coulomb potential and manifests itself by more than 100 cycles of coherent energy exchange at single quantum level between different motional modes. By exploiting this interaction, we simulate the process of non-degenerate parametric down conversion in a regime of depleted pump, demonstrate deviation from the thermal statistic for the `signal' and `idler' modes and discuss its relation with a simple model of Hawking radiation. We also present experimental results on simulation of Jaynes-Cummings model using this trilinear Hamiltonian.

  16. Imaging mass spectrometry in biological tissues by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Becker, J Su; Zoriy, M V; Dobrowolska, J; Matucsh, A

    2007-01-01

    Of all the inorganic mass spectrometric techniques, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) plays a key role as a powerful and sensitive microanalytical technique enabling multi- element trace analysis and isotope ratio measurements at trace and ultratrace level. LA-ICP-MS was used to produce images of detailed regionally-specific element distribution in 20 microm thin sections of different parts of the human brain. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, lead and uranium distribution in thin slices of human brain samples was performed using matrix-matched laboratory standards via external calibration procedures. Imaging mass spectrometry provides new information on the spatially inhomogeneous element distribution in thin sections of human tissues, for example, of different brain regions (the insular region) or brain tumor tissues. The detection limits obtained for Cu, Zn, Pb and U were in the ng g(-1) range. Possible strategies of LA-ICP-MS in brain research and life sciences include the elemental imaging of thin slices of brain tissue or applications in proteome analysis by combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS to study phospho- and metal- containing proteins will be discussed. PMID:17885277

  17. A propulsion-mass tensor coupling in relativistic rocket motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Hector Hugo

    1998-01-01

    Following earlier speculations about antigravity machines and works on the relativistic dynamics of constant and variable rest mass point particles, a mass tensor is found in connection with the closed system consisting of the rocket driven spaceship and its propellant mass, provided a ``solidification'' point other than the system center of mass is considered. Therefore, the mass tensor form depends on whether the system is open or closed, and upon where the ``solidification'' point is located. An alternative propulsion principle is subsequently derived from the tensor mass approach. The new principle, the covariant equivalent of Newton's Third Law for the physical interpretation of the relativistic rocket motion, reads: A spaceship undergoes a propulsion effect when the whole system mass 4-ellipsoid warps.

  18. Estimating impacts of land use on groundwater quality using trilinear analysis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ying; Zhang, Jia En; Cui, Lihua

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater is connected to the landscape above and is thus affected by the overlaying land uses. This study evaluated the impacts of land uses upon groundwater quality using trilinear analysis. Trilinear analysis is a display of experimental data in a triangular graph. Groundwater quality data collected from agricultural, septic tank, forest, and wastewater land uses for a 6-year period were used for the analysis. Results showed that among the three nitrogen species (i.e., nitrate and nitrite (NO(x)), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and total organic nitrogen (TON)), NO(x) had a high percentage and was a dominant species in the groundwater beneath the septic tank lands, whereas TON was a major species in groundwater beneath the forest lands. Among the three phosphorus species, namely the particulate phosphorus (PP), dissolved ortho phosphorus (PO4(3-)) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP), there was a high percentage of PP in the groundwater beneath the septic tank, forest, and agricultural lands. In general, Ca was a dominant cation in the groundwater beneath the septic tank lands, whereas Na was a dominant cation in the groundwater beneath the forest lands. For the three major anions (i.e., F(-), Cl(-), and SO4(2-)), F(-) accounted for <1% of the total anions in the groundwater beneath the forest, wastewater, and agricultural lands. Impacts of land uses on groundwater Cd and Cr distributions were not profound. This study suggests that trilinear analysis is a useful technique to characterize the relationship between land use and groundwater quality. PMID:24802588

  19. Capillary LC Coupled with High-Mass Measurement Accuracy Mass Spectrometry for Metabolic Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jie; Sorensen, Christina M.; Zhang, Qibin; Jiang, Hongliang; Jaitly, Navdeep; Livesay, Eric A.; Shen, Yufeng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2007-08-15

    We have developed an efficient and robust high-pressure capillary LC-MS method for the identification of large numbers of metabolites in biological samples using both positive and negative ESI modes. Initial efforts focused on optimizing the separations conditions for metabolite extracts using various LC stationary phases in conjunction with multiple mobile phase systems, as applied to the separation of 45 metabolite standards. The optimal mobile and stationary phases of those tested were determined experimentally (in terms of peak shapes, theoretical plates, retention of small, polar compounds, etc.), and both linear and exponential gradients were applied in the study of metabolite extracts from the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Finally, an automated dual-capillary LC system was constructed and evaluated for the effectiveness and reproducibility of the chromatographic separations using the above samples. When coupled with a commercial LTQ-Orbitrap MS, ~900 features were reproducibly detected from Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 metabolite extracts. In addition, 12 compounds were tentatively identified, based on accurate mass, isotopic distribution, and MS/MS information.

  20. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: Dimensionless coupling of bulk scalars at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, P.-H.; Azuelos, G.; Burgess, C. P.

    2004-10-01

    We identify the lowest-dimension interaction which is possible between standard model brane fields and bulk scalars in six dimensions. The lowest-dimension interaction is unique and involves a trilinear coupling between the standard model Higgs boson and the bulk scalar. Because this interaction has a dimensionless coupling, it depends only logarithmically on ultraviolet mass scales and heavy physics need not decouple from it. We compute its influence on Higgs physics at ATLAS and identify how large a coupling can be detected at the LHC. Besides providing a potentially interesting signal in Higgs-boson searches, such couplings provide a major observational constraint on 6D large-extra-dimensional models with scalars in the bulk.

  1. Determination of plutonium in urine: evaluation of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrzak, R.; Kaplan, E.

    1996-11-01

    Mass spectroscopy has the distinct advantage of detecting atoms rather than radioactive decay products for nuclides of low specific activity. Electrothermal vaporization (ETV) is an efficient means of introducing small volumes of prepared samples into an inductively coupled mass spectrometer to achieve the lowest absolute detection limits. The operational characteristics and capabilities of electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled mass spectrometer mass spectroscopy were evaluated. We describe its application as a detection method for determining Pu in urine, in conjunction with a preliminary separation technique to avoid matrix suppression of the signal.

  2. Relativistic mean-field models with scaled hadron masses and couplings: Hyperons and maximum neutron star mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, K. A.; Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2016-06-01

    An equation of state of cold nuclear matter with an arbitrary isotopic composition is studied within a relativistic mean-field approach with hadron masses and coupling constants depending self-consistently on the scalar mean-field. All hadron masses decrease universally with the scalar field growth, whereas meson-nucleon coupling constants can vary differently. More specifically we focus on two modifications of the KVOR model studied previously. One extension of the model (KVORcut) demonstrates that the equation of state stiffens if the increase of the scalar-field magnitude with the density is bounded from above at some value for baryon densities above the saturation nuclear density. This can be realized if the nucleon vector-meson coupling constant changes rapidly as a function of the scalar field slightly above the desired value. The other version of the model (MKVOR) utilizes a smaller value of the nucleon effective mass at the nuclear saturation density and a saturation of the scalar field in the isospin asymmetric matter induced by a strong variation of the nucleon isovector-meson coupling constant as function of the scalar field. A possibility of hyperonization of the matter in neutron star interiors is incorporated. Our equations of state fulfill majority of known empirical constraints including the pressure-density constraint from heavy-ion collisions, direct Urca constraint, gravitational-baryon mass constraint for the pulsar J0737-3039B, and the constraint on the maximum mass of the neutron stars.

  3. Aspect of Fermion Mass Hierarchy within Flavor Democracy for Yukawa Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Katsuichi; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    We discuss the fermion mass hierarchy by including vector-like fermions which are accommodated in E6 GUTs within flavor democracy for Yukawa couplings. In this framework, all Yukawa couplings for the standard Higgs doublet have the same strength, and all Yukawa couplings for the singlet Higgs have the same strength (New ansatz). In addition, singlet Higgs and right-handed neutrinos exist. Under this condition, the mass hierarchy mt ≫ mb ˜ mτ as well as mt ≫ mc, mu can be naturally explained.

  4. Leptogenesis in a neutrino mass model coupled with inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Daijiro

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scenario for the generation of baryon number asymmetry based on the inflaton decay in a radiative neutrino mass model extended with singlet scalars. In this scenario, lepton number asymmetry is produced through the decay of non-thermal right-handed neutrinos caused from the inflaton decay. Since the amount of non-thermal right-handed neutrinos could be much larger than the thermal ones, the scenario could work without any resonance effect for rather low reheating temperature. Sufficient baryon number asymmetry can be generated for much lighter right-handed neutrinos compared with the Davidson-Ibarra bound.

  5. MICROSCALE FLOW INJECTION AND MICROBORE HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATORGRAPHY COUPLED WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY VIA A HIGH-EFFICIENCY NEBULIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high-effeciency nebulizer has been used for coupling microscale flow injection and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The microscale flow injection system was configured to minimize band broadening between...

  6. Coupling of Ultrafast LC with Mass Spectrometry by DESI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Chen, Hao

    2014-10-01

    Recently we reported a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) interface to combine liquid chromatography (LC) with mass spectrometry (MS) using a new LC eluent splitting strategy through a tiny orifice on LC capillary tube [ J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 286 (2014)]. The interface introduces negligible dead volume and back pressure, thereby allowing "near real-time" MS detection, fast LC elution, and online MS-directed purification. This study further evaluates the LC/DESI-MS performance with focus of using ultra-fast LC. Using a monolithic C18 column, metabolites in urine can be separated within 1.6 min and can be online collected for subsequent structure elucidation (e.g., by NMR, UV, IR) in a recovery yield up to 99%. Using a spray solvent with alkaline pH, negative ions could be directly generated for acidic analytes (e.g., ibuprofen) in acidic LC eluent by DESI, offering a novel protocol to realize "wrong-way around" ionization for LC/MS analysis. In addition, DESI-MS is found to be compatible with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) for the first time.

  7. Vectorlike W± -boson coupling at TeV and third family fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In the third fermion family and gauge symmetry of the Standard Model, we study the quark-quark, lepton-lepton and quark-lepton four-fermion operators in an effective theory at high energies. These operators have nontrivial contributions to the Schwinger-Dyson equations for fermion self-energy functions and the W±-boson coupling vertex. As a result, the top-quark mass is generated via the spontaneous symmetry breaking of ⟨t ¯t ⟩-condensate and the W±-boson coupling becomes approximately vectorlike at TeV scale. The bottom-quark, tau-lepton and tau-neutrino masses are generated via the explicit symmetry breaking of W±-contributions and quark-lepton interactions. Their masses and Yukawa couplings are functions of the top-quark mass and Yukawa coupling. We qualitatively show the hierarchy of fermion masses and Yukawa couplings of the third fermion family. We also discuss the possible collider signatures due to the vectorlike (parity-restoration) feature of W±-boson coupling at high energies.

  8. Exact Mass-Coupling Relation for the Homogeneous Sine-Gordon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajnok, Zoltán; Balog, János; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2016-05-01

    We derive the exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multiscale quantum integrable model, i.e., the homogeneous sine-Gordon model with two mass scales. The relation is obtained by comparing the perturbed conformal field theory description of the model valid at short distances to the large distance bootstrap description based on the model's integrability. In particular, we find a differential equation for the relation by constructing conserved tensor currents, which satisfy a generalization of the Θ sum rule Ward identity. The mass-coupling relation is written in terms of hypergeometric functions.

  9. Exact Mass-Coupling Relation for the Homogeneous Sine-Gordon Model.

    PubMed

    Bajnok, Zoltán; Balog, János; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2016-05-01

    We derive the exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multiscale quantum integrable model, i.e., the homogeneous sine-Gordon model with two mass scales. The relation is obtained by comparing the perturbed conformal field theory description of the model valid at short distances to the large distance bootstrap description based on the model's integrability. In particular, we find a differential equation for the relation by constructing conserved tensor currents, which satisfy a generalization of the Θ sum rule Ward identity. The mass-coupling relation is written in terms of hypergeometric functions. PMID:27203313

  10. Microfluidics-to-Mass Spectrometry: A review of coupling methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Yi, Lian; Mukhitov, Nikita; Schrell, Adrian M.; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Roper, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices offer great advantages in integrating sample processes, minimizing sample and reagent volumes, and increasing analysis speed, while mass spectrometry detection provides high information content, is sensitive, and can be used in quantitative analyses. The coupling of microfluidic devices to mass spectrometers is becoming more common with the strengths of both systems being combined to analyze precious and complex samples. This review summarizes select achievements published between 2010 – July 2014 in novel coupling between microfluidic devices and mass spectrometers. The review is subdivided by the types of ionization sources employed, and the different microfluidic systems used. PMID:25458901

  11. Electrochemical generation of selegiline metabolites coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Smoluch, Marek; Kotlinska, Jolanta H; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gotszalk, Teodor; Babij, Michal; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy

    2015-04-10

    The metabolic pathways of selegiline (a drug used for the treatment of early-stage Parkinson's disease) were analyzed by electrochemical oxidation with application of the flow electrochemical cell consisting of three electrodes (ROXY™, Antec, the Netherlands). Two types of working electrodes were applied: glassy carbon (GC) and boron-doped diamond (BDD). The potential applied at working electrode and composition of the solvent were optimized for the best conditions for oxidation and identification processes. All products were directly analyzed on-line by mass spectrometry. For further characterization of electrochemical oxidation products, the novel approach involving reversed phase chromatography linked to mass spectrometry with dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI-MS) was used. In this manuscript, we report a novel technique for simulation of drug metabolism by electrochemical system (EC) connected to liquid chromatography (LC) and dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) mass spectrometry (MS) for direct on-line detection of electrochemical oxidation products. Here, we linked LC/DBDI-MS system with an electrochemical flow cell in order to study metabolic pathways via identification of drug metabolites generated electrochemically. The DBDI source has never been used before for identification of psychoactive metabolites generated in an electrochemical flow cell. Our knowledge on the biological background of xenobiotics metabolism and its influence on human body is constantly increasing, but still many mechanisms are not explained. Nowadays, metabolism of pharmaceuticals is mainly studied using liver cells prepared from animals or humans. Cytochrome P450, present in microsomes, is primarily responsible for oxidative metabolism of xenobiotics. It was also shown, that breakdown of popular medicines may be successfully simulated by electrochemistry under appropriate conditions. The presented experiments allow for comparison of these two entirely

  12. On the mass-coupling relation of multi-scale quantum integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajnok, Zoltán; Balog, János; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    We determine exactly the mass-coupling relation for the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model, the homogenous sine-Gordon model with two independent mass-scales. We first reformulate its perturbed coset CFT description in terms of the perturbation of a projected product of minimal models. This representation enables us to identify conserved tensor currents on the UV side. These UV operators are then mapped via form factor perturbation theory to operators on the IR side, which are characterized by their form factors. The relation between the UV and IR operators is given in terms of the sought-for mass-coupling relation. By generalizing the Θ sum rule Ward identity we are able to derive differential equations for the mass-coupling relation, which we solve in terms of hypergeometric functions. We check these results against the data obtained by numerically solving the thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations, and find a complete agreement.

  13. Mid Pleistocene foraminiferal mass extinction coupled with phytoplankton evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kender, Sev; McClymont, Erin L.; Elmore, Aurora C.; Emanuele, Dario; Leng, Melanie J.; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the interaction between climate and biotic evolution is crucial for deciphering the sensitivity of life. An enigmatic mass extinction occurred in the deep oceans during the Mid Pleistocene, with a loss of over 100 species (20%) of sea floor calcareous foraminifera. An evolutionarily conservative group, benthic foraminifera often comprise >50% of eukaryote biomass on the deep-ocean floor. Here we test extinction hypotheses (temperature, corrosiveness and productivity) in the Tasman Sea, using geochemistry and micropalaeontology, and find evidence from several globally distributed sites that the extinction was caused by a change in phytoplankton food source. Coccolithophore evolution may have enhanced the seasonal `bloom' nature of primary productivity and fundamentally shifted it towards a more intra-annually variable state at ~0.8 Ma. Our results highlight intra-annual variability as a potential new consideration for Mid Pleistocene global biogeochemical climate models, and imply that deep-sea biota may be sensitive to future changes in productivity.

  14. Mode-shape-based mass detection scheme using mechanically diverse, indirectly coupled microresonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glean, Aldo A.; Judge, John A.; Vignola, Joseph F.; Ryan, Teresa J.

    2015-02-01

    We explore vibration localization in arrays of microresonators used for ultrasensitive mass detection and describe an algorithm for identifying the location and amount of added mass using measurements of a vibration mode of the system. For a set of sensing elements coupled through a common shuttle mass, the inter-element coupling is shown to be proportional to the ratio of the element masses to the shuttle mass and to vary with the frequency mistuning between any two sensing elements. When any two elements have sufficiently similar frequencies, mass adsorption on one element can result in measurable changes to multiple modes of the system. We describe the effects on system frequencies and mode shapes due to added mass, in terms of mass ratio and frequency spacing. In cases in which modes are not fully localized, frequency-shift-based mass detection methods may give ambiguous results. The mode-shape-based detection algorithm presented uses a single measured mode shape and corresponding natural frequency to identify the location and amount of added mass. Mass detection in the presence of measurement noise is numerically simulated using a ten element sensor array. The accuracy of the detection scheme is shown to depend on the amplitude with which each element vibrates in the chosen mode.

  15. Mid Pleistocene foraminiferal mass extinction coupled with phytoplankton evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kender, Sev; McClymont, Erin L.; Elmore, Aurora C.; Emanuele, Dario; Leng, Melanie J.; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between climate and biotic evolution is crucial for deciphering the sensitivity of life. An enigmatic mass extinction occurred in the deep oceans during the Mid Pleistocene, with a loss of over 100 species (20%) of sea floor calcareous foraminifera. An evolutionarily conservative group, benthic foraminifera often comprise >50% of eukaryote biomass on the deep-ocean floor. Here we test extinction hypotheses (temperature, corrosiveness and productivity) in the Tasman Sea, using geochemistry and micropalaeontology, and find evidence from several globally distributed sites that the extinction was caused by a change in phytoplankton food source. Coccolithophore evolution may have enhanced the seasonal ‘bloom' nature of primary productivity and fundamentally shifted it towards a more intra-annually variable state at ∼0.8 Ma. Our results highlight intra-annual variability as a potential new consideration for Mid Pleistocene global biogeochemical climate models, and imply that deep-sea biota may be sensitive to future changes in productivity. PMID:27311937

  16. Mid Pleistocene foraminiferal mass extinction coupled with phytoplankton evolution.

    PubMed

    Kender, Sev; McClymont, Erin L; Elmore, Aurora C; Emanuele, Dario; Leng, Melanie J; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between climate and biotic evolution is crucial for deciphering the sensitivity of life. An enigmatic mass extinction occurred in the deep oceans during the Mid Pleistocene, with a loss of over 100 species (20%) of sea floor calcareous foraminifera. An evolutionarily conservative group, benthic foraminifera often comprise >50% of eukaryote biomass on the deep-ocean floor. Here we test extinction hypotheses (temperature, corrosiveness and productivity) in the Tasman Sea, using geochemistry and micropalaeontology, and find evidence from several globally distributed sites that the extinction was caused by a change in phytoplankton food source. Coccolithophore evolution may have enhanced the seasonal 'bloom' nature of primary productivity and fundamentally shifted it towards a more intra-annually variable state at ∼0.8 Ma. Our results highlight intra-annual variability as a potential new consideration for Mid Pleistocene global biogeochemical climate models, and imply that deep-sea biota may be sensitive to future changes in productivity. PMID:27311937

  17. Design and Analyisi of a Self-centered Cold Mass Support for the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Li, S. Y.; Guo, Xing Long; Zheng, Shi Xian; Green, Michael A.

    2011-05-04

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils in seven modules, which are magnetically hooked together since there is no iron to shield the coils and the return flux. The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module consists of a superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional conducting 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities. The coupling coil will produce up to a 2.2 T magnetic field on the centerline to keep the beam within the RF cavities. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in MICE is up to 500 kN in longitudinal direction, which will be transferred to the base of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module through a cold mass support system. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediate thermal interruption is applied to the coupling magnet, and the design is introduced in detail in this paper. The thermal and structural analysis on the cold mass support assembly has been carried out using ANSYS. The present design of the cold mass support can satisfy with the stringent requirements for the magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4.2 K and fully charged.

  18. Dynamical mass generation in strongly coupled quantum electrodynamics with weak magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alejandro; Raya, Alfredo; Rojas, Eduardo; Bashir, Adnan

    2006-05-15

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics in the presence of weak magnetic fields using Schwinger-Dyson equations. Contrary to the case where the magnetic field is strong, in the weak field limit the coupling should exceed certain critical value in order for the generation of masses to take place, just as in the case where no magnetic field is present. The weak field limit is defined as eB<mass in the absence of the field. We carry out a numerical analysis to study the magnetic field dependence of the mass function above critical coupling and show that in this regime the dynamically generated mass and the chiral condensate for the lowest Landau level increase proportionally to (eB){sup 2}.

  19. Coupled Gravity and Elevation Measurement of Ice Sheet Mass Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, K. C.; Baumgartner, F.

    2005-01-01

    During June 2003, we measured surface gravity at six locations about a glaciological measurement site located on the South-central Greenland Ice. We operated a GPS unit for 90 minutes at each site -the unit was operated simultaneously with a base station unit in Sondrestrom Fjord so as to enable differential, post-processing of the data. We installed an aluminum, accumulation-rate-pole at each site. The base section of the pole also served as the mount for the GPS antenna. Two gravimeters were used simultaneously at each site. Measurements were repeated at each site with at time lapse of at least 50 minutes. We measured snow physical properties in two shallow pits The same measurement sites were occupied in 1981 and all were part of a hexagonal network of geodetic and glaciological measurements established by The Ohio State University in 1980. Additional gravity observations were acquired at three of the sites in 1993 and 1995. Gravity data were collected in conjunction with Doppler satellite measurements of position and elevation in 1981 and global positioning system measurements subsequently. The use of satellite navigation techniques permitted reoccupation of the same sites in each year to within a few 10 s of meters or better. After detrending the gravity data, making adjustments for tides and removing the residual effects of local spatial gradients in gravity, we observe an average secular decrease in gravity of about 0.01 milligal/year, but with tenths of milligal variations about the mean trend. The trend is consistent with a nearly linear increase in surface elevation of between 7 to 10 c d y r (depending on location) as measured by repeated airborne laser altimeter, surface Doppler satellite and GPS elevation measurements. Differences between the residual gravity anomalies after free air correction may be attributable to local mass changes. This project is a collaboration between the Byrd Polar Research Center of the Ohio State University and the Arctic

  20. Evaluation of Inductively Couple Plasma-time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Laser Ablation Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Bajic; D.B. Aeschliman; D.P. Baldwin; R.S. Houk

    2003-09-30

    The purpose of this trip to LECO Corporation was to test the non-matrix matched calibration method and the principal component analysis (PCA) method on a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOFMS) system. An LA-ICP-TOFMS system allows for multielement single-shot analysis as well as spatial analysis on small samples, because the TOFMS acquires an entire mass spectrum for all ions extracted simultaneously from the ICP. The TOFMS system differs from the double-focusing mass spectrometer, on which the above methods were developed, by having lower sensitivity and lower mass resolution.

  1. Mass spectrometry based on a coupled Cooper-pair box and nanomechanical resonator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cheng; Chen, Bin; Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2011-10-01

    Nanomechanical resonators (NRs) with very high frequency have a great potential for mass sensing with unprecedented sensitivity. In this study, we propose a scheme for mass sensing based on the NR capacitively coupled to a Cooper-pair box (CPB) driven by two microwave currents. The accreted mass landing on the resonator can be measured conveniently by tracking the resonance frequency shifts because of mass changes in the signal absorption spectrum. We demonstrate that frequency shifts induced by adsorption of ten 1587 bp DNA molecules can be well resolved in the absorption spectrum. Integration with the CPB enables capacitive readout of the mechanical resonance directly on the chip.

  2. SU-F-BRD-03: Determination of Plan Robustness for Systematic Setup Errors Using Trilinear Interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, MK; Volken, W; Frei, D; Terribilini, D; Dal Pra, A; Schmuecking, M; Manser, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment plan evaluations in radiotherapy are currently ignoring the dosimetric impact of setup uncertainties. The determination of the robustness for systematic errors is rather computational intensive. This work investigates interpolation schemes to quantify the robustness of treatment plans for systematic errors in terms of efficiency and accuracy. Methods: The impact of systematic errors on dose distributions for patient treatment plans is determined by using the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan (SMCP). Errors in all translational directions are considered, ranging from −3 to +3 mm in mm steps. For each systematic error a full MC dose calculation is performed leading to 343 dose calculations, used as benchmarks. The interpolation uses only a subset of the 343 calculations, namely 9, 15 or 27, and determines all dose distributions by trilinear interpolation. This procedure is applied for a prostate and a head and neck case using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with 2 arcs. The relative differences of the dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and the organs at risks are compared. Finally, the interpolation schemes are used to compare robustness of 4- versus 2-arcs in the head and neck treatment plan. Results: Relative local differences of the DVHs increase for decreasing number of dose calculations used in the interpolation. The mean deviations are <1%, 3.5% and 6.5% for a subset of 27, 15 and 9 used dose calculations, respectively. Thereby the dose computation times are reduced by factors of 13, 25 and 43, respectively. The comparison of the 4- versus 2-arcs plan shows a decrease in robustness; however, this is outweighed by the dosimetric improvements. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the use of trilinear interpolation to determine the robustness of treatment plans can remarkably reduce the number of dose calculations. This work was supported by Varian Medical Systems. This work was supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  3. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online. PMID:23305831

  4. Non-Abelian vortices at weak and strong coupling in mass deformed ABJM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzzi, Roberto; Kumar, S. Prem

    2009-10-01

    We find half-BPS vortex solitons, at both weak and strong coupling, in the Script N = 6 supersymmetric mass deformation of ABJM theory with U(N) × U(N) gauge symmetry and Chern-Simons level k. The strong coupling gravity dual is obtained by performing a Bbb Zk quotient of the Script N = 8 supersymmetric eleven dimensional supergravity background of Lin, Lunin and Maldacena corresponding to the mass deformed M2-brane theory. At weak coupling, the BPS vortices preserving six supersymmetries are found in the Higgs vacuum of the theory where the gauge symmetry is broken to U(1) × U(1). The classical vortex solitons break a colour-flavour locked global symmetry resulting in non-Abelian internal orientational moduli and a CP1 moduli space of solutions. At strong coupling and large k, upon reduction to type IIA strings, the vortex moduli space and its action are computed by a probe D0-brane in the dual geometry. The mass of the D0-brane matches the classical vortex mass. However, the gravity picture exhibits a six dimensional moduli space of solutions, a section of which can be identified as the CP1 we find classically, along with a Dirac monopole connection of strength k. It is likely that the extra four dimensions in the moduli space are an artifact of the strong coupling limit and of the supergravity approximation.

  5. Tribological behavior of a friction couple functioning with selective mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Experimental researches on different lubricated friction couples, have confirmed that it is useful to investigate thermodynamic processes which are unstable in lubricant and on the friction couples surfaces in the first stage of the friction process. This presupposes that, in operating conditions, physical-chemical processes which are favourable to friction, such as: polymerization, formation of colloids, formation of other active substances at the contact surfaces and of other compounds with low resistance to shear take place. Friction in such conditions takes place with selective mass transfer, and it is used there where the friction of the mixed and adherence layers is not safe enough, or the durability of the friction couples is not assured. The selective mass transfer allows the transfer of some elements of the materials in contact from one surface to the other, covering them with a thin, superficial layer, with superior properties at minimal friction and wear. The aim of this paper is to analyse the physical-chemical factors and the proper processes for achieving the selective mass transfer for the couple steel/bronze, which in optimal conditions, forms a thin layer of copper on the contact surfaces areas. Also, it presents some studies and researches concerning the tribological behaviour of the surfaces of a friction couple with linear contact (roll/roll) which operates with selective mass transfer, tested on Amsler tribometer.

  6. Self-excited coupled cantilevers for mass sensing in viscous measurement environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuno, Hiroshi; Seo, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    The eigenstate shift in two nearly identical and weakly coupled cantilevers provides a means to realize much higher-sensitivity mass detection compared with the eigenfrequency shift approach. We propose using self-excited oscillations for eigenstate detection without using frequency response or resonance curve normally used in conventional methods. Mass sensing thus becomes possible even in high-viscosity environments, where the peak of the frequency response curve is ambiguous or does not exist. The feedback control method is theoretically clarified to produce self-excited oscillation and the validity of the proposed method is investigated experimentally using macroscale coupled cantilevers.

  7. Improving picogram mass sensitivity via frequency doubling in coupled silicon micro-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong F.; Du, Xu; Wang, Xin; Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    Two geometrically different cantilevers, with primary frequencies of 182.506 kHz (u-shaped cantilever for sensing) and 372.503 kHz (rectangular cantilever for detecting), were coupled by two symmetrical coupling overhangs for oscillation-based mass sensing verification with phase-locking. Based on a lumped element model, a theoretical expression, containing a nonlinear spring constant and a term corresponding to the effect of the coupling spring, was proposed to consider the factors influencing the entrainment range, which is defined as a plateau with a frequency ratio (resonant frequency of rectangular cantilever to that of u-shaped cantilever) of 2.000 in present study. A picogram order mass sensing by applying a polystyrene microsphere as a small mass perturbation onto the tip of the u-shaped cantilever was demonstrated. By varying driving voltages, two entrainment regions with and without microsphere were experimentally measured and comparatively shown. At a driving voltage of 1 Vpp, when the u-shaped cantilever was excited at its shifted frequency of 180.29 kHz, the frequency response of the coupled rectangular cantilever had a peak at double the shifted frequency of 360.58 kHz of the u-shaped cantilever. The frequency shift for picogram mass sensing was thus doubled from 2560 Hz to 5133 Hz due to phase-locking. A mass of 3.732 picogram was derived based on the doubled frequency shift corresponding to a calculated mass of 3.771 picogram from measured diameter and reported density. Both experimental demonstration and theoretical discussions from the viewpoint of entrainment range elicits the possibility of increasing the mass sensitivity via phase-locking in the coupled silicon micro-cantilevers.

  8. MASSES OF SUBGIANT STARS FROM ASTEROSEISMOLOGY USING THE COUPLING STRENGTHS OF MIXED MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Benomar, O.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Deheuvels, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2012-02-15

    For a few decades now, asteroseismology, the study of stellar oscillations, has enabled us to probe the interiors of stars with great precision. It allows stringent tests of stellar models and can provide accurate radii, masses, and ages for individual stars. Of particular interest are the mixed modes that occur in subgiant solar-like stars since they can place very strong constraints on stellar ages. Here, we measure the characteristics of the mixed modes, particularly the coupling strength, using a grid of stellar models for stars with masses between 0.9 and 1.5 M{sub Sun }. We show that the coupling strength of the l = 1 mixed modes is predominantly a function of stellar mass and appears to be independent of metallicity. This should allow an accurate mass evaluation, further increasing the usefulness of mixed modes in subgiants as asteroseismic tools.

  9. The Helium Cooling System and Cold Mass Support System for theMICE Coupling Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Wu, H.; Li, L.K.; Green, M.A.; Liu, C.S.; Li, L.Y.; Jia, L.X.; Virostek, S.P.

    2007-08-27

    The MICE cooling channel consists of alternating threeabsorber focus coil module (AFC) and two RF coupling coil module (RFCC)where the process of muon cooling and reacceleration occurs. The RFCCmodule comprises a superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around fourconventional conducting 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities and producing up to2.2T magnetic field on the centerline. The coupling coil magnetic fieldis to produce a low muon beam beta function in order to keep the beamwithin the RF cavities. The magnet is to be built using commercialniobium titanium MRI conductors and cooled by pulse tube coolers thatproduce 1.5 W of cooling capacity at 4.2 K each. A self-centering supportsystem is applied for the coupling magnet cold mass support, which isdesigned to carry a longitudinal force up to 500 kN. This report willdescribe the updated design for the MICE coupling magnet. The cold masssupport system and helium cooling system are discussed indetail.

  10. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  11. Mass dependence of shear viscosity in a binary fluid mixture: mode-coupling theory.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sk Musharaf; Samanta, Alok; Choudhury, Niharendu; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2006-11-01

    An expression for the shear viscosity of a binary fluid mixture is derived using mode-coupling theory in order to study the mass dependence. The calculated results on shear viscosity for a binary isotopic Lennard-Jones fluid mixture show good agreement with results from molecular dynamics simulation carried out over a wide range of mass ratio at different composition. Also proposed is a new generalized Stokes-Einstein relation connecting the individual diffusivities to shear viscosity. PMID:17279895

  12. Iron-Isotopic Fractionation Studies Using Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Zhang, C.; Barling, J.; Roe, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of Fe biogeochemistry has stimulated interest in Fe isotope fractionation. Recent studies using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and a "double spike" demonstrate the existence of biogenic Fe isotope effects. Here, we assess the utility of multiple-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry(MC-ICP-MS) with a desolvating sample introduction system for Fe isotope studies, and present data on Fe biominerals produced by a thermophilic bacterium. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Use of Generalized Mass in the Interpretation of Dynamic Response of BENDING-TORSION Coupled Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESLIMY-ISFAHANY, S. H. R.; BANERJEE, J. R.

    2000-11-01

    The interpretation of mode shapes and dynamic response of bending-torsion coupled beams is assessed by using the concept of generalized mass. In the first part of this investigation, the free vibratory motion of bending-torsion coupled beams is studied in detail. The conventional method of interpreting the normal modes of vibration consisting of bending displacements and torsional rotations is shown to be inadequate and replaced by an alternative method which is focussed on the constituent parts of the generalized mass arising from bending and torsional displacements. Basically, the generalized mass in a particular mode is identified and examined in terms of bending, torsion and bending-torsion coupling effects. It is demonstrated that the contribution of individual components in the expression of the generalized mass of a normal mode is a much better indicator in characterizing a coupled mode. It is also shown that the usually adopted criteria of plotting bending displacement and torsional rotations to describe a coupled mode can be deceptive and misleading. In the second part of the investigation, attention is focussed on the dynamic response characteristics of bending-torsion coupled beams when subjected to random bending or torsional loads. A normal mode approach is used to establish the total response. The input random excitation is assumed to be stationary and ergodic so that with the linearity assumption, the output spectrum of the response is obtained by using the frequency response function. The contribution of each normal mode to the overall response is isolated. Particular emphasis is placed on bending-induced torsional response and torsion-induced bending response. A number of case studies involving different types of bending-torsion coupled beams with Cantilever end conditions are presented. The limitations of existing methods of modal interpretation are highlighted, and an insight into the mode selection for response analysis is provided.

  14. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  15. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  16. ULTRASONIC NEBULIZATION AND ARSENIC VALENCE STATE CONSIDERATIONS PRIOR TO DETERMINATION VIA INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was utilized as a sample introduction device for an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in an attempt to increase the sensitivity for As. The USN produced a valence state response difference for As. The As response was suppressed approximate...

  17. DETERMINATION OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATERS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection by-product in drinking water, formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer is combined with an ion chromatograph for the analysis of bromate in drinking waters. Three chromatographic colu...

  18. Determination of Arsenic in Sinus Wash and Tap Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnell, Anna M.; Nahan, Keaton; Holloway, Dawone; Vonderheide, Anne P.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element to which humans are primarily exposed through food and water; it occurs as a result of human activities and naturally from the earth's crust. An experiment was developed for a senior level analytical laboratory utilizing an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the analysis of arsenic in household…

  19. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, Y.C.

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent. 8 figs.

  20. Comparison of thermal ionization mass spectrometry and Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for cesium isotope ratio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnard, H.; Granet, M.; Caussignac, C.; Ducarme, E.; Nonell, A.; Tran, B.; Chartier, F.

    2009-11-01

    In the nuclear domain, precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of elements in spent nuclear fuels is mandatory to validate neutron calculation codes and for nuclear waste disposal. The present study presents the results obtained on Cs isotope ratio by mass spectrometric measurements. Natural cesium is monoisotopic ( 133Cs) whereas cesium in spent fuels has 4 isotopes ( 133Cs, 134Cs, 135Cs, and 137Cs). As no standard reference material is available to evaluate the accuracy of Cs isotopic measurements, a comparison of cesium isotopic composition in spent nuclear fuels has been performed between Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and a new method involving Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) measurements. For TIMS measurements, isotopic fractionation has been evaluated by studying the behavior of cesium isotope ratios ( 133Cs/ 137Cs and 135Cs/ 137Cs) during the analyses. For MC-ICPMS measurements, the mass bias effects have been corrected with an external mass bias correction using elements (Eu and Sb) close to cesium masses. The results obtained by the two techniques show good agreement: relative difference on 133Cs/ 137Cs and 135Cs/ 137Cs ratios for two nuclear samples, analyzed after chemical separation, ranges from 0.2% to 0.5% depending on the choice of reference value for mass bias correction by MC-ICPMS. Finally the quantification of the 135Cs/ 238U ratio by the isotope dilution technique is presented in the case of a MOx (mixed oxide) spent fuel sample. Evaluation of the global uncertainties shows that this ratio could be defined at an uncertainty of 0.5% ( k = 2). The intercomparison between two independent mass spectrometric techniques is fundamental for the evaluation of uncertainty when no isotopic standard is available.

  1. Current medical research with the application of coupled techniques with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most effective methods of analysis of organic compounds in biological fluids are coupled chromatographic techniques. Capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) allows the most efficient separation, identification and quantification of volatile metabolites in biological fluids. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is especially suitable for the analysis of non-volatile and/or thermally unstable compounds. A major drawback of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry is that no standard spectral libraries such as NIST and Wiley for GC-MS are available to facilitate the identification of unknown compounds. Moreover, the identification of potential new compounds, especially new biomarkers in LC-MS, is much more challenging than in GC-MS. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) has been widely used to characterize metabolomes. Capillary electrophoresis is a powerful technique for the separation of charged metabolites, offering high analyte resolution. The advantages of CE-MS are applicability for hydrophilic metabolites, robust separation efficiency and short duration of analysis. This review provides an overview of current chromatographic methods – gas chromatography – mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry – and their applications in current medical research. The focus is on the description of metabonomics research, strategies for biomarkers identification, medical diagnoses of diseases and research of drugs. PMID:21525822

  2. Microfluidic Chip Coupled with Thermal Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic chips have been used as platforms for a diversity of research purposes such as for separation and micro-reaction. One of the suitable detectors for microfluidic chip is mass spectrometry. Because microfluidic chips are generally operated in an open air condition, mass spectrometry coupled with atmospheric pressure ion sources can suit the requirement with minimum compromise. In this study, we develop a new interface to couple a microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. A capillary tip coated with a layer of graphite, capable of absorbing energy of near-infrared (NIR) light is used to interface microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. An NIR laser diode (λ=808 nm) is used to irradiate the capillary tip for assisting the generation of spray from the eluent of the microfluidic chip. An electrospray is provided to fuse with the spray generated from the microfluidic chip for post-ionization. Transesterification is used as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of using this interface to couple microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. PMID:26839753

  3. Higgs mass and unified gauge coupling in the NMSSM with vector matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Buttazzo, Dario; Hall, Lawrence J.; Marzocca, David

    2016-07-01

    We consider the NMSSM extended to include one vector-like family of quarks and leptons. If (some of) these vector-like matter particles, as the Higgs doublets, have Yukawa couplings to the singlet S that exceed unity at about the same scale Λ ≲ 103 TeV, this gives the order 40% enhancement of the tree level Higgs boson mass required in the MSSM to reach 125 GeV. It is conceivable that the Yukawa couplings to the singlet S, although naively blowing up close to Λ, will not spoil gauge coupling unification. In such a case the unified coupling α X could be interestingly led to a value not far from unity, thus providing a possible explanation for the number of generations. The characteristic signal is an enhanced resonant production of neutral spin zero particles at LHC, that could even explain the putative diphoton resonance hinted by the recent LHC data at 750 GeV.

  4. Coupled Fluids-Radiation Analysis of a High-Mass Mars Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Allen, Gary; Tang, Chun; Brown, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The NEQAIR line-by-line radiation code has been incorporated into the DPLR Navier-Stokes flow solver such that the NEQAIR subroutines are now callable functions of DPLR. The coupled DPLR-NEQAIR code was applied to compute the convective and radiative heating rates over high-mass Mars entry vehicles. Two vehicle geometries were considered - a 15 m diameter 70-degree sphere cone configuration and a slender, mid-L/D vehicle with a diameter of 5 m called an Ellipsled. The entry masses ranged from 100 to 165 metric tons. Solutions were generated for entry velocities ranging from 6.5 to 9.1 km/s. The coupled fluids-radiation solutions were performed at the peak heating location along trajectories generated by the Traj trajectory analysis code. The impact of fluids-radiation coupling is a function of the level of radiative heating and the freestream density and velocity. For the high-mass Mars vehicles examined in this study, coupling effects were greatest for entry velocities above 8.5 km/s where the surface radiative heating was reduced by up 17%. Generally speaking, the Ellipsled geometry experiences a lower peak radiative heating rate but a higher peak turbulent convective heating rate than the MSL-based vehicle.

  5. Measurement of the 135Cs half-life with accelerator mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. M.; Cornett, R. J.; Charles, C. R. J.; Zhao, X. L.; Kieser, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 135Cs is quoted as having a half-life of 2.3 Myr. However, there are three published values ranging from 1.8 to 3 Myr. This research reviews previous measurements and reports a new measurement of the half-life using newly developed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques along with β and γ radiometric analysis. The half-life was determined to be (1.6 ±0.6 ) ×106 yr by AMS and (1.3 ±0.2 ) ×106 yr by ICPMS with 95% confidence. The two values agree with each other but differ from the accepted value by ˜40 % .

  6. The climatic mass balance of Svalbard glaciers: a 10-year simulation with a coupled atmosphere-glacier mass balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aas, Kjetil S.; Dunse, Thorben; Collier, Emily; Schuler, Thomas V.; Berntsen, Terje K.; Kohler, Jack; Luks, Bartłomiej

    2016-05-01

    In this study we simulate the climatic mass balance of Svalbard glaciers with a coupled atmosphere-glacier model with 3 km grid spacing, from September 2003 to September 2013. We find a mean specific net mass balance of -257 mm w.e. yr-1, corresponding to a mean annual mass loss of about 8.7 Gt, with large interannual variability. Our results are compared with a comprehensive set of mass balance, meteorological, and satellite measurements. Model temperature biases of 0.19 and -1.9 °C are found at two glacier automatic weather station sites. Simulated climatic mass balance is mostly within about 100 mm w.e. yr-1 of stake measurements, and simulated winter accumulation at the Austfonna ice cap shows mean absolute errors of 47 and 67 mm w.e. yr-1 when compared to radar-derived values for the selected years 2004 and 2006. Comparison of modeled surface height changes from 2003 to 2008, and satellite altimetry reveals good agreement in both mean values and regional differences. The largest deviations from observations are found for winter accumulation at Hansbreen (up to around 1000 mm w.e. yr-1), a site where sub-grid topography and wind redistribution of snow are important factors. Comparison with simulations using 9 km grid spacing reveal considerable differences on regional and local scales. In addition, 3 km grid spacing allows for a much more detailed comparison with observations than what is possible with 9 km grid spacing. Further decreasing the grid spacing to 1 km appears to be less significant, although in general precipitation amounts increase with resolution. Altogether, the model compares well with observations and offers possibilities for studying glacier climatic mass balance on Svalbard both historically as well as based on climate projections.

  7. New Applications of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Henry; Dagmar Koller; Phil Marriott

    1998-12-31

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) complements the traditional methods of quantitation of radioactive isotopes. Because of the favorable ionization potential of most actinides and their daughter products, the argon plasma provides a rich, stable source of ions, which are introduced through a plasma-mass spectrometer interface into the mass spectrometer for isotopic separation. Samples are normally introduced in solution, although direct solids analysis has also been achieved using laser ablation of the sample into the argon plasma. Since 1983, improvements in ICP-MS sensitivity have resulted in correspondingly lower mass detection capability. This development has in turn expanded the number of isotopes accessible to measurement at the levels required in the nuclear industry.

  8. Modeling of diagenesis in relation to coupled mass and heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrak, R.

    1996-12-31

    Pore fluid flow is an important factor influencing the diagenetic evolution of rocks, as has been shown by various diagenetic studies, especially in connection with fluid inclusion measurements. A 3D- computer model is presented, which allows to simulate coupled mass and heat transport in porous rocks. The model is used to study the interaction of heat and mass transport with respect to the temporal and spatial evolution of sandstones. Mineral dissolution or precipitation change the mineralogical composition of rocks, and modify the physical properties at the same time. Altering the permeability of the rock affects the fluid flow system in the rock which determines the mass transport of the entire system. In addition to mass transport, fluid flow transports thermal energy, which may modify the temperature evolution of the rock. The model will be used to examine the effect of convective heat and mass transport on temperature and diagenetic evolution of clastic rocks. Although the model cannot claim to simulate nature, it can be used to study the effect of different mechanisms, and their interaction within the coupled system. For practical applications, the model may be used to determine possible flow rates, which are necessary to explain the observed diagenetic and thermal history of sandstones.

  9. Nanomanipulation-coupled nanospray mass spectrometry as an approach for single cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Mandy; Hamilton, Jason; Verbeck, Guido F.

    2014-12-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry is now a widely used technique for observing cell content of various biological tissues. However, electrospray techniques (liquid chromatography and direct infusion) often involve lysing a group of cells and extracting the biomolecules of interest, rather than a sensitive, individual cell method to observe local chemistry. Presented here is an approach of combining a nanomanipulator workstation with nanospray mass spectrometry, which allows for extraction of a single cell, followed by rapid mass analysis that can provide a detailed metabolic profile. Triacylglycerol content was profiled with this tool coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate heterogeneity between healthy and tumorous tissues as well as lipid droplet containing adipocytes in vitro as proof of concept. This selective approach provides cellular resolution and complements existing bioanalytical techniques with minimal invasion to samples. In addition, the coupling of nanomanipulation and mass spectrometry holds the potential to be used in a great number of applications for individual organelles, diseased tissues, and in vitro cell cultures for observing heterogeneity even amongst cells and organelles of the same tissue.

  10. On-line coupling of capillary gel electrophoresis with electrospray mass spectrometry for oligonucleotide analysis.

    PubMed

    Freudemann, T; von Brocke, A; Bayer, E

    2001-06-01

    Homooligodeoxyribonucleotides differing one nucleotide in length from 12- to 15-mer and from 17- to 20-mer were separated by size with capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) using an entangled polymer solution in coated capillaries. The resolved components were analyzed by on-line coupling of CGE with electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS), denoted as CGE/ES-MS, in the full-scan negative ion detection mode. Baseline separation was achieved for the 12-15-mer oligonucleotide mixtures. Both synthetic phosphodiester oligonucleotide mixtures as well as their phosphorothioate analogues, serving as model compounds for antisense oligonucleotides, could be analyzed by on-line CGE/ES-MS coupling. Terminally phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated synthetic failure sequences could be electrophoretically separated and mass spectrometically characterized as well. This methodology might be a useful tool for synthesis control of phosphodiester oligonucleotides as well as for analysis of phosphorothioate analogues as they are used in antisense drug development. PMID:11403304

  11. Elemental Bioimaging by Means of Fast Scanning Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehe, Christoph A.; Thyssen, Georgina M.; Herdering, Christina; Raj, Indra; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common setups for elemental bioimaging, the hyphenation of a laser ablation (LA) system and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), was expanded by adding full scan mass spectrometric information as another dimension of information. While most studies deal with the analysis of typically not more than up to 10 isotopes per scan cycle, a fast scanning quadrupole mass analyzer was utilized to record the full mass spectrum of interest in this work. Mass-to-charge ratios from 6 to 250 were observed within one cycle. Besides the x- and y-position on the ablated sample and the intensity, the m/z-ratio served as fourth variable for each pixel of the obtained data, closing thereby the gap between "inorganic" and "organic" mass spectrometric imaging techniques. The benefits of this approach include an improved control of interferences, the discovery of unexpected elemental distributions, the possibility to plot isotopic ratios, and to integrate the intensities of a certain number of mass channels recorded for each isotope, thus virtually increasing sensitivity. The respective data are presented for dried droplets as well as embedded animal and human tissue slices. Limits of detection were calculated and found to be in accordance with counting statistics. A dedicated software macro was developed for data manipulation prior to common evaluation and image creation.

  12. A DISTINCTIVE DISK-JET COUPLING IN THE LOWEST-MASS SEYFERT, NGC 4395

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, Mark T.; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gallo, Elena; Maitra, Dipankar

    2013-09-10

    Simultaneous observations of X-rays and radio luminosities have been well studied in accreting stellar-mass black holes. These observations are performed in order to understand how mass accretion rates and jetted outflows are linked in these individual systems. Such contemporaneous studies in supermassive black holes (SMBH) are harder to perform, as viscous times scale linearly with mass. However, as NGC 4395 is the lowest known mass Seyfert galaxy, we have used it to examine the simultaneous X-ray (Swift) and radio (Very Large Array) correlation in a SMBH in a reasonably timed observing campaign. We find that the intrinsic X-ray variability is stronger than the radio variability, and that the fluxes are only weakly or tentatively coupled, similar to prior results obtained in NGC 4051. If the corona and the base of the jet are one and the same, this may suggest that the corona in radio-quiet active galactic nucleus filters disk variations, only transferring the strongest and/or most sustained variations into the jet. Further, when both NGC 4395 and NGC 4051 are placed on the stellar-mass L{sub X} -L{sub R} plane, they appear to reside on the steeper L{sub X} -L{sub R} track. This suggests that SMBHs also follow two distinct tracks just as stellar-mass black holes do, and supports the idea that the same physical disk-jet mechanisms are at play across the mass scale.

  13. Elemental Bioimaging by Means of Fast Scanning Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wehe, Christoph A; Thyssen, Georgina M; Herdering, Christina; Raj, Indra; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common setups for elemental bioimaging, the hyphenation of a laser ablation (LA) system and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), was expanded by adding full scan mass spectrometric information as another dimension of information. While most studies deal with the analysis of typically not more than up to 10 isotopes per scan cycle, a fast scanning quadrupole mass analyzer was utilized to record the full mass spectrum of interest in this work. Mass-to-charge ratios from 6 to 250 were observed within one cycle. Besides the x- and y-position on the ablated sample and the intensity, the m/z-ratio served as fourth variable for each pixel of the obtained data, closing thereby the gap between "inorganic" and "organic" mass spectrometric imaging techniques. The benefits of this approach include an improved control of interferences, the discovery of unexpected elemental distributions, the possibility to plot isotopic ratios, and to integrate the intensities of a certain number of mass channels recorded for each isotope, thus virtually increasing sensitivity. The respective data are presented for dried droplets as well as embedded animal and human tissue slices. Limits of detection were calculated and found to be in accordance with counting statistics. A dedicated software macro was developed for data manipulation prior to common evaluation and image creation. PMID:25947196

  14. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.C.; Limbach, P.A.; Shomo, R.E. II; Marshall, A.G. ); Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF{sup {minus}}{sub 6} fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H){sup +} ions) of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with {ital tetra}-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol{sup ( )} sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon{sup ( )}. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  15. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas C.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Shomo, Ronald E., II; Marshall, Alan G.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Delmore, James E.

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF-6 fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis [e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H)+ ions] of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with tetra-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol■ sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon■. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  16. How might a statistical cloud scheme be coupled to a mass-flux convection scheme?

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Hannay, Cecile; Xu, Kuan-man

    2004-09-27

    The coupling of statistical cloud schemes with mass-flux convection schemes is addressed. Source terms representing the impact of convection are derived within the framework of prognostic equations for the width and asymmetry of the probability distribution function of total water mixing ratio. The accuracy of these source terms is quantified by examining output from a cloud resolving model simulation of deep convection. Practical suggestions for inclusion of these source terms in large-scale models are offered.

  17. Reduction of plyatomic ion interferences in indictively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with cryogenic desolvation

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, L.C.

    1993-09-01

    A desolvation scheme for introducing aqueous and organic samples into an argon inductively coupled plasma is described; the aerosol generated by nebulizer is heated (+140 C) and cooled ({minus}80 C) repeatedly, and the dried aerosol is then injected into the mass spectrometer. Polyatomic ions are greatly suppressed. This scheme was validated with analysis of seawater and urine reference samples. Finally, the removal of organic solvents by cryogenic desolvation was studied.

  18. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer. PMID:27155588

  19. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  20. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  1. Thin-layer chromatography combined with diode laser thermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bednařík, Antonín; Tomalová, Iva; Kanický, Viktor; Preisler, Jan

    2014-10-17

    Here we present a novel coupling of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) to diode laser thermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DLTV ICP MS). DLTV is a new technique of aerosol generation which uses a diode laser to induce pyrolysis of a substrate. In this case the cellulose stationary phase on aluminum-backed TLC sheets overprinted with black ink to absorb laser light. The experimental arrangement relies on economic instrumentation: an 808-nm 1.2-W continuous-wave infrared diode laser attached to a syringe pump serving as the movable stage. Using a glass tubular cell, the entire length of a TLC separation channel is scanned. The 8-cm long lanes were scanned in ∼35 s. The TLC - DLTV ICP MS coupling is demonstrated on the separation of four cobalamins (hydroxo-; adenosyl-; cyano-; and methylcobalamin) with limits of detection ∼2 pg and repeatability ∼15% for each individual species. PMID:25193171

  2. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  3. Hydromechanical coupling in fractured rock masses: mechanisms and processes of selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Hydromechanical (HM) coupling in fractured rock play an important role when events including dam failures, landslides, surface subsidences due to water withdrawal or drainage, injection-induced earthquakes and others are analysed. Generally, hydromechanical coupling occurs when a rock mass contain interconnected pores and fractures which are filled with water and pore/fracture pressures evolves. In the on hand changes in the fluid pressure can lead to stress changes, deformations and failures of the rock mass. In the other hand rock mass stress changes and deformations can alter the hydraulic properties and fluid pressures of the rock mass. Herein well documented case studies focussing on surface subsidence due to water withdrawal, reversible deformations of large-scale valley flanks and failure as well as deformation processes of deep-seated rock slides in fractured rock masses are presented. Due to pore pressure variations HM coupling can lead to predominantly reversible rock mass deformations. Such processes can be considered by the theory of poroelasticity. Surface subsidence reaching magnitudes of few centimetres and are caused by water drainage into deep tunnels are phenomenas which can be assigned to processes of poroelasticity. Recently, particular focus was given on large tunnelling projects to monitor and predict surface subsidence in fractured rock mass in oder to avoid damage of surface structures such as dams of large reservoirs. It was found that surface subsidence due to tunnel drainage can adversely effect infrastructure when pore pressure drawdown is sufficiently large and spatially extended and differential displacements which can be amplified due to topographical effects e.g. valley closure are occurring. Reversible surface deformations were also ascertained on large mountain slopes and summits with the help of precise deformation measurements i.e. permanent GPS or episodic levelling/tacheometric methods. These reversible deformations are often

  4. Exchange coupling between silicon donors: The crucial role of the central cell and mass anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, G.; Lovett, B. W.; Bhatt, R. N.; Lyon, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Donors in silicon are now demonstrated as one of the leading candidates for implementing qubits and quantum information processing. Single qubit operations, measurements, and long coherence times are firmly established, but progress on controlling two qubit interactions has been slower. One reason for this is that the interdonor exchange coupling has been predicted to oscillate with separation, making it hard to estimate in device designs. We present a multivalley effective mass theory of a donor pair in silicon, including both a central cell potential and the effective mass anisotropy intrinsic in the Si conduction band. We are able to accurately describe the single donor properties of valley-orbit coupling and the spatial extent of donor wave functions, highlighting the importance of fitting measured values of hyperfine coupling and the orbital energy of the 1s levels. Ours is a simple framework that can be applied flexibly to a range of experimental scenarios, but it is nonetheless able to provide fast and reliable predictions. We use it to estimate the exchange coupling between two donor electrons and we find a smoothing of its expected oscillations, and predict a monotonic dependence on separation if two donors are spaced precisely along the [100] direction.

  5. Rotation planar chromatography coupled on-line with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Llave, Jonathan J; De Apadoca, Marilyn F; Ford, Michael J

    2004-01-15

    The coupling of a rotation planar preparative thin-layer chromatography system on-line with mass spectrometry is demonstrated using a simple plumbing scheme and a self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe of a corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source. The self-aspiration of the heated nebulizer delivers approximately 20 microL/min of the 3.0 mL/min eluate stream to the mass spectrometer, eliminating the need for an external pump in the system. The viability of the coupling is demonstrated with a three-dye mixture composed of fat red 7B, solvent green 3, and solvent blue 35 separated and eluted from a silica gel-coated rotor using toluene. The real-time characterization of the dyes eluting from the rotor is illustrated in positive ion full-scan mode. Other self-aspirating ion source systems including atmospheric pressure photoionization, electrospray ionization, and inductively coupled plasma ionization, for example, might be configured and used in a similar manner coupled to the chromatograph to expand the types of analytes that could be ionized, detected, and characterized effectively. PMID:14719901

  6. Mass transport in low permeability rocks under the influence of coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.

    1984-10-01

    The present paper gives a general overview of mass transport in low permeability rocks under the coupled thermomechanical and hydrochemical effects associated with a nuclear waste repository. A classification of coupled processes is given. Then an ess is presented. example of a coupled process is presented. Discussions of coupled processes based on a recent LBL Panel meeting are summarized. 5 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Strong coupling and bounds on the spin-2 mass in massive gravity.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Clare; Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2013-07-12

    The de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley theory of a single massive spin-2 field has a cutoff much below its Planck scale because the extra modes from the massive spin-2 multiplet involve higher derivative self-interactions, controlled by a scale convoluted from its mass. Generically, these correct the propagator by environmental effects. The resulting effective cutoff depends on the environmental parameters and the spin-2 "graviton" mass. Requiring the theory to be perturbative down to O(1) mm, we derive bounds on the mass, corresponding to ≳O(1) meV for the generic case, assuming the coupling to be given by the standard Newton's constant, and somewhat weaker bounds in cases with fine-tuning. Thus, the theory of a single massive spin-2 can really only be viewed as a theory describing the full nonlinear propagation of a massive spin-2 field on a fixed background and not as an approximation to general relativity. PMID:23889386

  8. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, E.

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 {+-} 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 {+-} 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 {+-} 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 {+-} 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and {beta}-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of {sup 13}C{sup +} with {sup 12}C{sup 1}H{sup +} comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or {beta}-cyclodextrin.

  9. Neutrino masses in lepton number violating mSUGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kom, Steve C. H.

    2008-11-23

    In SUSY models which violate R-parity, there exist trilinear lepton number violating (LNV) operators which can lead to neutrino masses. If these operators are defined at the unification scale, the renormalization group flow becomes important and generally leads to one neutrino mass much heavier than the others. We study, in a minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) set-up with two trilinear LNV operators and three charged lepton mixing angles, numerically how these parameters may be arranged to be compatible with neutrino oscillation data, and discuss some phenomenological observations.

  10. Quantitative Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles by Coupling Thin Layer Chromatography with Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Neng; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Guo, Wei; Gan, Yiqun; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-06-16

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) determination has recently attracted considerable attention because of the continuing boom of nanotechnology. In this study, a novel method for separation and quantitative characterization of NPs in aqueous suspension was established by coupling thin layer chromatography (TLC) with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of various sizes were used as the model system. It was demonstrated that TLC not only allowed separation of gold nanoparticles from ionic gold species by using acetyl acetone/butyl alcohol/triethylamine (6:3:1, v/v) as the mobile phase, but it also achieved the separation of differently sized gold nanoparticles (13, 34, and 47 nm) by using phosphate buffer (0.2 M, pH = 6.8), Triton X-114 (0.4%, w/v), and EDTA (10 mM) as the mobile phase. Various experimental parameters that affecting TLC separation of AuNPs, such as the pH of the phosphate buffer, the coating of AuNPs, the concentrations of EDTA and Triton X-114, were investigated and optimized. It was found that separations of AuNPs by TLC displayed size dependent retention behavior with good reproducibility, and the retardation factors (R(f) value) increased linearly with decreasing nanoparticle size. The analytical performance of the present method was evaluated under optimized conditions. The limits of detection were in the tens of pg range, and repeatability (RSD, n = 7) was 6.3%, 5.9%, and 8.3% for 30 ng of 13 nm AuNPs, 34 nm AuNPs, and 47 nm AuNPs, respectively. The developed TLC-LA-ICP-MS method has also been applied to the analysis of spiked AuNPs in lake water, river water, and tap water samples. PMID:26005902

  11. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range. PMID:27070616

  12. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range. PMID:27070616

  13. Coupled simulations of fluvial erosion and mass wasting for cohesive river banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, Stephen E.; Rinaldi, Massimo; Dapporto, Stefano

    2007-09-01

    The erosion of sediment from riverbanks affects a range of physical and ecological issues. Bank retreat often involves combinations of fluvial erosion and mass wasting, and in recent years, bank retreat models have been developed that combine hydraulic erosion and limit equilibrium stability models. In related work, finite element seepage analyses have also been used to account for the influence of pore water pressure in controlling the onset of mass wasting. This paper builds on these previous studies by developing a simulation modeling approach in which the hydraulic erosion, finite element seepage, and limit equilibrium stability models are, for the first time, fully coupled. Application of the model is demonstrated by undertaking simulations of a single flow event at a single study site for scenarios where (1) there is no fluvial erosion and the bank geometry profile remains constant throughout, (2) there is no fluvial erosion but the bank profile is deformed by simulated mass wasting, and (3) the bank profile is allowed to freely deform in response to both simulated fluvial erosion and mass wasting. The results are limited in scope to the specific conditions encountered at the study site, but they nevertheless demonstrate the significant role that fluvial erosion plays in steepening the bank profile or creating overhangs, thereby triggering mass wasting. However, feedbacks between the various processes also lead to unexpected outcomes. Specifically, fluvial erosion also affects bank stability indirectly, as deformation of the bank profile alters the hydraulic gradients driving infiltration into the bank, thereby modulating the evolution of the pore water pressure field. Consequently, the frequency, magnitude, and mode of bank erosion events in the fully coupled scenario differ from the two scenarios in which not all the relevant bank process interactions are included.

  14. Determination of Oxidized Phosphatidylcholines by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Pia; Pötz, Sandra; Brunner, Martina; Trötzmüller, Martin; Fauland, Alexander; Triebl, Alexander; Hartler, Jürgen; Lankmayr, Ernst; Köfeler, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    A novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach for analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines by an Orbitrap Fourier Transform mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed. This method depends on three selectivity criteria for separation and identification: retention time, exact mass at a resolution of 100,000 and collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment spectra in a linear ion trap. The process of chromatography development showed the best separation properties with a silica-based Kinetex column. This type of chromatography was able to separate all major lipid classes expected in mammalian samples, yielding increased sensitivity of oxidized phosphatidylcholines over reversed phase chromatography. Identification of molecular species was achieved by exact mass on intact molecular ions and CID tandem mass spectra containing characteristic fragments. Due to a lack of commercially available standards, method development was performed with copper induced oxidation products of palmitoyl-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine, which resulted in a plethora of lipid species oxidized at the arachidonoyl moiety. Validation of the method was done with copper oxidized human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) prepared by ultracentrifugation. In these LDL samples we could identify 46 oxidized molecular phosphatidylcholine species out of 99 possible candidates. PMID:25874761

  15. Coupled sulfur isotopic and chemical mass transfer modeling: Approach and application to dynamic hydrothermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1988-09-21

    A computational modeling code (EQPSreverse arrowS) has been developed to examine sulfur isotopic distribution pathways coupled with calculations of chemical mass transfer pathways. A post processor approach to EQ6 calculations was chosen so that a variety of isotopic pathways could be examined for each reaction pathway. Two types of major bounding conditions were implemented: (1) equilibrium isotopic exchange between sulfate and sulfide species or exchange only accompanying chemical reduction and oxidation events, and (2) existence or lack of isotopic exchange between solution species and precipitated minerals, parallel to the open and closed chemical system formulations of chemical mass transfer modeling codes. All of the chemical data necessary to explicitly calculate isotopic distribution pathways is generated by most mass transfer modeling codes and can be input to the EQPS code. Routines are built in to directly handle EQ6 tabular files. Chemical reaction models of seafloor hydrothermal vent processes and accompanying sulfur isotopic distribution pathways illustrate the capabilities of coupling EQPSreverse arrowS with EQ6 calculations, including the extent of differences that can exist due to the isotopic bounding condition assumptions described above. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Identification of Microalgae by Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multiple Nanomatrices.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Shih, Chi-Yu; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chang, Jeng; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a simple method to identify microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using three different substrates: HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe nanostructures. The fragmentation/ionization processes of complex molecules in algae varied according to the heat absorption and transfer efficiency of the nanostructured matrices (NMs). Therefore, the mass spectra obtained for microalgae showed different patterns of m/z values for different NMs. The spectra contained both significant and nonsignificant peaks. Constructing a Venn diagram with the significant peaks obtained for algae when using HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe NMs in m/z ratio range 100-1000, a unique relationship among the three sets of values was obtained. This unique relationship of sets is different for each species of microalgae. Therefore, by observing the particular relationship of sets, we successfully identified different algae such as Isochrysis galbana, Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nannochloris sp., Skeletonema cf. costatum, and Tetraselmis chui. This simple and cost-effective SALDI-MS analysis method coupled with multi-nanomaterials as substrates may be extended to identify other microalgae and microorganisms in real samples. Graphical Abstract Identification of microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry coupled with three different mercury-based nanosubstrates. PMID:26842733

  17. Scandium analysis in silicon-containing minerals by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitty-Léveillé, Laurence; Drouin, Elisabeth; Constantin, Marc; Bazin, Claude; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-04-01

    This article reports on the development of a new method for the accurate and precise determination of the amount of scandium, Sc, in silicon-containing minerals, based on the use of tandem quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The tandem quadrupole instrument enables new mass filtering configurations, which can reduce polyatomic interferences during the determination of Sc in mineral matrices. He and O2 were used and compared as collision and reaction gases for the removal of interferences at m/z 45 and 61. Using helium gas was ineffective to overcome all of the spectral interferences observed at m/z 45 and particularly for Si-based interferences. However, conversion of Sc+ ions into ScO+ ions (after bombardment with O2 in the octopole reaction system coupled with the use of the instrument in MS/MS mass-shift mode) provided interference-free conditions and sufficiently low limits of detection, down to 3 ng L- 1, to accurately detect Sc. The accuracy of the proposed methodology was assessed by analyzing five different reference materials (BX-N, OKA-2, NIM-L, SY-3 and GH).

  18. Computation of D-brane instanton induced superpotential couplings: Majorana masses from string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Mirjam; Richter, Robert; Weigand, Timo

    2007-10-15

    We perform a detailed conformal field theory analysis of D2-brane instanton effects in four-dimensional type IIA string vacua with intersecting D6-branes. In particular, we explicitly compute instanton induced fermion two-point couplings which play the role of perturbatively forbidden Majorana mass terms for right-handed neutrinos or MSSM {mu} terms. These results can readily be extended to higher-dimensional operators. In concrete realizations of such nonperturbative effects, the Euclidean D2-brane has to wrap a rigid, supersymmetric cycle with strong constraints on the zero-mode structure. Their implications for type IIA compactifications on the T{sup 6}/(Z{sub 2}xZ{sub 2}) orientifold with discrete torsion are analyzed. We also construct a local supersymmetric GUT-like model allowing for a class of Euclidean D2-branes whose fermionic zero modes meet all the constraints for generating Majorana masses in the phenomenologically allowed regime. Together with perturbatively realized Dirac masses, these nonperturbative couplings give rise to the seesaw mechanism.

  19. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  20. Chaotic dynamics of Yang-Mills field as source of particle couplings and masses

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfain, E.

    1995-04-01

    Dynamics of classical uniform Yang-Mills fields is explored from the viewpoint of universal route to chaos in nonlinear systems. The author shows how the path to nonintegrable behavior of the field is equivalent to the period doubling bifurcation of the logistic map. Universal scalings of the growth parameter yield the full set of Standard Model couplings. Hamiltonian formulation in action-angle variables leads to the physics of phase transitions in classical lattice models. The ground state phase diagram of the system with {open_quotes}antiferromagnetic{close_quotes} interaction is known to exhibit a devil`s staircase form. Linking the staircase attributes to the asymptotic freedom of the gauge coupling yields an universal mass equation. Critical exponent is found to depend on the number of field flavors. Further solving the model for various stability plateaus renders the spectrum of particle masses in the low energy framework. Agreement between theory and experimental results is confirmed for the photon/graviton pair, weak bosons, leptons and quarks. The approach offers an intriguing explanation of the dymanical origin of the physical mass and on the internal hierarchy of particle families.

  1. Epileptogenic zone localization and seizure control in coupled neural mass models.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Zhou, Weidong; Zhang, Yanli; Geng, Shujuan

    2015-12-01

    Exact localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is the first priority for ensuring epilepsy treatments and reducing side effects. The results of traditional visual methods for localizing the origin of seizures are far from satisfactory in some cases. Signal processing methods could extract substantial information that may complement visual inspection of EEG signals. In this study, EZ localization is changed into a driver identification problem, and a nonlinear interdependence measure, the weighted rank interdependence, is proposed and used as a driver indicator because it can detect coupling information, especially directionality, from EEG signals. A proportional integral derivative (PID) controller is then explored, using simulations, to establish its suitability for seizure control. The seizure control we propose rests on identifying the EZ using nonlinear interdependence measures of directed functional connectivity. Two directionally coupled neural mass models are employed for simulation investigation. Two parameters can adjust the sensitivity and completeness of the weighted rank interdependence for different applications, and their effect is discussed in the context of neural mass models. Simulation results demonstrate that use of the weighted rank interdependence for EZ identification can be applied to different EZ types, and the approach achieves an overall identification rate of 98.84 % for several EZ types. Simulations also indicate that PID control can effectively regulate synchronization between neural masses. PMID:26585963

  2. Interface for Online Coupling of Surface Plasmon Resonance to Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Li, Xianjiang; Nie, Honggang; Yang, Li; Li, Ze; Bai, Yu; Niu, Li; Song, Daqian; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    The online coupling of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with mass spectrometry (MS) has been highly desired for the complementary information provided by each of the two techniques. In this work, a novel interface for direct and online coupling of SPR to direct analysis in real time (DART) MS was developed. A spray tip connected with the outlet of the SPR flow solution was conducted as the sampling part of the DART-MS, with which the online coupling interface of SPR-MS was realized. Four model samples, acetaminophen, metronidazole, quinine, and hippuric acid, dissolved in three kinds of common buffers were used in the SPR-DART-MS experiments for performance evaluation of the interface and the optimization of DART conditions. The results showed consistent signal changes and high tolerance of nonvolatile salts of this SPR-MS system, demonstrating the feasibility of the interface for online coupling of SPR with MS and the potential application in the characterization of interaction under physiological conditions. PMID:26067340

  3. Indirect hydrogen analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Augsburger, M

    2013-08-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is an analytical tool very useful to investigate the composition of gaseous mixtures. The different gases are separated by specific columns but, if hydrogen (H2 ) is present in the sample, its detection can be performed by a thermal conductivity detector or a helium ionization detector. Indeed, coupled to GC, no other detector can perform this detection except the expensive atomic emission detector. Based on the detection and analysis of H2 isotopes by low-pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS), a new method for H2 detection by GC coupled to MS with an electron ionization ion source and a quadrupole analyser is presented. The presence of H2 in a gaseous mixture could easily be put in evidence by the monitoring of the molecular ion of the protonated carrier gas. PMID:23893637

  4. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dominic S

    2008-01-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study we compare 30 cm long, 4.6 mm ID columns to capillary columns (750 {micro}m ID) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}pU, {sup 241}Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  5. Biomonitoring of hair samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, H.; Karpas, Z.; Zoriy, M.; Pickhardt, C.; Becker, J. S.

    2007-03-01

    An analytical method for determining essential elements (Zn, Fe and Cu) and toxic elements (Cr, Pb and U) on single hair strands by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-SFMS) using a double focusing sector field mass spectrometer was developed. Results obtained directly using LA-ICP-SFMS of hair were compared with those measured by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) of solutions of digested hair samples and the analytical methods were found to agree well. Different quantification strategies for trace element determination in hair samples such as external calibration, standard addition and isotope dilution were compared and demonstrated for uranium. For uranium determination in powdered hair by LA-ICP-MS solution-based calibration was applied by coupling the laser ablation chamber to an ultrasonic nebulizer. The significance of single hair analysis by LA-ICP-SFMS was demonstrated by a case study of a person who changed living environment. Differences in the uranium content observed along the single hair strand correlated with the changes in the level of uranium in drinking water. The uranium concentration in a single hair decreased from 212 to 18 ng g-1 with a change in the uranium concentration in drinking water from 2000 to 30 ng l-1. In addition, measurements of uranium isotope ratios showed a natural isotopic composition throughout the whole period in the drinking water, as well as in the hair samples. This paper demonstrates the potential use of laser ablation ICP-MS to provide measurements on a single hair strand and its potential to become a very powerful tool in hair analysis for biological monitoring.

  6. Yukawa coupling and anomalous magnetic moment of the muon: An update for the LHC era

    SciTech Connect

    Crivellin, Andreas; Girrbach, Jennifer; Nierste, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We study the interplay between a soft muon Yukawa coupling generated radiatively with the trilinear A-terms of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the absence of a tree-level muon Yukawa coupling the lightest smuon mass is predicted to be in the range between 600 GeV and 2200 GeV at 2{sigma}, if the bino mass M{sub 1} is below 1 TeV. Therefore, a detection of a smuon (in conjunction with a sub-TeV bino) at the LHC would directly imply a nonzero muon Yukawa coupling in the MSSM superpotential. Inclusion of slepton flavor mixing could in principle lower the mass of one smuonlike slepton below 600 GeV. However, the experimental bounds on radiative lepton decays instead strengthen the lower mass bound, with larger effects for smaller M{sub 1}, We also extend the analysis to the electron case and find that a light selectron close to the current experimental search limit may prove the MSSM electron Yukawa coupling to be nonzero.

  7. Determination of trace metals in marine biological reference materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, D.; McLaren, J.W.; Willie, S.N.; Berman, S.S.

    1988-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the analysis of two marine biological reference materials (dogfish liver tissue (DOLT-1) and dogfish muscle tissue (DORM-1)). The materials were put into solution by digestion in a nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixture. Thirteen elements (Na, Mg, Cr, Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb) were then determined. Accurate results were obtained by standard additions or isotope dilution techniques for all of these elements in DORM-1 and for all but Cr in DOLT-1.

  8. Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

    2007-11-13

    Time resolved signals in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are studied to determine the influence of experimental parameters on ICP-induced fractionation effects. Differences in sample composition and morphology, i.e., ablating brass, glass, or dust pellets, have a profound effect on the time resolved signal. Helium transport gas significantly decreases large positive signal spikes arising from large particles in the ICP. A binder for pellets also reduces the abundance and amplitude of spikes in the signal. MO{sup +} ions also yield signal spikes, but these MO{sup +} spikes generally occur at different times from their atomic ion counterparts.

  9. Production date determination of uranium-oxide materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsolt; Surányi, Gergely

    2007-09-01

    The paper describes analytical methods developed for the production date determination of uranium-based nuclear materials by the measurement of 230Th/234U isotope ratio. An improved sample preparation method for the destructive analysis involving extraction chromatographic separation with TEVA resin was applied prior to the measurement by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). The results obtained were compared with the direct, quasi-non-destructive measurement using laser ablation ICP-SFMS technique for age determination. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed. PMID:17765059

  10. Chemical recoveries of technetium-99 for various procedures using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ihsanullah; East, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    The procedure for the determination of {sup 99}Tc inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was based on the modification of a variety of available separation techniques. Standard Ru and Rh solutions were used for checking decontaminations and instrument response respectively. Technetium-99 and {sup 95m}Tc tracers were applied as yield monitors using ICP-MS and gamma-ray spectrometry respectively. Percent recoveries are reported for a variety of radiochemical separation procedures for water (58-83%), seaweed (10-76%), and for soil matrices (19-79%).

  11. Anomalous coupling, top-mass and parton-shower effects in W + W - production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Plätzer, S.; Reuschle, C.; von Soden-Fraunhofen, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process ppto {W}+{W}-to {e}+{ν}_e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ } at NLO QCD, including also effective field theory (EFT) operators mediating the ggW + W - interaction, which first occur at dimension eight. We further combine the NLO and EFT matrix elements produced by G oS am with the H erwig7/M atchbox framework, which offers the possibility to study the impact of a parton shower. We assess the effects of the anomalous couplings by comparing them to top-mass effects as well as uncertainties related to variations of the renormalisation, factorisation and hard shower scales.

  12. Characterization of Seed Storage Proteins from Chickpea Using 2D Electrophoresis Coupled with Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pramod Kumar; Shrivastava, Nidhi; Chaturvedi, Krishna; Sharma, Bechan; Bhagyawant, Sameer S

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic analysis was employed to map the seed storage protein network in landrace and cultivated chickpea accessions. Protein extracts were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) across a broad range 3.0-10.0 immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips. Comparative elucidation of differentially expressed proteins between two diverse geographically originated chickpea accessions was carried out using 2D-GE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 600 protein spots were detected in these accessions. In-gel protein expression patterns revealed three protein spots as upregulated and three other as downregulated. Using trypsin in-gel digestion, these differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) which showed 45% amino acid homology of chickpea seed storage proteins with Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27144024

  13. Characterisation of lipid fraction of marine macroalgae by means of chromatography techniques coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ragonese, Carla; Tedone, Laura; Beccaria, Marco; Torre, Germana; Cichello, Filomena; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2014-02-15

    In this work the characterisation of the lipid fraction of several species of marine macro algae gathered along the eastern coast of Sicily is reported. Two species of green marine algae (Chloropyceae), two species of red marine algae (Rhodophyceae) and four species of brown marine algae (Pheophyceae) were evaluated in terms of fatty acids, triacylglycerols, pigments and phospholipids profile. Advanced analytical techniques were employed to fully characterise the lipid profile of these Mediterranean seaweeds, such as GC-MS coupled to a novel mass spectra database supported by the simultaneous use of linear retention index (LRI) for the identification of fatty acid profile; LC-MS was employed for the identification of triacylglycerols (TAGs), carotenoids and phospholipids; the determination of accurate mass was carried out on carotenoids and phospholipids. Quantitative data are reported on fatty acids and triacylglycerols as relative percentage of total fraction. PMID:24128566

  14. Characterization of dihydrostreptomycin-related substances by liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pendela, Murali; Hoogmartens, Jos; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2009-06-01

    Dihydrostreptomycin sulphate (DHS) is a water-soluble, broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic. For quantitative analysis, the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) prescribes an ion-pairing liquid chromatography/ultraviolet (LC/UV) method using a C18 stationary phase. Several unknown compounds were detected in commercial samples. Hence, for characterization of these unknown peaks in a commercial DHS sample, the Ph. Eur. method was coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). However, since the Ph. Eur. method uses a non-volatile mobile phase, each peak eluted was collected and desalted before introduction into the mass spectrometer. The desalting procedure was applied to remove the non volatile salt, buffer and ion-pairing reagent in the collected fraction. In total, 20 impurities were studied and 14 of them were newly characterized. Five impurities which are already reported in the literature were also traced in this LC/UV method. PMID:19449319

  15. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  16. Coupling of a scanning flow cell with online electrochemical mass spectrometry for screening of reaction selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Jan-Philipp; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar R.; Cherevko, Serhiy; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.

    2014-10-01

    In this work the online coupling of a miniaturized electrochemical scanning flow cell (SFC) to a mass spectrometer is introduced. The system is designed for the determination of reaction products in dependence of the applied potential and/or current regime as well as fast and automated change of the sample. The reaction products evaporate through a hydrophobic PTFE membrane into a small vacuum probe, which is positioned only 50-100 μm away from the electrode surface. The probe is implemented into the SFC and directly connected to the mass spectrometer. This unique configuration enables fast parameter screening for complex electrochemical reactions, including investigation of operation conditions, composition of electrolyte, and material composition. The technical developments of the system are validated by initial measurements of hydrogen evolution during water electrolysis and electrochemical reduction of CO2 to various products, showcasing the high potential for systematic combinatorial screening by this approach.

  17. An RFID-Based Manufacturing Control Framework for Loosely Coupled Distributed Manufacturing System Supporting Mass Customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruey-Shun; Tsai, Yung-Shun; Tu, Arthur

    In this study we propose a manufacturing control framework based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology and a distributed information system to construct a mass-customization production process in a loosely coupled shop-floor control environment. On the basis of this framework, we developed RFID middleware and an integrated information system for tracking and controlling the manufacturing process flow. A bicycle manufacturer was used to demonstrate the prototype system. The findings of this study were that the proposed framework can improve the visibility and traceability of the manufacturing process as well as enhance process quality control and real-time production pedigree access. Using this framework, an enterprise can easily integrate an RFID-based system into its manufacturing environment to facilitate mass customization and a just-in-time production model.

  18. Characterization of Seed Storage Proteins from Chickpea Using 2D Electrophoresis Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramod Kumar; Shrivastava, Nidhi; Chaturvedi, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic analysis was employed to map the seed storage protein network in landrace and cultivated chickpea accessions. Protein extracts were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) across a broad range 3.0–10.0 immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips. Comparative elucidation of differentially expressed proteins between two diverse geographically originated chickpea accessions was carried out using 2D-GE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 600 protein spots were detected in these accessions. In-gel protein expression patterns revealed three protein spots as upregulated and three other as downregulated. Using trypsin in-gel digestion, these differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) which showed 45% amino acid homology of chickpea seed storage proteins with Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27144024

  19. Alleviation of overlap interferences for determination of potassium isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S.J.; Houk, R.S.; Stevens, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Positioning the sampling orifice relatively far from the load coil combined with use of low forward power and high aerosol gas flow rate causes the background mass spectrum to become dominated by NO/sup +/. Nearly all the Ar/sup +/ and ArH/sup +/ ions are suppressed under these conditions, which frees m/z 39 and 41 for potassium isotope ratio measurements. The precision is 0.3-0.9% relative standard deviation for potassium concentrations in the range 1-50 mg L/sup -1/. The determined ratios are approx. 9% higher than the accepted value and also vary with the concentration of sodium concomitant, so calibrations and chemical separations are desirable. These observations should permit use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid isotope ratio determinations of potassium from biological organisms or water sources.

  20. Screening for low molecular weight compounds in fish meal solubles by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple analytical method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was developed to screen for low molecular weight compounds in enzyme treated and untreated Alaskan pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) stickwater (SW) generated from processing fish meal with po...

  1. Investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer in heterogeneous porous media using numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Frippiat, C. C.; Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2007-12-01

    A significant body of knowledge exists on separates processes of thermal and mass transport in granular and fractured subsurface formations. However, the need to simulate these processes in a fully coupled way has become necessary to deal with problems associated with long-term-storage of nuclear waste, and the development of new technologies for subsurface remediation. Another emerging area for research is associated with the development of technologies for in situ extraction of underground resources. Numerical models that couple thermal and mass transport processes will play a crucial role in understanding the fundamental processes associated with these new technologies, as well as in making predictions on how complex subsurface systems are expected to behave. It is our hypothesis that heat transport will have a significant impact on distributions of solute concentration, through temperature-dependent dissolution and precipitation, and temperature-dependent rate-limited diffusive transfer of solutes in fractured or highly heterogeneous media. A number of issues related to the validity of existing numerical tools that capture these processes, and their application to field systems through up-scaling need to be investigated. With this overall goal in mind, in this preliminary study, we explore the effect of the variability of subsurface properties on heat and mass transport using simulations conducted using an existing multiphase model. The finite-element code FEHM (Finite-Element Heat and Mass transport code) used in this study was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This code allows for the coupled simulation of flow, heat and mass transport, accounting for density effects and dissolution and/or precipitation reactions. Our analysis is based on two- and three-dimensional simulations using synthetic data sets. Heterogeneous facies distributions are generated according to Markov Chain transition probability models. A distributed source of constant

  2. GaAs Coupled Micro Resonators with Enhanced Sensitive Mass Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chopard, Tony; Lacour, Vivien; Leblois, Therese

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates the improvement of mass detection sensitivity and time response using a simple sensor structure. Indeed, complicated technological processes leading to very brittle sensing structures are often required to reach high sensitivity when we want to detect specific molecules in biological fields. These developments constitute an obstacle to the early diagnosis of diseases. An alternative is the design of coupled structures. In this study, the device is based on the piezoelectric excitation and detection of two GaAs microstructures vibrating in antisymmetric modes. GaAs is a crystal which has the advantage to be micromachined easily using typical clean room processes. Moreover, we showed its high potential in direct biofunctionalisation for use in the biological field. A specific design of the device was performed to improve the detection at low mass and an original detection method has been developed. The principle is to exploit the variation in amplitude at the initial resonance frequency which has in the vicinity of weak added mass the greatest slope. Therefore, we get a very good resolution for an infinitely weak mass: relative voltage variation of 8%/1 fg. The analysis is based on results obtained by finite element simulation. PMID:25474375

  3. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  4. Effects of Large Wing-Tip Masses on Oscillatory Stability of Wing Bending Coupled with Airplane Pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Donald T.

    1959-01-01

    An examination of oscillatory stability for a straight-winged airplane with large concentrated wing-tip masses was made using wing-bending and airplane-pitching degrees of freedom and considering only quasi-steady aerodynamic forces. It was found that instability caused by coupling of airplane pitching and wing bending occurred for large ratios of effective wing-tip mass to total airplane mass and for coupled wing-bending frequencies near or below the uncoupled pitching frequency. Boundaries for this instability are given in terms of two quantities: (1) the ratio of effective tip mass to airplane mass, which can be estimated, and (2) the ratio of the coupled bending frequency to the uncoupled pitch frequency, which can be measured in flight. These boundaries are presented for various values of several airplane parameters.

  5. Super-Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources: Application and Coupling to API Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md. Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pressurizing the ionization source to gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a new tactic aimed at further improving the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources. In principle, all API sources, such as ESI, APCI and AP-MALDI, can be operated at pressure higher than 1 atm if suitable vacuum interface is available. The gas pressure in the ion source can have different role for different ionization. For example, in the case of ESI, stable electrospray could be sustained for high surface tension liquid (e.g., pure water) under super-atmospheric pressure, owing to the absence of electric discharge. Even for nanoESI, which is known to work well with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity were found to be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source was pressurized. For the gas phase ionization like APCI, measurement of gaseous compound also showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4–5 atm. The enhancement was due to the increased collision frequency among reactant ion and analyte that promoted the ion/molecule reaction and a higher intake rate of gas to the mass spectrometer. Because the design of vacuum interface for API instrument is based on the upstream pressure of 1 atm, some coupling aspects need to be considered when connecting the high pressure ion source to the mass spectrometer. Several coupling strategies are discussed in this paper. PMID:26819896

  6. Mapping differential interactomes by affinity purification coupled with data independent mass spectrometry acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Ivosev, Gordana; Couzens, Amber L.; Larsen, Brett; Taipale, Mikko; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Zhong, Quan; Lindquist, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Pawson, Tony; Bonner, Ron; Tate, Stephen; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing changes in protein-protein interactions associated with sequence variants (e.g. disease-associated mutations or splice forms) or following exposure to drugs, growth factors or hormones is critical to understanding how protein complexes are built, localized and regulated. Affinity purification (AP) coupled with mass spectrometry permits the analysis of protein interactions under near-physiological conditions, yet monitoring interaction changes requires the development of a robust and sensitive quantitative approach, especially for large-scale studies where cost and time are major considerations. To this end, we have coupled AP to data-independent mass spectrometric acquisition (SWATH), and implemented an automated data extraction and statistical analysis pipeline to score modulated interactions. Here, we use AP-SWATH to characterize changes in protein-protein interactions imparted by the HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 or melanoma-associated mutations in the human kinase CDK4. We show that AP-SWATH is a robust label-free approach to characterize such changes, and propose a scalable pipeline for systems biology studies. PMID:24162924

  7. Laser-ablation sampling for inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-DOFMS) has been coupled with laser-ablation (LA) sample introduction for the elemental analysis of solids. ICP-DOFMS is well suited for the analysis of laser-generated aerosols because it offers both high-speed mass analysis and simultaneous multi-elemental detection. Here, we evaluate the analytical performance of the LA-ICP-DOFMS instrument, equipped with a microchannel plate-based imaging detector, for the measurement of steady-state LA signals, as well as transient signals produced from single LA events. Steady-state detection limits are 1 mg g1, and absolute single-pulse LA detection limits are 200 fg for uranium; the system is shown capable of performing time-resolved single-pulse LA analysis. By leveraging the benefits of simultaneous multi-elemental detection, we also attain a good shot-to-shot reproducibility of 6% relative standard deviation (RSD) and isotope-ratio precision of 0.3% RSD with a 10 s integration time.

  8. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  9. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  10. Holomorphic Yukawa couplings in heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesneag, Stefan; Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Candelas, Philip; Lukas, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We develop techniques, based on differential geometry, to compute holomorphic Yukawa couplings for heterotic line bundle models on Calabi-Yau manifolds defined as complete intersections in projective spaces. It is shown explicitly how these techniques relate to algebraic methods for computing holomorphic Yukawa couplings. We apply our methods to various examples and evaluate the holomorphic Yukawa couplings explicitly as functions of the complex structure moduli. It is shown that the rank of the Yukawa matrix can decrease at specific loci in complex structure moduli space. In particular, we compute the up Yukawa coupling and the singlet-Higgs-lepton trilinear coupling in the heterotic standard model described in ref. [32].

  11. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    PubMed

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials. PMID:21428686

  12. Coupling Charge Reduction Mass Spectrometry to Liquid Chromatography for Complex Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, John R; Crowe, Matthew C; Alexander, James N; Bell, Bruce M; Dunkle, Melissa N

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of solution mixtures often generates complex mass spectra, even following liquid chromatography (LC), due to analyte multiple charging. Multiple charge state distributions can lead to isobaric interferences, mass spectral congestion, and ambiguous ion identification. As a consequence, data interpretation increases in complexity. Several charge reduction mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been previously developed to reduce the average charge state of gaseous ions; however, all of these techniques have been restricted to direct infusion MS. In this study, synthetic polyols and surfactants separated by liquid chromatography and ionized by positive mode ESI have been subjected to polonium-210 α-particle radiation to reduce the average charge state to singly charged cations prior to mass analysis. LC/MS analysis of 5000 molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG5000) generated an average charge state of 5.88+; whereupon, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/charge reduction/mass spectrometry (LC/CR/MS) analysis of PEG 5000 generated an average charge state of 1.00+. The PEG5000 results demonstrated a decrease in spectral complexity and enabled facile interpretation. Other complex solution mixtures representing specific MS challenges (i.e., competitive ionization and isobaric ion overlap) were explored and analyzed with LC/CR/MS to demonstrate the benefits of coupling LC to CR/MS. For example, polyol information related to initiator, identity/relative amount of monomer, and estimated molecular weight was characterized in random and triblock ethylene oxide/propylene oxide polyols using LC/CR/MS. LC/CR/MS is a new analytical technique for the analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:26971559

  13. Quantitative analysis of antibiotics in aquifer sediments by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lei; Liu, Hui; Xie, Cong; Li, Minjing

    2016-06-24

    A highly effective analytical method for multi-residue determination of antibiotics in aquifer sediments was first established in this study. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and solid-phase extraction were used for sample pre-concentration and purification, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) was applied for detection. For high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), the target compounds were tentatively identified by retention time and accurate mass which was measured with precursor ions in Target-SIM scan, and then confirmed by the monitoring of daughter ion fragments which were generated in dd-MS(2) scan. The results provided good mass accuracy with mass deviations below 2ppm (except norfloxacin with -2.3ppm) for quantitative analysis of the compounds by HRMS. Reasonable recoveries of all analytes were obtained more than 60% (except doxytetracycline) in fortification samples at concentrations higher than 10μgkg(-1). Relative standard deviations of repeatability and inter-day precision were below 21% and 11%. Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.1 to 3.8μgkg(-1), whereas limits of quantification (LOQ) were established between 0.3-9.0μgkg(-1). The method was applied to analyze real aquifer sediment samples in different aquifer depth of 4.0, 7.5, 13.0 and 18.0m. Chlorotetracycline and ofloxacin were observed at relative high concentrations of 53 and 19μgkg(-1) respectively in 18.0m deepness. The exposure to low doses of these compounds in subsurface environment increases concerns on long-term ecological security of underground system. PMID:27215464

  14. Recent developments in inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, A.N.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, J.C.; Jones, C.E.; Hall, C.M.; Yi, Wen; Teagle, D.; Walder, A.J.; Freedman, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes advances in isotopic measurements that have been made with an inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometer and presents results of new experiments aimed at further evaluating the instrument`s capability. It is shown using standard solutions that trace element ratios such as Rb/Sr can be measured precisely without isotope dilution by comparison with reference solutions of known composition. Similarly, using a new wide flight tube, Pb isotopic compositions and U/Pb ratios can be accurately measured simultaneously without isotope dilution. The effects of deliberately inducing changes in the running conditions (RF power) are shown to be significant for measuring trace element ratios but not for mass bias and interference corrected isotopic compositions. Finally, it is demonstrated that precise and accurate isotopic compositions of elements as refractory as W can be determined relatively easily by solution nebulization and even by direct laser ablation of complex silicates. Isobaric interferences in such experiments are negligible. These experiments serve to highlight the remarkable potential that this new field offers for hitherto difficult isotopic measurements in nuclear, earth, environmental and medical sciences. Isotopic measurements can be made that are reproducible at high precision through a range of running conditions, even in the presence of isobaric interferences. The ability to correct for mass discrimination accurately using a second element of similar mass, the very high sensitivity for elements that are otherwise difficult to ionize, the demonstrated capability for laser ablation work and the ability to measure through a wide mass range simultaneously give this instrument major advantages over other more traditional techniques of isotopic measurement.

  15. Fabrication of a polystyrene microfluidic chip coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianqiao; Dong, Yuanyuan; He, Qiaohong; Chen, Hengwu; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2015-05-15

    A highly integrated polystyrene (PS) microfluidic chip coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for on-chip protein digestion and online analysis was developed. The immobilized enzymatic microreactor for on-chip protein digestion was integrated onto microchip via the novel method of region-selective UV-modification combined with glutaraldehyde-based immobilization. The micro film electric contact for applying high voltage was prepared on chips by using UV-directed electroless plating technique. A micro-tip was machined at the end of main channel, serving as the interface between microchip and mass spectrometric detector. On-chip digestion and online detection of protein was carried out by coupling the microchip with mass spectrometry (MS). The influences of methanol flow rate in side channel on the stability of spray and intensity of signals were investigated systematically. Also the influence of sample flow rate on the performance of immobilized enzymatic reactor were investigated. Stable spray was obtained at the spray voltage of 2.8-3.0kV and the methanol flow rate of 500-700nLmin(-1) with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of total ion current (TIC) less than 10%. The influence of sample flow rate on the performance of immobilized enzymatic reactor was also studied. The sequence coverage of protein identification decreased with the increase of flow rate of the sample solution. A sequence coverage of 96% was obtained with immobilized enzymatic reactor at the sample flow rate of 100nLmin(-1) with the reaction time of 8.4min. It could detect cytochrome c as low as 10μgmL(-1) with the developed system. No obvious decrease in protein digestion efficiency was observed after the chip continuously performed for 4h and stored for 15d. PMID:25864010

  16. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  17. [Determination of Heavy Metal Elements in Diatomite Filter Aid by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xi-du; Fu, Liang

    2015-11-01

    This study established a method for determining Be, Cr, Ni, As, Cd, Sb, Sn, Tl, Hg and Pb, total 10 heavy metals in diatomite filter aid. The diatomite filter aid was digested by using the mixture acid of HNO₃ + HF+ H₃PO₄ in microwave system, 10 heavy metals elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The interferences of mass spectrometry caused by the high silicon substrate were optimized, first the equipment parameters and isotopes of test metals were selected to eliminate these interferences, the methane was selected as reactant gas, and the mass spectral interferences were eliminated by dynamic reaction cell (DRC). Li, Sc, Y, In and Bi were selected as the internal standard elements to correct the interferences caused by matrix and the drift of sensitivity. The results show that the detection limits for analyte is in the range of 3.29-15.68 ng · L⁻¹, relative standard deviations (RSD) is less than 4.62%, and the recovery is in the range of 90.71%-107.22%. The current method has some advantages such as, high sensitivity, accurate, and precision, which can be used in diatomite filter aid quality control and safety estimations. PMID:26978934

  18. Dynamical mass generation in QED with magnetic fields: Arbitrary field strength and coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, Eduardo; Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Raya, Alfredo

    2008-05-01

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics, in the presence of magnetics fields of arbitrary strength, by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion self-energy in the rainbow approximation. We employ the Ritus eigenfunction formalism which provides a neat solution to the technical problem of summing over all Landau levels. It is well known that magnetic fields catalyze the generation of fermion mass m for arbitrarily small values of electromagnetic coupling {alpha}. For intense fields it is also well known that m{proportional_to}{radical}(eB). Our approach allows us to span all regimes of parameters {alpha} and eB. We find that m{proportional_to}{radical}(eB) provided {alpha} is small. However, when {alpha} increases beyond the critical value {alpha}{sub c} which marks the onslaught of dynamical fermion masses in vacuum, we find m{proportional_to}{lambda}, the cutoff required to regularize the ultraviolet divergences. Our method permits us to verify the results available in literature for the limiting cases of eB and {alpha}. We also point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  19. Analysis of coupled mass transfer and sol-gel reaction in a two-phase system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelijns, H. J.; Huinink, H. P.; Pel, L.; Zitha, P. L. J.

    2006-07-01

    The coupled mass transfer and chemical reactions of a gel-forming compound in a two-phase system were studied in detail. Tetra-methyl-ortho-silicate (TMOS) is often used as a precursor in sol-gel chemistry to produce silica gels in aqueous systems. TMOS can also be mixed with many hydrocarbons without chemical reaction, which allows for various applications in multiphase systems. In this study, TMOS was mixed with n-hexadecane and placed together with water in small cylinders. Upon contact of the mixture with the water, TMOS transfers completely to the aqueous phase where it forms a gel through a heterogeneous reaction. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurements were employed to monitor the mass transfer of TMOS from the oleic to the aqueous phase. The longitudinal relaxation time (T1) was calibrated and used to determine the concentration of TMOS in n-hexadecane during the transfer. The mass transfer rate was obtained at various temperatures (25-45°C) and for several initial concentrations of TMOS. In the aqueous phase a sharp decrease in the transversal relaxation time (T2) is observed which is attributed to the gel reaction, in particular the formation of methanol in the initial stage. The minimum in T2 indicates the gelation point, and was found to be strongly dependent on temperature and concentration.

  20. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled using desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A

    2005-03-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was demonstrated as a means to couple thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with mass spectrometry. The experimental setup and its optimization are described. Development lanes were scanned by moving the TLC plate under computer control while directing the stationary DESI emitter charged droplet plume at the TLC plate surface. Mass spectral data were recorded in either selected reaction monitoring mode or in full scan ion trap mode using a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Fundamentals and practical applications of the technique were demonstrated in positive ion mode using selected reaction monitoring detection of rhodamine dyes separated on hydrophobic reversed-phase C8 plates and reversed-phase C2 plates, in negative ion full scan mode using a selection of FD&C dyes separated on a wettable reversed-phase C18 plate, and in positive ion full scan mode using a mixture of aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine from an over-the-counter pain medication separated on a normal-phase silica gel plate. PMID:15732898

  1. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  2. Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablation withinductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichen; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2001-04-02

    Single pulse laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was assessed for accurate chemical analysis. Elemental fractionation (e.g. Pb/U), the quantity of ablated mass (crater volume), ICP-MS intensity and the particle contribution (spike signal) during single pulse ablation of NIST 610 glass were investigated. Pb/U fractionation significantly changed between the first and second laser pulse and showed strong irradiance dependence. The Pb/U ratio obtained by the first pulse was usually higher than that of the second pulse, with the average value close to the representative level. Segregation during laser ablation is proposed to explain the composition change between the first and second pulse. Crater volume measurements showed that the second pulse produced significantly more ablated mass. A roll-off of the crater depth occurred at {approx}750 GW/cm{sup 2}. The absolute ICP-MS intensity from the second pulse showed no correlation with crater depth. Particle induced spikes on the transit signal showed irradiance and elemental species dependence.

  3. [Analysis of Trace Inorganic Elements in Castor Oil by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Tan-ping; Xie, Hua-lin; Nie, Xi-du

    2015-10-01

    A method for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, P, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Hg and Pb in castor oil after direct dilution with ethanol by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established. The sample was diluted by ethanol before ICP-MS determination. The condensation and deposition of high concentrations of carbon in mass cone interface and ion lens, which will decrease the sensitivity of element analysis, were avoided effectively by introducing O2 to plasma. The mass spectral interferences were eliminated by octopole reaction system (ORS). The matrix effects were calibrated to using Sc, Ge, Rh and Ir as internal standard elements. Au standard solution, which could form amalgam alloy with Hg, was dropped to eliminate the memory effect of Hg. The results show that the correlation coefficient for analyte is no less than 0.999 5, the detection limits is in the range of 0.06 - 20.1 ng x L(-1), the recovery is in the range of 990.4% - 110.2%, and the RSD is less than 4.8%. This method was very fast, simple and accurate to simultaneously analyze multi-elements in castor oil. PMID:26904837

  4. Miniaturized system of a gas chromatograph coupled with a Paul ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Miniature gas chromatography (GC) and miniature mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation has been developed to identify and quantify the chemical compounds present in complex mixtures of gases. The design approach utilizes micro-GC components coupled with a Paul quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Inherent to the system are high sensitivity, good dynamic range, good QIT resolution, low GC flow-rates to minimize vacuum requirements and the need for consumables; and the use of a modular approach to adapt to volatile organic compounds dissolved in water or present in sediment. Measurements are reported on system response to gaseous species at concentrations varying over four orders of magnitude. The ability of the system to deal with complicated mixtures is demonstrated, and future improvements are discussed. The GC/QIT system described herein has a mass, volume and power that are, conservatively, one-twentieth of those of commercial off-the-shelf systems. Potential applications are to spacecraft cabin-air monitoring, robotic planetary exploration and trace-species detection for residual gas analysis and environmental monitoring.

  5. Rapid and simultaneous determination of five vinca alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus and human serum using trilinear component modeling of liquid chromatography-diode array detection data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Wu, Hai-Long; Li, Yong; Gu, Hui-Wen; Yin, Xiao-Li; Xie, Li-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-07-15

    A novel chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography method coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was proposed for the simultaneous determination of vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VLB), vindoline (VDL), catharanthine (CAT) and yohimbine (YHB) in Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus) and human serum samples. With the second-order advantage of the alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) method, the resolution and rapid determination of five components of interest in complex matrices were performed, even in the present of heavy overlaps and unknown interferences. Therefore, multi-step purification was omitted and five components could be fast eluted out within 7.5min under simple isocratic elution condition (acetonitrile/0.2% formic acid water, 37:63, v/v). Statistical parameters, such as the linear correlation coefficient (R(2)), root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP), limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) had been calculated to investigate the accuracy and reliability of the method. The average recoveries of five vinca alkaloids ranged from 97.1% to 101.9% and 98.8% to 103.0% in C. roseus and human serum samples, respectively. The five vinca alkaloids were adequately determined with limits of detection (LODs) of 29.5-49.3ngmL(-1) in C. roseus and 12.4-27.2ngmL(-1) in human serum samples, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated that the analytical strategy provided a feasible alternative for synchronously monitoring the quality of raw herb and the concentration of blood drugs. PMID:26321366

  6. Association between Body Mass Index and Depressive Symptoms of African American Married Couples: Mediating and Moderating Roles of Couples' Behavioral Closeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickrama, Thulitha; Bryant, Chalandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined (a) associations between body mass index (BMI) and depressive symptoms in African American husbands and wives, (b) transactional associations between husbands and wives in this relationship, and (c) mediating and moderating role of couples' behavioral closeness in this association. Data came from a sample of 450 African…

  7. Breast mass segmentation in digital mammography based on pulse coupled neural network and level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Ma, Yide; Li, Yunsong

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach to mammographic image segmentation, termed as PCNN-based level set algorithm, is presented in this paper. Just as its name implies, a method based on pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) in conjunction with the variational level set method for medical image segmentation. To date, little work has been done on detecting the initial zero level set contours based on PCNN algorithm for latterly level set evolution. When all the pixels of the input image are fired by PCNN, the small pixel value will be a much more refined segmentation. In mammographic image, the breast tumor presents big pixel value. Additionally, the mammographic image with predominantly dark region, so that we firstly obtain the negative of mammographic image with predominantly dark region except the breast tumor before all the pixels of an input image are fired by PCNN. Therefore, in here, PCNN algorithm is employed to achieve mammary-specific, initial mass contour detection. After that, the initial contours are all extracted. We define the extracted contours as the initial zero level set contours for automatic mass segmentation by variational level set in mammographic image analysis. What's more, a new proposed algorithm improves external energy of variational level set method in terms of mammographic images in low contrast. In accordance with the gray scale of mass region in mammographic image is higher than the region surrounded, so the Laplace operator is used to modify external energy, which could make the bright spot becoming much brighter than the surrounded pixels in the image. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed method performs on a known public database namely MIAS, rather than synthetic images. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed approach can potentially obtain better masses detection results in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Ultimately, this algorithm could lead to increase both sensitivity and specificity of the physicians' interpretation of

  8. Assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, H.E.; Garbarino, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was conducted for selected analytes of importance in water quality applications and hydrologic research. A multielement calibration curve technique was designed to produce accurate and precise results in analysis times of approximately one minute. The suite of elements included Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn. The effects of sample matrix composition on the accuracy of the determinations showed that matrix elements (such as Na, Ca, Mg, and K) that may be present in natural water samples at concentration levels greater than 50 mg/L resulted in as much as a 10% suppression in ion current for analyte elements. Operational detection limits are presented.

  9. Determination of elemental content off rocks by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.

    1995-01-01

    A new method of analysis for rocks and soils is presented using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It is based on a lithium borate fusion and the free-running mode of a Nd/YAG laser. An Ar/N2 sample gas improves sensitivity 7 ?? for most elements. Sixty-three elements are characterized for the fusion, and 49 elements can be quantified. Internal standards and isotopic spikes ensure accurate results. Limits of detection are 0.01 ??g/g for many trace elements. Accuracy approaches 5% for all elements. A new quality assurance procedure is presented that uses fundamental parameters to test relative response factors for the calibration.

  10. Determination of mercury in fish samples by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Ming-Jyh; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Li, Yi-Ching

    1997-06-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of mercury in several fish samples. The effects of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals are reported. Palladium was used as modifier to delay the vaporization of mercury in this study. As the vaporization behavior of mercury in fish slurry and aqueous solution is quite different, the standard addition method was used for the determination of mercury in reference materials. The detection limit of mercury estimated from the standard addition curve was in the range 0.002-0.004 μg g -1 for different samples. This method has been applied to the determination of mercury in dogfish muscle reference material (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and dogfish liver reference material (DOLT-1). Accuracy was better than 4% and precision was better than 7% with the USS-ETV-ICP-MS method.

  11. Stable isotope dilution analysis of hydrologic samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Taylor, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is employed in the determination of Ni, Cu, Sr, Cd, Ba, Ti, and Pb in nonsaline, natural water samples by stable isotope dilution analysis. Hydrologic samples were directly analyzed without any unusual pretreatment. Interference effects related to overlapping isobars, formation of metal oxide and multiply charged ions, and matrix composition were identified and suitable methods of correction evaluated. A comparability study snowed that single-element isotope dilution analysis was only marginally better than sequential multielement isotope dilution analysis. Accuracy and precision of the single-element method were determined on the basis of results obtained for standard reference materials. The instrumental technique was shown to be ideally suited for programs associated with certification of standard reference materials.

  12. Multielement analysis of deep-sea sediments by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ning; Wu, Zhaohui; Guo, Dongfa; Yao, De

    2008-05-01

    Marine sediments were dissolved by HNO3-HF-HClO4 in a sealed container at low pressure; HF was evaporated in an open container and salts were dissolved in HCl by heating, then transferred to 2% HNO3 solution. A total of 45 elements, including Li, Be, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Cd, In, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th and U, were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Conditions and sample experiments showed that this procedure defines a good experimental method which has the advantages of clear interference, easy operation and reliable results. The concentrations of the 45 elements could be used for resource exploration, environmental assessment and academic research.

  13. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverková, Lenka; Hradilová, Šárka; Milde, David; Panáček, Aleš; Skopalová, Jana; Kvítek, Libor; Petrželová, Kamila; Zbořil, Radek

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2- and AgCl32 - for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results.

  14. Osmium isotopic ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.; Date, A.R.

    1987-04-01

    The isotopic composition of nanogram quantities of osmium was measured by using an inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometer. Sensitivity was enhanced a factor of approx.100 by the use of an osmium tetraoxide vapor generator rather than nebulization of solution. For samples less than or equal to5 ng, the ratios /sup 190/Os//sup 192/Os, /sup 189/Os//sup 192/Os, and /sup 188/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to better than +/- 0.5% (1sigma/sub m/) precision. For the minor isotopes, the ratios /sup 187/Os//sup 192/Os and /sup 186/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to +/-1%, and /sup 184/Os//sup 192/Os (4 x 10/sup -4/) was determined to approx.10%. Isotope ratios for common osmium are reported.

  15. Pulsed radio-frequency discharge inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for oxide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Yin, Zhibin; Hang, Wei; Li, Bin; Huang, Benli

    2016-08-01

    A direct solid sampling technique has been developed based on a pulsed radio-frequency discharge (RFD) in mixture of N2 and Ar environment at atmospheric pressure. With an averaged input power of 65 W, a crater with the diameter of 80 μm and depth of 50 μm can be formed on sample surface after discharge for 1 min, suggesting the feasibility of the pulsed RFD for sampling nonconductive solids. Combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), this technique allows to measure elemental composition of solids directly with relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~ 20%. Capability of quantitative analysis was demonstrated by the use of soil standards and artificial standards. Good calibration linearity and limits of detection (LODs) in range of 10- 8-10- 9 g/g were achieved for most elements.

  16. Phytochemical analysis of Hibiscus caesius using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ain, Quratul; Naveed, Muhammad Na; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad; Farman, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman

    2015-09-01

    Various species in genus Hibiscus are traditionally known for their therapeutic attributes. The present study focused on the phytochemical analysis of a rather unexplored species Hibiscus caesius (H. caesius), using high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The analysis revealed five major compounds in the aqueous extract, viz. vanillic acid, protocatechoic acid, quercetin, quercetin glucoside and apigenin, being reported for the first time in H. caesius. Literature suggests that these compounds have important pharmacological traits such as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and hepatoprotective etc. however, this requires further pharmacological investigations at in vitro and in vivo scale. The above study concluded the medicinal potential of H. caesius. PMID:26408882

  17. Unravelling plant molecular machineries through affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dedecker, Maarten; Van Leene, Jelle; De Jaeger, Geert

    2015-04-01

    Rather than functioning independently, proteins tend to work in concert with each other and with other macromolecules to form macromolecular complexes. Affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) can lead to a better understanding of the cellular functions of these complexes. With the development of easy purification protocols and ultra-sensitive MS, AP-MS is currently widely used for screening co-complex membership in plants. Studying complexes in their developmental context through the isolation of specific organs and tissues has now become feasible. Besides, the tagged protein can be employed for probing other interactions like protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions. With the tools at hand, protein-centred interaction studies will greatly improve our knowledge of how plant cells wire their functional components in relation to their function. PMID:25603557

  18. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  19. Heavy metals in aromatic spices by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bua, Daniel Giuseppe; Annuario, Giovanni; Albergamo, Ambrogina; Cicero, Nicola; Dugo, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Objective of this study was to determine the content of Cd, Hg, As and Pb in common spices traded in the Italian market, using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results were compared with the maximum limits established by the national Legislative Decree (LD) no. 107 implementing the Council Directive 88/388/EEC and by international organisations, such as Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO). Food safety for spices was assessed considering the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) and the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), respectively, for Cd and Hg and the 95% lower confidence limit of the benchmark dose of 1% extra risk (BMDL01) for As and Pb. Investigated elements in all samples were within the maximum limits as set by the national and international normative institutions. Nevertheless, the heavy metal content of some spices exceeded the PTWI, TWI and BMDL01, which needs attention when considering consumer's health. PMID:27074712

  20. Detection of Amadori compounds by capillary electrophoresis coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hau, Jörg; Devaud, Stéphanie; Blank, Imre

    2004-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is reported for the first time as an alternative and powerful analytical method for the characterization and monitoring of N-substituted 1-amino-1-deoxyketoses (Amadori compounds). It allows rapid separation and identification of Amadori compounds, while benefiting from the well-known advantages of MS, such as specificity and sensitivity. Amadori compounds of several amino acids, such as glycine, valine, isoleucine, methionine, proline, and phenylalanine, as well as a cysteine-derived compound, were separated and/or discriminated using CE-MS/MS under standard conditions. The technique may also be useful to study the stability and degradation kinetics of other labile charged Maillard intermediates that play an important role in food and medical science. PMID:15237408

  1. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma. PMID:14611049

  2. Combinatorial Library Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Valuable Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia A; Giudicessi, Silvana L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Saavedra, Soledad L; Acosta, Gerardo; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial library screening coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is a practical approach to identify useful peptides. Cyclic peptides can have high biological activity, selectivity, and affinity for target proteins, and high stability against proteolytic degradation. Here we describe two strategies to prepare combinatorial libraries suitable for MS analysis to accelerate the discovery of cyclic peptide structures. Both approaches use ChemMatrix resin and the linker 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid. One strategy involves the synthesis of a one-bead-two-peptides library in which each bead contains both the cyclic peptide and its linear counterpart to facilitate MS analysis. The other protocol is based on the synthesis of a cyclic depsipeptide library in which a glycolamidic ester group is incorporated by adding glycolic acid. After library screening, the ring is opened and the peptide is released simultaneously for subsequent MS analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27258690

  3. Sulfur analysis by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner Martínez-Sierra, J.; Galilea San Blas, O.; Marchante Gayón, J. M.; García Alonso, J. I.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years the number of applications of sulfur (S) analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as detector has increased significantly. In this article we describe in some depth the application of ICP-MS for S analysis with emphasis placed on the sulfur-specific detection by hyphenated techniques such as LC, GC, CE and LA coupled on-line to ICP-MS. The different approaches available for sulfur isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS are also detailed. Particular attention has been paid to the quantification of peptides/proteins and the analysis of metallopeptides/metalloproteins via sulfur by LC-ICP-MS. Likewise, the speciation analysis of metal-based pharmaceuticals and metallodrugs and non-metal selective detection of pharmaceuticals via S are highlighted. Labeling procedures for metabolic applications are also included. Finally, the measurement of natural variations in S isotope composition with multicollector ICP-MS instruments is also covered in this review.

  4. Determination of the rare-earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.; Meier, A.L.; Crock, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A method of analysis of geological materials for the determination of the rare-earth elements using the Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric technique (ICP-MS) has been developed. Instrumental parameters and factors affecting analytical results have been first studied and then optimized. Samples are analyzed directly following an acid digestion, without the need for separation or preconcentration with limits of detection of 2-11 ng/g, precision of ?? 2.5% relative standard deviation, and accuracy comparable to inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis. A commercially available ICP-MS instrument is used with modifications to the sample introduction system, torch, and sampler orifice to reduce the effects of high salt content of sample solutions prepared from geologic materials. Corrections for isobaric interferences from oxide ions and other diatomic and triatomic ions are made mathematically. Special internal standard procedures are used to compensate for drift in metahmetal oxide ratios and sensitivity. Reference standard values are used to verify the accuracy and utility of the method.

  5. Rapid determination of uranium isotopes in urine by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Dai, X; Collins, R; Kramer-Tremblay, S

    2011-08-01

    Following a radiological or nuclear emergency involving uranium exposure, rapid analytical methods are needed to analyze the concentration of uranium isotopes in human urine samples for early dose assessment. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, with its high sample throughput and high sensitivity, has advantages over alpha spectrometry for uranium urinalysis after minimum sample preparation. In this work, a rapid sample preparation method using an anion exchange chromatographic column was developed to separate uranium from the urine matrix. A high-resolution sector field ICP-MS instrument, coupled with a high sensitivity desolvation sample introduction inlet, was used to determine uranium isotopes in the samples. The method can analyze up to 24 urine samples in two hours with the limits of detection of 0.0014, 0.10, and 2.0 pg mL(-1) for (234)U, (235)U, and (238)U, respectively, which meet the requirement for isotopic analysis of uranium in a radiation emergency. PMID:21709502

  6. Hydrogen measurement during steam oxidation using coupled thermogravimetric analysis and quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parkison, Adam J.; Nelson, Andrew Thomas

    2016-01-11

    An analytical technique is presented with the goal of measuring reaction kinetics during steam oxidation reactions for three cases in which obtaining kinetics information often requires a prohibitive amount of time and cost. The technique presented relies on coupling thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a quantitative hydrogen measurement technique using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The first case considered is in differentiating between the kinetics of steam oxidation reactions and those for simultaneously reacting gaseous impurities such as nitrogen or oxygen. The second case allows one to independently measure the kinetics of oxide and hydride formation for systems in which both ofmore » these reactions are known to take place during steam oxidation. The third case deals with measuring the kinetics of formation for competing volatile and non-volatile oxides during certain steam oxidation reactions. In order to meet the requirements of the coupled technique, a methodology is presented which attempts to provide quantitative measurement of hydrogen generation using QMS in the presence of an interfering fragmentation species, namely water vapor. This is achieved such that all calibrations and corrections are performed during the TGA baseline and steam oxidation programs, making system operation virtually identical to standard TGA. Benchmarking results showed a relative error in hydrogen measurement of 5.7–8.4% following the application of a correction factor. Lastly, suggestions are made for possible improvements to the presented technique so that it may be better applied to the three cases presented.« less

  7. Coupled motion of rigid bodies about their center of mass. [Shuttle/payload system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.; Donaldson, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Nontrivial analytical solutions for the coupled motion of two rigid bodies about their center of mass are obtained on the assumptions that the rigid bodies are coupled by a massless rigid boom and that no external forces are acting on the system. Both relative rotational and translational motions of the two bodies are considered. General equations of motion are derived by regarding the two bodies as consisting of two distinct systems of particles and by applying the principle of conservation of angular momentum. It is shown that a basic nontrivial solution can be obtained for the translational problem if an assumption is made concerning the relative orientation of one principal axis of inertia of each body and that fundamental nontrivial solutions are readily obtained for the rotational problem if an additional assumption is made with respect to the symmetry of one body. Certain stability criteria are found for some of these motions by defining regions of constraint for the relative translational and rotational elements.

  8. Determination of selenium urinary metabolites by high temperature liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terol, A; Ardini, F; Basso, A; Grotti, M

    2015-02-01

    The coupling of high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the determination of selenium metabolites in urine samples is reported for the first time. In order to achieve "ICPMS-friendly" chromatographic conditions, the retention on a graphite stationary phase of the major selenium urinary metabolites using only plain water with 2% methanol as the mobile phase was investigated. Under the optimal conditions (T=80°C, Ql=1.2 mL min(-1)), methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-seleno-β-d-galactopyranoside (selenosugar 1), methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-seleno-β-d-glucosopyranoside (selenosugar 2) and trimethylselenonium ion were efficiently separated in less than 7 min, without any interferences due to other common selenium species (selenite, selenate, selenocystine and selenomethionine) or detectable effect of the urine matrix. The limits of detection were 0.3-0.5 ng Se mL(-1), and the precision of the analytical procedure was better than 3% (RSD%, n=5). The HTLC-ICPMS method was applied to the analysis of urine samples from two volunteers before and after ingestion of Brazil nuts or selenium supplements. The developed procedure proved to be adequate for the analytical task, providing results consistent with previous studies. PMID:25582485

  9. THE COUPLED EVOLUTION OF ELECTRONS AND IONS IN CORONAL MASS EJECTION-DRIVEN SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Manchester IV, W. B.; Van der Holst, B.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2012-09-01

    We present simulations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) performed with a new two-temperature coronal model developed at the University of Michigan, which is able to address the coupled thermodynamics of the electron and proton populations in the context of a single fluid. This model employs heat conduction for electrons, constant adiabatic index ({gamma} = 5/3), and includes Alfven wave pressure to accelerate the solar wind. The Wang-Sheeley-Arge empirical model is used to determine the Alfven wave pressure necessary to produce the observed bimodal solar wind speed. The Alfven waves are dissipated as they propagate from the Sun and heat protons on open magnetic field lines to temperatures above 2 MK. The model is driven by empirical boundary conditions that includes GONG magnetogram data to calculate the coronal field, and STEREO/EUVI observations to specify the density and temperature at the coronal boundary by the Differential Emission Measure Tomography method. With this model, we simulate the propagation of fast CMEs and study the thermodynamics of CME-driven shocks. Since the thermal speed of the electrons greatly exceeds the speed of the CME, only protons are directly heated by the shock. Coulomb collisions low in the corona couple the protons and electrons allowing heat exchange between the two species. However, the coupling is so brief that the electrons never achieve more than 10% of the maximum temperature of the protons. We find that heat is able to conduct on open magnetic field lines and rapidly propagates ahead of the CME to form a shock precursor of hot electrons.

  10. Investigating accretion disk - radio jet coupling across the stellar mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Altamirano, Diego; Körding, Elmar G.; Krimm, Hans A.; Maitra, Dipankar; Remillard, Ron A.; Russell, David M.; Tudose, Valeriu; Dhawan, Vivek; Fender, Rob P.; Heinz, Sebastian; Markoff, Sera; Migliari, Simone; Rupen, Michael P.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    2011-02-01

    Relationships between the X-ray and radio behavior of black hole X-ray binaries during outbursts have established a fundamental coupling between the accretion disks and radio jets in these systems. I begin by reviewing the prevailing paradigm for this disk-jet coupling, also highlighting what we know about similarities and differences with neutron star and white dwarf binaries. Until recently, this paradigm had not been directly tested with dedicated high-angular resolution radio imaging over entire outbursts. Moreover, such high-resolution monitoring campaigns had not previously targetted outbursts in which the compact object was either a neutron star or a white dwarf. To address this issue, we have embarked on the Jet Acceleration and Collimation Probe Of Transient X-Ray Binaries (JACPOT XRB) project, which aims to use high angular resolution observations to compare disk-jet coupling across the stellar mass scale, with the goal of probing the importance of the depth of the gravitational potential well, the stellar surface and the stellar magnetic field, on jet formation. Our team has recently concluded its first monitoring series, including (E)VLA, VLBA, X-ray, optical, and near-infrared observations of entire outbursts of the black hole candidate H 1743-322, the neutron star system Aquila X-1, and the white dwarf system SS Cyg. Here I present preliminary results from this work, largely confirming the current paradigm, but highlighting some intriguing new behavior, and suggesting a possible difference in the jet formation process between neutron star and black hole systems.

  11. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that

  12. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  13. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to liquid and gas chromatography for wine ethanol characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabañero, Ana I; Recio, Jose L; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2008-10-01

    Two new procedures for wine ethanol 13C/12C isotope ratio determination, using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS and GC/IRMS), have been developed to improve isotopic methods dedicated to the study of wine authenticity. Parameters influencing separation of ethanol from wine matrix such as column, temperature, mobile phase, flow rates and injection mode were investigated. Twenty-three wine samples from various origins were analyzed for validation of the procedures. The analytical precision was better than 0.15 per thousand, and no significant isotopic fractionation was observed employing both separative techniques coupled to IRMS. No significant differences and a very strong correlation (r = 0.99) were observed between the 13C/12C ratios obtained by the official method (elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the proposed new methodology. The potential advantages of the developed methods over the traditional one are speed (reducing time required from hours to minutes) and simplicity. In addition, these are the first isotopic methods that allow 13C/12C determination directly from a liquid sample with no previous ethanol isolation, overcoming technical difficulties associated with sample treatment. PMID:18798196

  14. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  15. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  16. Highly sensitive immunoassay based on immunogold-silver amplification and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Xing; Tang, Yurong; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2011-03-15

    In this work, we demonstrated a highly sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) method for the determination of human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which combined the inherent high sensitivity of elemental mass spectrometric measurement with the signal amplification of catalytic silver deposition on immunogold tags. The silver amplification procedure was easy to handle and required cheap reagents, and the sensitivity was greatly enhanced to 60-fold after a 15 min silver amplification procedure. The experimental conditions, including detection of gold and silver by ICPMS, immunoassay parameters, silver amplification parameters, analytical performance, and clinical serum samples analysis, were investigated. The ICPMS Ag signal intensity depends linearly on the logarithm of the concentration of human CEA over the range of 0.07-1000 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection (LOD, 3σ) of 0.03 ng mL(-1) (i.e., 0.15 pM). The LOD of the proposed method is around 2 orders of magnitude lower than that by the widely used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and 1 order of magnitude lower than that by clinical routine chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) or time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) and conventional ICPMS immunoassay. The present strategy was applied to the determination of human CEA in clinical human serum samples, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescence immunoassay. PMID:21348438

  17. Toward a Human Blood Serum Proteome: Analysis by Multidimensional Separation Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.); Varnum, Susan M.); Auberry, Kenneth J.); Moore, Ronald J.); Angell, Nicolas; Smith, Richard D.); Springer, David L.); Pounds, Joel G.)

    2002-12-01

    Blood serum is a complex bodily fluid that contains proteins ranging in concentration over at least nine orders of magnitude. Using a combination of powerful mass spectrometry technologies with improvements in sample preparation, we have performed a proteomic analysis with sub-mL quantities of serum, and increased the measurable concentration range for proteins in blood serum beyond previous reports. We have detected 490 proteins in serum by online reversed-phase microcapillary liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry. To perform this analysis, immunoglobulins were removed from serum using protein A/G, and the remaining proteins were digested with trypsin. Resulting peptides were separated by strong-cation exchange chromatography into distinct fractions prior to analysis. This separation resulted in an increase in the number of proteins detected in an individual serum sample by 3 to 5 fold. With this increase in the number of proteins identified we have detected some lower abundance serum proteins (ng/mL range) including human growth hormone, interleukin-12, and prostate-specific antigen. We also used SEQUEST to compare different protein databases with and without filtering. This comparison is plotted to allow for a quick visual assessment of different databases, as a subjective measure of quality. With this study, we have performed the most extensive analysis of serum proteins to date and laid the foundation for future refinements in the identification of novel protein biomarkers of disease.

  18. Investigation of palladium and platinum levels in food by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Cammarone, Roberta; Caroli, Sergio

    2007-05-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been increased concern regarding the impact of some noble metals, such as Pd and Pt, on human health. These elements pollute the environment due to their widespread use as catalytic converters and in medical applications. The risk they pose to human health and the environment is still controversial; however, literature data point to diet as an important source of uptake by the human body. Within this context, the total Pd and Pt content of several Italian food commodities has been investigated. A total of 90 samples, including flour products, vegetables and foodstuffs of animal origin (meat, milk and eggs), were collected and freeze-dried. Samples were analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) after chopping or crushing followed by freeze-drying and microwave (MW)-assisted acid digestion in a Class-100 clean-room. A mathematical approach was adopted to correct the mass signals for still unresolved interference (mDeltam = 300, 10 000). The lowest and highest concentrations of Pt, i.e. 17 and 93 ng kg(-1) (dry weight, dw), were found in vegetables and flour products, respectively. The lowest Pd level (2830 ng kg(-1) dw) was found in eggs and the highest (47 800 ng kg(-1) dw) in vegetables. PMID:17487666

  19. Plutonium determination in seawater by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liguo; Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Knowing the concentration and isotopic ratio of Pu in seawater is of critical importance for assessing Pu contamination and investigating oceanic processes. In recent decades, the concentration of (239+240)Pu in seawater, particularly for surface seawater, has presented an exponential decreasing trend with time; thus determination of Pu in seawater has become a challenge nowadays. Here, we have summarized and critically discussed a variety of reported analytical methods for Pu determination in seawater sample based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analytical technique for rapid ultra-trace detection of Pu. Generally, pretreatments for seawater sample include co-precipitation, valence adjustment and chemical separation and purification procedures, all of which are comprehensively reviewed. Overall, the selected anion-exchange, extraction resins and operation condition are important for decontamination of interference from matrix elements and achieving satisfactory chemical yields. In addition, other mass spectrometric and radiometric detections are briefly addressed and compared with the focus on assessing ICP-MS. Finally, we discuss some issues and prospects in determination and application of Pu isotopes in seawater samples for future research. PMID:26946007

  20. A new sheathless electrospray interface for coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bendahl, Lars; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Olsen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    A simple laboratory-made sheathless electrospray interface for coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ion-trap mass spectrometry (CE/MS) was developed. The interface was machined in-house and it was designed to be freely interchangeable with the commercially available ionization sources for the mass spectrometer. Sharpened fused-silica capillaries were coated with nickel by a simple electrodeless plating procedure and were used as all-in-one columns/emitters. The electrodeless plating produced a 2-5- micro m thick smooth nickel layer that lasted for more than 8 h of continuous electrospraying. The performance of the CE/MS interface was examined by using four cationic imipramine derivatives as test substances. Relative detection limits were calculated on the basis of the extracted ion electrophorograms and were in the range 6-130 nmol/L, corresponding to absolute detection limits in the range of 20-400 amol. The system was applied for analysis of impurities in an impure imipramine N-oxide preparation, and two of the impurities could be identified on the basis of online-MS(MS) spectra recorded in scan-dependent mode. PMID:12478579

  1. Thin layer chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for direct analysis of raw samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Xin, Gui-zhong; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Conventional mass spectrometric analysis of raw samples commonly requires sample pretreatment and chromatographic separation using high performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography, which could be time-consuming and laborious. In this study, thin layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was developed for direct analysis of raw samples. The sorbent material of the TLC plate was found to be able to retain the interfering compounds and allow interested analytes to be extracted, ionized and detected by ESI-MS with much reduced matrix interference. Our results showed that this method could be effectively applied in direct analysis of samples containing common interfering compounds, e.g., salts and detergents, and rapid detection and quantitation of target analytes in raw samples. Offline and online separation and detection of different components in mixture samples, e.g., plant extracts, using TLC-ESI-MS were also demonstrated. Overall, this study revealed that TLC-ESI-MS could be a simple, rapid and efficient method for analysis of raw samples. PMID:26362806

  2. Analysis of Amadori compounds by high-performance cation exchange chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davidek, Tomas; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Devaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Fabien; Blank, Imre

    2005-01-01

    High-performance cation exchange chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry or electrochemical detection was found to be an efficient tool for analyzing Amadori compounds derived from hexose and pentose sugars. The method allows rapid separation and identification of Amadori compounds, while benefiting from the well-known advantages of mass spectrometry, such as specificity and sensitivity. Glucose- and xylose-derived Amadori compounds of several amino acids, such as glycine, alanine, valine, leucine/isoleucine, methionine, proline, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid, were separated or discriminated using this new method. The method is suitable for the analysis of both model reaction mixtures and food products. Fructosylglutamate was found to be the major Amadori compound in dried tomatoes (approximately 1.5 g/100 g) and fructosylproline in dried apricots (approximately 0.2 g/100 g). Reaction of xylose and glycine at 90 degrees C (pH 6) for 2 h showed rapid formation of xylulosylglycine (approximately 12 mol %, 15 min) followed by slow decrease over time. Analysis of pentose-derived Amadori compounds is shown for the first time, which represents a major breakthrough in studying occurrence, formation, and decomposition of these labile Maillard intermediates. PMID:15623289

  3. Characterization of natural water resources in Israel by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halicz, L.; Becker, J. S.; Pickhardt, C.; Gavrieli, I.; Burg, A.; Nishri, A.; Platzner, I. T.

    2006-03-01

    Analytical procedures are applied for the determination of plutonium, uranium and strontium concentration, their isotope ratios and the analysis of rare earth elements (REE) at trace and ultratrace level in natural Israeli water resources with relatively high matrix content (Na = 20-150 mg L-1, Mg = 20-50 mg L-1 and Ca = 40-100 mg L-1) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). To avoid matrix and clogging effects on the cones during mass spectrometric measurements and to analyze Pu and REE at extremely low concentration levels, separation procedures from matrices were applied. An extremely low Pu contamination of the Sea of Galilee was observed due to global nuclear fallout after the nuclear weapons test in the 1960s. The detection limit, for example, for 239Pu was found to be <10-19 g mL-1. For uranium a natural variation of the 234U/238U isotope ratios by a factor of up to 2 in comparison to the IUPAC table value was detected using ICP-MS. This paper discusses the application of double-focusing sector field ICP-MS with single and multiple ion collection as well as quadrupole-based ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) for the quantitative determination of REE, plutonium, uranium and strontium and their isotope ratios after analyte/matrix separation at trace and ultratrace levels in natural water.

  4. Studies of selenium and xenon in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, T.

    1994-07-27

    Since its development, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been a widely used analytical technique. ICP-MS offers low detection limits, easy determination of isotope ratios, and simple mass spectra from analyte elements. ICP-MS has been successfully employed for many applications including geological, environmental, biological, metallurgical, food, medical, and industrial. One specific application important to many areas of study involves elemental speciation by using ICP-MS as an element specific detector interfaced to liquid chromatography. Elemental speciation information is important and cannot be obtained by atomic spectrometric methods alone which measure only the total concentration of the element present. Part 1 of this study describes the speciation of selenium in human serum by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and detection by ICP-MS. Although ICP-MS has been widely sued, room for improvement still exists. Difficulties in ICP-MS include noise in the background, matrix effects, clogging of the sampling orifice with deposited solids, and spectral interference caused by polyatomic ions. Previous work has shown that the addition of xenon into the central channel of the ICP decreases polyatomic ion levels. In Part 2 of this work, a fundamental study involving the measurement of the excitation temperature is carried out to further understand xenon`s role in the reduction of polyatomic ions. 155 refs.

  5. Direct solid sampling of fire assay beads by spark ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoven, R. L.; Nam, Sang-Ho; Montaser, Akbar; Doughten, M. W.; Dorrzapf, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    A spark-based, solid-sampling cell is described for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The cell is devised for the direct sampling of gold and silver beads produced by the classical lead fire assay procedure. The sampler produces a solid aerosol composed of submicron-sized vapor condensates and small (< 2 μm) spherules. In contrast to solution nebulization, the mass spectrum for spark-ICP-MS is relatively free of interfering metal oxide, polyatomic, and multiply-charged ions. The measurement precision is 3% RSD for Pt, Pd, and Rh preconcentrated into fire assay beads, but is 6% RSD for Ir due to its heterogeneous distribution in a silver bead. Detection limits determined for Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ir in fire assay beads range from 0.6 μg/g (Pt) to 1.2 μg/g (Pd). Calibration curves for these elements are linear up to the highest concentration in the bead studied (2000 μg/g). The quantitative potential of the method is evaluated using the South African Reference Material (SARM-7) geologic standard.

  6. Controlled Dissolution of Surface Layers for Elemental Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Elizabeth Lorge

    2007-12-01

    Determining the composition of thin layers is increasingly important for a variety of industrial materials such as adhesives, coatings and microelectronics. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are some of the techniques that are currently employed for the direct analysis of the sample surface. Although these techniques do not suffer from the contamination problems that often plague sample dissolution studies, they do require matrix matched standards for quantification. Often, these standards are not readily available. Despite the costs of clean hoods, Teflon pipette tips and bottles, and pure acids, partial sample dissolution is the primary method used in the semiconductor industry to quantify surface impurities. Specifically, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) coupled to ICP-MS or total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides elemental information from the top most surface layers at detection sensitivities in the 10{sup 7}-10{sup 10}atoms/cm{sup 2} range. The ability to quantify with standard solutions is a main advantage of these techniques. Li and Houk applied a VPD-like technique to steel. The signal ratio of trace element to matrix element was used for quantification. Although controlled dissolution concentrations determined for some of the dissolved elements agreed with the certified values, concentrations determined for refractory elements (Ti, Nb and Ta) were too low. LA-ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements indicated that carbide grains distributed throughout the matrix were high in these refractory elements. These elements dissolved at a slower rate than the matrix element, Fe. If the analyte element is not removed at a rate similar to the matrix element a true representation of the

  7. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  8. The potential of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric detection for capillary electrophoretic analysis of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; Shah, Monika; Kannamkumarath, Sasi S; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2005-04-01

    In this work, the potential of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) coupled to capillary electrophoresis (CE) to determine organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) is demonstrated. Element specific detection of (31)P with ICP-MS is performed for the detection of OPPs. Three common OPPs, including glyphosate, glufosinate, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), were analyzed by CE-ICP-MS to demonstrate its applicability for the analysis of OPPs. The advantages of using ICP-MS with respect to other common detectors, such as flame photometric detection (FPD), for CE analysis of OPPs are shown. Additionally, different CE separation conditions were studied to achieve complete baseline separation of the pesticide compounds in short migration times. Two CE buffer systems were evaluated for the separation of OPPs using ICP-MS detection. A buffer solution containing 40 mmol.L(-1) ammonium acetate at pH 9.0 and an applied voltage of +20 kV were finally selected leading to a separation time of 10.0 min. Both migration time and area relative standard deviations (%RSD) were evaluated and their respective values were in the intervals of 1.1-3.3% and 2.7-5.3%. Detection limits obtained with the CE-ICP-MS system were in the range of 0.11-0.19 mg.L(-1) (as compound) yielding an enhancement of 130- to 230-fold with respect to FPD. The proposed methodology was finally applied for the determination of the OPPs mentioned above in natural river water samples. PMID:15765486

  9. Control of coupling mass balance error in a process-based numerical model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    A process-based numerical model of integrated surface-subsurface flow is analyzed in order to identify, track, and reduce the mass balance errors affiliated with the model's coupling scheme. The sources of coupling error include a surface-subsurface grid interface that requires node-to-cell and cell-to-node interpolation of exchange fluxes and ponding heads, and a sequential iterative time matching procedure that includes a time lag in these same exchange terms. Based on numerical experiments carried out for two synthetic test cases and for a complex drainage basin in northern Italy, it is shown that the coupling mass balance error increases during the flood recession limb when the rate of change in the fluxes exchanged between the surface and subsurface is highest. A dimensionless index that quantifies the degree of coupling and a saturated area index are introduced to monitor the sensitivity of the model to coupling error. Error reduction is achieved through improvements to the heuristic procedure used to control and adapt the time step interval and to the interpolation algorithm used to pass exchange variables from nodes to cells. The analysis presented illustrates the trade-offs between a flexible description of surface and subsurface flow processes and the numerical errors inherent in sequential iterative coupling with staggered nodal points at the land surface interface, and it reveals mitigation strategies that are applicable to all integrated models sharing this coupling and discretization approach.

  10. Characterization of a Second-generation Focal-plane Camera Coupled to an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mattauch-Herzog Geometry Mass Spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, G D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes, James H.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M BONNER.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2006-07-01

    A second-generation Faraday-strip array detector has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma Mattauch- Herzog geometry mass spectrograph, thereby offering simultaneous acquisition of a range of mass-to-charge ratios. The second-generation device incorporates narrower, more closely spaced collectors than the earlier system. Furthermore, the new camera can acquire signal on all collectors at a frequency greater than 2 kHz and has the ability to independently adjust the gain level of each collector. Each collector can also be reset independently. With these improvements, limits of detection in the hundreds of picograms per liter for metals in solution have been obtained. Some additional features, such as a broader linear dynamic range (over 7 orders of magnitude), greater resolving power (up to 600), and improved isotope ratio accuracy were attained. In addition, isotope ratio precision as low as 0.018% RSD was achieved.

  11. Coupling of a gas chromatograph to a simultaneous-detection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrograph for speciation of organohalide and organometallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, James H.; Schilling, G; Sperline, Roger; Denton, M Bonner B.; Young, Erick T.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-06-01

    A gas chromatograph (GC) has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma Mattauch-Herzog geometry mass spectrograph (ICP-MHMS) equipped with a novel detector array. In its current state of development the detector array, termed the focal plan camera (FPC), permits the simultaneous monitoring of up to 15 m/z values. A heated line was used to transfer the capillary-column effluent from the GC to the ICP torch, though due to instrument operating conditions, the transfer line was terminated 50 mm ahead of the ICP torch. Minimal tailing was observed, with the most severe effect seen for high-boiling analytes. With the coupling, absolute limits of detection are in the tens to hundreds of femtogram regime for organometallic species and in the single pictogram regime for halogenated hydrocarbons.

  12. Minimalist coupled evolution model for stellar X-ray activity, rotation, mass loss, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Owen, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Late-type main-sequence stars exhibit an X-ray to bolometric flux ratio that depends on {tilde{R}o}, the ratio of rotation period to convective turnover time, as {tilde{R}o}^{-ζ } with 2 ≤ ζ ≤ 3 for {tilde{R}o} > 0.13, but saturates with |ζ| < 0.2 for {tilde{R}o} < 0.13. Saturated stars are younger than unsaturated stars and show a broader spread of rotation rates and X-ray activity. The unsaturated stars have magnetic fields and rotation speeds that scale roughly with the square root of their age, though possibly flattening for stars older than the Sun. The connection between faster rotators, stronger fields, and higher activity has been established observationally, but a theory for the unified time-evolution of X-ray luminosity, rotation, magnetic field and mass loss that captures the above trends has been lacking. Here we derive a minimalist holistic framework for the time evolution of these quantities built from combining a Parker wind with new ingredients: (1) explicit sourcing of both the thermal energy launching the wind and the X-ray luminosity via dynamo produced magnetic fields; (2) explicit coupling of X-ray activity and mass-loss saturation to dynamo saturation (via magnetic helicity build-up and convection eddy shredding); (3) use of coronal equilibrium to determine how magnetic energy is divided into wind and X-ray contributions. For solar-type stars younger than the Sun, we infer conduction to be a subdominant power loss compared to X-rays and wind. For older stars, conduction is more important, possibly quenching the wind and reducing angular momentum loss. We focus on the time evolution for stars younger than the Sun, highlighting what is possible for further generalizations. Overall, the approach shows promise towards a unified explanation of all of the aforementioned observational trends.

  13. Environmental forensics in groundwater coupling passive sampling and high resolution mass spectrometry for screening.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Coralie; Coureau, Charlotte; Togola, Anne

    2016-09-01

    One of the difficulties encountered when monitoring groundwater quality is low and fluctuating concentration levels and complex mixtures of micropollutants, including emerging substances or transformation products. Combining passive sampling techniques with analysis by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) should improve environmental metrology. Passive samplers accumulate compounds during exposure, which improves the detection of organic compounds and integrates pollution fluctuations. The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) were used in this study to sequester polar to semi-polar compounds. The methodology described here improves our knowledge of environmental pollution by highlighting and identifying pertinent compounds to be monitored in groundwater. The advantage of combining these two approaches is demonstrated on two different sites impacted by agricultural and/or urban pollution sources where groundwater was sampled for several months. Grab and passive sampling were done and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-QTOF). Various data processing approaches were used (target, suspect and non-target screening). Target screening was based on research from compounds listed in a homemade database and suspect screening used a database compiled using literature data. The non-target screening was done using statistical tools such as principal components analysis (PCA) with direct connections between original chromatograms and ion intensity. Trend plots were used to highlight relevant compounds for their identification. The advantage of using POCIS to improve screening of polar organic compounds was demonstrated. Compounds undetected in water samples were detected with these tools. The subsequent data processing identified sentinel molecules, molecular clusters as compounds never revealed in these sampling sites, and molecular fingerprints. Samples were compared and multidimensional

  14. Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer – Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; John Olson; Tracy Houghton

    2013-06-01

    The INL made an assessment of the commercially available inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICPMS) for actinide analysis; emphasizing low detection limits for plutonium. INL scientists subsequently determined if plutonium was present on a swipe, at a 10 million atom decision level. This report describes the evaluation of ICPMS instruments and the operational testing of a new process for the dissolution, separation and analysis via ICPMS of swipes for plutonium and uranium. The swipe dissolution, plutonium and uranium isolation, separation and purification are wet chemistry methods following established procedures. The ICPMS is a commercially available multi-collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes five ion counting detectors operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a sample introduction system allowing for sample volumes of < 1 mL to be reproducibly injected into the instrument with minimal waste of the sample solution, while maximizing the useable signal. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at concentrations of 12 parts per quadrillion (ppq, fg/mL) and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples spiked onto swipes at the 10 million atom level. The measured limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3s) for 239Pu is 310,000 atoms based upon the instrument blank data. The limit of quantification (LOQ defined as 10 s) for 239Pu is 105,000 atoms. The measured limit of detection for 239Pu from the SRM 4350B spiked onto a swipe was 2.7 million atoms with the limit of quantification being 9.0 million atoms.

  15. Optimization of operating parameters for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Maryam; Lindner, Helmut; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2012-10-01

    An inductively coupled plasma, connected to a mass spectrometer interface, is computationally investigated. The effect of pressure behind the sampler, injector gas flow rate, auxiliary gas flow rate, and applied power is studied. There seems to be an optimum range of injector gas flow rate for each setup which guaranties the presence and also a proper length of the central channel in the torch. Moreover, our modeling results show that for any specific purpose, it is possible to control that either only the central gas flow passes through the sampler orifice or that it is accompanied by the auxiliary gas flow. It was also found that depending on geometry, the variation of outgoing gas flow rate is much less than the variation of the injector gas flow rate and this causes a slightly higher pressure inside the torch. The general effect of increasing the applied power is a rise in the plasma temperature, which results in a higher ionization in the coil region. However, the negative effect is reducing the length of the cool central channel which is important to transfer the sample substances to the sampler. Using a proper applied power can enhance the efficiency of the system. Indeed, by changing the gas path lines, the power can control which flow (i.e., only from injector gas or also from the auxiliary gas) goes to the sampler orifice. Finally, as also reported from experiments in literature, the pressure behind the sampler has no dramatic effect on the plasma characteristics.

  16. Suppression of seizures based on the multi-coupled neural mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuzhen; Ren, Kaili; Su, Fei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Wang, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological disorders, which affects approximately 1% of population in the world. In order to effectively control the seizures, we propose a novel control methodology, which combines the feedback linearization control (FLC) with the underlying mechanism of epilepsy, to achieve the suppression of seizures. The three coupled neural mass model is constructed to study the property of the electroencephalographs (EEGs). Meanwhile, with the model we research on the propagation of epileptiform waves and the synchronization of populations, which are taken as the foundation of our control method. Results show that the proposed approach not only yields excellent performances in clamping the pathological spiking patterns to the reference signals derived under the normal state but also achieves the normalization of the pathological parameter, where the parameters are estimated from EEGs with Unscented Kalman Filter. The specific contribution of this paper is to treat the epilepsy from its pathogenesis with the FLC, which provides critical theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of neurological disorders.

  17. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation metal ions release detection in the human mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, J.

    2002-06-01

    Presence of more dental alloys in oral cavity often causes pathological symptoms. Due to various and multi-faced symptomatology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the dentist. Metal ions released from alloys can cause subjective and objective symptoms in mouth. The aim of this study was detection of metal elements presence in saliva. There were 4 groups of examined persons: with intact teeth (15 individuals) with metallic restorations, pathological currents 5-30 (mu) A, multi-faced subjective symptomatology and uncharacteristic objective diagnosis (32 patients), with metallic restorations and no subjective symptoms (14 persons) and with metallic restorations, without pathological currents and with problems related to galvanism (13 patients). Presence of 14 metal elements was checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation. Nd:YAG laser detector was used. There were significant differences in content of silver, gold and mercury between persons with intact teeth and other three groups. There were no differences found between subjects with and without galvanic currents, and presence of subjective and objective symptoms.

  18. Determination of metals in marine species by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Karl X.; Swami, Kamal

    2007-10-01

    A microwave digestion method suitable for determination of multiple elements in marine species was developed, with the use of cold vapor atomic spectrometry for the detection of Hg, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for all of the other elements. An optimized reagent mixture composed of 2 ml of HNO 3, 2 ml of H 2O 2 and 0.3 ml of HF used in microwave digestion of about 0.15 g (dry weight) of sample was found to give the best overall recoveries of metals in two standard reference materials. In the oyster tissue standard reference material (SRM 1566b), recoveries of Na, Al, K, V, Co, Zn, Se, Sr, Ag, Cd, Ni, and Pb were between 90% and 110%; Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, As, and Ba recoveries were between 85% and 90%; Hg recovery was 81%; and Ca recovery was 64%. In a dogfish certified reference material (DORM-2), the recoveries of Al, Cr, Mn, Se, and Hg were between 90% and 110%; Ni, Cu, Zn, and As recoveries were about 85%; and Fe recovery was 112%. Method detection limits of the elements were established. Metal concentrations in flounder, scup, and blue crab samples collected from coastal locations around Long Island and in the Hudson River estuary were determined.

  19. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry applied to isotopic analysis of iron in human fecal matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, B.T.G.; Janghorbani, M.

    1986-06-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry combined with stable isotope dilution is applied to accurate isotopic analysis of human fecal matter for /sup 54/Fe and /sup 58/Fe. Argon plasma generated interferences are of minor concern. The interference from /sup 54/Cr can be corrected instrumentally, whereas /sup 58/Ni must be removed chemically. The ratio of the stable isotopes of interest can be measured routinely with a relative standard deviation of about 1%. The overall accuracy of the method for quantitative isotopic analyses is evaluated in Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1577a (Bovine Liver), fecal homogenate subsamples, and synthetic solutions of iron. For SRM 1577a, the respective comparisons are (..mu..g/g) 192.2 +/- 2.2 (present method) vs. 194 +/- 20 (certified value). For the fecal matrix, the present method yields (..mu..g/mL) 15.14 +/- 0.36 vs. 15.82 +/- 0.48 based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For an iron solution (250 ppm), replicate analyses yield the value of 245.4 +/- 1.5 ppm.

  20. Determination of cobalamins using capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S. A.; Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    2000-12-01

    The determination of cobalamins using capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS) was investigated. Both capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) modes of operation were studied. The optimal separation of four cobalamin species (cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin, methylcobalamin, and 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin) and a potentially harmful corrinoid analogue (cobinamide dicyanide) was obtained using CZE at a pH of 2.5. Both 20 mM phosphate and 20 mM formate buffers were used with success, although the formate buffer provided improved resolution. The CZE-ICP-MS method was used to quantify cyanocobalamin in a vitamin supplement and the analytical results were in good agreement (±5%) with values obtained by ICP-MS for total Co levels. The solution detection limits for cobalamins using CZE-ICP-MS were approximately 50 ng/ml. MEKC was found to be useful for the screening of vitamin preparations because it provided a rapid means of distinguishing cyanocobalamin (the form most commonly used in vitamin preparations) from free cobalt. The separation of free cobalt and cyanocobalamin using MEKC was achieved in less than 10 min.

  1. Determination of long-lived actinides in soil leachates by inductively coupled plasma: Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Smith, L.L.; Yaeger, J.S.; Alvarado, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    Inductively coupled plasma -- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to concurrently determine multiple long-lived (t{sub 1/2} > 10{sup 4} y) actinide isotopes in soil samples. Ultrasonic nebulization was found to maximize instrument sensitivity. Instrument detection limits for actinides in solution ranged from 50 mBq L{sup {minus}1} ({sup 239}Pu) to 2 {mu}Bq L{sup {minus}1} ({sup 235}U) Hydride adducts of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U interfered with the determinations of {sup 233}U and {sup 239} Pu; thus, extraction chromatography was, used to eliminate the sample matrix, concentrate the analytes, and separate uranium from the other actinides. Alpha spectrometric determinations of {sup 230}Th, {sup 239}Pu, and the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio in soil leachates compared well with ICP-MS determinations; however, there were some small systematic differences (ca. 10%) between ICP-MS and a-spectrometric determinations of {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U activities.

  2. Determination of Phytochelatins in Rice by Stable Isotope Labeling Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Cai, Wen-Jing; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-01

    A highly sensitive method was developed for the detection of phytochelatins (PCs) in rice by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. A pair of isotope-labeling reagents [ω-bromoacetonylquinolinium bromide (BQB) and BQB-d(7)] were used to label PCs in plant sample and standard PCs, respectively, and then combined prior to LC/MS analysis. The heavy labeled standards were used as the internal standards for quantitation to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in MS analysis. In addition, the ionization efficiency of PCs was greatly enhanced through the introduction of a permanent charged moiety of quaternary ammonium of BQB into PCs. The detection sensitivities of PCs upon BQB labeling improved by 14-750-fold, and therefore, PCs can be quantitated using only 5 mg of plant tissue. Furthermore, under cadmium (Cd) stress, we found that the contents of PCs in rice dramatically increased with the increased concentrations and treatment time of Cd. It was worth noting that PC5 was first identified and quantitated in rice tissues under Cd stress in the current study. Taken together, this IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS method demonstrated to be a promising strategy in detection of PCs in plants with high sensitivity and reliability. PMID:26073168

  3. High Resolution Studies of the Origins of Polyatomic Ions in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jill Wisnewski Ferguson

    2006-08-09

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is an atmospheric pressure ionization source. Traditionally, the plasma is sampled via a sampler cone. A supersonic jet develops behind the sampler, and this region is pumped down to a pressure of approximately one Torr. A skimmer cone is located inside this zone of silence to transmit ions into the mass spectrometer. The position of the sampler and skimmer cones relative to the initial radiation and normal analytical zones of the plasma is key to optimizing the useful analytical signal [1]. The ICP both atomizes and ionizes the sample. Polyatomic ions form through ion-molecule interactions either in the ICP or during ion extraction [l]. Common polyatomic ions that inhibit analysis include metal oxides (MO{sup +}), adducts with argon, the gas most commonly used to make up the plasma, and hydride species. While high resolution devices can separate many analytes from common interferences, this is done at great cost in ion transmission efficiency--a loss of 99% when using high versus low resolution on the same instrument [2]. Simple quadrupole devices, which make up the bulk of ICP-MS instruments in existence, do not present this option. Therefore, if the source of polyatomic interferences can be determined and then manipulated, this could potentially improve the figures of merit on all ICP-MS devices, not just the high resolution devices often utilized to study polyatomic interferences.

  4. Fundamental and methodological investigations for the improvement of elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass soectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Christopher Hysjulien

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies meant to improve the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS. The emission behavior of individual droplets and LA generated particles in an ICP is studied using a high-speed, high frame rate digital camera. Phenomena are observed during the ablation of silicate glass that would cause elemental fractionation during analysis by ICP-MS. Preliminary work for ICP torch developments specifically tailored for the improvement of LA sample introduction are presented. An abnormal scarcity of metal-argon polyatomic ions (MAr{sup +}) is observed during ICP-MS analysis. Evidence shows that MAr{sup +} ions are dissociated by collisions with background gas in a shockwave near the tip of the skimmer cone. Method development towards the improvement of LA-ICP-MS for environmental monitoring is described. A method is developed to trap small particles in a collodion matrix and analyze each particle individually by LA-ICP-MS.

  5. Determination of mercury in whole blood and urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fong, Bonnie Mei Wah; Siu, Tak Shing; Lee, Joseph Sai Kit; Tam, Sidney

    2007-06-01

    The conventional method for the determination of mercury in clinical samples is cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Sample digestion or pretreatment require large sample volume and long sample preparation time. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method developed in this study requires only 100 microL of sample with practically no preparation, except for dilution with diluent. Significant savings in sample volumes, reagents, technician time, and analysis time are realized. Among different types of diluents, the one containing acid, tert-butanol, and potassium dichromate gave the best results to remove the mercury memory effect. The interassay precisions for whole blood and urine were < 5% and < 8%, respectively, and the intra-assay precisions were < 3% and < 7%, respectively. The lower limits of detection were 0.13, 0.17, and 0.26 microg/L for aqueous standard, urine, and whole blood, respectively. The developed ICP-MS method correlated well with the atomic absorption method and can offer an alternative to the atomic absorption method for mercury analysis with less sample volume requirement as well as shorter analysis time. PMID:17579973

  6. Determination of metals in Brazilian soils by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rui M; dos Santos, Jéssica A; Silva, Jessee A S; do Prado, Thiago G; da Fonseca, Adriel Ferreira; Chaves, Eduardo S; Frescura, Vera L A

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of metals in Brazilian soil under no-tillage (NT) and an area under native vegetation (NV) was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The applied method was based on microwave-assisted acid digestion using HNO3, HCl, H2O2, and HF. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analyzing two certified reference materials (BCR-142 and RS-3). The relative standard deviation for all target elements was below 8% indicating an adequate precision and the limit of detection ranged from 0.03 μg g(-1) (Cd) to 24.0 μg g(-1) (Fe). The concentrations of Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn in the different layers (0-10, 10-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm) were determined in two types of soils, located in Paraná State in Brazil. The soil layers analysis revealed a different behavior of metals concentrations in soil samples under NT and NV. The obtained results showed a clear impact of anthropogenic action with respect to specific metals due to many years of uncontrolled application rates of limestone and phosphate fertilizers. PMID:26220781

  7. Using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for calibration transfer between environmental CRMs.

    PubMed

    Turk, G C; Yu, L L; Salit, M L; Guthrie, W F

    2001-06-01

    Multielement analyses of environmental reference materials have been performed using existing certified reference materials (CRMs) as calibration standards for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The analyses have been performed using a high-performance methodology that results in comparison measurement uncertainties that are significantly less than the uncertainties of the certified values of the calibration CRM. Consequently, the determined values have uncertainties that are very nearly equivalent to the uncertainties of the calibration CRM. Several uses of this calibration transfer are proposed, including, re-certification measurements of replacement CRMs, establishing traceability of one CRM to another, and demonstrating the equivalence of two CRMs. RM 8704, a river sediment, was analyzed using SRM 2704, Buffalo River Sediment, as the calibration standard. SRM 1632c, Trace Elements in Bituminous Coal, which is a replacement for SRM 1632b, was analyzed using SRM 1632b as the standard. SRM 1635, Trace Elements in Subbituminous Coal, was also analyzed using SRM 1632b as the standard. PMID:11451248

  8. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: An emerging method for analysis of long-lived radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.R.; Noyce, J.R.; Lardy, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a relatively new technique that can analyze for most of the elements in the periodic table at parts per billion (ng/mL) to parts per trillion (pg/mL). Already in use several years for trace analysis of stable isotopes, ICP-MS is becoming a powerful, complementary method to the counting of decay radiations for the analysis of radionuclides. Most radionuclides with half-lives longer than approximately 1x10{sup 3} years can be quantitatively detected on ICP-MS instruments that have an electrothermal vaporization unit for the injection of sample aliquants. Radionuclides with half-lives greater than approximately 1x10{sup 4} years can be measured routinely with greater sensitivity and more quickly by ICP-MS than by radiation counting. Examples from the literature of applying ICP-MS to radionuclides are the bioassay of uranium in urine, measurement of {sup 237}Np in soil and silt, and analysis for {sup 99}Tc in sea water, seaweed, and marine sediment. This paper discusses the instrumentation, advantages and limitations, and present and potential applications of ICP-MS for radionuclide measurements.

  9. Determination of plastic additives in packaging by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moreta, Cristina; Tena, María-Teresa

    2015-10-01

    A simple and sensitive analytical method for the determination of several plastic additives in multilayer packaging based on solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to variable wavelength (VWD) and time of flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) detectors is presented. The proposed method allows the simultaneous determination of fourteen additives belonging to different families such as antioxidants, slip agents and light stabilizers, as well as two oxidation products in only 9min. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity, matrix effect error, detection and quantification limits, repeatability and intermediate precision. The instrumental method showed satisfactory repeatability and intermediate precision at concentrations closed to LOQ with RSDs less than 7 and 20%, respectively, and LODs until 5000 times more sensitive than other GC-FID and HPLC-VWD methods previously reported. Also, focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) was optimized and evaluated to extract plastic additives from packaging. Extraction results obtained by FUSLE and SLE were compared to those obtained by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). All extraction methods showed excellent extraction efficiency for slip agents, however quantitative recovery of all analytes was achieved only by SLE with just 5ml of hexane for 10h. Finally, the selected method was applied to the analysis of packaging samples where erucamide, Irgafos 168, oxidized Irgafos 168, Irganox 1076 and Irganox 1010 were detected and quantified. PMID:26319625

  10. Toward Sensitive and Accurate Analysis of Antibody Biotherapeutics by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable methodological advances in the past decade have expanded the application of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of biotherapeutics. Currently, LC/MS represents a promising alternative or supplement to the traditional ligand binding assay (LBA) in the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicokinetic studies of protein drugs, owing to the rapid and cost-effective method development, high specificity and reproducibility, low sample consumption, the capacity of analyzing multiple targets in one analysis, and the fact that a validated method can be readily adapted across various matrices and species. While promising, technical challenges associated with sensitivity, sample preparation, method development, and quantitative accuracy need to be addressed to enable full utilization of LC/MS. This article introduces the rationale and technical challenges of LC/MS techniques in biotherapeutics analysis and summarizes recently developed strategies to alleviate these challenges. Applications of LC/MS techniques on quantification and characterization of antibody biotherapeutics are also discussed. We speculate that despite the highly attractive features of LC/MS, it will not fully replace traditional assays such as LBA in the foreseeable future; instead, the forthcoming trend is likely the conjunction of biochemical techniques with versatile LC/MS approaches to achieve accurate, sensitive, and unbiased characterization of biotherapeutics in highly complex pharmaceutical/biologic matrices. Such combinations will constitute powerful tools to tackle the challenges posed by the rapidly growing needs for biotherapeutics development. PMID:25185260