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Sample records for massive protostellar core

  1. Deuterium Fractionation and Ionization Degree in Massive Protostellar/cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a survey of deuterium fractionation of N2H+, RD (N2H+) ≡ N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), with the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) to assess the use of RD (N2H+) as an evolutionary tracer among massive protostellar/cluster cores in early stages. Our sample includes 32 dense cores in various evolutionary stages, from high-mass starless cores (HMSCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), to ultra-compact (UC) HII regions, in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and high infrared extinction clouds. The results show a decreasing trend in deuterium fractionation with evolutionary stage traced by gas temperature and line width (Fig. 1). A moderate increasing trend of deuterium fractionation with the CO depletion factor is also found among cores in IRDCs and HMSCs. These suggest a general chemical behavior of deuterated species in low- and high-mass protostellar candidates. Upper limits to the ionization degree are also estimated to be in the range of 4 × 10-8 - 5 × 10-6.

  2. DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PROBE IN MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR/CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huei-Ru; Wang, Mei-Yan; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2011-12-20

    Clouds of high infrared extinction are promising sites of massive star/cluster formation. A large number of cloud cores discovered in recent years allow for the investigation of a possible evolutionary sequence among cores in early phases. We have conducted a survey of deuterium fractionation toward 15 dense cores in various evolutionary stages, from high-mass starless cores to ultracompact H II regions, in the massive star-forming clouds of high extinction, G34.43+0.24, IRAS 18151-1208, and IRAS 18223-1243, with the Submillimeter Telescope. Spectra of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (3-2), N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3-2), and C{sup 18}O (2-1) were observed to derive the deuterium fractionation of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, D{sub frac} {identical_to} N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), as well as the CO depletion factor for every selected core. Our results show a decreasing trend in D{sub frac} with both gas temperature and line width. Since colder and quiescent gas is likely to be associated with less evolved cores, larger D{sub frac} appears to correlate with early phases of core evolution. Such decreasing trend resembles the behavior of D{sub frac} in the low-mass protostellar cores and is consistent with several earlier studies in high-mass protostellar cores. We also find a moderate increasing trend of D{sub frac} with the CO depletion factor, suggesting that sublimation of ice mantles alters the competition in the chemical reactions and reduces D{sub frac}. Our findings suggest a general chemical behavior of deuterated species in both low- and high-mass protostellar candidates at early stages. In addition, upper limits to the ionization degree are estimated to be within 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} and 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}. The four quiescent cores have marginal field-neutral coupling and perhaps favor turbulent cooling flows.

  3. A BIPOLAR OUTFLOW FROM THE MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CORE W51e2-E

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hil@nao.cas.c

    2010-08-01

    We present high-resolution images of the bipolar outflow from W51e2, which are produced from the Submillimeter Array archival data observed for CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) lines with angular resolutions of 0.''8 x 0.''6 and 0.''3 x 0.''2, respectively. The images show that the powerful outflow originates from the protostellar core W51e2-E rather than from the ultracompact H II region W51e2-W. The kinematic timescale of the outflow from W51e2-E is about 1000 yr, younger than the age ({approx}5000 yr) of the ultracompact H II region W51e2-W. A large mass-loss rate of {approx}1 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a high mechanical power of 120 L{sub sun} are inferred, suggesting that an O star or a cluster of B stars are forming in W51e2-E. The observed outflow activity along with the inferred large accretion rate indicates that at present W51e2-E is in a rapid phase of star formation.

  4. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: PROTOSTELLAR CORE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Hori, Yasunori; Saigo, Kazuya; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.jp E-mail: okuzumi@nagoya-u.jp

    2013-01-20

    We report the first three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of protostellar collapse with and without Ohmic dissipation. We take into account many physical processes required to study star formation processes, including a realistic equation of state. We follow the evolution from molecular cloud cores until protostellar cores are formed with sufficiently high resolutions without introducing a sink particle. The physical processes involved in the simulations and adopted numerical methods are described in detail. We can calculate only about one year after the formation of the protostellar cores with our direct three-dimensional RMHD simulations because of the extremely short timescale in the deep interior of the formed protostellar cores, but successfully describe the early phase of star formation processes. The thermal evolution and the structure of the first and second (protostellar) cores are consistent with previous one-dimensional simulations using full radiation transfer, but differ considerably from preceding multi-dimensional studies with the barotropic approximation. The protostellar cores evolve virtually spherically symmetric in the ideal MHD models because of efficient angular momentum transport by magnetic fields, but Ohmic dissipation enables the formation of the circumstellar disks in the vicinity of the protostellar cores as in previous MHD studies with the barotropic approximation. The formed disks are still small (less than 0.35 AU) because we simulate only the earliest evolution. We also confirm that two different types of outflows are naturally launched by magnetic fields from the first cores and protostellar cores in the resistive MHD models.

  5. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2015-02-20

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass.

  6. From Prestellar to Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Yuri; Wakelam, Valentine; Hersant, Franck; Garrod, Robin; Herbst, Eric

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the molecular evolution and D/H abundance ratios that develop as star formation proceeds from dense cloud cores to protostellar cores. We solve a gas-grain reaction network, which is extended to include multi-deuterated species, using a 1-D radiative hydrodynamic model with infalling fluid parcels to derive molecular distribution in assorted evolutionary stages. We find that the abundances of large organic species in the central region increase with time. The duration of the warm-up phase, in which large organic species are efficiently formed, is longer in infalling fluid parcels at later stages. Formation of unsaturated carbon chains in the CH4 sublimation zone (warm carbon chain chemistry) is more effective in later stage. The carbon ion, which reacts with CH4 to form carbon chains, increases in abundance as the envelope density decreases. The large organic molecules and carbon chains are both heavily deuterated, mainly because their mother molecules have high D/H ratios, which are set in the cold phase. The observed CH2DOH/CH3OH ratio towards protostars is reproduced if we assume that the grain-surface exchange and abstraction reactions of CH3OH + D occurs efficiently. In our 1-D collapse model, the fluid parcels directly fall into the protostar, and the warm-up phase in the fluid parcels is rather short. But, in reality, a circumstellar disk is formed, and fluid parcels will stay there for a longer timescale than a free-fall time. We investigate the molecular evolution in such a disk by assuming that a fluid parcel stays at a constant temperature (i.e. a fixed disk radius) after the infall. The species CH3OCH3 and HCOOCH3 become more abundant in the disk than in the envelope. Both have high D/H abundance ratios as well.

  7. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HEATING IN A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Zhang Qizhou; Li Huabai

    2012-02-15

    The dense molecular clump P1 in the infrared dark cloud complex G28.34+0.06 harbors a massive protostellar cluster at its extreme youth. Our previous Submillimeter Array observations revealed several jet-like CO outflows emanating from the protostars, indicative of intense accretion and potential interaction with ambient natal materials. Here, we present the Expanded Very Large Array spectral line observations toward P1 in the NH{sub 3} (J,K) = (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines, as well as H{sub 2}O and class I CH{sub 3}OH masers. Multiple NH{sub 3} transitions reveal the heated gas widely spread in the 1 pc clump. The temperature distribution is highly structured; the heated gas is offset from the protostars, and morphologically matches the outflows very well. Hot spots of spatially compact, spectrally broad NH{sub 3} (3,3) emission features are also found coincident with the outflows. A weak NH{sub 3} (3,3) maser is discovered at the interface between an outflow jet and the ambient gas. These findings suggest that protostellar heating may not be effective in suppressing fragmentation during the formation of massive cores.

  8. Molecular Line Emission from Massive Protostellar Disks: Predictions for ALMA and the EVLA

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2007-05-07

    We compute the molecular line emission of massive protostellar disks by solving the equation of radiative transfer through the cores and disks produced by the recent radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of Krumholz, Klein, & McKee. We find that in several representative lines the disks show brightness temperatures of hundreds of Kelvin over velocity channels {approx} 10 km s{sup -1} wide, extending over regions hundreds of AU in size. We process the computed intensities to model the performance of next-generation radio and submillimeter telescopes. Our calculations show that observations using facilities such as the EVLA and ALMA should be able to detect massive protostellar disks and measure their rotation curves, at least in the nearest massive star-forming regions. They should also detect significant sub-structure and non-axisymmetry in the disks, and in some cases may be able to detect star-disk velocity offsets of a few km s{sup -1}, both of which are the result of strong gravitational instability in massive disks. We use our simulations to explore the strengths and weaknesses of different observational techniques, and we also discuss how observations of massive protostellar disks may be used to distinguish between alternative models of massive star formation.

  9. Clarifying Massive Protostellar Evolution and Circumstellar Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indebetouw, Remy; Brogan, Crystal; Hoare, Melvin; Lumsden, Stuart; Robitaille, Thomas; Sewilo, Marta; Urquhart, James; Viti, Serena; Whitney, Barbara

    2008-03-01

    Massive stars dominate the evolution of galaxies and even as protostars, their feedback can affect their own formation and that of their host clusters. We propose a systematic study of massive protostars through the stages of their early evolution, to derive a clearer evolutionary sequence and a better link between the state of the central source and physical conditions in circumstellar material. This experiment will improve over existing work by careful source selection to systematically span evolutionary parameter space, resulting in a more uniform and comprehensive sample. Sophisticated radiative transfer, ionization, and chemical modeling will be used to extract the full riches of each IRS spectrum and find trends in how massive stars form and process their natal material: We will be able to determine the temperature, density, and chemical state (heating history) of circumstellar dust and ice in the accretion disk and envelope, and at later evolutionary stages the ionizing and soft (PAH-exciting) ultraviolet radiation emitted by the protostars and how that radiation is quenched and shadowed by circumstellar material. This investigation is the key to realizing the full potential of previous infrared imaging surveys like MSX and Spitzer's GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL to study massive star formation. These surveys have provided a basis for us to select a large relatively unbiased sample spanning evolutionary state. In return, revealing the spectroscopic signature of massive YSOs will greatly clarify the modeling and interpretation of the thousands of other protostars in these imaging survey data.

  10. Probing Pre-Protostellar Cores with Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. E.; Lee, J.-E.; Evans, N. J., II; Goldsmith, P. F.; Doty, S. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present maps of the 6 cm and 1.3 mm transitions of H2CO toward three cold, dense pre-protostellar cores: L1498, L1512, and L1544. The 6 cm transition is uniquely suited to probe high density gas at low temperature. Our models indicate that H2CO is depleted in the interiors of PPCs. Depletion significantly affects how H2CO probes the earliest stages of star formation. Multi-stage, self-consistent models, including gas--dust energetics, of both H2CO transitions are presented, and the implications of the results discussed. This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the Research Corporation.

  11. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulations of Massive Star Formation with Protostellar Outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A J; Klein, R I; Krumholz, M R; McKee, C F

    2011-03-02

    We report the results of a series of AMR radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of massive star forming clouds using the ORION code. These simulations are the first to include the feedback effects protostellar outflows, as well as protostellar radiative heating and radiation pressure exerted on the infalling, dusty gas. We find that that outflows evacuate polar cavities of reduced optical depth through the ambient core. These enhance the radiative flux in the poleward direction so that it is 1.7 to 15 times larger than that in the midplane. As a result the radiative heating and outward radiation force exerted on the protostellar disk and infalling cloud gas in the equatorial direction are greatly diminished. The simultaneously reduces the Eddington radiation pressure barrier to high-mass star formation and increases the minimum threshold surface density for radiative heating to suppress fragmentation compared to models that do not include outflows. The strength of both these effects depends on the initial core surface density. Lower surface density cores have longer free-fall times and thus massive stars formed within them undergo more Kelvin contraction as the core collapses, leading to more powerful outflows. Furthermore, in lower surface density clouds the ratio of the time required for the outflow to break out of the core to the core free-fall time is smaller, so that these clouds are consequently influenced by outflows at earlier stages of collapse. As a result, outflow effects are strongest in low surface density cores and weakest in high surface density one. We also find that radiation focusing in the direction of outflow cavities is sufficient to prevent the formation of radiation pressure-supported circumstellar gas bubbles, in contrast to models which neglect protostellar outflow feedback.

  12. Radiation-hydrodynamic Simulations of Massive Star Formation with Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Klein, Richard I.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-10-01

    We report the results of a series of adaptive mesh refinement radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of massive star-forming clouds using the ORION code. These simulations are the first to include the feedback effects protostellar outflows, as well as protostellar radiative heating and radiation pressure exerted on the infalling, dusty gas. We find that outflows evacuate polar cavities of reduced optical depth through the ambient core. These enhance the radiative flux in the poleward direction so that it is 1.7-15 times larger than that in the midplane. As a result the radiative heating and outward radiation force exerted on the protostellar disk and infalling cloud gas in the equatorial direction are greatly diminished. This simultaneously reduces the Eddington radiation pressure barrier to high-mass star formation and increases the minimum threshold surface density for radiative heating to suppress fragmentation compared to models that do not include outflows. The strength of both these effects depends on the initial core surface density. Lower surface density cores have longer free-fall times and thus massive stars formed within them undergo more Kelvin contraction as the core collapses, leading to more powerful outflows. Furthermore, in lower surface density clouds the ratio of the time required for the outflow to break out of the core to the core free-fall time is smaller, so that these clouds are consequently influenced by outflows at earlier stages of the collapse. As a result, outflow effects are strongest in low surface density cores and weakest in high surface density ones. We also find that radiation focusing in the direction of outflow cavities is sufficient to prevent the formation of radiation pressure-supported circumstellar gas bubbles, in contrast to models which neglect protostellar outflow feedback.

  13. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VIII - Inner core formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a variety of spherically symmetric one-dimensional (1D) calculations intended to determine the robustness of the dynamical hiccup phenomenon in protostellar cores. The 1D models show that the phenomenon is relatively insensitive to changes in the equations of state, numerical resolution, initial density and temperature, and the radiative transfer approximation. In 1D, the hiccup results in an explosive destruction of the entire inner protostellar core. Inner core formation is studied with a sequence of three-dimensional models which show that rapid inner core rotation stabilizes the hiccup instability. Instead, the inner core becomes quite flat and undergoes a cycle of binary fragmentation, binary decay into a single object surrounded by a bar, breakup of the bar into a binary, etc. When lesser amounts of rotation are involved, the inner core does hiccup somewhat, but mass is ejected in only a few directions, leading to several broad streams of ejecta.

  14. Spatial Distribution of Small Organics in Prestellar and Protostellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waalkes, William; Guzman, Viviana; Oberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    In the interstellar medium, formaldehyde (H2CO) has efficient formation pathways in both the gas-phase and on the surfaces of dust grains. Methanol (CH3OH), on the other hand, is believed to form exclusively on grains as there are no efficient gas-phase reactions leading to CH3OH. We present observations taken with the IRAM 30m telescope of several H2CO and CH3OH lines in a prestellar and protostellar core. We investigated the formation pathways of H2CO and CH3OH by comparing their spatial distributions. We find that in the prestellar core, the two species are anti-correlated in the densest region, while their emission is correlated in the low-density region. In contrast, for the protostellar core we find a correlation in the distribution of both species. We conclude that in the protostellar source, H2CO and CH3OH form together on grains and have been thermally desorbed due to the central newly formed star. In the prestellar core, however, CH3OH forms on the ices and remains depleted in the coldest regions, while H2CO can form efficiently in the gas-phase. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  15. Young stars and protostellar cores near NGC 2023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Sandell, G.; Jarrett, T. H.; McMullin, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Context: We investigate the young (proto)stellar population in NGC 2023 and the L 1630 molecular cloud bordering the h ii region IC 434, using Spitzer IRAC and MIPS archive data, JCMT SCUBA imaging and spectroscopy as well as targeted BIMA observations of one of the Class 0 protostars, NGC 2023 MM 1. Aims: We study the distribution of gas, dust and young stars in this region to see where stars are forming, whether the expansion of the h ii region has triggered star formation, and whether dense cold cores have already formed stars. Methods: We have performed photometry of all IRAC and MIPS images, and used color-color diagrams to identify and classify all young stars seen within a 22'×26' field along the boundary between IC 434 and L 1630. For some stars, which have sufficient optical, IR, and/or sub-millimeter data we have also used the online SED fitting tool for a large 2D archive of axisymmetric radiative transfer models to perform more detailed modeling of the observed SEDs. We identify 5 sub-millimeter cores in our 850 and 450 μm SCUBA images, two of which have embedded class 0 or I protostars. Observations with BIMA are used to refine the position and characteristics of the Class 0 source NGC 2023 MM 1. These observations show that it is embedded in a very cold cloud core, which is strongly enhanced in NH2D. Results: We find that HD 37903 is the most massive member of a cluster with 20-30 PMS stars. We also find smaller groups of PMS stars formed from the Horsehead nebula and another elephant trunk structure to the north of the Horsehead. Star formation is also occurring in the dark lane seen in IRAC images and in the sub-millimeter continuum. We refine the spectral classification of HD 37903 to B2 Ve. We find that the star has a clear IR excess, and therefore it is a young Herbig Be star. Conclusions: Our study shows that the expansion of the IC 434 h ii region has triggered star formation in some of the dense elephant trunk structures and compressed gas

  16. MISALIGNMENT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND OUTFLOWS IN PROTOSTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Heiles, Carl; Meredith Hughes, A.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Jameson, Katherine; Mundy, Lee; Pound, Marc W.; Carpenter, John M.; Lamb, James W.; Pillai, Thushara; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W.; Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica; Houde, Martin; Matthews, Brenda C.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We present results of {lambda}1.3 mm dust-polarization observations toward 16 nearby, low-mass protostars, mapped with {approx}2.''5 resolution at CARMA. The results show that magnetic fields in protostellar cores on scales of {approx}1000 AU are not tightly aligned with outflows from the protostars. Rather, the data are consistent with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular), or where they are randomly aligned. If one assumes that outflows emerge along the rotation axes of circumstellar disks, and that the outflows have not disrupted the fields in the surrounding material, then our results imply that the disks are not aligned with the fields in the cores from which they formed.

  17. Evolutionary status of the pre-protostellar core L1498

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B.; Langer, W. D.; Velusamy, T.; Levin, S. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    L1498 is a classic example of a dense cold pre-protostellar core. To study the evolutionary status, the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of this core we have obtained high spatial and high spectral resolution observations of molecules tracing densities of 10(3)-10(5) cm-3. We observed CCS, NH3, C3H2, and HC7N with NASA's DSN 70 m antennas. We also present large-scale maps of C18O and 13CO observed with the AT&T 7 m antenna. For the high spatial resolution maps of selected regions within the core we used the VLA for CCS at 22 GHz, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) MMA for CCS at 94 GHz and CS (2-1). The 22 GHz CCS emission marks a high-density [n(H2) > 10(4) cm -3] core, which is elongated with a major axis along the SE-NW direction. NH3 and C3H2 emissions are located inside the boundary of the CCS emission. C18O emission traces a lower density gas extending beyond the CCS boundary. Along the major axis of the dense core, CCS, NH3 and C3H2 emission show evidence of limb brightening. The observations are consistent with a chemically differentiated onion-shell structure for the L1498 core, with NH3 in the inner and CCS in the outer parts of the core. The high angular resolution (9"-12") spectral line maps obtained by combining NASA Goldstone 70 m and VLA data resolve the CCS 22 GHz emission in the southeast and northwest boundaries into arclike enhancements, supporting the picture that CCS emission originates in a shell outside the NH3 emitting region. Interferometric maps of CCS at 94 GHz and CS at 98 GHz show that their emitting regions contain several small-scale dense condensations. We suggest that the differences between the CCS, CS, C3H2, and NH3 emission are caused by a time-dependent effect as the core evolves slowly. We interpret the chemical and physical properties of L1498 in terms of a quasi-static (or slowly contracting) dense core in which the outer envelope is still growing. The growth rate of the core is determined by the

  18. Evolutionary status of the pre-protostellar core L1498.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, T B; Langer, W D; Velusamy, T

    1996-09-10

    L1498 is a classic example of a dense cold pre-protostellar core. To study the evolutionary status, the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of this core we have obtained high spatial and high spectral resolution observations of molecules tracing densities of 10(3)-10(5) cm-3. We observed CCS, NH3, C3H2, and HC7N with NASA's DSN 70 m antennas. We also present large-scale maps of C18O and 13CO observed with the AT&T 7 m antenna. For the high spatial resolution maps of selected regions within the core we used the VLA for CCS at 22 GHz, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) MMA for CCS at 94 GHz and CS (2-1). The 22 GHz CCS emission marks a high-density [n(H2) > 10(4) cm -3] core, which is elongated with a major axis along the SE-NW direction. NH3 and C3H2 emissions are located inside the boundary of the CCS emission. C18O emission traces a lower density gas extending beyond the CCS boundary. Along the major axis of the dense core, CCS, NH3 and C3H2 emission show evidence of limb brightening. The observations are consistent with a chemically differentiated onion-shell structure for the L1498 core, with NH3 in the inner and CCS in the outer parts of the core. The high angular resolution (9"-12") spectral line maps obtained by combining NASA Goldstone 70 m and VLA data resolve the CCS 22 GHz emission in the southeast and northwest boundaries into arclike enhancements, supporting the picture that CCS emission originates in a shell outside the NH3 emitting region. Interferometric maps of CCS at 94 GHz and CS at 98 GHz show that their emitting regions contain several small-scale dense condensations. We suggest that the differences between the CCS, CS, C3H2, and NH3 emission are caused by a time-dependent effect as the core evolves slowly. We interpret the chemical and physical properties of L1498 in terms of a quasi-static (or slowly contracting) dense core in which the outer envelope is still growing. The growth rate of the core is determined by the

  19. Protostellar collapse of rotating cloud cores. Covering the complete first accretion period of the stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönke, J.; Tscharnuter, W. M.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the influence of turbulent viscosity on the collapse of a rotating molecular cloud core with axial symmetry, in particular, on the first and second collapse phase, as well as the evolution of the second (protostellar) core during its first accretion period. By using extensive numerical calculations, we monitor the intricate interactions between the newly formed protostar and the surrounding accretion disk (the first core) in which the star is embedded. Methods: We use a grid-based radiation-hydrodynamics code with a spatial grid designed to meet the high resolution required to study the second core. The radiative transfer is treated in the flux-limited diffusion approximation. A slightly supercritical Bonnor-Ebert sphere of 1 Msun and uniform rotation according to a fixed centrifugal radius of 100 AU serves as the initial condition without exception. In a parameter study, we vary the β-viscosity driving the angular momentum transport. Results: Without viscosity (β=0), a highly flattened accretion disk forms that fragments into several "cold" rings. For β = 10-4, a single "warm" ring forms that undergoes collapse due to hydrogen dissociation. For β = 10-3, ring formation is suppressed completely. The second collapse proceeds on the local thermal timescale, which is in contrast to the current view of a generally dynamical second collapse. During the first accretion period of the second core, the first core heats up globally and, as a consequence, a nearly spherical outflow occurs, destroying the structure of the former accretion disk completely. Finally, for β = 10-2, we see the classical dynamical second collapse and a shorter but more rapid accretion phase. The impact on the surrounding accretion disk is even more pronounced. We follow the resulting massive outflow up to several kyr after the second collapse, where the central parts (R < 0.7 AU) are now cut out and replaced with an appropriate inner boundary condition. Matter is found to

  20. Locally linear embedding: dimension reduction of massive protostellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. L.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of the application of locally linear embedding (LLE) to reduce the dimensionality of dereddened and continuum subtracted near-infrared spectra using a combination of models and real spectra of massive protostars selected from the Red MSX Source survey data base. A brief comparison is also made with two other dimension reduction techniques; principal component analysis (PCA) and Isomap using the same set of spectra as well as a more advanced form of LLE, Hessian locally linear embedding. We find that whilst LLE certainly has its limitations, it significantly outperforms both PCA and Isomap in classification of spectra based on the presence/absence of emission lines and provides a valuable tool for classification and analysis of large spectral data sets.

  1. Search for massive protostellar candidates in the southern hemisphere. I. Association with dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Brand, J.; Cesaroni, R.; Testi, L.; Molinari, S.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2005-03-01

    We have observed two rotational transitions of both CS and C17O, and the 1.2 mm continuum emission towards a sample of 130 high-mass protostellar candidates with δ < -30°. This work represents the first step of the extension to the southern hemisphere of a project started more than a decade ago aimed at the identification of massive protostellar candidates. Following the same approach adopted for sources with δ ≥ -30°, we have selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalogue 429 sources which potentially are compact molecular clouds on the basis of their IR colours. The sample has then been divided into two groups according to the colour indices [25 12] and [60 12]: the 298 sources with [25 12] ≥ 0.57 and [60 12] ≥ 1.30 have been called High sources, the remaining 131 have been called Low sources. In this paper, we check the association with dense gas and dust in 130 Low sources. We have obtained a detection rate of ~85% in CS, demonstrating a tight association of the sources with dense molecular clumps. Among the sources detected in CS, ~76% have also been detected in C17O and ~93% in the 1.2 mm continuum. Millimeter-continuum maps show the presence of clumps with diameters in the range 0.2-2 pc and masses from a few M⊙ to 105 M⊙; H2 volume densities computed from CS line ratios lie between ~104.5 and 105.5 cm-3. The bolometric luminosities of the sources, derived from IRAS data, are in the range 103-106 L⊙, consistent with embedded high-mass objects. Based on our results and those found in the literature for other samples of high-mass young stellar objects, we conclude that our sources are massive objects in a very early evolutionary stage, probably prior to the formation of an Hii region. We propose a scenario in which High and Low sources are both made of a massive clump hosting a high-mass protostellar candidate and a nearby stellar cluster. The difference might be due to the fact that the 12 μm IRAS flux, the best discriminant between the two

  2. DIGGING INTO NGC 6334 I(N): MULTIWAVELENGTH IMAGING OF A MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Indebetouw, R.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Beuther, H.; Menten, K. M.; Thorwirth, S.

    2009-12-10

    We present a high-resolution, multi-wavelength study of the massive protostellar cluster NGC 6334 I(N) that combines new spectral line data from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and VLA with a re-analysis of archival VLA continuum data, Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer images. As shown previously, the brightest 1.3 mm source SMA1 contains substructure at subarcsecond resolution, and we report the first detection of SMA1b at 3.6 cm along with a new spatial component at 7 mm (SMA1d). We find SMA1 (aggregate of sources a, b, c, and d) and SMA4 to be comprised of free-free and dust components, while SMA6 shows only dust emission. Our 1.''5 resolution 1.3 mm molecular line images reveal substantial hot-core line emission toward SMA1 and to a lesser degree SMA2. We find CH{sub 3}OH rotation temperatures of 165 +- 9 K and 145 +- 12 K for SMA1 and SMA2, respectively. We estimate a diameter of 1400 AU for the SMA1 hot-core emission, encompassing both SMA1b and SMA1d, and speculate that these sources comprise a approx>800 AU separation binary that may explain the previously suggested precession of the outflow emanating from the SMA1 region. Compact line emission from SMA4 is weak, and none is seen toward SMA6. The LSR velocities of SMA1, SMA2, and SMA4 all differ by 1-2 km s{sup -1}. Outflow activity from SMA1, SMA2, SMA4, and SMA6 is observed in several molecules including SiO(5-4) and IRAC 4.5 mum emission; 24 mum emission from SMA4 is also detected. Eleven water maser groups are detected, eight of which coincide with SMA1, SMA2, SMA4, and SMA6, while two others are associated with the Sandell source SM2. We also detect a total of 83 Class I CH{sub 3}OH 44 GHz maser spots which likely result from the combined activity of many outflows. Our observations paint the portrait of multiple young hot cores in a protocluster prior to the stage where its members become visible in the near-infrared.

  3. Water in high-mass pre- and proto-stellar cores from Hi-GAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Carina M.; Olmi, Luca; Codella, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    As a part of our on-going investigation of the earliest phases of massive star formation, we present Herschel-HIFI data of H2O, NH3 and N2H+ towards a sample of high-mass starless cores and proto-stellar objects in two galactic fields, each containing objects in different evolutionary stages. We observed 17 sources in the l = 30° galactic field, and 35 sources in the l = 59° field. The clumps in the l = 59°region have lower luminosity and mass than the l = 30° objects. We find that the sources with detections have much higher mean luminosities than compared to the sources with no detection of any line, but the mean masses are similar. Most sources with detections are proto-stellar, and at least two of the detected sources in the l = 59° region are in a more advanced stage of evolution. For the l = 30° sources no preferential evolutionary phase is evident. None of these sources, however, appear to belong to the late phase of envelope dispersal.The detections show complex line shapes from the protostellar envelopes, molecular outflows and infall. All detections in the l = 59° field show similar water line profiles with broad outflows, whereas towards l = 30° no outflows are detected and all sources display very different line shapes. Both water and ammonia are also often self-absorbed, sometimes saturated, and some sources show an inverse or a regular P-Cygni line profile. N2H+ do not exhibit line asymmetries or absorption. The integrated intensities of the three lines are correlated, and we also find correlations between the water line luminosity and continuum temperature. The typical water luminosity towards the l = 30° sources is lower than compared to l = 59° sources, but their continuum temperature is higher, which may suggest a later evolutionary stage.In the sight-lines towards 11 sources in the l = 30° field, among which four have no detections in the star-forming regions, we also detect H2O and NH3 in absorption from interstellar gas. Since

  4. Herschel-HIFI view of mid-IR quiet massive protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpin, F.; Chavarría, L.; Jacq, T.; Braine, J.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Baudry, A.; Bontemps, S.; Kristensen, L.; Schmalzl, M.; Mata, J.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present Herschel/HIFI observations of 14 water lines in a small sample of Galactic massive protostellar objects: NGC 6334I(N), DR21(OH), IRAS 16272-4837, and IRAS 05358+3543. Using water as a tracer of the structure and kinematics, we individually study each of these objects with the aim to estimate the amount of water around them, but to also to shed light on the high-mass star formation process. Methods: We analyzed the gas dynamics from the line profiles using Herschel-HIFI observations acquired as part of the WISH key-project of 14 far-IR water lines (H_216O, H_217O, H_218O) and several other species. Then through modeling the observations using the RATRAN radiative transfer code, we estimated outflow, infall, turbulent velocities, and molecular abundances and investigated the correlation with the evolutionary status of each source. Results: The four sources (and the previously studied W43-MM1) have been ordered in terms of evolution based on their spectral energy distribution from youngest to older: 1) NGC 64334I(N); 2) W43-MM1; 3) DR21(OH); 4) IRAS 16272-4837; 5) IRAS 05358+3543. The molecular line profiles exhibit a broad component coming from the shocks along the cavity walls that is associated with the protostars, and an infalling (or expanding, for IRAS 05358+3543) and passively heated envelope component, with highly supersonic turbulence that probably increases with the distance from the center. Accretion rates between 6.3 × 10-5 and 5.6 × 10-4M⊙ yr-1 are derived from the infall observed in three of our sources. The outer water abundance is estimated to be at the typical value of a few 10-8, while the inner abundance varies from 1.7 × 10-6 to 1.4 × 10-4 with respect to H2 depending on the source. Conclusions: We confirm that regions of massive star formation are highly turbulent and that the turbulence probably increases in the envelope with the distance to the star. The inner abundances are lower than the expected, 10-4, perhaps because

  5. Tracing Massive Protostellar Jets from Intermediate-Mass Protostars in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, A.

    2014-09-01

    We present new spectroscopy and imaging of four protostellar jets in the Carina nebula. Near-IR [Fe II] emission traces dense gas in the jet that is self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons from nearby O-type stars. New near-IR [Fe II] images reveal a substantial mass of dense, neutral gas that is not seen in the Halpha emission from these jets, leading to densities and mass-loss rate estimates an order of magnitude larger than those derived from the Halpha emission measure. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (around 2 - 8 solar masses) protostars. Velocities from new proper motion and spectroscopic measurements fall among the velocities typically measured in lower-luminosity sources (100 - 200 km/s). We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in low-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable. Thus, the jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars that exist in a feedback-dominated environment, and offer strong additional evidence that stars up to 8 solar masses form by the same accretion mechanisms as low-mass stars.

  6. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STARLESS AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES IN GOULD BELT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Di Francesco, James; Bontemps, Sylvain; Megeath, S. Thomas; Allgaier, Erin; Rebull, Luisa M.; Carey, Sean; McCabe, Caer-Eve; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Padgett, Deborah; Gutermuth, Robert; Hora, Joe; Huard, Tracy; Muzerolle, James; Terebey, Susan

    2010-02-20

    Using data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue (850 {mu}m) and Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6-70 {mu}m), we explore dense cores in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, Serpens, and Orion molecular clouds. We develop a new method to discriminate submillimeter cores found by Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) as starless or protostellar, using point source photometry from Spitzer wide field surveys. First, we identify infrared sources with red colors associated with embedded young stellar objects (YSOs). Second, we compare the positions of these YSO candidates to our submillimeter cores. With these identifications, we construct new, self-consistent starless and protostellar core mass functions (CMFs) for the five clouds. We find best-fit slopes to the high-mass end of the CMFs of -1.26 +- 0.20, -1.22 +- 0.06, -0.95 +- 0.20, and -1.67 +- 0.72 for Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, and Orion, respectively. Broadly, these slopes are each consistent with the -1.35 power-law slope of the Salpeter initial mass function at higher masses, but suggest some differences. We examine a variety of trends between these CMF shapes and their parent cloud properties, potentially finding a correlation between the high-mass slope and core temperature. We also find a trend between core mass and effective size, but we are very limited by sensitivity. We make similar comparisons between core mass and size with visual extinction (for A{sub V} >= 3) and find no obvious trends. We also predict the numbers and mass distributions of cores that future surveys with SCUBA-2 may detect in each of these clouds.

  7. Multilayer formation and evaporation of deuterated ices in prestellar and protostellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B.; Sipilä, Olli

    2014-08-10

    Extremely large deuteration of several molecules has been observed toward prestellar cores and low-mass protostars for a decade. New observations performed toward low-mass protostars suggest that water presents a lower deuteration in the warm inner gas than in the cold external envelope. We coupled a gas-grain astrochemical model with a one-dimensional model of a collapsing core to properly follow the formation and the deuteration of interstellar ices as well as their subsequent evaporation in the low-mass protostellar envelopes with the aim of interpreting the spatial and temporal evolutions of their deuteration. The astrochemical model follows the formation and the evaporation of ices with a multilayer approach and also includes a state-of-the-art deuterated chemical network by taking the spin states of H{sub 2} and light ions into account. Because of their slow formation, interstellar ices are chemically heterogeneous and show an increase of their deuterium fractionation toward the surface. The differentiation of the deuteration in ices induces an evolution of the deuteration within protostellar envelopes. The warm inner region is poorly deuterated because it includes the whole molecular content of ices, while the deuteration predicted in the cold external envelope scales with the highly deuterated surface of ices. We are able to reproduce the observed evolution of water deuteration within protostellar envelopes, but we are still unable to predict the super-high deuteration observed for formaldehyde and methanol. Finally, the extension of this study to the deuteration of complex organics, important for the prebiotic chemistry, shows good agreement with the observations, suggesting that we can use the deuteration to retrace their mechanisms and their moments of formation.

  8. Discovery of large-scale gravitational infall in a massive protostellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Ryder, Stuart D.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Miyamoto, Yosuke; Furukawa, Naoko; Fukui, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    We report Mopra Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), Anglo-Australian Telescope and Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment observations of a molecular clump in Carina, BYF73 = G286.21+0.17, which give evidence of large-scale gravitational infall in the dense gas. From the millimetre and far-infrared data, the clump has a mass of ~2 × 104Msolar, luminosity of ~2-3 × 104Lsolar and diameter of ~0.9 pc. From radiative transfer modelling, we derive a mass infall rate of ~3.4 × 10-2Msolaryr-1. If confirmed, this rate for gravitational infall in a molecular core or clump may be the highest yet seen. The near-infrared K-band imaging shows an adjacent compact HII region and IR cluster surrounded by a shell-like photodissociation region showing H2 emission. At the molecular infall peak, the K imaging also reveals a deeply embedded group of stars with associated H2 emission. The combination of these features is very unusual, and we suggest that they indicate the ongoing formation of a massive star cluster. We discuss the implications of these data for competing theories of massive star formation.

  9. Unveiling the Detailed Density and Velocity Structures of the Protostellar Core B335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2013-03-01

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H13CO+(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r)vpropr -p and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p ≈ 2 for r >~ 4000 AU and p ≈ 1.5 for r <~ 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of ~1.0 km s-1 over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of ~0.1 M ⊙, and suggest a small inward velocity, v_{r ≥ r_inf}˜ 0 km s^{-1} in the outer core at >~ 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  10. ON THE SIMULTANEOUS EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE PROTOSTARS AND THEIR HOST CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, R.; Yorke, H. W. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2013-07-20

    Studies of the evolution of massive protostars and the evolution of their host molecular cloud cores are commonly treated as separate problems. However, interdependencies between the two can be significant. Here, we study the simultaneous evolution of massive protostars and their host molecular cores using a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code that incorporates the effects of the thermal pressure and radiative acceleration feedback of the centrally forming protostar. The evolution of the massive protostar is computed simultaneously using the stellar evolution code STELLAR, modified to include the effects of variable accretion. The interdependencies are studied in three different collapse scenarios. For comparison, stellar evolutionary tracks at constant accretion rates and the evolution of the host cores using pre-computed stellar evolutionary tracks are computed. The resulting interdependencies of the protostellar evolution and the evolution of the environment are extremely diverse and depend on the order of events, in particular the time of circumstellar accretion disk formation with respect to the onset of the bloating phase of the star. Feedback mechanisms affect the instantaneous accretion rate and the protostar's radius, temperature, and luminosity on timescales t {<=} 5 kyr, corresponding to the accretion timescale and Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction timescale, respectively. Nevertheless, it is possible to approximate the overall protostellar evolution in many cases by pre-computed stellar evolutionary tracks assuming appropriate constant average accretion rates.

  11. Depletion of chlorine into HCl ice in a protostellar core. The CHESS spectral survey of OMC-2 FIR 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Caux, E.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Wakelam, V.; Dominik, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lanza, M.; Lique, F.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Lis, D. C.; Caballero, R. N.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The freezeout of gas-phase species onto cold dust grains can drastically alter the chemistry and the heating-cooling balance of protostellar material. In contrast to well-known species such as carbon monoxide (CO), the freezeout of various carriers of elements with abundances <10-5 has not yet been well studied. Aims: Our aim here is to study the depletion of chlorine in the protostellar core, OMC-2 FIR 4. Methods: We observed transitions of HCl and H2Cl+ towards OMC-2 FIR 4 using the Herschel Space Observatory and Caltech Submillimeter Observatory facilities. Our analysis makes use of state of the art chlorine gas-grain chemical models and newly calculated HCl-H2 hyperfine collisional excitation rate coefficients. Results: A narrow emission component in the HCl lines traces the extended envelope, and a broad one traces a more compact central region. The gas-phase HCl abundance in FIR 4 is 9 × 10-11, a factor of only 10-3 that of volatile elemental chlorine. The H2Cl+ lines are detected in absorption and trace a tenuous foreground cloud, where we find no depletion of volatile chlorine. Conclusions: Gas-phase HCl is the tip of the chlorine iceberg in protostellar cores. Using a gas-grain chemical model, we show that the hydrogenation of atomic chlorine on grain surfaces in the dark cloud stage sequesters at least 90% of the volatile chlorine into HCl ice, where it remains in the protostellar stage. About 10% of chlorine is in gaseous atomic form. Gas-phase HCl is a minor, but diagnostically key reservoir, with an abundance of ≲10-10 in most of the protostellar core. We find the [35Cl]/[37Cl] ratio in OMC-2 FIR 4 to be 3.2 ± 0.1, consistent with the solar system value. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. THE DISCOVERY OF THE YOUNGEST MOLECULAR OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTELLAR CORE, MMS-6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2012-01-20

    We present subarcsecond resolution HCN (4-3) and CO (3-2) observations made with the Submillimeter Array, toward an extremely young intermediate-mass protostellar core, MMS 6-main, located in the Orion Molecular Cloud 3 region (OMC-3). We have successfully imaged a compact molecular outflow lobe ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 AU) associated with MMS 6-main, which is also the smallest molecular outflow ever found in the intermediate-mass protostellar cores. The dynamical timescale of this outflow is estimated to be {<=}100 yr. The line width dramatically increases downstream at the end of the molecular outflow ({Delta}v {approx} 25 km s{sup -1}) and clearly shows the bow-shock-type velocity structure. The estimated outflow mass ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }) and outflow size are approximately two to four orders and one to three orders of magnitude smaller, respectively, while the outflow force ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) is similar, compared to the other molecular outflows studied in OMC-2/3. These results show that MMS 6-main is a protostellar core at the earliest evolutionary stage, most likely shortly after the second core formation.

  13. UNVEILING THE DETAILED DENSITY AND VELOCITY STRUCTURES OF THE PROTOSTELLAR CORE B335

    SciTech Connect

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2013-03-10

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p} and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p Almost-Equal-To 2 for r {approx}> 4000 AU and p Almost-Equal-To 1.5 for r {approx}< 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of {approx}1.0 km s{sup -1} over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, and suggest a small inward velocity, v{sub r{>=}r{sub i{sub n{sub f}}}}{approx}0 km s{sup -1} in the outer core at {approx}> 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  14. FROM PRESTELLAR TO PROTOSTELLAR CORES. II. TIME DEPENDENCE AND DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Y.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Garrod, R. T.; Herbst, E.

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the molecular evolution and D/H abundance ratios that develop as star formation proceeds from a dense molecular cloud core to a protostellar core, by solving a gas-grain reaction network applied to a one-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic model with infalling fluid parcels. Spatial distributions of gas and ice-mantle species are calculated at the first-core stage, and at times after the birth of a protostar. Gas-phase methanol and methane are more abundant than CO at radii r {approx}< 100 AU in the first-core stage, but gradually decrease with time, while abundances of larger organic species increase. The warm-up phase, when complex organic molecules are efficiently formed, is longer-lived for those fluid parcels infalling at later stages. The formation of unsaturated carbon chains (warm carbon-chain chemistry) is also more effective in later stages; C{sup +}, which reacts with CH{sub 4} to form carbon chains, increases in abundance as the envelope density decreases. The large organic molecules and carbon chains are strongly deuterated, mainly due to high D/H ratios in the parent molecules, determined in the cold phase. We also extend our model to simulate simply the chemistry in circumstellar disks, by suspending the one-dimensional infall of a fluid parcel at constant disk radii. The species CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} and HCOOCH{sub 3} increase in abundance in 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr at the fixed warm temperature; both also have high D/H ratios.

  15. Properties of dense cores in clustered massive star-forming regions at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Palau, Aina; Fontani, Francesco; Busquet, Gemma; Juárez, Carmen; Estalella, Robert; Tan, Jonathan C.; Sepúlveda, Inma; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou; Kurtz, Stan

    2013-07-01

    We aim at characterizing dense cores in the clustered environments associated with intermediate-/high-mass star-forming regions. For this, we present a uniform analysis of Very Large Array NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) observations towards a sample of 15 intermediate-/high-mass star-forming regions, where we identify a total of 73 cores, classify them as protostellar, quiescent starless, or perturbed starless, and derive some physical properties. The average sizes and ammonia column densities of the total sample are ˜0.06 pc and ˜1015 cm-2, respectively, with no significant differences between the starless and protostellar cores, while the linewidth and rotational temperature of quiescent starless cores are smaller, ˜1.0 km s-1 and 16 K, than linewidths and temperatures of protostellar (˜1.8 km s-1 and 21 K), and perturbed starless (˜1.4 km s-1 and 19 K) cores. Such linewidths and temperatures for these quiescent starless cores in the surroundings of intermediate-/high-mass stars are still significantly larger than the typical linewidths and rotational temperatures measured in starless cores of low-mass star-forming regions, implying an important non-thermal component. We confirm at high angular resolutions (spatial scales ˜0.05 pc) the correlations previously found with single-dish telescopes (spatial scales ≳ 0.1 pc) between the linewidth and the rotational temperature of the cores, as well as between the rotational temperature and the linewidth with respect to the bolometric luminosity. In addition, we find a correlation between the temperature of each core and the incident flux from the most massive star in the cluster, suggesting that the large temperatures measured in the starless cores of our sample could be due to heating from the nearby massive star. A simple virial equilibrium analysis seems to suggest a scenario of a self-similar, self-gravitating, turbulent, virialized hierarchy of structures from clumps (˜0.1-10 pc) to cores (˜0.05 pc). A closer

  16. SCUBA and HIRES Results for Protostellar Cores in the MON OB1 Dark Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf-Chase, G.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Fich, M.; Barsony, M.

    1999-05-01

    We have used HIRES-processing of IRAS data and point-source modelling techniques (Hurt & Barsony 1996; O'Linger 1997; Barsony et al. 1998), together with submillimeter continuum imaging using the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the 15-meter James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), to search CS cores in the Mon OB1 dark cloud (Wolf-Chase, Walker, & Lada 1995; Wolf-Chase & Walker 1995) for deeply embedded sources. These observations, as well as follow-up millimeter photometry at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 12-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, have lead to the identification of two Class 0 protostellar candidates, which were previously unresolved from two brighter IRAS point sources (IRAS 06382+0939 & IRAS 06381+1039) in this cloud. Until now, only one Class 0 object had been confirmed in Mon OB1; the driving source of the highly-collimated outflow NGC 2264 G (Ward-Thompson, Eiroa, & Casali 1995; Margulis et al. 1990; Lada & Fich 1996), which lies well outside the extended CS cores. One of the new Class 0 candidates may be an intermediate-mass source associated with an H_2O maser, and the other object is a low-mass source which may be associated with a near-infrared jet, and possibly with a molecular outflow. We report accurate positions for the new Class 0 candidates, based on the SCUBA images, and present new SEDs for these sources, as well as for the brighter IRAS point sources. A portion of this work was performed while GWC held a President's Fellowship from the University of California. MB and GWC gratefully acknowledge financial support from MB's NSF CAREER Grant, AST97-9753229.

  17. On the role of pseudodisk warping and reconnection in protostellar disk formation in turbulent magnetized cores

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Zhao, Bo; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2014-10-01

    The formation of rotationally supported protostellar disks is suppressed in ideal MHD in non-turbulent cores with aligned magnetic fields and rotation axes. A promising way to resolve this so-called 'magnetic braking catastrophe' is through turbulence. The reason for the turbulence-enabled disk formation is usually attributed to the turbulence-induced magnetic reconnection, which is thought to reduce the magnetic flux accumulated in the disk-forming region. We advance an alternative interpretation, based on magnetic decoupling-triggered reconnection of severely pinched field lines close to the central protostar and turbulence-induced warping of the pseudodisk of Galli and Shu. Such reconnection weakens the central split magnetic monopole that lies at the heart of the magnetic braking catastrophe under flux freezing. We show, through idealized numerical experiments, that the pseudodisk can be strongly warped, but not completely destroyed, by a subsonic or sonic turbulence. The warping decreases the rates of angular momentum removal from the pseudodisk by both magnetic torque and outflow, making it easier to form a rotationally supported disk. More importantly, the warping of the pseudodisk out of the disk-forming, equatorial plane greatly reduces the amount of magnetic flux threading the circumstellar, disk-forming region, further promoting disk formation. The beneficial effects of pseudodisk warping can also be achieved by a misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis. These two mechanisms of disk formation, enabled by turbulence and field-rotation misalignment respectively, are thus unified. We find that the disks formed in turbulent magnetized cores are rather thick and significantly magnetized. Implications of these findings, particularly for the thick young disk inferred in L1527, are briefly discussed.

  18. On the Role of Pseudodisk Warping and Reconnection in Protostellar Disk Formation in Turbulent Magnetized Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2014-10-01

    The formation of rotationally supported protostellar disks is suppressed in ideal MHD in non-turbulent cores with aligned magnetic fields and rotation axes. A promising way to resolve this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe" is through turbulence. The reason for the turbulence-enabled disk formation is usually attributed to the turbulence-induced magnetic reconnection, which is thought to reduce the magnetic flux accumulated in the disk-forming region. We advance an alternative interpretation, based on magnetic decoupling-triggered reconnection of severely pinched field lines close to the central protostar and turbulence-induced warping of the pseudodisk of Galli and Shu. Such reconnection weakens the central split magnetic monopole that lies at the heart of the magnetic braking catastrophe under flux freezing. We show, through idealized numerical experiments, that the pseudodisk can be strongly warped, but not completely destroyed, by a subsonic or sonic turbulence. The warping decreases the rates of angular momentum removal from the pseudodisk by both magnetic torque and outflow, making it easier to form a rotationally supported disk. More importantly, the warping of the pseudodisk out of the disk-forming, equatorial plane greatly reduces the amount of magnetic flux threading the circumstellar, disk-forming region, further promoting disk formation. The beneficial effects of pseudodisk warping can also be achieved by a misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis. These two mechanisms of disk formation, enabled by turbulence and field-rotation misalignment respectively, are thus unified. We find that the disks formed in turbulent magnetized cores are rather thick and significantly magnetized. Implications of these findings, particularly for the thick young disk inferred in L1527, are briefly discussed.

  19. Inferring the Structure of the Pre-Protostellar Core L1498

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, Sandra L.; Doty, Steven D.; Perkett, Matthew J.

    2014-09-01

    We present a study of the pre-protostellar core (PPC) L1498. A series of self-consistent, three-dimensional continuum radiative transfer models are constructed. The outputs of these models are convolved with appropriate telescope beam responses, including the effect of beam chopping to simulate SCUBA observations. The simulated observations are compared with existing observational data. An automated search is conducted in the multi-dimensional parameter space to identify the best-fit model. Grids of models are constructed in the vicinity of the best fit in order to understand the sensitivity/uncertainty of the results. We find that the source is well fit by a prolate spheroid of cutoff (and thus approximately outer) radius rcut = 0.073 ± 0.005 pc, axis ratio q = 2.0 ± 0.2, a central luminosity L* < 10^-3 Lsun, and an optical depth in the visible of τv = 20 ± 5. We find that the PPC is illuminated by two external radiation fields: a uniform ISRF of strength s_ISRF = 0.5 ± 0.25 and a local plane-parallel radiation field s_PPRF = 1.0 ± 0.5. Both of these radiation fields are locally attenuated, with τ_ISRF = 1.0 ± 0.25, and τ_PPRF = 1.25± 0.75, consistent with the fact that L1498 is embedded in a larger cloud. Most interestingly, the density fall-off at the outer edge is extremely steep, having a power law of m > 10. This is effectively a "sharp edge" to the PPC, and together with the constant density interior, is interpreted as potential signs of a pressure-confined core.

  20. Investigating Protostellar Carbon Reservoirs with High-Resolution Spectroscopy Toward Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Blake, G. A.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Lockwood, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution CO spectra toward massive YSOs reveal less dispersion in [12C16O]/[13C16O] gas compared to low-mass YSOs, while these ratios may be similarly affected by CO ice. Our new data suggest that CO2 may not originate from a CO reservoir.

  1. High-resolution ammonia mapping of the very young protostellar core Chamaeleon-MMS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väisälä, M. S.; Harju, J.; Mantere, M. J.; Miettinen, O.; Sault, R. S.; Walmsley, C. M.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the structure and kinematics of the nearby candidate first hydrostatic core Cha-MMS1. Methods: Cha-MMS1 was mapped in the NH3(1,1) line and the 1.2 cm continuum using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The angular resolution of the ATCA observations is 7″ (~1000 AU), and the velocity resolution is 50 m s-1. The core was also mapped with the 64 m Parkes Telescope in the NH3(1,1) and (2,2) lines. Observations from Herschel Space Observatory and Spitzer Space Telescope were used to help interpretation. The ammonia spectra were analysed using Gaussian fits to the hyperfine structure. A two-layer model was applied in the central parts of the core where the ATCA spectra show signs of self-absorption. Results: A compact high column density core with a steep velocity gradient (~20 km s-1 pc-1) is detected in ammonia. We derive a high gas density (~106 cm-3) in this region, and a fractional ammonia abundance compatible with determinations towards other dense cores (~10-8). This suggests that the age of the high density core is comparable to the freeze-out timescale of ammonia in these conditions, on the order of 104 years. The direction of the velocity gradient agrees with previous single-dish observations, and the overall velocity distribution can be interpreted as rotation. The rotation axis goes through the position of a compact far-infrared source detected by Spitzer and Herschel. The specific angular momentum of the core, ~10-3km s-1 pc, is typical for protostellar envelopes. A string of 1.2 cm continuum sources is tentatively detected near the rotation axis. The ammonia spectra suggest the presence of warm embedded gas in its vicinity. An hourglass-shaped structure is seen in ammonia at the cloud's average LSR velocity, also aligned with the rotation axis. Although this structure resembles a pair of outflow lobes the ammonia spectra show no indications of shocked gas. Conclusions: The observed ammonia

  2. The Deuteration Clock for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, S.; Tan, J. C.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.

    2016-05-01

    To understand massive star formation requires study of its initial conditions. Two massive starless core candidates, C1-N & C1-S, have been detected in IRDC G028.37+00.07 in N2D+(3-2) with ALMA. From their line widths, either the cores are subvirial and are thus young structures on the verge of near free-fall collapse, or they are threaded by ˜1 mG B-fields that help support them in near virial equilibrium and potentially have older ages. We modeled the deuteration rate of N2H+ to constrain collapse rates of the cores. First, to measure their current deuterium fraction, D≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+], we observed multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ with CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m and IRAM 30 m, to complement the ALMA data. For both cores we derived D ˜ 0.3, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. We then carried out chemodynamical modeling, exploring how collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff, affects the level of D that is achieved from a given initial condition. To reach the observed D, most models require slow collapse with αff˜0.1, i.e., ˜1/10th of free-fall. This makes it more likely that the cores have been able to reach a near virial equilibrium state and we predict that strong B-fields will eventually be detected. The methods developed here will be useful for measurement of the pre-stellar core mass function.

  3. revealing H{sub 2}D{sup +} depletion and compact structure in starless and protostellar cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Bourke, T. L.; Caselli, P.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Pineda, J. E.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the submillimeter dust continuum and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 10}-1{sub 11} emission toward two evolved, potentially protostellar cores within the Ophiuchus molecular cloud, Oph A SM1 and SM1N. The data reveal small-scale condensations within both cores, with mass upper limits of M ≲ 0.02 M {sub ☉} (∼20 M {sub Jup}). The SM1 condensation is consistent with a nearly symmetric Gaussian source with a width of only 37 AU. The SM1N condensation is elongated and extends 500 AU along its major axis. No evidence for substructure is seen in either source. A Jeans analysis indicates that these sources are unlikely to fragment, suggesting that both will form single stars. H{sub 2}D{sup +} is only detected toward SM1N, offset from the continuum peak by ∼150-200 AU. This offset may be due to either heating from an undetected, young, low-luminosity protostellar source or first hydrostatic core, or HD (and consequently H{sub 2}D{sup +}) depletion in the cold center of the condensation. We propose that SM1 is protostellar and that the condensation detected by ALMA is a warm (T ∼ 30-50 K) accretion disk. The less concentrated emission of the SM1N condensation suggests that it is still starless, but we cannot rule out the presence of a low-luminosity source, perhaps surrounded by a pseudodisk. These data observationally reveal the earliest stages of the formation of circumstellar accretion regions and agree with theoretical predictions that disk formation can occur very early in the star formation process, coeval with or just after the formation of a first hydrostatic core or protostar.

  4. QUASI-PERIODIC FORMALDEHYDE MASER FLARES IN THE MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR OBJECT IRAS 18566+0408

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Goss, W. M.; Kurtz, S.; Richards, A. M. S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.; Sewilo, M.

    2010-07-10

    We report results of an extensive observational campaign of the 6 cm formaldehyde maser in the young massive stellar object IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20) conducted from 2002 to 2009. Using the Arecibo Telescope, the Very Large Array, and the Green Bank Telescope, we discovered quasi-periodic formaldehyde flares (P {approx} 237 days). Based on Arecibo observations, we also discovered correlated variability between formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) masers. The H{sub 2}CO and CH{sub 3}OH masers are not spatially coincident, as demonstrated by different line velocities and high angular resolution MERLIN observations. The flares could be caused by variations in the infrared radiation field, possibly modulated by periodic accretion onto a young binary system.

  5. IS PROTOSTELLAR HEATING SUFFICIENT TO HALT FRAGMENTATION? A CASE STUDY OF THE MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER G8.68-0.37

    SciTech Connect

    Longmore, S. N.; Pillai, T.; Keto, E.; Zhang, Q.; Qiu, K.

    2011-01-10

    If star formation proceeds by thermal fragmentation and the subsequent gravitational collapse of the individual fragments, how is it possible to form fragments massive enough for O and B stars in a typical star-forming molecular cloud where the Jeans mass is about 1 M{sub sun} at the typical densities (10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}) and temperatures (10 K)? We test the hypothesis that a first generation of low-mass stars may heat the gas enough that subsequent thermal fragmentation results in fragments {>=}10 M{sub sun}, sufficient to form B stars. We combine ATCA and Submillimeter Array observations of the massive star-forming region G8.68-0.37 with radiative transfer modeling to derive the present-day conditions in the region and use this to infer the conditions in the past, at the time of core formation. Assuming that the current mass/separation of the observed cores equals the fragmentation Jeans mass/length and the region's average density has not changed requires the gas temperature to have been 100 K at the time of fragmentation. The postulated first generation of low-mass stars would still be around today, but the number required to heat the cloud exceeds the limits imposed by the observations. Several lines of evidence suggest the observed cores in the region should eventually form O stars yet none have sufficient raw material. Even if feedback may have suppressed fragmentation, it was not sufficient to halt it to this extent. To develop into O stars, the cores must obtain additional mass from outside their observationally defined boundaries. The observations suggest that they are currently fed via infall from the very massive reservoir ({approx}1500 M{sub sun}) of gas in the larger parsec scale cloud around the star-forming cores. This suggests that massive stars do not form in the collapse of individual massive fragments, but rather in smaller fragments that themselves continue to gain mass by accretion from larger scales.

  6. HST/WFC3 imaging of protostellar jets in Carina: [Fe II] emission tracing massive jets from intermediate-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    We present narrow-band Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)-UVIS and WFC3-IR images of four externally irradiated protostellar jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902 and HH 1066. These massive jets are unusual because they are bathed in UV radiation from dozens of nearby O-type stars, but despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of the jet remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, far-ultraviolet radiation or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates on to their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜2-8 M⊙) stars. Indeed, the IR driving sources of two of these outflows have luminosities that require intermediate-mass protostars (the other two are so deeply embedded that their luminosity is uncertain). All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in wide-angle molecular outflows associated with intermediate- and high-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable in the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows traced by shock-excited molecules in the outflow cavity give the impression that these outflows have a wider opening angle. Thus, the externally irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars and offer strong additional evidence

  7. MASSIVE QUIESCENT CORES IN ORION: DYNAMICAL STATE REVEALED BY HIGH-RESOLUTION AMMONIA MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Kauffmann, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present combined Very Large Array and Green Bank Telescope images of NH{sub 3} inversion transitions (1, 1) and (2, 2) toward OMC2 and OMC3. We focus on the relatively quiescent Orion cores, which are away from the Trapezium cluster and have no sign of massive protostars or evolved star formation. The 5'' angular resolution and 0.6 km s{sup -1} velocity resolution enable us to study the thermal and dynamic state of these cores at {approx}0.02 pc scales, comparable to or smaller than those of the current dust continuum surveys. We measure temperatures for a total of 30 cores, with average masses of 11 M{sub Sun }, radii of 0.039 pc, virial mass ratio R{sub vir}-bar = 3.9, and critical mass ratio R{sub C}-bar = 1.5. Twelve sources contain Spitzer protostars. The thus defined starless and protostellar subsamples have similar temperature, line width, but different masses, with an average of 7.3 M{sub Sun} for the former and 16 M{sub Sun} for the latter. Compared to other Gould Belt dense cores, more Orion cores have a high gravitational-to-kinetic energy ratio and more cores have a larger than unity critical mass ratio. Orion dense cores have velocity dispersions similar to those of cores in low-mass star-forming regions but larger masses for given size. Some cores appear to have truly supercritical gravitational-to-kinetic energy ratios, even when considering significant observational uncertainties: thermal and non-thermal gas motions alone cannot prevent collapse.

  8. Chemical Evolution of Protostellar Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; vanDishoeck, Ewine F.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Whittet, Douglas C. B.

    2000-01-01

    We review the chemical processes that are important in the evolution from a molecular cloud core to a protostellar disk. These cover both gas phase and gas grain interactions. The current observational and theoretical state of this field are discussed.

  9. The Wasp-Waist Nebula: VLA Ammonia Observations of the Molecular Core Envelope In a Unique Class 0 Protostellar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The Wasp-Waist Nebula was discovered in the IRAC c2d survey of the Ophiuchus starforming clouds. It is powered by a well-isolated, low-luminosity, low-mass Class 0 object. Its weak outflow has been mapped in the CO (3-2) transition with the JCMT, in 2.12 micron H2 emission with WIRC (the Wide-Field Infrared Camera) on the Hale 5-meter, and, most recently, in six H2 mid-infrared lines with the IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) on-board the Spitzer Space Telescope; possible jet twisting structure may be evidence of unique core dynamics. Here, we report results of recent VLA ammonia mapping observations of the dense gas envelope feeding the central core protostellar system. We describe the morphology, kinematics, and angular momentum characteristics of this unique system. The results are compared with the envelope structure deduced from IRAC 8-micron absorption of the PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) background emission from the cloud.

  10. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (~100 M ⊙) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N2D+ (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N2D+ cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number mA ~ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ~60 M ⊙, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that mA ~= 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  11. The dynamical fingerprint of core scouring in massive elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Erwin, P.; Fabricius, M.

    2014-02-10

    The most massive elliptical galaxies have low-density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centers of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centers by gravitationally slingshotting central stars toward large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here, we analyze the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars, and a dark matter halo. We show that the use of integral field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude on the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores, we detect a coherent lack of stars on radial orbits in the core region and a uniform excess of radial orbits outside of it: when scaled by the core radius r{sub b} , the radial profiles of the classical anisotropy parameter β(r) are nearly identical in core galaxies. Moreover, they quantitatively match the predictions of black hole binary simulations, providing the first convincing dynamical evidence for core scouring in the most massive elliptical galaxies.

  12. G11.92–0.61-MM2: A BONAFIDE MASSIVE PRESTELLAR CORE?

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Schnee, S.; Graninger, D.; Öberg, K. I.; Zhang, Q.; Vasyunin, A.; Friesen, R.

    2014-11-20

    Core accretion models of massive star formation require the existence of stable massive starless cores, but robust observational examples of such objects have proven elusive. We report subarcsecond-resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm, 1.1 mm, and 0.88 mm and Very Large Array 1.3 cm observations of an excellent massive starless core candidate, G11.92–0.61-MM2, initially identified in the course of studies of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects (EGOs). Separated by ∼7.''2 from the nearby MM1 protostellar hot core, MM2 is a strong, compact dust continuum source (submillimeter spectral index α = 2.6 ± 0.1), but is devoid of star formation indicators. In contrast to MM1, MM2 has no masers, no centimeter continuum, and no (sub)millimeter wavelength line emission in ∼24 GHz of bandwidth observed with the SMA, including N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), and HCN(3-2). Additionally, there is no evidence for an outflow driven by MM2. The (sub)millimeter spectral energy distribution of MM2 is best fit with a dust temperature of ∼17-19 K and luminosity of ∼5-7 L {sub ☉}. The combined physical properties of MM2, as inferred from its dust continuum emission, are extreme: M ≳ 30 M {sub ☉} within a radius <1000 AU, N{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup 25} cm{sup –2} and n{sub H{sub 2}} >10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. Comparison of the molecular abundance limits derived from our SMA observations with gas-grain chemical models indicates that extremely dense (n(H) >> 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}), cold (<20 K) conditions are required to explain the lack of observed (sub)millimeter line emission, consistent with the dust continuum results. Our data suggest that G11.92–0.61-MM2 is the best candidate for a bonafide massive prestellar core found to date, and a promising target for future higher-sensitivity observations.

  13. Feedback During Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    We present models of photoionization of massive protostellar cores, and show the impact of this ionization feedback on the efficiency of star formation and its observational features. Based on the Core Accretion scenario, we construct the collapse model of rotating massive-protostellar cloud cores together with a protostellar evolutional calculation, including feedback effects from a MHD disk wind, photoionization and radiation pressure. First, the MHD wind creates a bipolar outflow whose opening angle increases over the timescale of mass accretion. The ionizing luminosity dramatically increases after the protostar reaches ~ 5 Msun due to Kelvin-Helmholz contraction, and the MHD wind is photoionized when the protostellar mass reaches ~ 10 - 20 Msun. As the ionizing and bolometric luminosities increase, the outflow opening angle becomes wider due to radiation pressure feedback. By this combination of feedback processes, the envelope is eroded and the mass infall rate is significantly reduced to that arriving only from the disk-shielded equatorial region. At a protostellar mass of ~ 50 - 100 Msun, depending on the initial core properties, the mass accretion is halted by disk photoevaporation. In this way, feedback significantly reduces the star formation efficiency when forming massive stars from massive cloud cores, which could produce a cutoff at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. Along this evolutionary calculation, we also compute the detailed structure of the photoionized regions using a ray-tracing radiative transfer code and evaluate their emission signatures. Their free-free continuum and recombination line emissions are consistent with the variety of observed radio sources associated with massive protostars, i.e., jets and ultra/hyper-compact HII regions. The comparison between our models and such observations enables us to better define the evolutionary sequence of massive star formation.

  14. Ejection of gaseous clumps from gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the dynamics of gaseous clumps formed via gravitational fragmentation in young protostellar disks, focusing on the fragments that are ejected from the disk via many-body gravitational interaction. Methods: Numerical hydrodynamics simulations were employed to study the evolution of young protostellar disks that were formed from the collapse of rotating pre-stellar cores. Results: The protostellar disks that formed in our models undergo gravitational fragmentation driven by continuing mass-loading from parental collapsing cores. Several fragments can be ejected from the disk during the early evolution, but the low-mass fragments (<15 MJup) disperse, which creates spectacular bow-type structures while passing through the disk and collapsing core. The least massive fragment that survived the ejection (21 MJup) straddles the planetary-mass limit, while the most massive ejected fragments (145 MJup) can break up into several pieces, leading to the ejection of wide separation binary clumps in the brown-dwarf mass range. About half of the ejected fragments are gravitationally bound, the majority are supported by rotation against gravity, and all fragments have the specific angular momentum that is much higher than that expected for brown dwarfs. We found that the internal structure of the ejected fragments is distinct from what would be expected for gravitationally contracting clumps formed via molecular cloud fragmentation, which can help in differentiating their origin. Conclusions: The ejection of fragments is an important process, which is inherent to massive protostellar disks, and which produces freely floating pre-brown dwarf cores, regulates the disk and stellar masses and, potentially, enriches the intracluster medium with processed dust and complex organics.

  15. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion - The Core Mass Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Di; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Langer, Bill

    2006-01-01

    CMF studies to date have been largely restricted to low-mass star-forming regions. The present study focuses on a HIGH MASS star forming region, ORION, but observes positions sufficiently far from KL that effects of previously-formed massive stars are not overwhelming

  16. COLLAPSE OF MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH RADIATION TRANSFER: FORMATION OF MASSIVE STARS BY ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Daza-Montero, Judith; De Felice, Fernando

    2009-12-20

    Most early radiative transfer calculations of protostellar collapse have suggested an upper limit of approx40 M{sub sun} for the final stellar mass before radiation pressure can exceed the star's gravitational pull and halt the accretion. Here we perform further collapse calculations, using frequency-dependent radiation transfer coupled to a frequency-dependent dust model that includes amorphous carbon particles, silicates, and ice-coated silicates. The models start from pressure-bounded, logatropic spheres of mass between 5 M{sub sun} and 150 M{sub sun} with an initial nonsingular density profile. We find that in a logatrope the infall is never reversed by the radiative forces on the dust and that stars with masses approx>100 M{sub sun} may form by continued accretion. Compared to previous models that start the collapse with a rho propor to r{sup -2} density configuration, our calculations result in higher accretion times and lower average accretion rates with peak values of approx5.8 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The radii and bolometric luminosities of the produced massive stars (approx>90 M{sub sun}) are in good agreement with the figures reported for detected stars with initial masses in excess of 100 M{sub sun}. The spectral energy distribution from the stellar photosphere reproduces the observed fluxes for hot molecular cores with peaks of emission from mid- to near-infrared.

  17. The dynamics of massive starless cores with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-12-20

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (∼100 M {sub ☉}) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N{sub 2}H{sup +} in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N{sub 2}D{sup +} cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number m{sub A} ∼ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ∼60 M {sub ☉}, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that m{sub A} ≅ 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  18. Phosphorus-bearing Molecules in Massive Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M.; Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A.; Palau, A.

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects; hence, its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here, we show new detections of phosphorus nitride (PN) in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact H ii regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ≃5 km s‑1, and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 1011–12 cm‑2, marginally lower than the values derived in the few high-mass star-forming regions detected so far. New constraints on the abundance of phosphorus monoxide, the fundamental unit of biologically relevant molecules, are also given. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM-30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  19. Characterising the physical and chemical properties of a young Class 0 protostellar core embedded in the Orion B9 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, O.

    2016-08-01

    Deeply embedded low-mass protostars can be used as testbeds to study the early formation stages of solar-type stars, and the prevailing chemistry before the formation of a planetary system. The present study aims to characterise further the physical and chemical properties of the protostellar core Orion B9-SMM3. The Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope was used to perform a follow-up molecular line survey of SMM3. The observations were done using the single pointing (frequency range 218.2-222.2 GHz) and on-the-fly mapping methods (215.1-219.1 GHz). These new data were used in conjunction with our previous data taken by the APEX and Effelsberg 100 m telescopes. The following species were identified from the frequency range 218.2-222.2 GHz: ^{13}CO, C^{18}O, SO, para-H2CO, and E1-type CH3OH. The mapping observations revealed that SMM3 is associated with a dense gas core as traced by DCO+ and p-H2CO. Altogether three different p-H2CO transitions were detected with clearly broadened linewidths (Δ v˜8.2-11 km s^{-1} in FWHM). The derived p-H2CO rotational temperature, 64±15 K, indicates the presence of warm gas. We also detected a narrow p-H2CO line (Δ v=0.42 km s^{-1}) at the systemic velocity. The p-H2CO abundance for the broad component appears to be enhanced by two orders of magnitude with respect to the narrow line value ({˜}3×10^{-9} versus {˜}2×10^{-11}). The detected methanol line shows a linewidth similar to those of the broad p-H2CO lines, which indicates their coexistence. The CO isotopologue data suggest that the CO depletion factor decreases from {˜}27±2 towards the core centre to a value of {˜}8±1 towards the core edge. In the latter position, the N2D+/N2H+ ratio is revised down to 0.14±0.06. The origin of the subfragments inside the SMM3 core we found previously can be understood in terms of the Jeans instability if non-thermal motions are taken into account. The estimated fragmentation timescale, and the derived chemical abundances

  20. Reconstructing the history of water ice formation from HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios in protostellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, K.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Aikawa, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Recent interferometer observations have found that the D2O/HDO abundance ratio is higher than that of HDO/H2O by about one order of magnitude in the vicinity of low-mass protostar NGC 1333-IRAS 2A, where water ice has sublimated. Previous laboratory and theoretical studies show that the D2O/HDO ice ratio should be lower than the HDO/H2O ice ratio, if HDO and D2O ices are formed simultaneously with H2O ice. In this work, we propose that the observed feature, D2O/HDO > HDO/H2O, is a natural consequence of chemical evolution in the early cold stages of low-mass star formation as follows: 1) majority of oxygen is locked up in water ice and other molecules in molecular clouds, where water deuteration is not efficient; and 2) water ice formation continues with much reduced efficiency in cold prestellar/protostellar cores, where deuteration processes are highly enhanced as a result of the drop of the ortho-para ratio of H2, the weaker UV radiation field, etc. Using a simple analytical model and gas-ice astrochemical simulations, which traces the evolution from the formation of molecular clouds to protostellar cores, we show that the proposed scenario can quantitatively explain the observed HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios. We also find that the majority of HDO and D2O ices are likely formed in cold prestellar/protostellar cores rather than in molecular clouds, where the majority of H2O ice is formed. This work demonstrates the power of the combination of the HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios as a tool to reveal the past history of water ice formation in the early cold stages of star formation, and when the enrichment of deuterium in the bulk of water occurred. Further observations are needed to explore if the relation, D2O/HDO > HDO/H2O, is common in low-mass protostellar sources.

  1. The Physics and Chemistry of Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Goodson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Better characterization of the initial conditions is crucial to understanding massive star formation. Whether or not high-mass stars form in a similar way as low-mass stars can be tested by massive starless cores (MSCs), which are invoked as the initial condition in the Core Accretion model, but not in the Competitive Accretion model. We first searched for MSC candidates in the densest regions of Infrared Dark Clouds with the deuterated species N2D+, which has been found to be one of the best tracers of the cold, dense conditions of low-mass pre-stellar cores. Two candidates (C1-N & S) were revealed by our ALMA Cycle 0 observation. In particular, C1-S has ~ 60 M⊙. Our dynamical study found that ~mG magnetic fields need to be present if the cores are virialized. Next we developed astrochemical modeling to understand how high levels of deuteration arise in these cores, especially tracking the deuteration fraction DfracN2H+(≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+]), which can rise by several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Our models show that high levels of DfracN2H+ ≥ 0.1 generally require at least several local free-fall times to be established under typical core conditions and this is the basis of a "deuteration clock" that can measure the chemical age and thus collapse rates of MSCs. We have begun work to implement the astrochemical network into full (M)HD simulations of these structures. A detailed observational study to measure [N2D+], [N2H+] and thus DfracN2H+ in the C1-N and C1-S cores have been carried out, utilizing multi-transition data observed with ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, IRAM 30m and NRO 45m telescopes. We find high levels of DfracN2H+ ≈ 0.2 - 0.7. Comparing with the theoretical chemodynamical models indicates that C1-N and C1-S have been contracting at rates ~10 times slower than free-fall, which may be consistent with the presence of strong magnetic fields in the cores. Using ALMA, we have also extended our search for more MSCs, using N2D+(3

  2. DIVERSE PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTIONARY STATES IN THE YOUNG CLUSTER AFGL961

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Mann, Rita K.; Beaumont, Christopher N.; Swift, Jonathan J.; Adams, Joseph D.; Hora, Joe; Kassis, Marc; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.

    2009-07-10

    We present arcsecond resolution mid-infrared and millimeter observations of the center of the young stellar cluster AFGL961 in the Rosette molecular cloud. Within 0.2 pc of each other, we find an early B star embedded in a dense core, a neighboring star of similar luminosity with no millimeter counterpart, a protostar that has cleared out a cavity in the circumcluster envelope, and two massive, dense cores with no infrared counterparts. An outflow emanates from one of these cores, indicating a deeply embedded protostar, but the other is starless, bound, and appears to be collapsing. The diversity of states implies either that protostellar evolution is faster in clusters than in isolation or that clusters form via quasi-static rather than dynamic collapse. The existence of a pre-stellar core at the cluster center shows that some star formation continues after and in close proximity to massive, ionizing stars.

  3. Massive Star Formation: Characterising Infall and Outflow in dense cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shaila; Cunningham, Maria; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jones, Paul Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew John

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars are some of the most important objects in the Universe, shaping the evolution of galaxies, creating chemical elements, and hence shaping the evolution of the Universe. However, the processes by which they form, and how they shape their environment during their birth processes, are not well understood. We are using NH3 data from the "The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey" (HOPS) to define the positions of dense cores/clumps of gas in the southern Galactic plane that are likely to form stars. Due to its effective critical density, NH3 can detect massive star forming regions effectively compared to other tracers. We did a comparative study with different methods for finding clumps and found Fellwalker as the best. We found ~ 10% of the star forming clumps with multiple components and ~ 90% clumps with single component along the line of sight. Then, using data from the "The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz" (MALT90) survey, we search for the presence of infall and outflow associated with these cores. We will subsequently use the "3D Molecular Line Radiative Transfer Code" (MOLLIE) to constrain properties of the infall and outflow, such as velocity and mass flow. The aim of the project is to determine how common infall and outflow are in star forming cores, hence providing valuable constraints on the timescales and physical process involved in massive star formation.

  4. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    More than 95% of silicate minerals and other oxides found in meteorites were melted, or vaporized and recondensed in the Solar Nebula prior to their incorporation into meteorite parent bodies. Gravitational accretion energy and heating via radioactive decay further transformed oxide minerals accreted into planetesimals. In such an oxygen-rich environment the carbonaceous dust that fell into the nebula as an intimate mixture with oxide grains should have been almost completely converted to CO. While some pre-collapse, molecular-cloud carbonaceous dust does survive, much in the same manner as do pre-solar oxide grains, such materials constitute only a few percent of meteoritic carbon and are clearly distinguished by elevated D/H, N-15/N-16, C-13/C-12 ratios or noble gas patterns. Carbonaceous Dust in Meteorites: We argue that nearly all of the carbon in meteorites was synthesized in the Solar Nebula from CO and that this CO was generated by the reaction of carbonaceous dust with solid oxides, water or OH. It is probable that some fraction of carbonaceous dust that is newly synthesized in the Solar Nebula is also converted back into CO by additional thermal processing. CO processing might occur on grains in the outer nebula through irradiation of CO-containing ice coatings or in the inner nebula via Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) reactions on grain surfaces. Large-scale transport of both gaseous reaction products and dust from the inner nebula out to regions where comets formed would spread newly formed carbonaceous materials throughout the solar nebula. Formation of Organic Carbon: Carbon dust in the ISM might easily be described as inorganic graphite or amorphous carbon, with relatively low structural abundances of H, N, O and S . Products of FTT reactions or organics produced via irradiation of icy grains contain abundant aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. aldehydes, keytones, acids, amines and amides.. The net result of the massive nebular carbon cycle is to convert

  5. Infrared and Radio Observations of a Small Group of Protostellar Objects in the Molecular Core, L1251-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungha; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Choi, Minho; Bourke, Tyler L.; Evans, Neal J., II; Di Francesco, James; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Kang, Miju

    2015-05-01

    We present a multi-wavelength observational study of a low-mass star-forming region, L1251-C, with observational results at wavelengths from the near-infrared to the millimeter. Spitzer Space Telescope observations confirmed that IRAS 22343+7501 is a small group of protostellar objects. The extended emission in the east-west direction with its intensity peak at the center of L1251A has been detected at 350 and 850 μm with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and James Clerk Maxwell telescopes, tracing dense envelope material around L1251A. The single-dish data from the Korean VLBI Network and TRAO telescopes show inconsistencies between the intensity peaks of several molecular emission lines and that of the continuum emission, suggesting complex distributions of molecular abundances around L1251A. The Submillimeter Array interferometer data, however, show intensity peaks of CO 2-1 and 13CO 2-1 located at the position of IRS 1, which is both the brightest source in the Infrared Array Camera image and the weakest source in the 1.3 mm dust-continuum map. IRS 1 is the strongest candidate for the driving source of the newly detected compact CO 2-1 outflow. Over the entire region (14‧ × 14‧) of L125l-C, 3 Class I and 16 Class II sources have been detected, including three young stellar objects (YSOs) in L1251A. A comparison between the average projected distance among the 19 YSOs in L1251-C and that among the 3 YSOs in L1251A suggests that L1251-C is an example of low-mass cluster formation where protostellar objects form in a small group.

  6. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Protostellar Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Smith, Rowan J.; Greif, Thomas H.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker

    2010-11-01

    We study the formation and evolution of the protostellar discs that form around the first stars in the Universe. Using sink particles, we replace the gravitationally bound gas at densities higher than 1015 cm-3 and radii greater than 3 AU from the central protostellar core, with an accreting point mass that is able to gravitationally interact with the surrounding gas. We find the disc is gravitationally (or `Toomre') unstable, and is dominated by a strong m = 2 spiral mode. Although the angular momentum transport is dominated by a combination of gravitational torques and Reynolds stresses, which are extremely efficient mechanisms, the disc is unable to process the infalling material and grows increasingly gravitationally unstable. During the build-up of the disc, the temperature in the gas is regulated by a combination of H2 line cooling, collision-induced emission and H2 dissociation, which together help to offset heating from the gravitational collapse and feedback from the protostar. Once the disc starts to fragment, H2 dissociation keeps the gas almost isothermal as the collapse of the fragment progresses. The fragmentation occurs when the protostar/disc system is only 230 yr old and at a distance of ~20 AU from its sibling, by which point the central protostar has a mass of ~1 Msolar. Given the angular momentum of the new protostellar system, it is likely that the protostars will grow to become a massive binary system.

  7. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse: Low-metallicity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo

    2014-05-10

    Among many physical processes involved in star formation, radiation transfer is one of the key processes because it dominantly controls the thermodynamics. Because metallicities control opacities, they are one of the important environmental parameters that affect star formation processes. In this work, I investigate protostellar collapse in solar-metallicity and low-metallicity (Z = 0.1 Z {sub ☉}) environments using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Because radiation cooling in high-density gas is more effective in low-metallicity environments, first cores are colder and have lower entropies. As a result, first cores are smaller, less massive, and have shorter lifetimes in low-metallicity clouds. Therefore, first cores would be less likely to be found in low-metallicity star forming clouds. This also implies that first cores tend to be more gravitationally unstable and susceptible to fragmentation. The evolution and structure of protostellar cores formed after the second collapse weakly depend on metallicities in the spherical and magnetized models, despite the large difference in the metallicities. Because this is due to the change of the heat capacity by dissociation and ionization of hydrogen, it is a general consequence of the second collapse as long as the effects of radiation cooling are not very large during the second collapse. On the other hand, the effects of different metallicities are more significant in the rotating models without magnetic fields, because they evolve slower than other models and therefore are more affected by radiation cooling.

  8. CORE CREATION IN GALAXIES AND HALOS VIA SINKING MASSIVE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Goerdt, Tobias; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Read, J. I.

    2010-12-20

    We perform a detailed investigation into the disruption of central cusps via the transfer of energy from sinking massive objects. Constant density inner regions form at the radius where the enclosed mass approximately matches the mass of the infalling body. We explore parameter space using numerical simulations and give an empirical relation for the size of the resulting core within structures that have different initial cusp slopes. We find that infalling bodies always stall at the edge of these newly formed cores, experiencing no dynamical friction over many dynamical times. As applications, we consider the resulting decrease in the dark matter annihilation flux due to centrally destroyed cusps, and we present a new theory for the formation of close binary nuclei-the 'stalled binary' model. We focus on one particularly interesting binary nucleus system, the dwarf spheroidal galaxy VCC 128 which is dark matter dominated at all radii. We show that its nuclei would rapidly coalesce within a few million years if it has a central dark matter cusp slope steeper than r {sup -1}. However, if its initial dark matter cusp is slightly shallower than a logslope of -0.75 at {approx}0.1% of the virial radius, then the sinking nuclei naturally create a core equal to their observed separation and stall. This is close to the logslope measured in a recent billion particle cold dark matter halo simulation.

  9. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  10. 3D numerical calculations and synthetic observations of magnetized massive dense core collapse and fragmentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commerçon, B.; Hennebelle, P.; Levrier, F.; Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.

    2012-03-01

    I will present radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics calculations of low-mass and massive dense core collapse, focusing on the first collapse and the first hydrostatic core (first Larson core) formation. The influence of magnetic field and initial mass on the fragmentation properties will be investigated. In the first part reporting low mass dense core collapse calculations, synthetic observations of spectral energy distributions will be derived, as well as classical observational quantities such as bolometric temperature and luminosity. I will show how the dust continuum can help to target first hydrostatic cores and to state about the nature of VeLLOs. Last, I will present synthetic ALMA observation predictions of first hydrostatic cores which may give an answer, if not definitive, to the fragmentation issue at the early Class 0 stage. In the second part, I will report the results of radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics calculations in the context of high mass star formation, using for the first time a self-consistent model for photon emission (i.e. via thermal emission and in radiative shocks) and with the high resolution necessary to resolve properly magnetic braking effects and radiative shocks on scales <100 AU (Commercon, Hennebelle & Henning ApJL 2011). In this study, we investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, turbulence, and radiative transfer on the early phases of the collapse and the fragmentation of massive dense cores (M=100 M_⊙). We identify a new mechanism that inhibits initial fragmentation of massive dense cores, where magnetic field and radiative transfer interplay. We show that this interplay becomes stronger as the magnetic field strength increases. We speculate that highly magnetized massive dense cores are good candidates for isolated massive star formation, while moderately magnetized massive dense cores are more appropriate to form OB associations or small star clusters. Finally we will also present synthetic observations of these

  11. Physical and Chemical Properties of Massive Starless Cores in Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Massive starless cores are the initial conditions of massive stars in some theories of massive star formation, so it is important to identify and characterize such objects. I summarize our group’s efforts to find massive starless cores in Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), using MIR and FIR extinction mapping together with molecular line follow-up, especially of deuterated species with ALMA. Several candidates have been identified, including examples with masses up to about 60 solar masses. I discuss the dynamical state of the cores, including implications for magnetic field strengths. By modeling the chemical evolution of the cores, especially the rise in the level of deuteration of certain species, we are also able to constrain chemical ages and rates of collapse.

  12. Protostellar Disk Formation Traced by Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.

    2015-12-01

    Recent ALMA observations are revealing formation processes of a disk structure around a young protostars at an unprecedented spatial resolution. A few recent highlights in this area are reviewed with particular emphasis on chemistry. Our discovery of centrifugal barrier of an infalling rotating envelope gas and associated drastic chemical change are presented as an example. Chemical compositions can be used to explore not only the chemical evolution from protostellar cores to protoplanetary disks but also the physical formation process of rotationally supported disks in protostellar sources.

  13. COLLAPSE OF MASSIVE MAGNETIZED DENSE CORES USING RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: EARLY FRAGMENTATION INHIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Commercon, Benoit; Henning, Thomas; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2011-11-20

    We report the results of radiation-magnetohydrodynamics calculations in the context of high-mass star formation, using for the first time a self-consistent model for photon emission (i.e., via thermal emission and in radiative shocks) and with the high resolution necessary to properly resolve magnetic braking effects and radiative shocks on scales <100 AU. We investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, turbulence, and radiative transfer on the early phases of the collapse and the fragmentation of massive dense cores. We identify a new mechanism that inhibits initial fragmentation of massive dense cores where magnetic field and radiative transfer interplay. We show that this interplay becomes stronger as the magnetic field strength increases. Magnetic braking is transporting angular momentum outward and is lowering the rotational support and is thus increasing the infall velocity. This enhances the radiative feedback owing to the accretion shock on the first core. We speculate that highly magnetized massive dense cores are good candidates for isolated massive star formation while moderately magnetized massive dense cores are more appropriate forming OB associations or small star clusters.

  14. An Ordered Bipolar Outflow from a Massive Early-stage Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan C.; Kong, Shuo; Zhang, Yichen; Fontani, Francesco; Caselli, Paola; Butler, Michael J.

    2016-04-01

    We present ALMA follow-up observations of two massive, early-stage core candidates, C1-N and C1-S, in IRDC G028.37+00.07, that were previously identified by their {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission, and show high levels of deuteration of this species. The cores are also dark at far-infrared wavelengths up to ∼ 100 μ {{m}}. We detect 12CO(2-1) from a narrow, highly collimated bipolar outflow that is being launched from near the center of the C1-S core, which is also the location of the peak 1.3 mm dust continuum emission. This protostar, C1-Sa, has associated dense gas traced by {{{C}}}18{{O}}(2-1) and DCN(3-2), from which we estimate that it has a radial velocity that is near the center of the range exhibited by the C1-S massive core. A second outflow-driving source is also detected within the projected boundary of C1-S, but it appears to be at a different radial velocity. After considering the properties of the outflows, we conclude that C1-Sa is a promising candidate for an early-stage massive protostar and as such it shows that these early phases of massive star formation can involve highly ordered outflow, and thus accretion, processes, similar to models developed to explain low-mass protostars.

  15. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF CORE CONVECTION IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilet, C.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Zingale, M.

    2013-08-20

    This work presents three-dimensional simulations of core convection in a 15 M{sub Sun} star halfway through its main sequence lifetime. To perform the necessary long-time calculations, we use the low Mach number code MAESTRO, with initial conditions taken from a one-dimensional stellar model. We first identify several key factors that the one-dimensional initial model must satisfy to ensure efficient simulation of the convection process. We then use the three-dimensional simulations to examine the effects of two common modeling choices on the resulting convective flow: using a fixed composition approximation and using a reduced domain size. We find that using a fixed composition model actually increases the computational cost relative to using the full multi-species model because the fixed composition system takes longer to reach convection that is in a quasi-static state. Using a reduced (octant rather than full sphere) simulation domain yields flow with statistical properties that are within a factor of two of the full sphere simulation values. Both the octant and full sphere simulations show similar mixing across the convection zone boundary that is consistent with the turbulent entrainment model. However, the global character of the flow is distinctly different in the octant simulation, showing more rapid changes in the large-scale structure of the flow and thus a more isotropic flow on average.

  16. Colliding filaments and a massive dense core in the Cygnus OB 7 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Akisato, Ko; Ohashi, Kenjiro; Nakagomi, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saito, Hiro

    2014-12-10

    We report the results of molecular line observations carried out toward a massive dense core in the Cyg OB 7 molecular cloud. The core has an extraordinarily large mass (∼1.1 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) and size (∼2 × 5 pc{sup 2}), but there is no massive young star forming therein. We observed this core in various molecular lines such as C{sup 18}O(J = 1-0) using the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. We find that the core has an elongated morphology consisting of several filaments and core-like structures. The filaments are massive (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}), and they are apparently colliding with one another. Some candidates for young stellar objects are distributed around their intersection, suggesting that the collisions of the filaments may have influenced their formation. To understand the formation and evolution of such colliding filaments, we performed numerical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, adopting the observed core parameters (the mass and size) as the initial conditions. The results indicate that the filaments are formed as seen in other earlier simulations for small cores in the literature, but we could not reproduce the collisions of the filaments simply by assuming a large initial mass and size. We find that collisions of the filaments occur only when there is a large velocity gradient in the initial core, in a sense compressing it. We suggest that the observed core was actually compressed by an external effect, e.g., shocks from nearby supernova remnants, including HB 21 which has been suggested to be interacting with the Cyg OB 7 molecular cloud.

  17. Cluster Formation in Protostellar Outflow-driven Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2006-04-01

    Most, perhaps all, stars go through a phase of vigorous outflow during formation. We examine, through three-dimensional MHD simulation, the effects of protostellar outflows on cluster formation. We find that the initial turbulence in the cluster-forming region is quickly replaced by motions generated by outflows. The protostellar outflow-driven turbulence (``protostellar turbulence'' for short) can keep the region close to a virial equilibrium long after the initial turbulence has decayed away. We argue that there exist two types of turbulence in star-forming clouds: a primordial (or ``interstellar'') turbulence and a protostellar turbulence, with the former transformed into the latter mostly in embedded clusters such as NGC 1333. Since the majority of stars are thought to form in clusters, an implication is that the stellar initial mass function is determined to a large extent by the stars themselves, through outflows that individually limit the mass accretion onto forming stars and collectively shape the environments (density structure and velocity field) in which most cluster members form. We speculate that massive cluster-forming clumps supported by protostellar turbulence gradually evolve toward a highly centrally condensed ``pivotal'' state, culminating in rapid formation of massive stars in the densest part through accretion.

  18. Planet Forming Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubow, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The project achieved many of its objectives. The main area of investigation was the interaction of young binary stars with surrounding protostellar disks. A secondary objective was the interaction of young planets with their central stars and surrounding disks. The grant funds were used to support visits by coinvestigators and visitors: Pawel Artymowicz, James Pringle, and Gordon Ogilvie. Funds were also used to support travel to meetings by Lubow and to provide partial salary support.

  19. Encounters with Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Clayton H.

    1992-12-01

    A numerical study of encounters between stars with circumstellar disks has bee completed. Cross sections and rates for disk tilt, disk disruption, and binary formation are estimated using a large data base of encounter simulations. The consequences of these results for star-forming regions and our solar system are discussed. A numerical code is developed which is capable of evolving a mixture of stars and gas in three dimensions. The algorithm is based on the method of smoothed-particle hydrodynamics combined with the heirarchical tree method of computing gravitational forces. The code is tested by simulating the collision between two sheets of gas and the radial pulsations of a polytropic gas sphere. A protostellar-disk model is developed based on simple assumptions. Test encounters are performed to determine the sensitivity of measured quantities on algorithm parameters, such as the gravitational tolerance and viscosity. It is shown that the solar system could have had an encounter shortly after its formation of sufficient strength to generate the observed obliquity yet retain enough mass and radial extent to form the planetary system. For the Orion B clusters as a whole, it is estimated that during a one-million-year period of time a few percent of the stars will experience an enoucnter that results in a disk tilt of 7 degrees or greater. For the central regions of NGC 2024 and the Trapezium cluster values of 24% and 39% are obtained, respectively. Encounters between equal-mass stars with periastra of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 disk radii will retain on average about 15%, 40%, 55%, and 75% of the disk mass, respectively. For encounters that do not penetrate the disk a minimum of 15% of the mass is retained. Even in dense environments the characteristic lifetime of a disk due to disruptive encounters can be many millions of years. On average, an encounter that penetrates the disk will dissipate an amount of orbital energy equal to approximately 50% of the initial

  20. THE FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIZED, MASSIVE STAR-FORMING CORES WITH RADIATIVE FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Andrew T.; McKee, Christopher F.; Cunningham, Andrew J.; Klein, Richard I.; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-04-01

    We present a set of three-dimensional, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic calculations of the gravitational collapse of massive (300 M{sub Sun }), star-forming molecular cloud cores. We show that the combined effects of magnetic fields and radiative feedback strongly suppress core fragmentation, leading to the production of single-star systems rather than small clusters. We find that the two processes are efficient at suppressing fragmentation in different regimes, with the feedback most effective in the dense, central region and the magnetic field most effective in more diffuse, outer regions. Thus, the combination of the two is much more effective at suppressing fragmentation than either one considered in isolation. Our work suggests that typical massive cores, which have mass-to-flux ratios of about 2 relative to critical, likely form a single-star system, but that cores with weaker fields may form a small star cluster. This result helps us understand why the observed relationship between the core mass function and the stellar initial mass function holds even for {approx}100 M{sub Sun} cores with many thermal Jeans masses of material. We also demonstrate that a {approx}40 AU Keplerian disk is able to form in our simulations, despite the braking effect caused by the strong magnetic field.

  1. A mapping study of massive cores with 13CO J = 1 0 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esimbek, Jarken; Wu, Yuefang; Wang, Yang

    2008-04-01

    Using 13.7 m telescope of Qinghai station of Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) at Delingha, 27 sources were observed with 12CO J = 1-0 and mapped with 13CO J = 1-0 lines. Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) images and IRAS point source catalogue (PSC) were used to identify stellar objects embedded in the detected cores. Forty-one 13CO cores were obtained. The sizes of these cores is from 0.4 pc to 7 pc. Their average excitation temperatures and masses are 23.4 K and 3.1 × 10 4M⊙, which shows that these cores are massive and relatively cold. The line widths are much wider than those of low-mass cores. The correlation between line widths and core sizes is weak. According to the radio, IRAS and MSX data, there are three kinds of cores in the entire sample: group A has 21 cores whose Tex and Δ V are 15.5 K and 3.2 km/s on the average. The cores in group A are not associated with infrared sources. Group B contains 17 cores, of which five are associated with IRAS sources, the remaining 12 are associated with MSX sources. All the 17 cores are not associated with UC HII regions. Group C contains three cores which are associated with UC HII regions. All these physical parameters indicate that there could be an evolutionary development from group A to group C. The bolometric luminosities of groups B and C are also investigated. The reason for the displacement of the cores and the infrared sources in group A was discussed.

  2. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. I. DEPENDENCE ON BASIC CORE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2011-05-20

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee and Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step by step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST, and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The existence of the optically thick inner disk produces higher optical wavelength fluxes but reduces near- and mid-IR emission. The presence of outflow cavities, the inclination angle to the line of sight, and the thickness of the disk all affect the SEDs and images significantly. For the high-mass surface density cores considered here, the mid-IR emission can be dominated by the outflow cavity walls, as has been suggested by De Buizer. The effect of varying the pressure of the environment bounding the surface of the massive core is also studied. With lower surface pressures, the core is larger, has lower extinction and accretion rates, and the observed mid-IR flux from the disk can then be relatively high even though the accretion luminosity is lower. In this case the silicate absorption feature becomes prominent, in contrast to higher density cores forming under higher pressures.

  3. Massive quiescent cores in Orion. V. The internal structures and physical and chemical properties of two extremely dense cores

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhiyuan; Li, Di; Chapman, N. E-mail: dili@nao.cas.cn

    2014-06-20

    We present a high-resolution (∼ 1.''5) observational study of two massive dust-gas cores, ORI8nw{sub 2} and ORI2{sub 6}, in the Orion molecular cloud using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. In each region the 3.2 mm continuum emission exhibits a dense and compact dust core at the center with 1-3 solar masses. The cores have number densities exceeding 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}, which are among the highest volume densities observed in star-forming cores. In both regions the N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows clumpy structures that are spatially displaced from the densest gas. In OIR8nw{sub 2} in particular, the N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows a noticeable filament structure with a central cavity shell. The calculation for the dynamical state shows that this core can be potentially supported by the magnetic field against its gravitational instability, but the fragmentation might still occur and produce the observed N{sub 2}H{sup +} clumps if the gas density exceeds 5 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3} and this value is available within the observed density range. Also, the extremely high density at the core center suggests super-Jeans condition and the possibility for further fragmentation. For the chemical properties, the N{sub 2}H{sup +}-to-HCO{sup +} abundance ratios are shown to be different than those observed in infrared dark clouds. A combined analysis with the other Orion cores and the chemical model suggests that the different abundance ratios can be explained by the low CO abundances in our cores. To further reveal the evolution of such dense cores, higher resolution and sensitivity are required.

  4. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Schilke, P.; Menten, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    As Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now ``hot topics''. We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class~0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  5. A distance-limited sample of massive star-forming cores from the RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Moore, T. J. T.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cicchini, A.

    2015-09-01

    We analyse C18O (J = 3-2) data from a sample of 99 infrared (IR)-bright massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions that were identified as potential molecular-outflow sources in the Red MSX Source survey. We extract a distance-limited (D < 6 kpc) sample shown to be representative of star formation covering the transition between the source types. At the spatial resolution probed, Larson-like relationships are found for these cores, though the alternative explanation, that Larson's relations arise where surface-density-limited samples are considered, is also consistent with our data. There are no significant differences found between source properties for the MYSOs and H II regions, suggesting that the core properties are established prior to the formation of massive stars, which subsequently have little impact at the later evolutionary stages investigated. There is a strong correlation between dust-continuum and C18O-gas masses, supporting the interpretation that both trace the same material in these IR-bright sources. A clear linear relationship is seen between the independently established core masses and luminosities. The position of MYSOs and compact H II regions in the mass-luminosity plane is consistent with the luminosity expected from the most massive protostar in the cluster when using an ˜40 per cent star formation efficiency and indicates that they are at a similar evolutionary stage, near the end of the accretion phase.

  6. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. VI. The Internal Structures and a Candidate of Transiting Core in NGC 2024 Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiyuan; Li, Di

    2016-06-01

    We present a multiwavelength observational study of the NGC 2024 filament using infrared to submillimeter continuum and the {{NH}}3 (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions centered on FIR-3, the most massive core therein. FIR-3 is found to have no significant infrared point sources in the Spitzer/IRAC bands. But the {{NH}}3 kinetic temperature map shows a peak value at the core center with {T}{{k}}=25 K, which is significantly higher than the surrounding level ({T}{{k}}\\quad = 15–19 K). Such internal heating signature without an infrared source suggests an ongoing core collapse possibly at a transition stage from first hydrostatic core (FHSC) to protostar. The eight dense cores in the filament have dust temperatures between 17.5 and 22 K. They are much cooler than the hot ridge ({T}{{d}}∼ 55 K) around the central heating star IRS-2b. Comparison with a dust heating model suggests that the filament should have a distance of 3–5 pc from IRS-2b. This value is much larger than the spatial extent of the hot ridge, suggesting that the filament is spatially separated from the hot region along the line of sight.

  7. Long-term Evolution of Protostellar and Protoplanetary Disks. II. Layered Accretion with Infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Hartmann, Lee; Gammie, Charles

    2010-04-01

    We use one-dimensional two-zone time-dependent accretion disk models to study the long-term evolution of protostellar disks subject to mass addition from the collapse of a rotating cloud core. Our model consists of a constant surface density magnetically coupled active layer, with transport and dissipation in inactive regions only via gravitational instability. We start our simulations after a central protostar has formed, containing ~10% of the mass of the protostellar cloud. Subsequent evolution depends on the angular momentum of the accreting envelope. We find that disk accretion matches the infall rate early in the disk evolution because much of the inner disk is hot enough to couple to the magnetic field. Later infall reaches the disk beyond ~10 AU, and the disk undergoes outbursts of accretion in FU Ori-like events as described by Zhu et al. If the initial cloud core is moderately rotating, most of the central star's mass is built up by these outburst events. Our results suggest that the protostellar "luminosity problem" is eased by accretion during these FU Ori-like outbursts. After infall stops, the disk enters the T Tauri phase. An outer, viscously evolving disk has a structure that is in reasonable agreement with recent submillimeter studies and its surface density evolves from Σ vprop R -1 to R -1.5. An inner, massive belt of material—the "dead zone"—would not have been observed yet but should be seen in future high angular resolution observations by EVLA and ALMA. This high surface density belt is a generic consequence of low angular momentum transport efficiency at radii where the disk is magnetically decoupled, and would strongly affect planet formation and migration.

  8. Fragmentation of Massive Dense Cores Down to <~ 1000 AU: Relation between Fragmentation and Density Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Commerçon, Benoit; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Hennebelle, Patrick; di Francesco, James

    2014-04-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, and the National Research Council of Canada.

  9. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  10. Type Ic core-collapse supernova explosions evolved from very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Okita, Shinpei; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of a superluminous Type Ic core-collapse supernovae (SNe) producing a large amount of 56Ni. Very massive stars with a main-sequence mass larger than 100 M⊙ and a metallicity 0.001 < Z ≲ 0.004 are expected to explode as superluminous Type Ic SNe. Stars with ˜110-150 M⊙ and Z ≲ 0.001 would explode as Type Ic pulsational pair-instability SNe if the whole H and He layer has been lost by the mass-loss during pulsational pair instability. We evaluate the total ejecta mass and the yields of 56Ni, O and Si in core-collapse SNe evolved from very massive stars. We adopt 43.1 and 61.1 M⊙ WO stars with Z = 0.004 as SN progenitors expected to explode as Type Ic core-collapse SNe. These progenitors have masses of 110 and 250 M⊙ at the zero-age main sequence. Spherical explosions with an explosion energy larger than 2 × 1052 erg produce more than 3.5 M⊙56Ni, enough to reproduce the light curve of SN 2007bi. Asphericity of the explosion affects the total ejecta mass as well as the yields of 56Ni, O and Si. Aspherical explosions of the 110 and 250 M⊙ models reproduce the 56Ni yield of SN 2007bi. These explosions will also show large velocity dispersion. An aspherical core-collapse SN evolved from a very massive star is a possibility of the explosion of SN 2007bi.

  11. IRDC G030.88+00.13: A TALE OF TWO MASSIVE CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qizhou; Wang Ke

    2011-05-20

    Massive stars (M {approx}>10 M{sub sun}) form from collapse of parsec-scale molecular clumps. How molecular clumps fragment to give rise to massive stars in a cluster with a distribution of masses is unclear. We search for cold cores that may lead to future formation of massive stars in a massive (>10{sup 3} M{sub sun}), low luminosity (4.6 x 10{sup 2} L{sub sun}) infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G030.88+00.13. The NH{sub 3} data from the Very Large Array (VLA) and Green Bank Telescope reveal that the extinction feature seen in the infrared consists of two distinctive clumps along the same line of sight. The C1 clump at 97 km s{sup -1} coincides with the extinction in the Spitzer 8 and 24 {mu}m. Therefore, it is responsible for the majority of the IRDC. The C2 clump at 107 km s{sup -1} is more compact and has a peak temperature of 45 K. Compact dust cores and H{sub 2}O masers revealed in the Submillimeter Array and VLA observations are mostly associated with C2, and none are within the IRDC in C1. The luminosity indicates that neither the C1 nor C2 clump has yet to form massive protostars. But C1 might be at a precluster forming stage. The simulated observations rule out 0.1 pc cold cores with masses above 8 M{sub sun} within the IRDC. The core masses in C1 and C2 and those in high-mass protostellar objects suggest an evolutionary trend that the mass of cold cores increases over time. Based on our findings, we propose an empirical picture of massive star formation that protostellar cores and the embedded protostars undergo simultaneous mass growth during the protostellar evolution.

  12. A Massive Galaxy in Its Core Formation Phase Three Billion Years After the Big Bang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Erica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha M. Forster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores at early cosmic epochs. However, cores in their formation phase have not yet been observed. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we present a candidate core in formation 11 billion years ago, at z = 2.3. GOODS-N-774 has a stellar mass of 1.0 × 10 (exp 11) solar mass, a half-light radius of 1.0 kpc, and a star formation rate of 90 (sup +45 / sub -20) solar mass/yr. The star forming gas has a velocity dispersion 317 plus or minus 30 km/s, amongst the highest ever measured. It is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, compact quiescent galaxies at z is approximately equal to 2 (exp 8-11) and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 appear to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of the galaxy we infer that many star forming cores may be heavily obscured, and could be missed in optical and near-infrared surveys.

  13. THE COSMIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA RATE DOES NOT MATCH THE MASSIVE-STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Beacom, John F.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Thompson, Todd A.; Prieto, Jose L.

    2011-09-10

    We identify a 'supernova rate problem': the measured cosmic core-collapse supernova rate is a factor of {approx}2 smaller (with significance {approx}2{sigma}) than that predicted from the measured cosmic massive-star formation rate. The comparison is critical for topics from galaxy evolution and enrichment to the abundance of neutron stars and black holes. We systematically explore possible resolutions. The accuracy and precision of the star formation rate data and conversion to the supernova rate are well supported, and proposed changes would have far-reaching consequences. The dominant effect is likely that many supernovae are missed because they are either optically dim (low-luminosity) or dark, whether intrinsically or due to obscuration. We investigate supernovae too dim to have been discovered in cosmic surveys by a detailed study of all supernova discoveries in the local volume. If possible supernova impostors are included, then dim supernovae are common enough by fraction to solve the supernova rate problem. If they are not included, then the rate of dark core collapses is likely substantial. Other alternatives are that there are surprising changes in our understanding of star formation or supernova rates, including that supernovae form differently in small galaxies than in normal galaxies. These possibilities can be distinguished by upcoming supernova surveys, star formation measurements, searches for disappearing massive stars, and measurements of supernova neutrinos.

  14. A massive galaxy in its core formation phase three billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha Förster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-09-18

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores in early cosmic epochs. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes, but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we report a candidate core in the process of formation 11 billion years ago, at redshift z = 2.3. This galaxy, GOODS-N-774, has a stellar mass of 100 billion solar masses, a half-light radius of 1.0 kiloparsecs and a star formation rate of solar masses per year. The star-forming gas has a velocity dispersion of 317 ± 30 kilometres per second. This is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, which are compact quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 (refs 8-11) and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 seem to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of this galaxy we infer that many star-forming cores may be heavily obscured, and could be missed in optical and near-infrared surveys. PMID:25162527

  15. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J. L.

    1995-01-01

    ' problem of protostellar cores since the predicted central accretion rates are significantly reduced relative to that of the expansion wave solution. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that star-forming cloud cores are not very tightly bound and that modest disturbances can easily result in both termination of infall and dispersal of unaccreted material.

  16. Protostellar Collapse with a Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Hsu, Juliana J.

    1995-01-01

    ' problem of protostellar cores since the predicted central accretion rates are significantly reduced relative to that of the expansion wave solution. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that star-forming cloud cores are not very tightly bound and that modest disturbances can easily result in both termination of infall and dispersal of unaccreted material.

  17. A massive, cooling-flow-induced starburst in the core of a luminous cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-08-16

    In the cores of some clusters of galaxies the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous 'cooling flows' of gas sinking towards the cluster centre, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star-formation rates and cool gas masses for these 'cool-core' clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 (ref. 11) at redshift z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (8.2 × 10(45) erg s(-1)) galaxy cluster that hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (around 3,820 solar masses a year). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (formation of around 740 solar masses a year), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool-core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star-formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form through accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than (as is currently thought) assembling entirely via mergers. PMID:22895340

  18. A massive, cooling-flow-induced starburst in the core of a luminous cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Foley, R. J.; Ruel, J.; Sullivan, P.; Veilleux, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bazin, G.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Egami, E.; Forman, W. R.; Garmire, G. P.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Rawle, T. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Rex, M.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Simcoe, R.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; Šuhada, R.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2012-08-01

    In the cores of some clusters of galaxies the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous `cooling flows' of gas sinking towards the cluster centre, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star-formation rates and cool gas masses for these `cool-core' clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 (ref. 11) at redshift z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (8.2 × 1045 erg s-1) galaxy cluster that hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (around 3,820 solar masses a year). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (formation of around 740 solar masses a year), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool-core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star-formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form through accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than (as is currently thought) assembling entirely via mergers.

  19. NATURE OF W51e2: MASSIVE CORES AT DIFFERENT PHASES OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.c

    2010-02-10

    We present high-resolution continuum images of the W51e2 complex processed from archival data of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 0.85 and 1.3 mm and the Very Large Array at 7 and 13 mm. We also made line images and profiles of W51e2 for three hydrogen radio recombination lines (RRLs; H26alpha, H53alpha, and H66alpha) and absorption of two molecular lines of HCN(4-3) and CO(2-1). At least four distinct continuum components have been detected in the 3'' region of W51e2 from the SMA continuum images at 0.85 and 1.3 mm with resolutions of 0.''3 x 0.''2 and 1.''4 x 0.''7, respectively. The west component, W51e2-W, coincides with the ultracompact H II region reported from previous radio observations. The H26alpha line observation reveals an unresolved hyper-compact ionized core (<0.''06 or <310 AU) with a high electron temperature of 1.2 x 10{sup 4} K, with the corresponding emission measure EM>7 x 10{sup 10} pc cm{sup -6} and the electron density N{sub e} >7 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. The inferred Lyman continuum flux implies that the H II region W51e2-W requires a newly formed massive star, an O8 star or a cluster of B-type stars, to maintain the ionization. W51e2-E, the brightest component at 0.85 mm, is located 0.''9 east from the hyper-compact ionized core. It has a total mass of {approx}140 M{sub sun} according to our spectral energy distribution analysis and a large infall rate of >1.3 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} inferred from the absorption of HCN. W51e2-E appears to be the accretion center in W51e2. Given the fact that no free-free emission and no RRLs have been detected, the massive core of W51e2-E appears to host one or more growing massive proto-stars. Located 2'' northwest from W51e2-E, W51e2-NW is detected in the continuum emission at 0.85 and 1.3 mm. No continuum emission has been detected at lambda>= 7 mm. Along with the maser activities previously observed, our analysis suggests that W51e2-NW is at an earlier phase of star formation. W51e2-N is

  20. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  1. [Massive transfusion with the Rapid Infusion System. Its effect on core body temperature].

    PubMed

    Booke, M; Sielenkämper, A

    2001-12-01

    Extensive blood loss requires adequate volume replacement. However the infused volume cannot be adequately warmed especially when high infusion rates are necessary. Subsequently, hypothermia develops and results in hemodynamic instability and coagulopathy. The Rapid Infusion System (RIS) allows high infusion rates (up to 1.5 l/min) while at the same time guaranteeing sufficient warming. The efficacy of the RIS was investigated in 43 consecutive patients who required a massive transfusion. The average volume transfused in these patients was 31.7 +/- 4.5 l (minimum: 7.8 l; maximum: 165.3 l) which is equal to an average exchange of 6.4 times the circulating blood volume (maximum: 39.4 blood volumes). The replacement of such high blood volumes has not yet been published in a series of patients. Despite these high transfusion rates, the body core temperature was maintained at 35.85 +/- 0.1 degrees C. Only five patients had a body core temperature below 34 degrees C, all were trauma patients and four of these five patients already had a preoperative temperature below 34 degrees C. The mortality in this study was 28%, which is markedly reduced in comparison to previous publications although they all considered at patients with significantly less blood loss. Maintaining normothermia and normovolemia by the use of the RIS may explain the improved outcome. PMID:11824076

  2. Massively Multi-core Acceleration of a Document-Similarity Classifier to Detect Web Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, C; Gokhale, M; Top, P; Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2010-01-14

    This paper describes our approach to adapting a text document similarity classifier based on the Term Frequency Inverse Document Frequency (TFIDF) metric to two massively multi-core hardware platforms. The TFIDF classifier is used to detect web attacks in HTTP data. In our parallel hardware approaches, we design streaming, real time classifiers by simplifying the sequential algorithm and manipulating the classifier's model to allow decision information to be represented compactly. Parallel implementations on the Tilera 64-core System on Chip and the Xilinx Virtex 5-LX FPGA are presented. For the Tilera, we employ a reduced state machine to recognize dictionary terms without requiring explicit tokenization, and achieve throughput of 37MB/s at slightly reduced accuracy. For the FPGA, we have developed a set of software tools to help automate the process of converting training data to synthesizable hardware and to provide a means of trading off between accuracy and resource utilization. The Xilinx Virtex 5-LX implementation requires 0.2% of the memory used by the original algorithm. At 166MB/s (80X the software) the hardware implementation is able to achieve Gigabit network throughput at the same accuracy as the original algorithm.

  3. Magnetorotational collapse of massive stellar cores to neutron stars: Simulations in full general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Stephens, Branson C.

    2006-11-01

    We study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects arising in the collapse of magnetized, rotating, massive stellar cores to proto-neutron stars (PNSs). We perform axisymmetric numerical simulations in full general relativity with a hybrid equation of state. The formation and early evolution of a PNS are followed with a grid of 2500×2500 zones, which provides better resolution than in previous (Newtonian) studies. We confirm that significant differential rotation results even when the rotation of the progenitor is initially uniform. Consequently, the magnetic field is amplified both by magnetic winding and the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Even if the magnetic energy EEM is much smaller than the rotational kinetic energy Trot at the time of PNS formation, the ratio EEM/Trot increases to 0.1 0.2 by the magnetic winding. Following PNS formation, MHD outflows lead to losses of rest mass, energy, and angular momentum from the system. The earliest outflow is produced primarily by the increasing magnetic stress caused by magnetic winding. The MRI amplifies the poloidal field and increases the magnetic stress, causing further angular momentum transport and helping to drive the outflow. After the magnetic field saturates, a nearly stationary, collimated magnetic field forms near the rotation axis and a Blandford-Payne type outflow develops along the field lines. These outflows remove angular momentum from the PNS at a rate given by J˙˜ηEEMCB, where η is a constant of order ˜0.1 and CB is a typical ratio of poloidal to toroidal field strength. As a result, the rotation period quickly increases for a strongly magnetized PNS until the degree of differential rotation decreases. Our simulations suggest that rapidly rotating, magnetized PNSs may not give rise to rapidly rotating neutron stars.

  4. Core-Halo Structure of a Chemically Homogeneous Massive Star and Bending of the Zero-Age Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Mie; Ueno, Munetaka; Kato, Mariko

    1999-08-01

    We have recalculated the interior structure of very massive stars of uniform chemical composition with the OPAL opacity. Very massive stars are found to develop a core-halo structure with an extended radiative-envelope. With the core-halo structure, because a more massive star has a more extended envelope, the track of the upper zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) curves redward in the H-R diagram at > 100 MO (Z=0.02), >70 MO (Z=0.05), and > 15 MO for helium ZAMS (X=0, Z=0.02). Therefore, the effective temperatures of very massive ZAMS stars are rather low: e.g., for a 200 MO star, log T_eff=4.75 (Z=0.004), 4.60 (Z=0.02), 4.46 (Z=0.05), and 4.32 (Z=0.10). The effective temperatures of very luminous stars (> 120 MO ) found in the LMC, the SMC, and the Galaxy are discussed in relation to this metal dependence of a curving upper main-sequence.

  5. Mid-infrared Extinction Mapping of Infrared Dark Clouds. II. The Structure of Massive Starless Cores and Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2012-07-01

    We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler & Tan (Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 μm images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, Σ, up to ~= 0.5 g cm-2 with 2'' resolution and mitigate one of the main sources of uncertainty associated with Galactic MIREX mapping. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage cores and their surrounding clumps, selected from 10 infrared dark clouds, measuring Σcl(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M cl = 60 M ⊙. We find that these objects have a mean radius of R cl ~= 0.1 pc, mean \\bar{\\Sigma }_cl = 0.3\\:g\\:cm^{-2} and, if fitted by a power-law (PL) density profile \\rho _cl\\propto r^{-k_\\rho ,cl}, a mean value of k ρ, cl = 1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, then we find a mean core density PL index of k ρ, c = 1.6. We repeat this analysis as a function of radius and derive the best-fitting PL plus uniform clump envelope model for each of the 42 core/clumps. The cores have typical masses of Mc ~ 100 M ⊙ and \\bar{\\Sigma }_c\\sim 0.1\\:g\\:cm^{-2}, and are embedded in clumps with comparable mass surface densities. We also consider Bonnor-Ebert density models, but these do not fit the observed Σ profiles as well as PLs. We conclude that massive starless cores exist and are well described by singular polytropic spheres. Their relatively low values of Σ and the fact that they are IR dark may imply that their fragmentation is inhibited by magnetic fields rather than radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper

  6. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  7. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we aim to characterize high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al., we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II or photodissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 41.2 per cent, 36.6 per cent, 30.6 per cent and 12.7 per cent, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H2 column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 2.6 × 10-3, 7.0 × 10-3, 6.5 × 10-3 and 5.5 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. These values indicate that infall candidates at later evolutionary stages are still accumulating material efficiently. It is interesting to find that both infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected show a clear trend of increasing mass from the pre-stellar to proto-stellar, and to the H II stages. The power indices of the clump mass function are 2.04 ± 0.16 and 2.17 ± 0.31 for the infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected, respectively, which agree well with the power index of the stellar initial mass function (2.35) and the cold Planck cores (2.0).

  8. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we aim to characterise high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz (MALT90) survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al. (2015), we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII or photo-dissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII and PDR stages are 41.2%, 36.6%, 30.6% and 12.7%, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H2 column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII and PDR stages are 2.6×10-3, 7.0×10-3, 6.5×10-3 and 5.5×10-3 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. These values indicate that infall candidates at later evolutionary stages are still accumulating material efficiently. It is interesting to find that both infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected show a clear trend of increasing mass from the pre-stellar to proto-stellar, and to the HII stages. The power indices of the clump mass function (ClMF) are 2.04±0.16 and 2.17±0.31 for the infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected, respectively, which agree well with the power index of the stellar initial mass function (2.35) and the cold Planck cores (2.0).

  9. A DENSITY DEPENDENCE FOR PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY IN CLASS I SOURCES: COLLABORATIVE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Hurst, Rachel; Koenig, Xavier

    2014-02-10

    Class I protostars in three high-mass star-forming regions are found to have correlations among the local projected density of other Class I protostars, the summed flux from these other protostars, and the protostellar luminosity in the WISE 22 μm band. Brighter Class I sources form in higher-density and higher-flux regions, while low luminosity sources form anywhere. These correlations depend slightly on the number of neighbors considered (from 2 to 20) and could include a size-of-sample effect from the initial mass function (i.e., larger numbers include rarer and more massive stars). Luminosities seem to vary by neighborhood with nearby protostars having values proportional to each other and higher density regions having higher values. If Class I luminosity is partially related to the accretion rate, then this luminosity correlation is consistent with the competitive accretion model, although it is more collaborative than competitive. The correlation is also consistent with primordial mass segregation and could explain why the stellar initial mass function resembles the dense core mass function even when cores form multiple stars.

  10. Masgomas-4: Physical characterization of a double-core obscured cluster with a massive and very young stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Alegría, S.; Marín-Franch, A.; Herrero, A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. The discovery of new, obscured massive star clusters has changed our understanding of the Milky Way star-forming activity from a passive to a very active star-forming machine. The search for these obscured clusters is strongly supported by the use of all-sky, near-IR surveys. Aims: The main goal of the MASGOMAS project is to search for and study unknown, young, and massive star clusters in the Milky Way, using near-IR data. Here we try to determine the main physical parameters (distance, size, total mass, and age) of Masgomas-4, a new double-core obscured cluster. Methods: Using near-IR photometry (J, H, and KS) we selected a total of 21 stars as OB-type star candidates. Multi-object, near-IR follow-up spectroscopy allowed us to carry out the spectral classification of the OB-type candidates. Results: Of the 21 spectroscopically observed stars, ten are classified as OB-type stars, eight as F- to early G-type dwarf stars, and three as late-type giant stars. Spectroscopically estimated distances indicate that the OB-type stars belong to the same cluster, located at a distance of 1.90+1.28-0.90 kpc. Our spectrophotometric data confirm a very young and massive stellar population, with a clear concentration of pre-main-sequence massive candidates (Herbig Ae/Be) around one of the cluster cores. The presence of a surrounding H II cloud and the Herbig Ae/Be candidates indicate an upper age limit of 5 Myr.

  11. G305.136+0.068: A MASSIVE AND DENSE COLD CORE IN AN EARLY STAGE OF EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Guido; Mardones, Diego; Contreras, Yanett; Servajean, Elise; Guzmán, Andrés E.; Pineda, Jaime E.

    2015-01-20

    We report molecular line observations, made with ASTE and SEST, and dust continuum observations at 0.87 mm, made with APEX, toward the cold dust core G305.136+0.068. The molecular observations show that the core is isolated and roughly circularly symmetric and imply that it has a mass of 1.1 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. A simultaneous model fitting of the spectra observed in four transitions of CS, using a non-LTE radiative transfer code, indicates that the core is centrally condensed, with the density decreasing with radius as r {sup –1.8}, and that the turbulent velocity increases toward the center. The dust observations also indicate that the core is highly centrally condensed and that the average column density is 1.1 g cm{sup –2}, a value slightly above the theoretical threshold required for the formation of high-mass stars. A fit to the spectral energy distribution of the emission from the core indicates a dust temperature of 17 ± 2 K, confirming that the core is cold. Spitzer images show that the core is seen in silhouette from 3.6 to 24.0 μm and that it is surrounded by an envelope of emission, presumably tracing an externally excited photo-dissociated region. We found two embedded sources within a region of 20'' centered at the peak of the core, one of which is young, has a luminosity of 66 L {sub ☉}, and is accreting mass with a high accretion rate of ∼1 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We suggest that this object corresponds to the seed of a high-mass protostar still in the process of formation. The present observations support the hypothesis that G305.136+0.068 is a massive and dense cold core in an early stage of evolution, in which the formation of a high-mass star has just started.

  12. A giant outburst two years before the core-collapse of a massive star.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, A; Smartt, S J; Mattila, S; Eldridge, J J; Young, D; Itagaki, K; Yamaoka, H; Navasardyan, H; Valenti, S; Patat, F; Agnoletto, I; Augusteijn, T; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Boles, T; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Botticella, M T; Bufano, F; Cao, C; Deng, J; Dennefeld, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Harutyunyan, A; Keenan, F P; Iijima, T; Lorenzi, V; Mazzali, P A; Meng, X; Nakano, S; Nielsen, T B; Smoker, J V; Stanishev, V; Turatto, M; Xu, D; Zampieri, L

    2007-06-14

    The death of massive stars produces a variety of supernovae, which are linked to the structure of the exploding stars. The detection of several precursor stars of type II supernovae has been reported (see, for example, ref. 3), but we do not yet have direct information on the progenitors of the hydrogen-deficient type Ib and Ic supernovae. Here we report that the peculiar type Ib supernova SN 2006jc is spatially coincident with a bright optical transient that occurred in 2004. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the supernova leads us to suggest that the progenitor was a carbon-oxygen Wolf-Rayet star embedded within a helium-rich circumstellar medium. There are different possible explanations for this pre-explosion transient. It appears similar to the giant outbursts of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) of 60-100 solar masses, but the progenitor of SN 2006jc was helium- and hydrogen-deficient (unlike LBVs). An LBV-like outburst of a Wolf-Rayet star could be invoked, but this would be the first observational evidence of such a phenomenon. Alternatively, a massive binary system composed of an LBV that erupted in 2004, and a Wolf-Rayet star exploding as SN 2006jc, could explain the observations. PMID:17568740

  13. PROTOSTELLAR ACCRETION FLOWS DESTABILIZED BY MAGNETIC FLUX REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Li Zhiyun; Zhao Bo

    2012-09-20

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  14. Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Li, Zhi-Yun; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  15. Axisymmetric collapse simulations of rotating massive stellar cores in full general relativity: Numerical study for prompt black hole formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Yu-ichirou; Shibata, Masaru

    2005-04-15

    We perform axisymmetric simulations for gravitational collapse of a massive iron core to a black hole in full general relativity. The iron cores are modeled by {gamma}=4/3 equilibrium polytrope for simplicity. The hydrodynamic equations are solved using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme with a parametric equation of state. The Cartoon method is adopted for solving the Einstein equations. Simulations are performed for a wide variety of initial conditions changing the mass ({approx_equal}2.0-3.0M{sub {center_dot}}), the angular momentum, the rotational velocity profile of the core, and the parameters of the equations of state which are chosen so that the maximum mass of the cold spherical polytrope is {approx_equal}1.6M{sub {center_dot}}. Then, the criterion for the prompt black hole formation is clarified in terms of the mass and the angular momentum for several rotational velocity profile of the core and equations of state. It is found that (i) with the increase of the thermal energy generated by shocks, the threshold mass for the prompt black hole formation is increased by 20-40%, (ii) the rotational centrifugal force increases the threshold mass by < or approx. 25%, (iii) with the increase of the degree of differential rotation, the threshold mass is also increased, and (iv) the amplification factors shown in the results (i)-(iii) depend sensitively on the equation of state. We also find that the collapse dynamics and the structure of the shock formed at the bounce depend strongly on the stiffness of the adopted equation of state. In particular, as a new feature, a strong bipolar explosion is observed for the collapse of rapidly rotating iron cores with an equation of state which is stiff in subnuclear density and soft in supranuclear density. Gravitational waves are computed in terms of a quadrupole formula. It is also found that the waveform depends sensitively on the equations of state.

  16. Evaluation of Counter-Based Dynamic Load Balancing Schemes for Massive Contingency Analysis on Over 10,000 Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu; Rice, Mark J.

    2012-12-27

    Contingency analysis studies are necessary to assess the impact of possible power system component failures. The results of the contingency analysis are used to ensure the grid reliability, and in power market operation for the feasibility test of market solutions. Currently, these studies are performed in real time based on the current operating conditions of the grid with a set of pre-selected contingency list, which might result in overlooking some critical contingencies caused by variable system status. To have a complete picture of a power grid, more contingencies need to be studied to improve grid reliability. High-performance computing techniques hold the promise of being able to perform the analysis for more contingency cases within a much shorter time frame. This paper evaluates the performance of counter-based dynamic load balancing schemes for a massive contingency analysis program on 10,000+ cores. One million N-2 contingency analysis cases with a Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model have been used to demonstrate the performance. The speedup of 3964 with 4096 cores and 7877 with 10240 cores are obtained. This paper reports the performance of the load balancing scheme with a single counter and two counters, describes disk I/O issues, and discusses other potential techniques for further improving the performance.

  17. VLA and ALMA Imaging of the Massive Prestellar Core G11.92-0.61 MM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Schnee, S.

    2016-05-01

    We have obtained new Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations at X, K, and Ka bands (3 cm, 1.3 cm, and 0.9 cm) which have resolved the continuum emission from the most promising candidate for a massive pre-stellar core discovered to date: G11.92-0.61 MM2. As described in Cyganowski et al. ([1]), this bright dust continuum source (190 mJy at 1.1 mm) exhibits no spectral line emission in sub-arcsecond-resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) images across 24 GHz of bandwidth, including the typical tracers CO, HCN, HCO+, and N2H+. Astrochemical models require high density (> 109 cm-3) and low temperature (< 20 K) to explain the rare chemistry of this massive (M ≥ 30 M⊙) object, which may exist in a fleeting evolutionary state. This source is well detected and elongated in VLA Ka-band (9 mm) continuum image with a 0.25'' beam (800 AU), is marginally detected in poorer resolution (1) K-band (1.3 cm) data, and is undetected at X-band (3 cm) with 0.25'' resolution. In combination with existing SMA millimeter wavelength data, our results provide an accurate spectral energy distribution of this source, constraining the dust grain emissivity index to 1.0-1.6 and the luminosity to 3-37 L⊙. Preliminary results from ALMA Band 7 images confirm that the dust emission from MM2 is resolved in an east-west direction.

  18. Wolf-Rayet stars of type WN/WC and mixing processes during core helium burning of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, N.

    1991-01-01

    Consequences of the recent finding that most WN/WC spectra probably originate from individual Wolf-Rayet stars for the internal structure of massive stars are discussed. Numerical models including the effect of slow-down or prevention of convective mixing due to molecular weight gradients are presented, in which a transition layer with a composition mixture of H- and He-burning ashes is formed above the convective He-burning core. These models are able to qualitatively account for the observed WN/WC frequency and agree quantitatively with the only WN/WC-composition determination so far. It is argued that the same transition layer may be responsible for the final blue loop which the SN 1987 A progenitor performed some 10,000 yr before explosion. These results indicate that composition barriers may be efficient in restricting convection during central helium burning, in contrast to computations relying on the Schwarzschild criterion for convection, with or without overshooting.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL BOLTZMANN HYDRO CODE FOR CORE COLLAPSE IN MASSIVE STARS. I. SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC TREATMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-10-01

    We propose a novel numerical method for solving multi-dimensional, special relativistic Boltzmann equations for neutrinos coupled with hydrodynamics equations. This method is meant to be applied to simulations of core-collapse supernovae. We handle special relativity in a non-conventional way, taking account of all orders of v/c. Consistent treatment of the advection and collision terms in the Boltzmann equations has been a challenge, which we overcome by employing two different energy grids: Lagrangian remapped and laboratory fixed grids. We conduct a series of basic tests and perform a one-dimensional simulation of core-collapse, bounce, and shock-stall for a 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor model with a minimum but essential set of microphysics. We demonstrate in the latter simulation that our new code is capable of handling all phases in core-collapse supernova. For comparison, a non-relativistic simulation is also conducted with the same code, and we show that they produce qualitatively wrong results in neutrino transfer. Finally, we discuss a possible incorporation of general relativistic effects into our method.

  20. Double core evolution. 7: The infall of a neutron star through the envelope of its massive star companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, James L.; Taam, Ronald E.; Hernquist, Lars

    1995-01-01

    Binary systems with properties similar to those of high-mass X-ray binaries are evolved through the common envelope phase. Three-dimensional simulations show that the timescale of the infall phase of the neutron star depends upon the evolutionary state of its massive companion. We find that tidal torques more effectively accelerate common envelope evolution for companions in their late core helium-burning stage and that the infall phase is rapid (approximately several initial orbital periods). For less evolved companions the decay of the orbit is longer; however, once the neutron star is deeply embedded within the companion's envelope the timescale for orbital decay decreases rapidly. As the neutron star encounters the high-density region surrounding the helium core of its massive companion, the rate of energy loss from the orbit increases dramatically leading to either partial or nearly total envelope ejection. The outcome of the common envelope phase depends upon the structure of the evolved companion. In particular, it is found that the entire common envelope can be ejected by the interaction of the neutron star with a red supergiant companion in binaries with orbital periods similar to those of long-period Be X-ray binaries. For orbital periods greater than or approximately equal to 0.8-2 yr (for companions of mass 12-24 solar mass) it is likely that a binary will survive the common envelope phase. For these systems, the structure of the progenitor star is characterized by a steep density gradient above the helium core, and the common envelope phase ends with a spin up of the envelope to within 50%-60% of corotation and with a slow mass outflow. The efficiency of mass ejection is found to be approximately 30%-40%. For less evolved companions, there is insufficient energy in the orbit to unbind the common envelope and only a fraction of it is ejected. Since the timescale for orbital decay is always shorter than the mass-loss timescale from the common envelope

  1. THE DENSITY PROFILES OF MASSIVE, RELAXED GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. SEPARATING LUMINOUS AND DARK MATTER IN CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Sand, David J.

    2013-03-01

    We present stellar and dark matter (DM) density profiles for a sample of seven massive, relaxed galaxy clusters derived from strong and weak gravitational lensing and resolved stellar kinematic observations within the centrally located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). In Paper I of the series, we demonstrated that the total density profile derived from these data, which span three decades in radius, is consistent with numerical DM-only simulations at radii {approx}> 5-10 kpc, despite the significant contribution of stellar material in the core. Here, we decompose the inner mass profiles of these clusters into stellar and dark components. Parameterizing the DM density profile as a power law {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r {sup -{beta}} on small scales, we find a mean slope ({beta}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.10(random){sup +0.14} {sub -0.13}(systematic). Alternatively, cored Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with (log r {sub core}/kpc) = 1.14 {+-} 0.13{sup +0.14} {sub -0.22} provide an equally good description. These density profiles are significantly shallower than canonical NFW models at radii {approx}< 30 kpc, comparable to the effective radii of the BCGs. The inner DM profile is correlated with the distribution of stars in the BCG, suggesting a connection between the inner halo and the assembly of stars in the central galaxy. The stellar mass-to-light ratio inferred from lensing and stellar dynamics is consistent with that inferred using stellar population synthesis models if a Salpeter initial mass function is adopted. We compare these results to theories describing the interaction between baryons and DM in cluster cores, including adiabatic contraction models and the possible effects of galaxy mergers and active galactic nucleus feedback, and evaluate possible signatures of alternative DM candidates.

  2. The great dichotomy of the Solar System: Small terrestrial embryos and massive giant planet cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Lambrechts, M.; Jacobson, S.; Bitsch, B.

    2015-09-01

    The basic structure of the Solar System is set by the presence of low-mass terrestrial planets in its inner part and giant planets in its outer part. This is the result of the formation of a system of multiple embryos with approximately the mass of Mars in the inner disk and of a few multi-Earth-mass cores in the outer disk, within the lifetime of the gaseous component of the protoplanetary disk. What was the origin of this dichotomy in the mass distribution of embryos/cores? We show in this paper that the classic processes of runaway and oligarchic growth from a disk of planetesimals cannot explain this dichotomy, even if the original surface density of solids increased at the snowline. Instead, the accretion of drifting pebbles by embryos and cores can explain the dichotomy, provided that some assumptions hold true. We propose that the mass-flow of pebbles is two-times lower and the characteristic size of the pebbles is approximately ten times smaller within the snowline than beyond the snowline (respectively at heliocentric distance r rice , where rice is the snowline heliocentric distance), due to ice sublimation and the splitting of icy pebbles into a collection of chondrule-size silicate grains. In this case, objects of original sub-lunar mass would grow at drastically different rates in the two regions of the disk. Within the snowline these bodies would reach approximately the mass of Mars while beyond the snowline they would grow to ∼ 20 Earth masses. The results may change quantitatively with changes to the assumed parameters, but the establishment of a clear dichotomy in the mass distribution of protoplanets appears robust provided that there is enough turbulence in the disk to prevent the sedimentation of the silicate grains into a very thin layer.

  3. CHEMICAL SEGREGATION TOWARD MASSIVE HOT CORES: THE AFGL2591 STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q.; Viti, S.; Martin-Pintado, J.; De Wit, W.-J. E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es

    2012-07-01

    We present high angular resolution observations (0.''5 Multiplication-Sign 0.''3) carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward the AFGL2591 high-mass star-forming region. Our SMA images reveal a clear chemical segregation within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core, where different molecular species (Types I, II, and III) appear distributed in three concentric shells. This is the first time that such a chemical segregation is ever reported at linear scales {<=}3000 AU within a hot core. While Type I species (H{sub 2}S and {sup 13}CS) peak at the AFGL2591 VLA 3 protostar, Type II molecules (HC{sub 3}N, OCS, SO, and SO{sub 2}) show a double-peaked structure circumventing the continuum peak. Type III species, represented by CH{sub 3}OH, form a ring-like structure surrounding the continuum emission. The excitation temperatures of SO{sub 2}, HC{sub 3}N, and CH{sub 3}OH (185 {+-} 11 K, 150 {+-} 20 K, and 124 {+-} 12 K, respectively) show a temperature gradient within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 envelope, consistent with previous observations and modeling of the source. By combining the H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH images, representative of the three concentric shells, we find that the global kinematics of the molecular gas follow Keplerian-like rotation around a 40 M{sub Sun} star. The chemical segregation observed toward AFGL2591 VLA 3 is explained by the combination of molecular UV photodissociation and a high-temperature ({approx}1000 K) gas-phase chemistry within the low extinction innermost region in the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core.

  4. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, F.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M⊙, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  5. Tomography of massive stars from core collapse to supernova shock breakout

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Matthew D.; Haxton, W. C.; Yüksel, Hasan

    2013-11-20

    Neutrinos and gravitational waves are the only direct probes of the inner dynamics of a stellar core collapse. They are also the first signals to arrive from a supernova (SN) and, if detected, establish the moment when the shock wave is formed that unbinds the stellar envelope and later initiates the optical display upon reaching the stellar surface with a burst of UV and X-ray photons, the shock breakout (SBO). We discuss how neutrino observations can be used to trigger searches to detect the elusive SBO event. Observation of the SBO would provide several important constraints on progenitor structure and the explosion, including the shock propagation time (the duration between the neutrino burst and SBO), an observable that is important in distinguishing progenitor types. Our estimates suggest that next-generation neutrino detectors could exploit the overdensity of nearby SNe to provide several such triggers per decade, more than an order-of-magnitude improvement over the present.

  6. Is the core of the Coma cluster more massive than we thought?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    The, Lih Sin; White, Simon D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The paper investigates how the mass distribution and mass-to-light ratio of the Coma cluster are constrained by optical and X-ray observations. The X-ray data of Cowie et al. (1987) suggest that the mass of the cluster core is higher than optical estimates based on the assumption that galaxies trace the mass. The X-ray data do not strongly constrain the mass distribution beyond 2/h50 Mpc and are consistent both with a low total mass for the cluster and with a mass similar to the standard value. The low-mass model requires galaxies in the outer part of the cluster to be on near-circular orbits.

  7. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  8. HEATING AND COOLING PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, S.; Turner, N. J. E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-05-10

    We examine heating and cooling in protostellar disks using three-dimensional radiation-MHD calculations of a patch of the Solar nebula at 1 AU, employing the shearing-box and flux-limited radiation diffusion approximations. The disk atmosphere is ionized by stellar X-rays, well coupled to magnetic fields, and sustains a turbulent accretion flow driven by magnetorotational instability, while the interior is resistive and magnetically dead. The turbulent layers are heated by absorbing the light from the central star and by dissipating the magnetic fields. They are optically thin to their own radiation and cool inefficiently. The optically thick interior in contrast is heated only weakly, by re-emission from the atmosphere. The interior is colder than a classical viscous model and isothermal. The magnetic fields support an extended atmosphere that absorbs the starlight 1.5 times higher than the hydrostatic viscous model. The disk thickness thus measures not the internal temperature, but the magnetic field strength. Fluctuations in the fields move the starlight-absorbing surface up and down. The height ranges between 13% and 24% of the radius over timescales of several orbits, with implications for infrared variability. The fields are buoyant, so the accretion heating occurs higher in the atmosphere than the stresses. The heating is localized around current sheets, caused by magnetorotational instability at lower elevations and by Parker instability at higher elevations. Gas in the sheets is heated above the stellar irradiation temperature, even though accretion is much less than irradiation power when volume averaged. The hot optically thin current sheets might be detectable through their line emission.

  9. Magnetic Braking and Protostellar Disk Formation: The Ideal MHD Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, Richard R.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic fields are usually considered dynamically important in star formation when the dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio is close to, or less than, unity (λ lesssim 1). We show that, in disk formation, the requirement is far less stringent. This conclusion is drawn from a set of 2D (axisymmetric) simulations of the collapse of rotating, singular isothermal cores magnetized to different degrees. We find that a weak field corresponding to λ ~ 100 can begin to disrupt the rotationally supported disk through magnetic braking, by creating regions of rapid, supersonic collapse in the disk. These regions are separated by one or more centrifugal barriers, where the rapid infall is temporarily halted. The number of centrifugal barriers increases with the mass-to-flux ratio λ. When λ gtrsim 100, they merge together to form a more or less contiguous, rotationally supported disk. Even though the magnetic field in such a case is extremely weak on the scale of dense cores, it is amplified by collapse and differential rotation, to the extent that its pressure dominates the thermal pressure in both the disk and its surrounding region. For relatively strongly magnetized cores with λ lesssim 10, the disk formation is suppressed completely, as found previously. A new feature is that the mass accretion is highly episodic, due to reconnection of the magnetic field lines accumulated near the center. For rotationally supported disks to appear during the protostellar mass accretion phase of star formation in dense cores with realistic field strengths, the powerful magnetic brake must be weakened, perhaps through nonideal MHD effects. Another possibility is to remove, through protostellar winds, the material that acts to brake the disk rotation. We discuss the possibility of observing a generic product of the magnetic braking, an extended circumstellar region that is supported by a combination of toroidal magnetic field and rotation—a "magnetogyrosphere"—interferometrically.

  10. Infall-driven protostellar accretion and the solution to the luminosity problem

    SciTech Connect

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2014-12-10

    We investigate the role of mass infall in the formation and evolution of protostars. To avoid ad hoc initial and boundary conditions, we consider the infall resulting self-consistently from modeling the formation of stellar clusters in turbulent molecular clouds. We show that infall rates in turbulent clouds are comparable to accretion rates inferred from protostellar luminosities or measured in pre-main-sequence stars. They should not be neglected in modeling the luminosity of protostars and the evolution of disks, even after the embedded protostellar phase. We find large variations of infall rates from protostar to protostar, and large fluctuations during the evolution of individual protostars. In most cases, the infall rate is initially of order 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and may either decay rapidly in the formation of low-mass stars, or remain relatively large when more massive stars are formed. The simulation reproduces well the observed characteristic values and scatter of protostellar luminosities and matches the observed protostellar luminosity function. The luminosity problem is therefore solved once realistic protostellar infall histories are accounted for, with no need for extreme accretion episodes. These results are based on a simulation of randomly driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence on a scale of 4 pc, including self-gravity, adaptive-mesh refinement to a resolution of 50 AU, and accreting sink particles. The simulation yields a low star formation rate, consistent with the observations, and a mass distribution of sink particles consistent with the observed stellar initial mass function during the whole duration of the simulation, forming nearly 1300 sink particles over 3.2 Myr.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics of organic chemistry in the protostellar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kuan, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    A combination of astronomical observations, laboratory studies, and theoretical modelling is necessary to determine the organic chemistry of dense molecular clouds. We present spectroscopic evidence for the composition and evolution of organic molecules in protostellar environments. The principal reaction pathways to complex molecule formation by catalysis on dust grains and by reactions in the interstellar gas are described. Protostellar cores, where warming of dust has induced evaporation of icy grain mantles, are excellent sites in which to study the interaction between gas phase and grain-surface chemistries. We investigate the link between organics that are observed as direct products of grain surface reactions and those which are formed by secondary gas phase reactions of evaporated surface products. Theory predicts observable correlations between specific interstellar molecules, and also which new organics are viable for detection. We discuss recent infrared observations obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory, laboratory studies of organic molecules, theories of molecule formation, and summarise recent radioastronomical searches for various complex molecules such as ethers, azaheterocyclic compounds, and amino acids.

  12. The formation of protostellar disks. I - 1 M(solar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamical calculations of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating one solar mass protostellar cloud, including the effects of radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but without magnetic fields, are presented. The results include calculations of infrared protostellar spectra as a function of time and viewing angle. A numerical algorithm involving explicit nested grids is used to resolve the region of initial disk formation and at the same time to include the outer regions in the calculation. The central part of the protostar is modeled approximately. Initial conditions are systematically varied to investigate their influence on the evolution and final configuration of central star plus circumstellar disk. The initial state for the standard case is a centrally condensed molecular cloud core of one solar mass with a mean density of 8 x 10 exp -18 g/cu cm and a specific angular momentum at the outer edge of 7 x 10 exp 20 sq cm/s. The collapse is followed for 8 x 10 exp 4 yr, at which point 0.45 solar mass is contained in a rapidly rotating central object and most of the remainder in a surrounding equilibrium disk. The stability of this final structure is qualitatively analyzed.

  13. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  14. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Bieging, J.; Araya, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  15. Numerical simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttner, Gerhard; Smith, Michael D.; Yorke, Harold W.; Zinnecker, Hans

    Molecular jets announce the successful birth of a protostar. We develop here a model for the jets and their environments, adapting a multi-dimensional hydrocode to follow the molecular-atomic transitions of hydrogen. We examine powerful outflows into dense gas. The cocoon which forms around a jet is a very low density cavity of atomic gas. These atoms originate from strong shocks which dissociate the molecules. The rest of the molecules are either within the jet or swept up into very thin layers. Pulsed jets produce wider cavities and molecular layers which can grow onto resolvable jet knots. Three-dimensional simulations produce shocked molecular knots, distorted and multiple bow shocks and arclike structures. Spectroscopic and excitation properties of the hydrogen molecules are calculated. In the infrared, strong emission is seen from shocks within the jet (when pulsed) as well as from discrete regions along the cavity walls. Excitation, as measured by line ratios, is not generally constant. Broad double-peaked, shifted emission lines are predicted. The jet model for protostellar outflows is confronted with the constraints imposed by CO spectroscopic observations. From the three dimensional simulations we calculate line profiles and construct position-velocity diagrams for the (low-J) CO transitions. We find (1) the profiles imply power law variation of integrated brightness with velocity over a wide range of velocities, (2) the velocity field resembles a `Hubble Law' and (3) a hollow-shell structure at low velocities becomes an elongated lobe at high velocities. Deviations from the simple power law dependence of integrated brightness versus velocity occur at high velocities in our simulations. The curve first dips to a shallow minimum and then rises rapidly and peaks sharply. Reanalysis of the NGC 2264G and Cepheus E data confirm these predictions. We identify these two features with a jet-ambient shear layer and the jet itself. A deeper analysis reveals that

  16. A numerical model for the formation and long-term evolution of protostars and protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, A. M.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya. N.; Vorobyov, E. I.

    2016-02-01

    We present a physical and numerical model for studying the formation and evolution of protostellar objects with solar and sub-solar masses. The model covers several evolutionary phases of these objects starting from the gravitational collapse of an initially unstable pre-stellar cloud, proceeding through the formation and collapse of the first hydrostatic core, and ending with the complete dissipation of the initial cloud and formation of a protostar and protostellar disk. The model is described by a system of MHD equations that includes Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, and also a scheme for calculating the thermal and ionization structure of the cloud. We employ the multicomponent approach for computing the thermal structure of collapsing protostellar cloud, in which the dust and gas temperatures are treated separately, allowing us to accurately describe the initial stages of the cloud's gravitational contraction and collapse. We present the first results showing the structure of an initially quasi-equilibrium protostellar cloud during the first stages of gravitational collapse and subsequent evolution.

  17. Massive Chromite in the Brenham Pallasite and the Fractionation of Cr During the Crystallization of Asteroidal Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.; Lange, David E.; Francis, Carl A.; Ulff-Moller, Finn

    1999-01-01

    Large (greater than or equal to 2 mm) chromite grains are present in IIIAB iron meteorites and in the main-group a pallasites (PMG), closely related to high-Au IIIAB irons, Pallasites seem to have formed by the intrusion of a highly evolved metallic magma from a IIIAB-like core into fragmented olivine of the overlying dunite mantle. High Cr contents are commonly encountered during the analyses of metallic samples of high-Au IIIAB irons and main-group pallasites, an indication that Cr contents were high in the intruding liquid and that Cr behaved as an incompatible element during the crystallization of the IIIAB magma, contrary to expectations based on the negative IIIAB Cr-Ni and Cr-Au trends among low-Au IIIAB irons. In a region about 10 cm across in the Brenham main-group pallasite massive chromite fills the interstices between olivine grains, the site normally occupied by metal in Brenham and other pallasites. The massive chromite may have formed as a late cumulus phase; because Fe-Ni was also crystallizing, its absence in the chromite-rich region suggests a separation associated with differences in liquid buoyancy. The coexisting chromite and olivine are zoned; in the olivine FeO is highest in pallasitic (olivine-metal) regions, lowest in rims adjacent to chromite, and intermediate in the cores of these olivines. Chromite shows the opposite zoning, with the highest FeO contents at grain edges adjacent to olivine. The observed gradients are those expected to form by Fe-Mg exchange between olivine and chromite during slow cooling at subsolidus temperatures. Compared to normal Brenham, contents of phosphoran olivine and phosphates are higher in the chromitic pallasitic region. We also report data for large-to-massive chromites present in PMG Molong and in high-Au IIIAB Bear Creek that, like Brenham, formed from a highly evolved magma. The Bear Creek chromite has a much lower Mg content than that in the pallasites, implying that, in the PMG, the Mg was extracted

  18. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. deg of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: We present the fourth article in a series of papers focussed on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the cluster VVV CL041, which contains a new very massive star candidate, WR 62-2. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters (distance, reddening, mass, age) of VVV CL041. Results: We confirm that the cluster VVV CL041 is a young (less than 4 Myr) and massive (3 ± 2 × 103 M⊙) cluster, and not a simple asterism. It is located at a distance of 4.2 ± 0.9 kpc, and its reddening is AV = 8.0 ± 0.2 mag, which is slightly lower than the average for the young clusters towards the centre of the Galaxy. Spectral analysis shows that the most luminous star of the cluster, of the WN8h spectral type, is a candidate to have an initial mass larger than 100 M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002, and on observations with VLT/ISAAC at ESO (programme 087.D.0341A) and Flamingos-2 at Gemini (programme GS-2014A-Q-72).The photometric catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A31

  19. Theory of Protostellar Disk Fromation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during the hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in strict ideal MHD for the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe," and review possible resolutions to this problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and especially turbulence.

  20. Protostellar formation in rotating interstellar clouds. VII - Opacity and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of variations in the Rosseland mean opacity of dust grains on numerical models of three-dimensional protostellar collapse and fragmentation. In particular, it is found that increasing the dust grain opacity by factors of three to four has little effect upon the gross characteristics of protostellar fragmentation. Consequently, theoretical quantities such as the estimated minimum protostellar mass for Population I star formation are insensitive to the precise value of the opacity.

  1. Kinematics of the Envelope and Two Bipolar Jets in the Class 0 Protostellar System L1157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woojin; Fernández-López, Manuel; Stephens, Ian W.; Looney, Leslie W.

    2015-11-01

    A massive envelope and a strong bipolar outflow are the two main structures characterizing the youngest protostellar systems. In order to understand the physical properties of a bipolar outflow and the relationship with those of the envelope, we obtained a mosaic map covering the whole bipolar outflow of the youngest protostellar system L1157 with about 5″ angular resolution in CO J = 2-1 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. By utilizing these observations of the whole bipolar outflow, we estimate its physical properties and show that they are consistent with multiple jets. We also constrain a preferred precession direction. In addition, we observed the central envelope structure with 2″ resolution in the λ =1.3 and 3 mm continua and various molecular lines: C17O, C18O, 13CO, CS, CN, N2H+, CH3OH, H2O, SO, and SO2. All of the CO isotopes and CS, CN, and N2H+ have been detected and imaged. We marginally detected the features that can be interpreted as a rotating inner envelope in C17O and C18O and as an infalling outer envelope in N2H+. We also estimated the envelope and central protostellar masses and found that the dust-opacity spectral index changes with radius.

  2. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  3. Radiation transfer of models of massive star formation. III. The evolutionary sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; Hosokawa, Takashi E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2014-06-20

    We present radiation transfer simulations of evolutionary sequences of massive protostars forming from massive dense cores in environments of high mass surface densities, based on the Turbulent Core Model. The protostellar evolution is calculated with a multi-zone numerical model, with the accretion rate regulated by feedback from an evolving disk wind outflow cavity. The disk evolution is calculated assuming a fixed ratio of disk to protostellar mass, while the core envelope evolution assumes an inside-out collapse of the core with a fixed outer radius. In this framework, an evolutionary track is determined by three environmental initial conditions: the core mass M{sub c} , the mass surface density of the ambient clump Σ{sub cl}, and the ratio of the core's initial rotational to gravitational energy β {sub c}. Evolutionary sequences with various M{sub c} , Σ{sub cl}, and β {sub c} are constructed. We find that in a fiducial model with M{sub c} = 60 M {sub ☉}, Σ{sub cl} = 1 g cm{sup –2}, and β {sub c} = 0.02, the final mass of the protostar reaches at least ∼26 M {sub ☉}, making the final star formation efficiency ≳ 0.43. For each of the evolutionary tracks, radiation transfer simulations are performed at selected stages, with temperature profiles, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and multiwavelength images produced. At a given stage, the envelope temperature depends strongly on Σ{sub cl}, with higher temperatures in a higher Σ{sub cl} core, but only weakly on M{sub c} . The SED and MIR images depend sensitively on the evolving outflow cavity, which gradually widens as the protostar grows. The fluxes at ≲ 100 μm increase dramatically, and the far-IR peaks move to shorter wavelengths. The influence of Σ{sub cl} and β {sub c} (which determines disk size) are discussed. We find that, despite scatter caused by different M{sub c} , Σ{sub cl}, β {sub c}, and inclinations, sources at a given evolutionary stage appear in similar regions of

  4. (abstract) The Circumstellar Environment of the Extremely Young Protostellar Source L1448IRS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tereby, S.; Padgett, Deborah L.

    1994-01-01

    The class 0 sources form an interesting new category of protostellar objects. Many have strong millimeter continuum emission and exhibit jetlike outflows. There are suggestions that these objects are systematically younger than typical embedded (class I) sources. We are investigating the properties of class 0 sources to determine whether they are indeed very young or perhaps represent extreme physical conditions, such as rapid rotation. We present millimeter interferometric data for the class 0 object known as L1448 IRS3. This young low-mass star has extremely strong millimeter continuum emission. The interferometer data show the emission is resolved on a scale of a few arcseconds (1000 AU) This suggests the bulk of the dust continuum emission originates in an 'infall' envelope rather than a protostar disk. In addition, the C180 line data display a strong velocity gradiant which indicates the dense core is rapidly rotating. We compare our data with the predictions of protostellar collapse models.

  5. Leveraging the power of multi-core platforms for large-scale geospatial data processing: Exemplified by generating DEM from massive LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xuefeng; Wu, Huayi

    2010-10-01

    In recent years improvements in spatial data acquisition technologies, such as LiDAR, resulted in an explosive increase in the volume of spatial data, presenting unprecedented challenges for computation capacity. At the same time, the kernel of computing platforms the CPU, also evolved from a single-core to multi-core architecture. This radical change significantly affected existing data processing algorithms. Exemplified by the problem of generating DEM from massive air-borne LiDAR point clouds, this paper studies how to leverage the power of multi-core platforms for large-scale geospatial data processing and demonstrates how multi-core technologies can improve performance. Pipelining is adopted to exploit the thread level parallelism of multi-core platforms. First, raw point clouds are partitioned into overlapped blocks. Second, these discrete blocks are interpolated concurrently on parallel pipelines. On the interpolation run, intermediate results are sorted and finally merged into an integrated DEM. This parallelization demonstrates the great potential of multi-core platforms with high data throughput and low memory footprint. This approach achieves excellent performance speedup with greatly reduced processing time. For example, on a 2.0 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon platform, the proposed parallel approach can process approximately one billion LiDAR points (16.4 GB) in about 12 min and produces a 27,500×30,500 raster DEM, using less than 800 MB main memory.

  6. Anatomy of a high-mass star forming cloud: The G24.78+0.08 (proto)stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Codella, C.; Furuya, R. S.; Testi, L.

    2003-04-01

    We present the results of an interferometric and single-dish study of G24.78+0.08, a region associated with high-mass star formation. Observations have been carried out in several molecular species, which are suitable to trace environments with different densities and temperatures. Evidence for this region to contain a cluster of very young massive stellar objects has been presented in a previous paper (Furuya et al. \\cite{furu}). We suggest that the embedded stars might be too young to have affected the surrounding molecular cloud significantly on a large scale. This gives us the opportunity to investigate the configuration of the cloud as it was prior to the star formation episode. We assess that the (proto)stellar cluster lies at the center of a molecular clump with diameter of ~ 2 pc: to a good approximation this may be described as a spherically symmetric clump with density profile of the type nH_2~ R-1.8. Inside 0.5 pc from the center, instead, the gas is much more inhomogeneous and concentrated in a few high-density cores surrounding the (proto)stars. Our findings indicate that a self-regulating formation mechanism for the high-mass stars in G24.78 is plausible: in the proposed scenario star formation would occur from inside-out collapse of the parsec-scale clump, followed by infall reversal due to outflows powered by the newly formed massive stars. We also find that one of the two bipolar outflows powered by the embedded YSOs is more extended and hence older than the other, thus confirming the evolutionary sequence proposed in our previous article.

  7. Weak and compact radio emission in early massive star formation regions: an ionized jet toward G11.11–0.12P1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; McCoy, M.; Kurtz, S.; Loinard, L.; Carrasco-González, C.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Araya, E. D.; Cesaroni, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We report 1.3 cm and 6 cm continuum observations toward the massive proto-stellar candidate G11.11–0.12P1 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We detect a string of four unresolved radio continuum sources coincident with the mid-infrared source in G11P1. The continuum sources have positive spectral indices consistent with a thermal (free-free) ionized jet. The most likely origins of the ionized gas are shocks due to the interaction of a stellar wind with the surrounding high-density material. We also present NIR United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) archival data that show an extended structure detected only at K band (2.2 μm), which is oriented perpendicular to the jet, and that may be scattered light from a circumstellar disk around the massive protostar. Our observations plus the UKIRT archival data thus provide new evidence that a disk/jet system is present in the massive proto-stellar candidate located in the G11.11–0.12P1 core.

  8. GGD 37: AN EXTREME PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. D.; Watson, D. M.; Forrest, W. J.; Kim, K. H.; Bergin, E.; Maret, S.; Melnick, G.; Tolls, V.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Sargent, B. A.; Raines, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first Spitzer-IRS spectral maps of the Herbig-Haro flow GGD 37 detected in lines of [Ne III], [O IV], [Ar III], and [Ne V]. The detection of extended [O IV] (55 eV) and some extended emission in [Ne V] (97 eV) indicates a shock temperature in excess of 100,000 K, in agreement with X-ray observations, and a shock speed in excess of 200 km s{sup -1}. The presence of an extended photoionization or collisional ionization region indicates that GGD 37 is a highly unusual protostellar outflow.

  9. Occurrence of instability through the protostellar accretion disks by landing of low-mass condensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elyasi, Mahjubeh; Nejad-Asghar, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Low-mass condensations (LMCs) are observed inside the envelope of the collapsing molecular cloud cores. In this research, we investigate the effects of landing LMCs for occurrence of instability through the protostellar accretion disks. We consider some regions of the disk where duration of infalling and landing of the LMCs are shorter than the orbital period. In this way, we can consider the landing LMCs as density bumps and grooves in the azimuthal direction of an initial thin axisymmetric steady state self-gravitating protostellar accretion disk (nearly Keplerian). Using the linear effects of the bump quantities, we obtain a characteristic equation for growth/decay rate of bumps; we numerically solve it to find occurrence of instability. We also evaluate the minimum-growth-time-scale (MGTS) and the enhanced mass accretion rate. The results show that infalling and landing of the LMCs in the inner regions of the protostellar accretion disks can cause faster unstable modes and less enhanced accretion rates relative to the outer regions. Also, more fragmentation of landed LMCs in the azimuthal direction have less chance for instability, and then can produce more values of enhanced mass accretion rate.

  10. Simulating the Formation of Massive Protostars. I. Radiative Feedback and Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kuiper, Rolf; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi

    2016-05-01

    We present radiation hydrodynamic simulations of collapsing protostellar cores with initial masses of 30, 100, and 200 M ⊙. We follow their gravitational collapse and the formation of a massive protostar and protostellar accretion disk. We employ a new hybrid radiative feedback method blending raytracing techniques with flux-limited diffusion for a more accurate treatment of the temperature and radiative force. In each case, the disk that forms becomes Toomre-unstable and develops spiral arms. This occurs between 0.35 and 0.55 freefall times and is accompanied by an increase in the accretion rate by a factor of 2–10. Although the disk becomes unstable, no other stars are formed. In the case of our 100 and 200 M ⊙ simulations, the star becomes highly super-Eddington and begins to drive bipolar outflow cavities that expand outwards. These radiatively driven bubbles appear stable, and appear to be channeling gas back onto the protostellar accretion disk. Accretion proceeds strongly through the disk. After 81.4 kyr of evolution, our 30 M ⊙ simulation shows a star with a mass of 5.48 M ⊙ and a disk of mass 3.3 M ⊙, while our 100 M ⊙ simulation forms a 28.8 M ⊙ mass star with a 15.8 M ⊙ disk over the course of 41.6 kyr, and our 200 M ⊙ simulation forms a 43.7 M ⊙ star with an 18 M ⊙ disk in 21.9 kyr. In the absence of magnetic fields or other forms of feedback, the masses of the stars in our simulation do not appear to be limited by their own luminosities.

  11. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  12. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Carroll, Jonathan; Blackman, Eric G.; Quillen, Alice C.

    2009-02-01

    The link between turbulence in star-forming environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows, we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers'-type turbulence and produces a driving scale length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star-forming environments. In the last section, we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets cannot be the source of turbulence.

  13. Warm Gas and Dust of Massive Young Stellar Objects Revealed by Herschel PACS Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woojin; van der Tak, Floris; Karska, Agata; Herczeg, Gregory; Chavarria, Luis; Herpin, Fabrice; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Braine, Jonathan; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    We present results of Herschel PACS imaging spectroscopy data toward ten massive young stellar objects taken as part of the WISH project. Our sample consists of four high mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), two hot molecular cores (HMCs), and four ultracompact HII regions (UCHIIs), and the spectra cover a broad range of wavelengths (55 to 210 micron) presenting various atomic and molecular lines as well as excellent continua. By fitting the continua utilizing a modified black-body formula we estimate mass-weighted temperature and column density distributions of warm dust and find that UCHII regions are hottest and HMCs are most deeply embedded. We also estimate rotational temperature and column density distributions of warm CO gas using the rotational diagram analysis. In addition, based on the comparison of high J CO line fluxes to the RATRAN estimates of central heating envelope models, we find that majority of warm CO is originated from bipolar outflow shocks.

  14. Protostellar feedback halts the growth of the first stars in the universe.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki; Yorke, Harold W

    2011-12-01

    The first stars fundamentally transformed the early universe by emitting the first light and by producing the first heavy elements. These effects were predetermined by the mass distribution of the first stars, which is thought to have been fixed by a complex interplay of gas accretion and protostellar radiation. We performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations that followed the growth of a primordial protostar through to the early stages as a star with thermonuclear burning. The circumstellar accretion disk was evaporated by ultraviolet radiation from the star when its mass was 43 times that of the Sun. Such massive primordial stars, in contrast to the often-postulated extremely massive stars, may help explain the fact that there are no signatures of the pair-instability supernovae in abundance patterns of metal-poor stars in our galaxy. PMID:22075723

  15. High Spatial Resolution Observations of NH3 and CH3OH toward the Massive Twin Cores NGC 6334I and NGC 6334I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, H.; Thorwirth, S.; Zhang, Q.; Hunter, T. R.; Megeath, S. T.; Walsh, A. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2005-07-01

    Molecular line observations of NH3 (J,K)=(1,1) and (2, 2) and CH3OH at 24.93 GHz taken with the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) toward the massive twin cores NGC 6334I and NGC 6334I(N) reveal significant variations in the line emission between the two massive cores. The UC H II region/hot core NGC 6334I exhibits strong thermal NH3 and CH3OH emission adjacent to the UC H II region and coincident with two millimeter continuum peaks observed by T. R. Hunter et al. In contrast, we find neither compact NH3 nor thermal CH3OH line emission toward NGC 6334I(N). There the NH3 emission is distributed over a broad region (>1') without a clear peak, and we find Class I CH3OH maser emission with peak brightness temperatures up to 7000 K. The maser emission peaks appear to be spatially associated with the interfaces between the molecular outflows and the ambient dense gas. Peak NH3 (1, 1) line brightness temperatures >=70 K in both regions indicate gas temperatures on the same order. NH3 emission is also detected toward the outflow in NGC 6334I, resulting in an estimated rotational temperature of Trot~19 K. Furthermore, we observe CH3OH and NH3 absorption toward the UC H II region; the velocity structure is consistent with expanding molecular gas around the UC H II region. Thermal and kinematic effects possibly imposed from the UC H II region on the molecular core are also discussed.

  16. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  17. EARLY-STAGE MASSIVE STAR FORMATION NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER: Sgr C

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Cyganowski, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ∼10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H{sub 2} and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ∼10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}, with column densities of 1-2 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  18. Radiation Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Protostellar Collapse: Nonideal Magnetohydrodynamic Effects and Early Formation of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2015-03-01

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  19. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  20. Spitzer IRAC Detection of Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, E. A.; Balog, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We will discuss a method for detecting shocked H2 emission in IRAC band images and distinguishing H2 knots from stellar sources. Using this method we will present Spitzer IRAC imaging of a recently discovered parsec scale protostellar outflow. This outflow was detected in all four IRAC bands. The proposed source of the outflow is an embedded Class 0 object detected in the MIPS images. This work is based in part on archival data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by an award issued by JPL/Caltech and also a NASA LTSA Grant NNG05GD66G

  1. Detection of Methanol in a Class 0 Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, class 0 protostellar object.

  2. A Catalog of Low-mass Star-forming Cores Observed with SHARC-II at 350 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Akshaya; Dunham, Michael M.; Arce, Héctor G.; Evans, Neal J., II; Bourke, Tyler L.; Merello, Manuel; Wu, Jingwen

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalog of low-mass dense cores observed with the SHARC-II instrument at 350 μm. Our observations have an effective angular resolution of 10″, approximately 2.5 times higher than observations at the same wavelength obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, albeit with lower sensitivity, especially to extended emission. The catalog includes 81 maps covering a total of 164 detected sources. For each detected source, we tabulate basic source properties including position, peak intensity, flux density in fixed apertures, and radius. We examine the uncertainties in the pointing model applied to all SHARC-II data and conservatively find that the model corrections are good to within ∼3″, approximately 1/3 of the SHARC-II beam. We examine the differences between two array scan modes and find that the instrument calibration, beam size, and beam shape are similar between the two modes. We also show that the same flux densities are measured when sources are observed in the two different modes, indicating that there are no systematic effects introduced into our catalog by utilizing two different scan patterns during the course of taking observations. We find a detection rate of 95% for protostellar cores but only 45% for starless cores, and demonstrate the existence of a SHARC-II detection bias against all but the most massive and compact starless cores. Finally, we discuss the improvements in protostellar classification enabled by these 350 μm observations.

  3. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules during Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  4. Rotationally induced fragmentation in the prestellar core L1544

    SciTech Connect

    Klapp, Jaime; Zavala, Miguel; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Troconis, Jorge

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations indicate that there is no correlation between the level of turbulence and fragmentation in detected protostellar cores, suggesting that turbulence works mainly before gravitationally bound prestellar cores form and that their inner parts are likely to be velocity coherent. Based on this evidence, we simulate the collapse and fragmentation of an isolated, initially centrally condensed, uniformly rotating core of total mass M = 5.4 M {sub ☉}, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-2 modified with the inclusion of sink particles, in order to compare the statistical properties of the resulting stellar ensembles with previous gravoturbulent fragmentation models. The initial conditions are intended to fit the observed properties of the prestellar core L1544. We find that for ratios of the rotational to the gravitational energy β ≥ 0.05, a massive disk is formed at the core center from which a central primary condenses after ∼50 kyr. Soon thereafter the disk fragments into secondary protostars, consistent with an intermediate mode of star formation in which groups of 10-100 stars form from a single core. The models predict peak accretion rates between ∼10{sup –5} and 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for all stars and reproduce many of the statistical properties predicted from gravoturbulent fragmentation, suggesting that on the small scales of low-mass, dense cores these are independent of whether the contracting gas is turbulent or purely rotating.

  5. Deuterium Burning in Massive Giant Planets and Low-mass Brown Dwarfs Formed by Core-nucleated Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter; D'Angelo, Gennaro; Lissauer, Jack J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Saumon, Didier

    2013-06-01

    Using detailed numerical simulations, we study the formation of bodies near the deuterium-burning limit according to the core-nucleated giant planet accretion scenario. The objects, with heavy-element cores in the range 5-30 M ⊕, are assumed to accrete gas up to final masses of 10-15 Jupiter masses (M Jup). After the formation process, which lasts 1-5 Myr and which ends with a "cold-start," low-entropy configuration, the bodies evolve at constant mass up to an age of several Gyr. Deuterium burning via proton capture is included in the calculation, and we determined the mass, M 50, above which more than 50% of the initial deuterium is burned. This often-quoted borderline between giant planets and brown dwarfs is found to depend only slightly on parameters, such as core mass, stellar mass, formation location, solid surface density in the protoplanetary disk, disk viscosity, and dust opacity. The values for M 50 fall in the range 11.6-13.6 M Jup, in agreement with previous determinations that do not take the formation process into account. For a given opacity law during the formation process, objects with higher core masses form more quickly. The result is higher entropy in the envelope at the completion of accretion, yielding lower values of M 50. For masses above M 50, during the deuterium-burning phase, objects expand and increase in luminosity by one to three orders of magnitude. Evolutionary tracks in the luminosity versus time diagram are compared with the observed position of the companion to Beta Pictoris.

  6. Origin of the great dichotomy of the Solar System: small terrestrial embryos and massive giant planet cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Lambrechts, Michiel; Bitsch, Bertram; Jacobson, Seth

    2015-08-01

    The basic structure of the solar system is set by the presence of low-mass terrestrial planets in its inner part and giant planets in its outer part. This is the result of the formation of a system of multiple Mars-mass embryos in the inner disk and of a few multi-Earth-mass cores in the outer part, within the lifetime of the gaseous component of the protoplanetary disk. What was the origin of this dichotomy in the mass distribution of embryos/cores? We show in this paper that the classic processes of runaway and oligarchic growth from a disk of planetesimals can not explain this dichotomy, even if the original surface density of solids increased at the snowline. Instead, the accretion of drifting pebbles by embryos/cores can explain the dichotomy, provided that some assumptions hold true. We propose that the mass flow of pebbles is two-times lower and the characteristic size of the pebbles is ten times smaller within the snowline than beyond the snowline (respectively at r < r_ice and r > r_ice, where r_ice is the snowline heliocentric distance), due to ice sublimation and the splitting of icy pebbles into a collection of chondrule-size silicate grains. In this case, objects of original sub-lunar mass would grow at drastically different rates in the two regions of the disk. Within the snowline these bodies would reach approximately the mass of Mars while beyond the snowline they would grow to 20 Earth masses. The results may change quantitatively with the assumed parameters, but the establishment of a clear dichotomy in the mass distribution of protoplanets appears robust.

  7. Scaled up low-mass star formation in massive star-forming cores in the G333 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, B.; Lo, N.; Redman, M. P.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Burton, M. G.; Bronfman, L.

    2016-06-01

    Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer (RT) modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. The models and data together suggest that the observed properties of the high-mass star-forming regions such as infall, turbulence and mass are consistent with scaled-up versions of the low-mass case with turbulent velocities that are supersonic and an order of magnitude larger than those found in low-mass star-forming regions. Using detailed RT modelling, we show that the G333 cores are essentially undergoing a scaled-up version of low-mass star formation. This is an extension of earlier work in that the degree of infall and the chemical abundances are constrained by the RT modelling in a way that is not practical with a standard analysis of observational data. We also find high velocity infall and high infall mass rates, possibly suggesting accelerated collapse due to external pressure. Molecular depletion due to freeze-out on to dust grains in central regions of the cores is suggested by low molecular abundances of several species. Strong evidence for a local enhancement of 13C-bearing species towards the outflow cloud cores is discussed, consistent with the presence of shocks caused by the supersonic motions within them.

  8. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN G240.31+0.07: AN HOURGLASS IN A MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Keping; Zhang, Qizhou; Menten, Karl M.; Liu, Hauyu B.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Girart, Josep M.

    2014-10-10

    We report the first detection of an hourglass magnetic field aligned with a well-defined outflow rotation system in a high-mass, star-forming region. The observations were performed with the Submillimeter Array toward G240.31+0.07, which harbors a massive, flattened, and fragmenting molecular cloud core and a wide-angle bipolar outflow. The polarized dust emission at 0.88 mm reveals a clear hourglass-shaped magnetic field aligned within 20° of the outflow axis. Maps of high-density tracing spectral lines, e.g., H{sup 13}CO{sup +} (4-3), show that the core is rotating about its minor axis, which is also aligned with the magnetic field axis. Therefore, both the magnetic field and kinematic properties observed in this region are surprisingly consistent with the theoretical predictions of the classic paradigm of isolated low-mass star formation. The strength of the magnetic field in the plane of sky is estimated to be ∼1.1 mG, resulting in a mass-to-magnetic flux ratio of 1.4 times the critical value and a turbulent-to-ordered magnetic energy ratio of 0.4. We also find that the specific angular momentum almost linearly decreases from r ∼ 0.6 pc to 0.03 pc scales, which is most likely attributed to magnetic braking.

  9. VARIABLE ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN PROTOSTELLAR EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu E-mail: gammie@illinois.edu

    2013-02-20

    We extend the one-dimensional, two-zone models of long-term protostellar disk evolution with infall of Zhu et al. to consider the potential effects of a finite viscosity in regions where the ionization is too low for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to operate (the {sup d}ead zone{sup )}. We find that the presence of a small but finite dead zone viscosity, as suggested by simulations of stratified disks with MRI-active outer layers, can trigger inside-out bursts of accretion, starting at or near the inner edge of the disk, instead of the previously found outside-in bursts with zero dead zone viscosity, which originate at a few AU in radius. These inside-out bursts of accretion bear a qualitative resemblance to the outburst behavior of one FU Ori object, V1515 Cyg, in contrast to the outside-in burst models, which more closely resemble the accretion events in FU Ori and V1057 Cyg. Our results suggest that the type and frequency of outbursts are potentially a probe of transport efficiency in the dead zone. Simulations must treat the inner disk regions, R {approx}< 0.5 AU, to show the detailed time evolution of accretion outbursts in general and to observe the inside-out bursts in particular.

  10. Variable Accretion Outbursts in Protostellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Gammie, Charles

    2013-02-01

    We extend the one-dimensional, two-zone models of long-term protostellar disk evolution with infall of Zhu et al. to consider the potential effects of a finite viscosity in regions where the ionization is too low for the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to operate (the "dead zone"). We find that the presence of a small but finite dead zone viscosity, as suggested by simulations of stratified disks with MRI-active outer layers, can trigger inside-out bursts of accretion, starting at or near the inner edge of the disk, instead of the previously found outside-in bursts with zero dead zone viscosity, which originate at a few AU in radius. These inside-out bursts of accretion bear a qualitative resemblance to the outburst behavior of one FU Ori object, V1515 Cyg, in contrast to the outside-in burst models, which more closely resemble the accretion events in FU Ori and V1057 Cyg. Our results suggest that the type and frequency of outbursts are potentially a probe of transport efficiency in the dead zone. Simulations must treat the inner disk regions, R <~ 0.5 AU, to show the detailed time evolution of accretion outbursts in general and to observe the inside-out bursts in particular.

  11. Code dependencies of pre-supernova evolution and nucleosynthesis in massive stars: evolution to the end of core helium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.; Hirschi, R.; Pignatari, M.; Heger, A.; Georgy, C.; Nishimura, N.; Fryer, C.; Herwig, F.

    2015-01-15

    We present a comparison of 15M , 20M and 25M stellar models from three different codes|GENEC, KEPLER and MESA|and their nucleosynthetic yields. The models are calculated from the main sequence up to the pre-supernova (pre-SN) stage and do not include rotation. The GENEC and KEPLER models hold physics assumptions that are characteristic of the two codes. The MESA code is generally more flexible; overshooting of the convective core during the hydrogen and helium burning phases in MESA is chosen such that the CO core masses are consistent with those in the GENEC models. Full nucleosynthesis calculations are performed for all models using the NuGrid post-processing tool MPPNP and the key energy-generating nuclear reaction rates are the same for all codes. We are thus able to highlight the key diferences between the models that are caused by the contrasting physics assumptions and numerical implementations of the three codes. A reasonable agreement is found between the surface abundances predicted by the models computed using the different codes, with GENEC exhibiting the strongest enrichment of H-burning products and KEPLER exhibiting the weakest. There are large variations in both the structure and composition of the models—the 15M and 20M in particular—at the pre-SN stage from code to code caused primarily by convective shell merging during the advanced stages. For example the C-shell abundances of O, Ne and Mg predicted by the three codes span one order of magnitude in the 15M models. For the alpha elements between Si and Fe the differences are even larger. The s-process abundances in the C shell are modified by the merging of convective shells; the modification is strongest in the 15M model in which the C-shell material is exposed to O-burning temperatures and the γ -process is activated. The variation in the s-process abundances across the codes is smallest in

  12. Code dependencies of pre-supernova evolution and nucleosynthesis in massive stars: evolution to the end of core helium burning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, S.; Hirschi, R.; Pignatari, M.; Heger, A.; Georgy, C.; Nishimura, N.; Fryer, C.; Herwig, F.

    2015-01-15

    We present a comparison of 15M⊙ , 20M⊙ and 25M⊙ stellar models from three different codes|GENEC, KEPLER and MESA|and their nucleosynthetic yields. The models are calculated from the main sequence up to the pre-supernova (pre-SN) stage and do not include rotation. The GENEC and KEPLER models hold physics assumptions that are characteristic of the two codes. The MESA code is generally more flexible; overshooting of the convective core during the hydrogen and helium burning phases in MESA is chosen such that the CO core masses are consistent with those in the GENEC models. Full nucleosynthesis calculations are performed for allmore » models using the NuGrid post-processing tool MPPNP and the key energy-generating nuclear reaction rates are the same for all codes. We are thus able to highlight the key diferences between the models that are caused by the contrasting physics assumptions and numerical implementations of the three codes. A reasonable agreement is found between the surface abundances predicted by the models computed using the different codes, with GENEC exhibiting the strongest enrichment of H-burning products and KEPLER exhibiting the weakest. There are large variations in both the structure and composition of the models—the 15M⊙ and 20M⊙ in particular—at the pre-SN stage from code to code caused primarily by convective shell merging during the advanced stages. For example the C-shell abundances of O, Ne and Mg predicted by the three codes span one order of magnitude in the 15M⊙ models. For the alpha elements between Si and Fe the differences are even larger. The s-process abundances in the C shell are modified by the merging of convective shells; the modification is strongest in the 15M⊙ model in which the C-shell material is exposed to O-burning temperatures and the γ -process is activated. The variation in the s-process abundances across the codes is smallest in the 25M⊙ models, where it is comparable to the impact of nuclear

  13. The Pivotal Onset of Protostellar Collapse: ISO's View and Complementary Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesemeyer, H.; Gusten, R.; Cox, P.; Zylka, R.; Wright, M. C. H.

    We present {sc iso} observations of cloud cores in a stage of early accretion onto a central hydrostatic object. In order to study this pivotal phase of the dynamical protostellar collapse, we performed mid-{sc ir} imaging using the {sc isocam} {sc lw} array, and far-{sc ir} photometry with the {sc isophot} {sc pht-p} and {sc pht-c} sub-instruments towards extreme Class 0} objects in globular filament GF 9 (L 1082). With {sc isocam}, we detected the central accreting objects. {sc isophot} allowed for the identification of an extremely cold (~10 K) core. Complementary spectroscopic and continuum studies at lambda1.3 mm and 3 mm remove part of the remaining ambiguities.

  14. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    2007-02-01

    Context: Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. Aims: We performed an extensive exploration of the parameter space for the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient medium interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient medium interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. Methods: We performed a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming into a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. Results: Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular, we find that a protostellar jet that is less dense than the ambient medium well reproduces the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH 154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (v_sh ≈500 km s-1) detectable with Chandra. Furthermore, our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  15. Magnetic Fields in Early Protostellar Disk Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-03-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M⊙ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  16. Deuteration and evolution in the massive star formation process. The role of surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Busquet, G.; Palau, Aina; Caselli, P.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Tan, J. C.; Audard, M.

    2015-03-01

    OH) on grain mantles. It also reinforces the idea that Dfrac(N2H+) is the best tracer of massive starless cores, while high values of Dfrac(CH3OH) seem fairly good tracers of the early protostellar phases, where the evaporation or sputtering of the grain mantles is most efficient. Tables 3-6, 8, and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgIRAM 30 m data (final reduced data used in the paper, in FITS format) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A87

  17. A Search for Protostellar Collapse in Late Class I Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, E. M.; Mardones, D.; Evans, N. J., II; Myers, P. C.; Shirley, Y. L.; Wilson, C. D.

    2000-10-01

    Asymmetric spectra of optically thick spectral lines are associated with protostellar collapse in young stellar objects. Such asymmetries have been believed to be confined solely to the Class 0 stage, but collapse signatures have now been observed in Class I sources with Tbol < 200 K. We present partial results of a survey that extends earlier results in Class 0 and I sources of HCO+, a molecule that shows strong line asymmetry in simulations of collapsing clouds, to Class I sources with Tbol < 650 K to find when protostellar collapse ends and how infall motions change with time.

  18. The one dimensional collapse models of turbulent protostellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamozdra, S. N.

    The spherically-symmetric numerical modelling of the gravitational collapse of protostellar clouds is carried out, taking ambipolar diffusion and the pressure of Alfvenic turbulence into account. It is shown that the dependency of protostar formation time on ekg (the initial turbulent-to-gravitational energies ratio) is non-monotonic because it is determined by the complex interaction of large scale magnetosonic waves with the waves of turbulence amplification. Protostellar mass is almost independent on ekg while accretion rate variations with ekg can be of order of 10%.

  19. The Formation of Massive Stars by Collisional Mergers: Theoretical Constraints and Observational Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, Hans; Bally, John

    2004-08-01

    While accretional growth can lead to the formation of massive stars in isolation or in loose OB associations, collisional growth and mergers can only occur in high-density cluster environments. We will discuss the conditions in a very dense young star cluster under which the merger scenario of massive star formation may work, and whether these conditions are likely to occur somewhere in the our Galaxy (Orion BN/KL, NGC 3603, W3-IRS5), the Local Group (30 Dor, NGC 604), or other galaxies (NGC 5253, Henize 2-10, The Antennae clusters). We explore the observational consequences of the merger scenario. Protostellar mergers may produce high luminosity infrared flares. Mergers may be surrounded by thick tori of expanding debris, impulsive wide-angle outflows, shock-induced maser and radio continuum emission. The collision products are expected to have fast stellar rotation and a large multiplicity fraction. Massive stars growing by a series of mergers may produce eruptive bursts of wide-angle outflow activity with random orientations; the walls of the resulting outflow cavities may be observable as filaments of dense gas and dust pointing away from the massive star. The extremely rare merger of two stars close to the upper mass limit of the IMF may be a possible pathway to hypernova-generated gamma-ray bursters. We also speculate that the outflow "fingers" from the OMC1 core in the Orion molecular cloud were produced by a merger less than a thousand years ago (Bally and Zinnecker 2004, AJ submitted). Mergers may not occur in every dense young cluster, but certainly in some of them, especially those where dynamical mass segregation of massive stars has taken place (Freitag and Benz 2004, astro-ph 0403621).

  20. Star formation and cosmic massive black hole formation, a universal process organized by angular momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    It is suggested that star formation is organized following the same principles as we have applied in a recent explanation of galaxy and massive black hole formation. In this scenario angular momentum is randomly distributed by tidal torquing among condensations, Lyman-{alpha} clouds or cores for star formation during the initial non-linear phase of collapse. This angular momentum is characterized by the parameter, {lambda}, the ratio of the angular momentum of the cloud to that of a Keplerian orbit with the same central mass and radius. This parameter is calculated in very many simulations of structure formation of the universe as well as core formation and appears to be universal and independent of any scale. The specific angular momentum during the collapse of every cloud is locally conserved and universally produces a near flat rotation curve M{sub massive galactic black hole, 10{sup 8} M{sub o}, ({sup -}10{sup -3} of the galactic disk mass) or 1 M{sub o} ({sup -}0.03 of the core or of the protostellar disk mass). The inviscid collapse of a protosteller core with the same average {lambda} = 0.05 leads to the formation of a flat rotation curve (protostellar) disk of mass M{sub dsk} {sup -}30 M{sub o} of radius R{sub dsk} {approx_equal} 1100 AU or 5.4 x 10{sup -3} pc. In such a disk {Sigma} {proportional_to} 1/R and reaches the RVI condition at R{sub crit} {approx_equal} 40 AU where M{sub

  1. Structure and Stability of Steady Protostellar Accretion Flows - Part Three - Nonlinear Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluch, M.

    1991-03-01

    Recently, a global, linear stability analysis of the structure of spherically symmetric steady protostellar accretion flows with a shock discontinuity has been made (Balluch 1990b). A detailed non-linear time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics calculation is presented to complement this study. In the `ideal-case' with constant opacity, the shock front around the second, inner core appears unstable with respect to oscillation due to critical cooling, starting at the instant, when a cooling region occurs in the calculation (due to its resolution in the late stages of accretion) and lasting as long as the mass flow rate is larger than M ≥ 2.8 10-6 Msun yr-1. This is in best agreement with the results of the linear analysis. Next, a detailed calculation of the formation of the first, outer core using quasimolecular artificial viscosity length scales, is presented. In about twice the e-folding time of the unstable mode in the linear analysis, a significant growth of a disturbance can be seen. It appears first in the velocity and the radiation flux in the settling zone, accompanied by an oscillation of the radiation flux in the region upstream from the shock up to r = 1014 cm. Some time later, the shock front starts to move. Again, these characteristics are in best concordance with the linear results. In addition, the calculation shows the growth of these oscillations deep in the non-linear regime until the beginning of a rapid expansion of the whole protostellar core. At last, a calculation of the global evolution of this expansion of the first, outer core is presented. It is shown that the expansion is stopped when about twice the core mass is involved. Then another collapse follows, and the whole scenario of formation and expansion of the outer core starts anew. During this evolution, up to 3 shock fronts were present at the same time in the flow. The largest expansion leads to central physical quantities comparable to the initial ones of the interstellar medium. At

  2. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  3. The Structure and Environmental Impacts of Protostellar Outflows in DR 21 and Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, J. J.; Ho, P. T. P.; Brown, R.

    1997-12-01

    Regions of high-mass star formation are considerably more complicated than their low-mass counterparts. Recent HST NICMOS images of Orion-KL (Thompson et al. 1997) as well as sensitive ground-based infrared images of H_2 shock emission in the Orion outflow region (Chrysostomou et al. 1997, McCaughrean & Mac Low 1997, Schild et al. 1997) reveal intricate clumpy shock structures extending in nearly all radial directions from the source. The one radial direction in which the shock emission is particularly diminished is to the northeast, and it is precisely here that a molecular gas filament is present and highly heated, as though blocking the path of outflowing material from Orion-KL. We present our latest NH_3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) VLA MEM mosaics of the Orion-KL region. We present evidence from temperature and chemical excitation gradients that the molecular gas cores along the filament extending to the northeast of Orion-KL are strongly heated by impacts from protostellar ejecta. These effects are seen in the core ``CS1'' 30'' northeast of IRc2 and also in cores at least twice as distant (1.5 pc). The DR 21 outflow region is also quite complex, with multiple molecular outflows extending from a multiple-component HII region. We present sensitive VLA maps of hydrogen recombination line emission, and we report the detection of bipolar ionized gas within the molecular outflow lobes. This detection gives observational evidence for the initial ionized inner structure of high mass protostellar outflows. Chrysostomou, A. et al. 1997, MNRAS, 289, 605 McCaughrean, M., & Mac Low, M.-M. 1997, AJ, 113, 391 Schild, H., Miller, S., & Tennyson, J. 1997, A&A, 319, 1037 Thompson, R., Rieke, M., Schneider, G., Stolovy, S., Erickson, E., & Axon, D. 1997, STSCI Early Release Observation PRC97-13

  4. The formation of a massive protostar through the disk accretion of gas.

    PubMed

    Chini, Rolf; Hoffmeister, Vera; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Nielbock, Markus; Nürnberger, Dieter; Schmidtobreick, Linda; Sterzik, Michael

    2004-05-13

    The formation of low-mass stars like our Sun can be explained by the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud fragment into a protostellar core and the subsequent accretion of gas and dust from the surrounding interstellar medium. Theoretical considerations suggest that the radiation pressure from the protostar on the in-falling material may prevent the formation of stars above ten solar masses through this mechanism, although some calculations have claimed that stars up to 40 solar masses can in principle be formed via accretion through a disk. Given this uncertainty and the fact that most massive stars are born in dense clusters, it was suggested that high-mass stars are the result of the runaway merging of intermediate-mass stars. Here we report observations that clearly show a massive star being born from a large rotating accretion disk. The protostar has already assembled about 20 solar masses, and the accretion process is still going on. The gas reservoir of the circumstellar disk contains at least 100 solar masses of additional gas, providing sufficient fuel for substantial further growth of the forming star. PMID:15141204

  5. Methanol masers and millimetre lines : a common origin in protostellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torstensson, Karl Johan Erik

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis we study the earliest stages of high-mass star formation. Class II methanol masers are only associated with massive star formation and are a unique probe of these environments. Through observations we have studied where and when the methanol maser emission occur in relation to the protostar. We have found that for a fair fraction of the sources the methanol masers appear on size scales of ca. 1000 AU, in the equatorial region of the massive protostar. It appears that infall, rather than rotation, is the dominant motion. We propose that the maser emission occur close to or in a shock interface, possibly related to the accretion flow of the more extended gas in the protostellar envelope onto an accretion disk. The morphology and kinematics of the thermal methanol gas support the hypothesis that the maser region is also the region where the methanol molecules are released from the icy mantles of the du st grains. We have also estimated the temperature and column density of the methanol gas in the outflows and find evidence for radiative excitation of the methanol gas at the location of the maser emission.

  6. IRAS 16293-2422: Evidence for Infall onto a Counter-Rotating Protostellar Accretion Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Hollis, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution VLA observations of the low-mass star-forming region IRAS 16293-2422 using four molecular probes: ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN)) methyl formate (CH3OCHO), formic acid (HCOOH), and the ground vibrational state of silicon monoxide (SiO). Ethyl cyanide emission has a spatial scale of approx. 20" and encompasses binary cores A and B as determined by continuum emission peaks. Surrounded by formic acid emission, methyl formate emission has a spatial scale of approx. 6" and is confined to core B. SiO emission shows two velocity components with spatial scales less than 2" that map approx. 2" northeast of the A and B symmetry axis. The redshifted SiO is approx. 2" northwest of blueshifted SiO along a position angle of approx. 135deg which is approximately parallel to the A and B symmetry axis. We interpret the spatial position offset in red and blueshifted SiO emission as due to rotation of a protostellar accretion disk and we derive approx. 1.4 Solar Mass, interior to the SiO emission. In the same vicinity, Mundy et al. (1986) also concluded rotation of a nearly edge-on disk from OVRO observations of much stronger and ubiquitous CO-13 emission but the direction of rotation is opposite to the SiO emission findings. Taken together, SiO and CO-13 data suggest evidence for a counter-rotating disk. Moreover, archival BIMA array CO-12C data show an inverse P Cygni profile with the strongest absorption in close proximity to the SiO emission, indicating unambiguous material infall toward the counter-rotating protostellar disk at a new source location within the IRAS 16293-2422 complex. The details of these observations and our interpretations are discussed.

  7. A Theoretical Perspective on the Formation and Fragmentation of Protostellar Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, A.; Lomax, O.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the factors influencing the formation and gravitational fragmentation of protostellar discs. We start with a review of how observations of prestellar cores can be analysed statistically to yield plausible initial conditions for simulations of their subsequent collapse. Simulations based on these initial conditions show that, despite the low levels of turbulence in prestellar cores, they deliver primary protostars and associated discs which are routinely subject to stochastic impulsive perturbations; consequently misalignment of the spins and orbits of protostars are common. Also, the simulations produce protostars that collectively have a mass function and binary statistics matching those observed in nearby star-formation regions, but only if a significant fraction of the turbulent energy in the core is solenoidal, and accretion onto the primary protostar is episodic with a duty cycle ≳ 3 000 yr. Under this circumstance, a core typically spawns between 4 and 5 protostars, with high efficiency, and the lower mass protostars are mainly formed by disc fragmentation. The requirement that a proto-fragment in a disc lose thermal energy on a dynamical timescale dictates that there is a sweet spot for disc fragmentation at radii 70 AU ≲ R ≲ 100 AU and temperatures 10 K ≲ T ≲ 20 K, and this might explain the brown dwarf desert.

  8. SIMULATING PROTOSTELLAR JETS SIMULTANEOUSLY AT LAUNCHING AND OBSERVATIONAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Jon P.; Clarke, David A.

    2011-02-10

    We present the first 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of protostellar jets that include both the region in which the jet is launched magnetocentrifugally at scale lengths <0.1 AU and where the propagating jet is observed at scale lengths >10{sup 3} AU. These simulations, performed with the new adaptive mesh refinement MHD code AZEuS, reveal interesting relationships between conditions at the disk surface, such as the magnetic field strength, and direct observables such as proper motion, jet rotation, jet radius, and mass flux. By comparing these quantities with observed values, we present direct numerical evidence that the magnetocentrifugal launching mechanism is capable, by itself, of launching realistic protostellar jets.

  9. OUTFLOW, INFALL, AND PROTOSTARS IN THE STAR-FORMING CORE W3-SE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Zhao Junhui; Wright, M. C. H. E-mail: jzhao@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-10-20

    We report new results on outflow and infall in the star-forming cores W3-SE SMA-1 and SMA-2 based on analysis of {approx}2.''5 resolution observations of the molecular lines HCN(3-2), HCO{sup +}(3-2), N{sub 2}H{sup +}(3-2), and CH{sub 3}OH(5{sub 2,3}-4{sub 1,3}) with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A high-velocity bipolar outflow originating from the protostellar core SMA-1 was observed in the HCN(3-2) line, with a projected outflow axis at a position angle of 48{sup 0}. The detection of the outflow is confirmed from other molecular lines. An inverse P-Cygni profile in the HCN(3-2) line toward SMA-1 suggests that at least one of the double cores accretes matter from the molecular core. A filamentary structure in the molecular gas surrounds SMA-1 and SMA-2. Based on the SMA observations, our analysis suggests that the double pre-stellar cores SMA-1 and SMA-2 result from fragmentation in the collapsing massive molecular core W3-SE, and it is likely that they are forming intermediate- to high-mass stars which will be new members of a star cluster in the W3-SE region.

  10. Revealing the dynamics of Class 0 protostellar discs with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Walch, S.; Banerjee, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present synthetic ALMA observations of Keplerian, protostellar discs in the Class 0 stage studying the emission of molecular tracers like 13CO, C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, and H2CO. We model the emission of discs around low- and intermediate-mass protostars. We show that under optimal observing conditions ALMA is able to detect the discs already in the earliest stage of protostellar evolution, although the emission is often concentrated to the innermost 50 au. Therefore, a resolution of a few 0.1 arcsec might be too low to detect Keplerian discs around Class 0 objects. We also demonstrate that under optimal conditions for edge-on discs Keplerian rotation signatures are recognisable, from which protostellar masses can be inferred. For this we here introduce a new approach, which allows us to determine protostellar masses with higher fidelity than before. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to reveal Keplerian rotation even for strongly inclined discs and that ALMA should be able to detect possible signs of fragmentation in face-on discs. In order to give some guidance for future ALMA observations, we investigate the influence of varying observing conditions and source distances. We show that it is possible to probe Keplerian rotation in inclined discs with an observing time of 2 h and a resolution of 0.1 arcsec, even in the case of moderate weather conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that under optimal conditions, Keplerian discs around intermediate-mass protostars should be detectable up to kpc distances.

  11. A Study of Radio Polarization in Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécere, Mariana; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Araudo, Anabella T.; De Colle, Fabio; Esquivel, Alejandro; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is commonly observed in connection with shocks of different velocities, ranging from relativistic shocks associated with active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, or microquasars, to weakly or non-relativistic flows such as those observed in supernova remnants. Recent observations of synchrotron emission in protostellar jets are important not only because they extend the range over which the acceleration process works, but also because they allow us to determine the jet and/or interstellar magnetic field structure, thus giving insights into the jet ejection and collimation mechanisms. In this paper, we compute for the first time polarized (synchrotron) and non-polarized (thermal X-ray) synthetic emission maps from axisymmetrical simulations of magnetized protostellar jets. We consider models with different jet velocities and variability, as well as a toroidal or helical magnetic field. Our simulations show that variable, low-density jets with velocities of ˜1000 km s-1 and ˜10 times lighter than the environment can produce internal knots with significant synchrotron emission and thermal X-rays in the shocked region of the leading bow shock moving in a dense medium. While models with a purely toroidal magnetic field show a very large degree of polarization, models with a helical magnetic field show lower values and a decrease of the degree of polarization, in agreement with observations of protostellar jets.

  12. Particle simulation of supersonic convection in the protostellar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegger, J. M.

    1995-02-01

    For the simulation of compressible convection and a possible description of inner processes in meteorites a new algorithm for particle-in-cell methods in particle simulation is developed, which allows a direct description of the inner pressure by use of individual particle temperatures and therefore a description of gas dynamics without the approximations of perturbation theory. The simulation of nonadiabatic processes in superadiabatic stratified atmospheres leads to the self-organization of convection cells and to supersonic convection and instationary shock front systems for high Rayleigh numbers Ra > 5 × 10 5 as they are received by other numerical methods. The transport of material through shock fronts yields much faster temperature and pressure changes than ordinary convective transport in the subsonic range. Tracing the values of state along the pathlines shows that fast entropy increases occur either within shock fronts or due to local dissipation in turbulences. Transport through shock front systems results in multiple rapid temperature changes per cycle. Investigations on the local convective structure of the protostellar nebula with a simple radiative transfer and standard opacities and accretion rates indicate supersonic convection and multiple shock front systems in the outer layers of the solar nebula due to radiative cooling. Supersonic convection provides a very effective mechanism of dissipation for the protostellar nebula and makes a contribution to the discussion on the turbulent structure of the protostellar nebula and to the formation of chrondrules.

  13. The Impact of Protostellar Jets on their Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, B. F.

    2005-06-01

    The nature of the accelerated and heated gas along collimated outflows emanating from deeply embedded protostars is investigated. By analysing the shock structures and excitation conditions it is possible to deduce information concerning the flow dynamics and environmental structure governing the morphology of outflows. Narrow-band imaging at near-infrared wavelengths and various spectroscopic techniques are employed in conjunction with bow shock modeling to uncover the underlying gas dynamics and excitation structure. The L 1634 globule contains two series of aligned molecular shock waves associated with the Herbig-Haro flows HH~240 and HH~241. Near-infrared spectroscopy and narrow-band imaging in the (1,0)~S(1) and (2,1)~S(1) emission lines of molecular hydrogen yield the spatial distributions of both the molecular excitation and velocity, which demonstrate distinct properties for the individual bow shocks. Bow shock models are applied to infer the shock physics, geometry, speed, density and magnetic field properties. The advancing compact bow HH 240C is interpreted as a J-type bow (frozen-in magnetic field) with the flanks in transition to C-type (field diffusion). It is a paraboloidal bow of speed ˜ 42 km s-1 entering a medium of density ˜ 2 × 104 cm-3. The following bow HH 240A can be fit by a C-type model. It has a higher bow speed in spite of a lower excitation, and is propagating through a lower density medium. It is concluded that, while the CO emission originates from cloud gas directly set in motion, the H2 emission is generated from shocks sweeping through an outflow. The HH 211 outflow is of considerable interest because of its ascribed youth. The outflow is explored through imaging and spectroscopy in the near-infrared. The detection of a near-infrared continuum of unknown origin is confirmed. It is proposed that the continuum is emitted by the driving protostellar source, escapes the core through the jet-excavated cavity, and illuminates the

  14. DISENTANGLING THE ENTANGLED: OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF THE TRIPLE NON-COEVAL PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM VLA1623

    SciTech Connect

    Murillo, Nadia M.; Lai, Shih-Ping E-mail: slai@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2013-02-10

    Commonplace at every evolutionary stage, multiple protostellar systems (MPSs) are thought to be formed through fragmentation, but it is unclear when and how. The youngest MPSs, which have not yet undergone much evolution, provide important constraints to this question. It is then of interest to disentangle early stage MPSs. In this Letter we present the results of our work on VLA1623 using our observations and archival data from the Submillimeter Array. Our continuum and line observations trace VLA1623's components, outflow, and envelope, revealing unexpected characteristics. We construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) for each component using the results of our work and data from literature, as well as derive physical parameters from continuum and perform a simple kinematical analysis of the circumstellar material. Our results show VLA1623 to be a triple non-coeval system composed of VLA1623A, B, and W, with each source driving its own outflow and unevenly distributed circumstellar material. From the SED, physical parameters, and IR emission we conclude that VLA1623A and W are Class 0 and Class I protostars, respectively, and together drive the bulk of the observed outflow. Furthermore, we find two surprising results, first the presence of a rotating disk-like structure about VLA1623A with indications of pure Keplerian rotation, which, if real, would make it one of the first evidence of Keplerian disk structures around Class 0 protostars. Second, we find VLA1623B to be a bona fide extremely young protostellar object between the starless core and Class 0 stages.

  15. Accretion and magnetic field morphology around Class 0 stage protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Banerjee, R.; Pudritz, R. E.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse simulations of turbulent, magnetized molecular cloud cores focusing on the formation of Class 0 stage protostellar discs and the physical conditions in their surroundings. We show that for a wide range of initial conditions Keplerian discs are formed in the Class 0 stage already. In particular, we show that even subsonic turbulent motions reduce the magnetic braking efficiency sufficiently in order to allow rotationally supported discs to form. We therefore suggest that already during the Class 0 stage the fraction of Keplerian discs is significantly higher than 50 per cent, consistent with recent observational trends but significantly higher than predictions based on simulations with misaligned magnetic fields, demonstrating the importance of turbulent motions for the formation of Keplerian discs. We show that the accretion of mass and angular momentum in the surroundings of protostellar discs occurs in a highly anisotropic manner, by means of a few narrow accretion channels. The magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the discs is highly disordered, revealing field reversals up to distances of 1000 au. These findings demonstrate that as soon as even mild turbulent motions are included, the classical disc formation scenario of a coherently rotating environment and a well-ordered magnetic field breaks down. Hence, it is highly questionable to assess the magnetic braking efficiency based on non-turbulent collapse simulation. We strongly suggest that, in addition to the global magnetic field properties, the small-scale accretion flow and detailed magnetic field structure have to be considered in order to assess the likelihood of Keplerian discs to be present.

  16. THE CIRCUMBINARY OUTFLOW: A PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j

    2009-10-10

    Protostellar outflow is a star's first cry at the moment of birth. The outflows have an indispensable role in the formation of single stars because they carry off the excess angular momentum from the center of the shrinking gas cloud, and permit further collapse to form a star. On the other hand, a significant fraction of stars is supposedly born as binaries with circumbinary disks that are frequently observed. Here, we investigate the evolution of a magnetized rotating cloud using a three-dimensional resistive MHD nested-grid code, and show that the outflow is driven by the circumbinary disk and has an important role even in the binary formation. After the adiabatic core formation in the collapsing cloud core, the magnetic flux is significantly removed from the center of the cloud by the Ohmic dissipation. Since this removal makes the magnetic braking ineffective, the adiabatic core continuously acquires the angular momentum to induce fragmentation and subsequent binary formation. The magnetic field accumulates in the circumbinary disk where the removal and accretion of magnetic field are balanced, and finally drives the circumbinary outflow. This result explains the spectacular morphology of some specific young stellar objects such as L1551 IRS5. We can infer that most of the bipolar molecular outflows observed by low density tracers (i.e., CO) would correspond to circumbinary or circum-multiple outflows found in this Letter, since most of the young stellar objects are supposed to be binaries or multiples.

  17. Massive Hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Tariq, Cheema

    2016-01-01

    Hemoptysis, or coughing of blood, oftentimes triggers anxiety and fear for patients. The etiology of hemoptysis will determine the clinical course, which includes watchful waiting or intensive care admission. Any amount of hemoptysis that compromises the patient's respiratory status is considered massive hemoptysis and should be considered a medical emergency. In this article, we review introduction, definition, bronchial circulation anatomy, etiology, and management of massive hemoptysis. PMID:26919675

  18. Outflow-confined HII Regions. I. First Signposts of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-02-01

    We present an evolutionary sequence of models of the photoionized disk-wind outflow around forming massive stars based on the Core Accretion model. The outflow is expected to be the first structure to be ionized by the protostar and can confine the expansion of the H ii region, especially in lateral directions in the plane of the accretion disk. The ionizing luminosity increases as Kelvin-Helmholz contraction proceeds, and the H ii region is formed when the stellar mass reaches ˜10-20{M}⊙ depending on the initial cloud core properties. Although some part of the outer disk surface remains neutral due to shielding by the inner disk and the disk wind, almost the whole of the outflow is ionized in 103-{10}4 {{y}}{{r}} after initial H ii region formation. Having calculated the extent and temperature structure of the H ii region within the immediate protostellar environment, we then make predictions for the strength of its free-free continuum and recombination line emission. The free-free radio emission from the ionized outflow has a flux density of ˜(20-200) × \\quad {(ν /10{{GHz}})}p {{mJy}} for a source at a distance of 1 kpc with a spectral index p ≃ 0.4-0.7, and the apparent size is typically ˜500 AU at 10 GHz. The {{H}}40α line profile has a width of about 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1. These properties of our model are consistent with observed radio winds and jets around forming massive protostars.

  19. Protostellar collapse in a self-gravitating sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Boss, Alan; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary calculations of protostellar cloud collapse starting from an isothermal, self-gravitating gaseous layer in hydrostatic equilibrium. This gravitationally unstable layer collapses into a flattened or toroidal density distribution, even in the absence of rotation or magnetic fields. We suggest that the flat infalling envelope recently observed in HL Tau by Hayashi et al.is the result of collapse from an initially nonspherical layer. We also speculate that the later evolution of such a flattened, collapsing envelope can produce a structure similar to the 'flared disk' invoked by Kenyon and Hartmann to explain the infrared excesses of many T Tauri stars.

  20. The Anatomy of the Young Protostellar Outflow HH 211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, A.; Forbrich, J.; Martín, S.; Yuan, Y.; Lada, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope 5-36 μm mapping observations toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH 211. The southeastern terminal shock of the outflow shows a rich mid-infrared spectrum including molecular emission lines from OH, H2O, HCO+, CO2, H2, and HD. The spectrum also shows a rising infrared continuum toward 5 μm, which we interpret as unresolved emission lines from highly excited rotational levels of the CO v = 1-0 fundamental band. This interpretation is supported by a strong excess flux observed in the Spitzer/IRAC 4-5 μm channel 2 image compared to the other IRAC channels. The extremely high critical densities of the CO v = 1-0 ro-vibrational lines and a comparison to H2 and CO excitation models suggest jet densities larger than 106 cm-3 in the terminal shock. We also observed the southeastern terminal outflow shock with the Submillimeter Array and detected pure rotational emission from CO 2-1, HCO+ 3-2, and HCN 3-2. The rotationally excited CO traces the collimated outflow backbone as well as the terminal shock. HCN traces individual dense knots along the outflow and in the terminal shock, whereas HCO+ solely appears in the terminal shock. The unique combination of our mid-infrared and submillimeter observations with previously published near-infrared observations allow us to study the interaction of one of the youngest known protostellar outflows with its surrounding molecular cloud. Our results help us to understand the nature of some of the so-called green fuzzies (Extended Green Objects), and elucidate the physical conditions that cause high OH excitation and affect the chemical OH/H2O balance in protostellar outflows and young stellar objects. In an appendix to this paper, we summarize our Spitzer follow-up survey of protostellar outflow shocks to find further examples of highly excited OH occurring together with H2O and H2.

  1. THE ANATOMY OF THE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HH 211

    SciTech Connect

    Tappe, A.; Forbrich, J.; Lada, C. J.; Martin, S.; Yuan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope 5-36 {mu}m mapping observations toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH 211. The southeastern terminal shock of the outflow shows a rich mid-infrared spectrum including molecular emission lines from OH, H{sub 2}O, HCO{sup +}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and HD. The spectrum also shows a rising infrared continuum toward 5 {mu}m, which we interpret as unresolved emission lines from highly excited rotational levels of the CO v = 1-0 fundamental band. This interpretation is supported by a strong excess flux observed in the Spitzer/IRAC 4-5 {mu}m channel 2 image compared to the other IRAC channels. The extremely high critical densities of the CO v = 1-0 ro-vibrational lines and a comparison to H{sub 2} and CO excitation models suggest jet densities larger than 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in the terminal shock. We also observed the southeastern terminal outflow shock with the Submillimeter Array and detected pure rotational emission from CO 2-1, HCO{sup +} 3-2, and HCN 3-2. The rotationally excited CO traces the collimated outflow backbone as well as the terminal shock. HCN traces individual dense knots along the outflow and in the terminal shock, whereas HCO{sup +} solely appears in the terminal shock. The unique combination of our mid-infrared and submillimeter observations with previously published near-infrared observations allow us to study the interaction of one of the youngest known protostellar outflows with its surrounding molecular cloud. Our results help us to understand the nature of some of the so-called green fuzzies (Extended Green Objects), and elucidate the physical conditions that cause high OH excitation and affect the chemical OH/H{sub 2}O balance in protostellar outflows and young stellar objects. In an appendix to this paper, we summarize our Spitzer follow-up survey of protostellar outflow shocks to find further examples of highly excited OH occurring together with H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}.

  2. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  3. On the tidal interaction between protostellar disks and companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    1993-01-01

    Formation of protoplanets and binary stars in a protostellar disk modifies the structure of the disk. Through tidal interactions, energy and angular momentum are transferred between the disk and protostellar or protoplanetary companion. We summarize recent progress in theoretical investigations of the disk-companion tidal interaction. We show that low-mass protoplanets excite density waves at their Lindblad resonances and that these waves are likely to be dissipated locally. When a protoplanet acquires sufficient mass, its tidal torque induces the formation of a gap in the vicinity of its orbit. Gap formation leads to the termination of protoplanetary growth by accretion. For proto-Jupiter to attain its present mass, we require that (1) the primordial solar nebula is heated by viscous dissipation; (2) the viscous evolution time scale of the nebula is comparable to the age of typical T Tauri stars with circumstellar disks; and (3) the mass distribution in the nebula is comparable to that estimated from a minimum-mass nebula model.

  4. Disks around Massive Young Stellar Objects: Are They Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhibo; Tamura, Motohide; Hoare, Melvin G.; Yao, Yongqiang; Ishii, Miki; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji

    2008-02-01

    We present K-band polarimetric images of several massive young stellar objects at resolutions ~0.1''-0.5''. The polarization vectors around these sources are nearly centrosymmetric, indicating they are dominating the illumination of each field. Three out of the four sources show elongated low-polarization structures passing through the centers, suggesting the presence of polarization disks. These structures and their surrounding reflection nebulae make up bipolar outflow/disk systems, supporting the collapse/accretion scenario as their low-mass siblings. In particular, S140 IRS 1 shows well-defined outflow cavity walls and a polarization disk which matches the direction of previously observed equatorial disk wind, thus confirming that the polarization disk is actually the circumstellar disk. To date, a dozen massive protostellar objects show evidence for the existence of disks; our work adds additional samples around massive young stellar objects equivalent to early B type stars.

  5. The initial conditions of stellar protocluster formation - II. A catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps embedded in IRDCs in the Galactic longitude range 15° ≤ l ≤ 55°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Pineda, J. E.; Molinari, S.

    2015-08-01

    We present a catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in a 40° wide region of the inner Galactic plane (|b| ≤ 1°). We have extracted the far-infrared (FIR) counterparts of 3493 IRDCs with known distance in the Galactic longitude range 15° ≤ l ≤ 55° and searched for the young clumps using Herschel infrared Galactic plane survey, the survey of the Galactic plane carried out with the Herschel satellite. Each clump is identified as a compact source detected at 160, 250 and 350 μm. The clumps have been classified as protostellar or starless, based on their emission (or lack of emission) at 70 μm. We identify 1723 clumps, 1056 (61 per cent) of which are protostellar and 667 (39 per cent) starless. These clumps are found within 764 different IRDCs, 375 (49 per cent) of which are only associated with protostellar clumps, 178 (23 per cent) only with starless clumps, and 211 (28 per cent) with both categories of clumps. The clumps have a median mass of ˜250 M⊙ and range up to >104 M⊙ in mass and up to 105 L⊙ in luminosity. The mass-radius distribution shows that almost 30 per cent of the starless clumps identified in this survey could form high-mass stars; however these massive clumps are confined in only ≃4 per cent of the IRDCs. Assuming a minimum mass surface density threshold for the formation of high-mass stars, the comparison of the numbers of massive starless clumps and those already containing embedded sources suggests an upper limit lifetime for the starless phase of ˜105 yr for clumps with a mass M > 500 M⊙.

  6. The Formation and Early Evolution of Young Massive Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S. N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Bastian, N.; Bally, J.; Rathborne, J.; Testi, L.; Stolte, A.; Dale, J.; Bressert, E.; Alves, J.

    We review the formation and early evolution of the most massive (> few 104 M⊙) and dense (radius of a few parsecs) young stellar clusters, focusing on the role that studies of these objects in our Galaxy can play in our understanding of star and planet formation as a whole. Comparing the demographics of young massive cluster (YMC) progenitor clouds and YMCs across the Galaxy shows that gas in the Galactic Center can accumulate to a high enough density that molecular clouds already satisfy the criteria used to define YMCs, without forming stars. In this case formation can proceed in situ — i.e., the stars form at protostellar densities close to the final stellar density. Conversely, in the disk, the gas either begins forming stars while it is being accumulated to high density, in a "conveyor belt" mode, or the timescale to accumulate the gas to such high densities must be much shorter than the star-formation timescale. The distinction between the formation regimes in the two environments is consistent with the predictions of environmentally dependent density thresholds for star formation. This implies that stars in YMCs of similar total mass and radius can have formed at widely different initial protostellar densities. The fact that no strong, systematic variations in fundamental properties (such as the IMF) are observed between YMCs in the disk and Galactic Center suggests that, statistically speaking, stellar mass assembly is not affected by the initial protostellar density. We then review recent theoretical advances and summarize the debate on three key open questions: the initial (proto)stellar distribution, infant (im)mortality, and age spreads within YMCs. We conclude that (1) the initial protostellar distribution is likely hierarchical, (2) YMCs likely experienced a formation history that was dominated by gas exhaustion rather than gas expulsion, (3) YMCs are dynamically stable from a young age, and (4) YMCs have age spreads much smaller than their mean

  7. Planet traps and planetary cores: origins of the planet-metallicity correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2014-10-10

    Massive exoplanets are observed preferentially around high metallicity ([Fe/H]) stars while low-mass exoplanets do not show such an effect. This so-called planet-metallicity correlation generally favors the idea that most observed gas giants at r < 10 AU are formed via a core accretion process. We investigate the origin of this phenomenon using a semi-analytical model, wherein the standard core accretion takes place at planet traps in protostellar disks where rapid type I migrators are halted. We focus on the three major exoplanetary populations—hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters located at r ≅ 1 AU, and the low-mass planets. We show using a statistical approach that the planet-metallicity correlations are well reproduced in these models. We find that there are specific transition metallicities with values [Fe/H] = –0.2 to –0.4, below which the low-mass population dominates, and above which the Jovian populations take over. The exo-Jupiters significantly exceed the hot Jupiter population at all observed metallicities. The low-mass planets formed via the core accretion are insensitive to metallicity, which may account for a large fraction of the observed super-Earths and hot-Neptunes. Finally, a controlling factor in building massive planets is the critical mass of planetary cores (M {sub c,} {sub crit}) that regulates the onset of rapid gas accretion. Assuming the current data is roughly complete at [Fe/H] > –0.6, our models predict that the most likely value of the 'mean' critical core mass of Jovian planets is (M {sub c,} {sub crit}) ≅ 5 M {sub ⊕} rather than 10 M {sub ⊕}. This implies that grain opacities in accreting envelopes should be reduced in order to lower M {sub c,} {sub crit}.

  8. COMPLEX SCATTERED RADIATION FIELDS AND MULTIPLE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER IN NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsuya; Hough, James H.; Werner, Michael W.; Teixeira, Paula S.

    2011-11-01

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J, H, and K{sub s} bands has been carried out for the protostellar cluster region around NGC 2264 IRS 2 in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud. Various infrared reflection nebula clusters (IRNCs) associated with NGC 2264 IRS 2 and the IRAS 12 S1 core, as well as local infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe), were detected. The illuminating sources of the IRNe were identified with known or new near- and mid-infrared sources. In addition, 314 point-like sources were detected in all three bands and their aperture polarimetry was studied. Using a color-color diagram, reddened field stars and diskless pre-main-sequence stars were selected to trace the magnetic field (MF) structure of the molecular cloud. The mean polarization position angle of the point-like sources is 81 Degree-Sign {+-} 29 Degree-Sign in the cluster core, and 58 Degree-Sign {+-} 24 Degree-Sign in the perimeter of the cluster core, which is interpreted as the projected direction on the sky of the MF in the observed region of the cloud. The Chandrasekhar-Fermi method gives a rough estimate of the MF strength to be about 100 {mu}G. A comparison with recent numerical simulations of the cluster formation implies that the cloud dynamics is controlled by the relatively strong MF. The local MF direction is well associated with that of CO outflow for IRAS 12 S1 and consistent with that inferred from submillimeter polarimetry. In contrast, the local MF direction runs roughly perpendicular to the Galactic MF direction.

  9. Champagne flutes and brandy snifters: modelling protostellar outflow-cloud chemical interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, R. P.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Williams, D. A.; Redman, M. P.

    2014-10-01

    A rich variety of molecular species has now been observed towards hot cores in star-forming regions and in the interstellar medium. An increasing body of evidence from millimetre interferometers suggests that many of these form at the interfaces between protostellar outflows and their natal molecular clouds. However, current models have remained unable to explain the origin of the observational bias towards wide-angled `brandy snifter' shaped outflows over narrower `champagne flute' shapes in carbon monoxide imaging. Furthermore, these wide-angled systems exhibit unusually high abundances of the molecular ion HCO+. We present results from a chemodynamic model of such regions where a rich chemistry arises naturally as a result of turbulent mixing between cold, dense molecular gas and the hot, ionized outflow material. The injecta drives a rich and rapid ion-neutral chemistry in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the observations. The observational bias towards wide-angled outflows is explained naturally by the geometry-dependent ion injection rate causing rapid dissociation of CO in the younger systems.

  10. Different-sized dust grains and the chemical evolution of protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochina, O. V.; Wiebe, D. S.

    2014-04-01

    Results of modeling the chemical evolution of protostellar objects are presented. The models take into account the existence of different dust populations with distinct grain sizes, total mass fractions, and temperatures. In addition to "classical" dust grains, the models include an entirely different second dust population, with dust grain sizes of 30 Å and a higher temperature. Two chemical-evolution models are compared, one taking into account only classical dust and the other including both dust populations. The influence of a complex dust composition on the general evolution of the molecular contents of prestellar cores and the abundances of a number of chemical species is studied. At early evolutionary stages, differences are mainly determined by the modification changes in the photoprocesses' balance due to efficient UV absorption by the second population of dust grains and in collisional reactions with the dust grains. At late stages, distinctions between the models are also determined by the increasing dominance of additional reaction channels. The species that respond to the presence of small grains in different ways are separated into different groups. Allowing for the presence of small grains makes it possible to significantly lower the water abundance in the gas phase.

  11. Massive Fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.

    1977-01-01

    This ten-year study of the massive fibroid at the Queen of Angels Hospital will reveal an average of 66 cases per year which could be classified as large and massive. Only about ten cases per year qualify as massive (four gestational months or larger). There were none considered giant size (25 lbs or more). The literature is replete with these, one of which (weighing 100.2 lbs) will be reported in detail. The mortality rate continues to be considerable in these (14.8 to 16.7 percent). In the smaller tumors, mortality is rare and morbidity is minimal. Bleeding, pain, and pressure symptoms, due to impingement on neighboring organs, are the principal symptoms. Sarcomatous change, fortunately, still remains quite rare. Treatment usually involves a pre-operative dilatation and curettage when bleeding is a problem, followed by total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy where indicated. Appendectomy is usually incidental. Anesthesia is usually spinal, if not otherwise contraindicated. Ultrasound is a new and refined diagnostic tool. PMID:833892

  12. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  13. Signatures of Gravitational Instability in Resolved Images of Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Chiang, Eugene; Liu, Hauyu Baobab

    2016-06-01

    Protostellar (class 0/I) disks, which have masses comparable to those of their nascent host stars and are fed continuously from their natal infalling envelopes, are prone to gravitational instability (GI). Motivated by advances in near-infrared (NIR) adaptive optics imaging and millimeter-wave interferometry, we explore the observational signatures of GI in disks using hydrodynamical and Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations to synthesize NIR scattered light images and millimeter dust continuum maps. Spiral arms induced by GI, located at disk radii of hundreds of astronomical units, are local overdensities and have their photospheres displaced to higher altitudes above the disk midplane; therefore, arms scatter more NIR light from their central stars than inter-arm regions, and are detectable at distances up to 1 kpc by Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, and Subaru/HiCIAO/SCExAO. In contrast, collapsed clumps formed by disk fragmentation have such strong local gravitational fields that their scattering photospheres are at lower altitudes; such fragments appear fainter than their surroundings in NIR scattered light. Spiral arms and streamers recently imaged in four FU Ori systems at NIR wavelengths resemble GI-induced structures and support the interpretation that FUors are gravitationally unstable protostellar disks. At millimeter wavelengths, both spirals and clumps appear brighter in thermal emission than the ambient disk and can be detected by ALMA at distances up to 0.4 kpc with one hour integration times at ∼0.″1 resolution. Collapsed fragments having masses ≳1 M J can be detected by ALMA within ∼10 minutes.

  14. First Detection of Methanol in a Class O Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, William D.; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, Class O protostellar object. In addition, we identify a spectral feature in the outflow corresponding to an ethanol transition. Using the Caltech Owens Valley Millimeter Array with a synthesized beam size of 2", we detect spatially unresolved methanol in the 2(sub k) - 1(sub k) transitions at 3mm, which is coincident in position with the peak of the continuum emission. The gas phase methanol could be located in the central region (< 100 AU radius) of a flat disk, or in an extended heated surface layer (approx. 200 AU radius) of a flared disk. The fractional abundance of methanol X(CH3OH) is approx. 2 x l0(exp -8) in the flat disk model, and 3 x l0(exp -7) for the flared disk. The fractional abundance is small in the disk as a whole, but considerably larger in the warm portions. This difference indicates that substantial chemical processing probably takes place in the disk via depletion and desorption. The methanol desorbed from the grains in the warm surface layers returns to the icy grain mantles in the cooler interior of the disk, where it is available to become part of the composition of solar system-like bodies, such as comets, formed in the outer circumstellar region. This first millimeter-wavelength detection of a complex organic molecule in a young protostellar disk has implications for disk structure and chemical evolution and for potential use as a temperature probe. The research of TV and WL was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology with support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Hector G.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Mardones, Diego; Sargent, Anneila I.; Schnee, Scott L.

    2013-09-01

    We present observations of outflows in the star-forming region NGC 1333 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA). We combined the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (1-0) CARMA mosaics with data from the 14 m Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory to probe the central, most dense, and active region of this protostellar cluster at scales from 5'' to 7' (or 1000 AU to 0.5 pc at a distance of 235 pc). We map and identify {sup 12}CO outflows, and along with {sup 13}CO data we estimate their mass, momentum, and energy. Within the 7' Multiplication-Sign 7' map, the 5'' resolution allows for a detailed study of morphology and kinematics of outflows and outflow candidates, some of which were previously confused with other outflow emission in the region. In total, we identify 22 outflow lobes, as well as 9 dense circumstellar envelopes marked by continuum emission, of which 6 drive outflows. We calculate a total outflow mass, momentum, and energy within the mapped region of 6 M{sub Sun }, 19 M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1}, and 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg, respectively. Within this same region, we compare outflow kinematics with turbulence and gravitational energy, and we suggest that outflows are likely important agents for the maintenance of turbulence in this region. In the earliest stages of star formation, outflows do not yet contribute enough energy to totally disrupt the clustered region where most star formation is happening, but have the potential to do so as the protostellar sources evolve. Our results can be used to constrain outflow properties, such as outflow strength, in numerical simulations of outflow-driven turbulence in clusters.

  16. Embedded Protostellar Disks Around (Sub-)Solar Stars. II. Disk Masses, Sizes, Densities, Temperatures, and the Planet Formation Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2011-03-01

    We present basic properties of protostellar disks in the embedded phase of star formation (EPSF), which is difficult to probe observationally using available observational facilities. We use numerical hydrodynamics simulations of cloud core collapse and focus on disks formed around stars in the 0.03-1.0 M sun mass range. Our obtained disk masses scale near-linearly with the stellar mass. The mean and median disk masses in the Class 0 and I phases (M mean d,C0 = 0.12 M sun, M mdn d,C0 = 0.09 M sun and M mean d,CI = 0.18 M sun, M mdn d,CI = 0.15 M sun, respectively) are greater than those inferred from observations by (at least) a factor of 2-3. We demonstrate that this disagreement may (in part) be caused by the optically thick inner regions of protostellar disks, which do not contribute to millimeter dust flux. We find that disk masses and surface densities start to systematically exceed that of the minimum mass solar nebular for objects with stellar mass as low as M * = 0.05-0.1 M sun. Concurrently, disk radii start to grow beyond 100 AU, making gravitational fragmentation in the disk outer regions possible. Large disk masses, surface densities, and sizes suggest that giant planets may start forming as early as in the EPSF, either by means of core accretion (inner disk regions) or direct gravitational instability (outer disk regions), thus breaking a longstanding stereotype that the planet formation process begins in the Class II phase.

  17. Angular Momentum Loss in the Envelope–Disk Transition Region of the HH 111 Protostellar System: Evidence for Magnetic Braking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Hwang, Hsiang-Chih; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-08-01

    HH 111 is a Class I protostellar system at a distance of ˜400 pc, with the central source VLA 1 associated with a rotating disk deeply embedded in a flattened envelope. Here we present the observations of this system at ˜0.″6 (240 au) resolution in C18O (J = 2 — 1) and a 230 GHz continuum obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, and in SO ({N}J = {5}6-{4}5) obtained with the Submillimeter Array. The observations show for the first time how a Keplerian rotating disk can be formed inside a flattened envelope. The flattened envelope is detected in C18O, extending out to ≳2400 au from the VLA 1 source. It has a differential rotation, with the outer part (≳2000 au) better described by a rotation that has constant specific angular momentum, and the innermost part (≲160 au) by a Keplerian rotation. The rotationally supported disk is therefore relatively compact in this system, which is consistent with the dust continuum observations. Most interestingly, if the flow is in steady state, there is a substantial drop in specific angular momentum in the envelope–disk transition region from 2000 to 160 au, by a factor of ˜3. Such a decrease is not expected outside a disk formed from simple hydrodynamic core collapse, but can happen naturally if the core is significantly magnetized, because magnetic fields can be trapped in the transition region outside the disk by the ram pressure of the protostellar accretion flow, which can lead to efficient magnetic braking. In addition, SO shock emission is detected around the outer radius of the disk and could trace an accretion shock around the disk.

  18. Tracing Carina's protostellar jets to the source with WFC3-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2010-09-01

    Based on a recent H-alpha imaging survey of the Carina Nebula with ACS, we discovered 39 new Herbig-Haro {HH} jets marking the bipolar outflows from newly formed low-mass stars. This provides a valuable sample of jets that are all at the same distance, allowing us to study the relationship between protostars and their outflows where nearby massive stars are shredding the molecular cloud as new stars are forming. Carina has been studied extensively with Spitzer and Chandra, providing IR spectral energy distributions and X-ray luminosities for all detectable sources in the field. However, 29 of the jets seen at visual wavelengths emerge from opaque clouds or dark globules seen in silhouette against the bright background H II region, so the protostellar driving sources are still embedded in their natal clouds and are not identifiable in optical images. This makes the identification of the driving sources in lower resolution Spitzer and Chandra images ambiguous. Three of these jets {HH666, HH901, and HH902} have already been imaged with WFC3 as ERO targets after the servicing mission, demonstrating that near-IR [Fe II] emission lines in the F126N and F164N filters provide an excellent way to trace the jet emission back into the cloud and to thereby identify which embedded star is driving the outflow. Here we propose to obtain WFC3-IR images of [Fe II] emission from the remaining embedded jets in order to link the jets to the protostars that launch them. This will then permit a comparison of the jet properties to protostar properties for the full sample. Additionally, the flux ratio of these two [Fe II] lines will probe the spatially dependent extinction through the cloud all the way back to the source, providing a map of the density structure in the protostar's extended circumstellar envelope.

  19. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  20. Geology, mineralogy, and chemistry of sediment-hosted clastic massive sulfides in shallow cores, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfellow, W.D.; Franklin, J.M. )

    1993-12-01

    Middle Valley is a sediment-covered rift near the northern end of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Hydrothermal fluids are presently being discharged at two vent fields about 3 km apart, Bent Hill and the area of active venting. The hydrothermally active chimneys at both Bent Hill and the area of active venting consist of anhydrite and Mg-rich silicates with minor pyrite, Cu-Fe sulfide, sphalerite, and galena. Hydrothermal discharge in these areas appears to be focused along extensional faults. At the Bent Hill massive sulfide deposit, clastic sulfide layers are interbedded with hydrothermally altered and unaltered hemipelagic and turbiditic sediment along the flanks of the sulfide mound. Sulfide textures and mineralogy suggest that the Bent Hill sulfide mound formed by the build-up and collapse of sulfide chimneys, the resedimentation of sulfide debris and the formation of clastic sulfide layers, and the infilling and replacement of clastic sulfides by hydrothermal fluids near vents. Sulfur isotope values that are consistently more positive than basaltic sulfur support the addition of seawater sulfur. Pb isotope values for the Bent Hill deposit that are transitional between midocean ridge basalt (MORB) and Middle Valley sediments indicate that the sulfides probably formed from fluids which originated in the oceanic crust but which have been modified by reaction with lower temperature (<274 C) fluids generated in the sedimentary pile, similar to those now venting in Middle Valley.

  1. Gravitational Waves from Core-collapse Supernovae and Long GRBsLong GRBs and massive stellar explosions from frame dragging around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, M. H. P. M.

    2014-08-01

    The most energetic long GRBs and core-collapse supernovae may be powered by black hole inner engines. Normalized light curves of the BATSE catalogue of long GRBs are remarkably consistent with energizing an inner disk in the process of black hole spindown. A broad band chirp spectrum observed in a recent analysis of BeppoSax light curves of long GRBs may reflect the induced turbulence. Nearby CC-SNe are therefore potential sources of gravitational wave emissions with durations of tens of seconds commensurate with long GRBs.

  2. Rotationally driven Fragmentation in the Formation of the Binary Protostellar System L1551 IRS 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Yeung, Paul K. H.; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Saigo, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    Both bulk rotation and local turbulence have been widely suggested to drive the fragmentation in collapsing cores that produces multiple star systems. Even when the two mechanisms predict different alignments for stellar spins and orbits, subsequent internal or external interactions can drive multiple systems toward or away from alignment, thus masking their formation processes. Here, we demonstrate that the geometrical and dynamical relationship between a binary system and its surrounding bulk envelope provide the crucial distinction between fragmentation models. We find that the circumstellar disks of the binary protostellar system L1551 IRS 5 are closely parallel, not just with each other but also with their surrounding flattened envelope. Measurements of the relative proper motion of the binary components spanning nearly 30 years indicate an orbital motion related to that of the envelope rotation. Eliminating orbital solutions whereby the circumstellar disks would be tidally truncated to sizes smaller than observed, the remaining solutions favor a circular or low-eccentricity orbit tilted by up to ∼25° from the circumstellar disks. Turbulence-driven fragmentation can generate local angular momentum to produce a coplanar binary system, but this would have no particular relationship to the system’s surrounding envelope. Instead, the observed properties conform with predictions for rotationally driven fragmentation. If the fragments were produced at different heights or on opposite sides of the mid-plane in the flattened central region of a rotating core, the resulting protostars would then exhibit circumstellar disks parallel with the surrounding envelope but tilted from the orbital plane, as is observed.

  3. Recent massive sulfide deposits of the Semenov ore district, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 13°31' N: Associated rocks of the oceanic core complex and their hydrothermal alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsev, A. N.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Vlasov, E. A.; Beltenev, V. E.; Dobretsova, I. G.; Ageeva, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    The oceanic core complexes and large-offset detachment faults characteristic of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge are crucial for the structural control of large hydrothermal systems, including those forming sub-seafloor polymetallic sulfide mineralization. The structural-geological, petrographic, and mineralogical data are considered for the oceanic core complex enclosing the Semenov-1, -2, -3, -4, and -5 inactive hydrothermal sulfide fields recently discovered on the Mid-Oceanic Ridge at 13°31' N. The oceanic core complex is composed of serpentinized and talc-replaced peridotites and sporadic gabbroic rocks, however, all hydrothermal fields reveal compositional indications of basaltic substrate. The volcanic structures superposed on the oceanic core complex are marked by outcrops of pillow lavas with fresh quenched glass. Dolerites regarded as volcanic conduits seem to represent separate dike swarms. The superposed volcanic structures develop largely along the near-latitudinal high-angle tectonic zone controlling the Semenov-1, -2, -5, and -3 hydrothermal sulfide fields. The manifestations of hydrothermal metasomatic alteration are diverse. The widespread talcose rocks with pyrrhotite-pyrite mineralization after serpentinite, as well as finding of talc-chlorite metabasalt are interpreted as products of hydrothermal activity in the permeable zone of detachment fault. Chloritization and brecciation of basalts with superposed quartz or opal, barite, and pyrite or chalcopyrite mineralization directly related to the sub-seafloor sulfide deposition. The native copper mineralization in almost unaltered basalts at the Semenov-4 field is suggested to precipitate from ore-forming fluids before they reach the level of sub-seafloor sulfide deposition. Amphibolites with plagiogranite veinlets are interpreted as tectonic fragments of the highest-temperature portions of hydrothermal systems, where partial melting of basic rocks in the presence of aqueous fluid with

  4. Complexity of nearshore strontium-to-calcium ratio variability in a core sample of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea obtained in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Christopher D.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don; Morrison, Jennifer M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) were measured on the skeletal matrix of a core sample from a colony of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea collected in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Strontium and calcium are incorporated into the coral skeleton during the precipitation of aragonite by the coral polyps and their ratio is highly temperature dependent. The robustness of this temperature dependence makes Sr/Ca a reliable proxy for sea surface temperature (SST). Details presented from the St. John S. siderea core indicate that terrestrial inputs of sediment and freshwater can disrupt the chemical balance and subsequently complicate the utility of Sr/Ca in reconstructing historical SST. An approximately 44-year-long record of Sr/Ca shows that an annual SST signal is recorded but with an increasing Sr/Ca trend from 1980 to present, which is likely the result of runoff from the mountainous terrain of St. John. The overwhelming influence of the terrestrial fingerprint on local seawater chemistry makes utilizing Sr/Ca as a SST proxy in nearshore environments very difficult.

  5. The Fragmentation of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodon, Javier Adrian

    2009-11-01

    Since its discovery by E. Salpeter in 1955, the high-mass end of the Initial Mass Function (IMF) has been continuously tested, and its slope has not changed from the value -2.35 originally calculated by Salpeter, the "Salpeter value". Furthermore, it is found that this value is universal. It not only describes the mass distribution of stellar masses in the Milky Way but also in other galaxies. Stars form individually or in systems within molecular clouds, from local condensations of sizes on the order of ~0.01 pc, the so-called "dense cores". In the case of low-mass star-forming regions, it is found that the Core Mass Function (CMF) resembles the Salpeter IMF. However, in the case of massive star-forming (MSF) regions, the answer is not that clear. The first CMF for a MSF region was derived in 2004 by H. Beuther and P. Schilke for the MSF IRAS 19410+2336. They found that this CMF also resembled the Salpeter IMF. Since then, a few more CMFs for MSF regions have been derived, always with exponents comparable to Salpeter. This suggested that the CMF and the IMF are related in a one-to-one or nearly one-to-one relationship, and that the fragmentation processes within a molecular cloud would set the shape of the IMF at an early evolutionary stage. Attempting to test that scenario, in this thesis I present and analyse high angular resolution interferometric observations of several MSF regions at millimeter wavelengths, describing their protostellar content and deriving their CMF whenever is possible. We confirm the result of Beuther & Schilke (2004) and obtain a CMF with a power-law slope similar to the Salpeter IMF, however for other MSF regions we obtain a CMF with a power-law slope flatter than Salpeter. This difference suggests that the IMF might not be set at the moment of the fragmentation of the cloud, but instead would be a result of the evolution of the cloud, starting with a flatter mass distribution that becomes steeper at later evolutionary stages. This

  6. SMA Imaging of Massive Star Formation in NGC6334I and I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Megeath, S. T.; Beuther, H.; Zhang, Q.; Brogan, C. L.; Menten, K. M.; Thorwirth, S.

    We present high-resolution observations (1.3" x 2.3") of the massive star-formation regions NGC 6334 I and I(N) in the 230 GHz band (1.3 millimeters). Data were obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer, a joint venture of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academica Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Various pieces of past evidence, including a molecular line survey by Thorwirth et al. (2003), have suggested that these two fields exist in different evolutionary stages, with field I(N) being younger. Our new observations help to explore this hypothesis. In both fields, we have resolved the strong continuum emission into multiple sources. Most of the continuum arises from dust grains. In source I, there are four major components, the third brightest of which coincides with the compact HII region. In source I(N), we have resolved at least seven sources. One of the fainter ones is associated with a weak 3.5 cm source while the others have no centimeter continuum counterpart. In addition to the millimeter continuum emission, we have detected and imaged a number of molecular lines that trace the outflow activity and the location of dense gas in both fields. So far, our results suggest that both fields contain protostellar clusters, each with at least one line-rich core and a number of other (perhaps younger) cores that exhibit no known compact phenomena at centimeter wavelengths. These observations demonstrate the power and promise of high-resolution submillimeter observations.

  7. Comparing young massive clusters and their progenitor clouds in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. L.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Rathborne, J. M.; Galván-Madrid, R.; Liu, H. B.

    2016-04-01

    Young massive clusters (YMCs) have central stellar mass surface densities exceeding 104 M⊙ pc-2. It is currently unknown whether the stars formed at such high (proto)stellar densities. We compile a sample of gas clouds in the Galaxy which have sufficient gas mass within a radius of a few parsecs to form a YMC, and compare their radial gas mass distributions to the stellar mass distribution of Galactic YMCs. We find that the gas in the progenitor clouds is distributed differently than the stars in YMCs. The mass surface density profiles of the gas clouds are generally shallower than the stellar mass surface density profiles of the YMCs, which are characterized by prominent dense core regions with radii ˜0.1 pc, followed by a power-law tail. On the scale of YMC core radii, we find that there are no known clouds with significantly more mass in their central regions when compared to Galactic YMCs. Additionally, we find that models in which stars form from very dense initial conditions require surface densities that are generally higher than those seen in the known candidate YMC progenitor clouds. Our results show that the quiescent, less evolved clouds contain less mass in their central regions than in the highly star-forming clouds. This suggests an evolutionary trend in which clouds continue to accumulate mass towards their centres after the onset of star formation. We conclude that a conveyor-belt scenario for YMC formation is consistent with the current sample of Galactic YMCs and their progenitor clouds.

  8. 'STARLESS' SUPER-JEANS CORES IN FOUR GOULD BELT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug

    2010-07-20

    From a survey of 729 cores based on JCMT/SCUBA data, we present an analysis of 17 candidate starless cores with masses that exceed their stable Jeans masses. We re-examine the classification of these super-Jeans cores using Spitzer maps and find that 3 are re-classified as protostellar, 11 have ambiguous emission near the core positions, and 3 appear to be genuinely starless. We suggest that the 3 starless and 11 undetermined super-Jeans cores represent excellent targets for future observational and computational study to understand the evolution of dense cores and the process of star formation.

  9. Chemistry in low-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions.

    PubMed

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2006-08-15

    When interstellar clouds collapse to form new stars and planets, the surrounding gas and dust become part of the infalling envelopes and rotating disks, thus providing the basic material from which new solar systems are formed. Instrumentation to probe the chemistry in low-mass star-forming regions has only recently become available. The results of a systematic program to study the abundances in solar-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions are presented. Surveys at submillimeter and infrared wavelengths reveal a rich chemistry, including simple and complex (organic) gases, ices, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and silicates. Each of these species traces different aspects of the physical and chemical state of the objects as they evolve from deeply embedded protostars to pre-main sequence stars with planet-forming disks. Quantitative information on temperatures, densities, and abundances is obtained through molecular excitation and radiative transfer models as well as from analysis of solid-state line profiles. The chemical characteristics are dominated by freeze-out in the coldest regions and ice evaporation in the warmer zones. In the surface layers of disks, UV radiation controls the chemistry. The importance of complementary laboratory experiments and calculations to obtain basic molecular data is emphasized. PMID:16894165

  10. Chemistry in low-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions

    PubMed Central

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2006-01-01

    When interstellar clouds collapse to form new stars and planets, the surrounding gas and dust become part of the infalling envelopes and rotating disks, thus providing the basic material from which new solar systems are formed. Instrumentation to probe the chemistry in low-mass star-forming regions has only recently become available. The results of a systematic program to study the abundances in solar-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions are presented. Surveys at submillimeter and infrared wavelengths reveal a rich chemistry, including simple and complex (organic) gases, ices, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and silicates. Each of these species traces different aspects of the physical and chemical state of the objects as they evolve from deeply embedded protostars to pre-main sequence stars with planet-forming disks. Quantitative information on temperatures, densities, and abundances is obtained through molecular excitation and radiative transfer models as well as from analysis of solid-state line profiles. The chemical characteristics are dominated by freeze-out in the coldest regions and ice evaporation in the warmer zones. In the surface layers of disks, UV radiation controls the chemistry. The importance of complementary laboratory experiments and calculations to obtain basic molecular data is emphasized. PMID:16894165

  11. AN ADAPTIVE OPTICS SURVEY FOR CLOSE PROTOSTELLAR BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Reipurth, Bo; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2009-11-15

    In order to test the hypothesis that Class I protostellar binary stars are a product of ejections during the dynamical decay of nonhierarchical multiple systems, we combined the results of new adaptive optics (AO) observations of Class I protostars with our previously published AO data to investigate whether Class I protostars with a widely separated companion (r > 200 AU) are more likely to also have a close companion (r < 200 AU). In total, we observed 47 embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) with either the Subaru natural guide star AO system or the Keck laser guide star AO system. We found that targets with a widely separated companion within 5000 AU are not more likely to have a close companion. However, targets with another YSO within a projected separation of 25,000 AU are much more likely to have a close companion. Most importantly, every target with a close companion has another YSO within a projected separation of 25,000 AU. We came to the same conclusions after considering a restricted sample of targets within 500 pc and close companions wider than 50 AU to minimize incompleteness effects. The Orion star-forming region was found to have an excess of both close binaries and YSOs within 25,000 AU compared to other star-forming regions. We interpret these observations as strong evidence that many close Class I binary stars form via ejections and that many of the ejected stars become unbound during the Class I phase.

  12. Massive Star Formation at Millimeter and Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Nung

    2004-06-01

    associated with luminous young stellar objects have been studied in high angular resolutions (<10"). I find that the outflow associated with each IRAS source shows a clear bipolar morphology in 12CO, with properties (i.e., total mass of order 10-100 M_sun, mass-outflow rate >10^-3 M_sun yr^-1, dynamical timescale 10^4-10^5 yrs, and energetics) comparable with those of other massive outflows associated with luminous young stellar objects. Each outflow appears to be centered on a dust and gas condensation with a mass of 200-300 M_sun, likely marking the location of the driving source. The mass-velocity diagrams of both outflows change in slope at a velocity of ~10 km s^-1, suggesting that the high-velocity component (HVC) may drive the low-velocity component (LVC). Neither HVC has a momentum supply rate sufficient to drive their corresponding LVCs, and as for other molecular outflows the primary driving agent cannot be ionized gas, leaving atomic gas as the other remaining candidate. Finally, I present a first glimpse at the small-scale distribution of dust around UC HII regions and high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs) at 0.85 mm made with the Submillimeter Array (SMA), and investigate whether HMPOs and UC HII regions can serve as useful gain calibrators for the SMA. The SMA observations with an angular resolution of ~3" reveal that although a large fraction of the dust emission originates from an extended ``halo' component, a compact unresolved component often remains that when sufficiently strong may serve as a useful calibrator. I discuss the origin of the core-halo structure seen in many sources and conclude with suggestions for future searches for calibrators with the SMA.

  13. Evolution of Massive Protostars Via Disk Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2010-09-01

    Mass accretion onto (proto-)stars at high accretion rates \\dot{M}_* > 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr^{-1} is expected in massive star formation. We study the evolution of massive protostars at such high rates by numerically solving the stellar structure equations. In this paper, we examine the evolution via disk accretion. We consider a limiting case of "cold" disk accretion, whereby most of the stellar photosphere can radiate freely with negligible backwarming from the accretion flow, and the accreting material settles onto the star with the same specific entropy as the photosphere. We compare our results to the calculated evolution via spherically symmetric accretion, the opposite limit, whereby the material accreting onto the star contains the entropy produced in the accretion shock front. We examine how different accretion geometries affect the evolution of massive protostars. For cold disk accretion at 10-3 M sun yr-1, the radius of a protostar is initially small, R *sime a few R sun. After several solar masses have accreted, the protostar begins to bloat up and for M * ~= 10 M sun the stellar radius attains its maximum of 30-400 R sun. The large radius ~100 R sun is also a feature of spherically symmetric accretion at the same accreted mass and accretion rate. Hence, expansion to a large radius is a robust feature of accreting massive protostars. At later times, the protostar eventually begins to contract and reaches the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) for M * ~= 30 M sun, independent of the accretion geometry. For accretion rates exceeding several 10-3 M sun yr-1, the protostar never contracts to the ZAMS. The very large radius of several hundreds R sun results in the low effective temperature and low UV luminosity of the protostar. Such bloated protostars could well explain the existence of bright high-mass protostellar objects, which lack detectable H II regions.

  14. The near-infrared excitation of the HH 211 protostellar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, B.; Smith, M. D.; Froebrich, D.; Davis, C. J.; Eislöffel, J.

    2005-02-01

    The protostellar outflow HH 211 is of considerable interest since it is extremely young and highly collimated. Here, we explore the outflow through imaging and spectroscopy in the near-infrared to determine if there are further diagnostic signatures of youth. We confirm the detection of a near-infrared continuum of unknown origin. We propose that it is emitted by the driving millimeter source, escapes the core through tunnels, and illuminates features aligning the outflow. Narrow-band flux measurements of these features contain an unusually large amount of continuum emission. [FeII] emission at 1.644 μm has been detected and is restricted to isolated condensations. However, the characteristics of vibrational excitation of molecular hydrogen resemble those of older molecular outflows. We attempt to model the ordered structure of the western outflow as a series of shocks, finding that bow shocks with J-type dissociative apices and C-type flanks are consistent. Moreover, essentially the same conditions are predicted for all three bows except for a systematic reduction in speed and density with distance from the driving source. We find increased K-band extinctions in the bright regions as high as 2.9 mag and suggest that the bow shocks become visible where the outflow impacts on dense clumps of cloud material. We propose that the outflow is carved out by episodes of pulsating jets. The jets, driven by central explosive events, are responsible for excavating a central tunnel through which radiation temporarily penetrates. Based in part on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, operated jointly by Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). Observations were also obtained with The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, which is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council.

  15. From nearby low-mass protostars to high redshift starbursts: protostellar outflows tracing the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Bergin, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    Embedded low-mass protostars are notoriously difficult to observe even in the nearest Galactic high-mass clusters where they outnumber the high-mass protostars by orders of magnitude. Thus, without a good tracer of the low-mass population, we do not have a good handle on the shape of the initial (core) mass function, leaving little hope for extrapolating to extragalactic regions where we will never have neither the sensitivity nor the resolution to directly observe this population. A good tracer of the low-mass population is needed.One such physical tracer is outflows. Outflow emission is directly proportional to envelope mass, and outflows are predominantly active during the deeply embedded phases of star formation. What is required for this method to work is species and transitions tracing outflows uniquely such that any signal is not diluted by the surrounding cloud, such as certain methanol transitions, water, high-J CO (J > 10).I will present a statistical model of a forming high-mass cluster. The model includes what we currently know about Galactic high-mass clusters and incorporates outflow emission from low-mass protostars. The latter component is obtained from observations of tens of nearby embedded low-mass protostellar outflows in the above-mentioned tracers. The model is benchmarked against ALMA and Herschel-HIFI observations of Galactic clusters proving the concept, and preliminary extrapolations to the extragalactic regime are presented. With this new probe, and traditional probes of the distant star formation which predominantly trace high mass stars, we will be able to explore the IMF in starburst galaxies from low to high redshift.

  16. Proper motions of embedded protostellar jets in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djupvik, A. A.; Liimets, T.; Zinnecker, H.; Barzdis, A.; Rastorgueva-Foi, E. A.; Petersen, L. R.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We determine the proper motion of protostellar jets around Class 0 and Class I sources in an active star forming region in Serpens. Methods: Multi-epoch deep images in the 2.122 μm line of molecular hydrogen, v = 1-0 S(1), obtained with the near-infrared instrument NOTCam on a timescale of 10 years, are used to determine the proper motion of knots and jets. K-band spectroscopy of the brighter knots is used to supply radial velocities, estimate extinction, excitation temperature, and H2 column densities towards these knots. Results: We measure the proper motion of 31 knots on different timescales (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years). The typical tangential velocity is around 50 km s-1 for the 10-year baseline, but for shorter timescales, a maximum tangential velocity up to 300 km s-1 is found for a few knots. Based on morphology, velocity information, and the locations of known protostars, we argue for the existence of at least three partly overlapping and deeply embedded flows, one Class 0 flow and two Class I flows. The multi-epoch proper motion results indicate time-variable velocities of the knots, for the first time directly measured for a Class 0 jet. We find in general higher velocities for the Class 0 jet than for the two Class I jets. While the bolometric luminosites of the three driving sources are about equal, the derived mass flow rate Ṁout is two orders of magnitude higher in the Class 0 flow than in the two Class I flows. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  17. RAPID MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, T. T.; Huang, H.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2012-01-20

    Spectral energy distribution (SED) in protostellar disks is determined by the disks' internal dissipation and reprocessing of irradiation from their host stars. Around T Tauri stars, most mid-infrared (MIR) radiation (in a wavelength range from a few to a few tens of {mu}m) emerges from regions around a fraction to a few AU. This region is interesting because it contains both the habitable zone and the snow line. Recent observations reveal SED variations in the MIR wavelength range. These variations are puzzling because they occur on a timescale (a few days) which is much shorter than the dynamical (months to years) timescale from 1 AU to a few AU. They are probably caused by shadows cast by inner onto outer disk regions. Interaction between disks and their misaligned magnetized host stars can lead to warped structure and periodic SED modulations. Rapid aperiodic SED variations may also be induced by observed X-ray flares from T Tauri stars. These flares can significantly modulate the ionization fraction of the gas and the net charge carried by the grains near the surface of the inner disk. The newly charged grains may be accelerated by the stellar or disk magnetic field and adjust their distances from the midplane. Shadows cast by these grains attenuate the flux of stellar photons irradiated onto regions at several AU from the central stars. We use this model to account for the observed rapid aperiodic SED variabilities. We suggest that regular monitoring of SED variations will not only provide valuable information on the distribution of the disk aspect ratio near the habitable zone but also provide a probe of the interaction between the inner regions of the disk with the magnetosphere of their host stars.

  18. A Protostellar Jet Emanating from a Hypercompact H ii Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Contreras, Yanett; Dougados, Catherine; Cabrit, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    We present radio continuum observations of the high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) G345.4938+01.4677 obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 5, 9, 17, and 19 GHz. These observations provide definite evidence that the outer and inner pairs of radio lobes consist of shock-ionized material being excited by an underlying collimated and fast protostellar jet emanating from a hypercompact H ii region. By comparing with images taken 6 years earlier at 5 and 9 GHz using the same telescope, we assess the proper motions (PMs) of the radio sources. The outer west and east lobes exhibit PMs of 64 ± 12 and 48 ± 13 mas yr‑1, indicating velocities projected in the plane of the sky and receding from G345.4938+01.4677 of 520 and 390 {\\text{km s}}-1, respectively. The internal radio lobes also display PM signals consistently receding from the HMYSO with magnitudes of 17 ± 11 and 35 ± 10 mas yr‑1 for the inner west and east lobes, respectively. The morphology of the outer west lobe is that of a detached bow shock. At 17 and 19 GHz, the outer east lobe displays an arcuate morphology also suggesting a bow shock. These results show that disk accretion and jet acceleration—possibly occurring in a very similar way compared with low-mass protostars—is taking place in G345.4938+01.4677 despite the presence of ionizing radiation and the associated hypercompact H ii region.

  19. RADIATION TRANSFER OF MODELS OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION. II. EFFECTS OF THE OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yichen; Tan, Jonathan C.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2013-04-01

    We present radiation transfer simulations of a massive (8 M{sub Sun }) protostar forming from a massive (M{sub c} = 60 M{sub Sun }) protostellar core, extending the model developed by Zhang and Tan. The two principal improvements are (1) developing a model for the density and velocity structure of a disk wind that fills the bipolar outflow cavities, based in part on the disk-wind model of Blandford and Payne; and (2) solving for the radially varying accretion rate in the disk due to a supply of mass and angular momentum from the infall envelope and their loss to the disk wind. One consequence of the launching of the disk wind is a reduction in the amount of accretion power that is radiated by the disk. We also include a non-Keplerian potential appropriate for a growing, massive disk. For the transition from dusty to dust-free conditions where gas opacities dominate, we now implement a gradual change as a more realistic approximation of dust destruction. We study how the above effects, especially the outflow, influence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and the synthetic images of the protostar. Dust in the outflow cavity significantly affects the SEDs at most viewing angles. It further attenuates the short-wavelength flux from the protostar, controlling how the accretion disk may be viewed, and contributes a significant part of the near- and mid-IR fluxes. These fluxes warm the disk, boosting the mid- and far-IR emission. We find that for near face-on views, i.e., looking down the outflow cavity (although not too close to the axis), the SED from the near-IR to about 60 {mu}m is very flat, which may be used to identify such systems. We show that the near-facing outflow cavity and its walls are still the most significant features in images up to 70 {mu}m, dominating the mid-IR emission and determining its morphology. The thermal emission from the dusty outflow itself dominates the flux at {approx}20 {mu}m. The detailed distribution of the dust in the outflow

  20. The Blast Survey of the Vela Molecular Cloud: Physical Properties of the Dense Cores in Vela-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, Luca; Ade, Peter A. R.; Anglés-Alcázar, Daniel; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; De Luca, Massimo; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Elia, Davide; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Giannini, Teresa; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Lorenzetti, Dario; Marengo, Massimo; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G.; Massi, Fabrizio; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Salama, Alberto; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Smith, Howard A.; Strafella, Francesco; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

    2009-12-01

    The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) carried out a 250, 350, and 500 μm survey of the galactic plane encompassing the Vela Molecular Ridge, with the primary goal of identifying the coldest dense cores possibly associated with the earliest stages of star formation. Here, we present the results from observations of the Vela-D region, covering about 4 deg2, in which we find 141 BLAST cores. We exploit existing data taken with the Spitzer MIPS, IRAC, and SEST-SIMBA instruments to constrain their (single-temperature) spectral energy distributions, assuming a dust emissivity index β = 2.0. This combination of data allows us to determine the temperature, luminosity, and mass of each BLAST core, and also enables us to separate starless from protostellar sources. We also analyze the effects that the uncertainties on the derived physical parameters of the individual sources have on the overall physical properties of starless and protostellar cores, and we find that there appear to be a smooth transition from the pre- to the protostellar phase. In particular, for protostellar cores we find a correlation between the MIPS24 flux, associated with the central protostar, and the temperature of the dust envelope. We also find that the core mass function of the Vela-D cores has a slope consistent with other similar (sub)millimeter surveys.

  1. Identification of Gas Phase PAHs in Absorption Towards Protostellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The infrared emission bands (also known as the UIR bands.) have recently been observed in absorption at 3.25 micrometers in the ices surrounding a few proto-stellar objects at 11.2 micrometers in MonR2, and at 6.2 micrometers towards two sources near the galactic center. The UIR bands have been observed in emission for many years, but identifying these bands has proven to be both difficult and contentious as no one has yet found a single material that provides a good match to the features. However, most investigators agree that some form of carbon-based material with aromatic bonds is the most likely candidate, and many arguments favor free molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) as the carriers of at least the narrow emission bands. Since the emission arises not from a single molecule but from a family of molecules, identifying which PAHs are contributing to the infrared emission bands is difficult. The identification is further complicated by the fact that the emission at short wavelengths is dominated by small molecules while at long wavelengths it is dominated by large molecules. Thus, for example, the emission at 3.3 micrometers is from a different mix of molecules than those which produce the 11.2 micrometer band. To complicate matters further, the molecular mix includes both neutral and ionic species. In absorption, the same mixture of molecules contributes at all wavelengths and the molecules should be neutral, potentially simplifying comparisons with lab data. Also, absorption strengths measured in the lab are directly applicable to interstellar absorption bands without the need to model an emission spectrum of an unknown mixture of ionized and neutral PAHs. In this paper we show that a mixture of argon matrix isolated PAH molecules can reproduce the 3.25 micrometers absorption band seen in the ISO SWS spectra of four embedded Infrared sources, S140 IRS1, AFGL 2591, Elias 29, and AFGL 989. In section 2 we describe the ISO SWS data analysis and

  2. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A.; Sano, T.

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface

  3. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Jet- and Wind-driven Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Stone, James M.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2001-08-01

    We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of both jet- and wind-driven models for protostellar outflows in order to make detailed comparisons to the kinematics of observed molecular outflows. The simulations are performed with the ZEUS-2D hydrodynamic code using a simplified equation of state, simplified cooling and no external heating, and no self-gravity. In simulations of steady jets, swept-up ambient gas forms a thin shell that can be identified as a molecular outflow. We find a simple ballistic bow shock model is able to reproduce the structure and transverse velocity of the shell. Position-velocity (PV) diagrams for the shell cut along the outflow axis show a convex spur structure with the highest velocity at the bow tip and low-velocity red and blue components at any viewing angle. The power-law index of the mass-velocity (MV) relationship ranges from 1.5 to 3.5, depending strongly on the inclination. If the jet is time-variable, the PV diagrams show multiple convex spur structures, and the power-law index becomes smaller than the steady jet simulation. In simulations of isothermal steady wide-angle winds, swept-up ambient gas forms a thin shell that at early stages has a similar shape to the shell in the jet-driven model; it becomes broader at later times. We find the structure and kinematics of the shell is well described by a momentum-conserving model similar to that of Shu et al. (1991). In contrast to the results from jet simulations, the PV diagrams for the shell cut along the outflow axis show a lobe structure tilted with source inclination, with components that are primarily either red or blue unless the inclination is nearly in the plane of sky. The power-law index of the MV relationship ranges from 1.3 to 1.8. If the wind is time-variable, the PV diagrams also show multiple structures, and the power-law index becomes smaller than the steady wind simulation. Comparing the different simulations with observations, we find that some outflows

  4. Observations of Isotope Fractionation in Prestellar Cores: Interstellar Origin of Meteoritic Hot Spot?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar system without undergoing significant processing. Here, we show the results of models and observations of the nitrogen and carbon fractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  5. Do siblings always form and evolve simultaneously? Testing the coevality of multiple protostellar systems through SEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, N. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Tobin, J. J.; Fedele, D.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Multiplicity is common in field stars and among protostellar systems. Models suggest two paths of formation: turbulent fragmentation and protostellar disk fragmentation. Aims: We attempt to find whether or not the coevality frequency of multiple protostellar systems can help to better understand their formation mechanism. The coevality frequency is determined by constraining the relative evolutionary stages of the components in a multiple system. Methods: Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for known multiple protostars in Perseus were constructed from literature data. Herschel PACS photometric maps were used to sample the peak of the SED for systems with separations ≥7″, a crucial aspect in determining the evolutionary stage of a protostellar system. Inclination effects and the surrounding envelope and outflows were considered to decouple source geometry from evolution. This together with the shape and derived properties from the SED was used to determine each system's coevality as accurately as possible. SED models were used to examine the frequency of non-coevality that is due to geometry. Results: We find a non-coevality frequency of 33 ± 10% from the comparison of SED shapes of resolved multiple systems. Other source parameters suggest a somewhat lower frequency of non-coevality. The frequency of apparent non-coevality that is due to random inclination angle pairings of model SEDs is 17 ± 0.5%. Observations of the outflow of resolved multiple systems do not suggest significant misalignments within multiple systems. Effects of unresolved multiples on the SED shape are also investigated. Conclusions: We find that one-third of the multiple protostellar systems sampled here are non-coeval, which is more than expected from random geometric orientations. The other two-thirds are found to be coeval. Higher order multiples show a tendency to be non-coeval. The frequency of non-coevality found here is most likely due to formation and enhanced by

  6. ALIGNMENT BETWEEN FLATTENED PROTOSTELLAR INFALL ENVELOPES AND AMBIENT MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles; Davidson, Jacqueline A.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Houde, Martin; Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W.; Li Zhiyun; Matthews, Brenda; Peng Ruisheng; Vaillancourt, John E.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.

    2013-06-20

    We present 350 {mu}m polarization observations of four low-mass cores containing Class 0 protostars: L483, L1157, L1448-IRS2, and Serp-FIR1. This is the second paper in a larger survey aimed at testing magnetically regulated models for core-collapse. One key prediction of these models is that the mean magnetic field in a core should be aligned with the symmetry axis (minor axis) of the flattened young stellar object inner envelope (aka pseudodisk). Furthermore, the field should exhibit a pinched or hourglass-shaped morphology as gravity drags the field inward toward the central protostar. We combine our results for the four cores with results for three similar cores that were published in the first paper from our survey. An analysis of the 350 {mu}m polarization data for the seven cores yields evidence of a positive correlation between mean field direction and pseudodisk symmetry axis. Our rough estimate for the probability of obtaining by pure chance a correlation as strong as the one we found is about 5%. In addition, we combine together data for multiple cores to create a source-averaged magnetic field map having improved signal-to-noise ratio, and this map shows good agreement between mean field direction and pseudodisk axis (they are within 15 Degree-Sign ). We also see hints of a magnetic pinch in the source-averaged map. We conclude that core-scale magnetic fields appear to be strong enough to guide gas infall, as predicted by the magnetically regulated models. Finally, we find evidence of a positive correlation between core magnetic field direction and bipolar outflow axis.

  7. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  8. The role of cosmic rays on magnetic field diffusion and the formation of protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Galli, D.; Hennebelle, P.; Commerçon, B.; Joos, M.

    2014-11-01

    Context. The formation of protostellar discs is severely hampered by magnetic braking, as long as magnetic fields remain frozen in the gas. The latter condition depends on the levels of ionisation that characterise the innermost regions of a collapsing cloud. Aims: The chemistry of dense cloud cores and, in particular, the ionisation fraction is largely controlled by cosmic rays. The aim of this paper is to evaluate whether the attenuation of the flux of cosmic rays expected in the regions around a forming protostar is sufficient to decouple the field from the gas, thereby influencing the formation of centrifugally supported disc. Methods: We adopted the method developed in a former study to compute the attenuation of the cosmic-ray flux as a function of the column density and the field strength in clouds threaded by poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields. We applied this formalism to models of low- and high-mass star formation extracted from numerical simulations of gravitational collapse that include rotation and turbulence. Results: For each model we determine the size of the magnetic decoupling zone, where collapse or rotation motion becomes unaffected by the local magnetic field. In general, we find that decoupling only occurs when the attenuation of cosmic rays is taken into account with respect to a calculation in which the cosmic-ray ionisation rate is kept constant. The extent of the decoupling zone also depends on the dust grain size distribution and is larger if large grains (of radius ~10-5 cm) are formed by compression and coagulation during cloud collapse. The decoupling region disappears for the high-mass case. This is due to magnetic field diffusion caused by turbulence that is not included in the low-mass models. Conclusions: We conclude that a realistic treatment of cosmic-ray propagation and attenuation during cloud collapse may lead to a value of the resistivity of the gas in the innermost few hundred AU around a forming protostar that is higher

  9. Using FU Orionis outbursts to constrain self-regulated protostellar disk models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. R.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1994-01-01

    One-dimensional, convective, vertical structure models and one dimensional time-dependent, radial diffusion models are combined to create a self-consistent picture in which FU Orionis outbursts occur in young stellar objects (YSOs) as the result of a large-scale, self-regulated, thermal ionization instability in the surrounding protostellar accretion disk. Although active accretion disks have long been postulated to be ubiqitous among low-mass YSOs, few constraints have until now been imposed on physical conditions in these disks. By fitting the results of time-dependent disk models to observed timescales of FU Orionis events, we estimate the magnitude of the effective viscous stress in the inner disk (r approximately less than 1 AU) to be, in accordance with an ad hoc 'alpha' prescription, the product of the local sound speed, pressure scale height, and an efficiency factor alpha of 10(exp -4) where hydrogen is neutral and 10(exp 3) where hydrogen is ionized. We hypothesize that all YSOs receive infall onto their outer disks which is steady (or slowly declining with time) and that FU Orionis outbursts are self-regulated, disk outbursts which occur only in systems which transport matter inward at a rate sufficiently high to cause hydrogen to be ionized in the inner disk. We estimate a critical mass flux of dm(sub crit)/dt = 5 x 10(exp 7) solar mass/yr independent of the magnitude of alpha for systems with one solar mass, three solar radius central objects. Infall accretion rates in the range of dm(sub in)/dt = 1-10) x 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr produce observed FU Orionis timescales consistent with estimates of spherical molecular cloud core collapse rates. Modeled ionization fronts are typically initiated near the inner edge of the disk and propogate out to a distance of several tens of stellar radii. Beyond this region, the disk transports mass steadily inward at the supplied constant infall rate. Mass flowing through the innermost disk annulus is equal to dm

  10. Molecular ions in the protostellar shock L1157-B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podio, L.; Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: We perform a complete census of molecular ions with an abundance greater than ~10-10 in the protostellar shock L1157-B1. This allows us to study the ionisation structure and chemistry of the shock. Methods: An unbiased high-sensitivity survey of L1157-B1 performed with the IRAM-30 m and Herschel/HIFI as part of the CHESS and ASAI large programmes allows searching for molecular ions emission. Then, by means of a radiative transfer code in the large velocity gradient approximation, the gas physical conditions and fractional abundances of molecular ions are derived. The latter are compared with estimates of steady-state abundances in the cloud and their evolution in the shock calculated with the chemical model Astrochem. Results: We detect emission from HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, HCS+, and for the first time in a shock, from HOCO+ and SO+. The bulk of the emission peaks at blue-shifted velocity, ~0.5-3 km s -1 with respect to systemic, has a width of ~3-7 km s-1 and is associated with the outflow cavities (Tkin ~ 20-70 K, nH2 ~ 105 cm-3). A high-velocity component up to -40 km s-1, associated with the primary jet, is detected in the HCO+ 1-0 line. Observed HCO+ and N2H+ abundances (XHCO+ ~ 0.7-3 × 10-8, XN2H+ ~ 0.4-8 × 10-9) agree with steady-state abundances in the cloud and with their evolution in the compressed and heated gas in the shock for cosmic rays ionisation rate ζ = 3 × 10-16 s-1. HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ observed abundances (XHOCO+ ~ 10-9, XSO+ ~ 8 × 10-10, XHCS+ ~ 3-7 × 10-10), instead, are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than predicted in the cloud; on the other hand, they are strongly enhanced on timescales shorter than the shock age (~2000 years) if CO2, S or H2S, and OCS are sputtered off the dust grains in the shock. Conclusions: The performed analysis indicates that HCO+ and N2H+ are a fossil record of pre-shock gas in the outflow cavity, whilst HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ are effective shock tracers that can be used to infer the amount of CO2 and sulphur

  11. Galactic cold cores. VII. Filament formation and evolution: Methods and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marston, A.; Martin, P. G.; Pagani, L.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Marshall, D. J.; Montier, L.; Tóth, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The association of filaments with protostellar objects has made these structures a priority target in star formation studies. However, little is known about the link between filament properties and their local environment. Aims: The datasets from the Herschel Galactic Cold cores key programme allow for a statistical study of filaments with a wide range of intrinsic and environmental characteristics. Characterisation of this sample can therefore be used to identify key physical parameters and quantify the role of the environment in the formation of supercritical filaments. These results are necessary to constrain theoretical models of filament formation and evolution. Methods: Filaments were extracted from fields at distance D< 500 pc with the getfilaments algorithm and characterised according to their column density profiles and intrinsic properties. Each profile was fitted with a beam-convolved Plummer-like function, and the filament structure was quantified based on the relative contributions from the filament "core", represented by a Gaussian, and "wing" component, dominated by the power-law behaviour of the Plummer-like function. These filament parameters were examined for populations associated with different background levels. Results: Filaments increase their core (Mline,core) and wing (Mline,wing) contributions while increasing their total linear mass density (Mline,tot). Both components appear to be linked to the local environment, with filaments in higher backgrounds having systematically more massive Mline,core and Mline,wing. This dependence on the environment supports an accretion-based model of filament evolution in the local neighbourhood (D ≤ 500 pc). Structures located in the highest backgrounds develop the highest central AV, Mline,core, and Mline,wing as Mline,tot increases with time, favoured by the local availability of material and the enhanced gravitational potential. Our results indicate that filaments acquiring a significantly

  12. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  13. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Suttner, G.; Lin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly influence the evolution during early phase of star formation.

  14. CCS Observations of the Protostellar Envelope of B335

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velusamy, T.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Langer, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the density, velocity and chemical profiles around protostars is of fundamental importance for testing dynamical models of protostar evolution and understanding the nature of the material falling onto circumstellar disks. Presented are single dish and interferometric spectral line observations of CCS towards the core of B335, a classic example of a young, low mass stellar object.

  15. G 10.472+0.027: AN EXTREME WATER MASER OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH A MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Titmarsh, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2013-09-20

    An Australia Telescope Compact Array search for 22 GHz water masers toward 6.7 GHz class II methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey has resulted in the detection of extremely high-velocity emission from one of the sources. The water maser emission associated with this young stellar object covers a velocity span of nearly 300 km s{sup –1}. The highest velocity water maser emission is redshifted from the systemic velocity by 250 km s{sup –1}, which is a new record for high-mass star formation regions. The maser is associated with a very young late O, or early B star, which may still be actively accreting matter (and driving the extreme outflow). If that is the case, future observations of the kinematics of this water maser will provide a unique probe of accretion processes in the highest mass young stellar objects and test models of water maser formation.

  16. Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS): Constraining the formation of complex organic molecules with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Jes K.; Coutens, Audrey; Bourke, Tyler L.; Favre, Cecile; Garrod, Robin; Lykke, Julie; Mueller, Holger; Oberg, Karin I.; Schmalzl, Markus; van der Wiel, Matthijs; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Wampfler, Susanne F.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding how, when and where complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules are formed is a fundamental goal of astrochemistry and an integral part of origins of life studies. Already now ALMA is showing its capabilities for studies of the chemistry of solar-type stars with its high sensitivity for faint lines, high spectral resolution which limits line confusion, and high angular resolution making it possible to study the structure of young protostars on solar-system scales. We here present the first results from a large unbiased survey “Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)” targeting one of the astrochemical template sources, the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. The survey is more than an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous surveys of the source and provide imaging down to 25 AU scales (radius) around each of the two components of the binary. An example of one of the early highlights from the survey is unambiguous detections of the (related) prebiotic species glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (two lowest energy conformers), methyl formate and acetic acid. The glycolaldehyde-ethylene glycol abundance ratio is high in comparison to comets and other protostars - but agrees with previous measurements, e.g., in the Galactic Centre clouds possibly reflecting different environments and/or evolutionary histories. Complete mapping of this and other chemical networks in comparison with detailed chemical models and laboratory experiments will reveal the origin of complex organic molecules in a young protostellar system and investigate the link between these protostellar stages and the early Solar System.

  17. A survey of 44-GHz Class I methanol masers toward High Mass Protostellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenice Rodríguez Garza, Carolina; Kurtz, Stan

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of 44-GHz Class I methanol maser observations made with the Very Large Array toward a sample of 55 High Mass Protostellar Objects. We found a 44% detection rate of methanol maser emission. We present a statistical description of our results, along with a comparison of the location of the 44-GHz masers with respect to shocked gas, traced by Extended Green Objects seen in the Spitzer/IRAC bands.

  18. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Adele L; Arce, Héctor G; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A

    2015-11-01

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such 'episodic' ejection events have been observed during the class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of the turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a young, class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The (12)C(16)O (J = 2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes--one of the first detectable signs of star formation--which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C(18)O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic, accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence. PMID:26536957

  19. The Infrared Reflection Nebula Around the Protostellar System in S140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, D.; Bregman, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the protostellar system in S140 at 2.2, 3.1 and 3.45 microns using a 128x128 InSb array at the Lick Observatory 3m telescope. Besides the protostellar sources, the data reveal a bright infrared reflection nebula. We have developed a simple model of this region and derived the physical conditions. IRSI is surrounded by a dense dusty disk viewed almost edge-on. Photons leaking out through the poles illuminate almost directly north and south the inner edge of a surrounding shell of molecular gas, Analysis of the observed colors and intensities of the NIR light, using Mie scattering theory, reveal that the dust grains in the molecular cloud are somewhat larger than in the general diffuse interstellar medium. Moreover, the incident light has a "cool" color temperature, approximately equals 800K, and likely originates from a dust photosphere close to the protostar. Finally, we find little H2O ice associated with the dusty disk around IRSI. Most of the 3.1 micron ice extinction arises instead from cool intervening molecular cloud material. We have compared our infrared dust observations with millimeter and radio observations of molecular gas associated with this region. The large scale structure observable in the molecular gas is indicative of the interaction between the protostellar wind and the surrounding molecular cloud rather than the geometry of the protostellar disk. We conclude that S140 is a young blister formed by this outflow on the side of a molecular cloud and viewed edge-on.

  20. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Spectral Energy Distributions and Fits Using a Grid of Protostellar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, E.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Stutz, A. M.; Stanke, T.; Tobin, J. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Osorio, M.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Poteet, C. A.; Booker, J.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Allen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2–870 μm and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ∼100 μm. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.

  1. Episodic molecular outflow in the very young protostellar cluster Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Héctor G.; Mardones, Diego; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunham, Michael M.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Gallardo, José; Corder, Stuartt A.

    2015-11-01

    The loss of mass from protostars, in the form of a jet or outflow, is a necessary counterpart to protostellar mass accretion. Outflow ejection events probably vary in their velocity and/or in the rate of mass loss. Such `episodic' ejection events have been observed during the Class 0 protostellar phase (the early accretion stage), and continue during the subsequent class I phase that marks the first one million years of star formation. Previously observed episodic-ejection sources were relatively isolated; however, the most common sites of star formation are clusters. Outflows link protostars with their environment and provide a viable source of turbulence that is necessary for regulating star formation in clusters, but it is not known how an accretion-driven jet or outflow in a clustered environment manifests itself in its earliest stage. This early stage is important in establishing the initial conditions for momentum and energy transfer to the environment as the protostar and cluster evolve. Here we report that an outflow from a very young class 0 protostar, at the hub of the very active and filamentary Serpens South protostellar cluster, shows unambiguous episodic events. The 12CO (J=2-1) emission from the protostar reveals 22 distinct features of outflow ejecta, the most recent having the highest velocity. The outflow forms bipolar lobes --- one of the first detectable signs of star formation --- which originate from the peak of 1-mm continuum emission. Emission from the surrounding C18O envelope shows kinematics consistent with rotation and an infall of material onto the protostar. The data suggest that episodic accretion-driven outflow begins in the earliest phase of protostellar evolution, and that the outflow remains intact in a very clustered environment, probably providing efficient momentum transfer for driving turbulence.

  2. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). III. Chemical structure of the protostellar envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak-Barthel, M.; Semenov, D. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Chavarría, L.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to understand the richness of chemical species observed in the isolated high-mass envelope of AFGL 2591, a prototypical object for studying massive star formation. Methods: Based on HIFI and JCMT data, the molecular abundances of species found in the protostellar envelope of AFGL 2591 were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (Ratran), assuming a mixture of constant and 1D stepwise radial profiles for abundance distributions. The reconstructed 1D abundances were compared with the results of the time-dependent gas-grain chemical modeling, using the best-fit 1D power-law density structure. The chemical simulations were performed considering ages of 1-5 × 104 years, cosmic ray ionization rates of 5-500 × 10-17 s-1, uniformly-sized 0.1-1 μm dust grains, a dust/gas ratio of 1%, and several sets of initial molecular abundances with C/O < 1 and >1. The most important model parameters varied one by one in the simulations are age, cosmic ray ionization rate, external UV intensity, and grain size. Results: Constant abundance models give good fits to the data for CO, CN, CS, HCO+, H2CO, N2H+, CCH, NO, OCS, OH, H2CS, O, C, C+, and CH. Models with an abundance jump at 100 K give good fits to the data for NH3, SO, SO2, H2S, H2O, HCl, and CH3OH. For HCN and HNC, the best models have an abundance jump at 230 K. The time-dependent chemical model can accurately explain abundance profiles of 15 out of these 24 species. The jump-like radial profiles for key species like HCO+, NH3, and H2O are consistent with the outcome of the time-dependent chemical modeling. The best-fit model has a chemical age of ~10-50 kyr, a solar C/O ratio of 0.44, and a cosmic-ray ionization rate of ~5 × 10-17 s-1. The grain properties and the intensity of the external UV field do not strongly affect the chemical structure of the AFGL 2591 envelope, whereas its chemical age, the cosmic-ray ionization rate, and the initial abundances play an important role

  3. The Orion fingers: Near-IR adaptive optics imaging of an explosive protostellar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Ginsburg, Adam; Silvia, Devin; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-07-01

    Aims: Adaptive optics (AO) images are used to test the hypothesis that the explosive BN/KL outflow from the Orion OMC1 cloud core was powered by the dynamical decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars. Methods: Narrow-band H2, [Fe ii], and broad-band Ks obtained with the Gemini South multi-conjugate AO system GeMS and near-IR imager GSAOI are presented. The images reach resolutions of 0.08 to 0.10'', close to the 0.07'' diffraction limit of the 8-m telescope at 2.12 μm. Comparison with previous AO-assisted observations of sub-fields and other ground-based observations enable measurements of proper motions and the investigation of morphological changes in H2 and [Fe ii] features with unprecedented precision. The images are compared with numerical simulations of compact, high-density clumps moving ~103 times their own diameter through a lower density medium at Mach 103. Results: Several sub-arcsecond H2 features and many [Fe ii] "fingertips" on the projected outskirts of the flow show proper motions of ~300 km s-1. High-velocity, sub-arcsecond H2 knots ("bullets") are seen as far as 140'' from their suspected ejection site. If these knots propagated through the dense Orion A cloud, their survival sets a lower bound on their densities of order 107 cm-3, consistent with an origin within a few au of a massive star and accelerated by a final multi-body dynamic encounter that ejected the BN object and radio source I from OMC1 about 500 yr ago. Conclusions: Over 120 high-velocity bow-shocks propagating in nearly all directions from the OMC1 cloud core provide evidence for an explosive origin for the BN/KL outflow triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars. Such events may be linked to the origin of runaway, massive stars. The final set of FITS files is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A130

  4. Tracing Protostellar Envelope Evolution with HOPS, the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Will; Megeath, Tom; Furlan, Elise; Ali, Babar; Stutz, Amy; Booker, Joseph; Tobin, John; Stanke, Thomas; Osorio, Mayra

    2013-07-01

    HOPS, the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, is an unprecedented program of large surveys with the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, and APEX observatories, as well as near-IR observations from the IRTF and other telescopes. Together these are providing a comprehensive observational assessment of protostellar evolution, from the earliest phases (see poster by A. Stutz) through the dissipation of the protostellar envelope. The BLT (bolometric luminosity and temperature) diagram for the ˜300 HOPS protostars resembles those constructed for other nearby star-forming regions. We fit the 1-870 um SEDs of the protostars with our grid of radiative transfer models to determine their luminosities, envelope densities, cavity angles, and inclinations (see poster by E. Furlan). High-resolution HST images of the scattered light nebulae provide additional constraints on envelope density, disk geometry, cavity geometry, and inclination angle (see poster by J. Booker). Finally, near-IR atomic hydrogen lines provide independent estimates of reddening and accretion luminosity in the less embedded sources. This multi-pronged modeling approach provides a more reliable assessment of envelope evolution than raw observational diagnostics like the bolometric temperature. We will compare the distributions of envelope densities and protostellar luminosities to the predictions of star-formation models.

  5. Broad N2H+ Emission toward the Protostellar Shock L1157-B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Viti, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Gómez-Ruiz, A.; Podio, L.; Vasta, M.

    2013-10-01

    We present the first detection of N2H+ toward a low-mass protostellar outflow, namely, the L1157-B1 shock, at ~0.1 pc from the protostellar cocoon. The detection was obtained with the IRAM 30 m antenna. We observed emission at 93 GHz due to the J = 1-0 hyperfine lines. Analysis of this emission coupled with HIFI CHESS multiline CO observations leads to the conclusion that the observed N2H+(1-0) line originated from the dense (>=105 cm-3) gas associated with the large (20''-25'') cavities opened by the protostellar wind. We find an N2H+ column density of a few 1012 cm-2 corresponding to an abundance of (2-8) × 10-9. The N2H+ abundance can be matched by a model of quiescent gas evolved for more than 104 yr, i.e., for more than the shock kinematical age (sime2000 yr). Modeling of C-shocks confirms that the abundance of N2H+ is not increased by the passage of the shock. In summary, N2H+ is a fossil record of the pre-shock gas, formed when the density of the gas was around 104 cm-3, and then further compressed and accelerated by the shock.

  6. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement. PMID:26475873

  7. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D.; Thompson, T. E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  8. Higher dimensional massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-08-01

    We study higher-dimensional scenarios of massive bigravity, which is a very interesting extension of nonlinear massive gravity since its reference metric is assumed to be fully dynamical. In particular, the Einstein field equations along with the following constraint equations for both physical and reference metrics of a five-dimensional massive bigravity will be addressed. Then, we study some well-known cosmological spacetimes such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metrics for the five-dimensional massive bigravity. As a result, we find that massive graviton terms will serve as effective cosmological constants in both physical and reference sectors if a special scenario, in which reference metrics are chosen to be proportional to physical ones, is considered for all mentioned metrics. Thanks to the constancy property of massive graviton terms, consistent cosmological solutions will be figured out accordingly.

  9. Massive Stellar Outflows From the Combined Action of Multiple Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Peters, T.; Klaassen, P.; Schrön, M.; Klessen, R.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is usually accompanied by powerful protostellar outflows. Such high-mass outflows are not simply scaled-up versions of their lower-mass counterparts, since observations seem to suggest that the collimation degree degrades with stellar mass. Theoretically, the origins of massive outflows are not well understood because radiative feedback and gravitational fragmentation of the accretion flow around the high-mass star impede the driving of magnetic disk winds. We here present the first 3D simulation of massive star formation that simultaneously includes feedback by non-ionizing and ionizing radiation as well as a subgrid-scale model for protostellar outflows. We ran this model with the Flash adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode. We find that stars that form in a common accretion flow have aligned outflow axes, so that the individual jets of lower-mass companion stars combine to form a collective outflow. We compare our simulation to observations with synthetic H2 and CO observations and find that the morphology and kinematics of this collective outflow is very similar to observed massive outflows, such as Cepheus A and DR 21. The properties of high-mass outflows are therefore generally consistent with the formation of massive stars in gravitationally unstable accretion flows. We acknowledge support from SNF grant 200020 137896, U. Zurich grant FK-13-112, NSF grant AST11-09395, and DFG grant KL 1358/14-1, as well as SBB 811, and computing time at the LRZ (project h1343), the CSCS (Project 364), and the Juelich Supercomputing Center (project HHD14).

  10. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  11. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  12. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in cluster-forming clumps of the Aquila Rift complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe; Maury, Anaëlle

    2015-08-01

    One of the main goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (André et al. 2010) is to elucidate the physicalmechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores in molecular clouds. In theAquila cloud complex imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70-500 μm, we have recently identifieda complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them are gravitationally-bound prestellar cores, likelyforming stars in the future. We also detected 58 protostellar cores (Könyves et al. 2010 and 2015, subm.- see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives). This region is dominated by two (proto)clusters which arecurrently active sites of clustered star formation (SF): the filamentary Serpens South cloud and the W40HII region. The latter is powered by massive young stars, and a 2nd-generation SF can be witnessed inthe surroundings (Maury et al. 2011).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in Aquila and suggest aclose connection between them and the formation process of prestellar cores, where both structures arehighly concentrated around the protoclusters. About 10-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filamentsbelow Av~7, while ~50-75% of the dense gas mass above Av~7-10 is in filamentary structures.Furthermore, ~90% of our prestellar cores are located above a background column density correspondingto Av~7, and ~75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unitlength >16 M⊙/pc. Indeed, a strong correlation is found between the spatial distribution of prestellar coresand the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects found by Spitzerin the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~1 Myr for the formation and evolution of bothprestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in Aquila support a filamentary paradigm for the early stages of SF,where the cores result from the gravitational fragmentation

  13. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  14. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  15. Resonantly driven nonlinear density waves in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Chi; Cassen, Pat

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations of binary, pre-main-sequence, solar-type stars provide evidence that such systems may coexist with circumstellar disks. The binary disk systems, besides being of general interest for the study of star formation, potentially provide useful tests of companion-disk interaction theories prominent in current hypotheses of planet formation. In this paper, we apply an asymptotic analysis of the nonlinear, resonant interaction of a stellar companion with a disk to understand the dependence of such interactions on the properties of the system: the binary mass ratio, the physical properties of the disk, and the effective dissipation (treated herein as viscosity). The method is based on a WKBJ approximation and exploits the conditions that the disk is thin and much less massive than the primary, but does not require that the companion-induced disturbance be small. Both isothermal and adiabatic responses are treated. Only circular orbit resonances are considered in this paper. It is demonstrated that the temperature of the disk as well as the relative mass of the companion affects the degree of nonlinearity, and that nonlinearity promotes high wave compression ratios, long wavelengths, and increased propagation distances. Nevertheless, the total torque exerted between the companion and the disk is well represented by linear theory. The amplitudes of density disturbances are reduced by viscosity and nonisothermality. Because resonant interactions are generally strong and capable of driving rapid evolution, one might expect observations of systems undergoing strong, resonant-driven evolution to be rare. In this connection, it is pointed out that the m = 1 resonance is distinguished by being anomalously weaker than the others and is therefore of observational interest. It is speculated that, in conditions of intrinsically small dissipation, the propagation of resonant-driven density waves is limited by the tendency of their wavelength to diminish with distance

  16. Massive relic galaxies prefer dense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta de Arriba, Luis; Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio; Cebrián, María; Balcells, Marc

    2016-09-01

    We study the preferred environments of z ˜ 0 massive relic galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies with little or no growth from star formation or mergers since z ˜ 2). Significantly, we carry out our analysis on both a large cosmological simulation and an observed galaxy catalogue. Working on the Millennium I-WMAP7 simulation we show that the fraction of today massive objects which have grown less than 10 per cent in mass since z ˜ 2 is ˜0.04 per cent for the whole massive galaxy population with M⋆ > 1010 M⊙. This fraction rises to ˜0.18 per cent in galaxy clusters, confirming that clusters help massive galaxies remain unaltered. Simulations also show that massive relic galaxies tend to be closer to cluster centres than other massive galaxies. Using the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue, and defining relics as M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ early-type galaxies with colours compatible with single-stellar population ages older than 10 Gyr, and which occupy the bottom 5-percentile in the stellar mass-size distribution, we find 1.11 ± 0.05 per cent of relics among massive galaxies. This fraction rises to 2.4 ± 0.4 per cent in high-density environments. Our findings point in the same direction as the works by Poggianti et al. and Stringer et al. Our results may reflect the fact that the cores of the clusters are created very early on, hence the centres host the first cluster members. Near the centres, high-velocity dispersions and harassment help cluster core members avoid the growth of an accreted stellar envelope via mergers, while a hot intracluster medium prevents cold gas from reaching the galaxies, inhibiting star formation.

  17. Ammonia observations of cold cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungerechts, H.; Winnewisser, G.; Walmsley, C. M.

    1982-07-01

    The NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) lines have been observed towards the cores of seven dark dust clouds, mostly in the Taurus region. From these measurements the gas kinetic temperature is estimated to be close to 10 K. The cloud cores have sizes of about 0.05-0.3 pc, and densities of about 10,000-100,000/cu cm. No evidence is found for local heating by embedded protostellar objects. These cloud cores may be close to a stable state of hydrostatic equilibrium in which the gravitational forces are balanced by thermal pressure. In three cases, however, prima facie evidence is found for rotation, and the centrifugal force may be of importance for the dynamics.

  18. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  19. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  20. Methylammonium methylcarbamate thermal formation in interstellar ice analogs: a glycine salt precursor in protostellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, J.-B.; Duvernay, F.; Theulé, P.; Borget, F.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Chiavassa, T.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Analyses of dust cometary grains collected by the Stardust spacecraft have shown the presence of amines and amino acids molecules, and among them glycine (NH{2}CH{2}COOH). We show how the glycine molecule could be produced in the protostellar environments before its introduction into comets. Aims: We study the evolution of the interstellar ice analogues affected by both thermal heating and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons, in addition to the nature of the formed molecules and the confrontation of our experimental results with astronomical observations. Methods: Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are used to monitor the evolution of the H{2}O:CO{2}:CH{3}NH{2} and CO{2}:CH{3}NH{2} ice mixtures during both warming processes and VUV photolysis. Results: We first show how carbon dioxide (CO{2}) and methylamine (CH{3}NH{2}) thermally react in water-dominated ice to form methylammonium methylcarbamate [ CH{3}NH{3}+] [ CH{3}NHCOO-] noted C. We then determine the reaction rate and activation energy. We show that C thermal formation can occurs in the 50-70 K temperature range of a protostellar environment. Secondly, we report that a VUV photolysis of a pure C sample produces a glycine salt, methylammonium glycinate [ CH{3}NH{3}+] [ NH{2}CH{2}COO-] noted G. We propose a scenario explaining how C and subsequently G can be synthesized in interstellar ices and precometary grains. Conclusions: [ CH{3}NH{3}+] [ CH{3}NHCOO-] could be readily formed and would act as a glycine salt precursor in protostellar environments dominated by thermal and UV processing. We propose a new pathway leading to a glycine salt, which is consistent with the detection of glycine and methylamine within the returned samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 from the Stardust mission.

  1. OBSERVING SIMULATED PROTOSTARS WITH OUTFLOWS: HOW ACCURATE ARE PROTOSTELLAR PROPERTIES INFERRED FROM SEDs?

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Hansen, Charles E.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2012-07-10

    The properties of unresolved protostars and their local environment are frequently inferred from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using radiative transfer modeling. In this paper, we use synthetic observations of realistic star formation simulations to evaluate the accuracy of properties inferred from fitting model SEDs to observations. We use ORION, an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) three-dimensional gravito-radiation-hydrodynamics code, to simulate low-mass star formation in a turbulent molecular cloud including the effects of protostellar outflows. To obtain the dust temperature distribution and SEDs of the forming protostars, we post-process the simulations using HYPERION, a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. We find that the ORION and HYPERION dust temperatures typically agree within a factor of two. We compare synthetic SEDs of embedded protostars for a range of evolutionary times, simulation resolutions, aperture sizes, and viewing angles. We demonstrate that complex, asymmetric gas morphology leads to a variety of classifications for individual objects as a function of viewing angle. We derive best-fit source parameters for each SED through comparison with a pre-computed grid of radiative transfer models. While the SED models correctly identify the evolutionary stage of the synthetic sources as embedded protostars, we show that the disk and stellar parameters can be very discrepant from the simulated values, which is expected since the disk and central source are obscured by the protostellar envelope. Parameters such as the stellar accretion rate, stellar mass, and disk mass show better agreement, but can still deviate significantly, and the agreement may in some cases be artificially good due to the limited range of parameters in the set of model SEDs. Lack of correlation between the model and simulation properties in many individual instances cautions against overinterpreting properties inferred from SEDs for unresolved protostellar

  2. CORRELATING INFALL WITH DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION IN DENSE CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Scott; Brunetti, Nathan; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Pon, Andy; Caselli, Paola

    2013-11-10

    We present a survey of HCO{sup +} (3-2) observations pointed toward dense cores with previous measurements of N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}). Of the 26 cores in this survey, 5 show the spectroscopic signature of outward motion, 9 exhibit neither inward nor outward motion, 11 appear to be infalling, and 1 is not detected. We compare the degree of deuterium fractionation with infall velocities calculated from the HCO{sup +} spectra and find that those cores with [D]/[H] > 0.1 are more likely to have the signature of inward motions than cores with smaller [D]/[H] ratios. Infall motions are also much more common in cores with masses exceeding their thermal Jeans masses. The fastest infall velocity measured belongs to one of the two protostellar cores in our survey, L1521F, and the observed motions are typically on the order of the sound speed.

  3. A protostellar jet model for the water masers in W49N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Elitzur, Moshe; Stone, James M.; Konigl, Arieh

    1994-01-01

    Observations by Gwinn, Moran, & Reid of the proper motions of water masers in W49N show that they have elongated distribution expanding from a common center. Features with high space velocity only occur far from the center, while low-velocity features occur at all distances. We propose that these observations can be interpreted in terms of a shell of shocked molecular gas that is driven by the expanding cocoon of a high-velocity protostellar jet. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations in support of this interpretation and argue that this source provides a unique oppurtunity for a detailed study of jet-driven cocoons.

  4. Keplerian Circumbinary Disk and Accretion Streams around the Protostellar Binary System L1551 NE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuwa, S.; Saito, M.; Lim, J.; Saigo, K.; Hanawa, T.; Matsumoto, T.

    2013-10-01

    We show our recent observational results of L1551 NE, an archetypal binary protostellar system, in the 0.9-mm dust continuum emission and the C18O (J=3-2) emission with the SubMillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA results show firm evidence for a Keplerian circumbinary disk, circumstellar disks, and an inner clearing in the circumbinary disk, in L1551 NE. We demonstrate that future observations of L1551 NE with Atacama Large Millimeter and submillimeter Array (ALMA) have the potential to unveil the theoretically-predicted “accretion streams” that channel material from the circumbinary disk to the individual circumstellar disks.

  5. Imaging the water snow-line during a protostellar outburst.

    PubMed

    Cieza, Lucas A; Casassus, Simon; Tobin, John; Bos, Steven P; Williams, Jonathan P; Perez, Sebastian; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Caceres, Claudio; Canovas, Hector; Dunham, Michael M; Hales, Antonio; Prieto, Jose L; Principe, David A; Schreiber, Matthias R; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Zurlo, Alice

    2016-07-14

    A snow-line is the region of a protoplanetary disk at which a major volatile, such as water or carbon monoxide, reaches its condensation temperature. Snow-lines play a crucial role in disk evolution by promoting the rapid growth of ice-covered grains. Signatures of the carbon monoxide snow-line (at temperatures of around 20 kelvin) have recently been imaged in the disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars TW Hydra and HD163296 (refs 3, 10), at distances of about 30 astronomical units (au) from the star. But the water snow-line of a protoplanetary disk (at temperatures of more than 100 kelvin) has not hitherto been seen, as it generally lies very close to the star (less than 5 au away for solar-type stars). Water-ice is important because it regulates the efficiency of dust and planetesimal coagulation, and the formation of comets, ice giants and the cores of gas giants. Here we report images at 0.03-arcsec resolution (12 au) of the protoplanetary disk around V883 Ori, a protostar of 1.3 solar masses that is undergoing an outburst in luminosity arising from a temporary increase in the accretion rate. We find an intensity break corresponding to an abrupt change in the optical depth at about 42 au, where the elevated disk temperature approaches the condensation point of water, from which we conclude that the outburst has moved the water snow-line. The spectral behaviour across the snow-line confirms recent model predictions: dust fragmentation and the inhibition of grain growth at higher temperatures results in soaring grain number densities and optical depths. As most planetary systems are expected to experience outbursts caused by accretion during their formation, our results imply that highly dynamical water snow-lines must be considered when developing models of disk evolution and planet formation. PMID:27411631

  6. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1994-01-01

    We simulate collisional evolution of grains in dense turbulent molecular cloud cores (or Bok globules) in static equilibrium and free-fall collapse, assuming spherical symmetry. Relative velocities are due to thermal motions, differential settling, and turbulence, with the latter dominant for sonic turbulence with an assumed Kolmogorov spectrum. Realistic criteria are used to determine outcomes of collisions (coagulation vs. destruction) as functions of particle size and velocity. Results are presented for a variety of cloud parameters (radial density profile, turbulent velocity) and particle properties (density, impact strength). Results are sensitive to the assumed mechanical properties (density and impact strength) of grain aggregates. Particle growth is enhanced if aggregates have low density or fractal structures. On a timescale of a few Myr, an initial population of 0.1 micrometers grains may produce dense compact particles approximately 1 micrometer in size, or fluffy aggregates approximately 100 micrometers. For impact strengths less than or equal to 10(exp 6) ergs/g, a steady state is reached between coagulation of small grains and collisional disruption of larger aggregates. Formation of macroscopic aggregates requires high mechanical strengths and low aggregate densities. We assume sonic turbulence during collapse, with varied eddy size scales determining the dissipation rate or turbulence strength. The degree of collisional evolution during collapse is sensitive to the assumed small-scale structure (inner sc ale) of the turbulence. Weak turbulence results in few collisions and preserves the precollapse particle size distribution with little change. Strong turbulence tends to produce net destruction, rather than particle growth, during infall, unless inpact strengths are greater than 10(exp 6)ergs/g.

  7. Imaging the water snow-line during a protostellar outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, Lucas A.; Casassus, Simon; Tobin, John; Bos, Steven P.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Perez, Sebastian; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Caceres, Claudio; Canovas, Hector; Dunham, Michael M.; Hales, Antonio; Prieto, Jose L.; Principe, David A.; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Zurlo, Alice

    2016-07-01

    A snow-line is the region of a protoplanetary disk at which a major volatile, such as water or carbon monoxide, reaches its condensation temperature. Snow-lines play a crucial role in disk evolution by promoting the rapid growth of ice-covered grains. Signatures of the carbon monoxide snow-line (at temperatures of around 20 kelvin) have recently been imaged in the disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars TW Hydra and HD163296 (refs 3, 10), at distances of about 30 astronomical units (AU) from the star. But the water snow-line of a protoplanetary disk (at temperatures of more than 100 kelvin) has not hitherto been seen, as it generally lies very close to the star (less than 5 AU away for solar-type stars). Water-ice is important because it regulates the efficiency of dust and planetesimal coagulation, and the formation of comets, ice giants and the cores of gas giants. Here we report images at 0.03-arcsec resolution (12 AU) of the protoplanetary disk around V883 Ori, a protostar of 1.3 solar masses that is undergoing an outburst in luminosity arising from a temporary increase in the accretion rate. We find an intensity break corresponding to an abrupt change in the optical depth at about 42 AU, where the elevated disk temperature approaches the condensation point of water, from which we conclude that the outburst has moved the water snow-line. The spectral behaviour across the snow-line confirms recent model predictions: dust fragmentation and the inhibition of grain growth at higher temperatures results in soaring grain number densities and optical depths. As most planetary systems are expected to experience outbursts caused by accretion during their formation, our results imply that highly dynamical water snow-lines must be considered when developing models of disk evolution and planet formation.

  8. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  9. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  10. AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Kirk, H. M.; Shirley, Y. L.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a pointed survey of N{sub 2}D{sup +} 2-1 and N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 emission toward 64 N{sub 2}H{sup +}-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +}, R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), of 0.08, with a maximum R{sub D} = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N{sub 2}H{sup +} with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H{sub 2} column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between R{sub D} and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H{sub 2} ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  11. An Analysis of the Deuterium Fractionation of Star-forming Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, R. K.; Kirk, H. M.; Shirley, Y. L.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a pointed survey of N2D+ 2-1 and N2D+ 3-2 emission toward 64 N2H+-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N2H+, RD = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), of 0.08, with a maximum RD = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N2H+ with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H2 column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between RD and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  12. Supersymmetrizing massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaeb, O.

    2013-07-01

    When four scalar fields with global Lorentz symmetry are coupled to gravity and take a vacuum expectation value, breaking diffeomorphism invariance spontaneously, the graviton becomes massive. This model is supersymmetrized by considering four N=1 chiral superfields with global Lorentz symmetry. The global supersymmetry is promoted to a local one using the rules of tensor calculus of coupling the N=1 supergravity Lagrangian to the four chiral multiplets. When the scalar components of the chiral multiplets zA acquire a vacuum expectation value, both diffeomorphism invariance and local supersymmetry are broken spontaneously. The global Lorentz index A becomes identified with the space-time Lorentz index, making the scalar fields zA vectors and the chiral spinors ψA spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields. We show that the spectrum of the model in the broken phase consists of a massive spin-2 field, two massive spin-3/2 fields with different mass and a massive vector.

  13. Massive Oral Decoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicke, Eugene M.

    1981-01-01

    An intensive reading clinic used the Massive Oral Decoding (MOD) technique to help 10 reading disabled students (grades 7 and 8) increase independent reading skills. MOD stresses large amounts of reading practice at the student's independent level. (CL)

  14. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Wind-driving protostellar accretion discs (Salmeron+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmeron, R.; Konigl, A.; Wardle, M.

    2011-10-01

    We continue our study of weakly ionized protostellar accretion discs that are threaded by a large-scale magnetic field and power a centrifugally driven wind. It has been argued that there is already evidence in several protostellar systems that such a wind transports a significant fraction of the angular momentum from at least some part of the disc. We model this situation by considering a radially localized disc model in which the matter is everywhere well coupled to the field and the wind is the main repository of excess angular momentum. We consider stationary configurations in which magnetic diffusivity counters the shearing and advection of the magnetic field lines. In Wardle & Koenigl (1997, ASP Conf. Ser., 121, 561) we analysed the disc structure in the hydrostatic approximation (vertical motions neglected inside the disc) and presented exact disc/wind solutions for the ambipolar diffusivity regime. In Koenigl, Salmeron & Wardle (Paper I, 2010MNRAS.401..479K) we generalized the hydrostatic analysis to the Hall and Ohm diffusivity domains and used it to identify the disc parameter sub-regimes in which viable solutions with distinct physical properties can be expected to occur. In this paper we test the results of Paper I by deriving full numerical solutions (integrated through the sonic critical surface) of the disc equations in the Hall domain. (1 data file).

  16. Limits on the location of planetesimal formation in self-gravitating protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Lodato, G.

    2009-09-01

    In this Letter, we show that if planetesimals form in spiral features in self-gravitating discs, as previously suggested by the idealized simulations of Rice et al., then in realistic protostellar discs, this process will be restricted to the outer regions of the disc (i.e. at radii in excess of several tens of au). This restriction relates to the requirement that dust has to be concentrated in spiral features on a time-scale that is less than the (roughly dynamical) lifetime of such features, and that such rapid accumulation requires spiral features whose fractional amplitude is not much less than unity. This in turn requires that the cooling time-scale of the gas is relatively short, which restricts the process to the outer disc. We point out that the efficient conversion of a large fraction of the primordial dust in the disc into planetesimals could rescue this material from the well-known problem of rapid inward migration at an approximate metre-size scale and that in principle the collisional evolution of these objects could help to resupply small dust to the protostellar disc. We also point out the possible implications of this scenario for the location of planetesimal belts inferred in debris discs around main sequence stars, but stress that further dynamical studies are required in order to establish whether the disc retains a memory of the initial site of planetesimal creation.

  17. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN AROUND AFGL 2591: A PROBE OF PROTOSTELLAR STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Veach, Todd J.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hedden, Abigail

    2013-03-10

    Vibrationally excited molecules with submillimeter rotational transitions are potentially excellent probes of physical conditions near protostars. This study uses observations of the v = 1 and v = 2 ro-vibrational modes of HCN (4-3) to probe this environment. The presence or absence and relative strengths of these ro-vibrational lines probe the gas excitation mechanism and physical conditions in warm, dense material associated with protostellar disks. We present pilot observations from the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope and follow-up observations from the Submillimeter Array. All vibrationally excited HCN (4-3) v = 0, v = 1, and v = 2 lines were observed. The existence of the three v = 2 lines at approximately equal intensity imply collisional excitation with a density of greater than (10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) and a temperature of >1000 K for the emitting gas. This warm, high-density material should directly trace structures formed in the protostellar envelope and disk environment. Further, the line shapes of the v = 2 emission may suggest a Keplerian disk. This Letter demonstrates the utility of this technique which is of particular interest due to the recent inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  18. Millimeter-sized grains in the protostellar envelopes: Where do they come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yi Hang Valerie; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Grain growth during star formation affects the physical and chemical processes in the evolution of star-forming clouds. We investigate the origin of the millimeter (mm)-sized grains recently observed in Class I protostellar envelopes. We use the coagulation model developed in our previous paper and find that a hydrogen number density of as high as 1010 cm-3, instead of the typical density 105 cm-3, is necessary for the formation of mm-sized grains. Thus, we test a hypothesis that such large grains are transported to the envelope from the inner, denser parts, finding that gas drag by outflow efficiently "launches" the large grains as long as the central object has not grown to ≳0.1 M⊙. By investigating the shattering effect on the mm-sized grains, we ensure that the large grains are not significantly fragmented after being injected in the envelope. We conclude that the mm-sized grains observed in the protostellar envelopes are not formed in the envelopes but formed in the inner parts of the star-forming regions and transported to the envelopes before a significant mass growth of the central object, and that they survive in the envelopes.

  19. Millimeter-sized grains in the protostellar envelopes: Where do they come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yi Hang Valerie; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-06-01

    Grain growth during star formation affects the physical and chemical processes in the evolution of star-forming clouds. We investigate the origin of the millimeter (mm)-sized grains recently observed in Class I protostellar envelopes. We use the coagulation model developed in our previous paper and find that a hydrogen number density of as high as 1010 cm-3, instead of the typical density 105 cm-3, is necessary for the formation of mm-sized grains. Thus, we test a hypothesis that such large grains are transported to the envelope from the inner, denser parts, finding that gas drag by outflow efficiently "launches" the large grains as long as the central object has not grown to ≳0.1 M⊙. By investigating the shattering effect on the mm-sized grains, we ensure that the large grains are not significantly fragmented after being injected in the envelope. We conclude that the mm-sized grains observed in the protostellar envelopes are not formed in the envelopes but formed in the inner parts of the star-forming regions and transported to the envelopes before a significant mass growth of the central object, and that they survive in the envelopes.

  20. Far infrared observations of pre-protostellar sources in Lynds 183

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.; Lemke, D.; Juvela, M.; Prusti, T.; Laureijs, R.

    2003-02-01

    Using ISOPHOT maps at 100 and 200 mu m and raster scans at 100, 120, 150 and 200 mu m we have detected four unresolved far-infrared sources in the high latitude molecular cloud L 183. Two of the sources are identified with 1.3 mm continuum sources found by Ward-Thompson et al. (\\cite{wthompson94}, \\cite{wthompson00}) and are located near the temperature minimum and the coincident column density maximum of dust distribution. For these two sources, the ISO observations have enabled us to derive temperatures ( ~ 8.3 K) and masses ( ~ 1.4 and 2.4 Msun). They are found to have masses greater than or comparable to their virial masses and are thus expected to undergo gravitational collapse. We classify them as pre-protostellar sources. The two new sources are good candidates for pre-protostellar sources or protostars within L 183. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  1. Protostellar Multiplicity in Perseus Characterized by the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie; Li, Zhi-Yun; Chandler, Claire J.; Dunham, Michael; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Sadavoy, Sarah; Melis, Carl; Harris, Robert J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Perez, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of multiple star systems is thought to begin early in the star formation process. However, there have not been sufficient numbers of young protostars observed with high enough resolution to determine when and where most multiple systems form. To significantly improve our knowledge of protostellar multiplicity, we have carried out the VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) survey, a 264 hour Jansky VLA program at wavelengths of 8 mm, 1 cm, 4 cm, and 6 cm toward all known Perseus protostars (N ~ 80) down to 15 AU (0.065") resolution. The unbiased nature of the survey has enabled us to conduct the most complete characterization of protostellar multiplicity to date, finding evidence for a bi-modal distribution of multiple protostar system separations. The bi-modal distribution may be evidence for multiple processes contributing to the formation of multiple systems. The inner peak at ~75 AU could be produced from disk fragmentation, while the outer peak at ~3000 AU could be produced by turbulent and/or rotational fragmentation Moreover, three systems are found to reside within larger, disk-like structures suggesting that they may be the product of disk fragmentation via gravitational instability. The results of this survey demonstrate the power and utility of unbiased surveys toward young stars.

  2. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF CRYSTALLINE SILICATES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Poteet, Charles A.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Watson, Dan M.; Remming, Ian S.; McClure, Melissa K.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Tobin, John J.; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Allen, Lori E.; Ali, Babar

    2011-06-01

    We present the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of the Orion A protostar HOPS-68. The mid-infrared spectrum reveals crystalline substructure at 11.1, 16.1, 18.8, 23.6, 27.9, and 33.6 {mu}m superimposed on the broad 9.7 and 18 {mu}m amorphous silicate features; the substructure is well matched by the presence of the olivine end-member forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}). Crystalline silicates are often observed as infrared emission features around the circumstellar disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars. However, this is the first unambiguous detection of crystalline silicate absorption in a cold, infalling, protostellar envelope. We estimate the crystalline mass fraction along the line of sight by first assuming that the crystalline silicates are located in a cold absorbing screen and secondly by utilizing radiative transfer models. The resulting crystalline mass fractions of 0.14 and 0.17, respectively, are significantly greater than the upper limit found in the interstellar medium ({approx}<0.02-0.05). We propose that the amorphous silicates were annealed within the hot inner disk and/or envelope regions and subsequently transported outward into the envelope by entrainment in a protostellar outflow.

  3. The thermal structure of low-mass cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launhardt, Ralf; Stutz, Amelia; Schmiedecke, Anika; Henning, Thomas; Krause, Oliver; Balog, Zoltan; Beuther, Henrik; Kainulainen, Jouni; Linz, Hendrik; Lippok, Nils; Nielbock, Markus; Ragan, Sarah; Schmalzl, Markus; Shirley, Yancy; Steinacker, Juergen

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of the temperature and density structure of star-forming cloud cores is one of the key aspects in protostellar collapse models. Yet this structure, in particular the temperature, is not well-constrained observationally. In the framework of the EPoS Herschel key project, we observed the NIR extinction and FIR through mm dust emission from selected isolated nearby starless and protostellar cloud cores. Based on these data, we reconstruct the full dust temperature and density structure of the cores. We find that the thermal structure of all globules is completely dominated by external heating through the ISRF and moderate shielding by thin extended halos. All globules have warm outer envelopes (14-20 K) and colder dense interiors (7-11 K) with column densities of up to 10^23 cm^-2 and central volume densities of a few 10^5 cm^-3 (starless cores). The protostars embedded in some of the globules raise the local temperature of the dense cores only within radii out to about 5000 AU, but do not significantly affect the overall thermal balance of the globules.

  4. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). I. Highly excited linear rotor molecules in the high-mass protostellar envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Pagani, L.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Linear rotor molecules such as CO, HCO+ and HCN are important probes of star-forming gas. For these species, temperatures of ≲ 50 K are sufficient to produce emission lines that are observable from the ground at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Molecular gas in the environment of massive protostellar objects, however, is known to reach temperatures of several hundred K. To probe this, space-based far-infrared observations are required. Aims: We aim to reveal the gas energetics in the circumstellar environment of the prototypical high-mass protostellar object AFGL 2591. Methods: Rotational spectral line signatures of CO species, HCO+, CS, HCN and HNC from a 490-1240 GHz survey with Herschel/HIFI, complemented by ground-based JCMT and IRAM 30 m spectra, cover transitions in the energy range (Eup/k) between 5 K and ~ 300 K. Selected frequency settings in the highest frequency HIFI bands (up to 1850 GHz) extend this range to 750 K for 12C16O. The resolved spectral line profiles are used to separate and study various kinematic components. Observed line intensities are compared with a numerical model that calculates excitation balance and radiative transfer based on spherical geometry. Results: The line profiles show two emission components, the widest and bluest of which is attributed to an approaching outflow and the other to the envelope. We find evidence for progressively more redshifted and wider line profiles from the envelope gas with increasing energy level. This trend is qualitatively explained by residual outflow contribution picked up in the systematically decreasing beam size. Integrated line intensities for each species decrease as Eup/k increases from ≲ 50 to ~700 K. The H2 density and temperature of the outflow gas are constrained to ~105-106 cm-3 and 60-200 K. In addition, we derive a temperature between 9 and 17 K and N(H2) ~ 3 × 1021 cm-2 for a known foreground cloud seen in absorption, and N(H2) ≲ 1019 cm-2 for a second foreground component

  5. Contraction Signatures toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δv, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δv and collapse model results, we find that δv is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s-1) to supersonic (0.4 km s-1), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/MJ > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/MJ, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  6. Simulating star formation in molecular cloud cores. IV. The role of turbulence and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, R. E.; Goodwin, S. P.; Stamatellos, D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2009-02-01

    Context: Observations suggest that low-mass stars condense out of dense, relatively isolated, molecular cloud cores, with each core spawning a small-N cluster of stars. Aims: Our aim is to identify the physical processes shaping the collapse and fragmentation of a 5.4 M_⊙ core, and to understand how these processes influence the mass distribution, kinematics, and binary statistics of the resulting stars. Methods: We perform SPH simulations of the collapse and fragmentation of cores having different initial levels of turbulence (α_TURB = 0.05, 0.10, 0.25). We use a new treatment of the energy equation that captures (i) excitation of the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of H2, dissociation of H2, ionisation of H and He; and (ii) the transport of cooling radiation against opacity due to both dust and gas (including the effects of dust sublimation, molecules, and H- ions). We also perform comparison simulations using a standard barotropic equation of state. Results: We find that - when compared with the barotropic equation of state - our more realistic treatment of the energy equation results in more protostellar objects being formed, and a higher proportion of brown dwarfs; the multiplicity frequency is essentially unchanged, but the multiple systems tend to have shorter periods (by a factor ~3), higher eccentricities, and higher mass ratios. The reason for this is that small fragments are able to cool more effectively with the new treatment, as compared with the barotropic equation of state. We also note that in our simulations the process of fragmentation is often bimodal, in the following sense. The first protostar to form is usually, at the end, the most massive, i.e. the primary. However, frequently a disc-like structure subsequently forms round this primary, and then, once it has accumulated sufficient mass, quickly fragments to produce several secondaries. Conclusions: We believe that this delayed fragmentation of a disc-like structure is likely

  7. An Extremely High Velocity Molecular Jet Surrounded by an Ionized Cavity in the Protostellar Source Serpens SMM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Girart, Josep M.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Dunham, Michael M.; Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Cortés, Paulo C.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Plambeck, Richard L.

    2016-06-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a one-sided, high-velocity (∼80 km s‑1) CO(J = 2\\to 1) jet powered by the intermediate-mass protostellar source Serpens SMM1-a. The highly collimated molecular jet is flanked at the base by a wide-angle cavity; the walls of the cavity can be seen in both 4 cm free–free emission detected by the Very Large Array and 1.3 mm thermal dust emission detected by ALMA. This is the first time that ionization of an outflow cavity has been directly detected via free–free emission in a very young, embedded Class 0 protostellar source that is still powering a molecular jet. The cavity walls are ionized either by UV photons escaping from the accreting protostellar source or by the precessing molecular jet impacting the walls. These observations suggest that ionized outflow cavities may be common in Class 0 protostellar sources, shedding further light on the radiation, outflow, and jet environments in the youngest, most embedded forming stars.

  8. The HIFI spectral survey of massive star-forming region AFGL 2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmierczak, Maja; van der Tak, Floris; Helmich, Frank; Chvarria, Luis; Wang, Kuo-Song; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2013-07-01

    AFGL 2591 is a massive protostellar object with a bipolar outflow. It has been widely studied before since it is a relatively isolated and nearby star-forming region. Here we present an overview of the Herschel/HIFI spectral survey, as a part of CHESS Key Project. The survey covers a frequency range from 480 up to 1240 GHz as well as some particular lines from 1267 to 1901 GHz. From the spectral survey a total of 32 species were identified. The data analysis is divided into various families of molecules, eg. CO and its isotopologues, nitrogen-bearing molecules, sulfur-bearing species, organic molecules. We will discuss different types of observed molecules and their physical parameters. The radial abundance profiles of some molecules will be presented to learn about the chemical processes leading to their formation and destruction. One of the studied molecule is ammonia, which is concentrated in the inner part of the protostellar envelope (when T > 100K i.e. where water ice evaporates), with the abundance of 3x10e-7.

  9. Resolving Supercritical Orion Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Chapman, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Velusamy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical framework for high mass star formation (HMSF) is unclear. Observations reveal a seeming dichotomy between high- and low-mass star formation, with HMSF occurring only in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), mostly in clusters, and with higher star formation efficiencies than low-mass star formation. One crucial constraint to any theoretical model is the dynamical state of massive cores, in particular, whether a massive core is in supercritical collapse. Based on the mass-size relation of dust emission, we select likely unstable targets from a sample of massive cores (Li et al. 2007 ApJ 655, 351) in the nearest GMC, Orion. We have obtained N2H+ (1-0) maps using CARMA with resolution ( 2.5", 0.006 pc) significantly better than existing observations. We present observational and modeling results for ORI22. By revealing the dynamic structure down to Jeans scale, CARMA data confirms the dominance of gravity over turbulence in this cores. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Driven and decaying turbulence simulations of low–mass star formation: From clumps to cores to protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2008-10-20

    Molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin of this turbulence is not well understood. As a result, there are two different approaches to simulating molecular clouds, one in which the turbulence is allowed to decay after it is initialized, and one in which it is driven. We use the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, Orion, to perform high-resolution simulations of molecular cloud cores and protostars in environments with both driven and decaying turbulence. We include self-gravity, use a barotropic equation of state, and represent regions exceeding the maximum grid resolution with sink particles. We analyze the properties of bound cores such as size, shape, line width, and rotational energy, and we find reasonable agreement with observation. At high resolution the different rates of core accretion in the two cases have a significant effect on protostellar system development. Clumps forming in a decaying turbulence environment produce high-multiplicity protostellar systems with Toomre Q unstable disks that exhibit characteristics of the competitive accretion model for star formation. In contrast, cores forming in the context of continuously driven turbulence and virial equilibrium form smaller protostellar systems with fewer low-mass members. Furthermore, our simulations of driven and decaying turbulence show some statistically significant differences, particularly in the production of brown dwarfs and core rotation, but the uncertainties are large enough that we are not able to conclude whether observations favor one or the other.

  11. Driven and decaying turbulence simulations of low–mass star formation: From clumps to cores to protostars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2008-10-20

    Molecular clouds are observed to be turbulent, but the origin of this turbulence is not well understood. As a result, there are two different approaches to simulating molecular clouds, one in which the turbulence is allowed to decay after it is initialized, and one in which it is driven. We use the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, Orion, to perform high-resolution simulations of molecular cloud cores and protostars in environments with both driven and decaying turbulence. We include self-gravity, use a barotropic equation of state, and represent regions exceeding the maximum grid resolution with sink particles. We analyze the propertiesmore » of bound cores such as size, shape, line width, and rotational energy, and we find reasonable agreement with observation. At high resolution the different rates of core accretion in the two cases have a significant effect on protostellar system development. Clumps forming in a decaying turbulence environment produce high-multiplicity protostellar systems with Toomre Q unstable disks that exhibit characteristics of the competitive accretion model for star formation. In contrast, cores forming in the context of continuously driven turbulence and virial equilibrium form smaller protostellar systems with fewer low-mass members. Furthermore, our simulations of driven and decaying turbulence show some statistically significant differences, particularly in the production of brown dwarfs and core rotation, but the uncertainties are large enough that we are not able to conclude whether observations favor one or the other.« less

  12. Nearby regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Cunningham, Nathaniel; Moeckel, Nickolas; Smith, Nathan

    Observations of the nearest regions of massive star formation such as Orion are reviewed. Early-type stars in the local OB associations, as well as their superbubbles and supershells provide a fossil record of massive star birth in the Solar vicinity over about the last 40 Myr. This record shows that most massive stars are born from dense, high-pressure, hot cores which spawn transient clusters that dissipate into the field soon after formation. A large fraction (15 to 30%) of massive stars are high-velocity runaways moving at more than 20 km s^{-1}. High-mass stars have a larger companion fraction than their lower-mass siblings. The Orion star forming complex contains the nearest site of on-going massive star formation. Studies of the Orion Nebula and the dense molecular cloud core located immediately behind the HII region provide our sharpest view of massive star birth. This region has formed a hierarchy of clusters within clusters. The Trapezium, OMC-1S, and OMC-1 regions represent three closely spaced sub-clusters within the more extended Orion Nebula Cluster. The oldest of these sub-clusters, which consists of the Trapezium stars, has completely emerged from its natal core. The OMC-1S and OMC-1 regions, are still highly embedded and forming clusters of additional moderate and high mass stars. Over a dozen YSOs embedded in OMC-1S are driving jets and outflows, many of which are injecting energy and momentum into the Orion Nebula. Recent proper motion measurements indicate that the Becklin-Neugebauer object is a high-velocity star moving away from the OMC1 core with a velocity of 30 km s^{-1}, making it the youngest high-velocity star known. Source I may be moving in the opposite direction with a velocity of about 12 km s^{-1}. The projected separation between source I and BN was less than few hundred AU about 500 years ago. The spectacular bipolar molecular outflow and system of shock-excited H_2 fingers emerging from OMC-1 has a dynamical age of about 1100

  13. Introduction to Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia

    We review recent progress on massive gravity. We first show how extra dimensions prove to be a useful tool in building theories of modified gravity, including Galileon theories and their DBI extensions. DGP arises from an infinite size extra dimension, and we show how massive gravity arises from `deconstructing' the extra dimension in the vielbein formalism. We then explain how the ghost issue is resolved in that special theory of massive gravity. The viability of such models relies on the Vainshtein mechanism which is best described in terms of Galileons. While its implementation is successful in most of these models it also comes hand in hand with superluminalities and strong coupling which are reviewed and their real consequences are discussed.

  14. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  15. Chemical Evolution of Infrared Dark Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Susanna C.; Jackson, J. M.; Chambers, E. T.; Rathborne, J. M.; Simon, R.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are molecular clouds seen as extinction features against the mid-infrared Galactic background. Studies of IRDCs have shown them to be cold (< 25 K), dense (> 10^5 cm^-3), and have very high column densities ( 10^23-10^25 cm^-2, e.g., Egan et al. 1998; Carey et al. 1998, 2000). IRDCs host the earliest stages of high-mass star and cluster formation (Rathborne et al. 2005, 2006, 2007). We have mapped 59 IRDC protostellar cores in the fourth Galactic quadrant using the ATNF Mopra telescope simultaneously in HCN (1-0), HC3N (10-9), HCO+ (1-0), HNC (1-0), N2H+ (1-0), and SiO (2-1). We found that the ratios of intensities of the different molecular tracers vary greatly from cloud to cloud, and from core to core within clouds. These different line ratios probably correspond to chemical differences which arise in different evolutionary sequences. We show that specific line ratios distinguish cold pre-stellar cores from warm star-forming cores. N2H+ was found to be a good tracer of active star-forming cores, correlating well with cores containing "green fuzzies,” i.e., extended 4.5 micron emission due to shocked gas (Chambers et al., in press). This work was funded by NSF grant AST-0808001.

  16. Placing Observational Constraints on Massive Star Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip

    2011-10-01

    The lives and deaths of massive stars are intricately linked to the evolution of galaxies. Yet, despite their integral importance to understanding galaxy evolution, models of massive stars are inconsistent with observations. These uncertainties can be traced to limited observational constraints available for improving massive star models. A sensitive test of the underlying physics of massive stars, e.g., convection, rotation, and mass loss is to measure the ratio of blue core helium burning stars {BHeB} to red core helium burning stars {RHeB}, 5-20Msun stars in the stage evolution immediately following the main sequence. Even the most sophisticated models cannot accurately predict the observed ratio over a range of metallicities, suggesting an insufficient understanding of the underlying physics. However, observational measurements of this ratio over a wide range of environments would provide substantial constraints on the physical parameters governing the evolution of all stars >5 Msun.We propose to place stringent observational constraints on the physics of massive star evolution by uniformly measuring the B/R HeB ratio in a wide range of galaxies. The HST archive contains high quality optical imaging of resolved stellar populations of dozens of nearby galaxies. From the ANGST program, we identified 38 galaxies, spanning 2 dex in metallicity that have significant BHeB and RHeB populations. Using this sample, we will empirically characterize the colors of the BHeB and RHeB sequences as a function of luminosity and metallicity, measure the B/R ratio, and constrain the lifetimes of the BHeB and RHeBs in the Padova stellar evolution models and the Cambridge STARS code.

  17. Nonlinear evolution of protostellar disks and light modulations in young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.; Bell, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    An evolutionary model of dynamical processes in protostellar disks is described and illustrated with graphs of typical results. The effective transport mechanisms are discussed, including thermal convection, nonaxisymmetric gravitational instabilities in the outer regions of disks, and wave propagation. Consideration is then given to the stages of dynamical evolution, FU Ori outburst phenomena, unsteady accretion-disk flows, and nonlinear feedback as a mechanism to modulate mass transfer. The simulations show that mass redistribution is determined by angular-momentum transfer, which in turn is regulated by the effective viscosity generated by convectively driven turbulence. Significant mass transfer occurs as a result of mixing of infalling material with disk gas and is affected by the tidal torque associated with the growth of nonaxisymmetric disturbances in the outer disk. The time scale for disk evolution is found to be about 1 Myr.

  18. Far-infrared image restoration analysis of the protostellar cluster in S140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Harvey, P. M.; Joy, M.; Ellis, H. B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are applied to one-dimensional scans at 50 and 100 microns of the protostellar cluster in S140. These measurements resolve the surrounding nebula clearly, and Fourier methods are used to match the effective beam profiles at these wavelengths. This allows the radial distribution of temperature and dust column density to be derived at a diffraction limited spatial resolution of 23 arcsec (0.1 pc). Evidence for heating of the S140 molecular cloud by a nearby ionization front is established, and the dissociation of molecules inside the ionization front is spatially well correlated with the heating of the dust. The far-infrared spectral distribution of the three near-infrared sources within 10 arcsesc of the cluster center is presented.

  19. The structure of the Cepheus E protostellar outflow: The jet, the bowshock, and the cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Gusdorf, A.; Codella, C.; Eislöffel, J.; Neri, R.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Güsten, R.; Leurini, S.; Risacher, C.; Benedettini, M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Protostellar outflows are a crucial ingredient of the star-formation process. However, the physical conditions in the warm outflowing gas are still poorly known. Aims: We present a multi-transition, high spectral resolution CO study of the outflow of the intermediate-mass Class 0 protostar Cep E-mm. The goal is to determine the structure of the outflow and to constrain the physical conditions of the various components in order to understand the origin of the mass-loss phenomenon. Methods: We have observed the J = 12-11, J = 13-12, and J = 16-15 CO lines at high spectral resolution with SOFIA/GREAT and the J = 5-4, J = 9-8, and J = 14-13 CO lines with HIFI/Herschel towards the position of the terminal bowshock HH377 in the southern outflow lobe. These observations were complemented with maps of CO transitions obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope (J = 1-0, 2-1), the Plateau de Bure interferometer (J = 2-1), and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (J = 3-2, 4-3). Results: We identify three main components in the protostellar outflow: the jet, the cavity, and the bowshock, with a typical size of 1.7″ × 21″, 4.5″, and 22″ × 10″, respectively. In the jet, the emission from the low-J CO lines is dominated by a gas layer at Tkin = 80-100 K, column density N(CO) = 9 × 1016 cm-2, and density n(H2) = (0.5-1) × 105 cm-3; the emission of the high-J CO lines arises from a warmer (Tkin = 400-750 K), denser (n(H2) = (0.5-1) × 106 cm-3), lower column density (N(CO) = 1.5 × 1016 cm-2) gas component. Similarly, in the outflow cavity, two components are detected: the emission of the low-J lines is dominated by a gas layer of column density N(CO) = 7 × 1017 cm-2 at Tkin = 55-85 K and density in the range (1-8) × 105 cm-3; the emission of the high-J lines is dominated by a hot, denser gas layer with Tkin = 500-1500K, n(H2) = (1-5) × 106 cm-3, and N(CO) = 6 × 1016 cm-2. A temperature gradient as a function of the velocity is found in the high-excitation gas

  20. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE IN THE FLATTENED ENVELOPE AND JET IN THE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM HH 211

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Rao, Ramprasad; Hirano, Naomi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hwang, Hsiang-Chih; Ching, Tao-Chung; Lai, Shih-Ping

    2014-12-10

    HH 211 is a young Class 0 protostellar system with a flattened envelope, a possible rotating disk, and a collimated jet. We have mapped it with the Submillimeter Array in the 341.6 GHz continuum and SiO J = 8-7 at ∼0.''6 resolution. The continuum traces the thermal dust emission in the flattened envelope and the possible disk. Linear polarization is detected in the continuum in the flattened envelope. The field lines implied from the polarization have different orientations, but they are not incompatible with current gravitational collapse models, which predict a different orientation depending on the region/distance. Also, we might have detected for the first time polarized SiO line emission in the jet due to the Goldreich-Kylafis effect. Observations at higher sensitivity are needed to determine the field morphology in the jet.

  1. Laboratory formation of a scaled protostellar jet by coaligned poloidal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, B; Ciardi, A; Nakatsutsumi, M; Vinci, T; Béard, J; Bonito, R; Billette, J; Borghesi, M; Burkley, Z; Chen, S N; Cowan, T E; Herrmannsdörfer, T; Higginson, D P; Kroll, F; Pikuz, S A; Naughton, K; Romagnani, L; Riconda, C; Revet, G; Riquier, R; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya; Soloviev, A; Huarte-Espinosa, M; Frank, A; Portugall, O; Pépin, H; Fuchs, J

    2014-10-17

    Although bipolar jets are seen emerging from a wide variety of astrophysical systems, the issue of their formation and morphology beyond their launching is still under study. Our scaled laboratory experiments, representative of young stellar object outflows, reveal that stable and narrow collimation of the entire flow can result from the presence of a poloidal magnetic field whose strength is consistent with observations. The laboratory plasma becomes focused with an interior cavity. This gives rise to a standing conical shock from which the jet emerges. Following simulations of the process at the full astrophysical scale, we conclude that it can also explain recently discovered x-ray emission features observed in low-density regions at the base of protostellar jets, such as the well-studied jet HH 154. PMID:25324383

  2. Induced velocities of grains embedded in a turbulent gas. [test particle theory application to protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voelk, H. J.; Morfill, G.; Roeser, S.; Jones, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    A theory is presented for the dynamics of dust particles in an incompressible turbulent fluid. Grain-gas coupling occurs through friction forces that are proportional to the mean grain velocity relative to the gas. This test particle theory is applied to the case of Kolmogoroff spectrum in a protostellar cloud. The mean turbulence induced grain velocity and the mean turbulent relative velocity of two grains are calculated. Whereas the former should determine the dust scale height, grain-grain collisions are influenced by the latter. For a reasonable strength of turbulence, the mean induced relative velocity of two particles turns out to be at least as large as the corresponding terminal velocity difference during gravitational settling.

  3. Initiation of bipolar flows by magnetic field twisting in protostellar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, William I.; Newman, Alice L.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    1992-01-01

    A model is developed for the time-dependent twisting of an initial poloidal magnetic field threading a conducting protostellar disk. The region outside the disk is assumed to be filled, at least initially, with a low-density, force-free 'coronal' plasma. The differential rotation of the disk acts to twist the B field in the space outside the disk thus generating a toroidal magnetic field. In turn, the toroidal field acts to pinch the plasma and the poloidal field toward the system axis producing a collimated channel. This channel could facilitate the formation of bipolar flows. The magnitude and duration of the field twisting is expected to be limited by magnetohydrodynamic instability.

  4. Massive and Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  5. Massive Stars: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2007-07-01

    Massive stars dominate the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM, and ultimately of their parent galaxy and the universe, because of their fast evolution and intense supersonic winds. Four decades ago, the first rocket UV spectra of massive stars revealed the importance of mass loss and began to change our understanding of their evolution. Recently, advances in stellar modeling, and the observation of crucial ions in the far-UV spectral range, led to the resolution of long-standing issues in our understanding of massive star atmospheres. A revised (downwards) calibration of Teff for early spectral types is emerging as a result. Meanwhile, HST imaging, and large ground-based telescopes with multislit spectroscopic capabilities, had opened the possibility of resolved studies of stellar populations in Local Group galaxies, which sample a variety of metallicity and environment conditions. More recently, GALEX is providing a global, deep view of the young stellar populations for hundreds of nearby galaxies, revealing their recent star-formation history and modalities. The wide-field coverage and sensitivity of the GALEX UV imaging, easily detecting extremely low levels of star formation, is again changing some of our views on massive star formation in galaxies.

  6. New massive supergravity multiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James, Jr.; Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Tartaglino-Mazzucchelli, Gabriele

    2007-02-01

    We present new off-shell formulations for the massive superspin-3/2 multiplet. In the massless limit, they reduce respectively to the old minimal (n = -1/3) and non-minimal (n≠-1/3,0) linearized formulations for 4D Script N = 1 supergravity. Duality transformations, which relate the models constructed, are derived.

  7. Supertwistors and massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mezincescu, Luca; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    In the (super)twistor formulation of massless (super)particle mechanics, the mass-shell constraint is replaced by a “spin-shell” constraint from which the spin content can be read off. We extend this formalism to massive (super)particles (with N-extended space–time supersymmetry) in three and four space–time dimensions, explaining how the spin-shell constraints are related to spin, and we use it to prove equivalence of the massive N=1 and BPS-saturated N=2 superparticle actions. We also find the supertwistor form of the action for “spinning particles” with N-extended worldline supersymmetry, massless in four dimensions and massive in three dimensions, and we show how this simplifies special features of the N=2 case. -- Highlights: •Spin-shell constraints are related to Poincaré Casimirs. •Twistor form of 4D spinning particle for spin N/2. •Twistor proof of scalar/antisymmetric tensor equivalence for 4D spin 0. •Twistor form of 3D particle with arbitrary spin. •Proof of equivalence of N=1 and N=2 BPS massive 4D superparticles.

  8. Mathematical method for the study and teaching of stellar and protostellar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John Francis

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a relatively simple yet effective method of teaching stellar and protostellar structure. There are four differential equations describing the structure of a star. They are: These equations are linearly approximated in the following form: W = Wo (1 plus or minus wx). Here, W represents the pressure (P), temperature (T), mass (M), and/or luminosity (L) gradients within the star; W represents some initial value of these parameters expanded inwardly or outwardly from an initial point, ro; and w represents what is called the Motz Dimensionless Variables (MDV) which are directly derivable from the above set of equations. They are dimensionless, so, in the expansion, W has the same units as wo. The MDV appear below: As yet, there is no MDV for luminosity owing to the complicating energy generation factor, epsilon. In the above sets of equations, the mean molecular weight is micro; the opacity is kappa; the ratio of gas pressure to total pressure is beta; and the other symbols have their usual meanings. In the above set of equations describing the MDV, if the surface of the star is expanded to larger values, representing earlier, and therefore, protostellar stages of the star, by theoretically halting accretion, no dynamical factors need to be considered. The above set of equations describing a stellar structure in static equilibrium may then be used. This method was designed for college and early graduate students who have never before encountered the topic of stellar structure. This method was taught to a class of college physics majors in a local New York City college. The students had never before seen these equations. After the presentation, they were asked to attempt construction of sample stellar model using this method and also to complete a questionnaire concerning their general academic history and their opinions of the method. According to the questionnaire, most subjects felt that it was effective, yet simple enough, as

  9. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  10. Explosive Outflows from Forming Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.; Ginsburg, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    AO imaging of the near IR [Fe ii] and H2 lines and ALMA CO J = 2 - 1 data confirms the explosive nature of the BN/KL outflow in Orion. N-body interactions in compact groups may be responsible for the production of powerful, explosive protostellar outflows and luminous infrared flares. The Orion event may have been triggered by a protostellar merger. First results of a search for Orion-like events in 200 nearby galaxies with the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) are briefly discussed.

  11. The Population One Core of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael G.; Allen, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral imaging in the near-infrared of the central parsec of the Galaxy has revealed that a population of massive young stars resides in the core of our Galaxy. We suggest it has undergone a mild starburst.

  12. Formation of massive protostars in atomic cooling haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Fernando; Greif, Thomas H.; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars E.

    2015-01-01

    We present the highest-resolution three-dimensional simulation to date of the collapse of an atomic cooling halo in the early Universe. We use the moving-mesh code AREPO with the primordial chemistry module introduced in Greif, which evolves the chemical and thermal rate equations for over more than 20 orders of magnitude in density. Molecular hydrogen cooling is suppressed by a strong Lyman-Werner background, which facilitates the near-isothermal collapse of the gas at a temperature of about 104 K. Once the central gas cloud becomes optically thick to continuum emission, it settles into a Keplerian disc around the primary protostar. The initial mass of the protostar is about 0.1 M⊙, which is an order of magnitude higher than in minihaloes that cool via molecular hydrogen. The high accretion rate and efficient cooling of the gas catalyse the fragmentation of the disc into a small protostellar system with 5-10 members. After about 12 yr, strong gravitational interactions disrupt the disc and temporarily eject the primary protostar from the centre of the cloud. By the end of the simulation, a secondary clump has collapsed at a distance of ≃ 150 au from the primary clump. If this clump undergoes a similar evolution as the first, the central gas cloud may evolve into a wide binary system. High accretion rates of both the primary and secondary clumps suggest that fragmentation is not a significant barrier for forming at least one massive black hole seed.

  13. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  14. Massive cold cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta

    2015-08-01

    The all-sky Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015) allows an almost unbiased study of the early phases of star-formation in our Galaxy. Several thousand of the clumps have also distance estimates allowing a mass, and density determination. The nature of Planck clumps varies from IRDCs to tiny nearby cold clouds with masses ranging from one to several tens of thousands solar masses. Some of the clumps are embedded in GMCs, others are isolated. Some are close or even very close to OB associations, while others lay far from any UV luminous objects.The small scale clustering of these objects was studied with the improved Minimum Spanning Tree method of Cartwright & Whitworth identifying groups in 3D space. As a result also massive cold cloud clusters were identified. We analyse the MST structures, and discuss their relation to ongoing and future massive star formation.

  15. Skyrmions with massive pions

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, Richard A.; Sutcliffe, Paul M.

    2006-05-15

    In the Skyrme model with massless pions, the minimal energy multi-Skyrmions are shell-like, with the baryon density localized on the edges of a polyhedron that is approximately spherical and generically of the fullerene-type. In this paper we show that in the Skyrme model with massive pions these configurations are unstable for sufficiently large baryon number. Using numerical simulations of the full nonlinear field theory, we show that these structures collapse to form qualitatively different stable Skyrmion solutions. These new Skyrmions have a flat structure and display a clustering phenomenon into lower charge components, particularly components of baryon numbers three and four. These new qualitative features of Skyrmions with massive pions are encouraging in comparison with the expectations based on real nuclei.

  16. THE SPITZER c2d SURVEY OF NEARBY DENSE CORES. VII. CHEMISTRY AND DYNAMICS IN L43

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Evans, Neal J.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bourke, Tyler L. E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.ed E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-11-10

    We present results from the Spitzer Space Telescope and molecular line observations of nine species toward the dark cloud L43. The Spitzer images and molecular line maps suggest that it has a starless core and a Class I protostar evolving in the same environment. CO depletion is seen in both sources, and DCO{sup +} lines are stronger toward the starless core. With a goal of testing the chemical characteristics from pre- to protostellar stages, we adopt an evolutionary chemical model to calculate the molecular abundances and compare with our observations. Among the different model parameters we tested, the best-fit model suggests a longer total timescale at the pre-protostellar stage, but with faster evolution at the later steps with higher densities.

  17. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  18. Young Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Gieles, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Young massive clusters (YMCs) are dense aggregates of young stars that form the fundamental building blocks of galaxies. Several examples exist in the Milky Way Galaxy and the Local Group, but they are particularly abundant in starburst and interacting galaxies. The few YMCs that are close enough to resolve are of prime interest for studying the stellar mass function and the ecological interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. The distant unresolved clusters may be effectively used to study the star-cluster mass function, and they provide excellent constraints on the formation mechanisms of young cluster populations. YMCs are expected to be the nurseries for many unusual objects, including a wide range of exotic stars and binaries. So far only a few such objects have been found in YMCs, although their older cousins, the globular clusters, are unusually rich in stellar exotica. In this review, we focus on star clusters younger than ˜100 Myr, more than a few current crossing times old, and more massive than ˜104M⊙; the size of the cluster and its environment are considered less relevant as distinguishing parameters. We describe the global properties of the currently known young massive star clusters in the Local Group and beyond, and discuss the state of the art in observations and dynamical modeling of these systems. In order to make this review readable by observers, theorists, and computational astrophysicists, we also review the cross-disciplinary terminology.

  19. ALMA results of the pseudodisk, rotating disk, and jet in the continuum and HCO{sup +} in the protostellar system HH 212

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Hirano, Naomi; Shang, Hsien; Ho, Paul T. P.; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-05-10

    HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system showing several components that can be compared with theoretical models of core collapse. We have mapped it in the 350 GHz continuum and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 emission with ALMA at up to ∼0.''4 resolution. A flattened envelope and a compact disk are seen in the continuum around the central source, as seen before. The HCO{sup +} kinematics shows that the flattened envelope is infalling with small rotation (i.e., spiraling) into the central source, and thus can be identified as a pseudodisk in the models of magnetized core collapse. Also, the HCO{sup +} kinematics shows that the disk is rotating and can be rotationally supported. In addition, to account for the missing HCO{sup +} emission at low-redshifted velocity, an extended infalling envelope is required, with its material flowing roughly parallel to the jet axis toward the pseudodisk. This is expected if it is magnetized with an hourglass B-field morphology. We have modeled the continuum and HCO{sup +} emission of the flattened envelope and disk simultaneously. We find that a jump in density is required across the interface between the pseudodisk and the disk. A jet is seen in HCO{sup +} extending out to ∼500 AU away from the central source, with the peaks upstream of those seen before in SiO. The broad velocity range and high HCO{sup +} abundance indicate that the HCO{sup +} emission traces internal shocks in the jet.

  20. HOW MASSIVE ARE MASSIVE COMPACT GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Marchesini, Danilo; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo

    2009-11-20

    Using a sample of nine massive compact galaxies at zapprox 2.3 with rest-frame optical spectroscopy and comprehensive U -> 8 mum photometry, we investigate how assumptions in spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling change the stellar mass estimates of these galaxies, and how this affects our interpretation of their size evolution. The SEDs are fitted to tau-models with a range of metallicities, dust laws, and different stellar population synthesis codes. These models indicate masses equal to, or slightly smaller than, our default masses. The maximum difference is 0.16 dex for each parameter considered, and only 0.18 dex for the most extreme combination of parameters. Two-component populations with a maximally old stellar population superposed with a young component provide reasonable fits to these SEDs using the models of Bruzual and Charlot; however, when using models with updated treatment of TP-AGB stars, the fits are poorer. The two-component models predict masses that are 0.08-0.22 dex larger than the tau-models. We also test the effect of a bottom-light initial mass function (IMF) and find that it would reduce the masses of these galaxies by 0.3 dex. Considering the range of allowable masses from the tau-models, two-component fits, and IMF, we conclude that on average these galaxies lie below the mass-size relation of galaxies in the local universe by a factor of 3-9, depending on the SED models used.

  1. How Massive Single Stars End Their Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heger, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Woosley, S. E.; Langer, N.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    How massive stars die-what sort of explosion and remnant each produces-depends chiefly on the masses of their helium cores and hydrogen envelopes at death. For single stars, stellar winds are the only means of mass loss, and these are a function of the metallicity of the star. We discuss how metallicity, and a simplified prescription for its effect on mass loss, affects the evolution and final fate of massive stars. We map, as a function of mass and metallicity, where black holes and neutron stars are likely to form and where different types of supernovae are produced. Integrating over an initial mass function, we derive the relative populations as a function of metallicity. Provided that single stars rotate rapidly enough at death, we speculate on stellar populations that might produce gamma-ray bursts and jet-driven supernovae.

  2. Herschel-HIFI observations of H2O, NH3, and N2H+ toward high-mass starless and protostellar clumps identified by the Hi-GAL survey⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.; Persson, C. M.; Codella, C.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Our present understanding of high-mass star formation still remains very schematic. In particular, it is not yet clear how much of the difference between low-mass and high-mass star formation occurs during the earliest star formation phases. Aims: The chemical characteristics of massive cold clumps, and the comparison with those of their low-mass counterparts, could provide crucial clues about the exact role that chemistry plays in differentiating the early phases of low-mass and high-mass star formation. Water, in particular, is a unique probe of physical and chemical conditions in star-forming regions. Methods: Using the HIFI instrument of Herschel, we have observed the ortho-NH3 (10-00) (572 GHz), ortho-H2O (110-101) (557 GHz), and N2H+ (6-5) (559 GHz) lines toward a sample of high-mass starless and protostellar clumps selected from the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL). We compare our results to previous studies of low-mass and high-mass protostellar objects. Results: At least one of the three molecular lines was detected in 4 (out of 35) and 7 (out of 17) objects in the ℓ = 59° and ℓ = 30° galactic regions, respectively. All detected sources are protostellar. The water spectra are complex and consist of several kinematic components, identified through a Gaussian decomposition, and we detected inverse and regular P-Cygni profiles in a few sources. All water line profiles of the ℓ = 59° region are dominated by a broad Gaussian emission feature, indicating that the bulk of the water emission arises in outflows. No such broad emission is detected toward the ℓ = 30° objects. The ammonia line in some cases also shows line wings and an inverse P-Cygni profile, thus confirming that NH3 rotational transitions can be used to probe the dynamics of high-mass, star-forming regions. Both bolometric and water line luminosity increase with the continuum temperature. Conclusions: The higher water abundance toward the ℓ = 59° sources

  3. The Inflow Signature toward Different Evolutionary Phases of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kee-Tae; Evans, Neal J., II

    2016-08-01

    We analyze both HCN J = 1–0 and HNC J = 1–0 line profiles to study the inflow motions in different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: 54 infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), 69 high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and 54 ultra-compact H ii regions (UCHIIs). Inflow asymmetry in the HCN spectra seems to be prevalent throughout all the three evolutionary phases, with IRDCs showing the largest excess in the blue profile. In the case of the HNC spectra, the prevalence of blue sources does not appear, apart from for IRDCs. We suggest that this line is not appropriate to trace the inflow motion in the evolved stages of massive star formation, because the abundance of HNC decreases at high temperatures. This result highlights the importance of considering chemistry in dynamics studies of massive star-forming regions. The fact that the IRDCs show the highest blue excess in both transitions indicates that the most active inflow occurs in the early phase of star formation, i.e., in the IRDC phase rather than in the later phases. However, mass is still inflowing onto some UCHIIs. We also find that the absorption dips of the HNC spectra in six out of seven blue sources are redshifted relative to their systemic velocities. These redshifted absorption dips may indicate global collapse candidates, although mapping observations with better resolution are needed to examine this feature in more detail.

  4. Formation of Dense Clumps/Cores in Infrared Dark Clouds and Their Magnetic Field Properties from AMR MHD Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.

    2014-07-01

    Massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are believed to be the precursors to star clusters and massive stars (e.g. Bergin & Tafalla 2007). The supersonic turbulent nature of molecular clouds in the presence of magnetic fields poses a great challenge in understanding the structure and dynamics of molecular clouds and the star formation therein (e.g. Falgarone et al. 2008, Crutcher et al. 2010, Peretto & Fuller 2010, Hernandez & Tan 2011, Harcar et al. 2013, Kainulainen & Tan 2013). We perform two high resolution ideal MHD AMR simulations with supersonically driven turbulence on the formation of massive infrared dark clouds, using our radiative-MHD AMR code ORION2 (P.S. Li, et al. 2012), to reveal the complex 3D filamentary structure and the subsequent formation of dense clumps and cores inside the dark clouds. The two models differ only in field strength, with one model having an initial field 10 times as strong as the other. The magnetic properties of the clumps from the two models are compared with the Zeeman observations summarized in Crutcher et al. (2010). Our dense clumps exhibit a power-law relation between magnetic field strength and density similar to the observations. Despite the order of magnitude difference in initial field strength, with the magnetic field enhancement and fragmentation as the result of turbulence, the magnetic properties of clumps in the weak field model are remarkably similar to those in the strong field model, except for a clear difference in the magnetic field orientation with respect to the global mean field direction. The almost random orientation of the weak field simulation is inconsistent with the observation of the field orientation on large and small scales by H.-b. Li, et al. (2009). I will briefly summarize the physical properties of the filamentary dark clouds in the simulations and report a detailed comparison of the magnetic properties of dense clumps in the simulations with the Zeeman observations. We have continued the

  5. The Kinematics of Molecular Cloud Cores in the Presence of Driven and Decaying Turbulence: Comparisons with Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, S R; Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2007-12-17

    In this study we investigate the formation and properties of prestellar and protostellar cores using hydrodynamic, self-gravitating Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, comparing the cases where turbulence is continually driven and where it is allowed to decay. We model observations of these cores in the C{sup 18}O(2 {yields} 1), NH{sub 3}(1, 1), and N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1 {yields} 0) lines, and from the simulated observations we measure the linewidths of individual cores, the linewidths of the surrounding gas, and the motions of the cores relative to one another. Some of these distributions are significantly different in the driven and decaying runs, making them potential diagnostics for determining whether the turbulence in observed star-forming clouds is driven or decaying. Comparing our simulations with observed cores in the Perseus and {rho} Ophiuchus clouds shows reasonably good agreement between the observed and simulated core-to-core velocity dispersions for both the driven and decaying cases. However, we find that the linewidths through protostellar cores in both simulations are too large compared to the observations. The disagreement is noticeably worse for the decaying simulation, in which cores show highly supersonic in fall signatures in their centers that decrease toward their edges, a pattern not seen in the observed the regions.

  6. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  7. Mathematical Method for the Study and Teaching of Stellar and Protostellar Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John Francis

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a relatively simple yet effective method of teaching stellar and protostellar structure. There are four differential equations describing the structure of a star. They are:. These equations are linearly approximated in the following form: W = W_{rm o} (1+/-wx). Here, W represents the pressure (P), temperature (T), mass (M), and/or luminosity (L) gradients within the star; W represents some initial value of these parameters expanded inwardly or outwardly from an initial point, r_{rm o}; and w represents what is called the Motz Dimensionless Variables (MDV) which are directly derivable from the above set of equations. They are dimensionless, so, in the expansion, W has the same units as w _{rm o}. The MDV appear below:. As yet, there is no MDV for luminosity owing to the complicating energy generation factor, varepsilon . In the above sets of equations, the mean molecular weight is mu; the opacity is kappa; the ratio of gas pressure to total pressure is beta; and the other symbols have their usual meanings. In the above set of equations describing the MDV, if the surface of the star is expanded to larger values, representing earlier, and therefore, protostellar stages of the star, by theoretically halting accretion, no dynamical factors need to be considered. The above set of equations describing a stellar structure in static equilibrium may then be used. This method was designed for college and early graduate students who have never before encountered the topic of stellar structure. This method was taught to a class of college physics majors in a local New York City college. The students had never before seen these equations. After the presentation, they were asked to attempt construction of a sample stellar model using this method and also to complete a questionnaire concerning their general academic history and their opinions of the method. According to the questionnaire, most subjects felt that it was effective, yet simple

  8. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Kagan, Daniel; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key to physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Tayler (ST) mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magnetorotational effects can move models of given zero-age main sequence mass across "boundaries" from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the rotation of the inner core in general agreement with the observed "initial" rotation rates of pulsars. The MRI analysis suggests that localized fields ~1012 G may exist at the boundary of the iron core. With both the ST and MRI mechanisms active in the 20 M ⊙ model, we find that the helium shell mixes entirely out into the envelope. Enhanced mixing could yield a population of yellow or even blue supergiant supernova progenitors that would not be standard SN IIP.

  9. THE ROLE OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Kagan, Daniel; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil

    2015-01-20

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is key to physics in accretion disks and is widely considered to play some role in massive star core collapse. Models of rotating massive stars naturally develop very strong shear at composition boundaries, a necessary condition for MRI instability, and the MRI is subject to triply diffusive destabilizing effects in radiative regions. We have used the MESA stellar evolution code to compute magnetic effects due to the Spruit-Tayler (ST) mechanism and the MRI, separately and together, in a sample of massive star models. We find that the MRI can be active in the later stages of massive star evolution, leading to mixing effects that are not captured in models that neglect the MRI. The MRI and related magnetorotational effects can move models of given zero-age main sequence mass across ''boundaries'' from degenerate CO cores to degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores and from degenerate O/Ne/Mg cores to iron cores, thus affecting the final evolution and the physics of core collapse. The MRI acting alone can slow the rotation of the inner core in general agreement with the observed ''initial'' rotation rates of pulsars. The MRI analysis suggests that localized fields ∼10{sup 12} G may exist at the boundary of the iron core. With both the ST and MRI mechanisms active in the 20 M {sub ☉} model, we find that the helium shell mixes entirely out into the envelope. Enhanced mixing could yield a population of yellow or even blue supergiant supernova progenitors that would not be standard SN IIP.

  10. Infall motions in massive star-forming regions: results from years 1 and 2 of the MALT90 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2015-06-01

    Massive star-forming regions with observed infall motions are good sites for studying the birth of massive stars. In this paper, 405 compact sources have been extracted from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) compact sources that also have been observed in the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz (MALT90) survey during years 1 and 2. These observations are complemented with Spitzer GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL mid-IR survey data to help classify the elected star-forming clumps into three evolutionary stages: pre-stellar, proto-stellar and UCHII regions. The results suggest that 0.05 g cm-2 is a reliable empirical lower bound for the clump surface densities required for massive-star formation to occur. The optically thick HCO+(1-0) and HNC(1-0) lines, as well as the optically thin N2H+(1-0) line were used to search for infall motions towards these sources. By analysing the asymmetries of the optically thick HCO+(1-0) and HNC(1-0) lines and the mapping observations of HCO+(1-0), a total of 131 reliable infall candidates have been identified. The HCO+(1-0) line shows the highest occurrence of obvious asymmetric features, suggesting that it may be a better infall motion tracer than other lines such as HNC(1-0). The detection rates of infall candidates towards pre-stellar, proto-stellar and UCHII clumps are 0.3452, 0.3861 and 0.2152, respectively. The relatively high detection rate of infall candidates towards UCHII clumps indicates that many UCHII regions are still accreting matter. The peak column densities and masses of the infall candidates, in general, display an increasing trend with progressing evolutionary stages. However, the rough estimates of the mass infall rate show no obvious variation with evolutionary stage.

  11. Instability considerations for massive star eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to explain the observed properties of the giant eruptions of 'supernova imposters' such as {eta} Car and P Cyg. This mechanism must be episodic, generate a large amount of energy, and be very deep-seated, in order to lift about 10 solar masses out of the deep gravitational potential well of these massive evolved stars. We suggest that nonradial gravity mode oscillations capable of existing in the core grow slowly to sufficient amplitude to cause an episode of mixing. This mixing generates a burst of nuclear energy deep in the star that is responsible for the observed large mass ejection and bolometric magnitude increase.

  12. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  13. Understanding the size growth of massive galaxies through stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    The growth of massive galaxies remains an open problem. The observational evidence seems to converge on a two-stage scenario, where a compact massive core is formed during an early, intense burst, followed by a more extended process of mass and size growth at intermediate redshift (z<2). This talk focuses on the latter, exploring the growth of massive galaxies through a detailed analysis of the stellar populations in close pairs, to study their formation history. Two surveys are explored (SHARDS and GAMA), probing the stellar populations of pre-merging systems out to z~1.3, and down to a mass ratio ~1:100. We will compare the results between medium band spectral fitting (SHARDS) and those from a more targeted analysis of line strengths in the GAMA data. The combination of the two datasets provide a unique insight of the growth channel of massive galaxies via mergers.

  14. The RMS survey: ammonia mapping of the environment of massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Figura, C. C.; Moore, T. J. T.; Csengeri, T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Pillai, T.; Thompson, M. A.; Eden, D. J.; Morgan, L. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of ammonia observations towards 66 massive star forming regions identified by the Red Midcourse Space Experiment Source survey. We have used the Green Bank Telescope and the K-Band Focal Plane Array to map the ammonia (NH3) (1,1) and (2,2) inversion emission at a resolution of 30 arcsec in 8 arcmin regions towards the positions of embedded massive star formation. We have identified a total of 115 distinct clumps, approximately two-thirds of which are associated with an embedded massive young stellar object or compact H II region, while the others are classified as quiescent. There is a strong spatial correlation between the peak NH3 emission and the presence of embedded objects. We derive the spatial distribution of the kinetic gas temperatures, line widths, and NH3 column densities from these maps, and by combining these data with dust emission maps we estimate clump masses, H2 column densities and ammonia abundances. The clumps have typical masses of ˜1000 M⊙ and radii ˜0.5 pc, line widths of ˜2 km s-1 and kinetic temperatures of ˜16-20 K. We find no significant difference between the sizes and masses of the star-forming and quiescent subsamples; however, the distribution maps reveal the presence of temperature and line width gradients peaking towards the centre for the star-forming clumps while the quiescent clumps show relatively uniform temperatures and line widths throughout. Virial analysis suggests that the vast majority of clumps are gravitationally bound and are likely to be in a state of global free fall in the absence of strong magnetic fields. The similarities between the properties of the two subsamples suggest that the quiescent clumps are also likely to form massive stars in the future, and therefore provide an excellent opportunity to study the initial conditions of massive pre-stellar and protostellar clumps.

  15. Massively Parallel QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

    2007-04-11

    The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

  16. The dependence of protostellar luminosity on environment in the Cygnus-X star-forming complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Hora, J. L.; Smith, Howard A.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Kraemer, K.; Hennemann, M.; Motte, F.

    2014-07-01

    The Cygnus-X star-forming complex is one of the most active regions of low- and high-mass star formation within 2 kpc of the Sun. Using mid-infrared photometry from the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer Cygnus-X Legacy Survey, we have identified over 1800 protostar candidates. We compare the protostellar luminosity functions of two regions within Cygnus-X: CygX-South and CygX-North. These two clouds show distinctly different morphologies suggestive of dissimilar star-forming environments. We find the luminosity functions of these two regions are statistically different. Furthermore, we compare the luminosity functions of protostars found in regions of high and low stellar density within Cygnus-X and find that the luminosity function in regions of high stellar density is biased to higher luminosities. In total, these observations provide further evidence that the luminosities of protostars depend on their natal environment. We discuss the implications this dependence has for the star formation process.

  17. Eccentricity Evolution of Extrasolar Multiple Planetary Systems Due to the Depletion of Nascent Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Ida, S.

    2003-04-01

    Most extrasolar planets are observed to have eccentricities much larger than those in the solar system. Some of these planets have sibling planets, with comparable masses, orbiting around the same host stars. In these multiple planetary systems, eccentricity is modulated by the planets' mutual secular interaction as a consequence of angular momentum exchange between them. For mature planets, the eigenfrequencies of this modulation are determined by their mass and semimajor axis ratios. However, prior to the disk depletion, self-gravity of the planets' nascent disks dominates the precession eigenfrequencies. We examine here the initial evolution of young planets' eccentricity due to the apsidal libration or circulation induced by both the secular interaction between them and the self-gravity of their nascent disks. We show that as the latter effect declines adiabatically with disk depletion, the modulation amplitude of the planets' relative phase of periapsis is approximately invariant despite the time-asymmetrical exchange of angular momentum between planets. However, as the young planets' orbits pass through a state of secular resonance, their mean eccentricities undergo systematic quantitative changes. For applications, we analyze the eccentricity evolution of planets around υ Andromedae and HD 168443 during the epoch of protostellar disk depletion. We find that the disk depletion can change the planets' eccentricity ratio. However, the relatively large amplitude of the planets' eccentricity cannot be excited if all the planets had small initial eccentricities.

  18. A CHEMICAL VIEW OF PROTOSTELLAR-DISK FORMATION IN L1527

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Lopez-Sepulcre, Ana; Lefloch, Bertrand; Vastel, Charlotte; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Caux, Emmanuel; Coutens, Audrey; Aikawa, Yuri; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi

    2014-08-20

    Subarcsecond images of the rotational line emissions of CCH, CS, H{sub 2}CO, and CH{sub 3}OH have been obtained toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 04368+2557 in L1527 as one of the early science projects of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The intensity distributions of CCH and CS show a double-peaked structure along the edge-on envelope with a dip toward the protostar position, whereas those of H{sub 2}CO and CH{sub 3}OH are centrally peaked. By analyzing the position-velocity diagrams along the envelope, CCH and CS are found to reside mainly in the envelope, where the gas is infalling with conservation of its angular momentum. They are almost absent inward of the centrifugal barrier (a half of the centrifugal radius). Although H{sub 2}CO exists in the infalling rotating envelope, it also resides in the disk component inside the centrifugal barrier to some extent. On the other hand, CH{sub 3}OH seems to exist around the centrifugal barrier and in the disk component. Hence, the drastic chemical change occurs at the centrifugal barrier. A discontinuous infalling motion as well as the gas-grain interaction would be responsible for the chemical change. This result will put an important constraint on initial chemical compositions for chemical evolution of protostellar disks.

  19. A Self-Perpetuating Catalyst for the Production of Complex Organic Molecules in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. Many mechanisms may contribute to the total organic content in protostellar nebulae, ranging from organics formed via ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the cold dark clouds from which such nebulae collapse, to similar ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the dark regions of the nebula far from the proto star, to gas phase reactions in sub-nebulae around growing giant planets and in the nebulae themselves. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. The Haber-Bosch catalytic reduction of N2 by hydrogen was thought to produce the reduced nitrogen found in meteorites. However, the clean iron metal surfaces that catalyze these reactions are easily poisoned via reaction with any number of molecules, including the very same complex organics that they produce and both reactions work more efficiently in the hot regions of the nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Although none work as well as pure iron grains, and all produce a wide range of organic products rather than just pure methane, these materials are not truly catalysts.

  20. Molecules with a peptide link in protostellar shocks: a comprehensive study of L1157

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Lefloch, B.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Interstellar molecules with a peptide link (-NH-C(=O)-), like formamide (NH2CHO), acetamide (NH2COCH3) and isocyanic acid (HNCO), are particularly interesting for their potential role in pre-biotic chemistry. We have studied their emission in the protostellar shock regions L1157-B1 and L1157-B2, with the IRAM 30 m telescope, as part of the ASAI Large Programme. Analysis of the line profiles shows that the emission arises from the outflow cavities associated with B1 and B2. Molecular abundances of ≈(0.4-1.1) × 10-8 and (3.3-8.8) × 10-8 are derived for formamide and isocyanic acid, respectively, from a simple rotational diagram analysis. Conversely, NH2COCH3 was not detected down to a relative abundance of a few ≤10-10. B1 and B2 appear to be among the richest Galactic sources of HNCO and NH2CHO molecules. A tight linear correlation between their abundances is observed, suggesting that the two species are chemically related. Comparison with astrochemical models favours molecule formation on icy grain mantles, with NH2CHO generated from hydrogenation of HNCO.

  1. Associative massively parallel processor for video processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikelis, Argy; Tawiah, T.

    1996-03-01

    Massively parallel processing architectures have matured primarily through image processing and computer vision application. The similarity of processing requirements between these areas and video processing suggest that they should be very appropriate for video processing applications. This research describes the use of an associative massively parallel processing based system for video compression which includes architectural and system description, discussion of the implementation of compression tasks such as DCT/IDCT, Motion Estimation and Quantization and system evaluation. The core of the processing system is the ASP (Associative String Processor) architecture a modular massively parallel, programmable and inherently fault-tolerant fine-grain SIMD processing architecture incorporating a string of identical APEs (Associative Processing Elements), a reconfigurable inter-processor communication network and a Vector Data Buffer for fully-overlapped data input-output. For video compression applications a prototype system is developed, which is using ASP modules to implement the required compression tasks. This scheme leads to a linear speed up of the computation by simply adding more APEs to the modules.

  2. Inconsistency of topologically massive hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.; Deser, S.

    1985-01-01

    The coupled topologically massive spin-5/2 gravity system in D = 3 dimensions whose kinematics represents dynamical propagating gauge invariant massive spin-5/2 and spin-2 excitations, is shown to be inconsistent, or equivalently, not locally hypersymmetric. In contrast to D = 4, the local constraints on the system arising from failure of the fermionic Bianchi identities do not involve the 'highest spin' components of the field, but rather the auxiliary spinor required to construct a consistent massive model.

  3. Higher dimensional nonlinear massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by a recent ghost-free nonlinear massive gravity in four-dimensional spacetime, we study its higher dimensional scenarios. As a result, we are able to show the constantlike behavior of massive graviton terms for some well-known metrics such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini (anti-) de Sitter metrics in a specific five-dimensional nonlinear massive gravity under an assumption that its fiducial metrics are compatible with physical ones. In addition, some simple cosmological solutions of the five-dimensional massive gravity are figured out consistently.

  4. Problems of massive gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Izumi, K.; Ong, Y. C.; Waldron, A.

    2015-01-01

    The method of characteristics is a key tool for studying consistency of equations of motion; it allows issues such as predictability, maximal propagation speed, superluminality, unitarity and acausality to be addressed without requiring explicit solutions. We review this method and its application to massive gravity (mGR) theories to show the limitations of these models' physical viability: Among their problems are loss of unique evolution, superluminal signals, matter coupling inconsistencies and micro-acausality (propagation of signals around local closed time-like curves (CTCs)/closed causal curves (CCCs)). We extend previous no-go results to the entire three-parameter range of mGR theories. It is also argued that bimetric models suffer a similar fate.

  5. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  6. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  7. Aspergilloma and massive haemoptysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wern Yew; Chan, Tze; Yadavilli, Rajesh Kumar; McWilliams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year-old homeless woman who was a known intravenous drug user and heroin smoker, presented with massive haemoptysis. Initial CT-pulmonary angiogram (CT-PA) did not show active haemorrhage but found an opacity in a right upper lobe cavity likely to represent a mycetoma. She was started on antifungal therapy but haemoptysis persisted and bronchial angiography was performed. Again no active haemorrhage was identified but abnormal vasculature was seen supplying the right upper lobe. This was empirically embolised with particles which did not improve her symptoms. A subsequent CT-PA identified a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm in the cavity wall which was successfully embolised. There was no further haemoptysis and a repeat CT-PA 3 weeks later showed continuing occlusion of the pulmonary artery aneurysm. Investigations for tuberculosis were negative and she was discharged clinically well and on long-term antifungal therapy. PMID:24739651

  8. The Evolution and Stability of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiode, Joshua Hajime

    Massive stars are the ultimate source for nearly all the elements necessary for life. The first stars forge these elements from the sparse set of ingredients supplied by the Big Bang, and distribute enriched ashes throughout their galactic homes via their winds and explosive deaths. Subsequent generations follow suit, assembling from the enriched ashes of their predecessors. Over the last several decades, the astrophysics community has developed a sophisticated theoretical picture of the evolution of these stars, but it remains an incomplete accounting of the rich set of observations. Using state of the art models of massive stars, I have investigated the internal processes taking place throughout the life-cycles of stars spanning those from the first generation ("Population III") to the present-day ("Population I"). I will argue that early-generation stars were not highly unstable to perturbations, contrary to a host of past investigations, if a correct accounting is made for the viscous effect of convection. For later generations, those with near solar metallicity, I find that this very same convection may excite gravity-mode oscillations that produce observable brightness variations at the stellar surface when the stars are near the main sequence. If confirmed with modern high-precision monitoring experiments, like Kepler and CoRoT, the properties of observed gravity modes in massive stars could provide a direct probe of the poorly constrained physics of gravity mode excitation by convection. Finally, jumping forward in stellar evolutionary time, I propose and explore an entirely new mechanism to explain the giant eruptions observed and inferred to occur during the final phases of massive stellar evolution. This mechanism taps into the vast nuclear fusion luminosity, and accompanying convective luminosity, in the stellar core to excite waves capable of carrying a super-Eddington luminosity out to the stellar envelope. This energy transfer from the core to the

  9. Theoretical Developments in Understanding Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorke, H. W.; Bodenheimer, P.

    2008-05-01

    Except under special circumstances massive stars in galactic disks will form through accretion. The gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core will initially produce one or more low-mass quasi-hydrostatic objects of a few Jupiter masses. Through subsequent accretion the masses of these cores grow as they simultaneously evolve toward hydrogen-burning central densities and temperatures. We review the evolution of accreting (proto-)stars, including new results calculated with a publicly available stellar evolution code written by the authors. The evolution of accreting stars depends strongly on the accretion history. We find that for the high accretion rates considered, ˜10^{-3} M_⊙yr^{-1}, stars of ˜5-10 M_⊙ tend to bloat up to radii which may exceed 100 R_⊙. Because of the high rate of binarity among massive stars, we expect that these large radii during short phases of evolution will result in mass transfer, common envelope evolution, and a higher number of tight binaries with periods of a few days.

  10. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; La Barbera, Francesco; Ferreras, Ignacio; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disc decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or discs of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a compact core as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, there are abundant compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ˜ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red nuggets with elliptical galaxies, a comparable fraction of red nuggets might have ended up embedded in discs. This result generalizes the inside-out formation scenario; present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disc is formed later.

  11. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  12. BROAD N{sub 2}H{sup +} EMISSION TOWARD THE PROTOSTELLAR SHOCK L1157-B1

    SciTech Connect

    Codella, C.; Fontani, F.; Gómez-Ruiz, A.; Vasta, M.; Viti, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Podio, L.; Caselli, P.

    2013-10-10

    We present the first detection of N{sub 2}H{sup +} toward a low-mass protostellar outflow, namely, the L1157-B1 shock, at ∼0.1 pc from the protostellar cocoon. The detection was obtained with the IRAM 30 m antenna. We observed emission at 93 GHz due to the J = 1-0 hyperfine lines. Analysis of this emission coupled with HIFI CHESS multiline CO observations leads to the conclusion that the observed N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) line originated from the dense (≥10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) gas associated with the large (20''-25'') cavities opened by the protostellar wind. We find an N{sub 2}H{sup +} column density of a few 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} corresponding to an abundance of (2-8) × 10{sup –9}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance can be matched by a model of quiescent gas evolved for more than 10{sup 4} yr, i.e., for more than the shock kinematical age (≅2000 yr). Modeling of C-shocks confirms that the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +} is not increased by the passage of the shock. In summary, N{sub 2}H{sup +} is a fossil record of the pre-shock gas, formed when the density of the gas was around 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and then further compressed and accelerated by the shock.

  13. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  14. Molecular inventories and chemical evolution of low-mass protostellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, J. K.; Schöier, F. L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents the first substantial study of the chemistry of the envelopes around a sample of 18 low-mass pre- and protostellar objects for which physical properties have previously been derived from radiative transfer modeling of their dust continuum emission. Single-dish line observations of 24 transitions of 9 molecular species (not counting isotopes) including HCO+, N2H+, CS, SO, SO2, HCN, HNC, HC3N and CN are reported. The line intensities are used to constrain the molecular abundances by comparison to Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling of the line strengths. In general the nitrogen-bearing species together with HCO+ and CO cannot be fitted by a constant fractional abundance when the lowest excitation transitions are included, but require radial dependences of their chemistry since the intensity of the lowest excitation lines are systematically underestimated in such models. A scenario is suggested in which these species are depleted in a specific region of the envelope where the density is high enough that the freeze-out timescale is shorter than the dynamical timescale and the temperature low enough that the molecule is not evaporated from the icy grain mantles. This can be simulated by a ``drop'' abundance profile with standard (undepleted) abundances in the inner- and outermost regions and a drop in abundance in between where the molecule freezes out. An empirical chemical network is constructed on the basis of correlations between the abundances of various species. For example, it is seen that the HCO+ and CO abundances are linearly correlated, both increasing with decreasing envelope mass. This is shown to be the case if the main formation route of HCO+ is through reactions between CO and H3+, and if the CO abundance still is low enough that reactions between H3+ and N2 are the main mechanism responsible for the removal of H3+. Species such as CS, SO and HCN show no trend with envelope mass. In particular no trend is seen between

  15. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XIV. Physical Properties of Massive Starless and Star-forming Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian E.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Battersby, Cara; Rosolowsky, Erik W.; Ginsburg, Adam G.; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Pestalozzi, Michele R.; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Bally, John; Glenn, Jason

    2016-05-01

    We sort 4683 molecular clouds between 10° < ℓ < 65° from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey based on observational diagnostics of star formation activity: compact 70 μm sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, H2O and CH3OH masers, and UCH ii regions. We also present a combined NH3-derived gas kinetic temperature and H2O maser catalog for 1788 clumps from our own GBT 100 m observations and from the literature. We identify a subsample of 2223 (47.5%) starless clump candidates (SCCs), the largest and most robust sample identified from a blind survey to date. Distributions of flux density, flux concentration, solid angle, kinetic temperature, column density, radius, and mass show strong (>1 dex) progressions when sorted by star formation indicator. The median SCC is marginally subvirial (α ∼ 0.7) with >75% of clumps with known distance being gravitationally bound (α < 2). These samples show a statistically significant increase in the median clump mass of ΔM ∼ 170–370 M ⊙ from the starless candidates to clumps associated with protostars. This trend could be due to (i) mass growth of the clumps at \\dot{M}∼ 200{--}440 M ⊙ Myr‑1 for an average freefall 0.8 Myr timescale, (ii) a systematic factor of two increase in dust opacity from starless to protostellar phases, and/or (iii) a variation in the ratio of starless to protostellar clump lifetime that scales as ∼M ‑0.4. By comparing to the observed number of CH3OH maser containing clumps, we estimate the phase lifetime of massive (M > 103 M ⊙) starless clumps to be 0.37 ± 0.08 Myr (M/103 M ⊙)‑1 the majority (M < 450 M ⊙) have phase lifetimes longer than their average freefall time.

  16. Physical and Chemical Properties of Protocluster Clumps and Massive Young Stellar Objects Associated to Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The study of high-mass stars is important not only because of the effects they produce in their environment through outflows, expanding HII regions, stellar winds, and eventually supernova shock waves, but also because they play a crucial role in estimating star formation rates in other galaxies. Although we have an accepted evolutionary scenario that explains (isolated) low-mass star formation, the processes that produce massive stars (M_star > 8 M_sol) and star clusters, especially their earliest stages, are not well understood. The newly discovered class of interstellar clouds now termed infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent excellent laboratories to study the earliest stages of high-mass star formation given that some of the clumps within them are known to have high masses (~100's M_sol), high densities (n > 10^5 cm^-3), and low temperatures (10-20K) as expected for the birthplaces of high-mass stars. Some questions remain unanswered: Do IRDCs harbor the very early stages of high-mass star formation, i.e., the pre-protocluster phase? If so, how do they compare with low-mass star formation sites? Is there chemical differentiation in IRDC clumps? What is the mass distribution of IRDCs? In this dissertation and for the first time, a catalog of 12529 IRDC candidates at 24 um has been created using archival data from the MIPSGAL/Spitzer survey, as a first step in searching for the massive pre-protocluster clumps. From this catalog, a sample of ~60 clumps has been selected in order to perform single-pointing observations with the IRAM 30m, Effelsberg 100m, and APEX 12m telescopes. One IRDC clump seems to be a promising candidate for being in the pre-protocluster phase. In addition, molecular line mapping observations have been performed on three clumps within IRDCs and a detailed chemical study of 10 molecular lines has been carried out. A larger difference in column densities and abundances has been found between these clumps and high-m! ass protostellar objects

  17. Role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of astrophysical ices in protostellars environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson Monteiro Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    The astrophysical ices survival is directly related with the temperature and ionizing radiation field in protostellars environments such as disks and envelopes. Computational models has shown that pure volatile molecules like CO and CH _{4} should survive only inside densest regions of molecular clouds or protoplanetary disks On the other hand, solid molecules such as H _{2}O and CH _{3}OH can be placed around 5 - 10 AU from the central protostar. Unlike of the previous models, we investigate the role of the UV external radiation field on the presence of ices in disks and envelopes. Once that a star-forming region is composed by the formation of many protostars, the external radiation field should be an important component to understand the real localization of the ices along the sight line. To address this topic it was employed the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D based on the Monte Carlo method. The code was used to model the spectrum and the near-infrared image of Elias 29. The initial parameters of the disk and envelope was taken from our previous paper (Rocha & Pilling (2015), ApJ 803:18). The opacities of the ices were calculated from the complex refractive index obtained at laboratory experiments perfomed at Grand Accélerateur National d'Íons Lourds (GANIL), by using the NKABS code from Rocha & Pilling (2014), SAA 123:436. The partial conclusions that we have obtained shows that pure CO volatile molecule cannot be placed at disk or envelope of Elias 29, unlike shown in our paper about Elias 29. Once it was observed in Elias 29 spectrum obtained with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 2.5 - 190 μm, this molecule should be placed in foreground molecular clouds or trapped in the water ice matrix. The next calculations will be able to show where are placed the ices such as CH _{3}OH and CH _{3}CHO observed in Elias 29 spectrum.

  18. On the mechanism of self gravitating Rossby interfacial waves in proto-stellar accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellin-Bergovoy, Ron; Heifetz, Eyal; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical response of edge waves under the influence of self-gravity is examined in an idealized two-dimensional model of a proto-stellar disc, characterized in steady state as a rotating vertically infinite cylinder of fluid with constant density except for a single density interface at some radius r0. The fluid in basic state is prescribed to rotate with a Keplerian profile $\\Omega_k(r)\\sim r^{-3/2}$ modified by some additional azimuthal sheared flow. A linear analysis shows that there are two azimuthally propagating edge waves, kin to the familiar Rossby waves and surface gravity waves in terrestrial studies, which move opposite to one another with respect to the local basic state rotation rate at the interface. Instability only occurs if the radial pressure gradient is opposite to that of the density jump (unstably stratified) where self-gravity acts as a wave stabilizer irrespective of the stratification of the system. The propagation properties of the waves are discussed in detail in the language of vorticity edge waves. The roles of both Boussinesq and non-Boussinesq effects upon the stability and propagation of these waves with and without the inclusion of self-gravity are then quantified. The dynamics involved with self-gravity non- Boussinesq effect is shown to be a source of vorticity production where there is a jump in the basic state density, in addition, self-gravity also alters the dynamics via the radial main pressure gradient, which is a Boussinesq effect . Further applications of these mechanical insights are presented in the conclusion including the ways in which multiple density jumps or gaps may or may not be stable.

  19. Molecules in protostellar shocks: the CHESS view on L1157-B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Benedettini, M.; Cabrit, S.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Codella, C.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; Parise, B.; Salez, M.; Vasta, M.; Viti, S.; CHESS Team

    2011-05-01

    Shocks driven by protostellar outflows play an important role in the chemical evolution of molecular gas through temperature and density changes resulting from the activation of endothermic reactions, ionization, and dust destruction. These various processes lead to molecular abundance enhancements up to several orders of magnitude, as reported for various molecular species in "chemically active" outflows, whose archetype is the outflow of the low mass Class 0 protostar L1157. The opening up of the full far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength domains by Herschel has deep impact in the field by providing access to key spectral diagnostics of shock dynamics and chemistry at very high spectral resolution with HIFI and permitting to map the brightest features with the PACS and SPIRE multi-pixel spectrometers. We present the results of the spectral survey of the shock region L1157-B1 from 3.75mm up to 60 μm, carried out with the instruments onboard Herschel and with the IRAM 30m telescope, as part of the CHESS key project. The unprecedented sensitivity of these instruments brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions of this long studied region, thanks to the detection of hydrides (H2O, NH, HCl, ..) and of the high-excitation lines of heavy molecules (CO, CS, HCO+, HCN, ..). We will discuss the molecular content and the properties of the warm chemically enriched gas (abundance, excitation conditions). We will show how multi-transition analysis of the line profiles allows to constrain the shock physical conditions, the formation scenarios of various molecular species, including water, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models.

  20. Dense cavity walls traced by CS in the L1157-B1 protostellar shocked region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Ruiz, Arturo; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand; Benedettini, Milena; Busquet, Gemma; Nisini, Brunella; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Cabrit, Sylvie; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the CHESS Key Program, an unbiased spectral survey performed with Herschel and IRAM, in the frequency range from 97 to 600 GHz, have provided a chemical census of the protostellar shock L1157-B1. Here we focus on the study of carbon monosulfide (CS), a standard tracer of high-density gas. We have detected a total of 18 emission lines, with E_u up to 183 K, due to four isotopologues (^12C^32S, ^12C^34S, ^13C^32S, and ^12C^33S). The unprecedented sensitivity of the survey allow us to carefully analyze the line profiles. These profiles can be well fitted by two exponential laws: I ∝ exp(-|v/v0|) with v0 = 4.4, and 2.5 km s-1. Remarkably these two exponential laws are the same as those found in the CO line profiles by Lefloch et al. (2012), and named g2 and g3 components, respectively. These components have been related to the cavity walls produced by the B1 shock and the older B2 shock, respectively. An important characteristic of the lines profiles is that the emission of high-J CS transitions (E_u > 60 K) comes only from the g2 component. Using the LVG approximation, the CS solutions constrain n >= 10^4.5 cm^-3. In addition, when contrasted with the CO results (that already constrained T_k of 90 K and 40 K for g2 and g3, respectively), we see that the LVG can provide strong constrains to the gas density, in this case about 5 x 10^5 cm^-3 for both g2 and g3 components. Thus, the combination of CO and CS is a powerful tool to constrain both n and T_k. Our CS observations show therefore that this molecule is highlighting the dense cavity walls produced by the episodic outflow.

  1. Supermassive star formation via episodic accretion: protostellar disc instability and radiative feedback efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Hosokawa, T.; Yoshida, N.; Omukai, K.; Yorke, H. W.

    2016-06-01

    The formation of supermassive stars (SMSs) is a potential pathway to seed supermassive black holes in the early universe. A critical issue for forming SMSs is stellar UV feedback, which may limit the stellar mass growth via accretion. In this paper, we study the evolution of an accreting SMS and its UV emissivity with realistic variable accretion from a circumstellar disc. First we conduct a 2D hydrodynamical simulation to follow the protostellar accretion until the stellar mass exceeds 104 M⊙. The disc fragments by gravitational instability, creating many clumps that migrate inward to fall on to the star. The resulting accretion history is highly time-dependent: short episodic accretion bursts are followed by longer quiescent phases. We show that the disc for the direct collapse model is more unstable and generates greater variability than normal Pop III cases. Next, we conduct a stellar evolution calculation using the obtained accretion history. Our results show that, regardless of the variable accretion, the stellar radius monotonically increases with almost constant effective temperature at Teff ≃ 5000 K as the stellar mass increases. The resulting UV feedback is too weak to hinder accretion due to the low flux of stellar UV photons. The insensitivity of stellar evolution to variable accretion is attributed to the fact that time-scales of variability, ≲103 yr, are too short to affect the stellar structure. We argue that this evolution will continue until the SMS collapses to produce a black hole by the general relativistic instability after the mass reaches ≳105 M⊙.

  2. Abundance profiles of CH3OH and H2CO toward massive young stars as tests of gas-grain chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Caselli, P.

    2000-09-01

    The chemistry of CH3OH and H2CO in thirteen regions of massive star formation is studied through single-dish and interferometer line observations at submillimeter wavelengths. Single-dish spectra at 241 and 338 GHz indicate that Trot = 30-200 K for CH3OH, but only 60-90 K for H2CO. The tight correlation between Trot(CH3OH) and Tex(C2H2) from infrared absorption suggests a common origin of these species, presumably outgassing of icy grain mantles. The CH3OH line widths are 3-5 km s-1, consistent with those found earlier for C17O and C34S, except in GL 7009S and IRAS 20126, whose line shapes reveal CH3OH in the outflows. This difference suggests that for low-luminosity objects, desorption of CH3OH-rich ice mantles is dominated by shocks, while radiation is more important around massive stars. The wealth of CH3OH and H2CO lines covering a large range of excitation conditions allows us to calculate radial abundance profiles , using the physical structures of the sources derived earlier from submillimeter continuum and CS line data. The data indicate three types of abundance profiles: flat profiles at CH3OH/H2 ~ 10-9 for the coldest sources, profiles with a jump in its abundance from ~ 10-9 to ~ 10-7 for the warmer sources, and flat profiles at CH3OH/H2 ~ few 10-8 for the hot cores. The models are consistent with the ~ 3'' size of the CH3OH 107 GHz emission measured interferometrically. The location of the jump at T~ 100 K suggests that it is due to evaporation of grain mantles, followed by destruction in gas-phase reactions in the hot core stage. In contrast, the H2CO data can be well fit with a constant abundance of a few x 10-9 throughout the envelope, providing limits on its grain surface formation. These results indicate that Trot (CH3OH) can be used as evolutionary indicator during the embedded phase of massive star formation, independent of source optical depth or orientation. Model calculations of gas-grain chemistry show that CO is primarily reduced (into CH3OH

  3. Identification of protostellar clusters in the inner part of the milky way : Interaction between the ISM and star forming regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Pestalozzi, M.; Schisano, E.

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between the interstellar medium (ISM) and young stellar objects (YSO) need to be investigated to better understand star formation. We used the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) method to identify protostellar clusters in the inner part of galactic plane. Using heliocentric distance estimates, we obtained about 230 clusters over a 140 × 2 square degree region. Most of these clusters are correlated with Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) or H II regions. We conclude that clustering is more important for protostars than for prestellar clumps and that a strong correlation can be established between the distribution of H II regions, known star formation complexes and the YSOs identified in the Hi-GAL data.

  4. Massive stars: Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa María

    2007-07-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. b) Stellar clusters are an important mode of star formation in starbursts. c) The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar medium: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s%u22121 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. High-spatial resolution spectra are also needed to isolate the light from the center to the disk in UV luminous galaxies found by GALEX. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution spectrograph with high spatial

  5. A search for massive young stellar objects with 98 CH3OH maser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yue-Fang; Wang, Ke

    2010-01-01

    Using the 13.7 m telescope of the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO), a survey of the J = 1-0 lines of CO and its isotopes was carried out on 98 methanol maser sources in January 2008. Eighty-five sources have infrared counterparts within one arcmin. In the survey, except for 43 sources showing complex or multiple-peak profiles, almost all the 13CO line profiles of the other 55 sources have large line widths of 4.5km s-1 on average and are usually asymmetric. Fifty corresponding Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sources of these 55 sources have Lbol larger than 103 Lodot, which can be identified as possible high-mass young stellar sources. Statistics show that the 13CO line widths correlate with the bolometric luminosity of the associated IRAS sources. Here, we also report the mapping results of two sources: IRAS 06117+1350 and IRAS 07299-1651. Two cores were found in IRAS 06117+1350 and one core was detected in IRAS 07299-1651. The northwest core in IRAS 06117+1350 and the core in IRAS 07299-1651 can be identified as precursors of UC HII regions or high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs). The southeast core of IRAS 06117+1350 has no infrared counterpart, seeming to be at a younger stage than the pre-UC HII phase.

  6. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  7. Massive gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Carlos M.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2016-06-01

    Gauge-flation model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory offers an interesting scenario for realizing inflation within a particle physics context, allowing us to investigate interesting possible connections between inflation and the subsequent evolution of the Universe. Difficulties, however, arise at the perturbative level, thus motivating a modification of the original model. In order to agree with the latest Planck observations, we modify the model such that the new dynamics can produce a relation between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r allowed by the data. By including an identical mass term for each of the fields of the system, we find interesting dynamics leading to slow-roll inflation of the right length. The presence of the mass term has the potential to modify the ns versus r relation so as to agree with the data. As a first step, we study the model at zeroth-order in cosmological perturbation theory, finding the conditions required for slow-roll inflation and the number of e-foldings of inflation. Numerical solutions are used to explore the impact of the mass term. We conclude that the massive version of gauge-flation offers a viable inflationary model.

  8. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  9. Chemical Models of Star-Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.

    2013-10-01

    prestellar cores may indicate that a fraction of COMs formed in the vicinity of a protostar could be distributed to ambient clouds by outflows. COMs and carbon chains in protostellar phase inherit the high D/H ratio of their mother molecules, which originate mostly in cold prestellar phase.

  10. The 3D Death of a Massive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    What happens at the very end of a massive star's life, just before its core's collapse? A group led by Sean Couch (California Institute of Technology and Michigan State University) claim to have carried out the first three-dimensional simulations of these final few minutes — revealing new clues about the factors that can lead a massive star to explode in a catastrophic supernova at the end of its life. A Giant Collapses In dying massive stars, in-falling matter bounces off the of collapsed core, creating a shock wave. If the shock wave loses too much energy as it expands into the star, it can stall out — but further energy input can revive it and result in a successful explosion of the star as a core-collapse supernova. In simulations of this process, however, theorists have trouble getting the stars to consistently explode: the shocks often stall out and fail to revive. Couch and his group suggest that one reason might be that these simulations usually start at core collapse assuming spherical symmetry of the progenitor star. Adding Turbulence Couch and his collaborators suspect that the key is in the final minutes just before the star collapses. Models that assume a spherically-symmetric star can't include the effects of convection as the final shell of silicon is burned around the core — and those effects might have a significant impact! To test this hypothesis, the group ran fully 3D simulations of the final three minutes of the life of a 15 solar-mass star, ending with core collapse, bounce, and shock-revival. The outcome was striking: the 3D modeling introduced powerful turbulent convection (with speeds of several hundred km/s!) in the last few minutes of silicon-shell burning. As a result, the initial structure and motions in the star just before core collapse were very different from those in core-collapse simulations that use spherically-symmetric initial conditions. The turbulence was then further amplified during collapse and formation of the shock

  11. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  12. FRAGMENTATION AT THE EARLIEST PHASE OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qizhou; Wang Yang; Pillai, Thushara; Rathborne, Jill

    2009-05-01

    We present 1.3 mm continuum and spectral line images of two massive molecular clumps P1 and P2 in the G28.34+0.06 region with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). While the two clumps contain masses of 1000 and 880 M {sub sun}, respectively, P1 has a luminosity OF <10{sup 2} L {sub sun}, and a lower gas temperature and smaller line width than P2. Thus, P1 appears to be at a much earlier stage of massive star formation than P2. The high-resolution SMA observations reveal two distinctive cores in P2 with masses of 97 and 49 M {sub sun}, respectively. The 4 GHz spectral bandpass captures line emission from CO isotopologues, SO, CH{sub 3}OH, and CH{sub 3}CN, similar to hot molecular cores harboring massive young stars. The P1 clump, on the other hand, is resolved into five cores along the filament with masses from 22 to 64 M {sub sun} and an average projected separation of 0.19 pc. Except {sup 12}CO, no molecular line emission is detected toward the P1 cores at a 1{sigma} rms of 0.1 K. Since strong {sup 12}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are seen with the single-dish telescope at a resolution of 11'', the nondetection of these lines with the SMA indicates a depletion factor up to 10{sup 3}. While the spatial resolution of the SMA is better than the expected Jeans length, the masses in P1 cores are much larger than the thermal Jeans mass, indicating the importance of turbulence and/or magnetic fields in cloud fragmentation. The hierarchical structures in the P1 region provide a glimpse of the initial phase of massive star and cluster formation.

  13. Gravity as main driver of non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Smith, R.; Billot, N.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Peretto, N.; Molinari, S.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-05-01

    The origin of the observed non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions is still unclear. These motions can originate from local turbulence or from self-gravity and the two scenarios lead to two different star formation mechanisms. The recent findings of Heyer et al. ([5]) have supported self-gravity as main driver of the non-thermal motions, although without a clear interpretation of the results. In this contribution we introduce a new formalism to describe the relation between gravity and kinetic motion in massive star formation. We show that the Heyer findings are a particular result of this description and have a direct physical interpretation. We applied this formalism to different surveys of massive star forming regions covering all spatial scales from giant molecular clouds down to massive cores, including new data from massive candidate starless clumps. The results presented in this contribution strongly support a chaotic, gravitationally driven global collapse scenario as massive star formation mechanism.

  14. Stability and Coalescence of Massive Twin Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Lombardi, J. C., Jr.; Rasio, F. A.; Kalogera, V.

    2015-06-01

    Massive stars are usually found in binaries, and binaries with periods less than 10 days may have a preference for near equal component masses (“twins”). In this paper we investigate the evolution of massive twin binaries all the way to contact and the possibility that these systems can be progenitors of double neutron star binaries. The small orbital separations of observed double neutron star binaries suggest that the progenitor systems underwent a common envelope phase at least once during their evolution. Bethe & Brown proposed that massive binary twins will undergo a common envelope evolution while both components are ascending the red giant branch (RGB) or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) simultaneously, also known as double-core evolution. Using models generated from the stellar evolution code EZ (evolve zero-age main sequence), we determine the range of mass ratios resulting in a contact binary with both components simultaneously ascending the RGB or AGB as a function of the difference in birth times, Δτ. We find that, even for a generous Δτ = 5 Myr, the minimum mass ratio {{q}min }=0.933 for an 8 {{M}⊙ } primary and increases for larger mass primaries. We use a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, StarSmasher, to study specifically the evolution of q = 1 common envelope systems as a function of initial component mass, age, and orbital separation. We also consider a q = 0.997 system to test the effect of relaxing the constraint of strictly identical components. We find the dynamical stability limit, the largest orbital separation where the binary becomes dynamically unstable, as a function of the component mass and age. Finally, we calculate the efficiency of ejecting matter during the inspiral phase to extrapolate the properties of the remnant binary from our numerical results, assuming the common envelope is completely ejected. We find that for the nominal core masses, there is a minimum orbital separation for a given component mass such that the

  15. The formation of massive star systems by accretion.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Mark R; Klein, Richard I; McKee, Christopher F; Offner, Stella S R; Cunningham, Andrew J

    2009-02-01

    Massive stars produce so much light that the radiation pressure they exert on the gas and dust around them is stronger than their gravitational attraction, a condition that has long been expected to prevent them from growing by accretion. We present three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of a massive prestellar core and find that radiation pressure does not halt accretion. Instead, gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities channel gas onto the star system through nonaxisymmetric disks and filaments that self-shield against radiation while allowing radiation to escape through optically thin bubbles. Gravitational instabilities cause the disk to fragment and form a massive companion to the primary star. Radiation pressure does not limit stellar masses, but the instabilities that allow accretion to continue lead to small multiple systems. PMID:19150809

  16. Inner Structure of Protostellar Collapse Candidate B335 Derived from Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Daniel W. A.; Wilner, David J.; Myers, Philip C.; Tafalla, Mario; Mardones, Diego

    2003-02-01

    We present a study of the density structure of the protostellar collapse candidate B335 using continuum observations from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer made at wavelengths of 1.2 and 3.0 mm. We analyze these data, which probe spatial scales from 5000 to 500 AU, directly in the visibility domain by comparison with synthetic observations constructed from models that assume different physical conditions. This approach allows for much more stringent constraints to be derived from the data than from analysis of images. A single radial power law in density provides a good description of the data, with a best-fit power-law density index p=1.65+/-0.05. Through simulations, we quantify the sensitivity of this result to various model uncertainties, including assumptions of temperature distribution, outer boundary, dust opacity spectral index, and an unresolved central component. The largest uncertainty comes from the unknown presence of a centralized point source. The maximal point source, with 1.2 mm flux of F=12+/-7 mJy, reduces the power-law density index to p=1.47+/-0.07. The remaining sources of systematic uncertainty, of which the most important is the radial dependence of the temperature distribution, likely contribute a total uncertainty at the level of δp<~0.2. Taking into account the uncertainties, we find strong evidence that the power-law index of the density distribution within 5000 AU is significantly less than the value at larger radii, close to 2.0, from previous studies of dust emission and extinction. Images made from the data show clear departures from spherical symmetry, with the globule being slightly extended perpendicular to the outflow axis. The inclusion of a crude model of the outflow as a hollow bipolar cone of constant opening angle improves the fit and leaves the resulting density power-law index unchanged. These results conform well to the generic paradigm of isolated, low-mass star formation, which predicts a power-law density index

  17. PROTOSTELLAR DISK EVOLUTION OVER MILLION-YEAR TIMESCALES WITH A PRESCRIPTION FOR MAGNETIZED TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Russell; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Turner, Neal J.

    2013-07-10

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is the most promising mechanism behind accretion in low-mass protostellar disks. Here we present the first analysis of the global structure and evolution of non-ideal MRI-driven T-Tauri disks on million-year timescales. We accomplish this in a 1+1D simulation by calculating magnetic diffusivities and utilizing turbulence activity criteria to determine thermal structure and accretion rate without resorting to a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulation. Our major findings are as follows. First, even for modest surface densities of just a few times the minimum-mass solar nebula, the dead zone encompasses the giant planet-forming region, preserving any compositional gradients. Second, the surface density of the active layer is nearly constant in time at roughly 10 g cm{sup -2}, which we use to derive a simple prescription for viscous heating in MRI-active disks for those who wish to avoid detailed MHD computations. Furthermore, unlike a standard disk with constant-{alpha} viscosity, the disk midplane does not cool off over time, though the surface cools as the star evolves along the Hayashi track. Instead, the MRI may pile material in the dead zone, causing it to heat up over time. The ice line is firmly in the terrestrial planet-forming region throughout disk evolution and can move either inward or outward with time, depending on whether pileups form near the star. Finally, steady-state mass transport is an extremely poor description of flow through an MRI-active disk, as we see both the turnaround in the accretion flow required by conservation of angular momentum and peaks in M-dot (R) bracketing each side of the dead zone. We caution that MRI activity is sensitive to many parameters, including stellar X-ray flux, grain size, gas/small grain mass ratio and magnetic field strength, and we have not performed an exhaustive parameter study here. Our 1+1D model also does not include azimuthal information, which prevents

  18. SPITZER SPECTRAL LINE MAPPING OF PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS. II. H{sub 2} EMISSION IN L1157

    SciTech Connect

    Nisini, Brunella; Giannini, Teresa; Antoniucci, Simone; Neufeld, David A.; Yuan Yuan; Bergin, Edwin A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    2010-11-20

    We present an analysis of Spitzer-IRS spectroscopic maps of the L1157 protostellar outflow in the H{sub 2} pure-rotational lines from S(0) to S(7). The aim of this work is to derive the physical conditions pertaining to the warm molecular gas and study their variations within the flow. The mid-IR H{sub 2} emission follows the morphology of the precessing flow, with peaks correlated with individual CO clumps and H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m ro-vibrational emission. More diffuse emission delineating the CO cavities is detected only in the low-laying transitions, with J{sub lower{<=}} 2. The H{sub 2} line images have been used to construct two-dimensional maps of N(H{sub 2}), H{sub 2} ortho-to-para ratio (OPR), and temperature spectral index {beta}, in the assumption of a gas temperature stratification where the H{sub 2} column density varies as T {sup -}{beta}. Variations of these parameters are observed along the flow. In particular, the OPR ranges from {approx}0.6 to 2.8, highlighting the presence of regions subject to recent shocks where the OPR has not had time yet to reach the equilibrium value. Near-IR spectroscopic data on ro-vibrational H{sub 2} emission have been combined with the mid-IR data and used to derive additional shock parameters in the brightest blueshifted and redshifted emission knots. A high abundance of atomic hydrogen (H/H{sub 2} {approx} 0.1-0.3) is implied by the observed H{sub 2} column densities, assuming n(H{sub 2}) values as derived by independent SiO observations. The presence of a high fraction of atomic hydrogen indicates that a partially dissociative shock component should be considered for the H{sub 2} excitation in these localized regions. However, planar shock models, either of C- or J-type, are not able to consistently reproduce all the physical parameters derived from our analysis of the H{sub 2} emission. Globally, H{sub 2} emission contributes to about 50% of the total shock radiated energy in the L1157 outflow. We find that the

  19. The ALMA view of the protostellar system HH212. The wind, the cavity, and the disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Gueth, F.; Podio, L.; Leurini, S.; Bachiller, R.; Gusdorf, A.; Lefloch, B.; Nisini, B.; Tafalla, M.; Yvart, W.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Because it is viewed simply edge-on, the HH212 protostellar system is an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay of infall, outflow, and rotation in the earliest stages of low-mass star formation. Aims: We wish to exploit the unmatched combination of high angular resolution, high sensitivity, high-imaging fidelity, and spectral coverage provided by ALMA to shed light on the complex kinematics of the innermost central regions of HH212. Methods: We mapped the inner 10″ (4500 AU) of the HH212 system at ≃0.5″ resolution in several molecular tracers and in the 850 μm dust continuum using the ALMA interferometer in band 7 in the extended configuration of the Early Science Cycle 0 operations. Results: Within a single ALMA spectral set-up, we simultaneously identify all the crucial ingredients known to be involved in the star formation recipe: (i) the fast, collimated bipolar SiO jet driven by the protostar; (ii) the large-scale swept-up CO outflow; (iii) the flattened rotating and infalling envelope, with bipolar cavities carved by the outflow (in C17O(3-2)); and (iv) a rotating wide-angle flow that fills the cavities and surrounds the axial jet (in C34S(7-6)). In addition, the compact high-velocity C17O emission (±1.9-3.5 km s-1 from systemic) shows a velocity gradient along the equatorial plane consistent with a rotating disk of ≃0farcs2 = 90 AU around a ≃0.3 ± 0.1 M⊙ source. The rotating disk is possibly Keplerian. Conclusions: HH212 is the third Class 0 protostar with possible signatures of a Keplerian disk of radius ≥30 AU. The warped geometry in our CS data suggests that this large Keplerian disk might result from misaligned magnetic and rotation axes during the collapse phase. The wide-angle CS flow suggests that disk winds may be present in this source. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFinal reduced ALMA cubes (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp

  20. Submm Observations of Massive Star Formation in the Giant Molecular Cloud NGC 6334 : Gas Kinematics with Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zernickel, A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. How massive stars (M>8 Ms) form and how they accrete gas is still an open research field, but it is known that their influence on the interstellar medium (ISM) is immense. Star formation involves the gravitational collapse of gas from scales of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) down to dense hot molecular cores (HMCs). Thus, it is important to understand the mass flows and kinematics in the ISM. Aims. This dissertation focuses on the detailed study of the region NGC 6334, located in the Galaxy at a distance of 1.7 kpc. It is aimed to trace the gas velocities in the filamentary, massive star-forming region NGC 6334 at several scales and to explain its dynamics. For that purpose, different scales are examined from 0.01-10 pc to collect information about the density, molecular abundance, temperature and velocity, and consequently to gain insights about the physio-chemical conditions of molecular clouds. The two embedded massive protostellar clusters NGC 6334I and I(N), which are at different stages of development, were selected to determine their infall velocities and mass accretion rates. Methods. This astronomical source was surveyed by a combination of different observatories, namely with the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the single-dish telescope Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), and the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO). It was mapped with APEX in carbon monoxide (13CO and C18O, J=2-1) at 220.4 GHz to study the filamentary structure and turbulent kinematics on the largest scales of 10 pc. The spectral line profiles are decomposed by Gaussian fitting and a dendrogram algorithm is applied to distinguish velocity-coherent structures and to derive statistical properties. The velocity gradient method is used to derive mass flow rates. The main filament was mapped with APEX in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and oxomethylium (HCO+, J=3-2) at 267.6 GHz to trace the dense gas. To reproduce the position- velocity diagram (PVD), a cylindrical model with the radiative transfer

  1. QUARK MATTER IN MASSIVE COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenborn, Simon; Pagliara, Giuseppe; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen; Sagert, Irina; Hempel, Matthias

    2011-10-10

    The recent observation of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 with a mass of 1.97 {+-} 0.04 M{sub sun} gives a strong constraint on the quark and nuclear matter equations of state (EoS). We explore the parameter ranges for a parameterized EoS for quark stars. We find that strange stars, made of absolutely stable strange quark matter, comply with the new constraint only if effects from the strong coupling constant and color-superconductivity are taken into account. Hybrid stars, compact stars with a quark matter core and a hadronic outer layer, can be as massive as 2 M{sub sun}, but only for a significantly limited range of parameters. We demonstrate that the appearance of quark matter in massive stars crucially depends on the stiffness of the nuclear matter EoS. We show that the masses of hybrid stars stay below the ones of hadronic and pure quark stars, due to the softening of the EoS at the quark-hadron phase transition.

  2. A MASSIVE RUNAWAY STAR FROM 30 DORADUS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C. J.; Walborn, N. R.; Massa, D.; Lennon, D. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D.; Howarth, I. D.; Sana, H.; Van Loon, J. Th.

    2010-06-01

    We present the first ultraviolet (UV) and multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of 30 Dor 016, a massive O2-type star on the periphery of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The UV data were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Servicing Mission Observatory Verification program after Servicing Mission 4, and reveal no. 016 to have one of the fastest stellar winds known. From analysis of the C IV {lambda}{lambda}1548-51 doublet we find a terminal velocity, v {sub {infinity}} = 3450 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1}. Optical spectroscopy is from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey, from which we rule out a massive companion (with 2 days < P < 1 yr) to a confidence of 98%. The radial velocity of no. 016 is offset from the systemic value by -85 km s{sup -1}, suggesting that the star has traveled the 120 pc from the core of 30 Doradus as a runaway, ejected via dynamical interactions.

  3. Molecular Outflows in Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nichol

    2015-11-01

    This thesis presents millimetre continuum and molecular line observations exploring the properties of molecular outflows towards massive star forming regions. Massive stars produce some of the most energetic phenomena in the Galaxy, yet we still do not have a comprehensive understanding of how they actually form. Outflows are known to play a key role in this formation process and their properties, particularly how they change depending on the mass, luminosity and evolution of the driving source can shed light on how massive stars actually form. This thesis presents observations at both high (SMA 3 arcsecond) and low (JCMT 15 arcsecond) spatial resolution of the known jet/outflow tracers, SiO and 12CO, towards a sample massive star forming region drawn from the RMS survey. Furthermore, the presence of infall signatures is explored through observations of HCO+ and H13CO+, and the hot core nature of the regions is probed using tracers such as CH3CN, HC3N and CH3OH. SiO is detected towards approximately 50% of the massive young stellar objects and HII regions in the JCMT sample. The detection of SiO appears to be linked to the age of the RMS source, with the likely younger sources showing a stronger dependence with SiO. The presence of SiO also appears to be linked to the CO velocity, with SiO more efficiently tracing sources with higher velocity dispersions. In the MOPRA observations towards a sample of 33 RMS sources, CH3CN is detected towards 66% of the sources, with the redder likely younger sources having the largest rotational temperatures. This thesis presents the first interferometric SiO (5-4) and 12CO (2-1) observations, taken with the SMA, towards the massive star forming region G203.3166/NGC 2264-C. In this intermediate/massive star forming cluster, SiO is again tracing the youngest sources. Both the SiO and 12CO emission trace two bipolar, high velocity outflows towards the mm brightest, IR-dark, likely youngest sources in this reg! ion. In contrast the IR

  4. Extreme Mergers from the Massive Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Roger

    2010-09-01

    We propose to observe two extraordinary, high-redshift galaxy clusters from the Massive Cluster Survey. Both targets are very rare, triple merger systems (one a nearly co-linear merger), and likely lie at the deepest nodes of the cosmic web. Both targets show multiple strong gravitational lensing arcs in the cluster cores. These targets only possess very short (10ks) Chandra observations, and are unobserved by XMM-Newton. The X-ray data will be used to probe the mass distribution of hot, baryonic gas, and to reveal the details of the merger physics and the process of cluster assembly. We will also search for hints of X-ray emission from filaments between the merging clumps. Subaru and Hubble Space Telescope imaging data are in hand; we request additional HST coverage for one object.

  5. Extreme Mergers from the Massive Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R.

    2010-09-01

    We will observe an extraordinary, high-redshift galaxy cluster from the Massive Cluster Survey. The target is a very rare, triple merger system, and likely lies at the one of deepest nodes of the cosmic web. The target shows multiple strong gravitational lensing arcs in the cluster core. This target only possesses a very short {10ks} Chandra observations, and is unobserved by XMM-Newton. The X-ray data from this joint Chandra/HST proposal will be used to probe the mass distribution of hot, baryonic gas, and to reveal the details of the merger physics and the process of cluster assembly. We will also search for hints of X-ray emission from filaments between the merging clumps. Subaru and some Hubble Space Telescope imaging data are in hand; we will gather additional HST coverage for a lensing analysis.

  6. The close-binary content of massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen C.

    2015-08-01

    The fates of star clusters and the binaries in them are closely intertwined. Close binaries support a cluster against core collapse, while stellar encounters in the dense cores of massive star clusters shape the properties and numbers of the binaries. Observations of massive globular clusters with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed hundreds of close binaries. I will present new results from deep HST observations of massive star clusters including 47Tuc, M28, and M4, that are aimed at classifying the X-ray source populations. Besides exotic systems such as low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond pulsars, more mundane systems such as magnetically active binaries and accreting white dwarfs have been found. I will discuss how a breakdown of sources by class has revealed how the various binary populations bear the imprints of stellar encounters: some are dominated by dynamical creation, others by dynamical destruction. I will also discuss the effects on the integrated X-ray emissivity of massive star clusters, which is suppressed compared to lower-density environments.

  7. PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Krivov, Alexander V.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-09-01

    Massive planetary cores ({approx}10 Earth masses) trigger rapid gas accretion to form gas giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. We investigate the core growth and the possibilities for cores to reach such a critical core mass. At the late stage, planetary cores grow through collisions with small planetesimals. Collisional fragmentation of planetesimals, which is induced by gravitational interaction with planetary cores, reduces the amount of planetesimals surrounding them, and thus the final core masses. Starting from small planetesimals that the fragmentation rapidly removes, less massive cores are formed. However, planetary cores acquire atmospheres that enlarge their collisional cross section before rapid gas accretion. Once planetary cores exceed about Mars mass, atmospheres significantly accelerate the growth of cores. We show that, taking into account the effects of fragmentation and atmosphere, initially large planetesimals enable formation of sufficiently massive cores. On the other hand, because the growth of cores is slow for large planetesimals, a massive disk is necessary for cores to grow enough within a disk lifetime. If the disk with 100 km sized initial planetesimals is 10 times as massive as the minimum mass solar nebula, planetary cores can exceed 10 Earth masses in the Jovian planet region (>5 AU).

  8. The formation of substellar objects induced by the collision of protostellar disks

    PubMed

    Lin; Laughlin; Bodenheimer; Rozyczka

    1998-09-25

    Simulations of a close encounter between two protostars, each surrounded by a relatively massive disk, resulted in the ejection of some of the disk material into a tidal tail. A portion of the tail condensed into an object with a mass in the range of 5 to 10 jovian masses. This mechanism may explain the existence of the single objects of substellar mass that have recently been discovered. PMID:9748161

  9. Holographically viable extensions of topologically massive and minimal massive gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altas, Emel; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Recently [E. Bergshoeff et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 31, 145008 (2014)], an extension of the topologically massive gravity (TMG) in 2 +1 dimensions, dubbed as minimal massive gravity (MMG), which is free of the bulk-boundary unitarity clash that inflicts the former theory and all the other known three-dimensional theories, was found. Field equations of MMG differ from those of TMG at quadratic terms in the curvature that do not come from the variation of an action depending on the metric alone. Here we show that MMG is a unique theory and there does not exist a deformation of TMG or MMG at the cubic and quartic order (and beyond) in the curvature that is consistent at the level of the field equations. The only extension of TMG with the desired bulk and boundary properties having a single massive degree of freedom is MMG.

  10. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  11. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-02-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  12. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION OF PROTO-STELLAR COLLAPSE: TWO-COMPONENT MOLECULAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Ohsuga, Ken; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: masahiro.machida@nao.ac.jp E-mail: matsu@hosei.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We perform a three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) simulation with self-gravity to study the early phase of the low-mass star formation process from a rotating molecular cloud core to a first adiabatic core just before the second collapse begins. Radiation transfer is implemented with the flux-limited diffusion approximation, operator-splitting, and implicit time integrator. In the RMHD simulation, the outer region of the first core attains a higher entropy and its size is larger than that in the magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the barotropic approximation. Bipolar molecular outflow consisting of two components is driven by magnetic Lorentz force via different mechanisms, and shock heating by the outflow is observed. Using the RMHD simulation we can predict and interpret the observed properties of star-forming clouds, first cores, and outflows with millimeter/submillimeter radio interferometers, especially the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.

  13. Mapping water in protostellar outflows with Herschel. PACS and HIFI observations of L1448-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisini, B.; Santangelo, G.; Antoniucci, S.; Benedettini, M.; Codella, C.; Giannini, T.; Lorenzani, A.; Liseau, R.; Tafalla, M.; Bjerkeli, P.; Cabrit, S.; Caselli, P.; Kristensen, L.; Neufeld, D.; Melnick, G.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Water is a key probe of shocks and outflows from young stars because it is extremely sensitive to both the physical conditions associated with the interaction of supersonic outflows with the ambient medium and the chemical processes at play. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the spatial and velocity distribution of H2O along outflows, its relationship with other tracers, and its abundance variations. In particular, this study focuses on the outflow driven by the low-mass protostar L1448-C, which previous observations have shown to be one of the brightest H2O emitters among the class 0 outflows. Methods: To this end, maps of the o-H2O 110-101 and 212-101 transitions taken with the Herschel-HIFI and PACS instruments, respectively, are presented. For comparison, complementary maps of the CO(3-2) and SiO(8-7) transitions, obtained at the JCMT, and the H2 S(0) and S(1) transitions, taken from the literature, were used as well. Physical conditions and H2O column densities were inferred using large velocity gradient radiative transfer calculations. Results: The water distribution appears to be clumpy, with individual peaks corresponding to shock spots along the outflow. The bulk of the 557 GHz line is confined to radial velocities in the range ±10-50 km s-1, but extended emission at extreme velocities (up to vr ~ 80 km s-1) is detected and is associated with the L1448-C extreme high-velocity (EHV) jet. The H2O 110-101/CO(3-2) ratio shows strong variations as a function of velocity that likely reflect different and changing physical conditions in the gas that is responsible for the emissions from the two species. In the EHV jet, a low H2O/SiO abundance ratio is inferred, which could indicate molecular formation from dust-free gas directly ejected from the proto-stellar wind. The ratio between the two observed H2O lines and the comparison with H2 indicate averaged Tkin and n(H2) values of ~300-500 K and 5 × 106 cm-3, respectively, while a water abundance with

  14. Water distribution in shocked regions of the NGC 1333-IRAS 4A protostellar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santangelo, G.; Nisini, B.; Codella, C.; Lorenzani, A.; Yıldız, U. A.; Antoniucci, S.; Bjerkeli, P.; Cabrit, S.; Giannini, T.; Kristensen, L. E.; Liseau, R.; Mottram, J. C.; Tafalla, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Water is a key molecule in protostellar environments because its line emission is very sensitive to both the chemistry and the physical conditions of the gas. Observations of H2O line emission from low-mass protostars and their associated outflows performed with HIFI onboard the Herschel Space Observatory have highlighted the complexity of H2O line profiles, in which different kinematic components can be distinguished. Aims: The goal is to study the spatial distribution of H2O, in particular of the different kinematic components detected in H2O emission, at two bright shocked regions along IRAS 4A, one of the strongest H2O emitters among the Class 0 outflows. Methods: We obtained Herschel-PACS maps of the IRAS 4A outflow and HIFI observations of two shocked positions. The largest HIFI beam of 38'' at 557 GHz was mapped in several key water lines with different upper energy levels, to reveal possible spatial variations of the line profiles. A large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis was performed to determine the excitation conditions of the gas. Results: We detect four H2O lines and CO (16-15) at the two selected shocked positions. In addition, transitions from related outflow and envelope tracers are detected. Different gas components associated with the shock are identified in the H2O emission. In particular, at the head of the red lobe of the outflow, two distinct gas components with different excitation conditions are distinguished in the HIFI emission maps: a compact component, detected in the ground-state water lines, and a more extended one. Assuming that these two components correspond to two different temperature components observed in previous H2O and CO studies, the LVG analysis of the H2O emission suggests that the compact (about 3'', corresponding to about 700 AU) component is associated with a hot (T ~ 1000 K) gas with densities nH2 ~ (1-4) × 105 cm-3, whereas the extended (10''-17'', corresponding to 2400-4000 AU) one traces a warm (T ~ 300

  15. Massive ascites of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Massive ascites of unknown origin is an uncommon condition, which represent a diagnostic challenge. Patients with delayed diagnosis and treatment may have a poor prognosis. A 22-year-old female was referred to this hospital due to a 4-year progressive abdominal distension with massive ascites of unknown origin. By thorough investigations, she was eventually diagnosed as chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. She received pericardiectomy and had an uneventful postoperative course. With a few day paracentesis, ascites did not progress any more. She was doing well at 5-month follow-up and has returned to work. Extracardiac manifestations, such as massive ascites and liver cirrhosis, were rare in patients with constrictive pericarditis. Pericardiectomy can be a radical solution for the treatment of chronic constrictive pericarditis. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, physicians have to bear in mind this rare manifestation of chronic calcified constrictive pericarditis. PMID:24600502

  16. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  17. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  18. Protostellar accretion traced with chemistry. Comparing synthetic C18O maps of embedded protostars to real observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimann, S.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Padoan, P.; Haugbølle, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Understanding how protostars accrete their mass is a central question of star formation. One aspect of this is trying to understand whether the time evolution of accretion rates in deeply embedded objects is best characterised by a smooth decline from early to late stages or by intermittent bursts of high accretion. Aims: We create synthetic observations of deeply embedded protostars in a large numerical simulation of a molecular cloud, which are compared directly to real observations. The goal is to compare episodic accretion events in the simulation to observations and to test the methodology used for analysing the observations. Methods: Simple freeze-out and sublimation chemistry is added to the simulation, and synthetic C18O line cubes are created for a large number of simulated protostars. The spatial extent of C18O is measured for the simulated protostars and compared directly to a sample of 16 deeply embedded protostars observed with the Submillimeter Array. If CO is distributed over a larger area than predicted based on the protostellar luminosity, it may indicate that the luminosity has been higher in the past and that CO is still in the process of refreezing. Results: Approximately 1% of the protostars in the simulation show extended C18O emission, as opposed to approximately 50% in the observations, indicating that the magnitude and frequency of episodic accretion events in the simulation is too low relative to observations. The protostellar accretion rates in the simulation are primarily modulated by infall from the larger scales of the molecular cloud, and do not include any disk physics. The discrepancy between simulation and observations is taken as support for the necessity of disks, even in deeply embedded objects, to produce episodic accretion events of sufficient frequency and amplitude.

  19. Population synthesis of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, Dany

    2014-09-01

    This review deals with massive star population synthesis with a realistic population of binaries. We focus on the comparison between observed star numbers (as a function of metallicity) and theoretically predicted numbers of stellar populations in regions of continuous star formation and in starburst regions. Special attention is given to the O-type/WR/red supergiant stellar population, the population of blue supergiants, the pulsar and binary pulsar population, and the supernova rates. Finally, we consider massive double compact star mergers and the link with gravitational wave sources (the advanced LIGO II) and r-process element production sites.

  20. Sedeonic Equations of Massive Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Sergey V.; Mironov, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work on space-time sedeon algebra models relativistic quantum mechanical equation of motion with corresponding field equations, mediated by massive or massless spin-1 or spin-1/2 particles. In the massless spin-1 case, such exchange particles mediate fields in analogy to Maxwell's equations in Lorentz gauge. This paper demonstrates fundamental aspects of massive field's theory, such as gauge invariance, charge conservation, Poynting's theorem, potential of a stationary scalar point source, plane wave solution, and interaction between point sources. We briefly discuss some aspects of sedeonic algebra and their potential physical applications.

  1. Massive Gravitons on Bohmian Congruences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Mohsen; Mohseni, Morteza

    2016-08-01

    Taking a quantum corrected form of Raychaudhuri equation in a geometric background described by a Lorentz-violating massive theory of gravity, we go through investigating a time-like congruence of massive gravitons affected by a Bohmian quantum potential. We find some definite conditions upon which these gravitons are confined to diverging Bohmian trajectories. The respective behaviour of those quantum potentials are also derived and discussed. Additionally, and through a relativistic quantum treatment of a typical wave function, we demonstrate schematic conditions on the associated frequency to the gravitons, in order to satisfy the necessity of divergence.

  2. Effects of a new 3-alpha reaction on the s-process in massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuch, Yukihiro; Ono, Masaomi; Matsuo, Yasuhide; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro

    2012-11-12

    Effect of a new 3-alpha reaction rate on the s-process during the evolution of a massive star of 25 solar mass is investigated for the first time, because the s-process in massive stars have been believed to be established with only minor change. We find that the s-process with use of the new rate during the core helium burning is very inefficient compared to the case with the previous 3-alpha rate. However, the difference of the overproduction is found to be largely compensated by the subsequent carbon burning. Since the s-process in massive stars has been attributed so far to the neutron irradiation during core helium burning, our finding reveals for the first time the importance of the carbon burning for the s-process during the evolution of massive stars.

  3. Little Massive Substructure in CMZ Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, J.; Pillai, T.; Zhang, Q.; Menten, K. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lu, X.; Guzman, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ; inner ˜100pc) hosts some of the most dense and massive molecular clouds of the Milky Way. Studying these clouds can potentially lead to a better understanding of the dense clouds seen in the central starburst regions in nearby galaxies or in the early universe. The clouds share an unusual feature: they form stars at an unusually slow rate compared to other Milky Way clouds of similar mass and density. Here we use interferometer data from ALMA and the SMA to show that this reduced star formation rate is a consequence of the cloud density structure: CMZ clouds have unusually flat density slopes. The clouds do, for example, exceed the average density of the Orion A molecular cloud by an order of magnitude on spatial scales ˜5 pc, but the cores of CMZ clouds with ˜0.1 pc radius often have masses and densities lower than what is found in the Orion KL region. This relative absence of highest-density gas probably explains the suppression of star formation. The clouds are relatively turbulent, and ALMA observations of H2CO and SiO indicate that the turbulence is induced by high-velocity shocks. We speculate that these shocks might prevent the formation of high-mass cores.

  4. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  5. The Embedded Phase of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, Floris

    2000-11-01

    This thesis studies the physical and chemical structure of a set of massive young stars which are surrounded by a thick envelope of dust and gas, the earliest known phase of massive star formation. The primary scientific questions addressed are: (i) What is the evolutionary order of the phenomena associated with massive star formation? (ii) What is the physical and chemical structure of the envelopes of massive young stars? How do they compare to those of low-mass stars? Do specific molecules trace different stages? (iii) What are the masses of any circumstellar disks, and on what time scales are they dispersed? To answer these questions, a sample of infrared and submillimeter sources has been selected on high luminosity, close distance, isolated location and high mid-infrared flux. We present observations of these sources with single-dish submillimeter antennas, millimeter interferometers and near-infrared spectroscopy, and also discuss ISO spectra. For the interpretation, we have developed models with a detailed physical structure, combined with chemical differentiation, which is strongly coupled to the temperature. Some of the conclusions are: The envelopes of massive young stars are well described by centrally heated spherical models, with masses of ~ 100-1000 Modot within radii of ~0.1 pc. For a power-law density structure n(r) = n0 (r / r0)-α, we find α = 1.0-1.5 for the younger sources, significantly lower than α ≅ 2 found for the envelopes of low-mass stars at a comparable stage of evolution. This difference may indicate that the support against gravitational collapse in high-mass cores is by nonthermal (e.g., turbulent) pressure, and in low-mass cores by thermal pressure. For the more evolved sources, α = 1.5-2.0 fits the data best. Unlike in low-mass star formation, the near-infrared emission decreases as the envelope warms up, indicates that the hot dust close to the star is destroyed and/or pushed out by stellar radiation or mass loss. The

  6. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  7. Massively parallel visualization: Parallel rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.D.; Krogh, M.; White, W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume renderer use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  8. Dark matter in massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin

    2013-07-01

    The spatial distributions of luminous and dark matter in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) reflect the formation processes which shaped these systems. This article reviews the predictions of cosmological simulations for the dark and baryonic components of ETGs, and the observational constraints from lensing, hydrostatic X-ray gas atmospheres, and outer halo stellar dynamics.

  9. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Pastakia, B.; Weiss, S.H.

    1987-11-01

    Gallium uptake corresponding to the extent of the disease in a patient with histologically proven sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) is reported. Computerized tomography confirmed the presence of bilateral retrobulbar masses, involvement of both lateral recti, erosion of the bony orbital floor with encroachment of tumor into the right maxillary antrum, and retropharyngeal involvement.

  10. Understanding massively open online courses.

    PubMed

    Billings, Diane M

    2014-02-01

    Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are an innovative delivery system for educational offerings. MOOCs have been hailed with optimism for making education accessible to many, but at the same time, they have been criticized for poor participant completion rates. Nurse educators are considering whether and how to use MOOCs; this column explains MOOCs and their advantages and disadvantages for nurse educators. PMID:24494660

  11. The Kinematics of Molecular Cloud Cores in the Presence of Driven and Decaying Turbulence: Comparisons with Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, S R; Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2008-04-18

    In this study we investigate the formation and properties of prestellar and protostellar cores using hydrodynamic, self-gravitating Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, comparing the cases where turbulence is continually driven and where it is allowed to decay. We model observations of these cores in the C{sup 18}O(2 {yields} 1), NH{sub 3}(1,1), and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1 {yields} 0) lines, and from the simulated observations we measure the linewidths of individual cores, the linewidths of the surrounding gas, and the motions of the cores relative to one another. Some of these distributions are significantly different in the driven and decaying runs, making them potential diagnostics for determining whether the turbulence in observed star-forming clouds is driven or decaying. Comparing our simulations with observed cores in the Perseus and {rho} Ophiuchus clouds shows reasonably good agreement between the observed and simulated core-to-core velocity dispersions for both the driven and decaying cases. However, we find that the linewidths through protostellar cores in both simulations are too large compared to the observations. The disagreement is noticeably worse for the decaying simulation, in which cores show highly supersonic infall signatures in their centers that decrease toward their edges, a pattern not seen in the observed regions. This result gives some support to the use of driven turbulence for modeling regions of star formation, but reaching a firm conclusion on the relative merits of driven or decaying turbulence will require more complete data on a larger sample of clouds as well as simulations that include magnetic fields, outflows, and thermal feedback from the protostars.

  12. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. THE FORMATION OF MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS IN THE PRESENCE OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J.

    2013-07-20

    Population III stars forming in the infant universe at z = 30 heralded the end of the cosmic dark ages. They are presumed to be assembled in the so-called minihalos with virial temperatures of a few thousand K where collapse is triggered by molecular hydrogen cooling. A central question concerns their final masses, and whether fragmentation occurs during their formation. While studies employing Lagrangian codes suggest fragmentation via a self-gravitating disk, recent high-resolution simulations indicated that disk formation is suppressed. Here we report the first high-resolution large-eddy simulations performed with the Eulerian grid-based code Enzo following the evolution beyond the formation of the first peak to investigate the accretion of the central massive clump and potential fragmentation. For a total of three halos, we see that a disk forms around the first clump. The central clump reaches {approx}10 solar masses after 40 yr, while subsequent accretion is expected at a rate of 10{sup -2} solar masses per year. In one of these halos, additional clumps form as a result of fragmentation which proceeds at larger scales. We note that subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence yields relevant contributions to the stability of the protostellar disks. Both with and without the SGS model, the disk evolution appears rather stable during the timescale considered here. We conclude that the first protostar may reach masses up to 40-100 M{sub Sun }, which are only limited by the effect of radiative feedback.

  14. Planck Cold Clumps in the λ Orionis Complex. I. Discovery of an Extremely Young Class 0 Protostellar Object and a Proto-brown Dwarf Candidate in the Bright-rimmed Clump PGCC G192.32-11.88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Zhang, Qizhou; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wu, Yuefang; Lee, Chang Won; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Choi, Minho; Juvela, Mika; Thompson, Mark; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Liu, Sheng-yuan; Naomi, Hirano; Koch, Patrick; Henkel, Christian; Sanhueza, Patricio; He, JinHua; Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Wang, Ke; Cunningham, Maria R.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Lai, Shih-Ping; Yuan, Jinghua; Li, Di; Fuller, Gary; Kang, Miju; Nguyen Luong, Quang; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Yang, Ji; Xu, Ye; Hirota, Tomoya; Mardones, Diego; Qin, Sheng-Li; Chen, Huei-Ru; Kwon, Woojin; Meng, FanYi; Zhang, Huawei; Kim, Mi-Ryang; Yi, Hee-Weon

    2016-01-01

    We are performing a series of observations with ground-based telescopes toward Planck Galactic cold clumps (PGCCs) in the λ Orionis complex in order to systematically investigate the effects of stellar feedback. In the particular case of PGCC G192.32-11.88, we discovered an extremely young Class 0 protostellar object (G192N) and a proto-brown dwarf candidate (G192S). G192N and G192S are located in a gravitationally bound bright-rimmed clump. The velocity and temperature gradients seen in line emission of CO isotopologues indicate that PGCC G192.32-11.88 is externally heated and compressed. G192N probably has the lowest bolometric luminosity (˜0.8 {L}⊙ ) and accretion rate (6.3 × 10-7 {M}⊙ yr-1) when compared with other young Class 0 sources (e.g., PACS Bright Red Sources) in the Orion complex. It has slightly larger internal luminosity (0.21 ± 0.01 {L}⊙ ) and outflow velocity (˜14 km s-1) than the predictions of first hydrostatic cores (FHSCs). G192N might be among the youngest Class 0 sources, which are slightly more evolved than an FHSC. Considering its low internal luminosity (0.08 ± 0.01 {L}⊙ ) and accretion rate (2.8 × 10-8 {M}⊙ yr-1), G192S is an ideal proto-brown dwarf candidate. The star formation efficiency (˜0.3%-0.4%) and core formation efficiency (˜1%) in PGCC G192.32-11.88 are significantly smaller than in other giant molecular clouds or filaments, indicating that the star formation therein is greatly suppressed owing to stellar feedback.

  15. Water formation in early solar nebula: II-Collapsing cloud core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, C.; Gast, P.; Motschmann, U.; Kupper, S.; Kührt, E.; Pelivan, I.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of water is a repetitive process and depends on the physical conditions in the different stages of the solar nebula and early solar system. Our solar nebula model considers the thermal and chemical evolution of a collapsing globular cloud core. We simulate the collapse with a semi-analytical model which is based on a multi-zone density distribution. This model describes the formation of a central protostellar object surrounded by a disk and a thin outer envelope. It considers an adiabatic equation of state, viscous gas flow and a resistive magnetic field. Due to the low temperatures in the hydrostatic stage of the core, icy layers of water mixed with other molecules build on the dust grains. In the course of the collapse the ice sublimates and drives a complex chemical evolution located in a warm region around the proto-stellar object called hot corino. Moreover, the relatively high temperatures in this region allow the gas phase formation of water together with other molecules. The abundances of the chemical compounds are computed from rate equations solved in a Lagrangian grid. We can show that there was high water density in the early and late accretion zone of the Earth. This water was sublimated from the dust or formed by hot neutral reactions in the gas phase. Thus, according to our collapse model, there were two sources delivering the water incorporated into the Earth.

  16. New Frontiers in Stellar Astrophysics: Massive Stars as Cosmological Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars are crucial building blocks in the study of star-forming galaxies, stellar evolution, and transient events, and their applications as fundamental astrophysical tools span a broad range of subfields. Unfortunately, many key traits of massive stars - from their physical properties and ionizing radiation to their evolution and core-collapse deaths - remain poorly understood. I will discuss several current research programs focused on developing a comprehensive picture of massive stars across the cosmos. These include observational surveys and population synthesis models of star-forming galaxies; progenitor and host environment studies of transient phenomena such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts; and the remarkable reach of extragalactic stellar observations, which recently led to the discovery of the first Thorne-Zytkow object candidate. With cutting-edge theoretical models and the capabilities of current ground-based and orbital observatories, we are ideally poised to make substantial progress in our understanding of massive stars over the coming decade. This in turn will equip us with the tools we need to take full advantage of the frontiers opened up by new observational facilities such as JWST, the ELTs, and LSST, allowing us to immediately begin probing the new corners of the universe that they reveal.

  17. Late stages of massive star evolution and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars in the mass range of 8 to 25 M solar mass is reviewed. The effect of electron degeneracy on the gravothermal nature of stars is discussed. Depending on the stellar mass, the stars form three types of cores, namely, non-degenerate, semi-degenerate, and strongly degenerate cores. The evolution for these cases is quite distinct from each other and leads to the three different types of final fate. It is suggested that our helium star model, which is equivalent to a 25 M solar mass star, will form a relatively small mass iron core despite the faster /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O reaction. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  18. Evidence for a solar system-size accretion disk around the massive protostar G192.16-3.82.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, D S; Claussen, M J; Kurtz, S E

    2001-05-25

    Seven-millimeter continuum observations of a massive bipolar outflow source, G192.16-3.82, were made at a milli-arc-second resolution with a capability that links the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array radio interferometer with the Very Long Baseline Array antenna, located in Pie Town, New Mexico. The observations provide evidence for a true accretion disk that is about the size of our solar system and located around a massive star. A model of the radio emission suggests the presence of a binary protostellar system. The primary protostar, G192 S1, at the center of the outflow, with a protostar mass of about 8 to 10 times the solar mass, is surrounded by an accretion disk with a diameter of 130 astronomical units (AU). The mass of the disk is on the order of the protostar mass. The outflow is poorly collimated with a full opening angle of about 40 degrees; there is no indication of a more highly collimated jetlike component. The companion source, G192 S2, is located 80 AU north of the primary source. PMID:11375484

  19. Angular Momentum Fluctuations in the Convective Helium Shell of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkis, Avishai; Soker, Noam

    2016-08-01

    We find significant fluctuations of angular momentum within the convective helium shell of a pre-collapse massive star—a core-collapse supernova progenitor—that may facilitate the formation of accretion disks and jets that can explode the star. The convective flow in our model of an evolved {M}{ZAMS}=15{M}ȯ star, computed using the subsonic hydrodynamic solver MAESTRO, contains entire shells with net angular momentum in different directions. This phenomenon may have important implications for the late evolutionary stages of massive stars and for the dynamics of core collapse.

  20. A full virial analysis of the prestellar cores in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattle, Kate; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2015-08-01

    We present the first observations of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud performed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We demonstrate methods for combining these data with HARP CO, Herschel and IRAM N2H+ observations in order to accurately quantify the properties of the SCUBA-2 sources in Ophiuchus.We perform a full virial analysis on the starless cores in Ophiuchus, including external pressure. We find that the majority of our cores are either bound or virialised, and that gravity and external pressure are typically of similar importance in confining cores. We find that the critical Bonnor-Ebert stability criterion is not a good indicator of the boundedness of our cores. We determine that N2H+ is a good tracer of the bound material of prestellar cores, and find that non-thermal linewidths decrease substantially between the intermediate-density gas traced by C18O and the high-density gas traced by N2H+, indicating the dissipation of turbulence within cores.We find variation from region to region in the virial balance of cores and the relative contributions of pressure and gravity to core support, as well as variation in the degree to which turbulence is dissipated within cores and in the relative numbers of protostellar and starless sources. We find further support for our previous hypothesis of a global evolutionary gradient from southwest to northeast across Ophiuchus, indicating sequential star formation across the region.

  1. Revolutionizing our View of Protostellar Multiplicity and Disks: The VLA Nascent Disk and Multiplicity (VANDAM) Survey of the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, J. J.; Looney, L. W.; Li, Z.-Y.; Chandler, C. J.; Dunham, M. M.; Segura-Cox, D.; Cox, E. G.; Harris, R. J.; Melis, C.; Sadavoy, S. I.; Pérez, L.; Kratter, K.

    2016-05-01

    There is substantial evidence for disk formation taking place during the early stages of star formation and for most stars being born in multiple systems; however, protostellar multiplicity and disk searches have been hampered by low resolution, sample bias, and variable sensitivity. We have conducted an unbiased, high-sensitivity Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) survey toward all known protostars (n = 94) in the Perseus molecular cloud (d ˜ 230 pc), with a resolution of ˜ 15 AU (0.06'') at λ = 8 mm. We have detected candidate protostellar disks toward 17 sources (with 12 of those in the Class 0 stage) and we have found substructure on < 50 AU scales for three Class 0 disk candidates, possibly evidence for disk fragmentation. We have discovered 16 new multiple systems (or new components) in this survey; the new systems have separations < 500 AU and 3 by < 30 AU. We also found a bi-modal distribution of separations, with peaks at ˜ 75 AU and ˜ 3000 AU, suggestive of formation through two distinct mechanisms: disk and turbulent fragmentation. The results from this survey demonstrate the necessity and utility of uniform, unbiased surveys of protostellar systems at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths.

  2. Chiral description of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Krasnov, Kirill; Speziale, Simone

    2013-06-01

    We propose and study a new first order version of the ghost-free massive gravity. Instead of metrics or tetrads, it uses a connection together with Plebanski's chiral 2-forms as fundamental variables, rendering the phase space structure similar to that of SU(2) gauge theories. The chiral description simplifies computations of the constraint algebra, and allows us to perform the complete canonical analysis of the system. In particular, we explicitly compute the secondary constraint and carry out the stabilization procedure, thus proving that in general the theory propagates 7 degrees of freedom, consistently with previous claims. Finally, we point out that the description in terms of 2-forms opens the door to an infinite class of ghost-free massive bi-gravity actions. Our results apply directly to Euclidean signature. The reality conditions to be imposed in the Lorentzian signature appear to be more complicated than in the usual gravity case and are left as an open issue.

  3. A CANDIDATE DETECTION OF THE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Harvey, Paul; Dunham, Michael M.; Schnee, Scott

    2010-10-10

    The first hydrostatic core (FHSC) represents a very early phase in the low-mass star formation process, after collapse of the parent core has begun but before a true protostar has formed. This large (few AU), cool (100 K), pressure-supported core of molecular hydrogen is expected from theory, but has yet to be observationally verified. Here, we present observations of an excellent candidate for the FHSC phase: Per-Bolo 58, a dense core in Perseus that was previously believed to be starless. The 70 {mu}m flux of 65 mJy, from new deep Spitzer MIPS observations, is consistent with that expected for the FHSC. A low signal-to-noise detection at 24 {mu}m leaves open the possibility that Per-Bolo 58 could be a very low luminosity protostar, however. We utilize radiative transfer models to determine the best-fitting FHSC and protostar models to the spectral energy distribution and 2.9 mm visibilities of Per-Bolo 58. The source is consistent with an FHSC with some source of lower opacity through the envelope allowing 24 {mu}m emission to escape; a small outflow cavity and a cavity in the envelope are both possible. While we are unable to rule out the presence of a protostar, if present it would be one of the lowest luminosity protostellar objects yet observed, with an internal luminosity of {approx}0.01 L {sub sun}.

  4. Massive gravity on a brane

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Graesser, M.L.; Grojean, C.; Pilo, L.

    2003-12-11

    At present no theory of a massive graviton is known that is consistent with experiments at both long and short distances. The problem is that consistency with long distance experiments requires the graviton mass to be very small. Such a small graviton mass however implies an ultraviolet cutoff for the theory at length scales far larger than the millimeter scale at which gravity has already been measured. In this paper we attempt to construct a model which avoids this problem. We consider a brane world setup in warped AdS spacetime and we investigate the consequences of writing a mass term for the graviton on a the infrared brane where the local cutoff is of order a large (galactic) distance scale. The advantage of this setup is that the low cutoff for physics on the infrared brane does not significantly affect the predictivity of the theory for observers localized on the ultraviolet brane. For such observers the predictions of this theory agree with general relativity at distances smaller than the infrared scale but go over to those of a theory of massive gravity at longer distances. A careful analysis of the graviton two-point function, however, reveals the presence of a ghost in the low energy spectrum. A mode decomposition of the higher dimensional theory reveals that the ghost corresponds to the radion field. We also investigate the theory with a brane localized mass for the graviton on the ultraviolet brane, and show that the physics of this case is similar to that of a conventional four dimensional theory with a massive graviton, but with one important difference: when the infrared brane decouples and the would-be massive graviton gets heavier than the regular Kaluza-Klein modes, it becomes unstable and it has a finite width to decay off the brane into the continuum of Kaluza-Klein states.

  5. Efficient, massively parallel eigenvalue computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Yan; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    In numerical simulations of disordered electronic systems, one of the most common approaches is to diagonalize random Hamiltonian matrices and to study the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of a single electron in the presence of a random potential. An effort to implement a matrix diagonalization routine for real symmetric dense matrices on massively parallel SIMD computers, the Maspar MP-1 and MP-2 systems, is described. Results of numerical tests and timings are also presented.

  6. Analytics for Massive Heat Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Shawn J.; Payne, Deborah A.; Nakamura, Grant C.; Love, Douglas V.

    2009-01-19

    High throughput instrumentation for genomics is producing data orders of magnitude greater than even a decade before. Biologists often visualize the data of these experiments through the use of heat maps. For large datasets, heat map visualizations do not scale. These visualizations are only capable of displaying a portion of the data, making it difficult for scientists to find and detect patterns that span more than a subsection of the data. We present a novel method that provides an interactive visual display for massive heat maps [O(108)]. Our process shows how a massive heat map can be decomposed into multiple levels of abstraction to represent the underlying macrostructures. We aggregate these abstractions into a framework that can allow real-time navigation of the space. To further assist pattern discovery, we ground our system on the principle of focus+context. Our framework also addresses the issue of balancing the memory and display resolution and heat map size. We will show that this technique for biologists provides a powerful new visual metaphor for analyzing massive datasets.

  7. Massive photon and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwn, Seyen; Oh, Phillial; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the cosmology of massive electrodynamics and explore the possibility whether the massive photon could provide an explanation of dark energy. The action is given by the scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravity, which is obtained by nonminimal coupling of the massive Stueckelberg QED with gravity; its cosmological consequences are studied by paying particular attention to the role of photon mass. We find that the theory allows for cosmological evolution where the radiation- and matter-dominated epochs are followed by a long period of virtually constant dark energy that closely mimics a Λ CDM model. We also find that the main source of the current acceleration is provided by the nonvanishing photon mass governed by the relation Λ ˜m2 . A detailed numerical analysis shows that the nonvanishing photon mass on the order of ˜1 0-34 eV is consistent with current observations. This magnitude is far less than the most stringent limit on the photon mass available so far, which is on the order of m ≤1 0-27 eV .

  8. Analytics for massive heat maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Shawn J.; Payne, Deborah; Nakamura, Grant; Love, Douglass

    2009-01-01

    High throughput instrumentation for genomics is producing data orders of magnitude greater than even a decade before. Biologists often visualize the data of these experiments through the use of heat maps. For large datasets, heat map visualizations do not scale. These visualizations are only capable of displaying a portion of the data, making it difficult for scientists to find and detect patterns that span more than a subsection of the data. We present a novel method that provides an interactive visual display for massive heat maps [O(108)]. Our process shows how a massive heat map can be decomposed into multiple levels of abstraction to represent the underlying macrostructures. We aggregate these abstractions into a framework that can allow near real-time navigation of the space. To further assist pattern discovery, we ground our system on the principle of focus+context. Our framework also addresses the issue of balancing the memory and display resolution and heat map size. We will show that this technique for biologists provides a powerful new visual metaphor for analyzing massive datasets.

  9. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  10. FROM DUSTY FILAMENTS TO MASSIVE STARS: THE CASE OF NGC 7538 S

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo-Romero, Raul; Zapata, Luis A.; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Takahashi, Satoko; Palau, Aina; Schilke, Peter

    2012-09-20

    We report on high-sensitivity and high angular resolution archival Submillimeter Array observations of the large ({approx}15,000 AU) putative circumstellar disk associated with the O-type protostar NGC 7538 S. Observations of the continuum resolve this putative circumstellar disk into five compact sources, with sizes {approx}3000 AU and masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }. This confirms the results of recent millimeter observations made with CARMA/BIMA toward this object. However, we find that most of these compact sources eject collimated bipolar outflows, revealed by our silicon monoxide (SiO J = 5-4) observations, and confirm that these sources have a (proto)stellar nature. All outflows are perpendicular to the large and rotating dusty structure. We propose therefore that, rather than being a single massive circumstellar disk, NGC 7538 S could instead be a large and massive contracting or rotating filament that is fragmenting at scales of 0.1-0.01 pc to form several B-type stars, via the standard process involving outflows and disks. As in recent high spatial resolution studies of dusty filaments, our observations also suggest that thermal pressure does not seem to be sufficient to support the filament, so that either additional support needs to be invoked or else the filament must be in the process of collapsing. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulation of the formation of a molecular cloud by converging warm neutral medium flows produces contracting filaments whose dimensions and spacings between the stars forming within them, as well as their column densities, strongly resemble those observed in the filament reported here.

  11. A Hot and Massive Accretion Disk around the High-mass Protostar IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou; Sridharan, T. K.; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Su, Yu-Nung

    2016-06-01

    We present new spectral line observations of the CH3CN molecule in the accretion disk around the massive protostar IRAS 20126+4104 with the Submillimeter Array, which, for the first time, measure the disk density, temperature, and rotational velocity with sufficient resolution (0.″37, equivalent to ∼600 au) to assess the gravitational stability of the disk through the Toomre-Q parameter. Our observations resolve the central 2000 au region that shows steeper velocity gradients with increasing upper state energy, indicating an increase in the rotational velocity of the hotter gas nearer the star. Such spin-up motions are characteristics of an accretion flow in a rotationally supported disk. We compare the observed data with synthetic image cubes produced by three-dimensional radiative transfer models describing a thin flared disk in Keplerian motion enveloped within the centrifugal radius of an angular-momentum-conserving accretion flow. Given a luminosity of 1.3 × 104 L ⊙, the optimized model gives a disk mass of 1.5 M ⊙ and a radius of 858 au rotating about a 12.0 M ⊙ protostar with a disk mass accretion rate of 3.9 × 10‑5 M ⊙ yr‑1. Our study finds that, in contrast to some theoretical expectations, the disk is hot and stable to fragmentation with Q > 2.8 at all radii which permits a smooth accretion flow. These results put forward the first constraints on gravitational instabilities in massive protostellar disks, which are closely connected to the formation of companion stars and planetary systems by fragmentation.

  12. THE BLAST SURVEY OF THE VELA MOLECULAR CLOUD: DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE DENSE CORES IN VELA-D

    SciTech Connect

    Olmi, Luca; Angles-Alcazar, Daniel; De Luca, Massimo; Elia, Davide; Giannini, Teresa; Lorenzetti, Dario; Massi, Fabrizio; Martin, Peter G.; Strafella, Francesco E-mail: olmi@arcetri.astro.i

    2010-11-10

    The Vela-D region, according to the nomenclature given by Murphy and May, of the star-forming complex known as the Vela molecular ridge (VMR), has recently been analyzed in detail by Olmi, who studied the physical properties of 141 pre- and proto-stellar cold dust cores, detected by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) during a much larger (55 deg{sup 2}) Galactic plane survey encompassing the whole VMR. This survey's primary goal was to identify the coldest dense dust cores possibly associated with the earliest phases of star formation. In this work, the dynamical state of the Vela-D cores is analyzed. Comparison to dynamical masses of a sub-sample of the Vela-D cores estimated from the {sup 13}CO survey of Elia is complicated by the fact that the {sup 13}CO linewidths are likely to trace the lower density intercore material, in addition to the dense gas associated with the compact cores observed by BLAST. In fact, the total internal pressure of these cores, if estimated using the {sup 13}CO linewidths, appears to be higher than the cloud ambient pressure. If this were the case, then self-gravity and surface pressure would be insufficient to bind these cores and an additional source of external confinement (e.g., magnetic field pressure) would be required. However, if one attempts to scale down the {sup 13}CO linewidths, according to the observations of high-density tracers in a small sample of sources, then most proto-stellar cores would be effectively gravitationally bound.

  13. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  14. Models for supernova progenitors in massive binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung Chul

    2014-09-01

    The diversity of core-collapse supernovae is closely related to binary interactions. For example, the majority of Type Ib/c and Type IIb supernovae may occur in massive binary systems as a result of mass transfer at various evolutionary stages. I will present some evolutionary models of massive binary stars including several important physical ingredients, like tidal interactions and mass and angular momentum exchange, and discuss their implications for supernova progenitors and their populations. I will particularly emphasize that Type Ib/c supernova progenitors at their pre-supernova stage should have very different properties compared to the observed Wolf-Rayet stars, which are widely believed to represent SN Ibc progenitors, and that many observed properties of SNe Ib/c and IIb can be explained well with the binary scenario.

  15. UH cosmic rays: Possible origin in massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.; Schramm, D. N.; Blake, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The origin of the Z greater than 28, ultraheavy, cosmic rays in supernova explosions of massive stars is considered. For Z greater than 70, the UH data is dominated by an r-process source distribution, but for the elements just beyond iron, 29 or = Z less than 36, the data cannot be explained by any single process of nucleosynthesis. This problem is solved naturally in a massive star model by secondary neutron capture reactions occuring during core helium burning and during explosive carbon burning. Interstellar propagation calculations were performed with these episodes of synthesis as source distributions, and the results offer an explanation for the current UH cosmic-ray data. The heavy element synthesis during explosive carbon burning is reexamined using more realistic initial conditions given by the post-helium-burning configuration of the star. Effects of preferential acceleration are considered, and experimental tests are discussed.

  16. Evolution and explosion of the most massive asymptotic giant branch star

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2014-05-02

    The most massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can form a critical mass of ONe core at its center. The collapse of such a critical ONe core may end up as an Electron Capture Supernova (ECSN). We have accomplished a progenitor calculation for ECSN for the first time in more than two decades and have updated a pre-explosion structure for this model. Some details for ONe core formation and important mechanisms for the core contraction are shown. We discuss how the envelope mass loss affects the predicted existence of ECSN, and what physics is needed to model for a plausible structure of ECSN progenitor.

  17. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  18. SPATIALLY RESOLVING SUBSTRUCTURES WITHIN THE MASSIVE ENVELOPE AROUND AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTAR: MMS 6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saigo, Kazuya; Tomida, Kengo

    2012-06-10

    With the Submillimeter Array, the brightest (sub)millimeter continuum source in the Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3 region, MMS 6, has been observed in the 850 {mu}m continuum emission with approximately 10 times better angular resolution than previous studies ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''3, Almost-Equal-To 120 AU at Orion). The deconvolved size, the mass, and the column density of MMS 6-main are estimated to be 0.''32 Multiplication-Sign 0.''29 (132 AU Multiplication-Sign 120 AU), 0.29 M{sub Sun }, and 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The estimated extremely high mean number density, 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, suggests that MMS 6-main is likely optically thick at 850 {mu}m. We compare our observational data with three theoretical core models: prestellar core, protostellar core + disk-like structure, and first adiabatic core. These comparisons clearly show that the observational data cannot be modeled as a simple prestellar core with a gas temperature of 20 K. A self-luminous source is necessary to explain the observed flux density in the (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Our recent detection of a very compact and energetic outflow in the CO (3-2) and HCN (4-3) lines supports the presence of a protostar. We suggest that MMS 6 is one of the first cases of an intermediate-mass protostellar core at an extremely young stage. In addition to the MMS 6-main peak, we have also spatially resolved a number of spiky structures and sub-clumps, distributed over the central 1000 AU. The masses of these sub-clumps are estimated to be 0.066-0.073 M{sub Sun }, which are on the order of brown dwarf masses. Higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity observations with ALMA and EVLA will reveal the origin and nature of these structures such as whether they are originated from fragmentations, spiral arms, or inhomogeneity within the disk-like structures/envelope.

  19. An Unstable Truth: How Massive Stars get their Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-08-01

    The pressure exerted by massive stars' radiation fields is an important mechanism regulating their formation. Detailed simulation of massive star formation therefore requires an accurate treatment of radiation. However, all published simulations have either used a diffusion approximation of limited validity; have only been able to simulate a single star fixed in space, thereby suppressing potentially-important instabilities; or did not provide adequate resolution at locations where instabilities may develop. To remedy this we have developed a new, highly accurate radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities, in agreement with previous results using stars capable of moving, but in disagreement with methods where the star is held fixed or with simulations that do not adequately resolve the development of RT instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. Instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. Our results suggest that RT features should be present around accreting massive stars throughout their formation.

  20. An ALMA Search for Substructure, Fragmentation, and Hidden Protostars in Starless Cores in Chamaeleon I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Tobin, John J.; Arce, Héctor G.; Chen, Xuepeng; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Lee, Katherine I.; Myers, Philip C.; Price, Daniel; Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Schnee, Scott

    2016-06-01

    We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 106 GHz (Band 3) continuum survey of the complete population of dense cores in the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud. We detect a total of 24 continuum sources in 19 different target fields. All previously known Class 0 and Class I protostars in Chamaeleon I are detected, whereas all of the 56 starless cores in our sample are undetected. We show that the Spitzer+Herschel census of protostars in Chamaeleon I is complete, with the rate at which protostellar cores have been misclassified as starless cores calculated as <1/56, or <2%. We use synthetic observations to show that starless cores collapsing following the turbulent fragmentation scenario are detectable by our ALMA observations when their central densities exceed ∼108 cm‑3, with the exact density dependent on the viewing geometry. Bonnor–Ebert spheres, on the other hand, remain undetected to central densities at least as high as 1010 cm‑3. Our starless core non-detections are used to infer that either the star-formation rate is declining in Chamaeleon I and most of the starless cores are not collapsing, matching the findings of previous studies, or that the evolution of starless cores are more accurately described by models that develop less substructure than predicted by the turbulent fragmentation scenario, such as Bonnor–Ebert spheres. We outline future work necessary to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  1. Chemical evolution in the early phases of massive star formation. II. Deuteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, T.; Shirley, Y. L.; Beuther, H.; Semenov, D.; Linz, H.; Albertsson, T.; Henning, Th.

    2015-07-01

    The chemical evolution in high-mass star-forming regions is still poorly constrained. Studying the evolution of deuterated molecules allows distinguishing between subsequent stages of high-mass star formation regions based on the strong temperature dependence of deuterium isotopic fractionation. We observed a sample of 59 sources including 19 infrared dark clouds, 20 high-mass protostellar objects, 11 hot molecular cores and 9 ultra-compact Hii regions in the (3-2) transitions of the four deuterated molecules, DCN, DNC, DCO+, and N2D+ as well as their non-deuterated counterparts. The overall detection fraction of DCN, DNC, and DCO+ is high and exceeds 50% for most of the stages. N2D+ was only detected in a few infrared dark clouds and high-mass protostellar objects. This may be related to problems in the bandpass at the transition frequency and to low abundances in the more evolved, warmer stages. We find median D/H ratios of 0.02 for DCN, 0.005 for DNC, 0.0025 for DCO+, and 0.02 for N2D+. While the D/H ratios of DNC, DCO+, and N2D+ decrease with time, DCN/HCN peaks at the hot molecular core stage. We only found weak correlations of the D/H ratios for N2D+ with the luminosity of the central source and the FWHM of the line, and no correlation with the H2 column density. In combination with a previously observed set of 14 other molecules (Paper I), we fitted the calculated column densities with an elaborate 1D physico-chemical model with time-dependent D-chemistry including ortho- and para-H2 states. Good overall fits to the observed data were obtained with the model. This is one of the first times that observations and modeling were combined to derive chemically based best-fit models for the evolution of high-mass star formation including deuteration. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. A distance-limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Moore, T. J. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Hoare, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions drawn from the Red MSX source survey in the J = 3-2 transition of 12CO and 13CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 per cent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic time-scale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation, we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force, with massive stars up to ˜30 M⊙ generating outflows. Taken at face value, the results support the model of a scaled-up version of the accretion-related outflow-generation mechanism associated with discs and jets in low-mass objects with time-averaged accretion rates of ˜10-3 M⊙ yr-1 on to the cores. However, we also suggest an alternative model, in which the molecular outflow dynamics are dominated by the entrained mass and are unrelated to the details of the acceleration mechanism. We find no evidence that outflows contribute significantly to the turbulent kinetic energy of the surrounding dense cores.

  3. SPITZER AND NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF A NEW BIPOLAR PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW IN THE ROSETTE MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Fleming, Scott W.; Balog, Zoltan; Phelps, Randy L.

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss Spitzer and near-infrared H{sub 2} observations of a new bipolar protostellar outflow in the Rosette Molecular Cloud. The outflow is seen in all four InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) bands and partially as diffuse emission in the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. An embedded MIPS 24 {mu}m source bisects the outflow and appears to be the driving source. This source is coincident with a dark patch seen in absorption in the 8 {mu}m IRAC image. Spitzer IRAC color analysis of the shocked emission was performed from which thermal and column density maps of the outflow were constructed. Narrowband near-infrared (NIR) images of the flow reveal H{sub 2} emission features coincident with the high temperature regions of the outflow. This outflow has now been given the designation MHO 1321 due to the detection of NIR H{sub 2} features. We use these data and maps to probe the physical conditions and structure of the flow.

  4. Near-infrared multiwavelength imaging polarimetry of the low-mass proto-stellar object HL Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, K.; Oya, S.; Pyo, T.-S.; Ishii, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present the {JHK}-band high-resolution polarimetric images of the low-mass proto-stellar object HL Tau using the adaptive optics-equipped CIAO instrument on the Subaru telescope. Our polarization images show a butterfly-shaped polarization disk with an ˜0.9 arcsec × 3.0 arcsec extension. In the nebula, where polarization vectors are centro-symmetrically aligned, the polarization is as high as PJ ˜30%, P_H˜42%, and PK ˜55%. On the other hand, low polarizations of P<3% in the J, H, and K bands and a low color excess ratio of EJ-H/EH-K=1.1 compared to the standard cloud value of 1.75 are detected towards the central star. We estimated the upper limit of the grain sizes a_max to be 0.4 μm in the nebula and ⪆0.7 μm in the line of sight towards the central star. Our high-resolution polarimetric data, which spatially resolves the polarization disk, provides us with important information about grain growth in the region close to the central star.

  5. Spontaneous Scalarization of Massive Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Fethi M.; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous scalarization is a phenomenon in certain scalar-tensor theories where large deviations from general relativity can be observed inside compact stars, while the known observational bounds can also be satisfied far away. This scenario has been investigated for massless scalars and binary neutron stars using numerical relativity, but the parameter space for such theories have been severely restricted by recent observations. Here, we present our results on the spontaneous scalarization of massive scalars. We simulate cases with different equations of state and scalar field parameters, and comment on the detectability of the scalar field effects from the gravitational wave signal.

  6. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  7. Quantum aspects of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minjoon

    2011-05-01

    We consider the effect of quantum interactions on Pauli-Fierz massive gravity. With generic graviton cubic interactions, we observe that the 1-loop counterterms do not conform to the tree level structure of Pauli-Fierz action, resulting in the reappearance of the sixth mode ghost. Then to explore the quantum effects to the full extent, we calculate the resummed graviton propagator with an arbitrary interaction and analyze its complete structure, from which a minimal condition for the absence of the ghost is obtained.

  8. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  9. Development of massively parallel quantum chemistry program SMASH

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura, Kazuya

    2015-12-31

    A massively parallel program for quantum chemistry calculations SMASH was released under the Apache License 2.0 in September 2014. The SMASH program is written in the Fortran90/95 language with MPI and OpenMP standards for parallelization. Frequently used routines, such as one- and two-electron integral calculations, are modularized to make program developments simple. The speed-up of the B3LYP energy calculation for (C{sub 150}H{sub 30}){sub 2} with the cc-pVDZ basis set (4500 basis functions) was 50,499 on 98,304 cores of the K computer.

  10. Development of massively parallel quantum chemistry program SMASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    A massively parallel program for quantum chemistry calculations SMASH was released under the Apache License 2.0 in September 2014. The SMASH program is written in the Fortran90/95 language with MPI and OpenMP standards for parallelization. Frequently used routines, such as one- and two-electron integral calculations, are modularized to make program developments simple. The speed-up of the B3LYP energy calculation for (C150H30)2 with the cc-pVDZ basis set (4500 basis functions) was 50,499 on 98,304 cores of the K computer.

  11. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION ON CORE MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2013-03-20

    Linear analysis of the formation of protostellar cores in planar magnetic interstellar clouds yields information about length scales involved in star formation. Combining these length scales with various distributions of other environmental variables (i.e., column density and mass-to-flux ratio) and applying Monte Carlo methods allow us to produce synthetic core mass functions (CMFs) for different environmental conditions. Our analysis shows that the shape of the CMF is directly dependent on the physical conditions of the cloud. Specifically, magnetic fields act to broaden the mass function and develop a high-mass tail while ambipolar diffusion will truncate this high-mass tail. In addition, we analyze the effect of small number statistics on the shape and high-mass slope of the synthetic CMFs. We find that observed CMFs are severely statistically limited, which has a profound effect on the derived slope for the high-mass tail.

  12. The Formation of Massive Stars and Star Clusters in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, C. D.

    2013-10-01

    The life cycle of stars and gas in the Milky Way illuminates and shapes our view of the universe. This cycle is driven largely by massive stars through their immense ionizing radiation, powerful winds and outflows, and explosive supernovae, yet the processes leading to their formation remain elusive. I review the status of our understanding of massive star and cluster formation, beginning with a theoretical framework outlining the varying modes proposed for the accumulation of material onto forming stars: core accretion and competitive accretion. The observable consequences of each theory and their current statuses are discussed. I then delve into the growing body of observations toward massive star and cluster forming regions, focusing on recent observations of the structure and evolution of cluster- forming regions at early stages. I conclude with an outlook for the next stages in the field of massive star formation.

  13. From Cores to Envelopes to Disks: A Multi-scale View of Magnetized Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of polarization in star forming regions have been made across many wavelengths, many size scales, and many stages of stellar evolution. One of the overarching goals of these observations has been to determine the importance of magnetic fields -- which are the cause of the polarization -- in the star formation process. We begin by describing the commissioning and the calibration of the 1.3 mm dual-polarization receiver system we built for CARMA (the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy), a radio telescope in the eastern Sierra region of California. One of the primary science drivers behind the polarization system is to observe polarized thermal emission from dust grains in the dense clumps of dust and gas where the youngest, Class 0 protostars are forming. We go on to describe the CARMA TADPOL survey -- the largest high-resolution (~1000 AU scale) survey to date of dust polarization in low-mass protostellar cores -- and discuss our main findings: (1) Magnetic fields (B-fields) on scales of ~1000 AU are not tightly aligned with protostellar outflows. Rather, the data are consistent both with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular) and where they are randomly aligned. (2) Sources with high CARMA polarization fractions have consistent B-field orientations on large scales (~20'', measured using single-dish submillimeter telescopes) and small scales (~2.5'', measured by CARMA). We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ~1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. Finally, (3) While on the whole outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. This work shows that the ~1000 AU

  14. Grain processes in massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that stars greater than 100 M(solar) exist in the Galaxy and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), however classical star formation theory predicts stellar mass limits of only approx. 60 M(solar). A protostellar accretion flow consists of inflowing gas and dust. Grains are destroyed as they are near the central protostar creating a dust shell or cocoon. Radiation pressure acting on the grain can halt the inflow of material thereby limiting the amount of mass accumulated by the protostar. We first consider rather general constraints on the initial grain to gas ratio and mass accretion rates that permit inflow. We further constrain these results by constructing a numerical model. Radiative deceleration of grains and grain destruction processes are explicitly accounted for in an iterative solution of the radiation-hydrodynamic equations. Findings seem to suggest that star formation by spherical accretion requires rather extreme preconditioning of the grain and gas environment.

  15. Solid holography and massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric response. We show that the types of response that can be consistently described within this framework is much wider than what is captured by the narrow class of models mostly considered so far.

  16. [Treatment alternatives in massive hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hinojosa, E; Murillo-Cabezas, F; Puppo-Moreno, A; Leal-Noval, S R

    2012-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in trauma patients, and is one of the most important causes in any patient following major surgery. Conventional treatment consists of volume replacement, including the transfusion of blood products, so that tissue perfusion and oxygenation may be maintained. Associated hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy is a lethal triad. This review focuses on the latest therapeutic management of massive hemorrhage. The authors advocate the use of crystalloids as per protocol (controlled volumes) in order to achieve a systolic blood pressure of 85mmHg. The administration of the three blood products (red cells, plasma, and platelets) should be on a 1:1:1 basis. Where possible, this in turn should be guided by thromboelastography performed at point of care near the patient. Coagulopathy can occur early and late. With the exception of tranexamic acid, the cost-benefit relationships of the hemostatic agents, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin complex, and recombinant F VII, are subject to discussion. PMID:22321860

  17. The French-Spanish Large Program ASAI:Chemistry along Protostellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2015-05-01

    The ASAI project addresses the important question of our chemical origin. Based on observations with the IRAM 30-m radiotelescope in Pico Veleta (Spain), it joins the efforts of nearly all specialists in Astrochemistry in Spain and France. ASAI will lead to a complete census of the gas chemical composition, including pre-biotic molecules, and its evolution along the main stages of the star formation process, from prestellar cores and protostars to protoplanetary disks. The resulting data set will remain as a reference database for astrochemists (astronomers, chemists, and theoreticians), while triggering many followup studies. It constitutes a big step forward in the understanding of molecular complexity of the infancy of our own solar system.

  18. VLA Ammonia Observations of IRAS 16253-2429: A Very Young and Low Mass Protostellar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    IRAS l6253-2429. the source of the Wasp-Waist Nebula seen in Spitzer IRAC images, is an isolated very low luminosity ("VeLLO") Class 0 protostar in the nearby rho Ophiuchi cloud. We present VLA ammonia mapping observations of the dense gas envelope feeding the central core accreting system. We find a flattened envelope perpendicular to the outflow axis, and gas cavities that appear to cradle the outflow lobes as though carved out by the flow and associated (apparently precessing) jet. Based on the NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) emission distribution, we derive the mass, velocity fields and temperature distribution for the envelope. We discuss the combined evidence for this source as possibly one of the youngest and lowest mass sources in formation yet known.

  19. The effect of external environment on the evolution of protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Lin, D. N. C.; Guedel, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Using numerical hydrodynamics simulations, we studied the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores of subsolar mass embedded into a low-density external environment. Methods: Four models with different magnitude and direction of rotation of the external environment with respect to the central core were studied and compared with an isolated model. Results: We found that the infall of matter from the external environment can significantly alter the disk properties as compared to those seen in the isolated model. Depending on the magnitude and direction of rotation of the external environment, a variety of disks can form including compact (≤200 AU) ones shrinking in size owing to infall of external matter with low angular momentum, as well as extended disks forming from infall of external matter with high angular momentum. The former are usually stable against gravitational fragmentation, while the latter are prone to fragmentation and formation of stellar systems with substellar/very-low-mass companions. In the case of a counter-rotating external environment, very compact (<5 AU) and short-lived (≲ a few 105 yr) disks can form when infalling material has low angular momentum. The most interesting case is found for the infall of counter-rotating external material with high angular momentum, leading to the formation of counter-rotating inner and outer disks separated by a deep gap at a few tens AU. The gap migrates inward owing to accretion of the inner disk onto the protostar, turns into a central hole, and finally disappears, giving way to the outer strongly gravitationally unstable disk. This model may lead to the emergence of a transient stellar system with planetary/substellar components counter-rotating with respect to that of the star.

  20. From clouds to stars. Protostellar collapse and the evolution to the pre-main sequence I. Equations and evolution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuchterl, G.; Tscharnuter, W. M.

    2003-02-01

    We present the first study of early stellar evolution with ``cloud'' initial conditions utilizing a system of equations that comprises a solar model solution. All previous studies of protostellar collapse either make numerous assumptions specifically tailored for different parts of the flow and different parts of the evolution or they do not reach the pre-main sequence phase. We calculate the pre-main sequence properties of marginally gravitationally unstable, isothermal, equilibrium ``Bonnor-Ebert'' spheres with an initial temperature of 10 K and masses of 0.05 to 10 Msun. The mass accretion rate is determined by the solution of the flow equations rather than being prescribed or neglected. In our study we determine the protostar's radii and the thermal structure together with the mass and mass accretion rate, luminosity and effective temperature during its evolution to a stellar pre-main sequence object. We calculate the time needed to accrete the final stellar masses, the corresponding mean mass accretion rates and median luminosities, and the corresponding evolutionary tracks in the theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We derive these quantities from the gas flow resulting from cloud collapse. We do not assume a value for an ``initial'' stellar radius and an ``initial'' stellar thermal structure at the ``top of the track'', the Hayashi-line or any other instant of the evolution. Instead we solve the flow equations for a cloud fragment with spherical symmetry. The system of equations we use contains the equations of stellar structure and evolution as a limiting case and has been tested by a standard solar model and by classical stellar pulsations (Wuchterl & Feuchtinger \\cite{Wuchterl1998}; Feuchtinger \\cite{Feuchtinger1999a}; Dorfi & Feuchtinger \\cite{Dorfi1999}). When dynamical accretion effects have become sufficiently small so that a comparison to existing hydrostatic stellar evolution calculations for corresponding masses can be made, young stars of 2