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Sample records for matched silicon geranium

  1. Graded Index Silicon Geranium on Lattice Matched Silicon Geranium Semiconductor Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R., Jr. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A lattice matched silicon germanium (SiGe) semiconductive alloy is formed when a {111} crystal plane of a cubic diamond structure SiGe is grown on the {0001} C-plane of a single crystalline Al2O3 substrate such that a <110> orientation of the cubic diamond structure SiGe is aligned with a <1,0,-1,0> orientation of the {0001} C-plane. A lattice match between the substrate and the SiGe is achieved by using a SiGe composition that is 0.7223 atomic percent silicon and 0.2777 atomic percent germanium. A layer of Si(1-x), ,Ge(x) is formed on the cubic diamond structure SiGe. The value of X (i) defines an atomic percent of germanium satisfying 0.2277

  2. Measurements of Thermophysical Properties of Molten Silicon and Geranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this ground base program is to measure thermophysical properties of molten/ undercooled silicon, germanium, and Si-Ge alloys using a high temperature electrostatic levitator and in clearly assessing the need of the microgravity environment to achieve the objective with higher degrees of accuracy. Silicon and germanium are two of the most important semiconductors for industrial applications: silicon is unsurpassed as a microelectronics material, occupying more than 95% of the electronics market. Si-Ge alloy is attracting keen interest for advanced electronic and optoelectronic applications in view of its variable band gap and lattice parameter depending upon its composition. Accurate thermophysical properties of these materials are very much needed in the semiconductor industry for the growth of large high quality crystals.

  3. III-V/Silicon Lattice-Matched Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.; McMahon, W.; Romero, M.; Reedy, R.; Jones, K.; Norman, A.; Duda, A.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated a monolithic III-V-on-silicon tandem solar cell in which most of the III-V layers are nearly lattice-matched to the silicon substrate. The cell includes a GaNPAs top cell, a GaP-based tunnel junction (TJ), and a diffused silicon junction formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on the silicon substrate. To accomplish this, we have developed techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

  4. Volatiles of Geranium purpureum Vill. and Geranium phaeum L.: chemotaxonomy of balkan Geranium and Erodium species (Geraniaceae).

    PubMed

    Radulović, Niko S; Dekić, Milan S

    2013-11-01

    The essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of Geranium purpureum and G. phaeum were characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses (the former for the first time in general). In total, 154 constituents were identified, accounting for 89.0-95.8% of the detected GC peak areas. The investigated essential oils consisted mainly of fatty acids and fatty-acid-derived compounds (45.4-81.3%), with hexadecanoic acid and (E)-phytol as the major components. The chemotaxonomic significance of the variations in the essential-oil composition/production of the presently and previously investigated Geranium and highly related Erodium taxa from Serbia and Macedonia was assessed by multivariate statistical analyses. The main conclusions drawn from the high chemical similarity of the two genera, visible from the obtained dendrograms and biplots, confirm the close phylogenetic relationship between the investigated Geranium and Erodium taxa, i.e., that there is no great intergeneric oil-composition variability. Changes in the composition and production of essential oils of the herein investigated taxa and 60 other randomly chosen species belonging to different plant genera were also statistically analyzed. The results put forward pro arguments for the oil-yield-oil-composition correlation hypothesis. PMID:24243613

  5. Effect of High Temperature on Extreme Substrate Acidification by Geranium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cause of sudden substrate pH decline by geranium is unknown and it may be due to high temperature and/or low P. ‘Designer Dark Red’ Geraniums were grown in two experiments and the first tested the effect of four temperatures (57/50, 64/57, 72/64 and 79/72º F day/night) on substrate acidificatio...

  6. GaNPAs Solar Cells that Can Be Lattice-Matched to Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; McMahon, W. E.; Ptak, A. J.; Kibbler, A. E.; Olson, J. M.; Kurtz, S.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Reedy, R. C.; Keyes, B. M.; Dippo, P.; Metzger, W. K.

    2003-05-01

    III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We have proposed the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct bandgaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We have demonstrated the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and shown improvements in material quality by reducing carbon and hydrogen impurities through optimization of growth conditions. We have achieved quantum efficiencies (QE) in these cells as high as 60% and PL lifetimes as high as 3.0 ns.

  7. Disk-loaded RF waveguide matching techniques applied to silicon woodpile accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ziran; England, Joel; Ng, Cho; Tantawi, Sami

    2012-12-21

    Silicon woodpile photonic crystal provides a three-dimensional dielectric waveguide system for high-gradient laser driven acceleration. The woodpile waveguide is periodically loaded in the longitudinal direction; therefore simple cross-sectional mode profile matching is not sufficient to launch the accelerating mode appropriately and will result in significant scattering loss. Hinted by the common nature of longitudinal periodicity between disk-loaded waveguide and woodpile waveguide, several coupler design schemes developed for multi-cell RF cavity are implemented in the woodpile accelerator design. Among them there are the travelling-wave match method based on S-matrix, the periodic VSWR method, and the TE-to-TM coupling iris design. This paper presents design procedures and simulation results using these methods. According to simulations, nearly 100% power transmission between SOI and woodpile waveguides with a travelling-wave match is achieved with a specially designed mode-launching coupler. Constructed by silicon rods extruding into the defect waveguide, the coupling iris provides necessary transition from TE mode to TM accelerating mode, also with negligible coupling loss.

  8. Studies of methylhexaneamine in supplements and geranium oil.

    PubMed

    Lisi, A; Hasick, N; Kazlauskas, R; Goebel, C

    2011-01-01

    A number of supplements are now available which are sold as fat burners or pre-workout boosters and contain stimulants which are banned in sport. Many contain methylhexaneamine under one of many pseudonyms including Geranamine, geranium oil or extract, or a number of chemical names such as 1,3-dimethylpentylamine. This has resulted in many athletes returning an adverse finding and having sanctions imposed. Other stimulants such as caffeine, phenpromethamine, synefrine, and phenethylamines are also to be found in supplements. This communication shows that geranium oils do not contain methylhexaneamine and that products labelled as containing geranium oil but which contain methylhexaneamine can only arise from the addition of synthetic material. Since the usual dose of methylhexaneamine is large, the drug is excreted at relatively high amounts for more than 29 h, the time for which the excretion was studied. PMID:22147493

  9. Enhancement of sparse silicon retina-based stereo matching using belief propagation and two-stage postfiltering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogler, Jürgen; Eibensteiner, Florian; Humenberger, Martin; Sulzbachner, Christoph; Gelautz, Margrit; Scharinger, Josef

    2014-07-01

    We present two improvement techniques for stereo matching algorithms using silicon retina sensors. We verify the results with ground truth data. In contrast to conventional monochrome/color cameras, silicon retina sensors deliver an asynchronous flow of events instead of common framed and discrete intensity or color images. While using this kind of sensor in a stereo setup to enable new fields of applications, it also introduces new challenges in terms of stereo image analysis. Using this type of sensor, stereo matching algorithms have to deal with sparse event data, thus, less information. This affects the quality of the achievable disparity results and renders improving the stereo matching algorithms a necessary task. For this reason, we introduce two techniques for increasing the accuracy of silicon retina stereo results, in the sense that the average distance error is reduced. The first method is an adapted belief propagation approach optimizing the initial matching cost volume, and the second is an innovative two-stage postfilter for smoothing and outlier rejection. The evaluation shows that the proposed techniques increase the accuracy of the stereo matching and constitute a useful extension for using silicon retina sensors for depth estimation.

  10. Susceptibility of Geranium Cultivars (Pelargonium spp.) to Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty-one cultivars of geraniums including zonal, regal, ivy, and scented were tested for susceptibility to three strains of Ralstonia solanacearum: a Race 1 Biovar 1 (R1B1) strain P597 isolated from tomato in Florida, a R1B1 strain P673 obtained from pothos originating in Costa Rica, and a Race 3 B...

  11. Substrate Acidification by Geranium (Pelargonium x Hortorum) I: Temperature Effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden pH decline (SPD) describes the situation where crops growing at an appropriate pH, suddenly (1-2 weeks) cause the substrate pH to shift downward one to two units. ‘Designer Dark Red’ Geraniums were grown in three experiments to test the effects of temperature on SPD. The first experiment te...

  12. Weed control in rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp).

    PubMed

    Kothari, Sushil K; Singh, Chandra P; Singh, Kamla

    2002-12-01

    Abstract: Field investigations were carried out during 1999 and 2000 to identify effective chemical/ cultural methods of weed control in rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp). The treatments comprised pre-emergence applications of oxyfluorfen (0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 kg AI ha(-1)) and pendimethalin (0.50, 0.75 and 1.00kg AI ha(-1)), successive hand weeding, hoeing and mulching using spent of lemon grass (at 5 tonnes ha(-1)) 45 days after planting (DAP), three hand-weedings 30, 60 and 90 DAP, weed-free (frequent manual weeding) and weedy control. Broad-leaf weeds were more predominant than grass and sedge weeds, accounting for 85.8% weed density and 93.0% weed dry weight in 1999 and 77.2% weed density and 93.9% weed dry weight in 2000. Unrestricted weed growth significantly reduced geranium oil yield, by 61.6% and 70.6% in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Pre-emergence application of pendimethalin (0.75-1.00 kgAI ha(-1)) or oxyfluorfen (0.25 kg AI ha(-1)), successive hand-weeding, hoeing and mulching and three hand-weedings were highly effective in reducing weed density and dry weight and gave oil yield comparable to the weed-free check. Application of oxyfluorfen (0.15 or 0.20 kg AI ha(-1)) and pendimethalin (0.50 kg AI ha(-1)) were less effective in controlling the weed species in geranium. None of the herbicides impaired the quality of rose-scented geranium oil measured in terms of citronellol and geraniol content. PMID:12477000

  13. The biological activities of cinnamon, geranium and lavender essential oils.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward; Wiktorowska-Owczarek, Anna; Jóźwiak-Bębenista, Marta; Łysakowska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. represent an important cause of nosocomial infections. Their resistance to some antibiotics, their ability to survive on inanimate surfaces in the hospital environment and their ability to produce biofilms contributes to their virulence. The aim of the study was to determine the antibacterial properties of cinnamon, lavender and geranium essential oils against bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter isolated from several clinical materials and from the hospital environment. A comprehensive evaluation of the susceptibility of Acinetobacter sp. clinical strains to recommended antibiotics was performed. The constituents of cinnamon, lavender and geranium essential oils were identified by GC-FID-MS analysis, and their Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) against tested clinical strains were determined by the micro-dilution broth method. In addition, the effects of essential oils on the viability of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and glioblastoma cell line (T98G) were evaluated. Cinnamon bark oil was the most active against clinical and environmental strains of Acinetobacter baumannii with MIC values ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 µL/mL. The MIC values for geranium oil were between 7.5 and 9.5 µL/mL, and between 10.5 and 13.0 µL/mL for lavender oil. These essential oils can be best employed in the fight against infections caused by bacteria from Acinetobacter genus as components of formulations for hygiene and disinfection of hospital environment. PMID:25514231

  14. Band structure properties of (BGa)P semiconductors for lattice matched integration on (001) silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Nadir; Sweeney, Stephen; Hosea, Jeff; Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Stolz, Wolfgang; Kunert, Bernerdette

    2013-12-04

    We report the band structure properties of (BGa)P layers grown on silicon substrate using metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. Using surface photo-voltage spectroscopy we find that both the direct and indirect band gaps of (BGa)P alloys (strained and unstrained) decrease with Boron content. Our experimental results suggest that the band gap of (BGa)P layers up to 6% Boron is large and suitable to be used as cladding and contact layers in GaP-based quantum well heterostructures on silicon substrates.

  15. Analysis of 1,3 dimethylamylamine concentrations in Geraniaceae, geranium oil and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Austin, Krista G; Travis, John; Pace, Gerry; Lieberman, Harris R

    2014-01-01

    1,3-Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) is a sympathomimetic compound currently incorporated into some dietary supplements. Significant controversy exists regarding the 'natural' origin of DMAA, as claimed by manufacturers of supplements. Manufacturers often refer to its presence by the name Geranamine® implying that DMAA is found in the plant species Geranium and Pelargonium known collectively as Geraniaceae. This study determined whether DMAA is present in the plant species, Geranium and Pelargonium. In addition, concentrations of DMAA in popular dietary supplements and commercial Geranium and Pelargonium oils were assessed. One Pelargonium cultivar, one Geranium cultivar, three essential oils from Pelargonium or Geranium, raw DMAA powder, and seven dietary supplements (DS) sold as finished products and labelled as containing DMAA, or one of its synonyms, were analyzed for the presence of DMAA by ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). No measurable levels of DMAA in Geranium, Pelargonium or essential oils at a detection limit of 1-2 ng/g were present. UPLC/MS/MS analysis confirmed the presence of DMAA in spiked plant and oil samples, all seven DS products, and raw DMAA powder. Concentrations (weight%) of DMAA provided in DS ranged from 0.11% to 673%. This study indicates DMAA contained in DS is of a synthetic origin and is not present in the plant species Geranium and Pelargonium; thus the 'natural' origin and use of DMAA as an ingredient in DS is not substantiated. PMID:23704033

  16. Joining of silicon carbide using interlayer with matching coefficient of thermal expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Perham, T. |

    1996-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to develop a technique for joining a commercially available Silicon Carbide that gives good room temperature strength and the potential for good high temperature strength. One secondary objective is that the joining technique be adaptable to SiC{sub f}/SiC composites and/or Nickel based superalloys, and another secondary objective is that the materials provide good neutron irradiation resistance and low activation for potential application inside nuclear fusion reactors. The joining techniques studied here are: (1) reaction bonding with Al-Si/Si/SiC/C; (2) reaction/infiltration with calcium aluminum silicate; (3) ion exchange mechanism to form calcium hexaluminate (a refractory cement); and (4) oxide frit brazing with cordierite.

  17. Silicon nanowire sensor by mix and match lithography process: Fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, U.

    2012-11-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have attracted significant interest in the study because of their potential to impact applications from nanoscale electronics to biomedical engineering. E-Beam Lithography couple with standard CMOS process is employed to fabricate the device. The exposure doses for the resist layer are varied in the range of 50 μC/cm2 to 180 μC/cm2 at 20 kV accelerating voltage with a beam current of 0.075 nA. The nanowires resist masks are well developed with dimension of less than 100 nm in width for the dose exposure parameters of 80 μC/cm2, 100 μC/cm2 and 120 μC/cm2. It is found that, the smallest SiNW with diameter of 65 nm is well aligned with electrode pads. In terms of sensitivity, the device with smaller nanowire is found to be more sensitive as a result of the high surface-to-volume ratio. These results demonstrate that the in-house fabricated SiNWs biosensor is capable as a platform for label-free biosensing.

  18. The Sensitivity of Endodontic Enterococcus spp. Strains to Geranium Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Łysakowska, Monika E; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Banaszek, Katarzyna; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci are able to survive endodontic procedures and contribute to the failure of endodontic therapy. Thus, it is essential to identify novel ways of eradicating them from infected root canals. One such approach may be the use of antimicrobials such as plant essential oils. Enterococcal strains were isolated from endodontically treated teeth by standard microbiological methods. Susceptibility to antibiotics was evaluated by the disc-diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of geranium essential oil was investigated by microdilution in 96-well microplates in Mueller Hinton Broth II. Biofilm eradication concentrations were checked in dentin tests. Geranium essential oil inhibited enterococcal strains at concentrations ranging from 1.8-4.5 mg/mL. No correlation was shown between resistance to antibiotics and the MICs of the test antimicrobials. The MICs of the test oil were lower than those found to show cytotoxic effects on the HMEC-1 cell line. Geranium essential oil eradicated enterococcal biofilm at concentrations of 150 mg/mL. Geranium essential oil inhibits the growth of endodontic enterococcal species at lower concentrations than those required to reach IC50 against the HMEC-1 cell line, and is effective against bacteria protected in biofilm at higher concentrations. In addition, bacteria do not develop resistance to essential oils. Hence, geranium essential oil represents a possible alternative to other antimicrobials during endodontic procedures. PMID:26703546

  19. 1,3-Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) in supplements and geranium products: natural or synthetic?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Woods, Ross M; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2012-12-01

    1,3-Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) is a stimulant existing in various pre-workout supplements and often labelled as part of geranium plants. The safety and origin of DMAA in these supplements is the subject of intense debate. In this study, the enantiomeric and diastereomeric ratios of two different known synthetic DMAA compounds, as well as the total concentrations of DMAA and its stereoisomeric ratios in 13 different supplements, were determined by gas chromatography. The stereoisomeric ratios of DMAA in the synthetic standards and in all the commercial supplements were indistinguishable. Eight different commercial geranium extracts of different geographical origins (China and the Middle East) were examined for the presence of DMAA by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). No DMAA was detected in any of the eight geranium products with a limit of detection of 10 parts per billion (w/w). PMID:22786761

  20. Wavelength-assignable 1310/1550 nm wavelength conversion using completely phase-matched two-pump four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Gao, Shiming

    2015-12-01

    A wavelength converter between 1310 and 1550 nm bands is presented based on two-pump four-wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon waveguide. The principle of the inter-band wavelength conversion is analyzed. For an arbitrary incident signal, the converted idler wavelength can be freely assigned by suitably setting the two pump wavelengths to completely satisfy the phase-matching condition. Simulation results show that the signal can be flexibly converted between 1310 and 1550 bands. The conversion efficiencies for the signals with different wavelengths are very stable because the FWM phase-matching condition is completely met. Using this two-pump FWM configuration, channel-selective function can also be realized for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) signals by engineering the dispersion profile of the silicon waveguide according to the WDM channel spacing.

  1. Evidence for the Presence of 1,3-Dimethylamylamine (1,3-DMAA) in Geranium Plant Materials.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    1,3-Dimethylamylamine (1,3-DMAA) is an aliphatic amine with stimulant properties that are reportedly found naturally only in geranium plants (Pelargonium graveolens). The presence of 1,3-DMAA in geranium plants was first reported in a paper published in 1996, but some have questioned the identification of 1,3-DMAA in that study. Since then, a number of additional studies have been published, largely reporting the absence of 1,3-DMAA in geranium plants and commercial geranium oils. However, in two recent studies, 1,3-DMAA was detected in geranium plant tissues and a geranium oil sample using a simplified extraction approach on tissues and oil sourced from China. Whether or not 1,3-DMAA is found naturally in plants has significant implications as to how commercial products containing 1,3-DMAA are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, differences in source materials, extraction procedures, and analytical approaches are reviewed in an attempt to rationalize the apparently conflicting evidence for the presence of 1,3-DMAA in geranium plant materials. PMID:23843687

  2. Sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles from a geranium leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Franco-Romano, M; Gil, M L A; Palacios-Santander, J M; Delgado-Jaén, J J; Naranjo-Rodríguez, I; Hidalgo-Hidalgo de Cisneros, J L; Cubillana-Aguilera, L M

    2014-07-01

    A rapid in situ biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed in which a geranium (Pelargonium zonale) leaf extract was used as a non-toxic reducing and stabilizing agent in a sonocatalysis process based on high-power ultrasound. The synthesis process took only 3.5 min in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. The stability of the nanoparticles was studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy with reference to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band. AuNPs have an average lifetime of about 8 weeks at 4 °C in the absence of light. The morphology and crystalline phase of the gold nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composition of the nanoparticles was evaluated by electron diffraction and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). A total of 80% of the gold nanoparticles obtained in this way have a diameter in the range 8-20 nm, with an average size of 12±3 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the presence of biomolecules that could be responsible for reducing and capping the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis concerning the type of organic molecules involved in this process is also given. Experimental design linked to the simplex method was used to optimize the experimental conditions for this green synthesis route. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a high-power ultrasound-based sonocatalytic process and experimental design coupled to a simplex optimization process has been used in the biosynthesis of AuNPs. PMID:24530142

  3. Detecting Root Rot Stress in Geranium by Measuring Changes in Leaf Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to determine if changes in geranium leaf temperature, measured by infrared (IR) transducers aimed at the plant canopy or individual leaves, correlate with root infection by pathogenic water molds. This is the first report to our knowledge that addresses the use of environmental se...

  4. The influence of phosphorus concentration on the development of Pythium root rot disease of seedling geranium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In greenhouse production systems, growers may increase nutrient supply to meet production demands or decrease nutrient supply due to cost or environmental concerns. Only a few floriculture crops’ response in different nutrient environments to a handful of diseases are well known. Seeding geraniums...

  5. Substrate Acidification by Geranium (Pelargonium x Hortorum) II: Light Effects and Phosphorus Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden pH decline (SPD) describes the situation where crops growing at an appropriate pH, suddenly (1-2 weeks) cause the substrate pH to shift downward one to two units. ‘Designer Dark Red’ geraniums (Pelargonium x hortorum Bailey) were grown in three experiments to test the effects of light on SPD...

  6. A Rare Excitatory Amino Acid from Flowers of Zonal Geranium responsible for Paralyzing the Japanese Beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    e Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) exhibits rapid paralysis after consuming flowers from zonal geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum). Activity-guided fractionations were conducted with polar flower petal extracts from Pelargonium × hortorum cv. Nittany Lion Red, which led to the isolation of a paraly...

  7. PHYSIOLOGY OF ECOTYPIC PLANT RESPONSE TO SULFUR DIOXIDE IN 'GERANIUM CAROLINIANUM' L

    EPA Science Inventory

    Populations of Geranium carolinianum, winter annual plant common in disturbed habitats vary in their folair response to sulfur dioxide and pollution resistance is characteristic of populations sampled from areas in which SO2 has been a prominent stress. The physiological basis of...

  8. SULFUR DIOXIDE FLUX INTO LEAVES OF 'GERANIUM CAROLINIANUM' L.: EVIDENCE FOR A NONSTOMATAL OR RESIDUAL RESISTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent exchange of SO2 and H2O vapor between the atmosphere and foliage of Geranium carolinanum was investigated using a whole-plant gas exchange chamber. Total leaf flux of SO2 was partitioned into leaf surface and internal fractions. The emission rate of SO2-induced H2S...

  9. Using Leaf Temperature to Detect Pythium Root Rot Stress in Geranium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diagnosis of incipient disease based on visual symptoms of geraniums (Pelargonium × hortorum L. H. Bailey) exposed to water mold pathogens is often difficult, especially when the plants are maintained under optimum growing conditions. Such plants tend to be asymptomatic until late in the infection ...

  10. Effect of High Temperature on Extreme Substrate Acidification by Geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum Bailey)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cause of sudden substrate pH decline by geranium is unknown and previous reports suggest it may be due to high temperature. The first of 2 experiments compared plants grown at 4 temperatures (14/10, 18/14, 22/18 and 26/22º C day/night). With increasing increments of temperature, substrate pH de...

  11. Lethal activity of individual and mixed monoterpenoids of geranium essential oil on Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Anabella; Picollo, María Inés; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón

    2015-03-01

    Plant essential oils and its constituent molecules have been suggested as an alternative to control insect. The contribution of the constituents to the effect of the oil is determined by the interactions occurring between them. Synergistic interactions would improve the insecticide efficacy of the compounds due to the utilization of lower doses. We evaluated the insecticidal activity of geranium (Geranium maculatum L.) oil and its major constituents against Musca domestica L. and studied the toxic interactions in artificial mixtures of those constituents in the natural ratio. While synergistic interactions were determined in house fly in this study, these were of low intensity evidencing that the effect of each constituent was slightly modified by the other constituents present in the mixtures. The search for synergism between components is a strategy to improve the insecticide activity of natural compounds. The synergism helps to reduce the environmental and toxicological impact due to the reduction of the dose of use. PMID:25604671

  12. Iodine 125 Brachytherapy With Vitrectomy and Silicone Oil in the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma: 1-to-1 Matched Case-Control Series

    SciTech Connect

    McCannel, Tara A. McCannel, Colin A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We initially reported the radiation-attenuating effect of silicone oil 1000 centistokes for iodine 125. The purpose of this report was to compare the clinical outcomes in case patients who had iodine 125 brachytherapy with vitrectomy and silicone oil 1000 centistokes with the outcomes in matched control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with uveal melanoma who were treated with iodine 125 plaque brachytherapy and vitrectomy with silicone oil with minimum 1-year follow-up were included. Control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone were matched for tumor size, location, and sex. Baseline patient and tumor characteristics and tumor response to radiation, final visual acuity, macular status, central macular thickness by ocular coherence tomography (OCT), cataract progression, and metastasis at last follow-up visit were compared. Surgical complications were also determined. Results: Twenty case patients met the inclusion criteria. The average follow-up time was 22.1 months in case patients and 19.4 months in control patients. The final logMAR vision was 0.81 in case patients and 1.1 in control patients (P=.071); 8 case patients and 16 control patients had abnormal macular findings (P=.011); and the average central macular thickness by OCT was 293.2 μm in case patients and 408.5 μm in control patients (P=.016). Eleven case patients (55%) and 1 control patient (5%) had required cataract surgery at last follow-up (P=.002). Four patients in the case group and 1 patient in the control group experienced metastasis (P=.18). Among the cases, intraoperative retinal tear occurred in 3 patients; total serous retinal detachment and macular hole developed in 1 case patient each. There was no case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, treatment failure, or local tumor dissemination in case patients or control patients. Conclusions: With up to 3 years of clinical follow-up, silicone oil during brachytherapy

  13. Identification and Quantification of Dimethylamylamine in Geranium by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, J.S.; Chen, M.; Li, Z.C.

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive and reliable method of liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/ MS) was developed and validated for determining 1,3-dimethylamylamine (1,3-DMAA) and 1,4-dimethylamylamine (1,4-DMAA) in geranium plants (Pelargonium graveolens). The sample was extracted with 0.5 M HCl and purified by liquid-liquid partition with hexane. The parameters for reverse-phase (C18) LC and positive ESI/MS/MS were optimized. The matrix effect, specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy and reproducibility of the method were determined and evaluated. The method was linear over a range of 0.10–10.00 ng/mL examined, with R2 of 0.99 for both 1,3-DMAA and 1,4-DMAA. The recoveries from spiked concentrations between 5.00–40.00 ng/g were 85.1%–104.9% for 1,3-DMAA, with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.9%–11.0%, and 82.9%–101.8% for 1,4-DMAA, with RSD of 3.2%–11.7%. The instrument detection limit was 1–2 pg for both DMAAs. The quantification limit was estimated to be 1–2 ng/g for the plant sample. This method was successfully applied to the quantitative determination of 1,3- and 1,4-DMAA in both geranium plant and geranium oil. PMID:22915838

  14. Chemical composition and hepatotoxic effect of Geranium schiedeanum in a thioacetamide-induced liver injury model

    PubMed Central

    Gayosso-De-Lucio, Juan; Bautista, Mirandeli; Velazquez-González, C.; De la O Arciniega, M; Morales-González, J.A.; Benedí, Juana

    2014-01-01

    One of the major components of some geraniums is geraniin, described by its discoverer as crystallizable tannin, well known as an excellent antioxidant, and also found in fruits such as pomegranate. Recently, natural antioxidants have attracted great attention from consumers over the world due to their lower toxicity than synthetics. But geraniin is not a stable compound, and also is difficult to obtain, that is why in the present study we obtained acetonylgeraniin from Geranium schideanum (Gs), a stable acetone condensate of geraniin. In the present study the effect of Gs acetone-water extract was studied in reference to postnecrotic liver regeneration induced by thioacetamide (TA) in rats. Two months male rats were pretreated with daily dose of Gs extract for 4 days (300 mg/kg) and the last day also were intraperitoneally injected with TA (6.6 mmol/kg). Samples of blood were obtained from rats at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following TA intoxication. The pre-treatment with the crude extract in the model of thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity in rats decreased and delayed liver injury by 66% at 24 h. This result suggests that Gs extract may be used as an alternative for reduction of liver damage. On the other hand, acute toxicity study revealed that the LD50 value of the Gs extract is more than the dose 5000 mg/kg in rats, according to the Lorke method. PMID:25298677

  15. Bioactivity-guided investigation of geranium essential oils as natural tick repellents.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wang, Mei; Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Parcher, Jon F; Carroll, John F; Kramer, Matthew; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2013-05-01

    The evaluation of 10 essential oils of geranium, Pelargonium graveolens (Geraniaceae), were all shown to have repellent activity against nymphs of the medically important lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.). The biological tests were carried out using a vertical filter paper bioassay, where ticks must cross an area of the paper treated with repellent to approach host stimuli. One of the essential oil samples that repelled >90% of the ticks at 0.103 mg/cm(2) was selected for further fractionation studies. The sesquiterpene alcohol, (-)-10-epi-γ-eudesmol, was isolated and identified by spectral methods. (-)-10-epi-γ-Eudesmol at 0.103 and 0.052 mg of compound/cm(2) of filter paper repelled 90 and 73.3% of the ticks, respectively. (-)-10-epi-γ-Eudesmol exhibited similar repellency to the reference standard N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) at concentrations of ≥0.052 mg of compound/cm(2) of filter paper, with (-)-10-epi-γ-eudesmol losing much of its repellency at 0.026 mg of compound/cm(2) and DEET at 0.013 mg of compound/cm(2). Isomenthone and linalool did not repel ticks at the concentrations tested. Most repellents are marketed with much higher concentrations of active ingredient than the concentrations of the natural repellents tested herein; therefore, effective compounds, such as (-)-10-epi-γ-eudesmol, found in geranium oil, have the potential for commercial development. PMID:23528036

  16. Fragrant volatile oil composition of Nutmeg Geranium (Pelargonium × fragrans Willd.) from India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ram S; Padalia, Rajendra C; Chauhan, Amit

    2013-04-01

    Hydrodistilled essential oil of 'Nutmeg Geranium' (Pelargonium × fragrans Willd.), grown in foothills of northern India was analysed by capillary gas chromatography (GC/flame ionisation detector (FID)) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A total of 51 constituents, representing 90.2% of the total oil composition were identified. The oil was mainly dominated by monoterpenoids (58.4%), followed by sesquiterpenoids (19.4%), and phenyl propanoids (10.1%). Major constituents of the essential oil were fenchone (10.7%), methyl eugenol (9.9%), α-pinene (9.4%), α-thujene (7.6%), limonene (6.4%), spathulenol (4.7%), sabinene (4.3%), linalool (4.2%), (E)-caryophyllene (4.2%), terpinen-4-ol (3.2%), β-pinene (2.9%), caryophyllene oxide (2.2%) and bicyclogermacrene (2.1%). This is the first report on essential oil composition of Nutmeg Geranium oil grown in India. PMID:22616953

  17. Fertilization and Colors of Plastic Mulch Affect Biomass and Essential Oil of Sweet-Scented Geranium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anderson de Carvalho; dos Santos, Wallace Melo; Prata, Paloma Santana; Alves, Péricles Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Sweet-scented geranium (Pelargonium graveolens L'Hér), a plant belonging to the Geraniaceae family, has medicinal and aromatic properties and is widely used in the cosmetic, soap, perfume, aromatherapy, and food industries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of fertilization and the use of different colors of plastic mulch on sweet-scented geranium biomass and essential oil. Three colors of plastic mulch (black, white, and silver-colored) and a control without plastic mulch were assessed along with three fertilizers (20,000 L·ha−1 of cattle manure; 1,000 kg·ha−1 of NPK 3-12-6; and 20,000 L·ha−1 of cattle manure + 1,000 kg·ha−1 of NPK 3-12-6 fertilizer) and a control without fertilizer. The absence of a soil cover negatively influenced the agronomical variables, while coverage with plastic mulch was associated with increased biomass. The use of fertilizer had no effect on the evaluated agronomic variables. When cattle manure and NPK 3-12-6 were used together, combined with white or black plastic mulch, the highest yields of essential oil were obtained. For the silver-colored plastic mulch, higher amounts of essential oil (6,9-guaiadien) were obtained with mineral fertilizer. PMID:24757440

  18. Fertilization and colors of plastic mulch affect biomass and essential oil of sweet-scented geranium.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anderson de Carvalho; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; dos Santos, Wallace Melo; Prata, Paloma Santana; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima

    2014-01-01

    Sweet-scented geranium (Pelargonium graveolens L'Hér), a plant belonging to the Geraniaceae family, has medicinal and aromatic properties and is widely used in the cosmetic, soap, perfume, aromatherapy, and food industries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of fertilization and the use of different colors of plastic mulch on sweet-scented geranium biomass and essential oil. Three colors of plastic mulch (black, white, and silver-colored) and a control without plastic mulch were assessed along with three fertilizers (20,000 L · ha(-1) of cattle manure; 1,000 kg · ha(-1) of NPK 3-12-6; and 20,000 L · ha(-1) of cattle manure + 1,000 kg · ha(-1) of NPK 3-12-6 fertilizer) and a control without fertilizer. The absence of a soil cover negatively influenced the agronomical variables, while coverage with plastic mulch was associated with increased biomass. The use of fertilizer had no effect on the evaluated agronomic variables. When cattle manure and NPK 3-12-6 were used together, combined with white or black plastic mulch, the highest yields of essential oil were obtained. For the silver-colored plastic mulch, higher amounts of essential oil (6,9-guaiadien) were obtained with mineral fertilizer. PMID:24757440

  19. Fungus gnat (Bradysia impatiens) feeding and mechanical wounding inhibit Pythium aphanidermatum infection of geranium seedlings (Pelargonium x hortorum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to investigate potential effects of fungus gnat (Bradysia impatiens) feeding damage on susceptibility of geranium seedlings (Pelargonium x hortorum) to infection by the root rot pathogen Pythium aphanidermatum. Effects were compared to those from similar t...

  20. Effect of Phosphorus Deficiency and High Temperature on Ammonium and Nitrate Uptake by Geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum Bailey)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cause of sudden substrate pH decline by geranium is unknown and may be due to a shift in cation-anion balance. Nitrogen plays a very important role in cation-anion balance since it accounts for over 50% of the mineral ions that will cross the plasma membrane and is the only mineral nutrient tha...

  1. Performance of rose scented geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) in heavy metal polluted soil vis-à-vis phytoaccumulation of metals.

    PubMed

    Chand, Sukhmal; Singh, Geetu; Patra, D D

    2016-08-01

    An investigation was carried out to evaluate the effect of heavy metal toxicity on growth, herb, oil yield and quality and metal accumulation in rose scented geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) grown in heavy metal enriched soils. Four heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb) each at two levels (10 and 20 mg kg-1 soil) were tested on geranium. Results indicated that Cr concentration in soil at 20 mg kg-1 reduced leaves, stem and root yield by 70, 83, and 45%, respectively, over control. Root growth was significantly affected in Cr stressed soil. Nickel, Cr, and Cd concentration and accumulation in plant increased with higher application of these metals. Chromium, nickel and cadmium uptake was observed to be higher in leaves than in stem and roots. Essential oil constituents were generally not significantly affected by heavy metals except Pb at 10 and 20 ppm, which significantly increased the content of citronellol and Ni at 20 ppm increased the content of geraniol. Looking in to the higher accumulation of toxic metals by geranium and the minimal impact of heavy metals on quality of essential oil, geranium can be commercially cultivated in heavy metal polluted soil for production of high value essential oil. PMID:26696243

  2. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by extracts and constituents from Angelica archangelica and Geranium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Steinthor; Gudbjarnason, Sigmundur

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of several Icelandic medicinal herbs. Ethanolic extracts of Angelica archangelica seeds and the aerial parts of Geranium sylvaticum proved effective, with IC50 values of 2.20 mg/ml and 3.56 mg/ml, respectively. The activity of imperatorin and xanthotoxin from A. archangelica was measured. Xanthotoxin proved much more potent than imperatorin, with an IC50 value of 155 microg/ml (0.72 mM) but that for imperatorin was above 274 microg/ml (1.01 mM). However, furanocoumarins seem to have a minor part in the total activity of this extract. Synergistic interaction was observed between the extracts of A. archangelica and G. sylvaticum. Several medicinal herbs (Achillea millefolium, Filipendula ulmaria, Thymus praecox and Matricaria maritima) did not show AChE inhibitory activity. PMID:18069242

  3. Combinations of Fungicides with Phylloplane Yeasts for Improved Control of Botrytis cinerea on Geranium Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Buck, J W

    2004-02-01

    ABSTRACT Control of Botrytis cinerea on geranium seedlings was evaluated in treatments with phylloplane yeasts in combination with 10 fungicides used to manage Botrytis blight of ornamental plants. Rhodotorula glutinis PM4 significantly reduced the development of lesions caused by B. cinerea on geranium cotyledons; however, yeast biocontrol efficacy was highly variable between trials. Treatment with the yeast in combination with azoxystrobin or trifloxystrobin at one tenth the labeled rate (7.5 mug a.i. ml(-1)) or the full labeled rate (7.5 mug a.i. ml(-1)) reduced lesion development, compared to treatment with the yeast or the fungicide alone. Vinclozolin at half the labeled rate or the full labeled rate (250 or 500 mug a.i. ml(-1)), in combination with R. glutinis PM4, significantly reduced the development of lesions caused by an isolate of B. cinerea resistant to vinclozolin. Copper hydroxide and iprodione at one-tenth the labeled rates, with or without yeast, were highly effective in limiting lesion development. Mancozeb did not increase the biocontrol efficacy of the yeast, and thiophanate-methyl negatively affected the yeast efficacy. Improved disease control was observed in treatments with vinclozolin at the labeled rate and R. glutinis PM4 at cell densities of 5 x 10(5) and 1 x 10(6) cells ml(-1), but not 1 x 10(5) cells ml(-1), on seedlings co-inoculated with B. cinerea in a suspension containing 1 x 10(5) conidia ml(-1). Disease control improved in treatments with combinations of vinclozolin and eight other isolates of R. glutinis, two isolates of R. graminis, and two isolates of R. mucilaginosa. Biocontrol was not observed in treatments with two isolates of R. minuta. The combination of yeast and vinclozolin significantly reduced the germination of conidia of B. cinerea and the growth of R. glutinis PM4 in vitro. All combinations of R. glutinis PM4 with azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, or vinclozolin provided highly effective and consistent disease control

  4. Rose geranium essential oil as a source of new and safe anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boukhatem, Mohamed Nadjib; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Ferhat, Mohamed Amine; Saidi, Fairouz; Mekarnia, Maamar

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the available anti-inflammatory drugs exert an extensive variety of side effects, the search for new anti-inflammatory agents has been a priority of pharmaceutical industries. Aims The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of rose geranium (RGEO). Methods The chemical composition of the RGEO was investigated by gas chromatography. The major components were citronellol (29.13%), geraniol (12.62%), and citronellyl formate (8.06%). In the carrageenan-induced paw edema, five different groups were established and RGEO was administered orally in three different doses. Results RGEO (100 mg/kg) was able to significantly reduce the paw edema with a comparable effect to that observed with diclofenac, the positive control. In addition, RGEO showed a potent anti-inflammatory activity by topical treatment in the method of croton oil-induced ear edema. When the dose was 5 or 10 µl of RGEO per ear, the inflammation was reduced by 73 and 88%, respectively. This is the first report to demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory activity of Algerian RGEO. In addition, histological analysis confirmed that RGEO inhibited the inflammatory responses in the skin. Conclusion Our results indicate that RGEO may have significant potential for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs with improved safety profile. PMID:24103319

  5. Absence of sex differential plasticity to light availability during seed maturation in Geranium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Varga, Sandra; Laaksonen, Ester; Siikamäki, Pirkko; Kytöviita, Minna-Maarit

    2015-01-01

    Sex-differential plasticity (SDP) hypothesis suggests that since hermaphrodites gain fitness through both pollen and seed production they may have evolved a higher degree of plasticity in their reproductive strategy compared to females which achieve fitness only through seed production. SDP may explain the difference in seed production observed between sexes in gynodioecious species in response to resource (nutrients or water) availability. In harsh environments, hermaphrodites decrease seed production whereas females keep it relatively similar regardless of the environmental conditions. Light availability can be also a limiting resource and thus could theoretically affect differently female and hermaphrodite seed output even though this ecological factor has been largely overlooked. We tested whether the two sexes in the gynodioecious species Geranium sylvaticum differ in their tolerance to light limitation during seed maturation in the field. We used a fully factorial block experiment exposing female and hermaphrodite plants to two different light environments (control and shade) after their peak flowering period. Specifically, we measured fruit and seed production in response to decreased light availability and compared it between the sexes. Shading reduced the number of fruits and seeds produced, but the decrease was similar between the sexes. Furthermore, shading delayed seed production by three days in both sexes, but did not affect seed mass, seed P content, or the probability of re-flowering the following year. Our results give no evidence for reproductive SDP in response to light during seed maturation. PMID:25738943

  6. Nectar Sugar Production across Floral Phases in the Gynodioecious Protandrous Plant Geranium sylvaticum

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Sandra; Nuortila, Carolin; Kytöviita, Minna-Maarit

    2013-01-01

    Many zoophilous plants attract their pollinators by offering nectar as a reward. In gynodioecious plants (i.e. populations are composed of female and hermaphrodite individuals) nectar production has been repeatedly reported to be larger in hermaphrodite compared to female flowers even though nectar production across the different floral phases in dichogamous plants (i.e. plants with time separation of pollen dispersal and stigma receptivity) has rarely been examined. In this study, sugar production in nectar standing crop and secretion rate were investigated in Geranium sylvaticum, a gynodioecious plant species with protandry (i.e. with hermaphrodite flowers releasing their pollen before the stigma is receptive). We found that flowers from hermaphrodites produced more nectar than female flowers in terms of total nectar sugar content. In addition, differences in nectar production among floral phases were found in hermaphrodite flowers but not in female flowers. In hermaphrodite flowers, maximum sugar content coincided with pollen presentation and declined slightly towards the female phase, indicating nectar reabsorption, whereas in female flowers sugar content did not differ between the floral phases. These differences in floral reward are discussed in relation to visitation patterns by pollinators and seed production in this species. PMID:23614053

  7. Mating system contributes only slightly to female maintenance in gynodioecious Geranium maculatum (Geraniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, M L; Deen, A C; Hamrick, J L; Chang, S-M

    2014-01-01

    Gynodioecy, the co-occurrence of female and hermaphroditic individuals within a population, is an important intermediate in the evolution of separate sexes. The first step, female maintenance, requires females to have higher seed fitness compared with hermaphrodites. A common mechanism thought to increase relative female fitness is inbreeding depression avoidance, the magnitude of which depends on hermaphroditic selfing rates and the strength of inbreeding depression. Less well studied is the effect of biparental inbreeding on female fitness. Biparental inbreeding can affect relative female fitness only if its consequence or frequency differs between sexes, which could occur if sex structure and genetic structure both occur within populations. To determine whether inbreeding avoidance and/or biparental inbreeding can account for female persistence in Geranium maculatum, we measured selfing and biparental inbreeding rates in four populations and the spatial genetic structure in six populations. Selfing rates of hermaphrodites were low and did not differ significantly from zero in any population, leading to females gaining at most a 1–14% increase in seed fitness from inbreeding avoidance. Additionally, although significant spatial genetic structure was found in all populations, biparental inbreeding rates were low and only differed between sexes in one population, thereby having little influence on female fitness. A review of the literature revealed few sexual differences in biparental inbreeding among other gynodioecious species. Our results show that mating system differences may not fully account for female maintenance in this species, suggesting other mechanisms may be involved. PMID:24824284

  8. Effect of Variable Solvents on Particle Size of Geranium Oil-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (Ge-SLN) For Mosquito Repellent Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnawi, Syalwati; Aziz, Azila A.; Aziz, Ramlan A.

    2009-06-01

    A new delivery system for insect repellent is proposed by the incorporation of geranium oil into solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN). A variety of solvents which act as co-surfactants, were introduced to increase the particle size of GE-SLN. Ethanol, which has a high boiling point and a long chain alcohol produced larger particle than dichloromethane. The structure of SLN was not stable when methanol and acetone were used as co-solvents. Concentration of solvents can also influence the size of SLN. In vitro release experiments showed that SLN was able to reduce the rapid evaporation of geranium oil.

  9. Changes in leaf water relations, gas exchange, growth and flowering quality in potted geranium plants irrigated with different water regimes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Blanco, Ma Jesús; Alvarez, Sara; Navarro, Alejandra; Bañón, Sebastián

    2009-03-15

    Geranium plants are an important part of urban green areas but suffer from drought, especially when grown in containers with a limited volume of medium. In this experiment, we examined the response of potted geraniums to different irrigation levels. Geranium (Pelargoniumxhortorum L.) seedlings were grown in a growth chamber and exposed to three irrigation treatments, whereby the plants were irrigated to container capacity (control), 60% of the control (moderate deficit irrigation, MDI), or 40% of the control (severe deficit irrigation, SDI). Deficit irrigation was maintained for 2 months, and then all the plants were exposed to a recovery period of 112 month. Exposure to drought induced a decrease in shoot dry weight and leaf area and an increase in the root/shoot ratio. Height and plant width were significantly inhibited by the SDI, while flower color parameters were not affected by deficit treatment. The number of wilting and yellow leaves increased, coinciding with the increase in the number of inflorescences and open flowers. Deficit irrigation led to a leaf water potential of about -0.8MPa at midday, which could have caused an important decrease in stomatal conductance, affecting the photosynthetic rate (Pn). Chlorophyll fluorescence (Fvm) values of 0.80 in all treatments throughout the experiment demonstrate the lack of drought-induced damage to PSII photochemistry. Pressure-volume analysis revealed low osmotic adjustment values of 0.2MPa in the SDI treatment, accompanied by increases in the bulk tissue elastic modulus (epsilon, wall rigidity) and resulting in turgor loss at lower leaf water potential values (-1.38MPa compared with -1.0MPa for the control). Leaf water potential values throughout the experiment below those for Psitlp were not found at any sampling time. By the end of the recovery period, the leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis had recovered. We infer from these results that moderate deficit irrigation in geranium

  10. Hepatoprotective effect of Geranium schiedeanum against ethanol toxicity during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Gayosso-De-Lucio, Juan A; Reyes-Rosales, Yadira; Posadas-Mondragón, Araceli; Morales-González, Ángel; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; García-Machorro, Jazmín; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Álvarez-González, Isela; Morales-González, José A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of an extract of Geranium schiedeanum (Gs) as a hepatoprotective agent against ethanol (EtOH)-induced toxicity in rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats weighing 200-230 g were subjected to a 70% partial hepatectomy (PH); they were then divided into three groups (groups 1-3). During the experiment, animals in group 1 drank only water. The other two groups (2-3) drank an aqueous solution of EtOH (40%, v/v). Additionally, rats in group 3 received a Gs extract daily at a dose of 300 mg/kg body weight intragastically. Subsequently, to identify markers of liver damage in serum, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and bilirubin were measured by colorimetric methods. Glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were also determined. In addition, oxidative damage was estimated by measuring lipid peroxidation [using thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances (TBARS)] in both plasma and the liver and by measuring the total concentration of antioxidants in serum and the total antioxidant capacity in the liver. In addition, a liver mass gain assessment, total DNA analysis and a morpho-histological analysis of the liver from animals in all three groups were performed and compared. Finally, the number of deaths observed in the three groups was analyzed. RESULTS: Administration of the Geranium shiedeanum extract significantly reduced the unfavorable effect of ethanol on liver regeneration (restitution liver mass: PH-EtOH group 60.68% vs PH-Gs-EtOH group 69.22%). This finding was congruent with the reduced levels of hepatic enzymes and the sustained or increased levels of albumin and decreased bilirubin in serum. The extract also modified the metabolic processes that regulate glucose and lipid levels, as observed from the serum measurements. Lower antioxidant levels and the liver damage induced by EtOH administration appeared to be mitigated by the extract, as observed from the TBARs (PH-EtOH group 200.14 mmol/mg vs PH

  11. Frequency-dependent pollinator discrimination acts against female plants in the gynodioecious Geranium maculatum

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, Megan L.; Chang, Shu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Gynodioecy, the co-occurrence of female and hermaphroditic individuals, is thought to be an intermediate step between hermaphroditism and separate sexes, a major transition in flowering plants. Because retaining females in a population requires that they have increased seed fitness (to compensate for the lack of pollen fitness), factors that affect seed fitness are of great importance to the evolution of this mating system and have often been studied. However, factors negatively affecting female fitness are equally important and have been largely neglected. One such factor stems from female flowers being less attractive to insects than hermaphrodite flowers, thereby decreasing their relative fitness. Methods To test the severity and consequences of this type of pollinator discrimination in Geranium maculatum, experimental populations with the range of sex ratios observed in nature were created, ranging from 13 % to 42 % females. Pollinators were observed in order to measure the strength of discrimination, and pollen deposition and seed production of both sexes were measured to determine the fitness consequences of this discrimination. Additionally a comparison was made across the sex ratios to determine whether discrimination was frequency-dependent. Key Results It was found that female flowers, on average, were visited at half of the rate of hermaphrodite flowers, which decreased their pollen receipt and seed production. Additionally, females were most discriminated against when rare, due to both changes in the pollinators' behaviour and a shift in pollinator composition. Conclusions The results suggest that pollinator discrimination negatively affects females' relative fitness when they are rare. Thus, the initial spread of females in a population, the first step in the evolution of gynodioecy, may be made more difficult due to pollinator discrimination. PMID:25326647

  12. Synorganisation without organ fusion in the flowers of Geranium robertianum (Geraniaceae) and its not so trivial obdiplostemony

    PubMed Central

    Endress, Peter K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Synorganisation of floral organs, an important means in angiosperm flower evolution, is mostly realized by congenital or post-genital organ fusion. Intimate synorganisation of many floral organs without fusion, as present in Geranium robertianum, is poorly known and needs to be studied. Obdiplostemony, the seemingly reversed position of two stamen whorls, widely distributed in core eudicots, has been the subject of much attention, but there is confusion in the literature. Obdiplostemony occurs in Geranium and whether and how it is involved in this synorganisation is explored here. Methods Floral development and architecture were studied with light microscopy based on microtome section series and with scanning electron microscopy. Key Results Intimate synorganisation of floral organs is effected by the formation of five separate nectar canals for the proboscis of pollinators. Each nectar canal is formed by six adjacent organs from four organ whorls. In addition, the sepals are hooked together by the formation of longitudinal ribs and grooves, and provide a firm scaffold for the canals. Obdiplostemony provides a guide rail within each canal formed by the flanks of the antepetalous stamen filaments. Conclusions Intimate synorganisation in flowers can be realized without any fusion, and obdiplostemony may play a role in this synorganisation. PMID:20802050

  13. Insecticidal activity of individual and mixed monoterpenoids of geranium essential oil against Pediculus humanus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Gallardo, A; Picollo, M I; González-Audino, P; Mougabure-Cueto, G

    2012-03-01

    The major components of geranium (Geranium maculatum L.) oil and their mixtures were tested against female Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae). Chemical analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry revealed four major constituents: citronellol (38%), geraniol (16%), citronellyl formate (10.4%), and linalool (6.45%) (concentration expressed as percentage of total). Topical application demonstrated that the most potent component was citronellol and geraniol, with LD50 values 9.7 and 12.7 microg/insect, respectively. Linalool and Citronellyl formate were less toxic with LD50 values 24.7 and 38.5 microg/insect, respectively. Toxicity of these four major constituents in the same proportion as the natural oil, was greater than whole oil and each individual component. Removal of any four constituents produced a decreased in effectiveness. The absence of citronellol caused the greatest decrease in toxicity (DL50 from 2.2 to 10.9 microg/insect), leading us to conclude that this constituent is the major contributor to oil toxicity. The knowledge of the role of each constituent in the toxicity of the whole oil gives the possibility to create artificial blends of different constituents for the development of more effective control agents. PMID:22493851

  14. Insecticidal and biting deterrent activity of rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp.) essential oils and individual compounds against Stephanitis pyrioides and Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rose-scented geranium, Pelargonium spp., essential oils from the cultivars ‘Bourbon’, ‘China’, ‘Egypt’ and cultivars ‘Rober’s Lemon Rose’ and ‘Frensham’ from South Carolina were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. One-hundred and thirty six compounds were identified from five essential oils, which constit...

  15. Effect of Inhalation of Aroma of Geranium Essence on Anxiety and Physiological Parameters during First Stage of Labor in Nulliparous Women: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Fakari, Fahimeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Kamali, Hossian; Rashidi Fakari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anxiety increases significantly during labor, especially among nulliparous women. Such anxiety may affect the progress of labor and physiological parameters. The use of essential oils of aromatic plants, or aromatherapy, is a non-invasive procedure that can decrease childbirth anxiety. This study examined the effect of inhalation of the aroma of geranium essential oil on the level of anxiety and physiological parameters of nulliparous women in the first stage of labor. Methods: In study, was carried out on 100 nulliparous women admitted to Bent al-Hoda Hospital in the city of Bojnord in North Khorasan province of Iran during 2012-2013. The women were randomly assigned to two groups of equal size, one experimental group (geranium essential oil) and one control (placebo) group. Anxiety levels were measured using Spielberger' questionnaire before and after intervention. Physiological parameters (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, pulse rate) were also measured before and after intervention in both groups. Data analysis was conducted using the x2 test, paired t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Wilcox on test on SPSS 11.5. Results: The mean anxiety score decreased significantly after inhalation of the aroma of geranium essential oil. There was also a significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Aroma of essential oil of geraniums can effectively reduce anxiety during labor and can be recommended as a non-invasive anti-anxiety aid during childbirth. PMID:26161367

  16. Twospotted spider mite population level, distribution, and damage on ivy geranium in response to different nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization regimes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Opit, George P; Jonas, Valerie M; Williams, Kimberly A; Nechols, James R; Margolies, David C

    2007-12-01

    The influence of plant nutrition on arthropod pests has often been studied by comparing plants provided suboptimal nutrients with those provided sufficient or luxurious nutrients, but such results have limited applicability to commercially produced crops because nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are almost never limiting in greenhouse production. We conducted a series of experiments with ivy geranium, Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Hŕ. ex Aiton 'Amethyst 96' to determine the response of twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acarina: Tetranychidae), to six combinations of N (8 or 24 mM) and P (0.32, 0.64, or 1.28 mM) that reflected commercial production practices. All six combinations resulted in saleable plants when plants were free of spider mites, but tissue N and P concentrations among fertilizer combinations were different. On mite-infested plants, no difference in mite numbers or plant damage was found in response to N fertilization rates. Phosphorus had no effect on mite population level until week 8, at which time plants fertilized with 0.64 mM P had slightly more mites than plants fertilized with 0.32 mM. However, overall quality and dry weight of plants fertilized by 0.32 mM P was lower than that of 0.64 and 1.28 mM, which suggests that ivy geranium plants fertilized with the higher P rates may better compensate for mite feeding damage. Positive correlations were found between within-plant distribution of mites and the corresponding tissue N and P concentrations in three foliage strata, suggesting that tissue nutrient content may influence mite selection of feeding sites. PMID:18232399

  17. Chemical characterization and bioactive properties of Geranium molle L.: from the plant to the most active extract and its phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Graça, V C; Barros, Lillian; Calhelha, Ricardo C; Dias, Maria Inês; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Santos, P F

    2016-05-18

    After a period of indifference, in which synthetic compounds were favored, there is an increasing interest in the study of the biological properties of plants and the active principles responsible for their therapeutic properties. Geranium molle L. has been used in the Portuguese folk medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer but, unlike many of the species from the Geranium genus, its phytochemical characterization and biological activity are virtually unexplored. In this study a G. molle sample from Trás-os-Montes, north-eastern Portugal, was chemically characterized regarding nutritional value, free sugars, organic acids, fatty acids and tocopherols, and several aqueous (decoction, infusion) and organic (n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, acetone, methanol) extracts of the plant were assessed for their bioactive properties. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by means of the free radicals scavenging activity, reducing power and inhibition of lipid peroxidation. The cytotoxicity of the different extracts was assessed in vitro against several human cancer cell lines (breast, lung, cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas) and, additionally, their hepatotoxicity was evaluated using a porcine liver primary cell culture. G. molle was shown to be rich in carbohydrates and proteins, providing tocopherols and essential fatty acids. Amongst the various extracts, the acetone extract was found to have the highest content of phenolic compounds (mainly ellagitannins, but also some flavone and flavonol glycosides) as well as the highest antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the chemical composition and bioactive properties of G. molle. PMID:27094513

  18. Generalised Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Raphael; Harrow, Aram W.; Popa, Alexandru; Sach, Benjamin

    Given a pattern p over an alphabet Σ p and a text t over an alphabet Σ t , we consider the problem of determining a mapping f from Σ p to {Σ}t+ such that t = f(p 1)f(p 2)...f(p m ). This class of problems, which was first introduced by Amir and Nor in 2004, is defined by different constraints on the mapping f. We give NP-Completeness results for a wide range of conditions. These include when f is either many-to-one or one-to-one, when Σ t is binary and when the range of f is limited to strings of constant length. We then introduce a related problem we term pattern matching with string classes which we show to be solvable efficiently. Finally, we discuss an optimisation variant of generalised matching and give a polynomial-time min (1,sqrt{k/OPT})-approximation algorithm for fixed k.

  19. Anti-hepatitis B virus activities of Geranium carolinianum L. extracts and identification of the active components.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiyang; Huang, Hai; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Meiqing; Zhou, Pei

    2008-04-01

    The ethanol extract of Geranium carolinianum L., a domestic plant grown in China, was subjected to sequential extractions with different organic solvents. The extracts were assayed for anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) activities. The ethyl acetate fraction was found to contain the highest level of anti-HBV activity. In order to identify the active ingredients, the ethyl acetate fraction was further fractionated by column chromatography. Seven compounds were identified including ellagic acid, geraniin, quercitrin, hyperin, hirsutrin, quercetin, and kaempferol, whose structures were determined by NMR. The presence of the anti-HBV compounds geraniin, ellagic acid and hyperin in G. carolinianum L. may account for the effectiveness of this folk medicine in the treatment of HBV infections. Geraniin inhibited hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) secretion by more than 85.8% and 63.7%, respectively, at the non-cytotoxic concentration of 200 microg/ml. The inhibitions of HBsAg and HBeAg secretion by geraniin were higher than the inhibition by the positive control Lamivudine, 33.5% and 32.2% respectively, at the same concentration. Since HBeAg is involved in immune tolerance during HBV infection, the newly identified anti-HBV compound geraniin might be a candidate agent to overcome the immune tolerance in HBV-infected individuals. This is the first report of the anti-HBV effects of geraniin and hyperin, the active substances derived from G. carolinianum L. PMID:18379075

  20. Inhibitory effects of geranium essential oil and its major component, citronellol, on degranulation and cytokine production by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuko; Sato, Harumi; Yorita, Mika; Nakayama, Hiroto; Miyazato, Hironari; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Jippo, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of geranium essential oil (GEO) on anaphylaxis. GEO can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, but its roles in allergic reactions are incompletely understood. Here, we used mouse cells to show that GEO inhibited the degranulation of cultured mast cells (CMCs). Citronellol is the major component of GEO and inhibited CMC degranulation. The l-enantiomer of citronellol more effectively suppressed CMC degranulation than did d-citronellol. We also examined whether citronellol could inhibit the immunoglobulin (Ig) E-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Treatment with various concentrations of citronellol before CMC activation with IgE significantly inhibited the induction of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, citronellol suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK), which is critical for ERK activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. These findings suggest that citronellol may represent a candidate compound for the effective treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:26927807

  1. Evaluation of anti-Candida potential of geranium oil constituents against clinical isolates of Candida albicans differentially sensitive to fluconazole: inhibition of growth, dimorphism and sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Rathod, V; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Fluconazole (FLC) susceptibility of isolates of Candida spp., (n = 42) and efficacy as well as mechanism of anti-Candida activity of three constituents of geranium oil is evaluated in this study. No fluconazole resistance was observed among the clinical isolates tested, however 22% were susceptible-dose-dependent (S-DD) [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 16 μg ml(-1)] and a standard strain of C. albicans ATCC 10231 was resistant (≥ 64 μg ml(-1)). Geraniol and geranyl acetate were equally effective, fungicidal at 0.064% v/v concentrations i.e. MICs (561 μg ml(-1) and 584 μg ml(-1) respectively) and killed 99.9% inoculum within 15 and 30 min of exposures respectively. Citronellol was least effective and fungistatic. C. albicans dimorphism (Y → H) was highly sensitive to geranium oil constituents tested (IC50 approximately 0.008% v/v). Geraniol, geranyl acetate and citronellol brought down MICs of FLC by 16-, 32- and 64-fold respectively in a FLC-resistant strain. Citronellol and geraniol arrested cells in G1 phase while geranyl acetate in G2-M phase of cell cycle at MIC(50). In vitro cytotoxicity study revealed that geraniol, geranyl acetate and citronellol were non-toxic to HeLa cells at MICs of the C. albicans growth. Our results indicate that two of the three geranium oil constituents tested exhibit excellent anti-Candida activity and significant synergistic activity with fluconazole. PMID:20337938

  2. Acquisition of physical dormancy and ontogeny of the micropyle–water-gap complex in developing seeds of Geranium carolinianum (Geraniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Arachchige, N. S.; Baskin, J. M.; Geneve, R. L.; Baskin, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The ‘hinged valve gap’ has been previously identified as the initial site of water entry (i.e. water gap) in physically dormant (PY) seeds of Geranium carolinianum (Geraniaceae). However, neither the ontogeny of the hinged valve gap nor acquisition of PY by seeds of Geraniaceae has been studied previously. The aims of the present study were to investigate the physiological events related to acquisition of PY and the ontogeny of the hinged valve gap and seed coat of G. carolinianum. Methods Seeds of G. carolinianum were studied from the ovule stage until dispersal. The developmental stages of acquisition of germinability, physiological maturity and PY were determined by seed measurement, germination and imbibition experiments using intact seeds and isolated embryos of both fresh and slow-dried seeds. Ontogeny of the seed coat and water gap was studied using light microscopy. Key Results Developing seeds achieved germinability, physiological maturity and PY on days 9, 14 and 20 after pollination (DAP), respectively. The critical moisture content of seeds on acquisition of PY was 11 %. Slow-drying caused the stage of acquisition of PY to shift from 20 to 13 DAP. Greater extent of cell division and differentiation at the micropyle, water gap and chalaza than at the rest of the seed coat resulted in particular anatomical features. Palisade and subpalisade cells of varying forms developed in these sites. A clear demarcation between the water gap and micropyle is not evident due to their close proximity. Conclusions Acquisition of PY in seeds of G. carolinianum occurs after physiological maturity and is triggered by maturation drying. The micropyle and water gap cannot be considered as two separate entities, and thus it is more appropriate to consider them together as a ‘micropyle–water-gap complex’. PMID:21546433

  3. Defensive strategies in Geranium sylvaticum, Part 2: Roles of water-soluble tannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids against natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Anu

    2013-11-01

    Geranium sylvaticum is a common herbaceous plant in Fennoscandia, which has a unique phenolic composition. Ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, galloylglucoses, gallotannins, galloyl quinic acids and flavonoids possess variable distribution in its different organs. These phenolic compounds are thought to have an important role in plant-herbivore interactions. The aim of this study was to quantify these different water-soluble phenolic compounds and measure the biological activity of the eight organs of G. sylvaticum. Compounds were characterized and quantified using HPLC-DAD/MS, in addition, total proanthocyanidins were determined by BuOH-HCl assay and total phenolics by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Two in vitro biological activity measurements were used: the prooxidant activity was measured by the browning assay and antioxidant activity by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. Organ extracts were fractionated using column chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and the activities of fractions was similarly measured to evaluate which polyphenol groups contributed the most to the biological activity of each organ. The data on the activity of fractions were examined by multivariate data analysis. The water-soluble extracts of leaves and pistils, which contained over 30% of the dry weight as ellagitannins, showed the highest pro-oxidant activity among the organ extracts. Fraction analysis revealed that flavonoids and galloyl quinic acids also exhibited high pro-oxidant activity. In contrast, the most antioxidant active organ extracts were those of the main roots and hairy roots that contained high amounts of proanthocyanidins in addition to ellagitannins. Analysis of the fractions showed that especially ellagitannins and galloyl quinic acids have high antioxidant activity. We conclude that G. sylvaticum allocates a significant amount of tannins in those plant parts that are important to the fitness of the plant and susceptible to natural enemies, i

  4. Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus, geranium, and lavender and the mosquito repellent MyggA natural to Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, Thomas G T; Garboui, Samira; Palsson, Katinka

    2006-07-01

    MyggA Natural (Bioglan, Lund, Sweden) is a commercially available repellent against blood-feeding arthropods. It contains 30% of lemon-scented eucalyptus, Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K. D. Hill & L. A. S. Johnson (Myrtaceae), oil with a minimum of 50% p-menthane-3,8-diol. MyggA Natural also contains small amounts of the essential oils of lavender, Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae), and geranium, Pelargonium graveolens L'Her. (Geraniaceae). In laboratory bioassays, MyggA Natural and C. citriodora oil exhibited 100% repellency against host-seeking nymphs of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae). Lavender oil and geranium oil, when diluted to 1% in 1,2-propanediol, had weak repellent activities on I. ricinus nymphs, but when diluted to 30% in 1,2-propanediol had 100% repellencies. 1,2-Propanediol (100%) had no significant repellent activity in comparison with that of the control. In field tests in tick-infested areas in central Sweden, tick repellency of MyggA Natural and C. citriodora oil was tested by the blanket-dragging technique for 4 d during a 6-d period. The repellencies (74 and 85%, respectively) on day 1 are similar (89%) to that of blankets treated in a similar manner with 19% diethyl-methyl-benzamide, based on previous work. Repellencies declined significantly from day 1 to day 6 (74 to 45% for MyggA Natural; 85 to 42% for C. citriodora oil). PMID:16892632

  5. Simultaneous functions of the installed DAS/DAK formaldehyde-assimilation pathway and the original formaldehyde metabolic pathways enhance the ability of transgenic geranium to purify gaseous formaldehyde polluted environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengen; Xiao, Sunqin; Xuan, Xiuxia; Sun, Zhen; Li, Kunzhi; Chen, Limei

    2015-04-01

    The overexpression of dihydroxyacetone synthase (DAS) and dihydroxyacetone kinase (DAK) from methylotrophic yeasts in chloroplasts created a photosynthetic formaldehyde (HCHO)-assimilation pathway (DAS/DAK pathway) in transgenic tobacco. Geranium has abilities to absorb and metabolize HCHO. Results of this study showed that the installed DAS/DAK pathway functioning in chloroplasts greatly enhanced the role of the Calvin cycle in transgenic geranium under high concentrations of gaseous HCHO stress. Consequently, the yield of sugars from HCHO-assimilation increased approximately 6-fold in transgenic geranium leaves, and concomitantly, the role of three original HCHO metabolic pathways reduced, leading to a significant decrease in formic acid, citrate and glycine production from HCHO metabolism. Although the role of three metabolic pathways reduced in transgenic plants under high concentrations of gaseous HCHO stress, the installed DAS/DAK pathway could still function together with the original HCHO metabolic pathways. Consequently, the gaseous HCHO-resistance of transgenic plants was significantly improved, and the generation of H2O2 in the transgenic geranium leaves was significantly less than that in the wild type (WT) leaves. Under environmental-polluted gaseous HCHO stress for a long duration, the stomata conductance of transgenic plants remained approximately 2-fold higher than that of the WT, thereby increasing its ability to purify gaseous HCHO polluted environment. PMID:25698666

  6. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  7. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  8. Matching a Distribution by Matching Quantiles Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sgouropoulos, Nikolaos; Yao, Qiwei; Yastremiz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of selecting representative portfolios for backtesting counterparty credit risks, we propose a matching quantiles estimation (MQE) method for matching a target distribution by that of a linear combination of a set of random variables. An iterative procedure based on the ordinary least-squares estimation (OLS) is proposed to compute MQE. MQE can be easily modified by adding a LASSO penalty term if a sparse representation is desired, or by restricting the matching within certain range of quantiles to match a part of the target distribution. The convergence of the algorithm and the asymptotic properties of the estimation, both with or without LASSO, are established. A measure and an associated statistical test are proposed to assess the goodness-of-match. The finite sample properties are illustrated by simulation. An application in selecting a counterparty representative portfolio with a real dataset is reported. The proposed MQE also finds applications in portfolio tracking, which demonstrates the usefulness of combining MQE with LASSO. PMID:26692592

  9. The inhibitory effects of Geranium thunbergii on interferon-γ- and LPS-induced inflammatory responses are mediated by Nrf2 activation

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, HEE-JIN; CHOI, HEE-JUNG; PARK, MI-JU; LEE, JI-YEON; JEONG, SEUNG-IL; LEE, SEONGOO; KIM, KYUN HA; JOO, MYUNGSOO; JEONG, HAN-SOL; KIM, JAI-EUN; HA, KI-TAE

    2015-01-01

    Geranium thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc. (GT; which belongs to the Geraniaceae family) has been used as a traditional medicine in East Asia for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, including arthritis and diarrhea. However, the underlying mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effects of GT remain poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of GT in macrophages. The results revealed that GT significantly inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, as shown by RT-PCR. However, the inhibitory effects of GT on LPS- and IFN-γ-induced inflammation were associated with an enhanced nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activity, but not with the suppression of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity, as shown by western blot analysis. In addition, in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) isolated from Nrf2 knockout mice, GT did not exert any inhibitory effect on the LPS- and IFN-γ-induced inflammation. Taken together, our findings indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of GT may be associated with the activation of Nrf2, an anti-inflammatory transcription factor. PMID:25761198

  10. Comparisons of hot water microclimate heating and conventional overhead heating on the development and nutritional status of seedling geraniums as well as fuel consumption of these heating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Two crops of seedling geraniums (Pelargonium x hortorum Bailey) were grown for 16 weeks under the microclimate system using ''Gro-Mat'' ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) tubing and a 10/sup 0/C air -21.1/sup 0/ media temperature environment. Another crop was grown with conventional heating at 16.6/sup 0/ air temperature. Evaluations were made on growth, flowering, nutritional status, and energy consumed. The microclimate system sporadically produced a taller plant during the first eight weeks of the October crop compared to the conventional heated crop; and the December crop was affected only twice during the initial eight weeks. This time the microclimate heating system produced a shorter plant. After week eight there were fewer differences in height. One of the principal differences noted in this study was that the conventionally heated plants flowered seven to ten days earlier than the microclimate plants. By the end of the crop (week 16) few differences in elemental concentrations were detected between the two types of heating systems. The microclimate heating system used about 30% less natural gas than did the conventional system. It appears that microclimate heating systems are a possible alternative to conventional heating systems.

  11. Chromatographic fingerprint and the simultaneous determination of five bioactive components of geranium carolinianum L. water extract by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiu-Yue; Zhou, Yang; Jin, Xin; Guan, Yue; Xu, Min; Liu, Li-Fang

    2011-01-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC method has been developed in combination with fingerprint analysis and simultaneous determination of five markers, namely gallic acid, corilagin, methyl brevifolincarboxylate, ellagic acid and rutin for evaluation and quality control of Geranium carolinianum L. water extract. Extraction methods were optimized by comparing the hydrolysis efficiency of geraniin, a major tannin of the herb, resulting in the method of extraction with water under reflux. Water extracts were analyzed by HPLC, with a mobile phase of 0.1% aqueous phosphoric acid (v/v) and acetonitrile in a gradient program within 65 min. Compounds were detected at 274 nm UV wavelength. For fingerprint analysis, 17 peaks were selected as the characteristic peaks to evaluate the similarities of different samples collected from the suburb of Nanjing. The correlation coefficients of similarity were greater than 0.993. In quantitative analysis, the five selected markers showed good regression (R > 0.9991) within test ranges, and the average recoveries were between 97.2-101.7% and their RSD values were less than 4.50%. The total contents of the five markers varied from 44.28 to 71.84 mg/g. The method can be very useful for further development of G. carolinianum L. extracts and preparations. PMID:22272101

  12. Chromosome number and secondary chromosomal associations in wild populations of Geranium pratense L. from the cold deserts of Lahaul-Spiti (India).

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Singhal, V K

    2013-01-01

    In this work we studied the meiotic chromosome number and details of secondary chromosomal associations recorded for the first time in Geranium pratense L. from the alpine environments in the cold deserts of Lahaul-Spiti (India). All the presently studied individuals of the species existed at 4x level (x = 14). The present chromosome count of n = 28 in the species adds a new cytotype to the already existing diploid chromosome count of 2n = 28 from the Eastern Himalayas and outside of India. Out of the six accessions scored presently four showed normal meiotic course. However, two accessions investigated from Mud, 3800 m and Koksar, 3140 m depicted abnormal meiotic course due to the presence of multivalents and univalents, and secondary associations of bivalents/chromosomes. The secondary chromosomal associations in the species existed among bivalents/chromosomes were noticed in the PMCs at prophase-1 (diakinesis) and persisted till the separation of sister chromatids at M-II. The variation in the number of bivalents/chromosomes involved in the secondary associations at M-I (2-8) and A-I/M-II (2-12) has also been recorded. The occurrence of such secondary associations of bivalents/chromosomes in G. pratense which existed at 4x level indicated the secondary polyploid nature of the species. PMID:23745363

  13. DOE Matching Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Marvin Adams

    2002-03-01

    OAK 270 - The DOE Matching Grant Program provided $50,000.00 to the Dept of N.E. at TAMU, matching a gift of $50,000.00 from TXU Electric. The $100,000.00 total was spent on scholarships, departmental labs, and computing network.

  14. Generic image matching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongjie T.

    1992-05-01

    The generic imaging matching system (GIMS) provides an optimal systematic solution to any problem of color image processing in printing and publishing that can be classified as or modeled to the generic image matching problem defined. Typical GIMS systems/processes include color matching from different output devices, color conversion, color correction, device calibration, colorimetric scanner, colorimetric printer, colorimetric color reproduction, and image interpolation from scattered data. GIMS makes color matching easy for the user and maximizes operational flexibility allowing the user to obtain the degree of match wanted while providing the capability to achieve the best balance with respect to the human perception of color, color fidelity, and preservation of image information and color contrast. Instead of controlling coefficients in a transformation formula, GIMS controls the mapping directly in a standard device-independent color space, so that color can be matched, conceptually, to the highest possible accuracy. An optimization algorithm called modified vector shading was developed to minimize the matching error and to perform a 'near-neighborhood' gamut compression. An automatic error correction algorithm with a multidirection searching procedure using correlated re-initialization was developed to avoid local minimum failures. Once the mapping for color matching is generated, it can be utilized by a multidimensional linear interpolator with a small look-up-table (LUT) implemented by either software, a hardware interpolator or a digital-signal-processor.

  15. Immersion Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon and Germanium Substrates in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiang-Rong; Wai, Chien M.; Zhang, Daqing; Kranov, Yanko; Mcilroy, David; Lin, Yuehe; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2003-01-29

    A low temperature carbon dioxide based on immersion deposition technology (SFID) has been developed for producing palladium, copper, silver, and other metal films on silicon-based substrates in supercritical CO2. The reaction is initiated by oxidation of elemental silicon to SiF4 or H2SiF6 by HF with the release of electrons that cause the reduction of metal ions in an organometallic precursor to the metallic form on silicon surface in CO2. Only the substrate surfaces are coated with metals using this method. Based on surface analysis of the films and spectroscopic analysis of the reaction products, the mechanism of metal film deposition is discussed. The metal films (Pd, Cu, and Ag) formed on silicon surfaces by the SFID method exhibit good coverage, smooth and dense texture, high purity and a metallic behavior. Similarly, metal films can also be deposited onto geranium substrates using SFID. The gas-like properties and the high pressure of the supercritical fluids, combined with the low reaction temperature, make this SFID method potentially useful for depositing thin metal films in small features, which are difficult to accomplish by conventional CVD methods.

  16. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  17. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  18. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  19. Meaningful matches in stereovision.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Neus; Almansa, Andrés; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    This paper introduces a statistical method to decide whether two blocks in a pair of images match reliably. The method ensures that the selected block matches are unlikely to have occurred "just by chance." The new approach is based on the definition of a simple but faithful statistical background model for image blocks learned from the image itself. A theorem guarantees that under this model, not more than a fixed number of wrong matches occurs (on average) for the whole image. This fixed number (the number of false alarms) is the only method parameter. Furthermore, the number of false alarms associated with each match measures its reliability. This a contrario block-matching method, however, cannot rule out false matches due to the presence of periodic objects in the images. But it is successfully complemented by a parameterless self-similarity threshold. Experimental evidence shows that the proposed method also detects occlusions and incoherent motions due to vehicles and pedestrians in nonsimultaneous stereo. PMID:22442122

  20. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  1. Scanner matching optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupers, Michiel; Klingbeil, Patrick; Tschischgale, Joerg; Buhl, Stefan; Hempel, Fritjof

    2009-03-01

    Cost of ownership of scanners for the manufacturing of front end layers is becoming increasingly expensive. The ability to quickly switch the production of a layer to another scanner in case it is down is important. This paper presents a method to match the scanner grids in the most optimal manner so that use of front end scanners in effect becomes interchangeable. A breakdown of the various components of overlay is given and we discuss methods to optimize the matching strategy in the fab. A concern here is how to separate the scanner and process induced effects. We look at the relative contributions of intrafield and interfield errors caused by the scanner and the process. Experimental results of a method to control the scanner grid are presented and discussed. We compare the overlay results before and after optimizing the scanner grids and show that the matching penalty is reduced by 20%. We conclude with some thoughts on the need to correct the remaining matching errors.

  2. Inter-image matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, R. H., Jr.; Juday, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Interimage matching is the process of determining the geometric transformation required to conform spatially one image to another. In principle, the parameters of that transformation are varied until some measure of some difference between the two images is minimized or some measure of sameness (e.g., cross-correlation) is maximized. The number of such parameters to vary is faily large (six for merely an affine transformation), and it is customary to attempt an a priori transformation reducing the complexity of the residual transformation or subdivide the image into small enough match zones (control points or patches) that a simple transformation (e.g., pure translation) is applicable, yet large enough to facilitate matching. In the latter case, a complex mapping function is fit to the results (e.g., translation offsets) in all the patches. The methods reviewed have all chosen one or both of the above options, ranging from a priori along-line correction for line-dependent effects (the high-frequency correction) to a full sensor-to-geobase transformation with subsequent subdivision into a grid of match points.

  3. MATCH PLAY, SOAP HOPE.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Perry G; Gururaja, Ramnarayan Paragi; Hilton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Education Commission (MEC) has published Graduate Medical Education (GME) data since 1997, including the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) and the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP), and totals all GME in Louisiana for annual publication. The NRMP provides the quotas and filled positions by institution. Following the NRMP, SOAP attempts to place unmatched candidates with slots that are unfilled. The NRMP Fellowship match also comes close to filling quotas and has a significant SOAP. Thus, an accurate number of total filled positions is best obtained in July of the same match year. All GME programs in Louisiana are represented for 2014, and the number trend 2005 to 2014 shows that the only dip was post-Katrina in 2005-2006. The March match after SOAP 2014 is at the peak for both senior medical students and post graduate year one (PGY-1) residents. A significant and similar number stay in Louisiana GME institutions after graduation. Also noteworthy is that a lower percentage are staying in state, due to increased enrollment in all Louisiana medical schools. PMID:27159458

  4. Asynchronous event-based binocular stereo matching.

    PubMed

    Rogister, Paul; Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Lichtsteiner, Patrick; Delbruck, Tobi

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel event-based stereo matching algorithm that exploits the asynchronous visual events from a pair of silicon retinas. Unlike conventional frame-based cameras, recent artificial retinas transmit their outputs as a continuous stream of asynchronous temporal events, in a manner similar to the output cells of the biological retina. Our algorithm uses the timing information carried by this representation in addressing the stereo-matching problem on moving objects. Using the high temporal resolution of the acquired data stream for the dynamic vision sensor, we show that matching on the timing of the visual events provides a new solution to the real-time computation of 3-D objects when combined with geometric constraints using the distance to the epipolar lines. The proposed algorithm is able to filter out incorrect matches and to accurately reconstruct the depth of moving objects despite the low spatial resolution of the sensor. This brief sets up the principles for further event-based vision processing and demonstrates the importance of dynamic information and spike timing in processing asynchronous streams of visual events. PMID:24808513

  5. Microfabrication of stacks of acoustic matching layers for 15 MHz ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Manh, Tung; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan Thai; Johansen, Tonni F; Hoff, Lars

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a novel method used to manufacture stacks of multiple matching layers for 15 MHz piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, using fabrication technology derived from the MEMS industry. The acoustic matching layers were made on a silicon wafer substrate using micromachining techniques, i.e., lithography and etch, to design silicon and polymer layers with the desired acoustic properties. Two matching layer configurations were tested: a double layer structure consisting of a silicon-polymer composite and polymer and a triple layer structure consisting of silicon, composite, and polymer. The composite is a biphase material of silicon and polymer in 2-2 connectivity. The matching layers were manufactured by anisotropic wet etch of a (110)-oriented Silicon-on-Insulator wafer. The wafer was etched by KOH 40 wt%, to form 83 μm deep and 4.5mm long trenches that were subsequently filled with Spurr's epoxy, which has acoustic impedance 2.4 MRayl. This resulted in a stack of three layers: The silicon substrate, a silicon-polymer composite intermediate layer, and a polymer layer on the top. The stacks were bonded to PZT disks to form acoustic transducers and the acoustic performance of the fabricated transducers was tested in a pulse-echo setup, where center frequency, -6 dB relative bandwidth and insertion loss were measured. The transducer with two matching layers was measured to have a relative bandwidth of 70%, two-way insertion loss 18.4 dB and pulse length 196 ns. The transducers with three matching layers had fractional bandwidths from 90% to 93%, two-way insertion loss ranging from 18.3 to 25.4 dB, and pulse lengths 326 and 446 ns. The long pulse lengths of the transducers with three matching layers were attributed to ripple in the passband. PMID:24041498

  6. Threefold entanglement matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Luis; Muñoz, Ariana; Hutin, Alice; Hecker, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    We address the problem of entanglement matching in the probabilistic teleportation scheme by considering two independent levels of entanglement in the measurement basis. The probability of a successful teleportation has an upper bound which only depends on the amount of entanglement of the quantum channel. However, we found that each entanglement of the measurement basis contributes independently to the success probability as long as it is weaker than the entanglement of the channel. Accordingly, the teleportation process reaches its optimal probability when both entanglements of the measurement basis match the entanglement of the channel. Additionally, we study the probabilistic scheme for extracting an unknown state from a partially known state. We characterize the success probability and the concurrence involved in that process.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the thermal requirements for stepwise physical dormancy-break in seeds of the winter annual Geranium carolinianum (Geraniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Arachchige, N. S.; Baskin, J. M.; Geneve, R. L.; Baskin, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Physical dormancy (PY)-break in some annual plant species is a two-step process controlled by two different temperature and/or moisture regimes. The thermal time model has been used to quantify PY-break in several species of Fabaceae, but not to describe stepwise PY-break. The primary aims of this study were to quantify the thermal requirement for sensitivity induction by developing a thermal time model and to propose a mechanism for stepwise PY-breaking in the winter annual Geranium carolinianum. Methods Seeds of G. carolinianum were stored under dry conditions at different constant and alternating temperatures to induce sensitivity (step I). Sensitivity induction was analysed based on the thermal time approach using the Gompertz function. The effect of temperature on step II was studied by incubating sensitive seeds at low temperatures. Scanning electron microscopy, penetrometer techniques, and different humidity levels and temperatures were used to explain the mechanism of stepwise PY-break. Key Results The base temperature (Tb) for sensitivity induction was 17·2 °C and constant for all seed fractions of the population. Thermal time for sensitivity induction during step I in the PY-breaking process agreed with the three-parameter Gompertz model. Step II (PY-break) did not agree with the thermal time concept. Q10 values for the rate of sensitivity induction and PY-break were between 2·0 and 3·5 and between 0·02 and 0·1, respectively. The force required to separate the water gap palisade layer from the sub-palisade layer was significantly reduced after sensitivity induction. Conclusions Step I and step II in PY-breaking of G. carolinianum are controlled by chemical and physical processes, respectively. This study indicates the feasibility of applying the developed thermal time model to predict or manipulate sensitivity induction in seeds with two-step PY-breaking processes. The model is the first and most detailed one yet developed for

  8. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  9. Multinomial pattern matching revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Multinomial pattern matching (MPM) is an automatic target recognition algorithm developed for specifically radar data at Sandia National Laboratories. The algorithm is in a family of algorithms that first quantizes pixel value into Nq bins based on pixel amplitude before training and classification. This quantization step reduces the sensitivity of algorithm performance to absolute intensity variation in the data, typical of radar data where signatures exhibit high variation for even small changes in aspect angle. Our previous work has focused on performance analysis of peaky template matching, a special case of MPM where binary quantization is used (Nq = 2). Unfortunately references on these algorithms are generally difficult to locate and here we revisit the MPM algorithm and illustrate the underlying statistical model and decision rules for two algorithm interpretations: the 1-of-K vector form and the scalar. MPM can also be used as a detector and specific attention is given to algorithm tuning where "peak pixels" are chosen based on their underlying empirical probabilities according to a reward minimization strategy aimed at reducing false alarms in the detection scenario and false positives in a classification capacity. The algorithms are demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations on the AFRL civilian vehicle dataset for variety of choices of Nq.

  10. Skyline based terrain matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Lance A.

    1990-01-01

    Skyline-based terrain matching, a new method for locating the vantage point of stereo camera or laser range-finding measurements on a global map previously prepared by satellite or aerial mapping is described. The orientation of the vantage is assumed known, but its translational parameters are determined by the algorithm. Skylines, or occluding contours, can be extracted from the sensory measurements taken by an autonomous vehicle. They can also be modeled from the global map, given a vantage estimate from which to start. The two sets of skylines, represented in cylindrical coordinates about either the true or the estimated vantage, are employed as 'features' or reference objects common to both sources of information. The terrain matching problem is formulated in terms of finding a translation between the respective representations of the skylines, by approximating the two sets of skylines as identical features (curves) on the actual terrain. The search for this translation is based on selecting the longest of the minimum-distance vectors between corresponding curves from the two sets of skylines. In successive iterations of the algorithm, the approximation that the two sets of curves are identical becomes more accurate, and the vantage estimate continues to improve. The algorithm was implemented and evaluated on a simulated terrain. Illustrations and examples are included.

  11. Matching pursuit of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeaud, Francois; Mallat, Stephane G.

    1995-04-01

    A crucial problem in image analysis is to construct efficient low-level representations of an image, providing precise characterization of features which compose it, such as edges and texture components. An image usually contains very different types of features, which have been successfully modeled by the very redundant family of 2D Gabor oriented wavelets, describing the local properties of the image: localization, scale, preferred orientation, amplitude and phase of the discontinuity. However, this model generates representations of very large size. Instead of decomposing a given image over this whole set of Gabor functions, we use an adaptive algorithm (called matching pursuit) to select the Gabor elements which approximate at best the image, corresponding to the main features of the image. This produces compact representation in terms of few features that reveal the local image properties. Results prove that the elements are precisely localized on the edges of the images, and give a local decomposition as linear combinations of `textons' in the textured regions. We introduce a fast algorithm to compute the matching pursuit decomposition for images with a complexity of (Omicron) (N log2 N) per iteration for an image of N2 pixels.

  12. The Earliest Matches

    PubMed Central

    Goren-Inbar, Naama; Freikman, Michael; Garfinkel, Yosef; Goring-Morris, Nigel A.; Grosman, Leore

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical objects made usually of fired clay but sometimes of stone were found at the Yarmukian Pottery Neolithic sites of Sha‘ar HaGolan and Munhata (first half of the 8th millennium BP) in the Jordan Valley. Similar objects have been reported from other Near Eastern Pottery Neolithic sites. Most scholars have interpreted them as cultic objects in the shape of phalli, while others have referred to them in more general terms as “clay pestles,” “clay rods,” and “cylindrical clay objects.” Re-examination of these artifacts leads us to present a new interpretation of their function and to suggest a reconstruction of their technology and mode of use. We suggest that these objects were components of fire drills and consider them the earliest evidence of a complex technology of fire ignition, which incorporates the cylindrical objects in the role of matches. PMID:22870306

  13. The earliest matches.

    PubMed

    Goren-Inbar, Naama; Freikman, Michael; Garfinkel, Yosef; Goring-Morris, A Nigel; Goring-Morris, Nigel A; Grosman, Leore

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical objects made usually of fired clay but sometimes of stone were found at the Yarmukian Pottery Neolithic sites of Sha'ar HaGolan and Munhata (first half of the 8(th) millennium BP) in the Jordan Valley. Similar objects have been reported from other Near Eastern Pottery Neolithic sites. Most scholars have interpreted them as cultic objects in the shape of phalli, while others have referred to them in more general terms as "clay pestles," "clay rods," and "cylindrical clay objects." Re-examination of these artifacts leads us to present a new interpretation of their function and to suggest a reconstruction of their technology and mode of use. We suggest that these objects were components of fire drills and consider them the earliest evidence of a complex technology of fire ignition, which incorporates the cylindrical objects in the role of matches. PMID:22870306

  14. Perfectly matched multiscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu

    In this dissertation, the Perfectly Matched Multiscale Simulations (PMMS), a method of discrete-to-continuum multiscale scale computation is studied, revised and extended. In particular, the role of the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) in PMMS is carefully studied. We show that instead of following the PML theory of continuum, the PML equations of motion in PMMS can be derived by stretching the inter-atomic equilibrium distance. As a result, the displacement solution in the PML region has the desired spatial damping property. It is also shown that the dispersion relationship in the PML region is different from the one in the original lattice. And a reflection coefficient is computed. We also incorporate the local Quasicontinuum (QC) theory with the cohesive Finite Element (FE) method to form a cohesive QC scheme which can deal with arbitrary discontinuities. This idea is built into the PMMS method to simulate a moving screw dislocation. The second part of the dissertation is to extend PMMS to finite temperature. A multiscale thermodynamics is proposed based on the idea of distributed coarse scale thermostats. Each coarse scale node is viewed as a thermostat and has part of atoms associated with it. The atomic motion at the fine scale level is governed by the Nose-Hoover dynamics. At the coarse scale, the expression of a coarse-grained Helmholtz free energy is derived and coupled thermo-mechanical equations are formulated based on it. With the proposed framework, the finite-temperature PMMS method is capable of simulating problems with drastic temperature change. Several numerical examples are computed to validate the method.

  15. Distinctiveness Maps for Image Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Tomasi, Carlo

    2000-01-01

    Stereo correspondence is hard because different image features can look alike. We propose a measure for the ambiguity of image points that allows matching distinctive points first and breaks down the matching task into smaller and separate subproblems. Experiments with an algorithm based on this measure demonstrate the ensuing efficiency and low likelihood of incorrect matches.

  16. Silicon microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Pola, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    Silicon detectors are being studied as microdosemeters since they can provide sensitive volumes of micrometric dimensions. They can be applied for assessing single-event effects in electronic instrumentation exposed to complex fields around high-energy accelerators or in space missions. When coupled to tissue-equivalent converters, they can be used for measuring the quality of radiation therapy beams or for dosimetry. The use of micrometric volumes avoids the contribution of wall effects to the measured spectra. Further advantages of such detectors are their compactness, cheapness, transportability and a low sensitivity to vibrations. The following problems need to be solved when silicon devices are used for microdosimetry: (i) the sensitive volume has to be confined in a region of well-known dimensions; (ii) the electric noise limits the minimum detectable energy; (iii) corrections for tissue-equivalency should be made; (iv) corrections for shape equivalency should be made when referring to a spherical simulated site of tissue; (v) the angular response should be evaluated carefully; (vi) the efficiency of a single detector of micrometric dimensions is very poor and detector arrays should be considered. Several devices have been proposed as silicon microdosemeters, based on different technologies (telescope detectors, silicon on insulator detectors and arrays of cylindrical p-n junctions with internal amplification), in order to satisfy the issues mentioned above. PMID:21112892

  17. Constraint-based stereo matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    The major difficulty in stereo vision is the correspondence problem that requires matching features in two stereo images. Researchers describe a constraint-based stereo matching technique using local geometric constraints among edge segments to limit the search space and to resolve matching ambiguity. Edge segments are used as image features for stereo matching. Epipolar constraint and individual edge properties are used to determine possible initial matches between edge segments in a stereo image pair. Local edge geometric attributes such as continuity, junction structure, and edge neighborhood relations are used as constraints to guide the stereo matching process. The result is a locally consistent set of edge segment correspondences between stereo images. These locally consistent matches are used to generate higher-level hypotheses on extended edge segments and junctions to form more global contexts to achieve global consistency.

  18. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  19. Quantum image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Dang, Yijie; Wang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Quantum image processing (QIP) means the quantum-based methods to speed up image processing algorithms. Many quantum image processing schemes claim that their efficiency is theoretically higher than their corresponding classical schemes. However, most of them do not consider the problem of measurement. As we all know, measurement will lead to collapse. That is to say, executing the algorithm once, users can only measure the final state one time. Therefore, if users want to regain the results (the processed images), they must execute the algorithms many times and then measure the final state many times to get all the pixels' values. If the measurement process is taken into account, whether or not the algorithms are really efficient needs to be reconsidered. In this paper, we try to solve the problem of measurement and give a quantum image matching algorithm. Unlike most of the QIP algorithms, our scheme interests only one pixel (the target pixel) instead of the whole image. It modifies the probability of pixels based on Grover's algorithm to make the target pixel to be measured with higher probability, and the measurement step is executed only once. An example is given to explain the algorithm more vividly. Complexity analysis indicates that the quantum scheme's complexity is O(2n) in contradistinction to the classical scheme's complexity O(2^{2n+2m}) , where m and n are integers related to the size of images.

  20. Nebular fractionation of silicon isotopes and implications for silicon in Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, N.; Poitrasson, F.; Burkhardt, C.

    2014-12-01

    The silicate Earth has a heavy silicon isotopic composition relative to all chondrite groups, which was taken as evidence for the presence of sufficient amounts of silicon in Earth's core to explain its density deficit. A difficulty remains, however, in that chondrites themselves show variable silicon isotopic composition. For example, enstatite chondrites, the only group of meteorites that matches the Earth's composition for 17O, 48Ca, 50Ti, 54Cr, and 92Mo, have very light silicon isotopic compositions that would require unrealistic amounts of silicon in Earth's core if they were its main constituents. We have measured the silicon isotopic composition of several achondrites that had not been measured before. In particular, we have found that angrites have a heavy silicon isotopic composition, similar to the Earth and the Moon. These meteorites formed under relatively oxidizing conditions (~IW+1) and core formation in their parent-body occurred at relatively low pressure (<0.1 GPa), so core-mantle silicon isotopic fractionation is excluded as a cause for their Earth-like silicon isotopic composition. Angrites are among the most volatile-depleted meteorites and their heavy silicon isotope signature most likely reflects isotopic fractionation by nebular processes. All chondrite groups and the bulk silicate Earth form a trend in silicon isotopic composition vs. Mg/Si ratio, which we will show quantitatively can be explained by a simple nebular process. This can also explain the similarity in silicon isotopic composition between lunar and terrestrial rocks. Therefore, silicon isotopes in terrestrial rocks provide no constraints on the amount of Si in the core and are consistent with the presence of other light elements such as oxygen.

  1. DOE Matching Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoukalas, L.

    2002-12-31

    Funding used to support a portion of the Nuclear Engineering Educational Activities. Upgrade of teaching labs, student support to attend professional conferences, salary support for graduate students. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded Purdue University School of Nuclear Engineering during the period of five academic years covered in this report starting in the academic year 1996-97 and ending in the academic year 2000-2001. The total amount of funding for the grant received from DOE is $416K. In the 1990's, Nuclear Engineering Education in the US experienced a significant slow down. Student enrollment, research support, number of degrees at all levels (BS, MS, and PhD), number of accredited programs, University Research and Training Reactors, all went through a decline to alarmingly low levels. Several departments closed down, while some were amalgamated with other academic units (Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, etc). The School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University faced a major challenge when in the mid 90's our total undergraduate enrollment for the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years dropped in the low 30's. The DOE Matching Grant program greatly strengthened Purdue's commitment to the Nuclear Engineering discipline and has helped to dramatically improve our undergraduate and graduate enrollment, attract new faculty and raise the School of Nuclear Engineering status within the University and in the National scene (our undergraduate enrollment has actually tripled and stands at an all time high of over 90 students; total enrollment currently exceeds 110 students). In this final technical report we outline and summarize how the grant was expended at Purdue University.

  2. Quantum memory based on phase matching control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi-Wen; Kalachev, A.; Hemmer, P.; Scully, M. O.; Kocharovskaya, O.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss a class of quantum memory (QM) scheme based on phase matching control (PMC). A single-photon wave packet can be mapped into and retrieved on demand from a long-lived spin grating in the presence of a control field, forming along with the signal field a Raman configuration, when the wave vector of the control field is continuously changed in time. Such mapping and retrieval takes place due to the phase matching condition and requires neither a variation of the amplitude of the control field nor inhomogeneous broadening of the medium. We discuss the general model of PMC QM and its specific implementation via (i) modulation of the refractive index, (ii) angular scanning of the control field, and (iii) its frequency chirp. We show that the performance of the PMC QM protocol may be as good as those realized in the gradient echo memory (GEM) but achieved with less stringent requirements on the medium. We suggest the experimental realization of PMC QM in nitrogen vacancies (NV) and silicon vacancies (SiV) in diamond as well as in rare-earth doped crystals. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Igor Yevseyev, the internationally renowned scientist, one of the pioneers of the field of quantum coherence effects. We have warm memories of many fruitful and pleasant communications with Professor Yevseyev during the International Laser Physics Workshops, which he so successfully organized and hosted.

  3. INFOODS guidelines for food matching

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is necessary to match food consumption data with food composition data in order to calculate estimates of nutrient intakes and dietary exposure. This can be done manually or through an automated system. As food matching procedures are key to obtaining high quality estimations of nutrient intake...

  4. Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Overview * Silicon cell development * Substrate production * Cell processing * Cell costs * Opportunities for improvement * Silicon-supported thin films * Summary * Acknowledgement * References

  5. The mode matching technology for MEMS gyroscopes with mutually spaced eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, O.; Postnikov, A.; Kozin, I.; Soloviev, A.; Tarasov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Paper presents a new technology for silicon micromachined gyroscope mode matching with mutually spaced eigenfrequencies. The fabrication of gyroscope sensing element is based on double-sided deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of standard silicon wafer and allows full 3D control of the gimbals and flexures geometry. The developed finite element model allows predicting dynamic characteristics of sensing element versus geometry of flexible suspension beams. Oxidation and successive wet etching of SiO2 layer lead to flexure geometry change (thinning). One-to-one correspondence of measured resonant frequencies and flexures geometry defines the oxidation depth. The mode matching condition is achieved by repeated oxidation-wet etching cycles.

  6. Matching by adjustment: if x matches y, does y match x?

    PubMed

    Dzhafarov, Ehtibar; Perry, Lacey

    2010-01-01

    When dealing with pairwise comparisons of stimuli in two fixed observation areas (e.g., one stimulus on the left, one on the right), we say that the stimulus space is regular well-matched if (1) every stimulus is matched by some stimulus in another observation area, and this matching stimulus is determined uniquely up to matching equivalence (two stimuli being equivalent if they always match or do not match any stimulus together); and (2) if a stimulus is matched by another stimulus then it matches it. The regular well-matchedness property has non-trivial consequences for several issues, ranging from the ancient "sorites" paradox to "probability-distance hypothesis" to modeling of discrimination probabilities by means of Thurstonian-type models. We have tested the regular well-matchedness hypothesis for locations of two dots within two side-by-side circles, and for two side-by-side "flower-like" shapes obtained by superposition of two cosine waves with fixed frequencies in polar coordinates. In the location experiment the two coordinates of the dot in one circle were adjusted to match the location of the dot in another circle. In the shape experiment the two cosine amplitudes of one shape were adjusted to match the other shape. The adjustments on the left and on the right alternated in long series according to the "ping-pong" matching scheme developed in Dzhafarov (2006b, J. Math. Psychol., 50, 74-93). The results have been found to be in a good agreement with the regular well-matchedness hypothesis. PMID:21833195

  7. 49 CFR 173.186 - Matches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Wax “Vesta” matches are matches that can be ignited by friction either on a prepared surface or on a solid surface. (c) Safety matches and wax “Vesta” matches must be tightly packed in securely closed... packaging with any material other than safety matches or wax “Vesta” matches, which must be packed...

  8. 49 CFR 173.186 - Matches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Wax “Vesta” matches are matches that can be ignited by friction either on a prepared surface or on a solid surface. (c) Safety matches and wax “Vesta” matches must be tightly packed in securely closed... packaging with any material other than safety matches or wax “Vesta” matches, which must be packed...

  9. 49 CFR 173.186 - Matches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Wax “Vesta” matches are matches that can be ignited by friction either on a prepared surface or on a solid surface. (c) Safety matches and wax “Vesta” matches must be tightly packed in securely closed... packaging with any material other than safety matches or wax “Vesta” matches, which must be packed...

  10. 49 CFR 173.186 - Matches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Wax “Vesta” matches are matches that can be ignited by friction either on a prepared surface or on a solid surface. (c) Safety matches and wax “Vesta” matches must be tightly packed in securely closed... packaging with any material other than safety matches or wax “Vesta” matches, which must be packed...

  11. 49 CFR 173.186 - Matches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Wax “Vesta” matches are matches that can be ignited by friction either on a prepared surface or on a solid surface. (c) Safety matches and wax “Vesta” matches must be tightly packed in securely closed... packaging with any material other than safety matches or wax “Vesta” matches, which must be packed...

  12. Evaluation of matching cost on the ISPRS stereo matching benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Qingxing; Tang, Xinming; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we evaluated several typical matching costs including CENSUS, mutual information (MI) and the normalized cross correlation using the ISPRS Stereo Matching Benchmark datasets for DSM generation by stereo matching. Two kinds of global optimization algorithms including semi-global matching (SGM) and graph cuts (GC) were used as optimization method. We used a sub-pixel method to obtain more accurate MI lookup table and a sub-pixel method was also used when computing cost by MI lookup table. MI itself is sensitive to partial radiation differences. So we used a kind of cost combined MI and CENSUS. After DSM generation, the deviation data between the generated DSM and Lidar was statistics out to compute the mean deviation (Mean), the median deviation (Med), the standard deviation (Stdev), the normalized median absolute deviation (NMAD), the percentage of deviation in tolerance etc., which were used to evaluate the accuracy of DSM generated from different cost.

  13. Lead-free electric matches.

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S. F.; Hiskey, M. A.; Naud, D.; Busse, J. R.; Asay, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Electric matches are used in pyrotechnics to initiate devices electrically rather than by burning fuses. Fuses have the disadvantage of burning with a long delay before igniting a pyrotechnic device, while electric matches can instantaneously fire a device at a user's command. In addition, electric matches can be fired remotely at a safe distance. Unfortunately, most current commercial electric match compositions contain lead as thiocyanate, nitroresorcinate or tetroxide, which when burned, produces lead-containing smoke. This lead pollutant presents environmental exposure problems to cast, crew, and audience. The reason that these lead containing compounds are used as electric match compositions is that these mixtures have the required thermal stability, yet are simultaneously able to be initiated reliably by a very small thermal stimulus. A possible alternative to lead-containing compounds is nanoscale thermite materials (metastable intermolecular composites or MIC). These superthermite materials can be formulated to be extremely spark sensitive with tunable reaction rate and yield high temperature products. We have formulated and manufactured lead-free electric matches based on nanoscale Al/MoO{sub 3} mixtures. We have determined that these matches fire reliably and to consistently ignite a sample of black powder. Initial safety, ageing and performance results are presented in this paper.

  14. MATCHING IN INFORMAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhout, Jan; Munshi, Kaivan

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes an informal financial institution that brings heterogeneous agents together in groups. We analyze decentralized matching into these groups, and the equilibrium composition of participants that consequently arises. We find that participants sort remarkably well across the competing groups, and that they re-sort immediately following an unexpected exogenous regulatory change. These findings suggest that the competitive matching model might have applicability and bite in other settings where matching is an important equilibrium phenomenon. (JEL: O12, O17, G20, D40) PMID:24027491

  15. The growth of cubic silicon carbide on a compliant substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Sharanda; Soward, Ida

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that silicon carbide grown on silicon and 6H silicon carbide has problems associated with these substrates. This is because silicon and silicon carbide has a 20% lattice mismatch and cubic silicon carbide has not been successfully achieved on 6H silicon carbide. We are investigating the growth of silicon carbide on a compliant substrate in order to grow defect free silicon carbide. This compliant substrate consists of silicon/silicon dioxide with 1200 A of single crystal silicon on the top layer. We are using this compliant substrate because there is a possibility that the silicon dioxide layer and the carbonized layer will allow the silicon lattice to shrink or expand to match the lattice of the silicon carbide. This would improve the electrical properties of the film for the use of device fabrication. When trying to grow silicon carbide, we observed amorphous film. To investigate, we examined the process step by step using RHEED. RHEED data showed that each step was amorphous. We found that just by heating the substrate in the presence of hydrogen it changed the crystal structure. When heated to 1000 C for 2 minutes, RHEED showed that there was an amorphous layer on the surface. We also heated the substrate to 900 C for 2 minutes and RHEED data showed that there was a deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We assumed that the presence of oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. Therefore, we evaporated 2500 A of silicon to all four edges of the wafer to try to enclose the oxygen. When heating the evaporated wafer to 900 C the RHEED data showed single crystalline structure however at 1000 C the RHEED data showed deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We conclude that the substrate itself is temperature dependent and that the oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. We propose to evaporate more silicon on the edges of the wafer to eliminate the escape of oxygen. this will allow

  16. New Effective Multithreaded Matching Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Manne, Fredrik; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-05-19

    Matching is an important combinatorial problem with a number of applications in areas such as community detection, sparse linear algebra, and network alignment. Since computing optimal matchings can be very time consuming, several fast approximation algorithms, both sequential and parallel, have been suggested. Common to the algorithms giving the best solutions is that they tend to be sequential by nature, while algorithms more suitable for parallel computation give solutions of less quality. We present a new simple 1 2 -approximation algorithm for the weighted matching problem. This algorithm is both faster than any other suggested sequential 1 2 -approximation algorithm on almost all inputs and also scales better than previous multithreaded algorithms. We further extend this to a general scalable multithreaded algorithm that computes matchings of weight comparable with the best sequential algorithms. The performance of the suggested algorithms is documented through extensive experiments on different multithreaded architectures.

  17. Upgrading Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, L. M.; Moore, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    Closed-loop process produces semiconductor-grade silicon. Metallurgical-grade silicon converted to ultrapure silicon by reacting with hydrogen and silicon tetrahalide to form trihalosilane, purifying this intermediate and again decomposing to high purity silicon in third stage. Heterogeneously and homogeneously nucleated polycrystalline silicon used in semiconductor device applications and in silicon photovoltaic solar cell fabrication.

  18. Silicon Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwenspoek, Miko; Jansen, Henri V.

    2004-08-01

    This comprehensive book provides an overview of the key techniques used in the fabrication of micron-scale structures in silicon. Recent advances in these techniques have made it possible to create a new generation of microsystem devices, such as microsensors, accelerometers, micropumps, and miniature robots. The authors underpin the discussion of each technique with a brief review of the fundamental physical and chemical principles involved. They pay particular attention to methods such as isotropic and anisotropic wet chemical etching, wafer bonding, reactive ion etching, and surface micromachining. There is a special section on bulk micromachining, and the authors also discuss release mechanisms for movable microstructures. The book is a blend of detailed experimental and theoretical material, and will be of great interest to graduate students and researchers in electrical engineering and materials science whose work involves the study of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  19. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  20. An infrared spectral match between GEMS and interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Keller, L. P.; Snow, T. P.; Hanner, M. S.; Flynn, G. J.; Gezo, J. C.; Clemett, S. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bowey, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectral properties of silicate grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were compared with those of astronomical silicates. The approximately 10-micrometer silicon-oxygen stretch bands of IDPs containing enstatite (MgSiO3), forsterite (Mg2SiO4), and glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS) exhibit fine structure and bandwidths similar to those of solar system comets and some pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars. Some GEMS exhibit a broad, featureless silicon-oxygen stretch band similar to those observed in interstellar molecular clouds and young stellar objects. These GEMS provide a spectral match to astronomical "amorphous" silicates, one of the fundamental building blocks from which the solar system is presumed to have formed.

  1. Matched Peptides: Tuning Matched Molecular Pair Analysis for Biopharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals hold great promise for the future of drug discovery. Nevertheless, rational drug design strategies are mainly focused on the discovery of small synthetic molecules. Herein we present matched peptides, an innovative analysis technique for biological data related to peptide and protein sequences. It represents an extension of matched molecular pair analysis toward macromolecular sequence data and allows quantitative predictions of the effect of single amino acid substitutions on the basis of statistical data on known transformations. We demonstrate the application of matched peptides to a data set of major histocompatibility complex class II peptide ligands and discuss the trends captured with respect to classical quantitative structure–activity relationship approaches as well as structural aspects of the investigated protein–peptide interface. We expect our novel readily interpretable tool at the interface of cheminformatics and bioinformatics to support the rational design of biopharmaceuticals and give directions for further development of the presented methodology. PMID:26501781

  2. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  3. Block Matching for Object Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C; Cheung, S

    2003-10-13

    Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.

  4. Matching properties, and voltage and temperature dependence of MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreary, J. L.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for designing MOS capacitor arrays is discussed, which includes a method of calculating capacitance ratio errors and subsequent total yield. Data illustrating the sensitivity of the ratio matching to capacitor layout, structures, and technology are presented, and measured voltage coefficients of MOS capacitors as function of surface concentration are compared with the calculated coefficients. It is demonstrated that the temperature dependence of space charge capacitance, thermal expansion, and temperature dependence of the dielectric constant are the major components of the temperature coefficient of capacitance. It is also shown that to a first-order, heavily doped polysilicon accumulates and depletes similar to crystalline silicon.

  5. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  6. Enhancing the efficiency of silicon Raman converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, Nathalie; Sipe, John E.; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-05-01

    We propose a silicon ring Raman converter in which the spatial variation of the Raman gain along the ring for TE polarization is used to quasi-phase-match the CARS process. If in addition the pump, Stokes, and anti-Stokes waves involved in the CARS interaction are resonantly enhanced by the ring structure, the Stokes-to-anti-Stokes conversion efficiency can be increased by at least four orders of magnitude over that of one-dimensional perfectly phase-matched silicon Raman converters, and can reach values larger than unity with relatively low input pump intensities. These improvements in conversion performance could substantially expand the practical applicability of the CARS process for optical wavelength conversion.

  7. Stereo matching using Hebbian learning.

    PubMed

    Pajares, G; Cruz, J M; Lopez-Orozco, J A

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the local stereo matching problem using edge segments as features with several attributes. We have verified that the differences in attributes for the true matches cluster in a cloud around a center. The correspondence is established on the basis of the minimum distance criterion, computing the Mahalanobis distance between the difference of the attributes for a current pair of features and the cluster center (similarity constraint). We introduce a learning strategy based on the Hebbian Learning to get the best cluster center. A comparative analysis among methods without learning and with other learning strategies is illustrated. PMID:18252332

  8. Memristor-based pattern matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimo, Martin; Such, Ondrej; Skvarek, Ondrej; Fratrik, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Pattern matching is a machine learning area that requires high-performance hardware. It has been hypothesized that massively parallel designs, which avoid von Neumann architecture, could provide a significant performance boost. Such designs can advantageously use memristive switches. This paper discusses a two-stage design that implements the induced ordered weighted average (IOWA) method for pattern matching. We outline the circuit structure and discuss how a functioning circuit can be achieved using metal oxide devices. We describe our simulations of memristive circuits and illustrate their performance on a vowel classification task.

  9. 7 CFR 2903.5 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.5 Matching requirements. There are no matching funds requirements for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and matching...

  10. 7 CFR 2903.5 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.5 Matching requirements. There are no matching funds requirements for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and matching...

  11. 7 CFR 2903.5 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.5 Matching requirements. There are no matching funds requirements for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and matching...

  12. 7 CFR 2903.5 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.5 Matching requirements. There are no matching funds requirements for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and matching...

  13. 7 CFR 2903.5 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM General Information § 2903.5 Matching requirements. There are no matching funds requirements for the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and matching...

  14. Substrate for thin silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-03-28

    A photovoltaic device for converting solar energy into electrical signals comprises a substrate, a layer of photoconductive semiconductor material grown on said substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an alloy of boron and silicon, the boron being present in a range of from 0.1 to 1.3 atomic percent, the alloy having a lattice constant substantially matched to that of the photoconductive semiconductor material and a resistivity of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}3} ohm-cm. 4 figures.

  15. Substrate for thin silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1995-01-01

    A photovoltaic device for converting solar energy into electrical signals comprises a substrate, a layer of photoconductive semiconductor material grown on said substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an alloy of boron and silicon, the boron being present in a range of from 0.1 to 1.3 atomic percent, the alloy having a lattice constant substantially matched to that of the photoconductive semiconductor material and a resistivity of less than 1.times.10.sup.-3 ohm-cm.

  16. Matching Teacher and Learner Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, John F.; Erickson, Marilyn R.

    This study focuses on the question of "emotional style," defined as the structure or lack of structure in the interaction between teacher and student. Characteristics of "open" and "structured" teachers and students are defined. It is hypothesized that a matching of teacher and student emotional style will result in greater student achievement. A…

  17. Acceptable Ungrammaticality in Sentence Matching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Nigel; Matsuo, Ayumi; Roberts, Leah

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a new set of experiments using the "sentence-matching paradigm" (Forster, 1979; Freedman and Forster, 1985; see also Bley-Vroman and Masterson, 1989), investigating native speakers' and second language (L2) learners' knowledge of constraints on clitic placement in French. Our purpose is three-fold: (1) to shed more light on…

  18. InGaAlAsPN: A Materials System for Silicon Based Optoelectronics and Heterostructure Device Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broekaert, T. P. E.; Tang, S.; Wallace, R. M.; Beam, E. A., III; Duncan, W. M.; Kao, Y. -C.; Liu, H. -Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new material system is proposed for silicon based opto-electronic and heterostructure devices; the silicon lattice matched compositions of the (In,Ga,Al)-(As,P)N 3-5 compounds. In this nitride alloy material system, the bandgap is expected to be direct at the silicon lattice matched compositions with a bandgap range most likely to be in the infrared to visible. At lattice constants ranging between those of silicon carbide and silicon, a wider bandgap range is expected to be available and the high quality material obtained through lattice matching could enable applications such as monolithic color displays, high efficiency multi-junction solar cells, opto-electronic integrated circuits for fiber communications, and the transfer of existing 3-5 technology to silicon.

  19. Modeling and analysis of silicon-embedded MEMS toroidal inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araghchini, M.; Lang, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the modeling and analysis of three-dimensional silicon-embedded toroidal inductors designed for power converter applications. Special attention is given to modeling phenomena associated with the presence of silicon, namely an increase in loss and parasitic capacitance. Silicon-embedded inductors can be fabricated with silicon inside the donut-shaped toroidal core and inside the donut hole, as well as with silicon above, below and outside the inductor. It is argued here that, with the exception of the losses in the core at high doping densities, the losses in the silicon can be tolerated in many power applications, making fully-integrated silicon-embedded air-core inductors viable for power applications. An equivalent circuit model is presented for such inductors which captures the stored magnetic energy, the parasitic electric energy stored between the windings and the silicon, the loss in the toroidal windings, and the electrically- and magnetically-driven losses inside the silicon. The model developed here is verified against experimental data, and the comparison shows a good match over the frequency range of interest to power electronics applications.

  20. Optical actuation of silicon cantilevers: modelling and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Keating, Adrian; Martyuink, Mariusz; Silva, Dilusha; Faraone, Lorenzo; Dell, John M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports on the modeling and experimental investigation of optical excitation of silicon cantilevers. In this work, the silicon cantilevers fabricated have dimensions with width of 15 μm, thickness of 0.26 μm, and variable length from 50 to 120 μm. In order to investigate the effect of the laser modulation frequency and position on the temperature at the anchor edge and displacements at the tip of cantilevers, a transient thermal ANSYS simulation and a steady-state static thermal mechanical ANSYS simulation were undertaken using a structure consisting of silicon device layer, SiO2 sacrificial layer and silicon substrate. The dynamic properties of silicon cantilevers were undertaken by a series of experiments. The period optical driving signal with controlled modulation amplitude was provided by a 405 nm diode laser with a 2.9 μW/μm2 laser power and variable frequencies. The laser spot was located through the longitude direction of silicon cantilevers. In factor, simulation results well matched with experimental observation, including: 1) for untreated silicon cantilevers, the maximum of displacement is observed when the laser beam was located half a diameter way from the anchor on the silicon suspended cantilever side; 2) for the both cantilevers, maximum displacement occurs when the optical actuation frequency is equal to the resonant frequency of cantilevers. Understanding the optical excitation on silicon cantilevers, as waveguides, can potentially increase sensing detection sensitivity (ratio of transmission to cantilever deflection).

  1. 78 FR 73195 - Privacy Act of 1974: CMS Computer Matching Program Match No. 2013-01; HHS Computer Matching...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Privacy Act of 1974: CMS Computer Matching Program Match No. 2013-01; HHS Computer Matching Program Match No. 1312 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of Computer...

  2. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Carleton, Karen L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  3. Antiphase domain tailoring for combination of modal and 4¯ -quasi-phase matching in gallium phosphide microdisks.

    PubMed

    Guillemé, P; Vallet, M; Stodolna, J; Ponchet, A; Cornet, C; Létoublon, A; Féron, P; Durand, O; Léger, Y; Dumeige, Y

    2016-06-27

    We propose a novel phase-matching scheme in GaP whispering-gallery-mode microdisks grown on Si substrate combining modal and 4¯ -quasi-phase-matching for second-harmonic-generation. The technique consists in unlocking parity-forbidden processes by tailoring the antiphase domain distribution in the GaP layer. Our proposal can be used to overcome the limitations of form birefringence phase-matching and 4¯ -quasi-phase-matching using high order whispering-gallery-modes. The high frequency conversion efficiency of this new scheme demonstrates the competitiveness of nonlinear photonic devices monolithically integrated on silicon. PMID:27410613

  4. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  5. Template matching on parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Sher

    1985-07-01

    Many important problems in computer vision can be characterized as template-matching problems on edge images. Some examples are circle detection and line detection. Two techniques for template matching are the Hough transform and correlation. There are two algorithms for correlation: a shift-and-add-based technique and a Fourier-transform-based technique. The most efficient algorithm of these three varies depending on the size of the template and the structure of the image. On different parallel architectures, the choice of algorithms for a specific problem is different. This paper describes two parallel architectures: the WARP and the Butterfly and describes why and how the criterion for making the choice of algorithms differs between the two machines.

  6. University Reactor Matching Grants Program

    SciTech Connect

    John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

    2003-02-14

    During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given.

  7. Photometric invariant stereo matching method.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Jinjun; Bu, Penghui; Zhao, Zixin

    2015-12-14

    A robust stereo matching method based on a comprehensive mathematical model for color formation process is proposed to estimate the disparity map of stereo images with noise and photometric variations. The band-pass filter with DoP kernel is firstly used to filter out noise component of the stereo images. Then the log-chromaticity normalization process is applied to eliminate the influence of lightning geometry. All the other factors that may influence the color formation process are removed through the disparity estimation process with a specific matching cost. Performance of the developed method is evaluated by comparing with some up-to-date algorithms. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the method. PMID:26698970

  8. Observational Studies: Matching or Regression?

    PubMed

    Brazauskas, Ruta; Logan, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    In observational studies with an aim of assessing treatment effect or comparing groups of patients, several approaches could be used. Often, baseline characteristics of patients may be imbalanced between groups, and adjustments are needed to account for this. It can be accomplished either via appropriate regression modeling or, alternatively, by conducting a matched pairs study. The latter is often chosen because it makes groups appear to be comparable. In this article we considered these 2 options in terms of their ability to detect a treatment effect in time-to-event studies. Our investigation shows that a Cox regression model applied to the entire cohort is often a more powerful tool in detecting treatment effect as compared with a matched study. Real data from a hematopoietic cell transplantation study is used as an example. PMID:26712591

  9. 32 CFR 806b.50 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computer matching. 806b.50 Section 806b.50... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.50 Computer matching. Computer matching programs... on forms used in applying for benefits. Coordinate computer matching statements on forms with...

  10. 32 CFR 806b.50 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computer matching. 806b.50 Section 806b.50... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.50 Computer matching. Computer matching programs... on forms used in applying for benefits. Coordinate computer matching statements on forms with...

  11. 32 CFR 806b.50 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computer matching. 806b.50 Section 806b.50... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.50 Computer matching. Computer matching programs... on forms used in applying for benefits. Coordinate computer matching statements on forms with...

  12. 32 CFR 806b.50 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computer matching. 806b.50 Section 806b.50... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.50 Computer matching. Computer matching programs... on forms used in applying for benefits. Coordinate computer matching statements on forms with...

  13. 32 CFR 806b.50 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computer matching. 806b.50 Section 806b.50... PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.50 Computer matching. Computer matching programs... on forms used in applying for benefits. Coordinate computer matching statements on forms with...

  14. Filterbank-based fingerprint matching.

    PubMed

    Jain, A K; Prabhakar, S; Hong, L; Pankanti, S

    2000-01-01

    With identity fraud in our society reaching unprecedented proportions and with an increasing emphasis on the emerging automatic personal identification applications, biometrics-based verification, especially fingerprint-based identification, is receiving a lot of attention. There are two major shortcomings of the traditional approaches to fingerprint representation. For a considerable fraction of population, the representations based on explicit detection of complete ridge structures in the fingerprint are difficult to extract automatically. The widely used minutiae-based representation does not utilize a significant component of the rich discriminatory information available in the fingerprints. Local ridge structures cannot be completely characterized by minutiae. Further, minutiae-based matching has difficulty in quickly matching two fingerprint images containing a different number of unregistered minutiae points. The proposed filter-based algorithm uses a bank of Gabor filters to capture both local and global details in a fingerprint as a compact fixed length FingerCode. The fingerprint matching is based on the Euclidean distance between the two corresponding FingerCodes and hence is extremely fast. We are able to achieve a verification accuracy which is only marginally inferior to the best results of minutiae-based algorithms published in the open literature. Our system performs better than a state-of-the-art minutiae-based system when the performance requirement of the application system does not demand a very low false acceptance rate. Finally, we show that the matching performance can be improved by combining the decisions of the matchers based on complementary (minutiae-based and filter-based) fingerprint information. PMID:18255456

  15. Geodesic matching of triangulated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamza, A; Krim, Hamid

    2006-08-01

    Recognition of images and shapes has long been the central theme of computer vision. Its importance is increasing rapidly in the field of computer graphics and multimedia communication because it is difficult to process information efficiently without its recognition. In this paper, we propose a new approach for object matching based on a global geodesic measure. The key idea behind our methodology is to represent an object by a probabilistic shape descriptor that measures the global geodesic distance between two arbitrary points on the surface of an object. In contrast to the Euclidean distance which is more suitable for linear spaces, the geodesic distance has the advantage to be able to capture the intrinsic geometric structure of the data. The matching task therefore becomes a one-dimensional comparison problem between probability distributions which is clearly much simpler than comparing three-dimensional structures. Object matching can then be carried out by an information-theoretic dissimilarity measure calculations between geodesic shape distributions, and is additionally computationally efficient and inexpensive. PMID:16900680

  16. Matching: its acquisition and generalization.

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Michael A; Donahoe, John W

    2004-01-01

    Choice typically is studied by exposing organisms to concurrent variable-interval schedules in which not only responses controlled by stimuli on the key are acquired but also switching responses and likely other operants as well. In the present research, discriminated key-pecking responses in pigeons were first acquired using a multiple schedule that minimized the reinforcement of switching operants. Then, choice was assessed during concurrent-probe periods in which pairs of discriminative stimuli were presented concurrently. Upon initial exposure to concurrently presented stimuli, choice approximated exclusive preference for the alternative associated with the higher reinforcement frequency. Concurrent schedules were then implemented that gave increasingly greater opportunities for switching operants to be conditioned. As these operants were acquired, the relation of relative response frequency to relative reinforcement frequency converged toward a matching relation. An account of matching with concurrent schedules is proposed in which responding exclusively to the discriminative stimulus associated with the higher reinforcement frequency declines as the concurrent stimuli become more similar and other operants-notably switching-are acquired and generalize to stimuli from both alternatives. The concerted effect of these processes fosters an approximate matching relation in commonly used concurrent procedures. PMID:15540502

  17. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  18. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  19. Quantum conductance of silicon-doped carbon wire nanojunctions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Unknown quantum electronic conductance across nanojunctions made of silicon-doped carbon wires between carbon leads is investigated. This is done by an appropriate generalization of the phase field matching theory for the multi-scattering processes of electronic excitations at the nanojunction and the use of the tight-binding method. Our calculations of the electronic band structures for carbon, silicon, and diatomic silicon carbide are matched with the available corresponding density functional theory results to optimize the required tight-binding parameters. Silicon and carbon atoms are treated on the same footing by characterizing each with their corresponding orbitals. Several types of nanojunctions are analyzed to sample their behavior under different atomic configurations. We calculate for each nanojunction the individual contributions to the quantum conductance for the propagating σ, Π, and σ∗electron incidents from the carbon leads. The calculated results show a number of remarkable features, which include the influence of the ordered periodic configurations of silicon-carbon pairs and the suppression of quantum conductance due to minimum substitutional disorder and artificially organized symmetry on these nanojunctions. Our results also demonstrate that the phase field matching theory is an efficient tool to treat the quantum conductance of complex molecular nanojunctions. PMID:23130998

  20. Matching Shapes Using Local Descriptors

    SciTech Connect

    White, R; Newsam, S; Kamath, C

    2004-08-13

    We present a method for comparing shapes of grayscale images in noisy circumstances. By establishing correspondences in a new image with a shape model, we can estimate a transformation between the new region and the model. Using a cost function for deviations from the model, we can rank resulting shape matches. We compare two separate distinct region detectors: Scale Saliency and difference of gaussians. We show that this method is successful in comparing images of fluid mixing under anisotropic geometric distortions and additive gaussian noise. Scale Saliency outperforms the difference of Gaussians in this context.

  1. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  2. Hybrid Schema Matching for Deep Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kerui; Zuo, Wanli; He, Fengling; Chen, Yongheng

    Schema matching is the process of identifying semantic mappings, or correspondences, between two or more schemas. Schema matching is a first step and critical part of data integration. For schema matching of deep web, most researches only interested in query interface, while rarely pay attention to abundant schema information contained in query result pages. This paper proposed a mixed schema matching technique, which combines attributes that appeared in query structures and query results of different data sources, and mines the matched schemas inside. Experimental results prove the effectiveness of this method for improving the accuracy of schema matching.

  3. Complexity matching in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usefie Mafahim, Javad; Lambert, David; Zare, Marzieh; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In the wide literature on the brain and neural network dynamics the notion of criticality is being adopted by an increasing number of researchers, with no general agreement on its theoretical definition, but with consensus that criticality makes the brain very sensitive to external stimuli. We adopt the complexity matching principle that the maximal efficiency of communication between two complex networks is realized when both of them are at criticality. We use this principle to establish the value of the neuronal interaction strength at which criticality occurs, yielding a perfect agreement with the adoption of temporal complexity as criticality indicator. The emergence of a scale-free distribution of avalanche size is proved to occur in a supercritical regime. We use an integrate-and-fire model where the randomness of each neuron is only due to the random choice of a new initial condition after firing. The new model shares with that proposed by Izikevich the property of generating excessive periodicity, and with it the annihilation of temporal complexity at supercritical values of the interaction strength. We find that the concentration of inhibitory links can be used as a control parameter and that for a sufficiently large concentration of inhibitory links criticality is recovered again. Finally, we show that the response of a neural network at criticality to a harmonic stimulus is very weak, in accordance with the complexity matching principle.

  4. Molecular bridging of silicon nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Geoffrey J; Phillips, Laurie J; Robinson, Benjamin J; Urasinska-Wojcik, Barbara; Lambert, Colin J; Grace, Iain M; Bryce, Martin R; Jitchati, Rukkiat; Tavasli, Mustafa; Cox, Timothy I; Sage, Ian C; Tuffin, Rachel P; Ray, Shona

    2010-12-28

    The highly doped electrodes of a vertical silicon nanogap device have been bridged by a 5.85 nm long molecular wire, which was synthesized in situ by grafting 4-ethynylbenzaldehyde via C-Si links to the top and bottom electrodes and thereafter by coupling an amino-terminated fluorene unit to the aldehyde groups of the activated electrode surfaces. The number of bridging molecules is constrained by relying on surface roughness to match the 5.85 nm length with an electrode gap that is nominally 1 nm wider and may be controlled by varying the reaction time: the device current increases from ≤1 pA at 1 V following the initial grafting step to 10-100 nA at 1 V when reacted for 5-15 min with the amino-terminated linker and 10 μA when reacted for 16-53 h. It is the first time that both ends of a molecular wire have been directly grafted to silicon electrodes, and these molecule-induced changes are reversible. The bridges detach when the device is rinsed with dilute acid solution, which breaks the imine links of the in situ formed wire and causes the current to revert to the subpicoampere leakage value of the 4-ethynylbenzaldehyde-grafted nanogap structure. PMID:21082817

  5. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  6. [Silicone breast implants].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M; Brandt, B; Breiting, V B; Christensen, L H; Thomsen, J L

    1989-12-18

    A brief review of the use of silicone breast implants, their structure, methods of implantation and complications is presented. Acute complications are rare, being mainly infection and hematoma. Long-term complications, on the contrary, are common, consisting mainly of capsular contracture around the prosthesis with subsequent pain and deformation of the breast. More rarely silicone granulomas form, and prosthesis rupture or herniation occurs. The importance of silicone leakage for these complications is discussed separately as well as the treatment of and prevention of capsular contracture and demonstration of silicone in tissue. A critical attitude towards the use of silicone breast implants, when these are used for purely cosmetic purposes, is recommended at present. New improved types of silicone breast implants are currently being tested clinically. PMID:2692262

  7. Growth of silicon bump induced by swift heavy ion at the silicon oxide-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, J.-F.; Touboul, A.D.; Ramonda, M.; Caussanel, M.; Guasch, C.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2006-01-23

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates are investigated by scanning probe microscopy before and after irradiation with 210 MeV Au+ ions. After irradiation and complete chemical etching of the silicon oxide layer, silicon bumps grown on the silicon surface are observed. It is shown that each impinging ion induces one silicon bump at the interface. This observation is consistent with the thermal spike theory. Ion energy loss is transferred to the oxide and induces local melting. Silicon-bump formation is favored when the oxide and oxide-silicon interface are silicon rich.

  8. Mist Ejection of Silicon Microparticle Using a Silicon Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Yoshinori; Murakami, Takaaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa; Itoh, Toshihiro

    The novel mist-jet technology using a silicon nozzle and a silicon reflector has been developed. Ejection of water mist containing the silicon microparticles is demonstrated. Impurities of the silicon microparticles ejected on the substrate are analyzed. It has been verified for the first time that the contamination is reduced by the silicon head. The silicon pattern drawn by the head is successfully formed.

  9. Micromachined Silicon Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, William R.; Tai, Yu-Chong; Yap, Markus; Walker, Christopher K.

    1994-01-01

    Components that handle millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths fabricated conveniently. Micromachining rectangular waveguide involves standard steps of masking, etching, and deposition of metal on silicon. Parts made assembled into half-waveguide and finally into full waveguide. Silicon-micromachining approach enables simultaneous fabrication of several versions of waveguide, with variations in critical parameter, on single wafer of silicon. Performances of versions compared and optimized more quickly and at lower cost than is possible if different versions are fabricated sequentially, by conventional machining techniques.

  10. Highly porous silicon membranes fabricated from silicon nitride/silicon stacks.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chengzhu; Striemer, Christopher C; Gaborski, Thomas R; McGrath, James L; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2014-07-23

    Nanopore formation in silicon films has previously been demonstrated using rapid thermal crystallization of ultrathin (15 nm) amorphous Si films sandwiched between nm-thick SiO2 layers. In this work, the silicon dioxide barrier layers are replaced with silicon nitride, resulting in nanoporous silicon films with unprecedented pore density and novel morphology. Four different thin film stack systems including silicon nitride/silicon/silicon nitride (NSN), silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon nitride (OSN), silicon nitride/silicon/silicon dioxide (NSO), and silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon dioxide (OSO) are tested under different annealing temperatures. Generally the pore size, pore density, and porosity positively correlate with the annealing temperature for all four systems. The NSN system yields substantially higher porosity and pore density than the OSO system, with the OSN and NSO stack characteristics fallings between these extremes. The higher porosity of the Si membrane in the NSN stack is primarily due to the pore formation enhancement in the Si film. It is hypothesized that this could result from the interfacial energy difference between the silicon/silicon nitride and silicon/silicon dioxide, which influences the Si crystallization process. PMID:24623562

  11. A Probabilistic Formulation for Hausdorff Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Clark F.

    1998-01-01

    Matching images based on a Hausdorff measure has become popular for computer vision applications. In this paper, we develope a probabilistic formulation for Hausdorff matching in terms of maximum likelihood estimation.

  12. Compounding with Silicones.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1940s, methylchlorosilanes have been used to treat glassware to prevent blood from clotting. The use of silicones in pharmaceutical and medical applications has grown to where today they are used in many life-saving devices (pacemakers, hydrocephalic shunts) and pharmaceutical applications from tubing, to excipients in topical formulations, to adhesives to affix transdermal drug delivery systems, and are also being used in products as active pharmaceutical ingredients, such as antiflatulents. About 60% of today's skin-care products now contain some type of silicone where they are considered safe and are known to provide a pleasant "silky-touch," non-greasy, and non-staining feel. Silicones exhibit many useful characteristics, and the safety of these agents supports their numerous applications; their biocompatibility is partially due to their low-chemical reactivity displayed by silicones, low-surface energy, and their hydrophobicity. Silicones are used both as active ingredients and as excipients. In addition is their use for "siliconization," or surface treatment, of many parenteral packaging components. Dimethicone and silicone oil are used as lubricants on stoppers to aid machineability, in syringes to aid piston movement, or on syringe needles to reduce pain upon injection. Silicones are also useful in pharmaceutical compounding as is discussed in this artiele included with this article are in developing formulations with silicones. PMID:26714363

  13. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  14. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  15. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  16. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  17. Phosphorus Removal from Silicon by Vacuum Refining and Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dachuan; Ren, Shiqiang; Shi, Shuang; Dong, Wei; Qiu, Jieshan; TAN, Yi; Li, Jiayan

    2014-02-01

    Silicon is widely used as a raw material for production of solar cells. As a major impurity in silicon, phosphorus must be removed to 1 × 10-5 wt.%. In the present study, based on the distribution of phosphorus in a silicon ingot obtained by vacuum refining and directional solidification, the mechanism for removal of phosphorus from silicon is investigated. The results show that the distribution is controlled not only by segregation at the solid-liquid interface but also by evaporation at the gas-liquid interface, showing some deviation from Scheil's equation. A modified model which considers both segregation and evaporation is used to simulate the distribution, matching quite well with the experimental results. The temperature and solidification rate are two important parameters that affect the overall mass transfer coefficient and the effective segregation coefficient and thus the distribution of phosphorus. A high removal efficiency and a homogeneous distribution can be obtained by adjusting these two parameters.

  18. Resistance after firing protected electric match

    DOEpatents

    Montoya, Arsenio P.

    1981-11-10

    An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

  19. Robust matching for voice recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Alan; Bahler, L.; Porter, J.; Blais, P.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes an automated method of comparing a voice sample of an unknown individual with samples from known speakers in order to establish or verify the individual's identity. The method is based on a statistical pattern matching approach that employs a simple training procedure, requires no human intervention (transcription, work or phonetic marketing, etc.), and makes no assumptions regarding the expected form of the statistical distributions of the observations. The content of the speech material (vocabulary, grammar, etc.) is not assumed to be constrained in any way. An algorithm is described which incorporates frame pruning and channel equalization processes designed to achieve robust performance with reasonable computational resources. An experimental implementation demonstrating the feasibility of the concept is described.

  20. Matching and Conditioned Reinforcement Rate

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A; Podlesnik, Christopher A; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to examine the effects of variations in relative conditioned reinforcement rate on choice have been confounded by changes in rates of primary reinforcement or changes in the value of the conditioned reinforcer. To avoid these problems, this experiment used concurrent observing responses to examine sensitivity of choice to relative conditioned reinforcement rate. In the absence of observing responses, unsignaled periods of food delivery on a variable-interval 90-s schedule alternated with extinction on a center key (i.e., a mixed schedule was in effect). Two concurrently available observing responses produced 15-s access to a stimulus differentially associated with the schedule of food delivery (S+). The relative rate of S+ deliveries arranged by independent variable-interval schedules for the two observing responses varied across conditions. The relation between the ratio of observing responses and the ratio of S+ deliveries was well described by the generalized matching law, despite the absence of changes in the rate of food delivery. In addition, the value of the S+ deliveries likely remained constant across conditions because the ratio of S+ to mixed schedule food deliveries remained constant. Assuming that S+ deliveries serve as conditioned reinforcers, these findings are consistent with the functional similarity between primary and conditioned reinforcers suggested by general choice theories based on the concatenated matching law (e.g., contextual choice and hyperbolic value-added models). These findings are inconsistent with delay reduction theory, which has no terms for the effects of rate of conditioned reinforcement in the absence of changes in rate of primary reinforcement. PMID:16673824

  1. 24 CFR 92.221 - Match credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Match credit. 92.221 Section 92.221... INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Requirements Matching Contribution Requirement § 92.221 Match credit. (a) When credit is given. Contributions are credited on a fiscal year basis at the time...

  2. 24 CFR 92.221 - Match credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Match credit. 92.221 Section 92.221... INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Requirements Matching Contribution Requirement § 92.221 Match credit. (a) When credit is given. Contributions are credited on a fiscal year basis at the time...

  3. 24 CFR 92.221 - Match credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Match credit. 92.221 Section 92.221... INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Requirements Matching Contribution Requirement § 92.221 Match credit. (a) When credit is given. Contributions are credited on a fiscal year basis at the time...

  4. Image Matching Using Generalized Hough Transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.; Hu, F. P.; Hwang, V.; Kitchen, L.

    1983-01-01

    An image matching system specifically designed to match dissimilar images is described. A set of blobs and ribbons is first extracted from each image, and then generalized Hough transform techniques are used to match these sets and compute the transformation that best registers the image. An example of the application of the approach to one pair of remotely sensed images is presented.

  5. Stereo Vision By Pyramidal Bli Graph Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Castan, Serge; Zhao, Jian

    1988-04-01

    We propose the pyramidal BLI (Binary Laplacian Image) graph matching method for stereo vision, which uses the local as well as the global similarities to assure a good precision of matching results and to eliminate the ambiguities. Because the BLI is detected by DRF method which has a fast realization and matching between graphs is fast, a pseudo-real time system is possible.

  6. Expected Trials under the Matching Rounds Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the famous "matching problem," with a particular focus on the expected number of objects that are correctly placed. The author discusses the following topics: three versions suitable for teaching the matching problem in the classroom; the solution to the matching problem; the use of the strong form of mathematical…

  7. Symmetric and Asymmetric Matching of Joint Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luce, R. Duncan

    2004-01-01

    The global psychophysical theory of summation and magnitude production of R. D. Luce (2002) had joint presentations of pairs of intensities (measured above threshold) being matched asymmetrically, with 1 component being 0 intensity and the other the matching intensity. For loudness, an intensity pair to the 2 ears is matched by an intensity in…

  8. 13 CFR 102.40 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computer matching. 102.40 Section... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 102.40 Computer matching. The OCIO will enforce the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act. The FOI/PA Office...

  9. 13 CFR 102.40 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computer matching. 102.40 Section... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 102.40 Computer matching. The OCIO will enforce the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act. The FOI/PA Office...

  10. 39 CFR 266.10 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computer matching. 266.10 Section 266.10 Postal... Computer matching. (a) General. Any agency or Postal Service component that wishes to use records from a... records must submit its proposal to the Postal Service Manager Records Office. Computer matching...

  11. 13 CFR 102.40 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computer matching. 102.40 Section... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 102.40 Computer matching. The OCIO will enforce the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act. The FOI/PA Office...

  12. 39 CFR 266.10 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computer matching. 266.10 Section 266.10 Postal... Computer matching. (a) General. Any agency or Postal Service component that wishes to use records from a... records must submit its proposal to the Postal Service Manager Records Office. Computer matching...

  13. 39 CFR 266.10 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computer matching. 266.10 Section 266.10 Postal... Computer matching. (a) General. Any agency or Postal Service component that wishes to use records from a... records must submit its proposal to the Postal Service Manager Records Office. Computer matching...

  14. 13 CFR 102.40 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computer matching. 102.40 Section... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 102.40 Computer matching. The OCIO will enforce the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act. The FOI/PA Office...

  15. 13 CFR 102.40 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computer matching. 102.40 Section... Protection of Privacy and Access to Individual Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 102.40 Computer matching. The OCIO will enforce the computer matching provisions of the Privacy Act. The FOI/PA Office...

  16. 39 CFR 266.10 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computer matching. 266.10 Section 266.10 Postal... Computer matching. (a) General. Any agency or Postal Service component that wishes to use records from a... records must submit its proposal to the Postal Service Manager Records Office. Computer matching...

  17. 39 CFR 266.10 - Computer matching.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computer matching. 266.10 Section 266.10 Postal... Computer matching. (a) General. Any agency or Postal Service component that wishes to use records from a... records must submit its proposal to the Postal Service Manager Records Office. Computer matching...

  18. Generalized full-vector multi-mode matching analysis of whispering gallery microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xuan; Vincent, Serge; Faucher, Mathieu; Picard, Marie-Josée; Lu, Tao

    2014-06-01

    We outline a full-vectorial three-dimensional multi-mode matching technique in a cylindrical coordinate system that addresses the mutual coupling among multiple modes copropagating in a perturbed whispering-gallery-mode microcavity. In addition to its superior accuracy in respect to our previously implemented single-mode matching technique, this current technique is suitable for modelling waveguide-to-cavity coupling where the influence of multi-mode coupling is non-negligible. Using this methodology, a robust scheme for hybrid integration of a microcavity onto a silicon-on-insulator platform is proposed.

  19. Method and apparatus for stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon grown in silicon nitride ambient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. A.; Wheeler, R. K. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for thermally growing stable silicon dioxide layers on silicon is disclosed. A previously etched and baked silicon nitride tube placed in a furnace is used to grow the silicon dioxide. First, pure oxygen is allowed to flow through the tube to initially coat the inside surface of the tube with a thin layer of silicon dioxide. After the tube is coated with the thin layer of silicon dioxide, the silicon is oxidized thermally in a normal fashion. If the tube becomes contaminated, the silicon dioxide is etched off thereby exposing clean silicon nitride and then the inside of the tube is recoated with silicon dioxide. As is disclosed, the silicon nitride tube can also be used as the ambient for the pyrolytic decomposition of silane and ammonia to form thin layers of clean silicon nitride.

  20. Matching network for RF plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  1. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-13

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  2. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  3. Silicon research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of solar cells suitable for space applications are discussed, along with the advantages and disadvantages of silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells. The goal of a silicon solar cell with 18% efficiency has not been reached and does not appear promising in the near future.

  4. Producing silicon continuously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, W. M.; Rosler, R. S.; Thompson, S.

    1981-01-01

    Fluid-bed vaporization followed by chemical vapor deposition generates large, semiconductor-grade silicon particles. Method is economical, high-volume alternative to conventional batch-processing methods. Harvested chunks, extracted in cyclone separator, are about 0.5 to 1.3 centimeters in diameter. Process is not limited to polymer feedstock; it utilizes any halosilane intermediate used in silicon production.

  5. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  6. Cervical silicone lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Latoni Kaysha; Thiruchelvam, Janavikulam

    2016-07-01

    A patient presented to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery with a rare case of cervical silicone lymphadenopathy. She had a painless ovoid mass in the left side of her neck and had had cosmetic breast augmentation 10 years before. Radiological imaging and core biopsy examination were consistent with silicone lymphadenopathy. PMID:26830068

  7. Silicon nitride sintered body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    The sintering of silicon carbide and it production are described. The method of production is by calcination in which molding is followed by sintering without compression. The invention improves the composition of the silicon carbide ceramic. Six examples of the invention are illustrated and discussed.

  8. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  9. GaNPAs Solar Cells Lattice-Matched To GaP: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We propose the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct band-gaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We demonstrate the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and discuss the prospects for the development of monolithic high-efficiency multijunction solar cells based on silicon substrates.

  10. Reversible Cycling of Silicon and Silicon Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrovac, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Lithium ion batteries typically use a graphite negative electrode. Silicon can store more lithium than any other element and has long been considered as an attractive replacement for graphite. The theoretical lithium storage capacity of silicon is nearly ten times higher than graphite volumetrically and three times higher gravimetrically. The equilibrium Si-Li binary system is well known. Completely new phase behaviors are observed at room temperature. This includes the formation of a new phase, Li15Si4, which is the highest lithium containing phase at room temperature [1]. The formation of Li15Si4 is accompanied by a 280 percent volume expansion of silicon. During de-alloying this phase contracts, forming amorphous silicon. The volume expansion of alloys can cause intra-particle fracture and inter-particle disconnection; leading to loss of cycle life. To overcome issues with volume expansion requires a detailed knowledge of Li-Si phase behavior, careful design of the composition and nanostructure of the alloy and the microstructure of the negative electrode [2]. In this presentation the phase behavior of the Li-Si system will be described. Using this knowledge alone, strategies can be developed so that silicon can be reversibly cycled in a battery hundreds of times. Further increases in energy density and efficiency can be gained by alloying silicon with other elements, while controlling microstructure [2]. Coupled with negative electrode design strategies, practical negative electrodes for lithium ion cells can be developed based on bulk materials, with significant energy density improvement over conventional electrodes. [4pt] [1] M.N. Obrovac and L.J. Krause, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A103. [0pt] [2] M.N. Obrovac, Leif Christensen, Dinh Ba Le, and J.R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) A849

  11. Spin Transport in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2008-03-01

    Silicon has been broadly viewed as the ideal material for spintronics due to its low atomic weight, lattice inversion symmetry, and near lack of nuclear spin, resulting in exceptionally long spin lifetime. Despite this appeal, however, the experimental difficulties of achieving coherent spin transport in silicon were overcome for the first time only recently, by using unique spin-polarized hot-electron injection and detection techniques. [1] Our subsequent observations of very long spin lifetimes and transit lengths [2] have impact on prospects for Silicon spintronics as the basis for a new paradigm of information processing. [1] Ian Appelbaum, Biqin Huang, and Douwe J. Monsma, ``Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon,'' Nature 447, 295 (2007). [2] Biqin Huang, Douwe J. Monsma, and Ian Appelbaum, ``Coherent spin transport through a 350-micron-thick silicon wafer,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 177209 (2007).

  12. Intraventricular Silicone Oil

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Boissonnot, Michèle; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Simonet, Charles; Ciron, Jonathan; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intracranial silicone oil is a rare complication of intraocular endotamponade with silicone oil. We describe a case of intraventricular silicone oil fortuitously observed 38 months after an intraocular tamponade for a complicated retinal detachment in an 82 year-old woman admitted in the Department of Neurology for a stroke. We confirm the migration of silicone oil along the optic nerve. We discuss this rare entity with a review of the few other cases reported in the medical literature. Intraventricular migration of silicone oil after intraocular endotamponade is usually asymptomatic but have to be known of the neurologists and the radiologists because of its differential diagnosis that are intraventricular hemorrhage and tumor. PMID:26735537

  13. Silicone-containing composition

    DOEpatents

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  14. Matching roots to their environment

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Gregory, Peter J.; Bengough, A. Glyn; Hallett, Paul D.; McKenzie, Blair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants form the base of the terrestrial food chain and provide medicines, fuel, fibre and industrial materials to humans. Vascular land plants rely on their roots to acquire the water and mineral elements necessary for their survival in nature or their yield and nutritional quality in agriculture. Major biogeochemical fluxes of all elements occur through plant roots, and the roots of agricultural crops have a significant role to play in soil sustainability, carbon sequestration, reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses, and in preventing the eutrophication of water bodies associated with the application of mineral fertilizers. Scope This article provides the context for a Special Issue of Annals of Botany on ‘Matching Roots to Their Environment’. It first examines how land plants and their roots evolved, describes how the ecology of roots and their rhizospheres contributes to the acquisition of soil resources, and discusses the influence of plant roots on biogeochemical cycles. It then describes the role of roots in overcoming the constraints to crop production imposed by hostile or infertile soils, illustrates root phenotypes that improve the acquisition of mineral elements and water, and discusses high-throughput methods to screen for these traits in the laboratory, glasshouse and field. Finally, it considers whether knowledge of adaptations improving the acquisition of resources in natural environments can be used to develop root systems for sustainable agriculture in the future. PMID:23821619

  15. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  16. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  17. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kovačević, Goran Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-28

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  18. A Custom Made Intrinsic Silicone Shade Guide for Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Behanam, Mohammed; Ahila, S.C.; Jei, J. Brintha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Replication of natural skin colour in maxillofacial prosthesis has been traditionally done using trial and error method, as concrete shade guides are unavailable till date. Hence a novel custom made intrinsic silicone shade guide has been attempted for Indian population. Aim Reconstruction of maxillofacial defects is challenging, as achieving an aesthetic result is not always easy. A concoction of a novel intrinsic silicone shade guide was contemplated for the study and its reproducibility in clinical practice was analysed. Materials and Methods Medical grade room temperature vulcanising silicone was used for the fabrication of shade tabs. The shade guide consisted of three main groups I, II and III which were divided based upon the hues yellow, red and blue respectively. Five distinct intrinsic pigments were added in definite proportions to subdivide each group of different values from lighter to darker shades. A total number of 15 circular shade tabs comprised the guide. To validate the usage of the guide, visual assessment of colour matching was done by four investigators to investigate the consent of perfect colour correspondence. Data was statistically analysed using kappa coefficients. Results The kappa values were found to be 0.47 to 0.78 for yellow based group I, 0.13 to 0.65 for red based group II, and 0.07 to 0.36 for blue based group III. This revealed that the shade tabs of yellow and red based hues matched well and showed a statistically good colour matching. Conclusion This intrinsic silicone shade guide can be effectively utilised for fabrication of maxillofacial prosthesis with silicone in Indian population. A transparent colour formula with definite proportioning of intrinsic pigments is provided for obtaining an aesthetic match to skin tone. PMID:27190946

  19. Match-bounded String Rewriting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a new class of automated proof methods for the termination of rewriting systems on strings. The basis of all these methods is to show that rewriting preserves regular languages. To this end, letters are annotated with natural numbers, called match heights. If the minimal height of all positions in a redex is h+1 then every position in the reduct will get height h+1. In a match-bounded system, match heights are globally bounded. Using recent results on deleting systems, we prove that rewriting by a match-bounded system preserves regular languages. Hence it is decidable whether a given rewriting system has a given match bound. We also provide a sufficient criterion for the abence of a match-bound. The problem of existence of a match-bound is still open. Match-boundedness for all strings can be used as an automated criterion for termination, for match-bounded systems are terminating. This criterion can be strengthened by requiring match-boundedness only for a restricted set of strings, for instance the set of right hand sides of forward closures.

  20. Graph-matching based CTA.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, Dmitry; Hesser, Jürgen; Brockmann, Carolin; Jochum, Susanne; Dietz, Tiina; Schnitzer, Andreas; Düber, Christoph; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Diehl, Steffen

    2009-12-01

    Separating bone, calcification, and vessels in computer tomography angiography (CTA) allows for a detailed diagnosis of vessel stenosis. This paper presents a new, graph-based technique that solves this difficult problem with high accuracy. The approach requires one native data set and one that is contrast enhanced. On each data set, an attributed level-graph is derived and both graphs are matched by dynamic programming to differentiate between bone, on one hand side, and vessel/calcification on the other hand side. Lumen and calcified regions are then separated by a profile technique. Evaluation is based on data from vessels of pelvis and lower extremities of elderly patients. Due to substantial calcification and motion of patients between and during the acquisitions, the underlying approach is tested on a class of difficult cases. Analysis requires 3-5 min on a Pentium IV 3 GHz for a 700 MByte data set. Among 37 patients, our approach correctly identifies all three components in 80% of cases correctly compared to visual control. Critical inconsistencies with visual inspection were found in 6% of all cases; 70% of these inconsistencies are due to small vessels that have 1) a diameter near the resolution of the CT and 2) are passing next to bony structures. All other remaining deviations are found in an incorrect handling of the iliac artery since the slice thickness is near the diameter of this vessel and since the orientation is not in cranio-caudal direction. Increasing resolution is thus expected to solve many the aforementioned difficulties. PMID:19574161

  1. Process for purification of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rath, H. J.; Sirtl, E.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The purification of metallurgically pure silicon having a silicon content of more than 95% by weight is accomplished by leaching with an acidic solution which substantially does not attack silicon. A mechanical treatment leading to continuous particle size reduction of the granulated silicon to be purified is combined with the chemical purification step.

  2. Silicon germanium semiconductive alloy and method of fabricating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A silicon germanium (SiGe) semiconductive alloy is grown on a substrate of single crystalline Al.sub.2O.sub.3. A {111} crystal plane of a cubic diamond structure SiGe is grown on the substrate's {0001} C-plane such that a <110> orientation of the cubic diamond structure SiGe is aligned with a <1,0,-1,0> orientation of the {0001} C-plane. A lattice match between the substrate and the SiGe is achieved by using a SiGe composition that is 0.7223 atomic percent silicon and 0.2777 atomic percent germanium.

  3. Transformational silicon electronics.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally M; Hussain, Aftab Mustansir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-02-25

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry's most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. PMID:24476361

  4. Process for making silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  5. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  6. Visualizing underwater acoustic matched-field processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lawrence; Kamgar-Parsi, Behzad; Karahalios, Margarida; Heitmeyer, Richard

    1991-06-01

    Matched-field processing is a new technique for processing ocean acoustic data measured by an array of hydrophones. It produces estimates of the location of sources of acoustic energy. This method differs from source localization techniques in other disciplines in that it uses the complex underwater acoustic environment to improve the accuracy of the source localization. An unexplored problem in matched-field processing has been to separate multiple sources within a matched-field ambiguity function. Underwater acoustic processing is one of many disciplines where a synthesis of computer graphics and image processing is producing new insight. The benefits of different volume visualization algorithms for matched-field display are discussed. The authors show how this led to a template matching scheme for identifying a source within the matched-field ambiguity function that can help move toward an automated source localization process.

  7. Silicon applications in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  8. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O’Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  9. Improving the Nephrology Match: the Path Forward.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chi-yuan; Parker, Mark G; Ross, Michael J; Schmidt, Rebecca J; Harris, Raymond C

    2015-11-01

    The Fellowship Match process was designed to provide applicants and program directors with an opportunity to consider all their options before making decisions about post-residency training. In a Match, applicants can choose the programs that best suit their career goals, and program directors can consider all candidates before preparing a rank order list. The Match is a contract, requiring obligations of both programs and applicants to achieve success, ensure uniformity, and standardize participation. PMID:26341128

  10. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  11. Retired Matches Among Male Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Breznik, Kristijan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of characteristics of various games and players on the proportion of retired tennis matches in the Open Era of tennis. The data included over 420,000 matches played among 17,553 tennis players in the period from 1968 to the end of 2010. The influence of the surface type was clearly confirmed, with the proportion of retired matches being higher on hard and clay courts compared to grass and carpet surfaces. Similarly, more retired matches were observed in outdoor venues than in indoor ones. The impact of other variables, tournament types, rounds at which the game was played and both players' ranks, is more ambiguous. Our interpretation of the obtained results is presented in the paper. Network analytic methods were applied to extract players with the most retired matches in their careers. Eventually, we defined a group of top tennis players and gave a more precise insight into retired matches in that group. Correspondence analysis was used to visually display the two-mode network of top players and the proportion of retired matches by surface type. Key pointsThe proportion of retired matches among professional tennis players has been increasing recently.Clay and hard courts are the most risky surfaces in relation to retired matches, particularly if the match is played at an outdoor venue.The difference in rankings of both players is proportional to the number/proportion of retired matches in professional tennis.Network analytic techniques could serve as an effective method to ascertain (a) group(s) of tennis players with the highest number of retired matches played among them. PMID:24149200

  12. Impact of plant growth promoting Pseudomonas monteilii PsF84 and Pseudomonas plecoglossicida PsF610 on metal uptake and production of secondary metabolite (monoterpenes) by rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium graveolens cv. bourbon) grown on tannery sludge amended soil.

    PubMed

    Dharni, Seema; Srivastava, Atul Kumar; Samad, Abdul; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial strains PsF84 and PsF610 were isolated from tannery sludge polluted soil, Jajmau, Kanpur, India. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the taxonomic affiliation of PsF84 as Pseudomonas monteilii and PsF610 as Pseudomonas plecoglossicida. A greenhouse study was carried out with rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium graveolenscv. bourbon) grown in soil treated with tannery sludge in different proportions viz. soil: sludge ratio of 100:0, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 0:100 to evaluate the effects of bacterial inoculation on the heavy metal uptake. The isolates solubilized inorganic phosphorus and were capable of producing indole acetic acid (IAA) and siderophore. The isolate PsF84 increased the dry biomass of shoot by 44%, root by 48%, essential oil yield 43% and chlorophyll by 31% respectively over uninoculated control. The corresponding increase with the isolate PsF610 were 38%, 40%, 39% and 28%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies reveal that the Cr(VI) accumulation resulted in breakdown of vascular bundles and sequesters Cr(VI) in roots. The glandular trichomes (GT) were investigated using SEM studies as these glands are probably the main site of essential oil synthesis. Owing to its wide action spectrum, these isolates could serve as an effective metal sequestering and bioinoculants due to the production of IAA, siderophore and solubilization of phosphate for geranium in metal-stressed soil. The present study has provided a new insight into the phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soil. PMID:25194330

  13. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  14. High band gap 2-6 and 3-5 tunneling junctions for silicon multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, Taher (Inventor); Kachare, Akaram H. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A multijunction silicon solar cell of high efficiency is provided by providing a tunnel junction between the solar cell junctions to connect them in series. The tunnel junction is comprised of p+ and n+ layers of high band gap 3-5 or 2-6 semiconductor materials that match the lattice structure of silicon, such as GaP (band gap 2.24 eV) or ZnS (band gap 3.6 eV). Each of which has a perfect lattice match with silicon to avoid defects normally associated with lattice mismatch.

  15. 24 CFR 582.110 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND... of the matching supportive services, applicants may count: (1) Salaries paid to staff of...

  16. Matching, maximizing, and hill-climbing

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, John M.; Staddon, J. E. R.

    1983-01-01

    In simple situations, animals consistently choose the better of two alternatives. On concurrent variable-interval variable-interval and variable-interval variable-ratio schedules, they approximately match aggregate choice and reinforcement ratios. The matching law attempts to explain the latter result but does not address the former. Hill-climbing rules such as momentary maximizing can account for both. We show that momentary maximizing constrains molar choice to approximate matching; that molar choice covaries with pigeons' momentary-maximizing estimate; and that the “generalized matching law” follows from almost any hill-climbing rule. PMID:16812350

  17. 44 CFR 361.4 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.4 Matching contributions. (a) All...

  18. 44 CFR 361.4 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.4 Matching contributions. (a) All...

  19. 44 CFR 361.4 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.4 Matching contributions. (a) All...

  20. 44 CFR 361.4 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.4 Matching contributions. (a) All...

  1. 44 CFR 361.4 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.4 Matching contributions. (a) All...

  2. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  3. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  4. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  5. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  6. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  7. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  8. Silicon sheet surface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1985-06-01

    Results of the program are presented on developing an understanding of the basic mechanisms of abrasion and wear of silicon and on the nondestructive measurement of residual stresses in sheet silicon. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures and in the presence of various fluids. In abrasive wear, it was shown that dislocations, microtwins, and cracks are generated beneath the contact surface. Residual stresses in ribbon by the edge defined film growth process were measured by use of a shadow moire interferometry technique.

  9. 7 CFR 3405.5 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Matching funds. 3405.5 Section 3405.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description § 3405.5 Matching funds. Each application...

  10. Anarchy, Stability, and Utopia: Creating Better Matchings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshelevich, Elliot; Das, Sanmay; Naamad, Yonatan

    We consider the loss in social welfare caused by individual rationality in matching scenarios. We give both theoretical and experimental results comparing stable matchings with socially optimal ones, as well as studying the convergence of various natural algorithms to stable matchings. Our main goal is to design mechanisms that incentivize agents to participate in matchings that are socially desirable. We show that theoretically, the loss in social welfare caused by strategic behavior can be substantial. However, under some natural distributions of utilities, we show experimentally that stable matchings attain close to the optimal social welfare. Furthermore, for certain graph structures, simple greedy algorithms for partner-switching (some without convergence guarantees) converge to stability remarkably quickly in expectation. Even when stable matchings are significantly socially suboptimal, slight changes in incentives can provide good solutions. We derive conditions for the existence of approximately stable matchings that are also close to socially optimal, which demonstrates that adding small switching costs can make socially optimal matchings stable.

  11. 24 CFR 92.221 - Match credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Match credit. 92.221 Section 92.221 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME... they were made may be carried over and applied to future fiscal years' match liability. Loans made...

  12. 24 CFR 92.221 - Match credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Match credit. 92.221 Section 92.221 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME... they were made may be carried over and applied to future fiscal years' match liability. Loans made...

  13. DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Lee

    2003-09-30

    For the academic year 2001-2002, the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences received $50,000 of industrial contributions, matched by a DOE grant of $35,000. We used the combined DOE/Industry Matching Grant of $85,000 toward (a) undergraduate merit scholarships and research support, (b) graduate student support, and (c) partial support of a research scientist.

  14. NCI-MATCH Trial Draws Strong Interest.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    After 800 cancer patients enrolled during the first 3 months of the NCI-MATCH trial, organizers have extended a temporary halt in enrollment to gear up for the next phase. The basket study, which matches patients to approved or experimental drugs based on specific genetic mutations in their tumors, is expected to resume in April or May. PMID:26896095

  15. Auditory-Oral Matching Behavior in Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xin; Striano, Tricia; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five newborn infants were tested for auditory-oral matching behavior when presented with the consonant sound /m/ and the vowel sound /a/--a precursor behavior to vocal imitation. Auditory-oral matching behavior by the infant was operationally defined as showing the mouth movement appropriate for producing the model sound just heard (mouth…

  16. 7 CFR 1739.14 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1739.14 Section 1739.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.14 Matching contributions. (a)...

  17. 7 CFR 1739.14 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1739.14 Section 1739.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.14 Matching contributions. (a)...

  18. 7 CFR 1739.14 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1739.14 Section 1739.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.14 Matching contributions. (a)...

  19. 7 CFR 1739.14 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1739.14 Section 1739.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.14 Matching contributions. (a)...

  20. Under Match and the Community College Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    This article defines the term "under matching" as the behavior in which mostly less-affluent, highly qualified high school graduates choose not to enroll at an institution that matches their qualifications--behavior which threatens their chances of earning a degree. The supporting research--rigorous, compelling, and…

  1. 28 CFR 33.21 - Match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Match. 33.21 Section 33.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Allocation of Funds § 33.21 Match. (a) Funds may be used to pay up to 50 percent of the cost of a program...

  2. 28 CFR 33.21 - Match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Match. 33.21 Section 33.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Allocation of Funds § 33.21 Match. (a) Funds may be used to pay up to 50 percent of the cost of a program...

  3. 28 CFR 33.21 - Match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Match. 33.21 Section 33.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Allocation of Funds § 33.21 Match. (a) Funds may be used to pay up to 50 percent of the cost of a program...

  4. 28 CFR 33.21 - Match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Match. 33.21 Section 33.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Allocation of Funds § 33.21 Match. (a) Funds may be used to pay up to 50 percent of the cost of a program...

  5. 28 CFR 33.21 - Match.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Match. 33.21 Section 33.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants Allocation of Funds § 33.21 Match. (a) Funds may be used to pay up to 50 percent of the cost of a program...

  6. Monkeys Match and Tally Quantities across Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kerry E.; MacLean, Evan L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    We report here that monkeys can actively match the number of sounds they hear to the number of shapes they see and present the first evidence that monkeys sum over sounds and sights. In Experiment 1, two monkeys were trained to choose a simultaneous array of 1-9 squares that numerically matched a sample sequence of shapes or sounds. Monkeys…

  7. A TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE FOR MAGNETIZED BEAM MATCHING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    To maintain low electron beam temperatures in the proposed RHIC electron cooler, careful matching of the magnetized beam from the source to the cooler solenoid is mandatory. We propose a tomographic technique to diagnose matching conditions. First simulation results will be presented.

  8. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  9. How Important Is a Cricket Test Match?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaister, P.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author analyzes the cricket series match between England and Australia by applying the concept of probability. The author presents solutions for obtaining results of either team winning or both ending up in a draw in the situation of a five-match series. The author also analyzes the probability wherein the series is still…

  10. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  11. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  12. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  13. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  14. Fast Approximate Quadratic Programming for Graph Matching

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Conroy, John M.; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J.; Kratzer, Steven G.; Harley, Eric T.; Fishkind, Donniell E.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Priebe, Carey E.

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance. PMID:25886624

  15. Fast approximate quadratic programming for graph matching.

    PubMed

    Vogelstein, Joshua T; Conroy, John M; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J; Kratzer, Steven G; Harley, Eric T; Fishkind, Donniell E; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Priebe, Carey E

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance. PMID:25886624

  16. The Matching Law: A Tutorial for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Derek D; Kaplan, Brent A

    2011-01-01

    The application of the matching law has historically been limited to use as a quantitative measurement tool in the experimental analysis of behavior to describe temporally extended patterns of behavior-environment relations. In recent years, however, applications of the matching law have been translated to clinical settings and populations to gain a better understanding of how naturally-occurring events affect socially important behaviors. This tutorial provides a brief background of the conceptual foundations of matching, an overview of the various matching equations that have been used in research, and a description of how to interpret the data derived from these equations in the context of numerous examples of matching analyses conducted with socially important behavior. An appendix of resources is provided to direct readers to primary sources, as well as useful articles and books on the topic. PMID:22649575

  17. A New Approach for Semantic Web Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanifar, Kamran; Heidary, Golsa; Nematbakhsh, Naser; Mardukhi, Farhad

    In this work we propose a new approach for semantic web matching to improve the performance of Web Service replacement. Because in automatic systems we should ensure the self-healing, self-configuration, self-optimization and self-management, all services should be always available and if one of them crashes, it should be replaced with the most similar one. Candidate services are advertised in Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI) all in Web Ontology Language (OWL). By the help of bipartite graph, we did the matching between the crashed service and a Candidate one. Then we chose the best service, which had the maximum rate of matching. In fact we compare two services' functionalities and capabilities to see how much they match. We found that the best way for matching two web services, is comparing the functionalities of them.

  18. Semantic Data Matching: Principles and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deaton, Russell; Doan, Thao; Schweiger, Tom

    Automated and real-time management of customer relationships requires robust and intelligent data matching across widespread and diverse data sources. Simple string matching algorithms, such as dynamic programming, can handle typographical errors in the data, but are less able to match records that require contextual and experiential knowledge. Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) (Berry et al. ; Deerwester et al. is a machine intelligence technique that can match data based upon higher order structure, and is able to handle difficult problems, such as words that have different meanings but the same spelling, are synonymous, or have multiple meanings. Essentially, the technique matches records based upon context, or mathematically quantifying when terms occur in the same record.

  19. Gas-phase silicon atom densities in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Ho, P.

    1993-12-31

    Silicon atom number density profiles have been measured using laser-induced fluorescence during the chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane. Measurements were obtained in a rotating-disk reactor as a function of silane partial pressure and the amount of hydrogen added to the carrier gas. Absolute number densities were obtained using an atomic absorption technique. Results were compared with calculated density profiles from a model of the coupled fluid flow, gas-phase and surface chemistry for an infinite-radius rotating disk. An analysis of the reaction mechanism showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH{sub 2} is not the dominant source of Si atoms. Profile shapes and positions, and all experimental trends are well matched by the calculations. However, the calculated number density is up to 100 times smaller than measured.

  20. Silicon and silicone: theoretical and clinical implications of breast implants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S H; Chang, C C; Teuber, S S; Gershwin, M E

    1993-02-01

    In the past 10 years, there have been multiple published reports associating silicone breast implants with scleroderma, morphea, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, CREST syndrome and "human adjuvant disease." The alleged offending material, silicone, is a synthetic polymer containing a silicon-oxygen backbone. Beginning with the heating of SiO2 in the presence of carbon, elemental silicon is produced. Methylchloride is added and the resulting product is hydrolyzed to form low molecular weight prepolymers which are linked to form linear silicone polymers and cross-linked to yield silicone rubbers or elastomers. The polymeric and hydrophobic characteristics of silicone and the presence of electrostatic charges and organic sidegroups make silicone a potentially ideal immunogen, leading to cross-reactivity with autoantigens. Silicon is an essential constituent of proteoglycans which theoretically could result in immunological cross-reactions between silicone and connective tissues. Although the literature contains numerous examples of silicone-associated autoimmune disease, there is no consistent pattern of immunological abnormalities observed. There are, however, some intriguing and interesting observations. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine if a link between silicone exposure and autoimmunity exists. Also, since the inducing events of autoimmune diseases are unknown, studies on silicone could provide a model for autoimmune diseases associated with toxicological factors. PMID:8441826

  1. To Match or Not to Match Samples on Ability for Equating: A Discussion of Five Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaggs, Gary

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this issue that address the effect of matching samples on ability are reviewed. In spite of these examinations of equating methods and sampling plans, it is still hard to determine a definitive answer to the question of to match or not to match. Implications are discussed. (SLD)

  2. Matching the Judgmental Task with Standard Setting Panelist Expertise: The Item-Descriptor (ID) Matching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Perie, Marianne; Johnson, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Psychometricians continue to introduce new approaches to setting cut scores for educational assessments in an attempt to improve on current methods. In this paper we describe the Item-Descriptor (ID) Matching method, a method based on IRT item mapping. In ID Matching, test content area experts match items (i.e., their judgments about the knowledge…

  3. Thick-film materials for silicon photovoltaic cell manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thick film technology is applicable to three areas of silicon solar cell fabrication; metallization, junction formation, and coating for protection of screened ohmic contacts, particularly wrap around contacts, interconnection and environmental protection. Both material and process parameters were investigated. Printed ohmic contacts on n- and p-type silicon are very sensitive to the processing parameters of firing time, temperature, and atmosphere. Wrap around contacts are easily achieved by first printing and firing a dielectric over the edge and subsequently applying a low firing temperature conductor. Interconnection of cells into arrays can be achieved by printing and cofiring thick film metal pastes, soldering, or with heat curing conductive epoxies on low cost substrates. Printed (thick) film vitreous protection coatings do not yet offer sufficient optical uniformity and transparency for use on silicon. A sprayed, heat curable SiO2 based resin shows promise of providing both optical matching and environmental protection.

  4. Nonlinear characteristics in fracture strength test of ultrathin silicon die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zunxu; Huang, YongAn; Xiao, Lin; Tang, Pengpeng; Yin, Zhouping

    2015-04-01

    The precise evaluation of fracture strength of ultrathin (<50 μm thick) silicon chips/ribbons plays a critical role in design of deformability and lifetime of flexible/stretchable electronics. In its three-point bending test, however, the classical linear theory used to convert the experimental fracture load into fracture strength value fails to match the emerged geometrically nonlinear characteristics for such an ultrathin silicon die. Here, we consider the geometric large deformation and present its nonlinear solution to more reliably evaluate the fracture stress of ultrathin specimen by virtue of the obtained experimental fracture load. A quite good agreement on experiments shows that the nonlinear analytical predictions allow a more comprehensive understanding for the effects of the silicon samples’ thickness on the transformation from linear relation to nonlinearity. The comparisons indicate that the fracture strength values are lower from linear evaluations, and to this the corresponding correction factor is defined to enhance the estimate precision.

  5. Treatment matching. Theoretic basis and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Gastfriend, D R; McLellan, A T

    1997-07-01

    An extensive knowledge base supports the development of treatment matching methods for alcohol and other drug abuse. Many matching variables have been identified that relate to specific modalities of treatment and to specific levels of care. Physicians and other providers can use many putative matching variables to address patients' substance use problems on a highly individualized basis. These variables include demographic factors (age, gender, culture), typology and severity (age of onset; severity of intoxication; withdrawal; quantity, recency, frequency of substance use), intrapersonal characteristics (psychiatric diagnosis, cognitive function, self-efficacy, stage of change), and interpersonal function (social stability). The evolution of formal criteria for patient placement such as the ASAM criteria is a beneficial, adaptive process that is underway in numerous states, managed care entities, professional provider societies, and provider groups. Currently, matching approaches rely more heavily on consensus recommendations than on empiric matching data. The technology for conducting psychosocial treatment matching studies is rapidly increasing in sophistication. Although predictive validity has not yet been fully demonstrated on a large, multisite basis, the national research portfolio on treatment matching is expanding in size and complexity. This is an essential public health need, given dramatic cost pressures, if addiction services are to continue to grow in quality and availability. PMID:9222262

  6. Efficient algorithms for robust feature matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, David M.; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    1997-01-01

    One of the basic building blocks in any point-based registration scheme involves matching feature points that are extracted from the sensed image to their counterparts in the reference image. This leads to the fundamental problem of point matching: given two sets of points, find the affine transformation that transforms one point set so that its distance from the other point set is minimized. Because of measurement errors and the presence of outlying data points, it is important that the distance measure between two point sets be robust to these effects. We measure distances using the generalized Hausdorff distance. Point matching can be a computationally intensive task, and there have been a number of algorithms and approaches proposed for solving this problem both theoretical and applied. We present two approaches to the point matching problem, in an attempt to reduce the computational complexity of the problem, while still providing guarantees on the quality of the final match. Our first method is an approximation algorithm, which is loosely based on a branch-and-bound approach due to Huttenlocher and Rucklidge. We show that by varying the approximation error bounds, it is possible to achieve a tradeoff between the quality of the match and the running time of the algorithm. Our second method involves a Monte Carlo method for accelerating the search process used in the first algorithm. With high probability this method succeeds in finding an approximately optimal match. We establish the efficiency of our approaches empirically.

  7. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  8. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  9. Large area sheet task. Advanced dendritic web growth development. [silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Frantti, E.; Schruben, J.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a silicon dendritic web growth machine is discussed. Several refinements to the sensing and control equipment for melt replenishment during web growth are described and several areas for cost reduction in the components of the prototype automated web growth furnace are identified. A circuit designed to eliminate the sensitivity of the detector signal to the intensity of the reflected laser beam used to measure melt level is also described. A variable speed motor for the silicon feeder is discussed which allows pellet feeding to be accomplished at a rate programmed to match exactly the silicon removed by web growth.

  10. 110 GHz CMOS compatible thin film LiNbO3 modulator on silicon.

    PubMed

    Mercante, Andrew J; Yao, Peng; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett; Murakowski, Janusz; Prather, Dennis W

    2016-07-11

    In this paper we address a significant limitation of silicon as an optical material, namely, the upper bound of its potential modulation frequency. This arises due to finite carrier mobility, which fundamentally limits the frequency response of all-silicon modulators to about 60 GHz. To overcome this limitation, another material must be integrated with silicon to provide increased operational bandwidths. Accordingly, this paper proposes and demonstrates the integration of a thin LiNbO3 device layer with silicon and a novel tuning process that matches the propagation velocities between the propagating radio-frequency (RF) and optical waves. The resulting lithium niobate on silicon (LiNOS) modulator is demonstrated to operate from DC to 110 GHz. PMID:27410831

  11. Silicone breast implant materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U

    2012-01-01

    This opinion article has been written on request because of the recent public controversy over silicone breast implants produced by a now-defunct company, Poly Implant Prosthese (PIP) in France. More than 300,000 PIP devices have been implanted. The purposes of my article are to (1.) provide a general overview of silicone breast implant materials, (2.) to describe the general safety of these materials as reported to date, and (3.) to summarise current publicly available information about these aspects of the PIP prostheses. The materials covered are the silicone rubber from which the implant shells are made and the silicone gel used to fill the shell. The materials safety issues are biocompatibility (especially of the gel) and biodurability of the shell. The literature reviewed indicates that biocompatibility is not an issue with other current generation implants. However, biodurability is. A rough estimate of implant shell rupture rate is ~10+% at 10 years. Information is still emerging about the PIP implants. Initial regulatory disclosures suggest the PIP implants may have both biocompatibility and biodurability problems. They also suggest that PIP implants may have been produced using silicone materials not certified as medical grade. Governmental health and regulatory agencies are just now in the process of deciding what actions should be taken to protect patients. PMID:22826101

  12. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  13. Liquidus of Silicon Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv; Tangstad, Merete

    2011-08-01

    Thermodynamic knowledge about liquid silicon is crucial for the production of solar-grade silicon feedstock from molten silicon. In the current study, liquidus for silicon binary alloys is formulated using a previously developed method in which the liquidus curve is calculated using two constants. The liquidus measurements for the silicon portion of the silicon alloys with Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, Zn, Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, Sn, Pb, Bi, Sb, Ga, In, Ni, Pd, Mn, and Rh are reviewed, and the consistent data were used to determine the liquidus constants. The liquidus curves for silicon binary systems are calculated and plotted. It is indicated that the calculated liquidus curves fit well with the experimental data. A correlation between the determined liquidus constants is also observed, which can be used to gain a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the silicon binary melts.

  14. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  15. Bondability of RTV silicon rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delollis, N. J.; Montoya, O.

    1972-01-01

    Glow discharge method for producing a bondable Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) silicone is described. Mechanical and chemical properties of silicone specimens are described. Theory concerning the relationship between surface characteristics and bondability is examined with respect to the polymer specimen.

  16. Predicting the Match Outcome in One Day International Cricket Matches, while the Game is in Progress

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Michael; Clarke, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Millions of dollars are wagered on the outcome of one day international (ODI) cricket matches, with a large percentage of bets occurring after the game has commenced. Using match information gathered from all 2200 ODI matches played prior to January 2005, a range of variables that could independently explain statistically significant proportions of variation associated with the predicted run totals and match outcomes were created. Such variables include home ground advantage, past performances, match experience, performance at the specific venue, performance against the specific opposition, experience at the specific venue and current form. Using a multiple linear regression model, prediction variables were numerically weighted according to statistical significance and used to predict the match outcome. With the use of the Duckworth-Lewis method to determine resources remaining, at the end of each completed over, the predicted run total of the batting team could be updated to provide a more accurate prediction of the match outcome. By applying this prediction approach to a holdout sample of matches, the efficiency of the “in the run ”wagering market could be assessed. Preliminary results suggest that the market is prone to overreact to events occurring throughout the course of the match, thus creating brief inefficiencies in the wagering market. Key Points In excess of 80% of monies wagered on the outcome of ODI matches are placed after the match has commenced. Using all past data from ODI matches, multiple linear regression models are constructed to predict team totals and margin of victory. By combining match information with prediction models, an ‘in the run’ prediction process is created for ODI matches. PMID:24357940

  17. Modelling relationships between match events and match outcome in elite football.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyou; Hopkins, Will G; Gómez, Miguel-Angel

    2016-08-01

    Identifying match events that are related to match outcome is an important task in football match analysis. Here we have used generalised mixed linear modelling to determine relationships of 16 football match events and 1 contextual variable (game location: home/away) with the match outcome. Statistics of 320 close matches (goal difference ≤ 2) of season 2012-2013 in the Spanish First Division Professional Football League were analysed. Relationships were evaluated with magnitude-based inferences and were expressed as extra matches won or lost per 10 close matches for an increase of two within-team or between-team standard deviations (SD) of the match event (representing effects of changes in team values from match to match and of differences between average team values, respectively). There was a moderate positive within-team effect from shots on target (3.4 extra wins per 10 matches; 99% confidence limits ±1.0), and a small positive within-team effect from total shots (1.7 extra wins; ±1.0). Effects of most other match events were related to ball possession, which had a small negative within-team effect (1.2 extra losses; ±1.0) but a small positive between-team effect (1.7 extra wins; ±1.4). Game location showed a small positive within-team effect (1.9 extra wins; ±0.9). In analyses of nine combinations of team and opposition end-of-season rank (classified as high, medium, low), almost all between-team effects were unclear, while within-team effects varied depending on the strength of team and opposition. Some of these findings will be useful to coaches and performance analysts when planning training sessions and match tactics. PMID:26190577

  18. Matching software practitioner needs to researcher activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching software practitioners' needs to software researchers' activities. It uses an accepted taxonomical software classfication scheme as intermediary, in terms of which practitioners express needs, and researchers express activities.

  19. Breast Cancer: Match of Her Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer The Match of Her Life Past Issues / Spring - ... Martina Navratilova stays strong in her battle against breast cancer and her work to help Americans live healthier, ...

  20. 7 CFR 3419.2 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MATCHING FUNDS REQUIREMENT FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EXTENSION FORMULA FUNDS AT 1890 LAND-GRANT INSTITUTIONS, INCLUDING TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY, AND AT 1862...

  1. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits.

    PubMed

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  2. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively. PMID:20197803

  3. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor.

    PubMed

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E; Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Johnson, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  4. Thick silicon growth techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Hall mobility measurements on a number of single crystal silicon ribbons grown from graphite dies have shown some ribbons to have mobilities consistent with their resistivities. The behavior of other ribbons appears to be explained by the introduction of impurities of the opposite sign. Growth of a small single crystal silicon ribbon has been achieved from a beryllia dia. Residual internal stresses of the order of 7 to 18,000 psi have been determined to exist in some silicon ribbon, particularly those grown at rates in excess of 1 in./min. Growth experiments have continued toward definition of a configuration and parameters to provide a reasonable yield of single crystal ribbons. High vacuum outgassing of graphite dies and evacuation and backfilling of growth chambers have provided significant improvements in surface quality of ribbons grown from graphite dies.

  5. Scriber for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.; Fortier, E. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for dividing silicon wafers into rectangular chips is characterized by a base including a horizontally oriented bed with a planar support surface, a vacuum chuck adapted to capture a silicon wafer seated on the support for translation in mutually perpendicular directions. A stylus support mounted on the bed includes a shaft disposed above and extended across the bed and a truck mounted on the shaft and supported thereby for linear translation along a path extended across the bed a vertically oriented scribe has a diamond tip supported by the truck also adapted as to engage a silicon wafer captured by the chuck and positioned beneath it in order to form score lines in the surface of the wafer as linear translation is imparted to the truck. A chuck positioning means is mounted on the base and is connected to the chuck for positioning the chuck relative to the stylus.

  6. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The flow instabilities in floating zones of silicon were investigated and methods for investigation of these instabilities in microgravity were defined. Three principal tasks were involved: (1) characterization of the float zone in small diameter rods; (2) investigation of melt flow instabilities in circular melts in silicon disks; and (3) the development of a prototype of an apparatus that could be used in near term space experiments to investigate flow instabilities in a molten zone. It is shown that in a resistance heated zoner with 4 to 7 mm diameter silicon rods that the critical Marangoni number is about 1480 compared to a predicted value of 14 indicative that viable space experiments might be performed. The prototype float zone apparatus is built and specifications are prepared for a flight zoner should a decision be reached to proceed with a space flight experimental investigation.

  7. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  8. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  9. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  10. Palladium contamination in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Ceresoli, M.; Codegoni, D.; Somaini, F.; Bianchi, I.; Volonghi, D.

    2015-04-01

    In this work palladium is characterized as a silicon contaminant by recombination lifetime, DLTS, C-V and C-t measurements of palladium-implanted wafers. Palladium introduced by ion implantation is found to remain in the solid solution in silicon after rapid thermal treatments, and to be a very effective recombination center. For this reason recombination lifetime measurements are the most sensitive method to detect palladium in silicon. Two palladium-related levels were found by DLTS in p-type material. One of these levels corresponds to a level reported in the literature as the single donor level of substitutional palladium. For what concerns MOS capacitors, palladium is responsible for negative oxide charge and for degradation of the generation lifetime. In addition, palladium is confirmed to be a very fast diffuser, which segregates at the wafer surface even with low temperature treatments (250 °C). Microscopy inspections showed that palladium precipitates and surface defects were formed upon segregation.

  11. `t Hooft anomaly matching for discrete symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Csaki, C.; Murayama, Hitoshi |

    1998-05-01

    The authors show how to extend the `t Hooft anomaly matching conditions to discrete symmetries. They check these discrete anomally matching conditions on several proposed low-energy spectra of certain strongly interacting gauge theories. The excluded examples include the proposed chirally symmetric vacuum of pure N = 1 supersymmetric yang-Mills theories, certain non-supersymmetric confining theories and some self-dual N = 1 supersymmetric theories based on exceptional groups.

  12. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1994-12-31

    In the field of microelectronics, and in particular the fabrication of microelectronics during plasma etching processes, electrostatic chucks have been used to hold silicon wafers during the plasma etching process. Current electrostatic chucks that operate by the {open_quotes}Johnson-Rahbek Effect{close_quotes} consist of a metallic base plate that is typically coated with a thick layer of slightly conductive dielectric material. A silicon wafer of approximately the same size as the chuck is placed on top of the chuck and a potential difference of several hundred volts is applied between the silicon and the base plate of the electrostatic chuck. This causes an electrostatic attraction proportional to the square of the electric field in the gap between the silicon wafer and the chuck face. When the chuck is used in a plasma filled chamber the electric potential of the wafer tends to be fixed by the effective potential of the plasma. The purpose of the dielectric layer on the chuck is to prevent the silicon wafer from coming into direct electrical contact with the metallic part of the chuck and shorting out the potential difference. On the other hand, a small amount of conductivity appears to be desirable in the dielectric coating so that much of its free surface between points of contact with the silicon wafer is maintained near the potential of the metallic base plate; otherwise, a much larger potential difference would be needed to produce a sufficiently large electric field in the vacuum gap between the wafer and chuck. Typically, the face of the chuck has a pattern of grooves in which about 10 torr pressure of helium gas is maintained. This gas provides cooling (thermal contact) between the wafer and the chuck. A pressure of 10 torr is equivalent to about 0.2 psi.

  13. Quantum learning and universal quantum matching machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Masahide; Carlini, Alberto

    2002-08-01

    Suppose that three kinds of quantum systems are given in some unknown states |f>⊗N, |g1>⊗K, and |g2>⊗K, and we want to decide which template state |g1> or |g2>, each representing the feature of the pattern class C1 or C2, respectively, is closest to the input feature state |f>. This is an extension of the pattern matching problem into the quantum domain. Assuming that these states are known a priori to belong to a certain parametric family of pure qubit systems, we derive two kinds of matching strategies. The first one is a semiclassical strategy that is obtained by the natural extension of conventional matching strategies and consists of a two-stage procedure: identification (estimation) of the unknown template states to design the classifier (learning process to train the classifier) and classification of the input system into the appropriate pattern class based on the estimated results. The other is a fully quantum strategy without any intermediate measurement, which we might call as the universal quantum matching machine. We present the Bayes optimal solutions for both strategies in the case of K=1, showing that there certainly exists a fully quantum matching procedure that is strictly superior to the straightforward semiclassical extension of the conventional matching strategy based on the learning process.

  14. Do audition electives impact match success?

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth; Newman, Linnie; Halligan, Katherine; Miller, Margaret; Schwab, Sally; Kosowicz, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The authors sought to determine the value of the audition elective to the overall success of medical students in the match. Method The authors surveyed 1,335 fourth-year medical students at 10 medical schools in 2013. The study took place over a 2-month period immediately following the match. Medical students were emailed a 14-question survey and asked about audition electives, rank order, and cost of ‘away’ rotations. Results One hundred percent of students wishing to match in otolaryngology, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, radiation oncology, and urology took the audition electives. The difference by specialty in the proportion of students who took an audition was statistically significant (p<0.001). Of the students who auditioned, 71% matched at one of their top three choices compared with 84% of non-auditioners who matched to one of their top three choices (p<0.01). Conclusions Students performed a large number of ‘away’ rotations as ‘auditions’ in order to improve their chances in the match. For certain competitive specialties, virtually all students auditioned. Overall, students who did not audition were just as successful as or more successful than students who did audition. PMID:27301380

  15. Lack of uniformity in colour matching.

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M

    1979-01-01

    1. The fraction of red in a red--green mixture matched to yellow increased as the intensities of the match constituents were increased sufficiently to bleach appreciable chlorolabe and erythrolabe. 2. All changes in matching found for a given normal trichromat, (i) with increase in the intensities of the matching components, (ii) as a function of time after the onset of very intense components, (iii) with change in the pupil region through which light enters the eye, and (iv) with change in the region of the retina under test, are consistent with the assumption that matching depends upon the absorption of light in three kinds of (individually colour blind) cones, each with its own visual pigment, provided that the lambda max densities of the latter can vary in the range 0.25--1.0 (common logarithmic units) depending upon the subject. 3. Individual differences in matching among normal (as well as among both varieties of red--green anomalous) trichromats, on the other hand, suggest that the extinction spectra of the cone pigments sensitive to long and medium wave lengths may differ from one trichromat to the next. PMID:313984

  16. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  17. Silicon sheet technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1982-09-01

    A classification of silicon sheet growth methods by meniscus geometry permits them to be discussed in three groups: short meniscus techniques, high meniscus techniques, and extended meniscus or large solid/liquid interface area techniques. A second parameter, meniscus shaper interaction with the liquid silicon, is also instrumental in determining the characteristics of the various sheet processes. The current status of each process is discussed in the context of meniscus geometry and shaper/melt interaction. One aspect of sheet growth, surface area generation rate, is quantitatively compared with combined ingot growth and wafering surface area generation rates.

  18. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  19. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  20. Determination of mechanical properties of PECVD silicon nitride thin films for tunable MEMS Fabry Pérot optical filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Winchester, K.; Liu, Y.; Hu, X. Z.; Musca, C. A.; Dell, J. M.; Faraone, L.

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports an investigation on techniques for determining elastic modulus and intrinsic stress gradient in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride thin films. The elastic property of the silicon nitride thin films was determined using the nanoindentation method on silicon nitride/silicon bilayer systems. A simple empirical formula was developed to deconvolute the film elastic modulus. The intrinsic stress gradient in the films was determined by using micrometric cantilever beams, cross-membrane structures and mechanical simulation. The deflections of the silicon nitride thin film cantilever beams and cross-membranes caused by in-thickness stress gradients were measured using optical interference microscopy. Finite-element beam models were built to compute the deflection induced by the stress gradient. Matching the deflection computed under a given gradient with that measured experimentally on fabricated samples allows the stress gradient of the PECVD silicon nitride thin films introduced from the fabrication process to be evaluated.

  1. [Biological function of some elements and their compounds. IV. Silicon, silicon acids, silicones].

    PubMed

    Puzanowska-Tarasiewicz, Helena; Kuźmicka, Ludmiła; Tarasiewicz, Mirosław

    2009-11-01

    The review is devoted for the occurance, meaning of silicon and their compounds, especially silicon acids and silicones. Silicon participates in biosynthesis of collagen, the basic component of connective tissue. It strengthens and makes the walls of blood vessels more flexible, diminishes capillaries permeability, accelerates healing processes, has a sebostatic activity, strengthens hair and nails. This element has a beneficial effect on phosphorylation of proteins saccharides, and nucleotides. It is also essential for the formation of cytoskeleton and other cellular structures of mechanical or supportive function. Silicon is an initial substrate for obtaining silicones. These are synthetic polymers, in which silicon atoms are bound by oxygen bridges. They are used in almost all kinds of products due to their most convenient physical and chemical properties: moistening and film-forming, giving liquid form increasing solubility. Silicon acids form colloid gel, silica gel, with absorptive abilities, like active carbon. PMID:19999810

  2. Enhancing selectivity of infrared emitters through quality-factor matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Enas; Zhou, Zhiguang; Bermel, Peter

    2015-09-01

    It has recently been proposed that designing selective emitters with photonic crystals (PhCs) or plasmonic metamaterials can suppress low-energy photon emission, while enhancing higher-energy photon emission. Here, we will consider multiple approaches to designing and fabricating nanophotonic structures concentrating infrared thermal radiation at energies above a critical threshold. These are based on quality factor matching, in which one creates resonant cavities that couple light out at the same rate that the underlying materials emit it. When this quality-factor matching is done properly, emissivities can approach those of a blackbody, but only within a selected range of thermal photon energies. One potential application is for improving the conversion of heat to electricity via a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system, by using thermal radiation to illuminate a photovoltaic (PV) diode. In this study, realistic simulations of system efficiencies are performed using finite-difference time domain (FDTD) and rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to capture both thermal radiation and PV diode absorption. We first consider a previously studied 2D molybdenum photonic crystal with a commercially-available silicon PV diode, which can yield TPV efficiencies up to 26.2%. Second, a 1D-periodic samarium-doped glass emitter with a gallium antimonide (GaSb) PV diode is presented, which can yield efficiencies up to 38.5%. Finally, a 2D tungsten photonic crystal with a 1D integrated, chirped filter and the GaSb PV diode can yield efficiencies up to 38.2%; however, the fabrication procedure is expected to be more challenging. The advantages and disadvantages of each strategy will be discussed.

  3. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  4. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  5. Micro-machined heat pipes in silicon MCM substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Mitchell, R.T.; Tuck, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Multichip modules (MCMs) containing power components need a substrate with excellent heat spreading capability to both avoid hot spots and to move dissipation heat toward the system heat sinks. Polycrystalline diamond is an excellent MCM heat spreading substrate but remains several orders of magnitude too expensive and somewhat more difficult to process than conventional mother-board materials. Today`s power MCMs concentrate on moderately priced silicon wafers and aluminum nitride ceramic with their improved thermal conductivity and good thermal expansion match to power semiconductor components in comparison to traditional alumina and printed wiring board materials. However, even silicon and AlN substrates are thermally challenged by designers needs. The authors report on the integral fabrication of micro-heat pipes embedded in silicon MCM substrates (5 x 5 cm) by the use of micromachined capillary wick structures and hermetic micro-cavities. This passive microstructure results in more than a 5 times improvement in heat spreading capability of the silicon MCM substrate over a large range of power densities and operating temperatures. Thus diamond-like cooling is possible at silicon prices.

  6. A mathematical approach to beam matching

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, A; Nandy, M; Gossman, M S; Sureka, C S; Ray, A; Sujatha, N

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This report provides the mathematical commissioning instructions for the evaluation of beam matching between two different linear accelerators. Methods: Test packages were first obtained including an open beam profile, a wedge beam profile and a depth–dose curve, each from a 10×10 cm2 beam. From these plots, a spatial error (SE) and a percentage dose error were introduced to form new plots. These three test package curves and the associated error curves were then differentiated in space with respect to dose for a first and second derivative to determine the slope and curvature of each data set. The derivatives, also known as bandwidths, were analysed to determine the level of acceptability for the beam matching test described in this study. Results: The open and wedged beam profiles and depth–dose curve in the build-up region were determined to match within 1% dose error and 1-mm SE at 71.4% and 70.8% for of all points, respectively. For the depth–dose analysis specifically, beam matching was achieved for 96.8% of all points at 1%/1 mm beyond the depth of maximum dose. Conclusion: To quantify the beam matching procedure in any clinic, the user needs to merely generate test packages from their reference linear accelerator. It then follows that if the bandwidths are smooth and continuous across the profile and depth, there is greater likelihood of beam matching. Differentiated spatial and percentage variation analysis is appropriate, ideal and accurate for this commissioning process. Advances in knowledge: We report a mathematically rigorous formulation for the qualitative evaluation of beam matching between linear accelerators. PMID:23995874

  7. Privacy-preserving matching of similar patients.

    PubMed

    Vatsalan, Dinusha; Christen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The identification of similar entities represented by records in different databases has drawn considerable attention in many application areas, including in the health domain. One important type of entity matching application that is vital for quality healthcare analytics is the identification of similar patients, known as similar patient matching. A key component of identifying similar records is the calculation of similarity of the values in attributes (fields) between these records. Due to increasing privacy and confidentiality concerns, using the actual attribute values of patient records to identify similar records across different organizations is becoming non-trivial because the attributes in such records often contain highly sensitive information such as personal and medical details of patients. Therefore, the matching needs to be based on masked (encoded) values while being effective and efficient to allow matching of large databases. Bloom filter encoding has widely been used as an efficient masking technique for privacy-preserving matching of string and categorical values. However, no work on Bloom filter-based masking of numerical data, such as integer (e.g. age), floating point (e.g. body mass index), and modulus (numbers wrap around upon reaching a certain value, e.g. date and time), which are commonly required in the health domain, has been presented in the literature. We propose a framework with novel methods for masking numerical data using Bloom filters, thereby facilitating the calculation of similarities between records. We conduct an empirical study on publicly available real-world datasets which shows that our framework provides efficient masking and achieves similar matching accuracy compared to the matching of actual unencoded patient records. PMID:26707453

  8. Robust matching algorithm for image mosaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Luan; Tan, Jiu-bin

    2010-08-01

    In order to improve the matching accuracy and the level of automation for image mosaic, a matching algorithm based on SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) features is proposed as detailed below. Firstly, according to the result of cursory comparison with the given basal matching threshold, the collection corresponding SIFT features which contains mismatch is obtained. Secondly, after calculating all the ratio of Euclidean distance from the closest neighbor to the distance of the second closest of corresponding features, we select the image coordinates of corresponding SIFT features with the first eight smallest ratios to solve the initial parameters of pin-hole camera model, and then calculate maximum error σ between transformation coordinates and original image coordinates of the eight corresponding features. Thirdly, calculating the scale of the largest original image coordinates of the eight corresponding features to the entire image size, the scale is regarded as control parameter k of matching error threshold. Finally, computing the difference of the transformation coordinates and the original image coordinates of all the features in the collection of features, deleting the corresponding features with difference larger than 3kσ. We can then obtain the exact collection of matching features to solve the parameters for pin-hole camera model. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is stable and reliable in case of the image having some variation of view point, illumination, rotation and scale. This new method has been used to achieve an excellent matching accuracy on the experimental images. Moreover, the proposed method can be used to select the matching threshold of different images automatically without any manual intervention.

  9. A graph theoretic approach to scene matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranganath, Heggere S.; Chipman, Laure J.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to match two scenes is a fundamental requirement in a variety of computer vision tasks. A graph theoretic approach to inexact scene matching is presented which is useful in dealing with problems due to imperfect image segmentation. A scene is described by a set of graphs, with nodes representing objects and arcs representing relationships between objects. Each node has a set of values representing the relations between pairs of objects, such as angle, adjacency, or distance. With this method of scene representation, the task in scene matching is to match two sets of graphs. Because of segmentation errors, variations in camera angle, illumination, and other conditions, an exact match between the sets of observed and stored graphs is usually not possible. In the developed approach, the problem is represented as an association graph, in which each node represents a possible mapping of an observed region to a stored object, and each arc represents the compatibility of two mappings. Nodes and arcs have weights indicating the merit or a region-object mapping and the degree of compatibility between two mappings. A match between the two graphs corresponds to a clique, or fully connected subgraph, in the association graph. The task is to find the clique that represents the best match. Fuzzy relaxation is used to update the node weights using the contextual information contained in the arcs and neighboring nodes. This simplifies the evaluation of cliques. A method of handling oversegmentation and undersegmentation problems is also presented. The approach is tested with a set of realistic images which exhibit many types of sementation errors.

  10. A graph theoretic approach to scene matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganath, Heggere S.; Chipman, Laure J.

    1991-08-01

    The ability to match two scenes is a fundamental requirement in a variety of computer vision tasks. A graph theoretic approach to inexact scene matching is presented which is useful in dealing with problems due to imperfect image segmentation. A scene is described by a set of graphs, with nodes representing objects and arcs representing relationships between objects. Each node has a set of values representing the relations between pairs of objects, such as angle, adjacency, or distance. With this method of scene representation, the task in scene matching is to match two sets of graphs. Because of segmentation errors, variations in camera angle, illumination, and other conditions, an exact match between the sets of observed and stored graphs is usually not possible. In the developed approach, the problem is represented as an association graph, in which each node represents a possible mapping of an observed region to a stored object, and each arc represents the compatibility of two mappings. Nodes and arcs have weights indicating the merit or a region-object mapping and the degree of compatibility between two mappings. A match between the two graphs corresponds to a clique, or fully connected subgraph, in the association graph. The task is to find the clique that represents the best match. Fuzzy relaxation is used to update the node weights using the contextual information contained in the arcs and neighboring nodes. This simplifies the evaluation of cliques. A method of handling oversegmentation and undersegmentation problems is also presented. The approach is tested with a set of realistic images which exhibit many types of sementation errors.

  11. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Prater, John Thomas; Narayan, Jagdish

    2016-09-01

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO3, SrTiO3 (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called "domain matching epitaxy," is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%-25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation "smart" devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin-film heterostructure systems that span a

  12. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  13. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  14. Selective formation of porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Jones (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H20. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  15. Silicon cladding for mirror substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, Christopher J.; Gunda, Nilesh; Schwartz, Jay R.; Robichaud, Joseph L.

    2009-08-01

    To reduce the finishing costs of silicon carbide mirror substrates, silicon claddings are applied allowing the surfaces to be more easily diamond turned and polished than the bare chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide or bimodal reaction bonded SiC (RB-SiC). The benefits of using silicon as the optical face will be reviewed as will the process for applying plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PE-CVD) deposited amorphous silicon cladding on substrates. Using one mirror as an example, the successful finishing results will be shared.

  16. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for new physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charm hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities. The Silicon Tracker is part of the tracking system and measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. The LHCb Silicon Tracker covers a total sensitive area of about 12 m2 using silicon micro-strip detectors with long readout strips. It consists of one four-layer tracking station before the LHCb dipole magnet and three stations after. The detector has performed extremely well since the start of the LHC operation despite the fact that the experiment is collecting data at instantaneous luminosities well above the design value. This paper reports on the operation and performance of the Silicon Tracker during the Physics data taking at the LHC during the last two years.

  17. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  18. Silicone/Acrylate Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two-step process forms silicone/acrylate copolymers. Resulting acrylate functional fluid is reacted with other ingredients to produce copolymer. Films of polymer were formed by simply pouring or spraying mixture and allowing solvent to evaporate. Films showed good weatherability. Durable, clear polymer films protect photovoltaic cells.

  19. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  20. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  1. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  2. Electroluminescence from silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J.; Solanki, R.; Freeouf, J. L.; Carruthers, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Room temperature electroluminescence has been demonstrated from undoped silicon nanowires that were grown from disilane. Ensembles of nanowires were excited by capacitively coupling them to an ac electric field. The emission peak occurred at about 600 nm from wires of average diameter of about 4 nm. The emission appears to result from band-to-band electron-hole recombination.

  3. A hybrid features based image matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Zhenbiao; Lin, Tao; Sun, Xiao; Dou, Hao; Ming, Delie

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel image matching method to find the correspondences between two sets of image interest points. The proposed method is based on a revised third-order tensor graph matching method, and introduces an energy function that takes four kinds of energy term into account. The third-order tensor method can hardly deal with the situation that the number of interest points is huge. To deal with this problem, we use a potential matching set and a vote mechanism to decompose the matching task into several sub-tasks. Moreover, the third-order tensor method sometimes could only find a local optimum solution. Thus we use a cluster method to divide the feature points into some groups and only sample feature triangles between different groups, which could make the algorithm to find the global optimum solution much easier. Experiments on different image databases could prove that our new method would obtain correct matching results with relatively high efficiency.

  4. A robust line extraction and matching algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussien, B.; Sridhar, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for extracting straight lines from intensity mages and describes a line matching algorithm for solving the line correspondence problem. The line extraction process begins by detecting edges in the intensity image. Next, line support regions are formed where image points (pixels) have similar gradient orientation. A line fitting algorithm is then used to fit a line to the points in the line support region based on a least means square fitting algorithm. Finally, line segments are linked together to form the final lines by using an adaptive line linking method; this results in much stronger lines and a smaller set of lines to be considered. Once the lines are detected in a sequence of images, a line matching algorithm is used to match lines in one image to the lines in the other image. The images are either from a motion or stereo sequence. The matched lines may then be used with the sensor position and orientation data to estimate range to objects corresponding to the lines. We present results based on applying the line extraction and line matching algorithms to a synthetic image and an outdoor scene captured by a camera on a helicopter.

  5. 11 CFR 9032.5 - Matching payment account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Matching payment account. 9032.5 Section 9032.5... MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.5 Matching payment account. Matching payment account means the Presidential Primary Matching Payment Account established by the Secretary of the Treasury under 26 U.S.C....

  6. Channeling of aluminum in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.G.; Hopkins, C.G.

    1985-05-15

    A systematic study of channeling of aluminum in the silicon crystal is reported. Depth distributions measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry are reported for 40-, 75-, and 150-keV aluminum channeled in the <100> and <110> directions of silicon. The profile dependence on alignment angle is shown for 150-keV aluminum in the <110> of silicon. Aluminum has low electronic stopping in silicon and corresponding deep channeled profiles are observed for aligned implants and deep channeling tails are observed on random implants. The maximum channeling range for 150-keV Al in <100> silicon is about 2.8 ..mu..m and is about 6.4 ..mu..m in <110> silicon. Some ions will reach the maximum channeling range even for 2/sup 0/ misalignment. Many of the deep channeling tails and ''supertails'' reported in earlier literature can be explained by the normal channeling of aluminum in silicon.

  7. Silicon oxidation in fluoride solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon is produced in a NaF, Na2SiF6, and Na matrix when SiF4 is reduced by metallic sodium. Hydrogen is evolved during acid leaching to separate the silicon from the accompanying reaction products, NaF and Na2SiF6. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied under conditions simulating leaching conditions by making suspensions of the dry silicon powder in aqueous fluoride solutions. The mechanism for the hydrogen evolution is discussed in terms of spontaneous oxidation of silicon resulting from the cooperative effects of (1) elemental sodium in the silicon that reacts with water to remove a protective silica layer, leaving clean reactive silicon, and (2) fluoride in solution that complexes with the oxidized silicon in solution and retards formation of a protective hydrous oxide gel.

  8. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  9. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  10. Supplemental silicon increases plasma and milk silicon concentrations in horses.

    PubMed

    Lang, K J; Nielsen, B D; Waite, K L; Hill, G M; Orth, M W

    2001-10-01

    The primary objective of this research was to determine the effect of supplemental dietary silicon (Si) on plasma and milk Si concentrations of lactating mares and the subsequent effect on plasma Si concentrations in nursing foals. Additionally, the role of Si on altering biochemical markers of bone turnover was investigated, because supplemental Si may be advantageous in enhancing bone health. Twelve Arabian mare/foal units were pair-matched by foaling date and randomly assigned to two groups, Si-supplemented (Supplemented) or control (Control). Blood and milk samples were taken on d 0, 15, 30, and 45, d 0 being the 1st d after parturition. Plasma and milk (or colostrum) Si concentrations were determined and serum was analyzed for osteocalcin, carboxy-terminal pyridinoline cross-linked telopeptide region of type I collagen, and pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline crosslinks. All Supplemented mares had higher (P < 0.01) plasma Si concentrations than Control by d 30, and Supplemented mares' milk had higher (P < 0.01) Si concentrations on d 45 than Control mares' milk. By d 45, foals of Supplemented mares had higher (P < 0.01) plasma Si concentrations than foals of Control mares. Supplemental Si did not influence (P > 0.36) bone metabolism in foals; however, trends (P < 0.10) for altered bone metabolism were observed in postpartum mares. Results indicate that supplemental Si increases plasma and milk Si concentrations. Further research is required to determine whether Si has a role in altering serum biochemical markers of bone and collagen activity. PMID:11721842

  11. An efficient VLSI architecture for template matching

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganathan, N.; Venugopal, S.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we describe a new special purpose VLSI architecture for template matching, based on a technique known as moment preserving pattern matching (MPPM). This technique first converts the given gray scale image and template into binary form using the moment preserving quantization method and then uses a pairing function to compute the similarity measure. The technique yields accurate results comparable to other approaches but involves simpler computations. The proposed architecture is systolic in nature and achieves a high degree of parallelism and pipelining. It is shown that the proposed architecture is much simpler, achieves higher speed, has a lower hardware complexity and utilizes lesser memory than other special purpose architectures for template matching.

  12. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom. PMID:26755901

  13. Tabu optimization for matched field inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Ghosh-Dastidar, Urmi

    2002-11-01

    Matched field processing is a powerful tool for source localization and geoacoustic inversion. Because of significant environmental and geometry uncertainties, however, matched field processing usually involves multiparameter searches. To facilitate these searches, global optimization techniques such as genetic algorithms and simulated annealing have been successfully employed. In this work, a different approach, tabu, is implemented for optimization in matched field inversion. Tabu is a technique relying on the use of memory; it searches for the global maximum of the objective function through a navigation process that avoids already revisited models, also making use of aspiration criteria and diversification for faster convergence. The tabu performance in localization and geoacoustic inversion is demonstrated through experimentation with both synthetic and real (SWellEX 96) data. The approach is shown to provide reliable estimates in an efficient manner. [Work supported by ONR.

  14. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom. PMID:26755901

  15. Anatomy Ontology Matching Using Markov Logic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhua; Zhao, Pengpeng; Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The anatomy of model species is described in ontologies, which are used to standardize the annotations of experimental data, such as gene expression patterns. To compare such data between species, we need to establish relationships between ontologies describing different species. Ontology matching is a kind of solutions to find semantic correspondences between entities of different ontologies. Markov logic networks which unify probabilistic graphical model and first-order logic provide an excellent framework for ontology matching. We combine several different matching strategies through first-order logic formulas according to the structure of anatomy ontologies. Experiments on the adult mouse anatomy and the human anatomy have demonstrated the effectiveness of proposed approach in terms of the quality of result alignment. PMID:27382498

  16. Computer-Generated Holographic Matched Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Steven Frank

    This dissertation presents techniques for the use of computer-generated holograms (CGH) for matched filtering. An overview of the supporting technology is provided. Included are techniques for modifying existing CGH algorithms to serve as matched filters in an optical correlator. It shows that matched filters produced in this fashion can be modified to improve the signal-to-noise and efficiency over that possible with conventional holography. The effect and performance of these modifications are demonstrated. In addition, a correction of film non-linearity in continuous -tone filter production is developed. Computer simulations provide quantitative and qualitative demonstration of theoretical principles, with specific examples validated in optical hardware. Conventional and synthetic holograms, both bleached and unbleached, are compared.

  17. Donor-recipient matching: myths and realities.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Javier; Ciria, Ruben; de la Mata, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Liver transplant outcomes keep improving, with refinements of surgical technique, immunosuppression and post-transplant care. However, these excellent results and the limited number of organs available have led to an increasing number of potential recipients with end-stage liver disease worldwide. Deaths on waiting lists have led liver transplant teams maximize every organ offered and used in terms of pre and post-transplant benefit. Donor-recipient (D-R) matching could be defined as the technique to check D-R pairs adequately associated by the presence of the constituents of some patterns from donor and patient variables. D-R matching has been strongly analysed and policies in donor allocation have tried to maximize organ utilization whilst still protecting individual interests. However, D-R matching has been written through trial and error and the development of each new score has been followed by strong discrepancies and controversies. Current allocation systems are based on isolated or combined donor or recipient characteristics. This review intends to analyze current knowledge about D-R matching methods, focusing on three main categories: patient-based policies, donor-based policies and combined donor-recipient systems. All of them lay on three mainstays that support three different concepts of D-R matching: prioritarianism (favouring the worst-off), utilitarianism (maximising total benefit) and social benefit (cost-effectiveness). All of them, with their pros and cons, offer an exciting controversial topic to be discussed. All of them together define D-R matching today, turning into myth what we considered a reality in the past. PMID:23104164

  18. Finite element analysis of expansion-matched submounts for high-power laser diodes packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuxi, Ni; Xiaoyu, Ma; Hongqi, Jing; Suping, Liu

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the output power and increase the lifetime of laser diodes, expansion-matched submounts were investigated by finite element analysis. The submount was designed as sandwiched structure. By varying the vertical structure and material of the middle layer, the thermal expansion behavior on the mounting surface was simulated to obtain the expansion-matched design. In addition, the thermal performance of laser diodes packaged by different submounts was compared. The numerical results showed that, changing the thickness ratio of surface copper to middle layer will lead the stress and junction temperature to the opposite direction. Thus compromise needs to be made in the design of the vertical structure. In addition, the silicon carbide (SiC) is the most promising material candidate for the middle layer among the materials discussed in this paper. The simulated results were aimed at providing guidance for the optimal design of sandwich-structure submounts.

  19. Line matching for automatic change detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhollande, Jérôme; Monnin, David; Gond, Laetitia; Cudel, Christophe; Kohler, Sophie; Dieterlen, Alain

    2012-06-01

    During foreign operations, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are one of major threats that soldiers may unfortunately encounter along itineraries. Based on a vehicle-mounted camera, we propose an original approach by image comparison to detect signicant changes on these roads. The classic 2D-image registration techniques do not take into account parallax phenomena. The consequence is that the misregistration errors could be detected as changes. According to stereovision principles, our automatic method compares intensity proles along corresponding epipolar lines by extrema matching. An adaptive space warping compensates scale dierence in 3D-scene. When the signals are matched, the signal dierence highlights changes which are marked in current video.

  20. Optical properties of hybrid plasmonic structure on silicon using transparent conducting-silver nanoparticles–silicon dioxide layers: the role of conducting oxide layer thickness in antireflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardana, Sanjay K.; Komarala, Vamsi K.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid plasmonic antireflection layer (HPAL) consisting of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin layers is investigated for enhancing light absorption within a silicon wafer. The optimization of HPAL for minimizing reflection losses from silicon is carried out by tuning the ITO layer thickness, which also affects Ag NP morphology during the growth process. Light reflectivity of ∼10% is observed from the silicon integrated with HPAL in the 300–1100 nm spectral region, due to enhanced light forward scattering as compared to a reflectivity of 26% from the bare silicon wafer. We have also investigated the ITO–SiO2 double layer (without Ag NPs) effect in reflection reduction from the silicon, but the HPAL performed better in Ag NPs’ surface plasmon resonance (<600 nm) and off-resonance (900–1100 nm) wavelength regions as compared to the double layer. With the Ag NPs, the ITO layer thickness can be reduced from 70 nm to 30 nm for the maximum reflectance reduction from the silicon surface. The thin SiO2 capping layer on Ag NPs provides a better refractive index match for further reflectance reduction, and also acts as a protective layer from degradation of Ag NPs with time.

  1. Bell's inequality violation with spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehollain, Juan P.; Simmons, Stephanie; Muhonen, Juha T.; Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Hudson, Fay; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Bell's theorem proves the existence of entangled quantum states with no classical counterpart. An experimental violation of Bell's inequality demands simultaneously high fidelities in the preparation, manipulation and measurement of multipartite quantum entangled states, and provides a single-number benchmark for the performance of devices that use such states for quantum computing. We demonstrate a Bell/ Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality violation with Bell signals up to 2.70(9), using the electron and the nuclear spins of a single phosphorus atom embedded in a silicon nanoelectronic device. Two-qubit state tomography reveals that our prepared states match the target maximally entangled Bell states with >96% fidelity. These experiments demonstrate complete control of the two-qubit Hilbert space of a phosphorus atom and highlight the important function of the nuclear qubit to expand the computational basis and maximize the readout fidelity.

  2. Bell's inequality violation with spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Dehollain, Juan P; Simmons, Stephanie; Muhonen, Juha T; Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Hudson, Fay; Itoh, Kohei M; Jamieson, David N; McCallum, Jeffrey C; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Bell's theorem proves the existence of entangled quantum states with no classical counterpart. An experimental violation of Bell's inequality demands simultaneously high fidelities in the preparation, manipulation and measurement of multipartite quantum entangled states, and provides a single-number benchmark for the performance of devices that use such states for quantum computing. We demonstrate a Bell/ Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality violation with Bell signals up to 2.70(9), using the electron and the nuclear spins of a single phosphorus atom embedded in a silicon nanoelectronic device. Two-qubit state tomography reveals that our prepared states match the target maximally entangled Bell states with >96% fidelity. These experiments demonstrate complete control of the two-qubit Hilbert space of a phosphorus atom and highlight the important function of the nuclear qubit to expand the computational basis and maximize the readout fidelity. PMID:26571006

  3. Aesthetic finger prosthesis with silicone biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, K M; Gururaju, C R; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of finger prosthesis is as much an art as it is science. The ideally constructed prosthesis must duplicate the missing structures so precisely that patients can appear in public without fear of attracting unwanted attraction. A 65-years-old patient reported with loss of his right index finger up to the second phalanx and wanted to get it replaced. An impression of the amputated finger and donor were made. A wax pattern of the prosthesis was fabricated using the donor impression; a trial was performed and flasked. Medical grade silicone was intrinsically stained to match the skin tone, following which it was packed, processed and finished. This clinical report describes a method of attaining retention by selective scoring of the master cast of partially amputated finger to enhance the vacuum effect at par with the proportional distribution of the positive forces on the tissues exerted by the prosthesis. PMID:23975917

  4. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portune, A. R.; Haber, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Silicon carbide mirrors were characterized using several qualitative and quantitative nondestructive ultrasound techniques in order to determine the most efficient method for rapid performance evaluations. Ultrasound testing was performed in immersion using both phased array and single transducer systems in pulse-echo configuration. C-scan images of top and bottom surface reflected signal peak amplitudes were used to qualitatively locate and identify homogeneity variations within the mirror materials. Quantitative analysis of normalized amplitude histograms revealed significant differences in homogeneity estimations between phased array and single transducer test methods. Acoustic spectroscopy over the 10-33 MHz regime identified bulk microstructural differences between high and low amplitude regions in the samples. While ultrasound phased array performed well at rapidly locating surface and subsurface heterogeneities, it could not match the resolution and clarity of single transducer C-scan images or the insight of acoustic spectroscopy analyses.

  5. Therapist-Worldview Matching: Not as Important as Matching to Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blow, Adrian J.; Davis, Sean D.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, we respond to Simon's article (2012). We discuss our view that therapy works best when therapists can match therapeutic interventions to the worldview of clients. We see this matching to client worldview as rooted in research evidence, and we suggest that therapists can practice authentically and effectively using more than one…

  6. Emergent Identity Matching after Successive Matching Training. II: Reflexivity or Transitivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urcuioli, Peter J.; Swisher, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments evaluated whether the apparent reflexivity effect reported by Sweeney and Urcuioli (2010) for pigeons might, in fact, be transitivity. In Experiment 1, pigeons learned symmetrically reinforced hue-form (A-B) and form-hue (B-A) successive matching. Those also trained on form-form (B-B) matching responded more to hue comparisons…

  7. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  8. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  9. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  10. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  11. Revisiting the Concept of "Style Match"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li-fang; Sternberg, Robert J.; Fan, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intellectual style, an encompassing term for such constructs as learning style, teaching style, teaching approach, and thinking style, refers to one's preferred way of processing information. For the past several decades, whether or not there is a need for a match between teachers' teaching styles and students' learning styles has been…

  12. 28 CFR 90.55 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Matching requirements. 90.55 Section 90.55 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN Indian Tribal... the same uses as the Violence Against Women Program funds and must be expended within the grant...

  13. 28 CFR 90.55 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Matching requirements. 90.55 Section 90.55 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN Indian Tribal... the same uses as the Violence Against Women Program funds and must be expended within the grant...

  14. 28 CFR 90.55 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Matching requirements. 90.55 Section 90.55 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN Indian Tribal... the same uses as the Violence Against Women Program funds and must be expended within the grant...

  15. 28 CFR 90.55 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Matching requirements. 90.55 Section 90.55 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN Indian Tribal... the same uses as the Violence Against Women Program funds and must be expended within the grant...

  16. Deformed Palmprint Matching Based on Stable Regions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangqian; Zhao, Qiushi

    2015-12-01

    Palmprint recognition (PR) is an effective technology for personal recognition. A main problem, which deteriorates the performance of PR, is the deformations of palmprint images. This problem becomes more severe on contactless occasions, in which images are acquired without any guiding mechanisms, and hence critically limits the applications of PR. To solve the deformation problems, in this paper, a model for non-linearly deformed palmprint matching is derived by approximating non-linear deformed palmprint images with piecewise-linear deformed stable regions. Based on this model, a novel approach for deformed palmprint matching, named key point-based block growing (KPBG), is proposed. In KPBG, an iterative M-estimator sample consensus algorithm based on scale invariant feature transform features is devised to compute piecewise-linear transformations to approximate the non-linear deformations of palmprints, and then, the stable regions complying with the linear transformations are decided using a block growing algorithm. Palmprint feature extraction and matching are performed over these stable regions to compute matching scores for decision. Experiments on several public palmprint databases show that the proposed models and the KPBG approach can effectively solve the deformation problem in palmprint verification and outperform the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26390453

  17. 7 CFR 1703.122 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1703.122 Section 1703.122 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program § 1703.122...

  18. 7 CFR 1703.122 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1703.122 Section 1703.122 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program § 1703.122...

  19. 24 CFR 582.110 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Matching requirements. 582.110 Section 582.110 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  20. 24 CFR 583.145 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Assistance Provided § 583.145 Matching..., rehabilitation, and new construction with an equal amount of funds from other sources. (b) Cash resources....

  1. Template Matching Using a Fluid Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William Curtis

    Template matching is successfully used in machine recognition of isolated spoken words. In these systems a word is broken into frames (20 millisecond time slices) and the spectral characteristics of each frame are found. Thus, each word is represented as a 2-dimensional (2-D) function of spectral characteristic and frame number. An unknown word is recognized by matching its 2-D representation to previously stored example words, or templates, also in this 2-D form. A new model for this matching step will be introduced. The 2-D representations of the template and unknown are used to determine the shape of a volume of viscous fluid. This volume is broken up into many small elements. The unknown is changed into the template by allowing flows between the element boundaries. Finally the match between the template and unknown is determined by calculating a weighted squared sum of the flow values. The model also allows the relative flow resistance between the element boundaries to be changed. This is useful for characterizing the important features of a given template. The flow resistances are changed according to the gradient of a simple performance function. This performance function is evaluated using a set of training samples provided by the user. The model is applied to isolated word and single character recognition tasks. Results indicate the applications where this model works best.

  2. Computers Launch Faster, Better Job Matching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gloria

    1976-01-01

    Employment Security Automation Project (ESAP), a five-year program sponsored by the Employment and Training Administration, features an innovative computer-assisted job matching system and instantaneous computer-assisted service for unemployment insurance claimants. ESAP will also consolidate existing automated employment security systems to…

  3. 13 CFR 108.2030 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 108.2030 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL... this part. (3) A portion of Private Capital may be designated as matching resources if the designated... with funds other than Regulatory Capital, from an insurance company acceptable to SBA and that may...

  4. 45 CFR 1301.20 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Matching requirements. 1301.20 Section 1301.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  5. 45 CFR 1301.20 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Matching requirements. 1301.20 Section 1301.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  6. 45 CFR 1301.20 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Matching requirements. 1301.20 Section 1301.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START GRANTS...

  7. 45 CFR 1301.20 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Matching requirements. 1301.20 Section 1301.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  8. 45 CFR 1301.20 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Matching requirements. 1301.20 Section 1301.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  9. Product Substitutability and the Matching Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxall, Gordon R.; James, Victoria K.; Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M.; Ribier, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of matching analysis, pioneered in the context of laboratory experiments, to the investigation and interpretation of consumer choice in natural environments is explored by the examination of sequential purchases of four product categories based on information from a panel of British consumers. Over a 52-week period, participants…

  10. Properly Matching Microcomputer Hardware, Software Minimizes "Glitches."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredenburg, Philip B.

    1986-01-01

    Microcomputer systems for school districts are best obtained by selecting the software, and matching it with hardware. Discusses criteria for software and hardware, monitors, input/output devices, backup devices, and printers. Components of two basic microcomputer systems for the business office are proposed. (MLF)

  11. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  12. Cash Management/Data Matching. Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This training guide for financial aid staff explains the process of direct loan reconciliation and suggests appropriate cash management accounting practices. Chapter 1 explains the importance of cash management, the role of data matching, and reviews basic reconciliation concepts and terms and direct loan reporting requirements. Chapter 2 reviews…

  13. 7 CFR 3406.5 - Matching support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching support. 3406.5 Section 3406.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Program...

  14. 7 CFR 3405.5 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching funds. 3405.5 Section 3405.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Program Description §...

  15. On the probability of matching DNA fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Risch, N J; Devlin, B

    1992-02-01

    Forensic scientists commonly assume that DNA fingerprint patterns are infrequent in the general population and that genotypes are independent across loci. To test these assumptions, the number of matching DNA patterns in two large databases from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and from Lifecodes was determined. No deviation from independence across loci in either database was apparent. For the Lifecodes database, the probability of a three-locus match ranges from 1 in 6,233 in Caucasians to 1 in 119,889 in Blacks. When considering all trios of five loci in the FBI database, there was only a single match observed out of more than 7.6 million comparisons. If independence is assumed, the probability of a five-locus match ranged from 1.32 x 10(-12) in Southeast Hispanics to 5.59 x 10(-14) in Blacks, implying that the minimum number of possible patterns for each ethnic group is several orders of magnitude greater than their corresponding population sizes in the United States. The most common five-locus pattern can have a frequency no greater than about 10(-6). Hence, individual five-locus DNA profiles are extremely uncommon, if not unique. PMID:1738844

  16. 36 CFR 64.10 - Matching share.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Matching share. 64.10 Section 64.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GRANTS AND ALLOCATIONS FOR RECREATION AND CONSERVATION USE OF ABANDONED RAILROAD RIGHTS-OF-WAY §...

  17. The Smart Potential behind Probability Matching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Schooler, Lael J.

    2008-01-01

    Probability matching is a classic choice anomaly that has been studied extensively. While many approaches assume that it is a cognitive shortcut driven by cognitive limitations, recent literature suggests that it is not a strategy per se, but rather another outcome of people's well-documented misperception of randomness. People search for patterns…

  18. The Match Quality Gains from Unemployment Insurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centeno, Mario

    2004-01-01

    The benefits of unemployment insurance (UI) by measuring its effect in match quality are assessed. The relationship between post-unemployment job tenure and measures of the state level UI generosity and the unemployment rate at the time of the job is analyzed, using NLSY data.

  19. 7 CFR 3430.906 - Matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching requirements. 3430.906 Section 3430.906 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS New Era Rural Technology Competitive...

  20. Quasi-phase-matched laser wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S J; Palastro, J P; Milchberg, H M

    2014-04-01

    The energy gain in laser wakefield acceleration is ultimately limited by dephasing, occurring when accelerated electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the wakefield. We apply quasi-phase-matching, enabled by axially modulated plasma channels, to overcome this limitation. Theory and simulations are presented showing that weakly relativistic laser intensities can drive significant electron energy gains. PMID:24745430

  1. Photon signature analysis using template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Hashim, S.; Saripan, M. I.; Wells, K.; Dunn, W. L.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an approach to detect improvised explosive devices (IEDs) by using a template matching procedure. This approach relies on the signature due to backstreaming γ photons from various targets. In this work we have simulated cylindrical targets of aluminum, iron, copper, water and ammonium nitrate (nitrogen-rich fertilizer). We simulate 3.5 MeV source photons distributed on a plane inside a shielded area using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP TM) code version 5 (V5). The 3.5 MeV source gamma rays yield 511 keV peaks due to pair production and scattered gamma rays. In this work, we simulate capture of those photons that backstream, after impinging on the target element, toward a NaI detector. The captured backstreamed photons are expected to produce a unique spectrum that will become part of a simple signal processing recognition system based on the template matching method. Different elements were simulated using different sets of random numbers in the Monte Carlo simulation. To date, the sum of absolute differences (SAD) method has been used to match the template. In the examples investigated, template matching was found to detect all elements correctly.

  2. Matching Environmental Variability and Organizational Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neves, Joao S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an experiential exercise designed to demonstrate how a good match between environmental characteristics and organizational solutions is critical for the performance of an organization. Use of the game by students and practitioners in production and operations management is explained, and adaptation of the game to other applications is…

  3. Behavior Matching in Multimodal Communication Is Synchronized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louwerse, Max M.; Dale, Rick; Bard, Ellen G.; Jeuniaux, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A variety of theoretical frameworks predict the resemblance of behaviors between two people engaged in communication, in the form of coordination, mimicry, or alignment. However, little is known about the time course of the behavior matching, even though there is evidence that dyads synchronize oscillatory motions (e.g., postural sway). This study…

  4. 7 CFR 1740.5 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching funds. 1740.5 Section 1740.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC TELEVISION STATION DIGITAL TRANSITION GRANT PROGRAM Public Television Station Digital...

  5. 7 CFR 1740.5 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Matching funds. 1740.5 Section 1740.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC TELEVISION STATION DIGITAL TRANSITION GRANT PROGRAM Public Television Station Digital...

  6. 7 CFR 1703.122 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1703.122 Section 1703.122 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program § 1703.122...

  7. 7 CFR 1703.122 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Matching contributions. 1703.122 Section 1703.122 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program § 1703.122...

  8. Matching in an Undisturbed Natural Human Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, J. J.; Caron, Marcia L.

    2010-01-01

    Data from the Oregon Youth Study, consisting of the verbal behavior of 210 adolescent boys determined to be at risk for delinquency (targets) and 210 of their friends (peers), were analyzed for their conformance to the complete family of matching theory equations in light of recent findings from the basic science, and using recently developed…

  9. Behavior matching in multimodal communication is synchronized.

    PubMed

    Louwerse, Max M; Dale, Rick; Bard, Ellen G; Jeuniaux, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A variety of theoretical frameworks predict the resemblance of behaviors between two people engaged in communication, in the form of coordination, mimicry, or alignment. However, little is known about the time course of the behavior matching, even though there is evidence that dyads synchronize oscillatory motions (e.g., postural sway). This study examined the temporal structure of nonoscillatory actions-language, facial, and gestural behaviors-produced during a route communication task. The focus was the temporal relationship between matching behaviors in the interlocutors (e.g., facial behavior in one interlocutor vs. the same facial behavior in the other interlocutor). Cross-recurrence analysis revealed that within each category tested (language, facial, gestural), interlocutors synchronized matching behaviors, at temporal lags short enough to provide imitation of one interlocutor by the other, from one conversational turn to the next. Both social and cognitive variables predicted the degree of temporal organization. These findings suggest that the temporal structure of matching behaviors provides low-level and low-cost resources for human interaction. PMID:22984793

  10. Matching Managerial Strategies to Conditions of Decline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim; Zammuto, Raymond

    1984-01-01

    A typology of decline based on institutional characteristics is suggested as a basis for matching managerial response to specific decline situations. The four decline types identified are erosion, contraction, dissolution, and collapse. The model is also suggested as a means for diagnosing organizational environments. (MSE)

  11. Interval Matching by Undergraduate Nonmusic Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Harry E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the sixth in a series of studies designed to explore factors that may affect pitch matching. Classifies undergraduate nonmusic majors enrolled in a music fundamentals class as uncertain, modulating, or certain singers. Reveals that there was a significant difference among singer types with uncertain singers being less able to match…

  12. In-group modulation of perceptual matching.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Zargol; Sui, Jie; Hewstone, Miles; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel effect of in-group bias on a task requiring simple perceptual matching of stimuli. Football fans were instructed to associate the badges of their favorite football team (in-group), a rival team (out-group), and neutral teams with simple geometric shapes. Responses to matching in-group stimuli were more efficient, and discriminability was enhanced, as compared to out-group stimuli (rival and neutral)-a result that occurred even when participants responded only to the (equally familiar) geometric shapes. Across individuals, the in-group bias on shape matching was correlated with measures of group satisfaction, and similar results were found when football fans performed the task, in the context of both the football ground and a laboratory setting. We also observed effects of in-group bias on the response criteria in some but not all of the experiments. In control studies, the advantage for in-group stimuli was not found in an independent sample of participants who were not football fans. This indicates that there was not an intrinsic advantage for the stimuli that were "in-group" for football fans. Also, performance did not differ for familiar versus unfamiliar stimuli without in-group associations. These findings indicate that group identification can affect simple shape matching. PMID:25582685

  13. Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    2008-04-22

    A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

  14. History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Sanjay Srinivasan; Alvaro Barrera; Sharad Yadav

    2004-08-31

    In the probabilistic approach for history matching, the information from the dynamic data is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, fluid properties, well configuration, flow constrains on wells etc. This implies probabilistic approach should then update different regions of the reservoir in different ways. This necessitates delineation of multiple reservoir domains in order to increase the accuracy of the approach. The research focuses on a probabilistic approach to integrate dynamic data that ensures consistency between reservoir models developed from one stage to the next. The algorithm relies on efficient parameterization of the dynamic data integration problem and permits rapid assessment of the updated reservoir model at each stage. The report also outlines various domain decomposition schemes from the perspective of increasing the accuracy of probabilistic approach of history matching. Research progress in three important areas of the project are discussed: {lg_bullet}Validation and testing the probabilistic approach to incorporating production data in reservoir models. {lg_bullet}Development of a robust scheme for identifying reservoir regions that will result in a more robust parameterization of the history matching process. {lg_bullet}Testing commercial simulators for parallel capability and development of a parallel algorithm for history matching.

  15. 13 CFR 130.450 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Matching funds. 130.450 Section 130.450 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... volunteers; (3) Program income or fees collected from small businesses receiving assistance; (4) Funds...

  16. 13 CFR 130.450 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matching funds. 130.450 Section 130.450 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... volunteers; (3) Program income or fees collected from small businesses receiving assistance; (4) Funds...

  17. 13 CFR 130.450 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Matching funds. 130.450 Section 130.450 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... volunteers; (3) Program income or fees collected from small businesses receiving assistance; (4) Funds...

  18. 13 CFR 130.450 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Matching funds. 130.450 Section 130.450 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... volunteers; (3) Program income or fees collected from small businesses receiving assistance; (4) Funds...

  19. 13 CFR 130.450 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Matching funds. 130.450 Section 130.450 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... volunteers; (3) Program income or fees collected from small businesses receiving assistance; (4) Funds...

  20. 7 CFR 1703.122 - Matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... generally must be in the form of cash. However, in-kind contributions solely for the purposes listed in § 1703.121 may be substituted for cash. (b) In-kind items listed in § 1703.121 must be non-depreciated or... considered in-kind matching. (c) Costs incurred by the applicant, or others on behalf of the applicant,...

  1. How Interesting Is a Cricket Match?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaister, P.

    2006-01-01

    Even for those passionate about both cricket and maths, each can have their dull moments. This article brings together the sometimes-dry binomial distribution with a problem of cricket matches where the result of the series has already been decided, and so are "dead". It is hoped that readers will become more interested in at least one or the…

  2. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  3. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  4. Making silicon stronger.

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Brad Lee

    2010-11-01

    Silicon microfabrication has seen many decades of development, yet the structural reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is far from optimized. The fracture strength of Si MEMS is limited by a combination of poor toughness and nanoscale etch-induced defects. A MEMS-based microtensile technique has been used to characterize the fracture strength distributions of both standard and custom microfabrication processes. Recent improvements permit 1000's of test replicates, revealing subtle but important deviations from the commonly assumed 2-parameter Weibull statistical model. Subsequent failure analysis through a combination of microscopy and numerical simulation reveals salient aspects of nanoscale flaw control. Grain boundaries, for example, suffer from preferential attack during etch-release thereby forming failure-critical grain-boundary grooves. We will discuss ongoing efforts to quantify the various factors that affect the strength of polycrystalline silicon, and how weakest-link theory can be used to make worst-case estimates for design.

  5. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  6. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  7. The LHCb silicon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeva, B.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bay, A.; Bernhard, R. P.; Bernet, R.; Blouw, J.; Carron, B.; Ermoline, Y.; Esperante, D.; Frei, R.; Gassner, J.; Hofmann, W.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Köstner, S.; Lehner, F.; Löchner, S.; Lois, C.; Needham, M.; Pugatch, V.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Tran, M. T.; Vazquez, P.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voss, H.

    2005-07-01

    LHCb is a dedicated B-physics and CP-violation experiment for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Efficient track reconstruction and excellent trigger performances are essential in order to exploit fully its physics potential. Silicon strip detectors providing fast signal generation, high resolution and fine granularity are used for this purpose in the large area Trigger Tracker station in front of the spectrometer magnet and the LHCb Inner Tracker covering the area close to the beam pipe behind the magnet. Long read-out strips of up to 38 cm are used together with fast signal shaping adapted to the 25 ns LHC bunch crossing. The design of these tracking stations, the silicon sensor strip geometries and the latest test results are presented here.

  8. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  9. Germanium epitaxy on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yu, Jinzhong

    2014-04-01

    With the rapid development of on-chip optical interconnects and optical computing in the past decade, silicon-based integrated devices for monolithic and hybrid optoelectronic integration have attracted wide attention. Due to its narrow pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si technology, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become a significant material for optoelectronic device applications. In this paper, we describe recent research progress on heteroepitaxy of Ge flat films and self-assembled Ge quantum dots on Si. For film growth, methods of strain modification and lattice mismatch relief are summarized, while for dot growth, key process parameters and their effects on the dot density, dot morphology and dot position are reviewed. The results indicate that epitaxial Ge-on-Si materials will play a bigger role in silicon photonics.

  10. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  11. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, S.; Remington, B.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-03-14

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent withmore » dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Furthermore, application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.« less

  12. Silicon-on-insulator integrated optic transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robin J.

    1997-04-01

    Silicon-on-insulator offers the chance to produce integrated optical `circuits' with properties which are appropriate even for demanding applications. Developments in SOI waveguide technology have been combined with the well- developed micro-engineering properties of silicon for use in fields such as telecommunication and sensors. An integrated optical transceiver is selected as an example with which to describe the features of the technology. The design will be used to illustrate the benefits brought by the use of SOI waveguide elements. These functional `building blocks' include alignment features, integrated mode-matching waveguide tapers, tap-off couplers and low back-reflection interfaces. Further possible integrated elements are described, including WDMs, as relevant to optical transceiver technology. The economic and technical drivers and difficulties surrounding the convergence of electrical, CMOS-like and optical SOI technologies are also considered. There is a spreading acceptance that low-cost motherboard technology is needed, to realize volume production of optical transceivers. A range of materials solutions have been reported. The relative merits of SOI technology are discussed. Motherboard techniques provide a platform for precise optical alignment between components. The SOI approach can deliver self-aligned waveguide and hybridization features--such as fiber attach or laser diode connections--and includes the ability to adapt to laser diode and optical fiber near-field characteristics.

  13. Matching current windstorms to historical analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Bernd; Maisey, Paul; Scannell, Claire; Vanvyve, Emilie; Mitchell, Lorna; Steptoe, Hamish

    2015-04-01

    European windstorms are capable of producing devastating socioeconomic impacts. They are capable of causing power outages to millions of people, closing transport networks, uprooting trees, causing walls, buildings and other structures to collapse, which in the worst cases has resulted in dozens of fatalities. In Europe windstorms present the greatest natural hazard risk for primary insurers and result in the greatest aggregate loss due to the high volume of claims. In the winter of 2013/2014 alone storms Christian, Xaver, Dirk and Tini cost the insurance industry an estimated EUR 2.5 bn. Here we make use of a high resolution (4 km) historical storm footprint catalogue which contains over 6000 storms. This catalogue was created using the 35 year ERA-Interim model reanalysis dataset, downscaled to 12 km and then to 4.4 km. This approach was taken in order to provide a long term, high resolution data set, consistent with Met Office high resolution deterministic forecast capability for Europe. The footprints are defined as the maximum 3 second gust at each model grid point over a 72 hour period during each storm. Matches between current/forecast storm footprints and footprints from the historical catalogue are found using fingerprint identification techniques, by way of calculating image texture derived from the gray-level-co-occurrence matrix (Haralick, 1973). The best match is found by firstly adding the current or forecast footprints to the stack of the historical storm catalogue. An "identical twin" or "best match" of this footprint is then sought from within this stack. This search is repeated for a set of measures (15 in total) including position of the strongest gusts, storm damage potential and 13 Haralick measures. Each time a candidate is found, the nearest neighbours are noted and a rank proximity measure is calculated. Finally, the Frobenius norm (distance between the two fields at each grid-point averaged) is calculated. This provides an independent

  14. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  15. Improved robust point matching with label consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Miller, James V.; Roy, Arunabha

    2010-03-01

    Robust point matching (RPM) jointly estimates correspondences and non-rigid warps between unstructured point-clouds. RPM does not, however, utilize information of the topological structure or group memberships of the data it is matching. In numerous medical imaging applications, each extracted point can be assigned group membership attributes or labels based on segmentation, partitioning, or clustering operations. For example, points on the cortical surface of the brain can be grouped according to the four lobes. Estimated warps should enforce the topological structure of such point-sets, e.g. points belonging to the temporal lobe in the two point-sets should be mapped onto each other. We extend the RPM objective function to incorporate group membership labels by including a Label Entropy (LE) term. LE discourages mappings that transform points within a single group in one point-set onto points from multiple distinct groups in the other point-set. The resulting Labeled Point Matching (LPM) algorithm requires a very simple modification to the standard RPM update rules. We demonstrate the performance of LPM on coronary trees extracted from cardiac CT images. We partitioned the point sets into coronary sections without a priori anatomical context, yielding potentially disparate labelings (e.g. [1,2,3] --> [a,b,c,d]). LPM simultaneously estimated label correspondences, point correspondences, and a non-linear warp. Non-matching branches were treated wholly through the standard RPM outlier process akin to non-matching points. Results show LPM produces warps that are more physically meaningful than RPM alone. In particular, LPM mitigates unrealistic branch crossings and results in more robust non-rigid warp estimates.

  16. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device developmentt for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B

    1980-02-15

    Research on the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is reported. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 11 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Crystal length is limited by the length of the substrate. The thickness of the coating and the size of the crystalline grains are controlled by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is withdrawn from the melt. The solar-cell potential of this SOC sheet silicon is promising. To date, solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material with an as-grown surface. Conversion efficiencies of about 10 percent with antireflection (AR) coating have been achieved. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current densities of 0.55V and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  17. Micromachined Silicon Cantilever Magnetometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparala, M. V.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic torque measurements give us a simple and attractive method for characterizing the anisotropic properties of magnetic materials. Silicon torque and force magnetometers have many advantages over traditional torsion fiber torque magnetometers. We have fabricated micromachined silicon torque and force magnetometers employing both capacitive(``Capacitance platform magnetometer for thin film and small crystal superconductor studies'', M. Chaparala et al.), AIP Conf. Proc. (USA), AIP Conference Proceedings, no.273, p. 407 1993. and strain dependent FET detection(``Strain Dependent Characterstics of Silicon MOSFETs and their Applications'', M. Chaparala et al.), ISDRS Conf. Proc. 1997. schemes which realize some of these gains. We will present the pros and cons of each of the different detection schemes and the associated design constraints. We have developed a feedback scheme which enables null detection thus preserving the integrity of the sample orientation. We will present a method of separating out the torque and force terms in the measured signals and will discuss the errors associated with each of the designs. Finally, we present the static magnetic torque measurements on various materials with these devices, including equilibrium properties on sub microgram specimens of superconductors, and dHvA measurements near H_c2. We will also discuss their usefulness in pulsed magnetic fields(``Cantilever magnetometry in pulsed magnetic fields", M. J. Naughton et al.), Rev. of Sci. Instrum., vol.68, p. 4061 1997..

  18. Silicon Pore Optics Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijersbergen, Marco; Collon, M. J.; Günther, R.; Partapsing, R.; Ackermann, M.; Olde Riekerink, M.; Cooper-Jensen, C.; Christensen, F.; Freyberg, M.; Krumrey, M.; Erhard, M.; van Baren, C.; Wallace, K.; Bavdaz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon pore optics have been developed over the last years to enable future astrophysical X-ray telescopes and have now become a candidate mirror technology for the IXO mission. Scientific requirements demand an angular resolution better than 5” and a large effective area of several square meters at photon energies of 1 keV. This paper discusses the performance of the latest generation of these novel light, stiff and modular X-ray optics, based on ribbed plates made from commercial high grade 12” silicon wafers. Stacks with several tens of silicon plates have been assembled in the course of an ESA technology development program, by bending the plates into an accurate shape and directly bonding them on top of each other. Several mirror modules, using two stacks each, have been aligned and integrated to form the conical approximation of a Wolter-I design. This paper presents the status of the technology, addresses and discusses a number of activities in the ongoing ESA technology development and shows the latest results of full area measurements at the long-beamline MPE X-ray test facility (PANTER) and the PTB beam line at the BESSY electron storage ring in Berlin.

  19. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  20. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  1. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  2. Special Issue: The Silicon Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, Martin; Yang, Deren

    2006-03-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of articles about different aspects of current silicon research and applications, ranging from basic investigations of mono- and polycrystalline silicon materials and nanostructures to technologies for device fabrication in silicon photovoltaics, micro- and optoelectronics. Guest Editors are Martin Kittler and Deren Yang, the organizers of a recent Sino-German symposium held in Cottbus, Germany, 19-24 September 2005.The cover picture shows four examples of The Silicon Age: the structure of a thin film solar cell on low-cost SSP (silicon sheet from powder) substrate (upper left image) [1], a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image and diffraction pattern of a single-crystalline Si nanowire (upper right) [2], a carrier lifetime map from an n-type multicrystalline silicon wafer after gettering by a grain boundary (lower left) [3], and a scanning acoustic microscopy image of a bonded 150 mm diameter wafer pair (upper right) [4].

  3. Superconducting Super Collider silicon tracking subsystem research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Thompson, T.C.; Ziock, H.J. ); Gamble, M.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    The Alamos National Laboratory Mechanical Engineering and Electronics Division has been investigating silicon-based elementary particle tracking device technology as part of the Superconducting Super Collider-sponsored silicon subsystem collaboration. Structural, materials, and thermal issues have been addressed. This paper explores detector structural integrity and stability, including detailed finite element models of the silicon wafer support and predictive methods used in designing with advanced composite materials. The current design comprises a magnesium metal matrix composite (MMC) truss space frame to provide a sparse support structure for the complex array of silicon detectors. This design satisfies the 25-{mu}m structural stability requirement in a 10-Mrad radiation environment. This stability is achieved without exceeding the stringent particle interaction constraints set at 2.5% of a radiation length. Materials studies have considered thermal expansion, elastic modulus, resistance to radiation and chemicals, and manufacturability of numerous candidate materials. Based on optimization of these parameters, the MMC space frame will possess a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near zero to avoid thermally induced distortions, whereas the cooling rings, which support the silicon detectors and heat pipe network, will probably be constructed of a graphite/epoxy composite whose CTE is engineered to match that of silicon. Results from radiation, chemical, and static loading tests are compared with analytical predictions and discussed. Electronic thermal loading and its efficient dissipation using heat pipe cooling technology are discussed. Calculations and preliminary designs for a sprayed-on graphite wick structure are presented. A hydrocarbon such as butane appears to be a superior choice of heat pipe working fluid based on cooling, handling, and safety criteria.

  4. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  5. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  6. Illumination-invariant face recognition with a contrast sensitive silicon retina

    SciTech Connect

    Buhmann, J.M.; Lades, M.; Eeckman, F.

    1993-11-29

    Changes in lighting conditions strongly effect the performance and reliability of computer vision systems. We report face recognition results under drastically changing lighting conditions for a computer vision system which concurrently uses a contrast sensitive silicon retina and a conventional, gain controlled CCD camera. For both input devices the face recognition system employs an elastic matching algorithm with wavelet based features to classify unknown faces. To assess the effect of analog on-chip preprocessing by the silicon retina the CCD images have been digitally preprocessed with a bandpass filter to adjust the power spectrum. The silicon retina with its ability to adjust sensitivity increases the recognition rate up to 50 percent. These comparative experiments demonstrate that preprocessing with an analog VLSI silicon retina generates image data enriched with object-constant features.

  7. SiN-assisted polarization-insensitive multicore fiber to silicon photonics interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulopoulos, Giannis N.; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Mitchell, Paul; Macdonald, John R.; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a polarization-insensitive coupler interfacing multicore-fiber (MCF) to silicon waveguides. It comprises a 3D glass fanout transforming the circular MCF core-arrangement to linear and performing initial tapering, followed by a Spot-Size-Converter on the silicon chip. Glass waveguides are formed of multiple overlapped modification elements and appropriate offsetting thereof yields tapers with symmetric cross-section. The Spot-Size-Converter is an inverselytapered silicon waveguide with a tapered polymer overcladding where light is initially coupled, whereas phase-matching gradually shifts it towards the silicon core. Co-design of the glass fanout and Spot-Size-Converter obtains theoretical loss below 1dB for the overall Si-to-MCF transition in both polarizations.

  8. Ultra-high-speed wavelength conversion in a silicon photonic chip.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael; Pu, Minhao; Peucheret, Christophe; Christian H Mulvad, Hans; Yvind, Kresten; Hvam, Jørn M; Jeppesen, Palle; Oxenløwe, Leif K

    2011-10-10

    We have successfully demonstrated all-optical wavelength conversion of a 640-Gbit/s line-rate return-to-zero differential phase-shift keying (RZ-DPSK) signal based on low-power four wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon photonic chip with a switching energy of only ~110 fJ/bit. The waveguide dispersion of the silicon nanowire is nano-engineered to optimize phase matching for FWM and the switching power used for the signal processing is low enough to reduce nonlinear absorption from two-photon-absorption (TPA). These results demonstrate that high-speed wavelength conversion is achievable in silicon chips with high data integrity and indicate that high-speed operation can be obtained at moderate power levels where nonlinear absorption due to TPA and free-carrier absorption (FCA) is not detrimental. This demonstration can potentially enable high-speed optical networks on a silicon photonic chip. PMID:21996996

  9. Pretest probability assessment derived from attribute matching

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Charles L; Pollack, Charles V; Diercks, Deborah B; Hollander, Judd E; Newgard, Craig D; Garvey, J Lee

    2005-01-01

    Background Pretest probability (PTP) assessment plays a central role in diagnosis. This report compares a novel attribute-matching method to generate a PTP for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We compare the new method with a validated logistic regression equation (LRE). Methods Eight clinical variables (attributes) were chosen by classification and regression tree analysis of a prospectively collected reference database of 14,796 emergency department (ED) patients evaluated for possible ACS. For attribute matching, a computer program identifies patients within the database who have the exact profile defined by clinician input of the eight attributes. The novel method was compared with the LRE for ability to produce PTP estimation <2% in a validation set of 8,120 patients evaluated for possible ACS and did not have ST segment elevation on ECG. 1,061 patients were excluded prior to validation analysis because of ST-segment elevation (713), missing data (77) or being lost to follow-up (271). Results In the validation set, attribute matching produced 267 unique PTP estimates [median PTP value 6%, 1st–3rd quartile 1–10%] compared with the LRE, which produced 96 unique PTP estimates [median 24%, 1st–3rd quartile 10–30%]. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.74 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.82) for the attribute matching curve and 0.68 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.77) for LRE. The attribute matching system categorized 1,670 (24%, 95% CI = 23–25%) patients as having a PTP < 2.0%; 28 developed ACS (1.7% 95% CI = 1.1–2.4%). The LRE categorized 244 (4%, 95% CI = 3–4%) with PTP < 2.0%; four developed ACS (1.6%, 95% CI = 0.4–4.1%). Conclusion Attribute matching estimated a very low PTP for ACS in a significantly larger proportion of ED patients compared with a validated LRE. PMID:16095534

  10. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  11. Rigid shape matching by segmentation averaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Oliensis, John

    2010-04-01

    We use segmentations to match images by shape. The new matching technique does not require point-to-point edge correspondence and is robust to small shape variations and spatial shifts. To address the unreliability of segmentations computed bottom-up, we give a closed form approximation to an average over all segmentations. Our method has many extensions, yielding new algorithms for tracking, object detection, segmentation, and edge-preserving smoothing. For segmentation, instead of a maximum a posteriori approach, we compute the "central" segmentation minimizing the average distance to all segmentations of an image. For smoothing, instead of smoothing images based on local structures, we smooth based on the global optimal image structures. Our methods for segmentation, smoothing, and object detection perform competitively, and we also show promising results in shape-based tracking. PMID:20224119

  12. Systems and methods for measuring component matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courter, Kelly J. (Inventor); Slenk, Joel E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Systems and methods for measuring a contour match between adjacent components are disclosed. In one embodiment, at least two pressure sensors are located between adjacent components. Each pressure sensor is adapted to obtain a pressure measurement at a location a predetermined distance away from the other pressure sensors, and to output a pressure measurement for each sensor location. An output device is adapted to receive the pressure measurements from at least two pressure sensors and display the pressure measurements. In one aspect, the pressure sensors include flexible thin film pressure sensors. In accordance with other aspects of the invention, a method is provided for measuring a contour match between two interfacing components including measuring at least one pressure applied to at least one sensor between the interfacing components.

  13. SSCL RFQ-DTL Matching Section instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Datte, P.; Aielo, R.; Hayworth, M.

    1993-11-01

    A description of the SSCL RFQ-DTL Matching Section instrumentation is presented with emphasis on design issues and early instrumentation commissioning results. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy through the RFQ-DTL matching section is 2.5 MeV, the beam current is 27 mA with a pulse width of 35 Its. The typical beam diameter is 3 mm. The instrumentation consists of three beam position monitors (BPM), a wire scanner, beam loss monitors (BLM), a slit and collector emittance measurement unit (EMU), a current toroid, and a Faraday cup. The instruments were designed to accommodate high current densities, have a large dynamic range with moderate bandwidths, and fit congested spaces.

  14. 36 CFR 72.32 - Funding and matching share.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.32 Funding and matching share. (a) Recovery Action Program Grant Matching. Up... development may be used as part of a local match for Innovation or Rehabilitation grants only when the... approved by the respective NPS Regional Office. (b) Rehabilitation and Innovation grant matching....

  15. 7 CFR 272.12 - Computer matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computer matching requirements. 272.12 Section 272.12... Computer matching requirements. (a) General purpose. The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act (CMA) of 1988, as amended, addresses the use of information from computer matching programs that involve...

  16. 75 FR 69988 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Guidelines on the Conduct of Matching Programs (54 FR 25818, June... Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ] ACTION: Notice--Computer... Department of Education implemented a computer matching program. The 18-month computer matching...

  17. 7 CFR 272.12 - Computer matching requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computer matching requirements. 272.12 Section 272.12... Computer matching requirements. (a) General purpose. The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act (CMA) of 1988, as amended, addresses the use of information from computer matching programs that involve...

  18. Tough silicon nitride matrix composites using Textron silicon carbide monofilaments

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, W.; Lecostaouec, J.F.; Landry, C.; Dipietro, S.; Vasilos, T.

    1989-10-01

    The use of Textron SCS silicon carbide monofilament fibers as a reinforcement for silicon nitride is described. Samples were processed by both chemical vapor infiltration and hot pressing. Mechanical tests were performed in flexure, tension, and in shear. A ballistic test demonstrated high velocity impact toughness. 5 refs.

  19. III-V/silicon germanium tandem solar cells on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Kenneth J.

    The development of a cost-effective high voltage tandem solar cell that can be grown directly on a silicon (Si) platform can lead to a 34% increase in efficiency over the present best monocrystalline Si laboratory device. III-V devices are known to yield some of the highest efficiencies in photovoltaics, but the high cost of lattice matched substrates and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and device development make them prohibitively expensive in many markets. By utilizing silicon substrates and limiting the thickness of the III-V MOCVD material growth, this cost can be reduced. The leveraging technology of this initiative is a metamorphic silicon:germanium (SiGe) buffer between the silicon substrate and the active device layers. As developed by AmberWave Inc., it provides a low-dislocation interface for III-V nucleation and a high quality bottom cell grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD). This research first reports on the theoretical limits of a III-V/SiGe tandem solar cell. Results will evaluate multiple III-V materials for the determination of optimal material composition to be lattice-matched with SiGe. Following this, a more complex device simulation, incorporating all major loss mechanisms, is accomplished in order to predict ideal efficiency targets and evaluate present experimental structures. Results demonstrate a robust model capable of simulating a wide range of binary and ternary III-V devices. Predictions show the capability of a tandem device operating at 32.5% 1-sun efficiency without requiring TDD improvement beyond that of the present SiGe layers. Following simulations, experimental III-V structures are grown via MOCVD and characterized, indicating successful process development for growth of III-V materials on the SiGe platform. This growth is then validated via the design and development of experimental solar device structures. Each iteration, beginning with the single-junction windowless GaAsP solar cell and

  20. Final report, DOE/industry matching grant

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arvind S.

    2003-02-25

    The Department of Energy/Industry Matching Grant was used to help improve nuclear engineering and science education at the University of Missouri-Rolla. The funds helped in the areas of recruitment and retention. Funds allowed the department to give scholarships to over 100 students (names included). Funds were also used for equipment upgrade and research, including two computers with peripherals, two NaI detectors, and a thermoluminescent dosimeter.

  1. Psychotherapy: Patient-Therapist Matching Reconsidered

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louis; Carter, James H.

    1982-01-01

    The personality of the therapist does influence the psychotherapeutic process. Given that therapists are human, they do, in fact, bring into the encounter their moral and cultural, and sometimes even racial, attitudes in spite of efforts to maintain objectivity and neutrality. Ignoring the impact of the therapist-client, organismic variables may lead to spurious research findings and impractical interventions. Research and practical intervention, therefore, should be concerned with matching clients with the most appropriate therapist. PMID:7120480

  2. National Medical School Matching Program: optimizing outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    The medical school admissions process is inefficient and costly to both applicants and medical schools. For the many rejected applicants, this process represents a costly, unproductive use of time. For medical schools, numerous applications are reviewed that ultimately do not yield matriculants, representing a substantial inefficiency. In order to streamline the process and reduce costs, we propose the development of a national medical school matching program.

  3. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  4. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  5. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2013-05-28

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Comparison of silicon oxide and silicon carbide absorber materials in silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Cordula; Kellermann, Martin; Wendler, Elke; Rensberg, Jura; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Since solar energy conversion by photovoltaics is most efficient for photon energies at the bandgap of the absorbing material the idea of combining absorber layers with different bandgaps in a multijunction cell has become popular. In silicon thin-film photovoltaics a multijunction stack with more than two subcells requires a high bandgap amorphous silicon alloy top cell absorber to achieve an optimal bandgap combination. We address the question whether amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) or amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO:H) is more suited for this type of top cell absorber. Our single cell results show a better performance of amorphous silicon carbide with respect to fill factor and especially open circuit voltage at equivalent Tauc bandgaps. The microstructure factor of single layers indicates less void structure in amorphous silicon carbide than in amorphous silicon oxide. Yet photoconductivity of silicon oxide films seems to be higher which could be explained by the material being not truly intrinsic. On the other hand better cell performance of amorphous silicon carbide absorber layers might be connected to better hole transport in the cell.

  8. Improved electromagnetic induction processing with novel adaptive matched filter and matched subspace detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Charles E.; McClellan, James H.; Scott, Waymond R.; Kerr, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces two advances in wide-band electromagnetic induction (EMI) processing: a novel adaptive matched filter (AMF) and matched subspace detection methods. Both advances make use of recent work with a subspace SVD approach to separating the signal, soil, and noise subspaces of the frequency measurements The proposed AMF provides a direct approach to removing the EMI self-response while improving the signal to noise ratio of the data. Unlike previous EMI adaptive downtrack filters, this new filter will not erroneously optimize the EMI soil response instead of the EMI target response because these two responses are projected into separate frequency subspaces. The EMI detection methods in this work elaborate on how the signal and noise subspaces in the frequency measurements are ideal for creating the matched subspace detection (MSD) and constant false alarm rate matched subspace detection (CFAR) metrics developed by Scharf The CFAR detection metric has been shown to be the uniformly most powerful invariant detector.

  9. A PERFECT MATCH CONDITION FOR POINT-SET MATCHING PROBLEMS USING THE OPTIMAL MASS TRANSPORT APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, PENGWEN; LIN, CHING-LONG; CHERN, I-LIANG

    2013-01-01

    We study the performance of optimal mass transport-based methods applied to point-set matching problems. The present study, which is based on the L2 mass transport cost, states that perfect matches always occur when the product of the point-set cardinality and the norm of the curl of the non-rigid deformation field does not exceed some constant. This analytic result is justified by a numerical study of matching two sets of pulmonary vascular tree branch points whose displacement is caused by the lung volume changes in the same human subject. The nearly perfect match performance verifies the effectiveness of this mass transport-based approach. PMID:23687536

  10. Fast image matching algorithm based on projection characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lijuan; Yue, Xiaobo; Zhou, Lijun

    2011-06-01

    Based on analyzing the traditional template matching algorithm, this paper identified the key factors restricting the speed of matching and put forward a brand new fast matching algorithm based on projection. Projecting the grayscale image, this algorithm converts the two-dimensional information of the image into one-dimensional one, and then matches and identifies through one-dimensional correlation, meanwhile, because of normalization has been done, when the image brightness or signal amplitude increasing in proportion, it could also perform correct matching. Experimental results show that the projection characteristics based image registration method proposed in this article could greatly improve the matching speed, which ensuring the matching accuracy as well.

  11. Project MATCH: Training for a Promotora Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Swider, Susan M.; Martin, Molly; Lynas, Carmen; Rothschild, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Adequate training and support are critical for community health workers (promotoras de salud in Spanish) to work effectively. Current literature on promotora training is limited by a focus on promotoras' knowledge and satisfaction immediately after training. The relevance of training to subsequent work performance and the need for ongoing training are rarely addressed. This paper describes the training and evaluation components of a promotora intervention focused on diabetes self management. Training Methods Project MATCH (the Mexican American Trial of Community Health Workers) is a clinical trial designed to test the effectiveness of an intensive, promotora-based intervention to improve disease self-management for Mexican-Americans with diabetes. The MATCH investigators designed a multi-component promotora training program that provided both initial and ongoing training. The investigators used multiple methods to determine promotoras' knowledge levels, initial competency in intervention delivery, and changes in this competency over time. Evaluation Methods and Results The evaluation results show that while the initial training provided a solid knowledge and skills base for the promotoras, the ongoing training was critical in helping them deal with both intervention-related and personal challenges. Conclusions The experiences of the MATCH study suggest that in addition to strong initial training, promotora interventions benefit from ongoing training and evaluation to ensure success. PMID:20008279

  12. Stereo matching using epipolar distance transform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingxiong; Ahuja, Narendra

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple but effective image transform, called the epipolar distance transform, for matching low-texture regions. It converts image intensity values to a relative location inside a planar segment along the epipolar line, such that pixels in the low-texture regions become distinguishable. We theoretically prove that the transform is affine invariant, thus the transformed images can be directly used for stereo matching. Any existing stereo algorithms can be directly used with the transformed images to improve reconstruction accuracy for low-texture regions. Results on real indoor and outdoor images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed transform for matching low-texture regions, keypoint detection, and description for low-texture scenes. Our experimental results on Middlebury images also demonstrate the robustness of our transform for highly textured scenes. The proposed transform has a great advantage, its low computational complexity. It was tested on a MacBook Air laptop computer with a 1.8 GHz Core i7 processor, with a speed of about 9 frames per second for a video graphics array-sized image. PMID:22801509

  13. One-loop effective lagrangians after matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Aguila, F.; Kunszt, Z.; Santiago, J.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the limitations of the covariant derivative expansion prescription advocated to compute the one-loop Standard Model (SM) effective lagrangian when the heavy fields couple linearly to the SM. In particular, one-loop contributions resulting from the exchange of both heavy and light fields must be explicitly taken into account through matching because the proposed functional approach alone does not account for them. We review a simple case with a heavy scalar singlet of charge -1 to illustrate the argument. As two other examples where this matching is needed and this functional method gives a vanishing result, up to renormalization of the heavy sector parameters, we re-evaluate the one-loop corrections to the T-parameter due to a heavy scalar triplet with vanishing hypercharge coupling to the Brout-Englert-Higgs boson and to a heavy vector-like quark singlet of charged 2 / 3 mixing with the top quark, respectively. In all cases we make use of a new code for matching fundamental and effective theories in models with arbitrary heavy field additions.

  14. Matching strategies for a plasma booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, P.; Rossi, A. R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of a matching strategy for the laser-plasma wakefield accelerator where the injected electron beam is produced by an external source. The matching is achieved after an initial focusing using conventional beam optics, combining a linear tapering of plasma density and the increasing non linearity of the plasma wake due to the focusing of the laser driver. Both effects contribute in increasing the focusing strength from an initial relatively low value, to the considerably higher value present in the flat top plasma profile, where acceleration takes place. The same procedure is exploited to match the beam from plasma to vacuum once acceleration has occurred. Beam loading plays a crucial role both at the very beginning and end of the whole process. In the last stage, two more effects take place: a partial emittance compensation, reducing emittance value by a sizable amount, and a reduction of the energy spread, due to the relevant beam loading operating when the laser is defocused.

  15. Lattice-Matched Semiconductor Layers on Single Crystalline Sapphire Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang; King, Glen; Park, Yeonjoon

    2009-01-01

    SiGe is an important semiconductor alloy for high-speed field effect transistors (FETs), high-temperature thermoelectric devices, photovoltaic solar cells, and photon detectors. The growth of SiGe layer is difficult because SiGe alloys have different lattice constants from those of the common Si wafers, which leads to a high density of defects, including dislocations, micro-twins, cracks, and delaminations. This innovation utilizes newly developed rhombohedral epitaxy of cubic semiconductors on trigonal substrates in order to solve the lattice mismatch problem of SiGe by using trigonal single crystals like sapphire (Al2O3) as substrate to give a unique growth-orientation to the SiGe layer, which is automatically controlled at the interface upon sapphire (0001). This technology is different from previous silicon on insulator (SOI) or SGOI (SiGe on insulator) technologies that use amorphous SiO2 as the growth plane. A cubic semiconductor crystal is a special case of a rhombohedron with the inter-planar angle, alpha = 90 deg. With a mathematical transformation, all rhombohedrons can be described by trigonal crystal lattice structures. Therefore, all cubic lattice constants and crystal planes (hkl) s can be transformed into those of trigonal crystal parameters. These unique alignments enable a new opportunity of perfect lattice matching conditions, which can eliminate misfit dislocations. Previously, these atomic alignments were thought to be impossible or very difficult. With the invention of a new x-ray diffraction measurement method here, growth of cubic semiconductors on trigonal crystals became possible. This epitaxy and lattice-matching condition can be applied not only to SiGe (111)/sapphire (0001) substrate relations, but also to other crystal structures and other materials, including similar crystal structures which have pointgroup rotational symmetries by 120 because the cubic (111) direction has 120 rotational symmetry. The use of slightly miscut (less than

  16. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  17. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  18. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  19. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  20. The effect of post-match alcohol ingestion on recovery from competitive rugby league matches.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alistair P; Snape, Alanna E; Minett, Geoffrey M; Skein, Melissa; Duffield, Rob

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of alcohol ingestion on lower-body strength and power and physiological and cognitive recovery after competitive Rugby League matches. Nine male Rugby players participated in 2 matches, followed by 1 of 2 randomized interventions, a control or alcohol ingestion session. Four hours post-match, participants consumed either beverages containing a total of 1 g of ethanol per kilogram bodyweight (vodka and orange juice; ALC) or a caloric and taste-matched nonalcoholic beverage (orange juice; CONT). Before the match, immediately post-match, 2 hours post-, and 16 hours post-match measures of countermovement jump (CMJ); maximal voluntary contraction (MVC); voluntary activation (VA); and damage and stress markers of creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), cortisol, and testosterone analyzed from venous blood collection; and cognitive function (modified Stroop test) were determined. Alcohol resulted in large effects for decreased CMJ height (-2.35 ± 8.14% and -10.53 ± 8.36% decrement for CONT and ALC, respectively; p = 0.15, d = 1.40), without changes in MVC (p = 0.52, d = 0.70) or VA (p = 0.15, d = 0.69). Furthermore, alcohol resulted in a significant slowing of total time in a cognitive test (p = 0.04, d = 1.59) while exhibiting large effects for detriments in congruent reaction time (p = 0.19, d = 1.73). Despite large effects for increased cortisol after alcohol ingestion during recovery (p = 0.28, d = 1.44), post-match alcohol consumption did not unduly affect testosterone (p = 0.96, d = 0.10), CK (p = 0.66, d = 0.70), or CRP (p = 0.75, d = 0.60). It seems that alcohol consumption during the evening after competitive rugby matches may have some detrimental effects on peak power and cognitive recovery the morning after a Rugby League match. Accordingly, practitioners should be aware of the potential associated detrimental effects of alcohol consumption on recovery and provide alcohol awareness to athletes at post-match

  1. Low cost silicon solar array project silicon materials task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was established to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost.

  2. Anomalous Plastic Deformation and Sputtering of Ion Irradiated Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nanowires of various diameters were irradiated with 100 keV and 300 keV Ar+ ions on a rotatable and heatable stage. Irradiation at elevated temperatures above 300 °C retains the geometry of the nanostructure and sputtering can be gauged accurately. The diameter dependence of the sputtering shows a maximum if the ion range matches the nanowire diameter, which is in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations based on binary collisions. Nanowires irradiated at room temperature, however, amorphize and deform plastically. So far, plastic deformation has not been observed in bulk silicon at such low ion energies. The magnitude and direction of the deformation is independent of the ion-beam direction and cannot be explained with mass-transport in a binary collision cascade but only by collective movement of atoms in the collision cascade with the given boundary conditions of a high surface to volume ratio. PMID:25951108

  3. Generation of correlated photons in nanoscale silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharping, Jay E.; Lee, Kim F.; Foster, Mark A.; Turner, Amy C.; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Kumar, Prem

    2006-12-01

    .We experimentally study the generation of correlated pairs of photons through four-wave mixing (FWM) in embedded silicon waveguides. The waveguides, which are designed to exhibit anomalous group-velocity dispersion at wavelengths near 1555 nm, allow phase matched FWM and thus efficient pair-wise generation of non-degenerate signal and idler photons. Photon counting measurements yield a coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) of around 25 for a signal (idler) photon production rate of about 0.05 per pulse. We characterize the variation in CAR as a function of pump power and pump-to-sideband wavelength detuning. These measurements represent a first step towards the development of tools for quantum information processing which are based on CMOS-compatible, silicon-on-insulator technology.

  4. Spatial analysis of corresponding fingerprint features from match and close non-match populations.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Joshua; Champod, Christophe; Lennard, Chris; Roux, Claude

    2013-07-10

    The development of statistical models for forensic fingerprint identification purposes has been the subject of increasing research attention in recent years. This can be partly seen as a response to a number of commentators who claim that the scientific basis for fingerprint identification has not been adequately demonstrated. In addition, key forensic identification bodies such as ENFSI [1] and IAI [2] have recently endorsed and acknowledged the potential benefits of using statistical models as an important tool in support of the fingerprint identification process within the ACE-V framework. In this paper, we introduce a new Likelihood Ratio (LR) model based on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) trained with features discovered via morphometric and spatial analyses of corresponding minutiae configurations for both match and close non-match populations often found in AFIS candidate lists. Computed LR values are derived from a probabilistic framework based on SVMs that discover the intrinsic spatial differences of match and close non-match populations. Lastly, experimentation performed on a set of over 120,000 publicly available fingerprint images (mostly sourced from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) datasets) and a distortion set of approximately 40,000 images, is presented, illustrating that the proposed LR model is reliably guiding towards the right proposition in the identification assessment of match and close non-match populations. Results further indicate that the proposed model is a promising tool for fingerprint practitioners to use for analysing the spatial consistency of corresponding minutiae configurations. PMID:23153799

  5. History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Sanjay Srinivasan; Alvaro Barrera; Yonghwee Kim; Sharad Yadav

    2006-08-31

    A novel methodology for delineating multiple reservoir domains for the purpose of history matching in a distributed computing environment has been proposed. A fully probabilistic approach to perturb permeability within the delineated zones is implemented. The combination of robust schemes for identifying reservoir zones and distributed computing significantly increase the accuracy and efficiency of the probabilistic approach. The information pertaining to the permeability variations in the reservoir that is contained in dynamic data is calibrated in terms of a deformation parameter rD. This information is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, well configuration, flow constrains etc. The probabilistic approach then has to account for multiple r{sub D} values in different regions of the reservoir. In order to delineate reservoir domains that can be characterized with different r{sub D} parameters, principal component analysis (PCA) of the Hessian matrix has been done. The Hessian matrix summarizes the sensitivity of the objective function at a given step of the history matching to model parameters. It also measures the interaction of the parameters in affecting the objective function. The basic premise of PC analysis is to isolate the most sensitive and least correlated regions. The eigenvectors obtained during the PCA are suitably scaled and appropriate grid block volume cut-offs are defined such that the resultant domains are neither too large (which increases interactions between domains) nor too small (implying ineffective history matching). The delineation of domains requires calculation of Hessian, which could be computationally costly and as well as restricts the current

  6. History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Sanjay Srinivasan; Alvaro Barrera; Sharad Yadav

    2005-10-01

    A novel methodology for delineating multiple reservoir domains for the purpose of history matching in a distributed computing environment has been proposed. A fully probabilistic approach to perturb permeability within the delineated zones is implemented. The combination of robust schemes for identifying reservoir zones and distributed computing significantly increase the accuracy and efficiency of the probabilistic approach. The information pertaining to the permeability variations in the reservoir that is contained in dynamic data is calibrated in terms of a deformation parameter rD. This information is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, well configuration, flow constrains etc. The probabilistic approach then has to account for multiple r{sub D} values in different regions of the reservoir. In order to delineate reservoir domains that can be characterized with different rD parameters, principal component analysis (PCA) of the Hessian matrix has been done. The Hessian matrix summarizes the sensitivity of the objective function at a given step of the history matching to model parameters. It also measures the interaction of the parameters in affecting the objective function. The basic premise of PC analysis is to isolate the most sensitive and least correlated regions. The eigenvectors obtained during the PCA are suitably scaled and appropriate grid block volume cut-offs are defined such that the resultant domains are neither too large (which increases interactions between domains) nor too small (implying ineffective history matching). The delineation of domains requires calculation of Hessian, which could be computationally costly and as well as restricts the current approach to

  7. Method of producing silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, C. B.; Meyer, T. N.

    1980-02-01

    A liquid reactant injector assembly suited for the injection of liquid reactant into a high temperature metal reductant vapor and carrier gas stream for the production of metal is presented. The assembly is especially adapted for the continuous production of high purity silicon by the reduction of SiCl4 with sodium. The assembly includes a refractory-lined, hollow metal shell having ten equally-spaced, concentric, radially directed ports provided in the shell and wall. A hydraulic, atomizing type spray nozzle is mounted in each of the ports recessed from the inner wall surface.

  8. Integrated hybrid silicon triplexer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsu-Hao; Kuo, Ying-hao; Jones, Richard; Barkai, Assia; Bowers, John E

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an integrated triplexer on silicon with a compact size of 1mm by 3.5mm by utilizing a selective area wafer bonding technique. The wavelength demultiplexer on the triplexer chip successfully separates signals at wavelengths of 1310 nm, 1490 nm and 1550 nm with more than 10 dB extinction ratio. The measured 3 dB bandwidth of the integrated laser and photodetectors are 2 GHz and 16 GHz, respectively. Open eye diagrams are also measured for the integrated photodetector up to 12.5 GHz PRBS inputs. PMID:21164734

  9. Potentialities of silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, R.; Libertino, S.; Corso, D.; Valvo, G.; Sanfilippo, D.; Fallica, P. G.; Lombardo, S.

    2014-03-01

    The Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a novel pixelated photon detector able to detect single photon arrival with good timing resolution and high gain. In this work we present a complete study of the performances of different SiPMs produced by STMicroelectronics. Their potentialities and limits were identified using experimental measurements and electrical simulations performed both on single pixel and SiPM having up to ˜4000 pixels. SiPM was tested in different experiments such as photoluminescence emission measurement, lifetime measurement of semiconductor materials and light diffusion in highly scattering material in the near infrared spectrum showing its aptitude to replace PMT in those applications.

  10. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  11. Colloidal luminescent silicon nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaotang; Hessel, Colin M; Yu, Yixuan; Bogart, Timothy D; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-07-10

    Silicon nanorods are grown by trisilane decomposition in hot squalane in the presence of tin (Sn) nanocrystals and dodecylamine. Sn induces solution-liquid-solid nanorod growth with dodecylamine serving as a stabilizing ligand. As-prepared nanorods do not luminesce, but etching with hydrofluoric acid to remove residual surface oxide followed by thermal hydrosilylation with 1-octadecene induces bright photoluminescence with quantum yields of 4-5%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the ligands prevent surface oxidation for months when stored in air. PMID:23731184

  12. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  13. Silicon material task review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Silicon Material Task are to evaluate technologies, new and old; to develop the most promising technologies; to establish practicality of the processes to meet production, energy use, and economic criteria; and to develop an information base on impurities in polysilicon and to determine their effects on solar cell performance. The approach involves determining process feasibility, setting milestones for the forced selection of the processes, and establishing the technical readiness of the integrated process.

  14. Vinyl ether silicones

    SciTech Connect

    Herzig, C.; Dauth, J.; Deubzer, B.; Weis, J.

    1995-12-01

    Siloxanes with vinyl ether groups are prepared by hydrosilylation reaction of dihydrosiloxanes with divinyl ethers in excess. Different stoichiometry, produces linear copolymers of different viscosities and double bond concentrations always with an active vinyl ether group at each chain end. Polymerisations triggered by UV light were done with mixtures of these compounds and a series of onium salts. Very fast cure is observed even with low doses at 290 nm. V.E. silicones are found to cure essentially quantitative. The comparison with other highly reactive cationic monomers revealed that compounds are among the fastest curing prepolymers in cationic chemistry.

  15. Micromachined Silicon Waveguide Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Rectangular waveguides are commonly used as circuit elements in remote-sensing heterodyne receivers at millimeter wavelengths. The advantages of waveguides are low loss and mechanical tunability. However, conventional machining techniques for waveguide components operating above a few hundred GHz are complicated and costly. Waveguides micromachined from silicon however would have several important advantages including low-cost; small size for very high frequency (submillimeter wave) operation; high dimensional accuracy (important for high-Q circuits); atomically smooth walls, thereby reducing rf losses; and the ability to integrate active and passive devices directly in the waveguide on thin membranes, thereby solving the traditional problem of mounting thin substrates.

  16. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  17. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-07-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  18. 78 FR 40541 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA)-Match Number 1014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA)--Match Number 1014 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ] ACTION: Notice of a renewal of an existing computer matching program that... amended, this notice announces a renewal of an existing computer matching program that we are...

  19. 77 FR 39748 - Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988; Report of Matching Program: RRB and State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Unemployment and Sickness Insurance Benefit System, which was published in the Federal Register (FR) on July 26, 2010 (75 FR 43725). 5. Inclusive Dates of the Matching Program: This computer matching program is... Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988; Report of Matching Program: RRB and State...

  20. 75 FR 63524 - Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988; Report of Matching Program: RRB and State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988; Report of Matching Program: RRB and State Medicare Agencies AGENCY: Railroad Retirement Board (RRB). ACTION: Notice of records used in computer matching... a computer matching program to publish a notice in the Federal Register regarding the...