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Sample records for material characterization reinforced

  1. Chemical Processing and Characterization of Fiber Reinforced Nanocomposite Silica Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Steven Shannon

    Ultrasound techniques, acoustic and electroacoustic spectroscopy, are used to investigate and characterize concentrated fluid phase nanocomposites. In particular, the data obtained from ultrasound methods are used as tools to improve the understanding of the fundamental process chemistry of concentrated, multicomponent, nanomaterial dispersions. Silicon nitride nanofibers embedded in silica are particularly interesting for lightweight nanocomposites, because silicon nitride is isostructural to carbon nitride, a super hard material. However, the major challenge with processing these composites is retarding particle-particle aggregation, to maintain highly dispersed systems. Therefore, a systematic approach was developed to evaluate the affect of process parameters on particle-particle aggregation, and improving the chemical kinetics for gelation. From the acoustic analysis of the nanofibers, this thesis was able to deduce that changes in aspect ratio affects the ultrasound propagation. In particular, higher aspect ratio fibers attenuate the ultrasound wave greater than lower aspect fibers of the same material. Furthermore, our results confirm that changes in attenuation depend on the hydrodynamical interactions between particles, the aspect ratio, and the morphology of the dispersant. The results indicate that the attenuation is greater for fumed silica due to its elastic nature and its size, when compared to silica Ludox. Namely, the larger the size, the greater the attenuation. This attenuation is mostly the result of scattering loss in the higher frequency range. In addition, the silica nanofibers exhibit greater attenuation than their nanoparticle counterparts because of their aspect ratio influences their interaction with the ultrasound wave. In addition, this study observed how 3M NH 4 Cl's acoustic properties changes during the gelation process, and during that change, the frequency dependency deviates from the expected squared of the frequency, until the

  2. Fibre-reinforced materials.

    PubMed

    Brown, D

    2000-11-01

    This paper considers the role of fibres in the reinforcement of composite materials, and the significance of the form the fibre takes and the material from which it is made. The current dental applications of fibre reinforcement, including dental cements and splints, fibres made into structures for use in composites, denture bases and the contemporary use of fibres in fixed partial dentures, are reviewed. Their role in biomedical implants is surveyed and their future forecast. PMID:11218597

  3. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  4. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  5. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  6. Thermo-mechanical characterization of nano filled and fiber reinforced brake friction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tej; Patnaik, Amar; Satapathy, Bhabani K.

    2013-06-01

    Brake friction materials filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and nanoclay have been fabricated and characterize for thermo-mechanical properties. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) show that the stability of the friction composites increased with increase in MWCNT and nanoclay contents. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of the composite have been carried out to characterize the storage modulus (E'), loss modulus (E″) and damping factor (Tan δ) as a function of temperature. The storage and loss modulus show a maxima at lower content of MWCNT and nanoclay.

  7. The development, fabrication, and material characterization of polypropylene composites reinforced with carbon nanofiber and hydroxyapatite nanorod hybrid fillers

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Cheng Zhu; Wong, Hoi Man; Yeung, Kelvin Wai Kwok; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the design, fabrication, microstructural and property characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation of polypropylene (PP) reinforced with carbon nanofiber (CNF) and hydroxyapatite nanorod (HANR) fillers. The purpose is to develop advanced PP/CNF–HANR hybrids with good mechanical behavior, thermal stability, and excellent biocompatibility for use as craniofacial implants in orthopedics. Several material-examination techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, tensile tests, and impact measurement are used to characterize the microstructural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the hybrids. Furthermore, osteoblastic cell cultivation and colorimetric assay are also employed for assessing their viability on the composites. The CNF and HANR filler hybridization yields an improvement in Young’s modulus, impact strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility of PP. The PP/2% CNF–20% HANR hybrid composite is found to exhibit the highest elastic modulus, tensile strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. PMID:24648729

  8. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  9. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, as Applied to Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composite Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Timothy Marvin

    1996-08-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) can be an elegantly simple nondestructive evaluation tool. The resonance spectrum of any specimen is dependent on, and sensitive at ppm levels to, its density, geometry, elastic and thermal properties, and boundary conditions. The measurement of spectrum is fast, taking between 15 and 90 seconds with state-of-the-art instrumentation, making it appropriate for following properties as a function of temperature. Parts per million changes in specimen density, geometry, elastic moduli, temperature, and boundary conditions are detected with RUS. A novel apparatus is presented for driving and detecting the mechanical resonance of objects with major dimensions ranging from 0.1 cm to 33 cm. The noise floor of the apparatus is characterized using a high Q titanium alloy and a low Q graphite/epoxy composite. The apparatus is used to measure the amplitude/frequency resonance spectra of right rectangular parallelepiped (RRP) specimens of four different lay-ups of AS4/3501-6 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy (CFRE) composite material at room temperature and at one degree C intervals between -177^circC and 25 ^circC. It is important to know the mechanical properties of this material at low temperatures for underwater, polar, and space applications. The temperature dependence of the second order elastic moduli are calculated from the resonance spectra of the AS4/3501-6 RRPs. High power ultrasound is used to enhance the cure of AS4/3501-6 CFRE composite. Composite panels are insonified through the caul plate, by a high power ultrasonic horn, while curing. Stiffness enhancements of five percent are observed. The resonance spectrum of a steel caul plate is used to monitor the degree of cure of AS4/3501-6 CFRE composite panels in real time. Because the curing composite acts to change the boundary conditions, the resonance spectrum changes as the composite cures. RUS is used to screen a variety of high precision engineered parts for mechanical defects

  10. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  11. Neutron imaging of fiber-reinforced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastürk, M.; Kardjilov, N.; Rauch, H.; Vontobel, P.

    2005-04-01

    Glass-fiber-reinforced plastic laminates used for the insulation of Toroidal Field (TF) magnet-coils and fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic composites used as structural material for the self-cooled Pb-17Li blanket module are attractive candidate materials for fusion reactors because of their high performance under extreme conditions. Porosity, which depends on the manufacturing process, and swelling of fiber-reinforced materials due to the high flux of radiation are the main problems. The aim of this study is to describe the experimental procedures of different imaging methods, and also to decide the most efficient imaging method for the investigations of the complex microstructure of fiber-reinforced materials. In this work, the fiber-reinforced composites were inspected with neutron and X-ray radiographies at ATI-Vienna and also at PSI-Villigen. A contrast enhancement at the edges can be achieved by means of phase contrast neutron radiography (NR), which is based on the wave properties of neutrons and arises from the neutron refraction (rather than attenuation). Elements having different refractive index within a sample cause a phase shift between coherent neutron waves. The degree of coherence can be determined by means of the coherence pattern caused by the sample, when a point source (pinhole) is used and the distance between source and sample is varied.

  12. Processing and characterization of smart composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    1998-07-01

    The issues of processing and characterization of pultruded smart composite reinforcements with the embedded fiber optic sensors are discussed. These fiber reinforced polymer reinforcements incorporate the optical fiber sensors to provide a strain monitoring of structures. The required modification of the pultrusion processing technology to allow for the incorporation of fiber optic sensors is developed. Fabry Perot and Bragg Grating optical strain sensors were chosen due to their small size and excellent sensitivity. The small diameter of the sensor and optical fiber allow them to be embedded without adversely affecting the strength of the composite. Two types of reinforcement with vinylester resin were used to produce the experimental 9.5 mm diameter rods. The reinforcements were carbon and E-glass fibers. In order to fully characterize the pultrusion process, it was decided to subject the strain sensors separately to each of the variables pertinent to the pultrusion process. Thus, sensors were used to monitor strain caused by compaction pressure in the die, compaction pressure plus standard temperature profile, and finally compaction pressure plus temperature plus resin cure (complete pultrusion process). A strain profile was recorded for each experiment as the sensor travelled through the pultrusion die, and for the cool-down period after the sensor had exited the die.

  13. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  14. Fatigue of continuous fiber reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mirdamadi, M.; Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The complex damage mechanisms that occur in fiber reinforced advanced metallic materials are discussed. As examples, results for several layups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites are presented. Fatigue tests were conducted and analyzed for both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Test conditions included isothermal, non-isothermal, and simulated mission profile thermomechanical fatigue. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 degree fibers is the controlling factor for fatigue life for a given test condition. An effective strain approach is presented for predicting crack initiation at notches. Fiber bridging models were applied to crack growth behavior.

  15. Method of preparing fiber reinforced ceramic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Alternate layers of mats of specially coated SiC fibers and silicon monotapes are hot pressed in two stages to form a fiber reinforced ceramic material. In the first stage a die is heated to about 600 C in a vacuum furnace and maintained at this temperature for about one-half hour to remove fugitive binder. In the second stage the die temperature is raised to about 1000 C and the layers are pressed at between 35 and 138 MPa. The resulting preform is placed in a reactor tube where a nitriding gas is flowed past the preform at 1100 to 1400 C to nitride the same.

  16. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  17. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  18. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  19. Comparison of the flexural strength of six reinforced restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B I; Volovich, Y; Musikant, B L; Deutsch, A S

    2001-01-01

    This study calculated the flexural strength for six reinforced restorative materials and demonstrated that flexural strength values can be determined simply by using physical parameters (diametral tensile strength and Young's modulus values) that are easily determined experimentally. A one-way ANOVA analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the two reinforced glass ionomers and the four composite resin materials, with the composite resin being stronger than the glass ionomers. PMID:12017792

  20. Material Properties for Fiber-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rouanet, Stephane; Moses, John; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic fiber-reinforced silica aerogels are novel materials for high performance insulation, including thermal protection materials. Experimental data are presented for the thermal and mechanical properties, showing the trends exhibited over a range of fiber loadings and silica aerogel densities. Test results are compared to that of unreinforced bulk aerogels.

  1. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  2. Resin Characterization in Cured Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular-level characterization of polymeric matrix resin in cured graphite-reinforced composite materials now determined through analysis of diffuse reflectance (DR) with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Improved analytical method based on diffuse reflectance. DR/ FTIR technique successfully applied to analysis of several different composites and adhesives impossible to analyze by conventional methods.

  3. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  4. Fracture behavior of laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum material

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, T.M. |; Lewandowski, J.J.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Hunt, W.H. Jr

    1994-05-01

    Laminated metallic composites are being developed for applications which require high specific stiffness and fracture resistance. Recent work with laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) materials has demonstrated the potential for marked improvements in stable crack growth resistance via extrinsic toughening. The purpose of this work is to compare the fracture mechanisms and fracture resistance of laminated DRA materials to unlaminated DRA materials. In particular, the production of extensive stable crack growth and the associated improvement in damage tolerance in DRA laminates is documented.

  5. NDE for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter s thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using NDE methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating. The results of that study are briefly reviewed in this article as well. Additionally, a short discussion on the future role of simulation to aid in these studies is provided.

  6. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  7. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  8. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  9. Process simulation for the compression moulding of fiber reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michaeli, W.; Goedel, M.; Heber, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will give a short overview about the activities of the compression moulding simulation for GMTs and SMCs. The simulation of the compression moulding process avoids the prototyping of new moulds for optimizing the process itself. That helps saving time and money. In compression moulding, a distinction is drawn between the more widespread ``Sheet Moulding Compound`` (SMC) and ``Glass Mat reinforced Thermoplastics`` (GMT). SMC is a glass fiber reinforced thermoset, while GMT has a thermoplastic matrix which is generally polypropylene. Both materials contain fibers with a fiber length of 12 to 25 mm. The fibers are not joined together in form of a fabric.

  10. Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Xu, Jin-Yu; Li, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material (BFRPGCM) was prepared. The stress-strain curve has been worked out. The ideal energy-absorbing efficiency has been analyzed and the application prospect has been explored. The results show the following: fiber reinforced cellular material has successively sized pore structures; the stress-strain curve has two stages: elastic stage and yielding plateau stage; the greatest value of the ideal energy-absorbing efficiency of BFRPGCM is 89.11%, which suggests BFRPGCM has excellent energy-absorbing property. Thus, it can be seen that BFRPGCM is easy and simple to make, has high plasticity, low density and excellent energy-absorbing features. So, BFRPGCM is a promising energy-absorbing material used especially in civil defense engineering.

  11. Corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    This experiment has examined the corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials. There were slight changes of weight after the occurring of corrosion based on time and H2SO4 concentration, but in general, the weight increased. It is assumed that this happens due to the basalt fiber precipitate. Prior to the corrosion, friction-wear behavior showed irregular patterns compared to metallic materials, and when it was compared with the behavior after the corrosion, the coefficient of friction was 2 to 3 times greater. The coefficient of friction of all test specimen ranged from 0.1 to 0.2. Such a result has proven that the basalt fiber, similar to the resin rubber, shows regular patterns regardless of time and H2SO4 concentration because of the space made between resins and reinforced materials.

  12. Mechanical characterization and structural analysis of recycled fiber-reinforced-polymer resin-transfer-molded beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Eugene Wie Loon

    1999-09-01

    The present investigation was focussed on the mechanical characterization and structural analysis of resin-transfer-molded beams containing recycled fiber-reinforced polymers. The beams were structurally reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers. The reinforcing filler materials consisted entirely of recycled fiber-reinforced polymer wastes (trim and overspray). The principal resin was a 100-percent dicyclo-pentadiene unsaturated polyester specially formulated with very low viscosity for resin transfer molding. Variations of the resin transfer molding technique were employed to produce specimens for material characterization. The basic materials that constituted the structural beams, continuous-glass-fiber-reinforced, recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled unsaturated polyesters, were fully characterized in axial and transverse compression and tension, and inplane and interlaminar shear, to ascertain their strengths, ultimate strains, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios. Experimentally determined mechanical properties of the recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled materials from the present investigation were superior to those of unsaturated polyester polymer concretes and Portland cement concretes. Mechanical testing and finite element analyses of flexure (1 x 1 x 20 in) and beam (2 x 4 x 40 in) specimens were conducted. These structurally-reinforced specimens were tested and analyzed in four-point, third-point flexure to determine their ultimate loads, maximum fiber stresses and mid-span deflections. The experimentally determined load capacities of these specimens were compared to those of equivalent steel-reinforced Portland cement concrete beams computed using reinforced concrete theory. Mechanics of materials beam theory was utilized to predict the ultimate loads and mid-span deflections of the flexure and beam specimens. However, these predictions proved to be severely inadequate. Finite element (fracture propagation

  13. Automobile materials competition: energy implications of fiber-reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings-Saxton, J.

    1981-10-01

    The embodied energy, structural weight, and transportation energy (fuel requirement) characteristics of steel, fiber-reinforced plastics, and aluminum were assessed to determine the overall energy savings of materials substitution in automobiles. In body panels, a 1.0-lb steel component with an associated 0.5 lb in secondary weight is structurally equivalent to a 0.6-lb fiber-reinforced plastic component with 0.3 lb in associated secondary weight or a 0.5-lb aluminum component with 0.25 lb of secondary weight. (Secondary weight refers to the combined weight of the vehicle's support structure, engine, braking system, and drive train, all of which can be reduced in response to a decrease in total vehicle weight.) The life cycle transportation energy requirements of structurally equivalent body panels (including their associated secondary weights) are 174.4 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 104.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. The embodied energy requirements are 37.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 22.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. These results can be combined to yield total energy requirements of 211.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 126.7 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 174.3 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. Fiber-reinforced plastics offer the greatest improvements over steel in both embodied and total energy requirements. Aluminum achieves the greatest savings in transportation energy.

  14. Structure A, dock reinforcing & bill of material. Drawing no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, dock reinforcing & bill of material. Drawing no. H2-306, revised as-built dated August 13, 1953. Original drawing by Black & Veatch, consulting engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1, 1951. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  15. Effect of reinforcement and fiber-matrix interface on dynamic fracture of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental technique of dynamic photoelasticity coupled with high speed photography has been used to study the interaction of running cracks with brittle and ductile fibers embedded in a brittle polymeric matrix. The effect of reinforcement and the fiber-matrix interface on dynamic stress intensity factor, crack bridging phenomena, crack surface morphology and toughening mechanisms occurring during dynamic fracturing of reinforced brittle matrix composites has been investigated. It is found that reinforcement reduces the crack velocity and the stress intensity factor. Thus the energy supplied to the crack tip is reduced resulting in reduction of the crack jump distance. Fiber pullout experiments were done to characterize the fiber-matrix interface. Rapid pullout results in an increase in interface shear strength. For rapid pullout of fibers the difference between maximum pullout loads. for well and weakly bonded fibers, is much smaller than for very slow pullout. A fiber-matrix interface which is weaker in the vicinity of the crack path, termed the partly debonded interface, produces higher crack closing forces and lower stress intensity factor compared to well bonded fibers. The former interface condition results in low fracture energy and shorter crack jump compared to the later. The interface condition significantly affects the fracture surface morphology. The fracture surface roughness is lower for reinforced materials compared to monolithic. Further the partly debonded fibers result in lower surface roughness compared to the well bonded fibers. Inclined fibers with various interface conditions have no significant effect on the stress intensity factor. The fiber debonded length, however, decreases, as compared to fibers which are aligned with the loading direction, due to the kinking of the fibers.

  16. A study of fiber materials for use in temperature resistant fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachowsky, M. J.; Anderson, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    This study has been directed at characterizing the micro-properties of candidate ceramics and glasses for use in making fibers used in fiber reinforced material composites. Particular emphasis has been given into developing techniques to guide the optimization of fiber properties. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) have been used to help collate the method of synthesis, crystal structure and surface morphology with physical performance parameters. As a result, progress has been made in characterizing such materials. This increased understanding makes the previous research worthy of further study.

  17. Mechanical response of composite materials with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Dickinson, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to identify the key geometrical parameters and quantify their influence on the mechanical response of through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforced composite materials. Composite laminates with TTT reinforcement fibers were fabricated using different TTT reinforcement materials and reinforcement methods and laminates were also fabricated of similar construction but without TTT reinforcement fibers. Coupon specimens were machined from these laminates and were destructively tested. TTT reinforcement yarns enhance damage tolerance and improve interlaminar strength. Thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns have equal or superior mechanical properties to thin-layer composites without TTT reinforcement yarns. A significant potential exists for fabrication cost reduction by using thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns. Removal of the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement improves compression strength. Stitching provides somewhat higher mechanical properties than integral weaving.

  18. Reinforced Pericardium as a Hybrid Material for Cardiovascular Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bracaglia, Laura G.; Yu, Li; Hibino, Narutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pericardium-based cardiovascular devices are currently bound by a 10-year maximum lifetime due to detrimental calcification and degradation. The goal of this work is to develop a novel synthetic material to create a lasting replacement for malfunctioning or diseased tissue in the cardiovascular system. This study couples poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and a natural biomaterial together in an unprecedented hybrid composite and evaluates the composite versus the standard glutaraldehyde-treated tissue. The polymer reinforcement is hypothesized to provide initial physical protection from proteolytic enzymes and degradation, but leave the original collagen and elastin matrix unaltered. The calcification rate and durability of the hybrid material are evaluated in vitro and in an in vivo subdermal animal model. Results demonstrate that PPF is an effective support and leads to significantly less calcium deposition, important metrics when evaluating cardiovascular material. By avoiding chemical crosslinking of the tissue and associated side effects, PPF-reinforced pericardium as a biohybrid material offers a promising potential direction for further development in cardiovascular material alternatives. Eliminating the basis for the majority of cardiovascular prosthetic failures could revolutionize expectations for extent of cardiovascular repair. PMID:25236439

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMAGED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Dehaven, M; McClelland, M; Chidester, S; Maienschein, J L

    2006-06-23

    Thermal damage experiments were conducted on LX-04, LX-10, and LX-17 at high temperatures. Both pristine and damaged samples were characterized for their material properties. A pycnometer was used to determine sample true density and porosity. Gas permeability was measured in a newly procured system (diffusion permeameter). Burn rate was measured in the LLNL strand burner. Weight losses upon thermal exposure were insignificant. Damaged pressed parts expanded, resulting in a reduction of bulk density by up to 10%. Both gas permeabilities and burn rates of the damaged samples increased by several orders of magnitude due to higher porosity and lower density. Moduli of the damaged materials decreased significantly, an indication that the materials became weaker mechanically. Damaged materials were more sensitive to shock initiation at high temperatures. No significant sensitization was observed when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature.

  20. Microscopic mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity in polymer nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Eun

    Modification of polymers by adding various nano-particles is an important method to obtain effective enhancement of materials properties. Within this class of materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are among the most studied materials for polymer reinforcement due to their extraordinary mechanical properties, superior thermal and electronic properties, and high aspect ratio. However, to unlock the potential of CNTs for applications, CNTs must be well dispersed in a polymer matrix and the microscopic mechanism of polymer reinforcement by CNTs must be understood. In this study, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composites with polypropylene (PP)-SWNT and polystyrene (PS)-SWNT were prepared and analyzed. Microscopic study of the mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity by SWNT included Raman spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and dielectric measurement. For PP-SWNT composites, tensile tests show a three times increase in the Young's modulus with addition of only 1 wt% SWNT, and much diminished increase of modulus with further increase in SWNT concentration. For PS-SWNT composites, well-dispersed SWNT/PS composite has been produced, using initial annealing of SWNT and optimum sonication conditions. The studies on the tangential mode in the Raman spectra and TEM indicated well-dispersed SWNTs in a PS matrix. We show that conductivity appears in composites already at very low concentrations, hinting at the formation of a 'percolative' network even below 0.5% of SWNT. The Raman studies for both composites show good transfer of the applied stress from the polymer matrices to SWNTs. However, no significant improvement of mechanical property is observed for PS-SWNT composites. The reason for only a slight increase of mechanical property remains unknown.

  1. Physicochemical characterization of three fiber-reinforced epoxide-based composites for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Bonon, Anderson J; Weck, Marcus; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) biomedical materials are in contact with living tissues arising biocompatibility questions regarding their chemical composition. The hazards of materials such as Bisphenol A (BPA), phthalate and other monomers and composites present in FRC have been rationalized due to its potential toxicity since its detection in food, blood, and saliva. This study characterized the physicochemical properties and degradation profiles of three different epoxide-based materials intended for restorative dental applications. Characterization was accomplished by several methods including FTIR, Raman, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) Analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and degradation experiments. Physicochemical characterization revealed that although materials presented similar chemical composition, variations between them were more largely accounted by the different phase distribution than chemical composition. PMID:27612785

  2. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  3. Identification of thermodynamically stable ceramic reinforcement materials for iron aluminide matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminide-base intermetallic matrix composites are currently being considered as potential high-temperature materials. One of the key factors in the selection of a reinforcement material is its chemical stability in the matrix. In this study, chemical interactions between iron aluminides and several potential reinforcement materials, which include carbides, oxides, borides, and nitrides, are analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. Several chemically compatible reinforcement materials are identified for the iron aluminides with Al concentrations ranging from 40 to 50 at. pct.

  4. Reinforced direct bonding of optical materials by femtosecond laser welding.

    PubMed

    Hélie, David; Bégin, Michael; Lacroix, Fabrice; Vallée, Réal

    2012-04-20

    A process for reinforcing a direct bond between optical materials using femtosecond laser welding is presented. As a side benefit, the optical transmission properties of the joined components are shown not to be altered by the joining process. The joints exhibits higher shear breakage loads, yielding a maximum measured joint strength of 5.25 MPa for an applied load of 75 kg in fused silica. The laser sealing of direct bonds between dissimilar materials improves their resistance to thermal shocks. Direct bonds sealed by a circular weld seam can withstand thermal shocks at temperatures at least twice as great as nonreinforced direct bonds. The combination of ultrashort laser welding and direct bonding provides an innovative joining method that benefits from the advantages of both contributing physical processes. PMID:22534922

  5. Maxillofacial Materials Reinforced with Various Concentrations of Polyhedral Silsesquioxanes

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Sharif A.; Wee, Alvin G.; Rumsey, Deborah J.; Schricker, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates two mechanical properties, tensile strength and tear strength, of maxillofacial materials reinforced with functional polyhedral silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles at 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0% (mass/mass) loading. Adding POSS was found to significantly affect the overall tensile strength and extensibility of the maxillofacial material. Significant differences were found in mean peak load (p = .050) and extension before failure (p = .050), respectively, between concentrations of 0% and 5%. For tear resistance, a significant difference was observed in mean load (p = .002) between concentrations of 1% and 5%. Significant differences were also observed in extension before failure between concentrations of 0% and 1% (p = .002) and between 0% and 2% (p = .002). Increased resistance to tensile or shearing stresses could lead to greater clinical longevity. The following results suggest that functional nanoparticles can be used to improve properties without compromising clinical handling. PMID:20981354

  6. The Application of Fiber-Reinforced Materials in Disc Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-Qing; Li, Hui; Zhu, Gang; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo; Wu, Shu-Qin

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc degeneration and injury are the most common spinal diseases with tremendous financial and social implications. Regenerative therapies for disc repair are promising treatments. Fiber-reinforced materials (FRMs) are a kind of composites by embedding the fibers into the matrix materials. FRMs can maintain the original properties of the matrix and enhance the mechanical properties. By now, there are still some problems for disc repair such as the unsatisfied static strength and dynamic properties for disc implants. The application of FRMs may resolve these problems to some extent. In this review, six parts such as background of FRMs in tissue repair, the comparison of mechanical properties between natural disc and some typical FRMs, the repair standard and FRMs applications in disc repair, and the possible research directions for FRMs' in the future are stated. PMID:24383057

  7. MULTIPHASE MATERIAL OPTIMIZATION FOR FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES CONSIDERING STRAIN SOFTENING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Junji; Ramm, Ekkehard; Terada, Kenjiro; Kyoya, Takashi

    The present paper addresses an optimization strategy of textile fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) with emphasis on its special failure behavior. Since both concrete and fiber are brittle materials, a prominent objective for FRC structures is concerned with the improvement of structural ductility, which may be defined as energy absorption capacity. Despite above unfavorable characteristics, the interface between fiber and matrix plays a substantial role in the structural response. This favorable 'composite effect' is related to material parameters involved in the interface and the material layout on the small scale level. Therefore the purpose of the present paper is to improve the structural ductility of FRC at the macroscopic level applying an optimization method with respect to significant material parameters at the small scale level. The method discussed is based on multiphase material optimization. This methodology is extended to a damage formulation. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated in a series of numerical examples; it is verified that the structural ductility can be considerably improved.

  8. CNT Reinforced Hybrid Microgels as Scaffold Materials for Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Ryon; Bae, Hojae; Cha, Jae Min; Mun, Ji Young; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Tekin, Halil; Shin, Hyeongho; Farshchi, Saeed; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Tang, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels that mimic biological extracellular matrix (ECM) can provide cells with mechanical support and signaling cues to regulate their behavior. However, despite the ability of hydrogels to generate artificial ECM that can modulate cellular behavior, they often lack the mechanical strength needed for many tissue constructs. Here, we present reinforced CNT-gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid as a biocompatible, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden three dimensional (3D) constructs. The addition of CNTs successfully reinforced GelMA hydrogels without decreasing their porosity or inhibiting cell growth. The CNT-GelMA hybrids were also photopatternable allowing for easy fabrication of microscale structures without harsh processes. NIH-3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) readily spread and proliferated after encapsulation in CNT-GelMA hybrid microgels. By controlling the amount of CNTs incorporated into the GelMA hydrogel system, we demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the hybrid material can be tuned making it suitable for various tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, due to the high pattern fidelity and resolution of CNT incorporated GelMA, it can be used for in vitro cell studies or fabricating complex 3D biomimetic tissue-like structures. PMID:22117858

  9. Flexible nanofiber-reinforced aerogel (xerogel) synthesis, manufacture, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Lichun; Yalcin, Baris; Nguyen, Baochau N; Meador, Mary Ann B; Cakmak, Miko

    2009-11-01

    Silica aerogels are sol-gel-derived materials consisting of interconnected nanoparticle building blocks that form an open and highly porous three-dimensional silica network. Flexible aerogel films could have wide applications in various thermal insulation systems. However, aerogel thin films produced with a pure sol-gel process have inherent disadvantages, such as high fragility and moisture sensitivity, that hinder wider applications of these materials. We have developed synthesis and manufacturing methods to incorporate electrospun polyurethane nanofibers into the cast sol film prior to gelation of the silica-based gel in order to reinforce the structure and overcome disadvantages such as high fragility and poor mechanical strength. In this method, a two-stage sol-gel process was employed: (1) acid-catalyzed tetraethyl orthosilicate hydrolysis and (2) base-catalyzed gelation. By precisely controlling the sol gelation kinetics with the amount of base present in the formulation, nanofibers were electrospun into the sol before the onset of the gelation process and uniformly embedded in the silica network. Nanofiber reinforcement did not alter the thermal conductivity and rendered the final composite film bendable and flexible. PMID:20356119

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at. percent Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1373 and 1573 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, beryllides, and silicides. Thermodynamic data for NiAl alloys have been reviewed and activity of Ni and Al in the beta phase have been derived at 1373 and 1573 K. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and the matrix have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been defined.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  13. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-19

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics. PMID:23011263

  14. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  15. Analysis of woven fabrics for reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Ramnath, V.; Rosen, B. Walter

    1987-01-01

    The use of woven fabrics as reinforcements for composites is considered. Methods of analysis of properties are reviewed and extended, with particular attention paid to three-dimensional constructions having through-the-thickness reinforcements. Methodology developed is used parametrically to evaluate the performance potential of a wide variety of reinforcement constructions including hybrids. Comparisons are made of predicted and measured properties of representative composites having biaxial and triaxial woven, and laminated tape lay-up reinforcements. Overall results are incorporated in advanced weave designs.

  16. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al(4)C(3)) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al(4)C(3). Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al(4)C(3) also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials. PMID:22571898

  17. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al4C3) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al4C3. Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al4C3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials.

  18. Chemical characterization of selected LDEF polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical characterization of selected polymeric materials which received exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is reported. The specimens examined include silvered fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon thermal blanket material, polysulfone, epoxy, polyimide matrix resin/graphite fiber reinforced composites, and several high performance polymer films. These specimens came from numerous LDEF locations, and thus received different environmental exposures. The results to date show no significant change at the molecular level in the polymer that survived exposure. Scanning electron and scanning tunneling microscopes show resin loss and a texturing of some specimens which resulted in a change in optical properties. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination on these materials is addressed. The possibility of continued post-exposure degradation of some polymeric films is also proposed.

  19. Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites Containing Metal Reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuentz, Lily; Salem, Anton; Singh, M.; Halbig, M. C.; Salem, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of polymeric systems using 3D printing has become quite popular recently due to rapid growth and availability of low cost and open source 3D printers. Two widely used 3D printing filaments are based on polylactic acid (PLA) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) systems. PLA is much more environmentally friendly in comparison to ABS since it is made from renewable resources such as corn, sugarcane, and other starches as precursors. Recently, polylactic acid-based metal powder containing composite filaments have emerged which could be utilized for multifunctional applications. The composite filaments have higher density than pure PLA, and the majority of the materials volume is made up of polylactic acid. In order to utilize functionalities of composite filaments, printing behavior and properties of 3-D printed composites need to be characterized and compared with the pure PLA materials. In this study, pure PLA and composite specimens with different metallic reinforcements (Copper, Bronze, Tungsten, Iron, etc) were 3D printed at various layer heights and resulting microstructures and properties were characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) behavior of filaments with different reinforcements were studied. The microscopy results show an increase in porosity between 3-D printed regular PLA and the metal composite PLA samples, which could produce weaker mechanical properties in the metal composite materials. Tensile strength and fracture toughness behavior of specimens as a function of print layer height will be presented.

  20. Railgun Application for High Energy Impact Testing of Nano-Reinforced Kevlar-Based Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Vricella, A.; Pastore, R.; Morles, R. B.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-08-01

    An advanced electromagnetic accelerator, called railgun, has been assembled and tuned in order to perform high energy impact test on layered structures. Different types of layered composite materials have been manufactured and characterized in terms of energy absorbing capability upon impact of metallic bullets fired at high velocity. The composite materials under testing are manufactured by integrating several layers of Kevlar fabric and carbon fiber ply within a polymeric matrix reinforced by carbon nanotubes at 1% of weight percentage. The experimental results show that the railgun-device is a good candidate to perform impact testing of materials in the space debris energy range, and that carbon nanotubes may enhance, when suitably coupled to the composite's matrix, the excellent antiballistic properties of the Kevlar fabrics.

  1. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  2. Plasma Treatment and Polymerization of Textile Reinforcing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, Hudec; Michal, Jaššo; Henrich, Krump; Mirko, Cernák; Viera, Šuriová

    In this paper different types of surface modification of polyester cords by low-temperature plasma at atmospheric pressure was studied. The first type cords were activated by pulse surface positive corona discharge generated in a plasma reactor or by coplanar dielectric surface barier discharge (DCSBD) in nitrogen or ambient air plasma at atmospheric pressure. The values of the static and dynamic adhesion of untreated cords and the plasma treated cords demonstrated possitive influence of plasma surface treatment on the adhesion of cords to rubber. The mechanical properties were not significantly affected by plasma treatment. The second type of plasma treatment involved the modification of cords by plasma polymerization in mixture of nitrogene with butadiene. The plasma layer homogenously coated the cords surface. The results shove, that values of static and dynamic adhesion for plasma polymerisation of treated cords are comparable with the standard chemical treatment based on resorcinol-formaldehyde latex (RFL). From the study of the surface properties of the plasma treated cords by SEM, AFM and XPS is evident that both chemical interactions and morphological changes of the surface cord fibres are responsible for the improved adhesion between treated reinforcing materials and rubber blend.

  3. Alternate anode materials for cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    2001-01-01

    Consumable and non-consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection (CP) systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where deicing salts are employed. The anode materials included Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, Al-12Zn-0.2In, and cobalt-sprayed Ti. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. Impressed current CP anodes were electrochemically aged at a current density 15 times as great as that used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in typical coastal ICCP systems (2.2 mA/m2 based on anode area). Increasing moisture at the anode-concrete interface reduced the operating voltage of all the anodes. Bond strength between the anodes and concrete decreased with electrochemical aging. The Zn-15Al and Al-12Zn-0.2In anodes provided adequate protection in GCP but their life was too short in the accelerated ICCP tests. Zinc had an adequate life in ICCP tests but was inadequate as a galvanic anode. Zinc-hydrogel performed well in both tests when the hydrogel was kept moist. Titanium was an excellent anode for ICCP, but is not suitable for GCP.

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at pct Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1173 and 1273 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, and silicides. Although several chemically compatible reinforcement materials are identified, the coefficients of thermal expansion for none of these materials match closely with that of FeAl alloys and this might pose serious problems in the design of composite systems based on FeAl alloys.

  5. Comparative wear resistance of reinforced glass ionomer restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Teo, J C; Teoh, S H

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the wear resistance of three restorative reinforced glass ionomer cements (Fuji IX GP FAST [FJ], Miracle Mix [MM] and Ketac Silver [KS]). Microfilled (Silux [SX]) and mini-filled (Z100 [ZO]) composites were used for comparison. Six specimens were made for each material. The specimens were conditioned for one week in distilled water at 37 degrees C and subjected to wear testing at 20 MPa contact stress against SS304 counterbodies using a reciprocal compression-sliding wear instrumentation. Distilled water was used as lubricant. Wear depth (microm) was measured using profilometry every 2,000 cycles up to 10,000 cycles. Results were analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's test (p<0.05). After 10,000 cycles of wear testing, ranking was as follows: KS>ZO>MM>FJ>SX. Wear ranged from 26.1 microm for SX to 71.5 microm for KS. The wear resistance of KS was significantly lower than FJ, MM and SX at all wear intervals. Although KS had significantly more wear than ZO at 2,000 to 6,000 cycles, no significant difference in wear was observed between these two materials at 8,000 and 10,000 cycles. Sintering of silver particles to glass ionomer cement (KS) did not appear to improve wear resistance. The simple addition of amalgam alloy to glass ionomer may improve wear resistance but results in poor aesthetics (silver-black color). FJ, which relies on improved chemistry instead of metal fillers, showed comparable wear resistance to the composites evaluated and is tooth-colored. It may serve as a potential substitute for composites in low-stress situations where fluoride release is desirable and aesthetic requirements are not high. PMID:11504433

  6. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of biodegradable starch/PVA composite films reinforced with cellulosic fibre.

    PubMed

    Priya, Bhanu; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Pathania, Deepak; Singha, Amar Singh

    2014-08-30

    Cellulosic fibres reinforced composite blend films of starch/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were prepared by using citric acid as plasticizer and glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. The mechanical properties of cellulosic fibres reinforced composite blend were compared with starch/PVA crossed linked blend films. The increase in the tensile strength, elongation percentage, degree of swelling and biodegradability of blend films was evaluated as compared to starch/PVA crosslinked blend films. The value of different evaluated parameters such as citric acid, glutaraldehyde and reinforced fibre to starch/PVA (5:5) was found to be 25 wt.%, 0.100 wt.% and 20 wt.%, respectively. The blend films were characterized using Fourier transform-infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA/DTG). Scanning electron microscopy illustrated a good adhesion between starch/PVA blend and fibres. The blend films were also explored for antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The results confirmed that the blended films may be used as exceptional material for food packaging. PMID:24815414

  8. Interfacial characterization of a SiC fiber-reinforced AlN composite

    SciTech Connect

    Park, K.; Vasilos, T.; Sung, C. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to improve the mechanical properties of AlN by the incorporation of SiC (SCS-6) fibers (TEXTRON Specialty Materials, Lowell, MA) in a unidirectional array. The SiC fibers are one of the most important reinforcements for ceramic- and metal-matrix composites due to high tensile strength (3,450 MPs), high tensile modulus (400 GPa), and low density (3.0 g/cc). The SiC fiber (15 vol %)-reinforced AlN composite was fabricated by hot-pressing in vacuum. The microstructure and chemistry of interfacial regions in as-fabricated and crept composite were characterized using analytical transmission electron microscopy, in order to investigate the nature of the reaction between the fiber and matrix during both composite fabrication and creep tests and to understand the reinforcing effects of SiC fiber in the AlN matrix. Interfacial characteristics of the composite play an important role in influencing the mechanical properties of the composite.

  9. Materials Characterization Center program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.D.; Ross, W.A.; Hill, O.F.; Mendel, J.E.; Merz, M.D.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) has been established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Materials Characterization Organization for providing an authoritative, referenceable basis for establishing nuclear waste material properties and test methods. The MCC will provide a data base that will include information on the components of the waste emplacement package - the spent fuel or processed waste form and the engineered barriers - and their interaction with each other and as affected by the environment. The MCC will plan materials testing, develop and document procedures, collect and analyze existing materials data, and conduct tests as necessary.

  10. Characterizing the self-sensing performance of carbon nanotube-enhanced fiber-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, Bryan R.; La Saponara, Valeria; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2010-04-01

    The increased usage of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) in recent decades has created a need to monitor the unique response of these materials to impact and fatigue damage. As most traditional nondestructive evaluation methods are illsuited to detecting damage in FRPs, new methods must be created without compromising the high strength-to-weight aspects of FRPs. This paper describes the characterization of carbon nanotube-polyelectrolyte thin films applied to glass fiber substrates as a means for in situ strain sensing in glass fiber-reinforced polymers (GFRP). The layer-by-layer deposition process employed is capable of depositing individual and small bundles of carbon nanotubes within a polyelectrolyte matrix and directly onto glass fiber matrices. Upon film fabrication, the nanocomposite-coated GFRP specimens are mounted in a load frame for characterizing their electromechanical performance. This preliminary results obtained from this study has shown that these thin films exhibit bilinear piezoresistivity. Time- and frequency-domain techniques are utilized to characterize the nanocomposite strain sensing response. An equivalent circuit is also derived from electrical impedance spectroscopic analysis of thin film specimens.

  11. Quantitative characterization of spatial distribution of particles in materials: Application to materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parse, J. B.; Wert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Most engineering materials contain second phase particles or fibers which serve to reinforce the matrix phase. The effect of reinforcements on material properties is usually analyzed in terms of the average volume fraction and spacing of reinforcements, quantities which are global microstructural characteristics. However, material properties can also depend on local microstructural characteristics; for example, on how uniformly the reinforcing phase is distributed in the material. The analysis method will then be applied to a materials processing problem to discover how processing parameters can be selected to maximize redistribution of the reinforcing phase during processing. Several mathematical analysis methods could be adapted to the problem of characterizing the distribution of particles in materials. A tessellation-based method was selected. In the first phase of the investigation, a software package was written to automate the analysis. Typical results are shown. The analysis technique allows the degree to which particles are clustered together, the size and spacing of particle clusters, and the particle density in clusters to be found. The analysis methods were applied to computer-generated distributions and to a few real particle-containing materials. Methods for analyzing a nonuniform particle distribution in a material can be applied to two broad classes of materials science problems: understanding how the resulting particle distribution affects properties. The analysis method described is applied to a materials processing problem: how to select extrusion conditions to maximize the redistribution of reinforcing particles that are initially nonuniformly distributed. In addition, the tessellation-based method to analyze star distributions in spiral galaxies was adapted, illustrating the diverse types of problems to which the analysis method can be applied.

  12. Materials Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Materials Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Materials Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) research focus is the physical and photoelectrochemical characterization of novel materials. In this laboratory unknown samples are characterized by identifying and quantifying molecular species present through the implementation of a suite of analytical instrumentation and techniques. This leads to the ability to deconvolute decomposition routes and elucidate reaction mechanisms of materials through thermal and evolved gas analysis. This aids in the synthesis of next generation materials that are tailored to optimize stability and performance. These techniques and next generation materials will have many applications. One particular focus is the stable and conductive tetherable cations for use as membrane materials in anion exchange membrane fuel cells. Another is to understand the leachant contaminants derived from balance of plant materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Once identified and quantified, these organic and ionic species are dosed as contaminants into ex/in-situ fuel cell tests, to determine the effect on durability and performance. This laboratory also acts in support of fuel cell catalysis, manufacturing, and other related projects. The Materials Characterization Laboratory will cover multiple analytical operations, with the overall goal of troubleshooting synthetic materials or process streams to improve performance. Having novel evolved gas analysis and other analytical capabilities; this laboratory provides a viable location to analyze small batch samples, whereas setting up these types of capabilities and expertise would be cost and time prohibitive for most institutions. Experiments that can be performed include: (1

  13. Development of Ceramic Fibers for Reinforcement in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, L. E.; Lent, W. E.; Teague, W. T.

    1961-01-01

    the. testing apparatus for single fiber tensile strength increased the precision. of tests conducted on nine fibers. The highest mean tensile strength, a value of 295,000 pounds per square inch, was obtained with R-141 fibers. Treatment of R-74 fibers with anhydrous Linde A-1100 silane finish improved its mean fiber tensile strength by 25 percent. The lapse of time after fiber formation had no measurable effect on tensile strength. A static heating test conducted with various high melting fibers indicated that Fiberfrax and R-108 underwent no significant changes in bulk volume or resiliency on exposure to 2750 degrees Fahrenheit (1510 degrees Centigrade) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For fiber-resin composition fabrication, ten fiber materials were selected on the bases of high fiber yield, fusion temperature, and type of composition. Fiberfrax, a commercial ceramic fiber, was included for comparison. A new, more effective method of removing pellets from blown fibers was developed. The de-pelletized fibers were treated with a silane finish and felted into ten-inch diameter felts prior to resin impregnation. Composites containing 30 percent by weight of CTL 91-LD phenolic resin were molded under high pressure from the impregnated felts and post-cured to achieve optimum properties. Flexural strength, flexural modules of elasticity, and punch shear strength tests were conducted on the composite specimens. The highest average flexural strength obtained was 19,958 pounds per square inch with the R-74-fiber-resin composite. This compares very favorably with the military specification of 13,000 pounds per square inch flexural strength for randomly oriented fiber reinforced composites. The highest punch shear strength (11,509 pounds per square inch) was obtained with the R-89 fiber-resin composite. The effects of anhydrous fiber finishes on composite strength were not clearly indicated. Plasma arc tests at a heat flux of 550 British Thermal Units per square foot per second on

  14. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Shape Memory Epoxy (CNFR-SME) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuyang

    Shape memory polymers have a wide range of applications due to their ability to mechanically change shapes upon external stimulus, while their achievable composite counterparts prove even more versatile. An overview of literature on shape memory materials, fillers and composites was provided to pave a foundation for the materials used in the current study and their inherent benefits. This study details carbon nanofiber and composite fabrication and contrasts their material properties. In the first section, the morphology and surface chemistry of electrospun-poly(acrylonitrile)-based carbon nanofiber webs were tailored through various fabrication methods and impregnated with a shape memory epoxy. The morphologies, chemical compositions, thermal stabilities and electrical resistivities of the carbon nanofibers and composites were then characterized. In the second section, an overview of thermal, mechanical and shape memory characterization techniques for shape memory polymers and their composites was provided. Thermal and mechanical properties in addition to the kinetic and dynamic shape memory performances of neat epoxy and carbon nanofiber/epoxy composites were characterized. The various carbon nanofiber web modifications proved to have notable influence on their respective composite performances. The results from these two sections lead to an enhanced understanding of these carbon nanofiber reinforced shape memory epoxy composites and provided insight for future studies to tune these composites at will.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of TiB2 Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Gautam, Gaurav; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Mohan, Anita; Mohan, Sunil

    2015-09-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites (AMCs) are developed to meet the demands of light weight high performance materials in aerospace, automotive, marine and other applications. The properties of AMCs can be tailored suitably by combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. AMCs are one of the most attractive alternatives for the manufacturing of light weight and high strength parts due to their low density and high specific strength. There are various techniques for preparing the AMCs with different reinforcement particles. In AMCs, the reinforcements are usually in the form of metal oxides, carbides, borides, nitrides and their combination. Among the various reinforcements titanium di-boride (TiB2) is of much interest due to its excellent stiffness, hardness, and wear resistance. This paper attempts to provide an overview to explore the possibilities of synthesizing titanium di-boride reinforced AMCs with different techniques. The mechanical and tribological properties of these composites have been emphasized to project these as tribo-materials.

  17. Microstructural characterization of glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Santos, J D; Knowles, J C; Reis, R L; Monteiro, F J; Hastings, G W

    1994-01-01

    The influence of phosphate-based glasses and a bioactive silica glass on the sintering mechanism of hydroxyapatite was studied over a wide range of temperatures. The composites were microstructurally characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Small additions of phosphate-based glasses proved to be beneficial to the sintering process and fully dense materials were obtained. A significant improvement in mechanical properties was achieved. beta-TCP and alpha-TCP were found in the microstructure depending on the sintering temperature. Additions of bioactive glass led to the development of calcium phosphate silicate. PMID:8161658

  18. Use of reinforced inorganic cement materials for spark wire and drift chamber wire frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The results of a survey, materials test, and analysis study directed toward the development of an inorganic glass-fiber reinforced cement material for use in the construction of space qualified spark wire frames and drift chamber frames are presented. The purpose for this research was to evaluate the feasibility of using glass fiber reinforced cement (GFRC) for large dimensioned structural frames for supporting a number of precisely located spark wires in multiple planes. A survey of the current state of the art in fiber reinforced cement materials was made; material sample mixes were made and tested to determine their laboratory performances. Tests conducted on sample materials showed that compressive and flexural strengths of this material could approach values which would enable fabrication of structural spark wire frames.

  19. An historical mullite fiber-reinforced ceramic composite: Characterization of the wootz' crucible refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, T.L. ); Merk, N.; Thomas, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Since at least the sixteenth century, the wootz'' ultra-high carbon white cast-iron ingot was produced in India by melting or carburising iron in a crucible. This ingot was forced into sword blades of so-called Damascus steel. The charged crucible was fired in a long (24-hour) single cycle at high temperature (1150-1250{degree}C) in a strongly reducing atmosphere. Raw materials for the refractory vessel are clay and coked'' rice husks. At high temperatures, two phases reinforce the glassy matrix: cristobalite relics of rice husks and a network of mullite crystals. This paper characterizes the microstructure and chemistry of the mullite network in the glassy matrix by means of a combination of techniques: optical microscopy, XRD, SEM, TEM and EDS, and HREM. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Imaging systems and materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Murr, L.E.

    2009-05-15

    This paper provides a broad background for the historical development and modern applications of light optical metallography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, field-ion microscopy and several forms of scanning probe microscopes. Numerous case examples illustrating especially synergistic applications of these imaging systems are provided to demonstrate materials characterization especially in the context of structure-property-performance issues which define materials science and engineering.

  1. Strength and toughness of structural fibres for composite material reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Herráez, M; Fernández, A; Lopes, C S; González, C

    2016-07-13

    The characterization of the strength and fracture toughness of three common structural fibres, E-glass, AS4 carbon and Kevlar KM2, is presented in this work. The notched specimens were prepared by means of selective carving of individual fibres by means of the focused ion beam. A straight-fronted edge notch was introduced in a plane perpendicular to the fibre axis, with the relative notch depth being a0/D≈0.1 and the notch radius at the tip approximately 50 nm. The selection of the appropriate beam current during milling operations was performed to avoid to as much as possible any microstructural changes owing to ion impingement. Both notched and un-notched fibres were submitted to uniaxial tensile tests up to failure. The strength of the un-notched fibres was characterized in terms of the Weibull statistics, whereas the residual strength of the notched fibres was used to determine their apparent toughness. To this end, the stress intensity factor of a fronted edge crack was computed by means of the finite-element method for different crack lengths. The experimental results agreed with those reported in the literature for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres obtained by using similar techniques. After mechanical testing, the fracture surface of the fibres was analysed to ascertain the failure mechanisms. It was found that AS4 carbon and E-glass fibres presented the lower toughness with fracture surfaces perpendicular to the fibre axis, emanating from the notch tip. The fractured region of Kevlar KM2 fibres extended along the fibre and showed large permanent deformation, which explains their higher degree of toughness when compared with carbon and glass fibres. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242306

  2. FTIR characterization of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to the characterization of advanced materials. FTIR sampling techniques including internal and external reflectance and photoacoustic spectroscopy are discussed. Representative examples from the literature of the analysis of resins, fibers, prepregs and composites are reviewed. A discussion of several promising specialized FTIR techniques is also presented.

  3. Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

    2008-03-01

    Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

  4. Plastic Fibre Reinforced Soil Blocks as a Sustainable Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, C. K. Subramania; Nambiar, E. K. Kunhanandan; Abraham, Benny Mathews

    2012-10-01

    Solid waste management, especially the huge quantity of waste plastics, is one of the major environmental concerns nowadays. Their employability in block making in the form of fibres, as one of the methods of waste management, can be investigated through a fundamental research. This paper highlights the salient observations from a systematic investigation on the effect of embedded fibre from plastic waste on the performance of stabilised mud blocks. Stabilisation of the soil was done by adding cement, lime and their combination. Plastic fibre in chopped form from carry bags and mineral water bottles were added (0.1% & 0.2% by weight of soil) as reinforcement. The blocks were tested for density, and compressive strength, and observed failure patterns were analysed. Blocks with 0.1% of plastic fibres showed an increase in strength of about 3 to 10%. From the observations of failure pattern it can be concluded that benefits of fibre reinforcement includes both improved ductility in comparison with raw blocks and inhibition of crack propogation after its initial formation.

  5. Creep behavior of abaca fibre reinforced composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, B.C.; Lieng, V.T.

    1996-12-31

    This study investigates the creep behavior of abaca fibre reinforced composite lamina. The optimum proportions of constituents and loading conditions, temperature and stresses, are investigated in terms of creep properties. Lamina with abaca fibre volume fractions of 60, 70 and 80 percent, embedded in polyester resin were fabricated. Creep tests in tension at three temperature levels 20{degrees}C, 100{degrees}C and 120{degrees}C and three constant stress levels of 0. 1 MPa, 0. 13 Mpa and 0. 198 MPa using a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) were performed. The creep curves show standard regions of an ideal creep curve such as primary and secondary creep stage. The results also show that the minimum creep rate of abaca fibre reinforced composite increases with the increase of temperature and applied stress. Plotting the minimum creep rate against stress, depicts the variations of stress exponents which vary from 1.6194 at 20{degrees}C to 0.4576 at 120{degrees}C.

  6. Investigation of Methods for Selectively Reinforcing Aluminum and Aluminum-Lithium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Alexa, Joel A.; Messick, Peter L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that selective reinforcement offers the potential to significantly improve the performance of metallic structures for aerospace applications. Applying high-strength, high-stiffness fibers to the high-stress regions of aluminum-based structures can increase the structural load-carrying capability and inhibit fatigue crack initiation and growth. This paper discusses an investigation into potential methods for applying reinforcing fibers onto the surface of aluminum and aluminum-lithium plate. Commercially-available alumina-fiber reinforced aluminum alloy tapes were used as the reinforcing material. Vacuum hot pressing was used to bond the reinforcing tape to aluminum alloy 2219 and aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 base plates. Static and cyclic three-point bend testing and metallurgical analysis were used to evaluate the enhancement of mechanical performance and the integrity of the bond between the tape and the base plate. The tests demonstrated an increase in specific bending stiffness. In addition, no issues with debonding of the reinforcing tape from the base plate during bend testing were observed. The increase in specific stiffness indicates that selectively-reinforced structures could be designed with the same performance capabilities as a conventional unreinforced structure but with lower mass.

  7. A mechanism responsible for reducing compression strength of through-the-thickness reinforced composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify one of the mechanisms that contributes to the reduced compression strength of composite materials with through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcements. In this study a series of thick (0/90) laminates with stitched and integrally woven TTT reinforcements were fabricated and statically tested. In both the stitching and weaving process a surface loop of TTT reinforcement yarn is created between successive TTT penetrations. It was shown that the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement 'kinked' the in-plane fibers in such a manner that they were made ineffective in carrying compressive load. The improvement in strength by removal of the surface loop and 'kinked' in-plane fibers was between 7 and 35 percent.

  8. MATERIAL SHAPE OPTIMIZATION FOR FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES APPLYING A DAMAGE FORMULATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Junji; Ramm, Ekkehard; Terada, Kenjiro; Kyoya, Takashi

    The present contribution deals with an optimization strategy of fiber reinforced composites. Although the methodical concept is very general we concentrate on Fiber Reinforced Concrete with a complex failure mechanism resulting from material brittleness of both constituents matrix and fibers. The purpose of the present paper is to improve the structural ductility of the fiber reinforced composites applying an optimization method with respect to the geometrical layout of continuous long textile fibers. The method proposed is achieved by applying a so-called embedded reinforcement formulation. This methodology is extended to a damage formulation in order to represent a realistic structural behavior. For the optimization problem a gradient-based optimization scheme is assumed. An optimality criteria method is applied because of its numerically high efficiency and robustness. The performance of the method is demonstrated by a series of numerical examples; it is verified that the ductility can be substantially improved.

  9. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Frank Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of gold nanoparticle reinforced Chitosan nanocomposites for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimitt G.

    Chitosan is a naturally derived polymer, which represents one of the most technologically important classes of active materials with applications in a variety of industrial and biomedical fields. Polymeric materials can be regarded as promising candidates for next generation devices due to their low energy payback time. These devices can be fabricated by high-throughput processing methodologies, such as spin coating, inkjet printing, gravure and flexographic printing onto flexible substrates. However, the extensive applications of polymeric films are still limited because of disadvantages such as poor electromechanical properties, high brittleness with a low strain at break, and sensitivity to water. For certain critical applications the need for modification of physical, mechanical and electrical properties of the polymer is essential. When blends of polymer films with other materials are used, as is commonly the case, device performance directly depends on the nanoscale morphology and phase separation of the blend components. To prepare nanocomposite thin films with the desired functional properties, both the film composition and microstructure have to be thoroughly characterized and controlled. Chitosan reinforced bio-nanocomposite films with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles were prepared through a solution casting method. Gold nanoparticles (˜ 32 nm diameter) were synthesized via a citrate reduction method from chloroauric acid and incorporated in the prepared Chitosan solution. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles was achieved throughout the chitosan matrix and was confirmed by SEM images. Synthesis outcomes and prepared nanocomposites were characterized using TEM, SAED, SEM, EDX, XRD, UV-Vis, particle size analysis, zeta potential and FT-IR for their physical, morphological and structural properties. Nanoscale mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized at room temperature, human body temperatures and higher

  11. Production and characterization of cellulose reinforced starch (CRT) films.

    PubMed

    Sudharsan, K; Chandra Mohan, C; Azhagu Saravana Babu, P; Archana, G; Sabina, K; Sivarajan, M; Sukumar, M

    2016-02-01

    Starch from Tamarind seed is considered to be a nonedible and inexpensive component, with many industrial applications. Extraction and characterization of tamarind seed starch was carried out for the synthesis of biopolymer. Tamarind seeds were collected, cleaned and further roasted, decorticated, and pulverized to get starch powder. Total starch content present in each tamarind seed is estimated to be around 65-70%. About 84.68% purified starch can be recovered from the tamarind seed. Defatted Tamarind seed starch has an amylose content of 27.55 wt.% and 72.45 wt.% of amylopectin. Morphological (SEM) and X-ray diffraction were used to evaluate crystallinity. Likewise, TGA and DSC of starch have also been analyzed. Thermal properties of starch obtained from tamarind seeds showed good thermal stability when compared to other starch sources such as Mesquite seed and Mango kernel. This study proved that the tamarind seed starch can be used as a potential biopolymer material. Thermo-stable biofilms were produced through initial optimization studies. Predictive response surface quadratic models were constructed for prediction and optimization of biofilm mechanical properties. Correlation coefficient values were calculated to me more than 0.90 for mechanical responses which implies the fitness of constructed model with experimental data. PMID:26592701

  12. Analysis of glass-reinforced epoxy material for radio frequency resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaman, M R; Islam, M T; Misran, N; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than -20 dB for C band and -34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior. PMID:24977230

  13. Analysis of Glass-Reinforced Epoxy Material for Radio Frequency Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. T.; Misran, N.; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than −20 dB for C band and −34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior. PMID:24977230

  14. Characterization of interphase environmental degradation at elevated temperature of fiber-reinforced TMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikas, Theodore E.

    2009-03-01

    Fiber reinforced metallic composite materials are being considered for a number of applications because of their attractive mechanical properties as compared to monolithic metallic alloys. An engineered interphase, including the bond strength between the composite's constituents, contributes to a large extent to the improvement of strength and stiffness properties of this class of materials. However, in high temperature applications, where combination of cyclic loading with environmental effects is expected, consideration should be given to interphase degradation, especially in the vicinity of stress risers, such as notches and holes. The applicability of damage tolerance analysis in structural components made of titanium matrix composite materials designed to operate under high temperature environments would depend on the availability of adequate characterization methods for the evaluation of interfacial degradation. The objective of this work is to provide a basic understanding of interfacial degradation mechanisms due to oxidation in environmentally exposed titanium-based composites subjected to cyclic stresses. A nondestructive method has been developed enabling highresolution monitoring of interfacial damage initiation and accumulation as well as surface/subsurface cracking behavior during interrupted fatigue tests. This nondestructive technique is based on surface acoustic wave propagation in the composites and can detect minute changes in elastic properties of the interfacial region due to elevated temperatures as well as oxygen effects.

  15. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  16. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  17. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  18. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1987-09-22

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate. 2 figs.

  19. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1987-01-01

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  20. Micromechanical model of crack growth in fiber reinforced brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.; Xu, Kang

    1990-01-01

    A model based on the micromechanical mechanism of crack growth resistance in fiber reinforced ceramics is presented. The formulation of the model is based on a small scale geometry of a macrocrack with a bridging zone, the process zone, which governs the resistance mechanism. The effect of high toughness of the fibers in retardation of the crack advance, and the significance of the fiber pullout mechanism on the crack growth resistance, are reflected in this model. The model allows one to address issues such as influence of fiber spacing, fiber flexibility, and fiber matrix friction. Two approaches were used. One represents the fracture initiation and concentrated on the development of the first microcracks between fibers. An exact closed form solution was obtained for this case. The second case deals with the development of an array of microcracks between fibers forming the bridging zone. An implicit exact solution is formed for this case. In both cases, a discrete fiber distribution is incorporated into the solution.

  1. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  2. Nano-particulate dispersion and reinforcement of nanostructured composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Virginia Hiu-Hung

    2005-12-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of reinforcing polymer composites using 30 nm SiC nanoparticles in a vinyl ester resin. The SiC nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Gamma-methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (MPS) was chosen as the coupling agent. Both mixing procedures with (1) the nanoparticles pretreated with a dilute MPS solution in an acid 5% (v/v) water-ethanol mixture and (2) the MPS sonicated as an integral blend with the filled vinyl ester, were attempted. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to study the silanol condensation between MPS and the SiC nanoparticles. The results show that ultrasonic mixing did not fully disperse the particles. Hence the composite strength did not improve although the modulus increased. The use of MPS improved the dispersion quality and hence the composite strength. The rheological behavior of SiC nanoparticle-filled vinyl ester resin systems was evaluated in terms of the Bingham, power law, Herschel-Bulkley, and Casson models. Even when the particle loading was less then 4% by weight, the viscosity of the nanoparticle suspension was found to increase much more than that of a microparticle suspension. This phenomenon may be the result of association between nanoparticles and polymer molecules, effectively making the nanoparticles larger. The resulting reduction in the mobility of polymer molecules also led to delayed curing. The maximum particle loading corresponding to infinite viscosity was determined as 0.1 volume fraction using the (1 - eta r-1/2) - φ dependence. The experimental optimum fractional weight per cent of the dispersants (wt. % dispersant/wt. % SiC) was found to be around 40% for 30 nm SiC nanoparticles, which is in close agreement with the theoretically calculated monolayer coverage dosage of 67%.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Rauser, Richard W.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 C and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used because they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with X-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  5. Development of high-toughness low-viscosity nano-molecular resins for reinforcing pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Matt; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Woody; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry; Edgecombe, Brian; Stephen, Tony; Villacorta, Ricardo; Solamon, Ray

    2011-04-01

    As the nation's asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, the need for corrective measures to restore safety and rideability increases. The potholes and alligator cracks in the asphalt pavement of our country's roadways have become an annoying part of our daily life and no innovative technologies are available to improve the safety of US drivers, reduce the cost of road maintenance. We have identified a polymeric material, dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin, which can be cured by Grubb's catalyst and other commercially available catalysts to become an ultratough material with all the desired properties for pothole repair. We have characterized DCPD infiltration characteristics using non-destructive CT scan, and the mechanical properties using indirect tensile test under hot, cold or wet conditions. The preliminary results show that DCPD is a promising material for applications in reinforced pothole patching materials.

  6. FNAS materials processing and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golben, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Research on melt-sintered high temperature superconducting materials is presented. The vibrating sample magnetometer has become a useful characterization tool for the study of high temperature superconductors. Important information regarding the superconducting properties of a sample can be obtained without actually making contact with the sample itself. A step toward microgravity processing of high temperature superconductors was taken. In the future, the samples need to be optimized prior to this processing of the sample before the specific effects of the microgravity environment can be isolated. A series of melt-sintered samples show that bulk processing of high temperature superconductors is getting better.

  7. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites - An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Results pertaining to graphite reinforced composites containing styrene-terminated oligomers as the matrix material are summarized. The processing parameters are determined and the properties of the resulting composite are evaluated. In terms of solvent impregnation techniques, CH2Cl2 is the preferred solvent due to its easy removal during the prepreg drying and consolidation steps.

  8. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  9. Characterization of mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composite utilizing laser interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Truskowski, J.W. USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH )

    1992-09-01

    A test technique to characterize the mode II fracture behavior in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites utilizing laser interferometry was developed. This was demonstrated by measuring the mode II critical strain energy release rate at room temperature. The present study used the silicon-carbide-fiber/glass-ceramic matrix composite system. 13 refs.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  11. Preparation and characterization of bionanocomposite films reinforced with nano kaolin.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Shima; Alias, Abd Karim; Ariffin, Fazilah; Mahmud, Shahrom; Najafi, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Effects of nano-kaolin incorporation into semolina films on the physical, mechanical, thermal, barrier and antimicrobial properties of the resulting bio-nanocomposite films were investigated. The properties included crystal structure (by X-ray diffraction), mechanical resistance, color, Fourier transform infrared spectra, decomposition temperature, water-vapor permeability (WVP), oxygen permeability (OP), and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Kaolin was incorporated into biofilms at various amounts (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 %, w/w total solid). All films were plasticized with 50 % (w/w total solid) combination of sorbitol/glycerol at 3:1 ratio. The incorporation of nanokaolin into semolina films decreased OP and WVP. The moisture content and water solubility of the films were found to decrease by nanokaolin reinforcement, and mechanical properties of films were improved by increasing nanokaolin concentration. Tensile strength and Young's modulus increased from 3.41 to 5.44 MPa and from 63.12 to 136.18, respectively, and elongation-at-break decreased. The films did not exhibit UV absorption. In conclusion, nanokaolin incorporation enhanced the barrier and mechanical properties of semolina films, indicating the potential application of these bio-nanocomposites in food-product packaging. PMID:27162391

  12. Characterization of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Heffner, R.H.; Hundley, M.F.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our goal has been to extend the Laboratory`s competency in nuclear and advanced materials by characterizing (measuring and interpreting) physical properties of advanced electronic materials and in this process to bridge the gap between materials synthesis and theoretical understanding. Attention has focused on discovering new physics by understanding the ground states of materials in which electronic correlations dominate their properties. Among several accomplishments, we have discovered and interpreted pressure-induced superconductivity in CeRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, boron content in UBe{sub 13-x}B{sub x} and the origin of small gaps in the spin and charge excitation spectra of Ce{sub 3}Bi{sub 4}Pt{sub 3}, and we provided seminal understanding of large magnetoresistive effects in La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. This work has established new research directions at LANL and elsewhere, involved numerous collaborators from throughout the world and attracted several postdoctoral fellows.

  13. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  14. Acousto-ultrasonic characterization of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1981-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic technique combines advantageous aspects of acoustic emission and ultrasonic methodologies. Acousto-ultrasonics operates by introducing a repeating series of ultrasonic pulses into a material. The waves introduced simulate the spontaneous stress waves that would arise if the material were put under stress as in the case of acoustic emission measurements. These benign stress waves are detected by an acoustic emission sensor. The physical arrangement of the ultrasonic (input) transducer and acoustic emission (output) sensor is such that the resultant waveform carries an imprint of morphological factors that govern or contribute to material performance. The output waveform is complex, but it can be quantitized in terms of a 'stress wave factor.' The stress wave factor, which can be defined in a number of ways, is a relative measure of the efficiency of energy dissipation in a material. If flaws or other material anomalies exist in the volume being examined, their combined effect appears in the stress wave factor.

  15. Yeh-Stratton Criterion for Stress Concentrations on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsien-Yang; Richards, W. Lance

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion with the stress concentrations on fiber-reinforced composites materials under tensile stresses. The Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion was developed from the initial yielding of materials based on macromechanics. To investigate this criterion, the influence of the materials anisotropic properties and far field loading on the composite materials with central hole and normal crack were studied. Special emphasis was placed on defining the crack tip stress fields and their applications. The study of Yeh-Stratton criterion for damage zone stress fields on fiber-reinforced composites under tensile loading was compared with several fracture criteria; Tsai-Wu Theory, Hoffman Theory, Fischer Theory, and Cowin Theory. Theoretical predictions from these criteria are examined using experimental results.

  16. Reinforcements: The key to high performance composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    Better high temperature fibers are the key to high performance, light weight composite materials. However, current U.S. and Japanese fibers still have inadequate high temperature strength, creep resistance, oxidation resistance, modulus, stability, and thermal expansion match with some of the high temperature matrices being considered for future aerospace applications. In response to this clear deficiency, both countries have research and development activities underway. Once successful fibers are identified, their production will need to be taken from laboratory scale to pilot plant scale. In such efforts it can be anticipated that the Japanese decisions will be based on longer term criteria than those applied in the U.S. Since the initial markets will be small, short term financial criteria may adversely minimize the number and strength of U.S. aerospace materials suppliers to well into the 21st century. This situation can only be compounded by the Japanese interests in learning to make commercial products with existing materials so that when the required advanced fibers eventually do arrive, their manufacturing skills will be developed.

  17. Surface characterization of LDEF materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, J. P.; Grammer, Holly Little

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), a passive experimental satellite, was placed into low-Earth orbit by the Shuttle Challenger in Apr. 1984. The LDEF spent an unprecedented 69 months in space. The flight and recovery of the LDEF provided a wealth of information on the longterm space environmental effects of a variety of materials exposed to the low-Earth orbit environment. Surface characterization of LDEF materials included polymers, composites, thermal control paints, and aluminum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis were used to document changes in both the surface composition and surface chemistry of these materials. Detailed XPS analysis of the polymer systems, such as Kapton, polyimide polysiloxane copolymers, and fluorinated ethylene propylene thermal blankets on the backside of the LDEF revealed significant changes in both the surface composition and surface chemistry as a result of exposure to the low-Earth orbit environment. Polymer systems such as Kapton, polyimide polysiloxane copolymers, and polysulfone showed a common trend of decreasing carbon content and increasing oxygen content with respect to the control sample. Carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis of the composite samples, in conjunction with SEM photomicrographs, revealed significant ablation of the polymer matrix resin to expose the carbon fibers of the composite during exposure to the space environment. Surface characterization of anodized aluminum tray clamps, which were located at regular intervals over the entire LDEF frame, provided the first results to evaluate the extent of contamination with respect to position on the LDEF. The XPS results clearly showed that the amount and state of both silicon and fluorine contamination were directly dependent upon the position of the tray clamp on the LDEF.

  18. Surface characterization of LDEF materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wightman, J. P.; Grammer, Holly Little

    1993-10-01

    The NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), a passive experimental satellite, was placed into low-Earth orbit by the Shuttle Challenger in Apr. 1984. The LDEF spent an unprecedented 69 months in space. The flight and recovery of the LDEF provided a wealth of information on the longterm space environmental effects of a variety of materials exposed to the low-Earth orbit environment. Surface characterization of LDEF materials included polymers, composites, thermal control paints, and aluminum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis were used to document changes in both the surface composition and surface chemistry of these materials. Detailed XPS analysis of the polymer systems, such as Kapton, polyimide polysiloxane copolymers, and fluorinated ethylene propylene thermal blankets on the backside of the LDEF revealed significant changes in both the surface composition and surface chemistry as a result of exposure to the low-Earth orbit environment. Polymer systems such as Kapton, polyimide polysiloxane copolymers, and polysulfone showed a common trend of decreasing carbon content and increasing oxygen content with respect to the control sample. Carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis of the composite samples, in conjunction with SEM photomicrographs, revealed significant ablation of the polymer matrix resin to expose the carbon fibers of the composite during exposure to the space environment. Surface characterization of anodized aluminum tray clamps, which were located at regular intervals over the entire LDEF frame, provided the first results to evaluate the extent of contamination with respect to position on the LDEF. The XPS results clearly showed that the amount and state of both silicon and fluorine contamination were directly dependent upon the position of the tray clamp on the LDEF.

  19. The effect of CNTs reinforcement on thermal and electrical properties of cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of the nano-reinforcement on the thermal properties of cement mortar. Nano-modified cement mortar with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) leading to the development of innovative materials possessing multi-functionality and smartness. Such multifunctional properties include enhanced mechanical behavior, electrical and thermal conductivity, and piezo-electric characteristics. The assessment of the thermal behavior was evaluated using IR Thermography. Two different thermographic techniques are used to monitor the influence of the nano-reinforcement. To eliminate any extrinsic effects (e.g. humidity) the specimens were dried in an oven before testing. The electrical resistivity was measured with a contact test method using a custom made apparatus and applying a known D.C. voltage. This study indicate that the CNTs nano-reinforcement enhance the thermal and electrical properties and demonstrate them useful as sensors in a wide variety of applications.

  20. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. Results: The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Conclusion: Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base. PMID:26877726

  1. Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Silicon Carbide (SiC) Reinforced Al-based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujba, Kachalla Abdullahi

    Composites are engineered materials developed from constituent materials; matrix and reinforcements, to attain synergistic behavior at the micro and macroscopic level which are different from the individual materials. The high specific strength, low weight, excellent chemical resistance and fatigue endurance makes these composites superior than other materials despite anisotropic behaviors. Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have excellent physical and mechanical properties and alumium (Al) alloy composites have gained considerable interest and are used in multiple industries including: aerospace, structural and automotive. The aim of this research work is to develop an advanced Al-based nanocomposites reinforced with Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silicon carbide particulates (SiCp) nanophases using mechanical alloying and advanced consolidation procedure (Non-conventional) i.e. Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) using two types of aluminum alloys (Al-7Si-0.3mg and Al-12Si-0.3Mg). Different concentrations of SiCp and CNTs were added and ball milled for different milling periods under controlled atmosphere to study the effect of milling time and the distribution of the second phases. Characterization techniques were used to investigate the morphology of the as received monolithic and milled powder using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Mapping, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Particle Size Analyses (PSA). The results revealed that the addition of high concentrations of SiCp and CNTs in both alloys aided in refining the structure of the resulting powder further as the reinforcement particles acted like a grinding agent. Good distribution of reinforcing particles was observed from SEM and no compositional fluctuations were observed from the EDS. Some degree of agglomerations was observed despite the ethyl alcohol sonication effect of the CNTs before ball milling. From the XRD; continuous reduction in crystallite size and

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  3. Microstructure and strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of particle reinforced epoxy-based reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley William

    The effects of reactive metal particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites is investigated in this work. Particle reinforced polymer composites show promise as structural energetic materials that can provide structural strength while simultaneously being capable of releasing large amounts of chemical energy through highly exothermic reactions occurring between the particles and with the matrix. This advanced class of materials is advantageous due to the decreased amount of high density inert casings needed for typical energetic materials and for their ability to increase payload expectancy and decrease collateral damage. Structural energetic materials can be comprised of reactive particles that undergo thermite or intermetallic reactions. In this work nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) particles were chosen as reinforcing constituents due to their well characterized mechanical and energetic properties. Although, the reactivity of nickel and aluminum is well characterized, the effects of their particle size, volume fractions, and spatial distribution on the mechanical behavior of the epoxy matrix and composite, across a large range of strain rates, are not well understood. To examine these effects castings of epoxy reinforced with 20--40 vol.% Al and 0--10 vol.% Ni were prepared, while varying the aluminum nominal particle size from 5 to 50 mum and holding the nickel nominal particle size constant at 50 mum. Through these variations eight composite materials were produced, possessing unique microstructures exhibiting different particle spatial distributions and constituent makeup. In order to correlate the microstructure to the constitutive response of the composites, techniques such as nearest-neighbor distances, and multiscale analysis of area fractions (MSAAF) were used to quantitatively characterize the microstructures. The composites were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading conditions to characterize

  4. Compressive strength of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed - delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  5. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  7. Poroviscoelastic characterization of particle-reinforced gelatin gels using indentation and homogenization.

    PubMed

    Galli, Matteo; Fornasiere, Elvis; Cugnoni, Joël; Oyen, Michelle L

    2011-05-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials for bioengineering applications, and are good model materials for the study of hydrated biological tissues. As these materials often have a structural function, the measurement of their mechanical properties is of fundamental importance. In the present study gelatin gels reinforced with ceramic microspheres are produced and their poroviscoelastic response in spherical indentation is studied. The constitutive responses of unreinforced gels are determined using inverse finite element modeling in combination with analytical estimates of material parameters. The behavior of composite gels is assessed by both analytical and numerical homogenization. The results of the identification of the constitutive parameters of unreinforced gels show that it is possible to obtain representative poroviscoelastic parameters by spherical indentation without the need for additional mechanical tests. The agreement between experimental results on composite gelatin and the predictions from homogenization modeling show that the adopted modeling tools are capable of providing estimates of the poroviscoelastic response of particle-reinforced hydrogels. PMID:21396610

  8. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced composites: processing and mechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2002-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been the subject of considerable attention because of their exceptional physical and mechanical properties. These properties observed at the nanoscale have motivated researchers to utilize carbon nanotubes as reinforcement in composite materials. In this research, a micro-scale twin-screw extruder was used to achieve dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a polystyrene matrix. Highly aligned nanocomposite films were produced by extruding the polymer melt through a rectangular die and drawing the film prior to cooling. Randomly oriented nanocomposites were produced by achieving dispersion first with the twin-screw extruder followed by pressing a film using a hydraulic press. The tensile behaviour of the aligned and random nanocomposite films with 5 wt.{%} loading of nanotubes were characterized. Addition of nanotubes increased the tensile modulus, yield strength and ultimate strengths of the polymer films, and the improvement in elastic modulus with the aligned nanotube composite is five times greater than the improvement for the randomly oriented composite.

  9. Development and Characterization of UHMWPE Fiber-Reinforced Hydrogels For Meniscal Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Julianne Leigh

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body. The current treatment of choice, however, is a partial meniscectomy that leads to osteoarthritis proportional to the amount of tissue removed. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring the biomechanical contact stress distribution to the knee after meniscectomy and preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. In this work, a fiber-reinforced hydrogel-based synthetic meniscus was developed that allows for tailoring of the mechanical properties and molding of the implant to match the size, shape, and property distribution of the native tissue. Physically cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers and characterized in compression (0.1-0.8 MPa) and tension (0.1-250 MPa) showing fine control over mechanical properties within the range of the human meniscus. Morphology and crystallinity analysis of PVA hydrogels showed increases in crystallinity and PVA densification, or phase separation, with freeze-thaw cycles. A comparison of freeze-thawed and aged, physically cross-linked hydrogels provided insight on both crystallinity and phase separation as mechanisms for PVA gelation. Results indicated both mechanisms independently contributed to hydrogel modulus for freeze-thawed hydrogels. In vitro swelling studies were performed using osmotic solutions to replicate the swelling pressure present in the knee. Minimal swelling was observed for hydrogels with a PVA concentration of 30-35 wt%, independently of hydrogel freeze-thaw cycles. This allows for independent tailoring of hydrogel modulus and pore structure using freeze-thaw cycles and swelling behavior using polymer concentration to match a wide range of properties needed for various soft tissue applications. The UHMWPE-PVA interface was identified as a significant weakness. To improve interfacial adhesion, a novel

  10. Nondestructive characterization of the elastic constants of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1993-01-01

    Composite structural components may be subjected to a variety of defects resulting in a sharp reduction in their load carrying capacity or even catastrophic failure. Thus, it is extremely important to have the means to monitor the degradation suffered by critical components of a structure for safe operation during its service life. A nondestructive method based on ultrasonics has recently been developed for the quantitative evaluation of composite structural components during service. The experimental part of the technique uses a two-transducer, pitch-catch type arrangement to generate a variety of elastic waves within the specimen immersed in water. The recorded reflection data are then analyzed by means of a theoretical model to back out the relevant properties. In this paper the method is applied to determine the stiffness constants of unidirectional graphite/epoxy materials. The measurements are shown to be efficient and sufficiently accurate so that it can be used for early detection of material degradation in composite structural elements during service.

  11. Feasibility study of prestressed natural fiber-reinforced polylactic acid (pla) composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinchcliffe, Sean A.

    The feasibility of manufacturing prestressed natural-fiber reinforced biopolymer composites is demonstrated in this work. The objective of this study was to illustrate that the specific mechanical properties of biopolymers can be enhanced by leveraging a combination of additive manufacturing (3D printing) and post-tensioning of continuous natural fiber reinforcement. Tensile and flexural PLA specimens were 3D-printed with and without post-tensioning ducts. The mechanical properties of reinforcing fibers jute and flax were characterized prior to post-tensioning. The effect of matrix cross-sectional geometry and post-tensioning on the specific mechanical properties of PLA were investigated using mechanical testing. Numerical and analytical models were developed to predict the experimental results, which confirm that 3D-printed matrices improve the specific mechanical properties of PLA composites and are further improved via initial fiber prestressing. The results suggest that both additive manufacturing and fiber prestressing represent viable new methods for improving the mechanical performance of natural fiber-reinforced polymeric composites.

  12. Role of matrix/reinforcement interfaces in the fracture toughness of brittle materials toughened by ductile reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Abbaschian, R.

    1992-10-01

    Crack interactions with ductile reinforcements, especially behavior of a crack tip at the interface, have been studied using MoSi2 composites reinforced with Nb foils. Effects of fracture energy of interfaces on toughness of the composites have also been investigated. Variation of interfacial bonding was achieved by depositing an oxide coating or by the development of a reaction prod- uct layer between the reinforcement and matrix. Toughness was measured using bend tests on chevron-notched specimens. It has been established that as a crack interacts with a ductile re- inforcement, three mechanisms compcte: interfacial debonding, multiple matrix fracture, and direct crack propagation through the reinforcement. Decohesion length at the matrix/reinforcement interface depends on the predominant mechanism. Furthermore, the results add to the evidence that the extent to which interfacial bonding is conducive to toughness of the composites depends on the criterion used to describe the toughness and that ductility of the ductile reinforcement is also an important factor in controlling toughness of the composites. Loss of ductility of the ductile reinforcement due to inappropriate processing could result in little improvement in tough- ness of the composites.

  13. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites: An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene terminated polysulfone oligomers are part of an oligomeric class of compounds with end groups capable of thermal polymerization. These materials can be used as matrices for graphite reinforced composites. The initial evaluation of styrene terminated polysulfone oligomer based composites are summarized in terms of fabrication methods, and mechanical and environmental properties. In addition, a description and evaluation is provided of the NASA/Industry Fellowship Program for Technology Transfer.

  14. μ-COMPUTED Tomography for Micro-Structure Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (cfrp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoessel, R.; Guenther, T.; Dierig, T.; Schladitz, K.; Godehardt, M.; Kessling, P.-M.; Fuchs, T.

    2011-06-01

    Non-destructive testing is of major importance for quality assurance of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) in aerospace industry. It is of interest to obtain information of the 3D inner micro-structure of CFRP. A promising option is the usage of μ-CT inspection. State-of-the art software tools are used to characterize the 3D inner micro-structure and to gather knowledge about porosity, cracks, and fiber orientation.

  15. Thermal characterization and tomography of carbon fiber reinforced plastics using individual identification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, V.P.; Grinzato, E.; Bison, P.G.; Marinetti, S.; Bressan, C.

    1996-05-01

    A method for thermal characterization of defect depth and thickness using individual inversion functions is described. Experimental results are obtained with standard carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimens which contained Teflon inserts and impact damage. Accuracy in determining defect dimensions was about 10 percent for defect depth and 33 percent for defect thickness. A technique to synthesize images of defect parameters is proposed. Thermal tomography advantages in analyzing defect in-depth propagation are illustrated.

  16. DCPD resin catalyzed with Grubbs catalysts for reinforcing pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Yao; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Jiann-Wen; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry; Edgecombe, Brian; Stephen, Tony

    2012-04-01

    The potholes and alligator cracks in the asphalt pavement of our country's roadways have become an annoying part of our daily life. In order to reinstate and maintain our pavement infrastructure integrity and durability, we have identified dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin for this purpose due to its unique properties - low cost, low viscosity at beginning and ultra-toughness after curing, chemical compatibility with tar, tunable curing profile due to catalyst design. DCPD resin can penetrate into high porous pavement area to reinforce them and block water or moisture seeping channels. It also can strongly bond the pothole patches with original pavement, and hold them together for a whole. With the catalyst design, DCPD could apply for all the weather, cold or hot, wet or dry. In this paper, we will investigate the DCPD reinforcement for cold mix and hot mix for pothole repair, as well as the bonding strength improvement between repair materials and original pavement, and show that DCPD is promising materials for application in reinforced pothole patching materials.

  17. Materials characterization on efforts for ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytula, Thomas P.; Schad, Kristin C.; Swann, Myles H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental efforts to develop a new procedure to measure char depth in carbon phenolic nozzle material are described. Using a Shor Type D Durometer, hardness profiles were mapped across post fired sample blocks and specimens from a fired rocket nozzle. Linear regression was used to estimate the char depth. Results are compared to those obtained from computed tomography in a comparative experiment. There was no significant difference in the depth estimates obtained by the two methods.

  18. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  19. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  20. Application of fiber-reinforced bismaleimide materials to aircraft nacelle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peros, Vasilios; Ruth, John; Trawinski, David

    1992-01-01

    Existing aircraft engine nacelle structures employ advanced composite materials to reduce weight and thereby increase overall performance. Use of advanced composite materials on existing aircraft nacelle structures includes fiber-reinforced epoxy structures and has typically been limited to regions furthest away from the hot engine core. Portions of the nacelle structure that are closer to the engine require materials with a higher temperature capability. In these portions, existing nacelle structures employ aluminum sandwich construction and skin/stringer construction. The aluminum structure is composed of many detail parts and assemblies and is usually protected by some form of ablative, insulator, or metallic thermal shield. A one-piece composite inner cowl for a new-generation engine nacelle structure has been designed using fiber-reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) materials and honeycomb core in a sandwich construction. The new composite design has many advantages over the existing aluminum structure. Multiple details were integrated into the one-piece composite design, thereby significantly reducing the number of detail parts and fasteners. The use of lightweight materials and the reduction of the number of joints result in a significant weight reduction over the aluminum design; manufacturing labor and the overall number of tools required have also been reduced. Several significant technical issues were addressed in the development of a BMI composite design. Technical evaluation of the available BMI systems led to the selection of a toughened BMI material which was resistant to microcracking under thermal cyclic loading and enhanced the damage tolerance of the structure. Technical evaluation of the degradation of BMI materials in contact with aluminum and other metals validated methods for isolation of the various materials. Graphite-reinforced BMI in contact with aluminum and some steels was found to degrade in salt spray testing. Isolation techniques such as

  1. Determination of Material Parameters for Microbuckling Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, M.

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on studying the effect of the constitutive law adopted for a matrix material on the compressive response of a unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite. To investigate this effect, a periodic unit cell model of a unidirectional composite with an initial fiber waviness and inelastic behavior of the matrix was used. The sensitivity of the compressive strength to the hydrostatic pressure, the flow rule and the fiber misalignment angle were presented. The model was verified against an analytical solution and experimental data. Results of this study indicate that a micromechanical model with correctly identified material parameters provides a useful alternative to theoretical models and experimentation.

  2. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  3. Apparatus for consolidating a pre-impregnated, filament-reinforced polymeric prepreg material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method were developed for providing a uniform, consolidated, unidirectional, continuous, fiber-reinforced polymeric material. The apparatus comprises a supply means, a forming means, a shaping means, and a take-up means. The forming means further comprises a pre-melting chamber and a stationary bar assembly. The shaping means is a loaded cooled nip-roller apparatus. Forming takes place by heating a polymeric prepreg material to a temperature where the polymer becomes viscous and applying pressure gradients at separate locations along the prepreg material. Upon exiting the forming means, the polymeric prepreg material is malleable, consolidated, and flattened. Shaping takes place by passing the malleable, consolidated, flattened prepreg material through a shaped, matched groove in a loaded, cooled nip-roller apparatus to provide the final solid product.

  4. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  5. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, Suleyman B.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quaiscrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked compositehibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus (stiffness).

  6. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked composite exhibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young`s modulus (stiffness). 3 figs.

  7. Flexural behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with advanced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shahawy, M.A.; Beitelman, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility study to investigate the flexural behavior of structurally damaged reinforced and prestressed concrete members retrofitted with bonded carbon fiber materials. The effect of CFRP laminates, bonded to the soffit of precracked reinforced concrete rectangular and tee beams, is investigated in terms of flexural strength, deflections, cracking behavior and failure modes. The results indicate that strengthening of significantly cracked structural members by bonding Carbon laminates is structurally efficient and that the retrofitted members are restored to stiffness and strength values nearly equal to or greater than those of the original. The results indicate that the retrofitted members maintained adequate structural integrity and composite action at all stages of testing up to failure.

  8. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  9. Theoretical analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with NiAl and FeAl matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Several potential reinforcement materials were assessed for their chemical, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and mechanical compatibility with the intermetallic matrices based on NiAl and FeAl. Among the ceramic reinforcement materials, Al2O3, TiC, and TiB2, appear to be the optimum choices for NiAl and FeAl matrices. However, the problem of CTE mismatch with the matrix needs to be solved for these three reinforcement materials. Beryllium-rich intermetallic compounds can be considered as potential reinforcement materials provided suitable reaction barrier coatings can be developed for these. Based on preliminary thermodynamic calculations, Sc2O3 and TiC appear to be suitable as reaction barrier coatings for the beryllides. Several reaction barrier coatings are also suggested for the currently available SiC fibers.

  10. Characterization of reinforcement distribution in cast Al-alloy/SiC{sub p} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Karnezis, P.A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1998-02-01

    The distribution of reinforcement in 10% SiC and 20% SiC{sub p} reinforced A356 alloy processed by gravity casting, squeeze casting, and roll casting is studied by using the mean free path, nearest neighbor distance, radial distribution function, and quadrat methods. The study is performed by using computer image analysis methods in an automated procedure to prevent operator errors, improve sample size, and minimize analysis time. From the methods used to characterize the SiC{sub p} distributions, the quadrat method and radial distribution function are found to be more effective in detecting pronounced changes in the metal-matrix composite (MMC) microstructure through appropriate parameters, whereas the mean free path is characteristic of the particular MMC system rather than process specific. Furthermore, the nearest neighbor distance is of little use in studying cast MMCs, because it is affected by local clusters of a few SiC particles commonly found in cast MMCs, thus failing to characterize the macroscopic arrangement of reinforcement. Quantitative methods present themselves as a useful tool for quality control in MMC fabrication and can be used to correlate particle distribution and properties of MMC systems.

  11. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber reinforced Post to Core Material

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, JN; Saha, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Aim: To compare the effect of different chemical solvents on glass fiber reinforced posts and to study the effect of these solvents on the shear bond strength of glass fiber reinforced post to core material. Materials and methods: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three chemical solvents, i.e. silane coupling agent, 6% H2O2 and 37% phosphoric acid on the shear bond strength of glass fiber post to a composite resin restorative material. The changes in post surface characteristics after different treatments were also observed, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and shear bond strength was analyzed using universal testing machine (UTM). Results: Surface treatment with hydrogen peroxide had greatest impact on the post surface followed by 37% phosphoric acid and silane. On evaluation of the shear bond strength, 6% H2O2 exhibited the maximum shear bond strength followed in descending order by 37% phosphoric acid and silane respectively. Conclusion: The surface treatment of glass fiber post enhances the adhesion between the post and composite resin which is used as core material. Failure of a fiber post and composite resin core often occurs at the junction between the two materials. This failure process requires better characterization. How to cite this article: Sharma A, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Saha S. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Reinforced Post to Core Material. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):192-196. PMID:25709300

  13. The Preparation and Characterization of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Aaron

    1980-01-01

    Presents several examples illustrating different aspects of materials problems, including problems associated with solid-solid reactions, sintering and crystal growth, characterization of materials, preparation and characterization of stoichiometric ferrites and chromites, copper-sulfur systems, growth of single crystals by chemical vapor…

  14. On constitutive equations for thermoelastic analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with isotropic matrix material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usal, Melek; Usal, Mustafa Reşit; Esendemir, Ümran

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with developing constitutive equations for the thermoelastic analysis of composites consisting of an isotropic matrix reinforced by independent and inextensible two families of fibers having an arbitrary distribution. The composite medium is assumed to be incompressible, dependent on temperature gradient, and showing linear elastic behavior. The reaction of the composite material subject to external loads is expressed in stress tensor and heat flux vector. The matrix material made of elastic material involving an artificial anisotropy due to fibers reinforcing by arbitrary distributions has been assumed as an isotropic medium. The theory is formulated within the scope of continuum mechanics. As a result of thermodynamic constraints, it has been determined that the stress potential function is dependent on the deformation tensor, the fiber fields vectors and the temperature, while the heat flux vector function is dependent on the deformation tensor, the fiber fields vectors, the temperature and temperature gradient. To determine arguments of the constitutive functionals, findings relating to the theory of invariants have been used as a method because of that isotropy constraint is imposed on the material. The constitutive equations of stress and heat flux vector have been written in terms of different coordinate descriptions.

  15. Use of bioabsorbable staple reinforcement material in side-to-side anastomoses: Suture line reinforcement of the weak point of the anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Masahiro; Terashita, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have been designed regarding optimal reinforcement of the crotch of a side-to-side anastomosis. The purpose of this study was to clarify the weak point of the side-to-side anastomosis and to evaluate the effect of bioabsorbable reinforcement material. Methods Fresh pig small bowel was used for all experiments. A side-to-side anastomosis was performed using a linear stapler, and the burst pressure of the anastomosis was measured. Three separate experiments were done. In experiment 1, the weak point and the burst pressure of that point were defined. In experiment 2, the burst pressure of the side of the anastomosis was measured. In experiment 3, we evaluated the effect of Neoveil® to strengthen the weak point of the anastomosis. Results The weak point of the side-to side anastomosis was the crotch and the burst pressure was 39.8 ± 5.7 mmHg. The burst pressure of the side of the anastomosis was 109.9 ± 7.9 mmHg. This was significantly higher than the burst pressure of the crotch (P = 0.008). The burst pressure of the crotch in the group with Neoveil® was 83.3 ± 14.9 mmHg. This pressure was significantly higher than the group with no Neoveil® reinforcement (P = 0.001). Conclusion These findings suggest that the use of Neoveil® as a buttressing material is associated with reinforced staple lines and increased crotch burst pressures compared to non-buttressed staple lines. Neoveil® was found to perform comparably to clinically available buttress materials in this ex vivo model. Reinforcement of the weak point of the side-to-side anastomosis with Neoveil®may lead to fewer anastomotic leaks. PMID:27158487

  16. Preparation, characterization and FE-simulation of the reinforcement of polycaprolactone with PEGylated silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaif, N.; Viejo, I.; Bielsa, J. M.; Crespo, C.; Irusta, S.; Yagüe, C.; Meier, J. G.

    2012-09-01

    We recently published the preparation and characterization of polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocomposites with a 45% increased modulus reinforced with only 4 wt% PEGylated silica (polyethylene-glycol/SiO2) nanoparticles obtained by melt-extrusion [1]. The achieved reinforcement is related to an excellent dispersion of the nanoparticles due to the polyethylene-glycol graft of the nanoparticles which was obtained by a simple one-pot synthesis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses identified the location of the PEG at the PCL/silica interface. However, the extension of the interface could not be resolved. In an attempt to describe the effect of the interface on the reinforcement we applied several analytical micromechanical models. Models considering core-shell systems fitted the experimental data well and gave estimations of the modulus and extension of the interphase. However, different sets of parameters gave equally good representations. In an alternative approach, 3D representative volume elements (RVE) of the composite with spherical nanoparticles including the shell were built-up from the morphological data to carry out computational micromechanics based on finite elements (FE). The interphase was modeled in the RVE. Both approaches demonstrated the need of an interphase extension of roughly twice the radius of the particle. The FEM approach estimates the interface-modulus much higher than the analytical models.

  17. Damage threshold study of sonic IR imaging on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoyan; He, Qi; Zhang, Ding; Ashbaugh, Mike; Favro, Lawrence D.; Newaz, Golam; Thomas, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Infrared Imaging, as a young NDE technology, has drawn a lot of attentions due to it's fast, wide-area evaluation capability, and due to its broad applications in different materials such as metal/metal alloy, composites and detection of various types of defects: surface, subsurface, cracks, delaminations/disbonds. Sonic IR Imaging combines pulsed ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging to detect defects in materials. The sound pulse causes rubbing due to non-unison motion between faces of defects, and infrared sensors image the temperature map over the target to identify defects. However, concerns have also been brought up about possible damages which might occur at the contact spots between the ultrasound transducer from the external excitation source and the target materials. In this paper, we present our results from a series of systematically designed experiments on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite panels to address the concerns.

  18. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  19. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed, to be cured, and be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000degC. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200degC, -SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Testing for this included thermal and mechanical testing per ASTM standard tests.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  1. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  2. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  3. Recovery of microfields in fiber-reinforced composite materials: Principles and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Andrew J.

    A detailed investigation of the limitations and errors induced by modeling a composite layer composed of straight carbon fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix as an homogenous layer with Cauchy effective moduli is performed. Specifically, the material system studied has IM7 carbon fibers arranged in a square array and bonded together with 8552 epoxy resin (IM7/8552). The finite element method is used to study the effect of free surfaces on the local elastic fields in 0°, 45° and 90° laminae, in which as many as 256 individual fibers are modeled. Through these analyses, it is shown that a micro-boundary layer, analogous to the macro-boundary layer observed in composite laminates, is developed at the microlevel. Additionally, [0/90]s and [90/0]s laminates are studied to investigate the joint action of the macro- and micro-boundary layers. Unless otherwise noted, fiber volume fractions of Vƒ=0.20 and Vƒ=0.65 are selected and the domains are subjected to uniform axial extension. Although this study is done for a highly idealized geometry (i.e. with a single material system and under a simple loading condition) the principles of periodicity, symmetry and antisymmetry used to efficiently perform a direct numerical simulation with a large number of fiber inclusions is general, and can be applied to more complicated geometries and boundary conditions. The purpose of the current work is to be the first step in a building block approach to understanding the interaction of multiple scales in fiber-reinforced composites through direct numerical simulations. The main part of the current manuscript focuses on the characterization of a micro-boundary layer that develops in fiber reinforced composite layers. This phenomena results from the changing constraints on the constituent phases as a result of discontinuities, such as free surfaces or ply interfaces. The effect is most pronounced in laminae that have a fiber termination intersecting a free surface, and appears to be

  4. Constitutive Modeling of Anisotropic Finite-Deformation Hyperelastic Behaviors of Soft Materials Reinforced by Tortuous Fibers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Philip H; Lammers, Steven R; Hunter, Kendall; Stenmark, Kurt R; Shandas, Robin; Qi, H Jerry

    2010-04-01

    Many biological materials are composites composed of a soft matrix reinforced with stiffer fibers. These stiffer fibers may have a tortuous shape and wind through the soft matrix. At small material deformation, these fibers deform in a bending mode and contribute little to the material stiffness; at large material deformation, these fibers deform in a stretching mode and induce a stiffening effect in the material behavior. The transition from bending mode deformation to stretching mode deformation yields a characteristic J-shape stress-strain curve. In addition, the spatial distribution of these fibers may render the composite an anisotropic behavior. In this paper, we present an anisotropic finite-deformation hyperelastic constitutive model for such materials. Here, the matrix is modeled as an isotropic neo-Hookean material. "The behaviors of single tortuous fiber are represented by a crimped fiber model". The anisotropic behavior is introduced by a structure tensor representing the effective orientation distribution of crimped fibers. Parametric studies show the effect of fiber tortuosity and fiber orientation distribution on the overall stress-strain behaviors of the materials. PMID:21822502

  5. Nondestructive Characterization of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly, composite materials are applied to fracture-critical structures of aircraft and spacecraft...Ultrasonics offer the most capable inspection technology and recently developed techniques appear to improve this technology significantly... Recent progress in ultrasonic NDE of composites will be reviewed.

  6. Noncontacting NDE for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, K.L.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes research performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from May 1983 to September 1995, funded by the Interior Department`s Bureau of Mines, on ultrasonic methods (particularly noncontacting methods) for nondestructive evaluation and process control. The abilities of ultrasonic techniques to measure microstructural features in metals, ceramics, and composite materials were demonstrated. A major emphasis in this project was the development of noncontacting ultrasonic techniques, based on laser generation and detection of elastic waves, for process monitoring and control in high-temperature, harsh environments without close coupling to the material being processed. Laser ultrasonic measurements were utilized for in situ process monitoring during ceramic sintering, high temperature annealing, and molten metal solidification.

  7. Reinforcement of Unsupported Enamel by Restorative Materials and Dentin Bonding Agents: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, M.; Ghavam, M.; Rostamzadeh, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Preservation of unsupported occlusal enamel after removal of underlying carious dentin may result in maintenance of aesthetics as well as wear resistance against the opposing enamel. This study investigates the influence of different restorative materials and bonding agents on reinforcement of unsupported enamel in molars and compares it with sound dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty- five extracted human molars were selected and randomly divided into five groups of nine. All lingual cusps were cut off. The dentin underlying the buccal cusps was removed in all groups except the positive control. The negative control group received no restorations. After application of varnish and Panavia F, spherical amalgam (Sina) and after application of Single-Bond (3M), composite resin (Tetric Ceram) was used to replace missing dentin. All specimens were thermocycled, then mounted in acrylic resin using a surveyor. Lingual inclination of facial cusps was positioned horizontally. Load was applied by an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min until fracture. Data were subjected to ANOVA (one way) and Post hoc Test (Duncan). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the five groups (P<0.001); however, no significant difference was revealed between bonded amalgam and the positive control groups (P=0.762). Composite and amalgam had the same effect (P=0.642), while the composite and negative group had no significant difference (P=0.056). Conclusion: Bonded amalgam systems (Panavia F) could reinforce the undermined occlusal enamel effectively. PMID:21998780

  8. Characterization of the polymer-filler interface in (gamma)-irradiated silica-reinforced polysiloxane composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, A T; Balazs, B; LeMay, J

    2000-04-03

    The changes in hydrogen bonding at the interface of silica-reinforced polysiloxane composites due to aging in gamma radiation environments were examined in this study. Solvent swelling was utilized to determine the individual contributions of the matrix polymer and polymer-filler interactions to the overall crosslink density. The results show how the polymer-filler hydrogen bonding dominates the overall crosslink density of the material. Air irradiated samples displayed decreased hydrogen bonding at the polymer-filler interface, while vacuum irradiation revealed the opposite effect.

  9. Mechanical characterization of SiC whisker-reinforced MoSi/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, D.H.; Gibbs, W.S.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics of an intermetallic matrix with two different reinforcements were studied. The matrix material was MoSi/sub 2/, with either Los Alamos VLS SiC whiskers or Huber VS SiC whiskers. The purpose of the reinforcement was to provide toughening at ambient temperature and strengthening at elevated temperatures. The VLS whiskers greatly improved the yield strength of the matrix at 1200/degree/C, and also increased the room temperature fracture toughness of the matrix. The VS whiskers were added because they are much smaller in length and diameter, and therefore decreased the mean free path between whiskers, at the same volume fraction. The VS whiskers improved the toughness of the matrix at ambient temperature, and increased the yield strength of MoSi/sub 2/ at 1400/degree/C by 470%. The high strength of this new composite places this material in the realm of attractive engineering materials for high-temperature applications. 11 refs., 6 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Thick fibrous composite reinforcements behave as special second-gradient materials: three-point bending of 3D interlocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeo, Angela; Ferretti, Manuel; dell'Isola, Francesco; Boisse, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose to use a second gradient, 3D orthotropic model for the characterization of the mechanical behavior of thick woven composite interlocks. Such second-gradient theory is seen to directly account for the out-of-plane bending rigidity of the yarns at the mesoscopic scale which is, in turn, related to the bending stiffness of the fibers composing the yarns themselves. The yarns' bending rigidity evidently affects the macroscopic bending of the material and this fact is revealed by presenting a three-point bending test on specimens of composite interlocks. These specimens differ one from the other for the different relative direction of the yarns with respect to the edges of the sample itself. Both types of specimens are independently seen to take advantage of a second-gradient modeling for the correct description of their macroscopic bending modes. The results presented in this paper are essential for the setting up of a correct continuum framework suitable for the mechanical characterization of composite interlocks. The few second-gradient parameters introduced by the present model are all seen to be associated with peculiar deformation modes of the mesostructure (bending of the yarns) and are determined by inverse approach. Although the presented results undoubtedly represent an important step toward the complete characterization of the mechanical behavior of fibrous composite reinforcements, more complex hyperelastic second-gradient constitutive laws must be conceived in order to account for the description of all possible mesostructure-induced deformation patterns.

  11. Processing and characterization of polyols plasticized-starch reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Rodríguez-Llamazares, S; Barral, L; Bouza, R; Montero, B

    2016-09-20

    Biocomposites suitable for short-life applications such as food packaging were prepared by melt processing and investigated. Biocomposites studied are wheat starch plasticized with two different molecular weight polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and reinforced with various amounts of microcrystalline cellulose. The effect of the plasticizer type and the filler amount on the processing properties, the crystallization behavior and morphology developed for the materials, and the influence on thermal stability, dynamic mechanical properties and water absorption behavior were investigated. Addition of microcrystalline cellulose led to composites with good filler-matrix adhesion where the stiffness and resistance to humidity absorption were improved. The use of sorbitol as a plasticizer of starch also improved the stiffness and water uptake behavior of the material as well as its thermal stability. Biodegradable starch-based materials with a wide variety of properties can be tailored by varying the polyol plasticizer type and/or by adding microcrystalline cellulose filler. PMID:27261733

  12. Influence of oxide reinforcement materials on high-temperatue oxidation resistance of Ni sub 3 A1 matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; McKamey, C.G.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of Ni{sub 3}Al-based metal matrix composites was studied in high-temperature air under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions as a function of the composition and form of oxide reinforcement material. The incorporation of oxide fibers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--ZrO{sub 2} or particles into the Ni{sub 3}Al matrix led to oxidation rates significantly greater than that for the monolithic aluminide. The increase in susceptibility was primarily due to internal oxidation along the fiber- (or particle-) matrix interfaces and depended on the type of reinforcement material and its deposition in the matrix. The results suggest that the choice of reinforcement material and the method of materials processing will be important considerations in the design of oxidation-resistant Ni{sub 3}Al composites. 10 refs, 4 figs.

  13. Measurement and characterization techniques for thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tritt, T.M.

    1997-07-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric materials can pose many problems. A temperature difference can be established across these materials as an electrical current is passed due to the Peltier effect. The thermopower of these materials is quite large and thus large thermal voltages can contribute to many of the measurements necessary to investigate these materials. This paper will discuss the chracterization techniques necessary to investigate these materials and provide an overview of some of the potential systematic errors which can arise. It will also discuss some of the corrections one needs to consider. This should provide an introduction to the characterization and measurement of thermoelectric materials and provide references for a more in depth discussion of the concepts. It should also serve as an indication of the care that must be taken while working with thermoelectric materials.

  14. Optimization of the hot pressing parameters to fabricate the fiber reinforced material (FRM)

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kunio; Onzawa, Tadao

    1995-11-01

    When hot pressing is used to fabricate the fiber reinforced materials (FRM), the deformation and the adhesion of the matrix foil must be completed and the thickness of the reaction layer at the matrix/fiber interface must be smaller than the critical value derived from the Ochiai`s theory. A simulation model was proposed to predict the deformation of matrix foils, where plastic and creep deformations were taken into account. These calculations provide a consistent and unified interpretation of experimental data for Ti-matrix FRM, while the creep constants of Ti are known. A method is proposed to estimate the creep constants from some experimental trial for the matrix materials whose creep constants are unknown. By using this method, to types of Ti{sub 3}Al matrix FRM were formed to demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm. The tensile strength of the FRM was examined.

  15. Modeling of the Indentation of Fiber Reinforced Materials Using Spherical Indenters

    SciTech Connect

    Gountsidou, V.; Polatoglou, H. M.

    2010-01-21

    Following the enormous development of the technology there is a great need for complex engineering materials to be studied in multilayered films at the nano-level. Careful modeling of the structure of engineering materials, using finite element analysis may reveal specific behavior of the component materials and the filling materials, such as mortars, which are the important boundaries of all the engineering materials. The instruments used for experiments are expensive and their utilization is hindered by many unexpected factors. With the help of computer programs it is possible to achieve virtual nanoindentation, a widely known non-destructive method. It is easy to model structures in whatever shape or dimensions we wish, with one or more layers and with linear or nonlinear materials in order to obtain stress, strain, displacement curves, study microhardness, etc. The purpose of this paper is to model the nanoindentation process for fiber-reinforced concrete and to study the mechanical properties as a function of the distance of a particular fibre.

  16. Development of an Iron-Based Hardfacing Material Reinforced with Fe-(TiW)C Composite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, E. O.; Alcantara, N. G.; Tecco, D. G.; Kumar, R. V.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the correlation of microstructure with wear resistance in a hardfacing material reinforced with Fe-(TiW)C composite powder particles. This material was designed for cladding components subjected to highly abrasive conditions and was deposited on a low-carbon steel substrate by open arc welding. The theoretical and experimental work undertaken includes solidification study, microstructural characterization, and abrasive wear testing. Microstructural analysis of the hardfaced top layer of the alloy showed the presence of TiWC carbide particles and TiNbC carbides randomly distributed in a eutectic mixture matrix γ/M7C3 containing primary austenite dendrites. Microstructural examinations also showed that hard and fine spherulitic carbides, in which a Ti-rich MC carbide core was encircled by MC carbide enriched with Nb and W, were homogeneously distributed in the matrix. The energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) mapping of spherulitic carbides showed that the any added Nb replaced a significant part of W in the Fe-(TiW)C powder, and W preferentially partitioned into other carbides and matrix during solidification. Abrasion test results showed that the preceding carbides improve the wear resistance of the hardfacing material in comparison with conventional Fe-Cr-C and Fe-Cr-C-Nb alloys, especially under high stress conditions.

  17. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  18. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  19. Carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid microgels as scaffold materials for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Bae, Hojae; Cha, Jae Min; Mun, Ji Young; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Tekin, Halil; Shin, Hyeongho; Farshchi, Saeed; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-24

    Hydrogels that mimic biological extracellular matrix (ECM) can provide cells with mechanical support and signaling cues to regulate their behavior. However, despite the ability of hydrogels to generate artificial ECM that can modulate cellular behavior, they often lack the mechanical strength needed for many tissue constructs. Here, we present reinforced CNT-gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid as a biocompatible, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden three-dimensional (3D) constructs. The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) successfully reinforced GelMA hydrogels without decreasing their porosity or inhibiting cell growth. The CNT-GelMA hybrids were also photopatternable allowing for easy fabrication of microscale structures without harsh processes. NIH-3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) readily spread and proliferated after encapsulation in CNT-GelMA hybrid microgels. By controlling the amount of CNTs incorporated into the GelMA hydrogel system, we demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the hybrid material can be tuned making it suitable for various tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, due to the high pattern fidelity and resolution of CNT incorporated GelMA, it can be used for in vitro cell studies or fabricating complex 3D biomimetic tissue-like structures. PMID:22117858

  20. Characterization of Materials, 2 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Elton N.

    2003-01-01

    Characterization of Materials (formerly Methods in Materials Research) provides comprehensive up-to-date coverage of materials characterization techniques including computational and theoretical methods as well as crystallography, mechanical testing, thermal analysis, optical imaging and spectroscopy, and more. Editor-in-Chief, Elton Kaufmann, Ph.D. is Associate Director of the Strategic Planning Group at the Argonne National Laboratory and has published approximately 100 technical papers in refereed journals and books. Dr. Kaufmann has assembled leading experts from academia, government, and industry to provide: A comprehensive up-to-date collection of methods used in the characterization of materials Articles on various methods from standard to cutting edge Periodic online updates to keep pace with latest developments A user-friendly format that is easy and simple to search and navigate Characterization of Materials is a collection of characterization methods that is widely applicable in the wide and diverse field of materials research irrespective of discipline or ultimate application and with which researchers, engineers, and educators must have familiarity. Methods covered include: General Vacuum Techniques X-Ray Powder Diffraction High Strain Rate Testing Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Cyclic Voltammetry Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Low Energy Electron Diffraction Thermogravimetric Analysis Magnetometry Transmission Electron Microscopy Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy This reference work is also available as a convenient online edition. For information regarding the online edition, please visit: www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/com

  1. Comparative study of the ballistic performance of glass reinforced plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudev, A.; Mehlman, M.J.

    1987-07-01

    The study consisted of two parts: 1) selection and characterization of E and S-2 Glass woven roving prepregs suitable for thick ballistic laminate fabrication; and 2) comparative evaluation of the ballistic performance of flat composite laminates ranging in thickness from 1.4'' to 1.9'' fabricated with the prepregs. E and S-2 glass woven roving reinforcements were prepregged with polyester, polyester Interpenetrating Network (IPN), vinylester and epoxy resins. A total of 14 different prepregs (2 E glass, 12 S-2 glass) from seven vendors were selected for evaluation. Two types of fiber finishes (epoxy compatible and starch-oil) were chosen to vary the level of surface compatibility (bond strength) with the particular matrix resin chosen. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Surface modification of fiber reinforced polymer composites and their attachment to bone simulating material.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, M P; Puska, M; Aho, A J; Kopperud, H M; Vallittu, P K

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber orientation of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and E-glass to the surface fabrication process by solvent dissolution. Intention of the dissolution process was to expose the fibers and create a macroporous surface onto the FRC to enhance bone bonding of the material. The effect of dissolution and fiber direction to the bone bonding capability of the FRC material was also tested. Three groups of FRC specimens (n = 18/group) were made of PMMA and E-glass fiber reinforcement: (a) group with continuous fibers parallel to the surface of the specimen, (b) continuous fibers oriented perpendicularly to the surface, (c) randomly oriented short (discontinuous) fibers. Fourth specimen group (n = 18) made of plain PMMA served as controls. The specimens were subjected to a solvent treatment by tetrahydrofuran (THF) of either 5, 15 or 30 min of time (n = 6/time point), and the advancement of the dissolution (front) was measured. The solvent treatment also exposed the fibers and created a surface roughness on to the specimens. The solvent treated specimens were embedded into plaster of Paris to simulate bone bonding by mechanical locking and a pull-out test was undertaken to determine the strength of the attachment. All the FRC specimens dissolved as function of time, as the control group showed no marked dissolution during the study period. The specimens with fibers along the direction of long axis of specimen began to dissolve significantly faster than specimens in other groups, but the test specimens with randomly oriented short fibers showed the greatest depth of dissolution after 30 min. The pull-out test showed that the PMMA specimens with fibers were retained better by the plaster of Paris than specimens without fibers. However, direction of the fibers considerably influenced the force of attachment. The fiber reinforcement increases significantly the

  3. LDEF polymeric materials: A summary of Langley characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Whitley, Karen S.; Kalil, Carol R.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Shen, James Y.; Chang, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) enabled the exposure of a wide variety of materials to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment. This paper provides a summary of research conducted at the Langley Research Center into the response of selected LDEF polymers to this environment. Materials examined include graphite fiber reinforced epoxy, polysulfone, and additional polyimide matrix composites, films of FEP Teflon, Kapton, several experimental high performance polyimides, and films of more traditional polymers such as poly(vinyl toluene) and polystyrene. Exposure duration was either 10 months or 5.8 years. Flight and control specimens were characterized by a number of analytical techniques including ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electron and scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and, in some instances, selected solution property measurements. Characterized effects were found to be primarily surface phenomena. These effects included atomic oxygen-induced erosion of unprotected surfaces and ultraviolet-induced discoloration and changes in selected molecular level parameters. No gross changes in molecular structure or glass transition temperature were noted. The intent of this characterization is to increase our fundamental knowledge of space environmental effects as an aid in developing new and improved polymers for space application. A secondary objective is to develop benchmarks to enhance our methodology for the ground-based simulation of environmental effects so that polymer performance in space can be more reliably predicted.

  4. NDE for Material Characterization in Aeronautic and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Kautz, Harold E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Martin, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes selected nondestructive evaluation (NDE) approaches that were developed or tailored at the NASA Glenn Research Center for characterizing advanced material systems. The emphasis is on high-temperature aerospace propulsion applications. The material systems include monolithic ceramics, superalloys, and high temperature composites. In the aeronautic area, the highlights are cooled ceramic plate structures for turbine applications, F-TiAl blade materials for low-pressure turbines, thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) for residual stress measurements in titanium based and nickel based engine materials, and acousto ultrasonics (AU) for creep damage assessment in nickel-based alloys. In the space area, examples consist of cooled carbon-carbon composites for gas generator combustors and flywheel rotors composed of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites for energy storage on the international space station (ISS). The role of NDE in solving manufacturing problems, the effect of defects on structural behavior, and the use of NDE-based finite element modeling are discussed. NDE technology needs for improved microelectronic and mechanical systems as well as health monitoring of micro-materials and components are briefly discussed.

  5. Dynamic fatigue and strength characterization of three ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica C; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Stoner, Brian R; Thompson, Jeffrey Y

    2007-06-01

    Fracture strength and fatigue parameters of three ceramic materials submitted to dynamic fatigue were evaluated. A machinable leucite-reinforced dental ceramic, aluminum oxide, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were tested. The inert strength of the materials was determined in air (25 degrees C) at stressing rates of 70, 250, 400 MPa/s for Porcelain, Alumina and YSZ respectively. The data was analyzed using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. The Weibull modulus (m) and the characteristic of fracture (sigma0) parameters were determined for each material. Specimens were also tested in 3-point bending at different stressing rates in distilled/deionized water at 37 degrees C (dynamic fatigue) in order to calculate the fatigue parameters n and ln B. The strength for each material was characterized using Strength-Probability-Time (SPT) diagrams for 1 day, 1 year and 10 years. YSZ showed a high-fracture strength sigma0 (1,459 MPa) at a failure probability of 63.2% and high resistance to subcritical crack growth. YSZ and alumina showed better resistance to slow crack growth than porcelain, indicating less susceptibility to strength degradation by stress corrosion. Lifetime predictions after 10 years indicate a reduction of 50%, 36% and 29% in strength for porcelain, alumina and YSZ respectively. YSZ seems to be a very promising material for long-term dental and biomedical applications. PMID:17277977

  6. Light scattering characterization of carbon nanotube dispersions and reinforcement of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian

    Dispersion and morphology of carbon nanotubes as well as enhancement for rubber reinforcement are studied. Several approaches including surfactant aids, functionalization and plasma treatment are used to assist dispersion. Several characterization methods are used to assess both the degree of dispersion and the level of reinforcement. Small angle light scattering is carried out as a primary tool to assess structure and dispersion of nanotubes treated through these approaches Stress-strain measurement and dynamic mechanical analysis are performed on elastomeric composites to study polymer reinforcement. These results are divided into five sections. The first section focuses on dispersion of untreated and acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanofibers (MWNF) suspended in water. Light scattering data provide the first insights into the mechanism by which surface treatment promotes dispersion. Both acid-treated and untreated nanofibers exhibit hierarchical morphology consisting of small-scale aggregates (bundles) that agglomerate to form fractal clusters that eventually precipitate. Although the morphology of the aggregates and agglomerates is nearly independent of surface treatment, their time evolution is quite different. Acid oxidation has little effect on bundle morphology. Rather acid treatment inhibits agglomeration of the bundles. The second section focuses on dispersion of the solubilized nanofibers. Light scattering data indicate that PEG-functionalized sample is dispersed at small rod-like bundle (side-by-side aggregate) level. Solubilization is achieved not by disrupting small-scale size-by-side bundles, but mainly by completely inhibiting large-scale agglomeration. The third section focuses on dispersion of plasma-treated carbon nanofibers. Comparison of untreated and plasma-treated nanofibers indicates that plasma treatment facilitates dispersion of nanofibers. The fourth section focuses on dispersion and structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs

  7. On the suitability of fiberglass reinforced polyester as building material for mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Berghahn, R; Brandsch, J; Piringer, O; Pluta, H J; Winkler, T

    1999-07-01

    Gel- and topcoat surface layers on fiberglass [glass-reinforced plastic (GRP)] made of unsaturated resin based on isophthalic acid polyester and neopentyl glycol (ISO-NPG) were tested for leaching, ecotoxicity of water eluates, and abrasion by river sediments at a current speed of 0.5 m * s-1. Leaching from topcoat tempered at low temperature was significant, whereas it was negligible from highly tempered gelcoat. Water eluates from both gel-and topcoat were nontoxic in routinely employed biotests (bacteria, algae, daphnids). No abrasion by river sediments was detectable. Based on these results, GRP with gelcoat made of ISO-NPG is considered a suitable building material for mesocosms. PMID:10381304

  8. Aging characteristics of short glass fiber reinforced ZA-27 alloy composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Girish, B. M.; Satish, B. M.; Kamath, R.

    1998-12-01

    Aging characteristics of short glass fiber reinforced ZA-27 alloy composite materials have been evaluated in the present study. The liquid metallurgy technique was used to fabricate the composites, in which preheated short glass fibers were introduced into the ZA-27 alloy melt above its liquidus temperature. The aging temperature employed was 125 °C for 6, 12,18, and 24 h. The aged alloy (no fibers) reached the peak hardness after 18 h, while the composites (regardless of filler content) reached the same hardness in 12 h. It is hypothesized that the aging treatment of a composite improves the strength of the interface between the short fibers and the matrix. This is confirmed by the tensile fractograph analysis, which indicates that at a given aging temperature, the composites aged for 18 h exhibit short fibers that remain attached to the metal matrix, while those aged for 6 h undergo debonding.

  9. Effect of the coating properties on crack propagation in fiber-reinforced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Singh, R.N.

    1996-12-31

    A finite element technique is used to study the effects of the coating properties on the crack propagation in fiber-reinforced materials. Crack opening stresses and energy release rates for the crack penetration and deflection have been studied in SCS6 (fiber) -C/BN (coating) - Zircon (matrix) composites. Effect of the coating thickness on crack propagation has been also studied. In general, no significant changes are found in stress ratio (ratio of hoop stresses along the crack and at the interface) and energy release rate ratio (ratio of energy release rates for the crack penetration and crack deflection), but the magnitudes of the stresses and energy release rates change substantially with the change in the coating thickness.

  10. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the Shuttle Orbiter will be more subject to meteoroid impact than previous spacecraft, due to its greater surface area and longer cumulative time in space. The Orbiter structural material, RCC, a reinforced carbon-carbon laminate with a diffused silicon carbide coating, is evaluated in terms of its resistance to hypervelocity impact. It was found that the specimens (disks with a mass of 34 g and a thickness of 5.0 mm) were cratered only on the front surface when the impact energy was 3 J or less. At 3 J, a trace of the black carbon interior was exposed. The specimens were completely penetrated when the energy was 34 J or greater.

  11. Surface emissivity of a reinforced carbon composite material with an oxidation-inhibiting coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Total effective emissivity and spectral emissivity over the wavelength range of 0.65 to 6.3 microns were determined for temperatures from 1300 t0 2250 deg K. A multi channel radiometer was used in the arcjet and laboratory tests. The black-body-hole method was used to independently check radiometer results. The results show the silicon-carbide coated reinforced carbon composite material is a nongray radiator. The total effective emissivity and the spectral emissivity at 0.65 micron both decreased with increasing temperature, respectively, from approximately 0.8 to 0.6, and from 0.4 to 0.25, over the temperature range. The emissivity values were the same when the sample was viewed normal to the surface or at a 45 deg angle. Recommended emissivity values are presented.

  12. Performance based seismic qualification of reinforced concrete nuclear materials processing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.; Loceff, F.; Houston, T.; Rauls, G.; Mulliken, J.

    1997-09-01

    A seismic qualification of a reinforced concrete nuclear materials processing facility using performance based acceptance criteria is presented. Performance goals are defined in terms of a minimum annual seismic failure frequency. Pushover analyses are used to determine the building`s ultimate capacity and relate the capacity to roof drift and joint rotation. Nonlinear dynamic analyses are used to quantify the building`s drift using a suite of ground motion intensities representing varying soil conditions and levels of seismic hazard. A correlation between joint rotation and building drift to damage state is developed from experimental data. The damage state and seismic hazard are convolved to determine annual seismic failure frequency. The results of this rigorous approach is compared to those using equivalent force methods and pushover techniques recommended by ATC-19 and FEMA-273.

  13. Thermal Protection Materials: Development, Characterization and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Silvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (TPS) are used to protect space vehicles from the heat experienced during entry into an atmosphere. The application for these materials is very specialized as are the materials. They must have specific properties to withstand conditions during specific entries. There is no one-size-fits-all TPS as the conditions experienced by a material are very dependent upon the atmosphere, the entry speed, the size and shape of the vehicle, and the location on the vehicle. However, all TPS must be reliable and efficient to ensure mission safety, that is to protect the vehicle while ensuring that payload is maximized. Types of TPS will be reviewed in relation to types of missions and applications. Both reusable and ablative materials will be discussed. Approaches to characterizing and evaluating these materials will be presented. The role of heritage versus new materials will be described.

  14. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  15. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot,

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used to enhance numerous applications such as electronics, sensors and composite strength. This presentation will show the synthesizing process of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperatures and hydrocarbon concentrations but weakly on pressures. The size, growth modes and orientations of carbon nanotube will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential applications including sensor, heat pipe, field emission, radiation shielding, and reinforcements for composites by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S.; Watson, M.

    2003-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used for numerous applications to enhance the performance of electronics, sensors and composites. This presentation will demonstrate the synthesizing process of carbon nanotube by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes could be synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperature and hydrocarbon concentration but weakly on pressure. The sizes, orientations, and growth modes of carbon nanotubes will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential aerospace applications such as reinforced and functional composites, temperature sensing, and thermal control by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  18. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.; Adamson, D. J.; King, W. D.

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  19. Development and characterization of orthotropic-birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Koller, G. M.; Niiro, T.

    1984-01-01

    Materials were selected and fabrication procedures developed for orthotropic birefringent materials. An epoxy resin (Maraset 658/558 system) was selected as the matrix material. Fibers obtained from style 3733 glass cloth and type 1062 glass roving were used as reinforcement. Two different fabrication procedures were used. In the first one, layers of unidirectional fibers removed from the glass cloth were stacked, impregnated with resin, bagged and cured in the autoclave at an elevated temperature. In the second procedure, the glass roving was drywound over metal frames, impregnated with resin and cured at room temperature under pressure and vacuum in an autoclave. Unidirectional, angle-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates of two thicknesses and with embedded flaws were fabricated. The matrix and the unidirectional glass/epoxy material were fully characterized. The density, fiber volume ratio, mechanical, and optical properties were determined. The fiber volume ratio was over 0.50. Birefringent properties were in good agreement with predictions based on a stress proportioning concept and also, with one exception, with properties predicted by a finite element analysis. Previously announced in STAR as N81-26183

  20. The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan Silvia; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been successfully used in orthopedic implants. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the properties, technical data, and safety of CFR-PEEK biomaterial and to evaluate its potential for new innovation in the design of articulating medical devices. A comprehensive search in PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify articles relevant to the outcomes of CFR-PEEK orthopedic implants. The search was also expanded by reviewing the reference sections of selected papers and references and benchmark reports provided by content experts. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. There is limited literature available assessing the performance of CFR-PEEK, specifically as an implant material for arthroplasty systems. Nevertheless, available studies strongly support CFR-PEEK as a promising and suitable material for orthopedic implants because of its biocompatibility, material characteristics, and mechanical durability. Future studies should continue to investigate CFR-PEEK's potential benefits. PMID:25780341

  1. Performance characterization of material identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher D.; Green, Robert L.

    2006-10-01

    In recent years a number of analytical devices have been proposed and marketed specifically to enable field-based material identification. Technologies reliant on mass, near- and mid-infrared, and Raman spectroscopies are available today, and other platforms are imminent. These systems tend to perform material recognition based on an on-board library of material signatures. While figures of merit for traditional quantitative analytical sensors are broadly established (e.g., SNR, selectivity, sensitivity, limit of detection/decision), measures of performance for material identification systems have not been systematically discussed. In this paper we present an approach to performance characterization similar in spirit to ROC curves, but including elements of precision-recall curves and specialized for the intended-use of material identification systems. Important experimental considerations are discussed, including study design, sources of bias, uncertainty estimation, and cross-validation and the approach as a whole is illustrated using a commercially available handheld Raman material identification system.

  2. Material characterization and modeling with shear ography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Callahan, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Shearography has emerged as a useful technique for nondestructible evaluation and materials characterization of aerospace materials. A suitable candidate for the technique is to determine the response of debonds on foam-metal interfaces such as the TPS system on the External Tank. The main thrust is to develop a model which allows valid interpretation of shearographic information on TPS type systems. Confirmation of the model with shearographic data will be performed.

  3. Acoustic Emission as a Tool for Damage Identification and Characterization in Glass Reinforced Cross Ply Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Loading of cross-ply laminates leads to the activation of distinct damage mechanisms, such as matrix cracking, delaminations between successive plies and fibre rupture at the final stage of loading. This study deals with the investigation of the failure of cross ply composites by acoustic emission (AE). Broadband AE sensors monitor the elastic waves originating from different sources of failure in coupons of this material during a tensile loading-unloading test. The cumulative number of AE activity, and other qualitative indices based on the waveforms shape, were well correlated to the sustained load and mechanical degradation as expressed by the gradual decrease of elastic modulus. AE parameters indicate the succession of failure mechanisms within the composite as the load increases. The proposed methodology based on Acoustic Emission for the identification of the damage stage of glass reinforced cross ply laminates is an initial step which may provide insight for the study of more complex laminations.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of a novel carbon fiber-reinforced calcium phosphate silicate bone cement with potential osteo-inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Xiao, Yu; Gong, Tianxing; Zhou, Shuxin; Troczynski, Tom; Yang, Quanzu; Bao, Chongyun; Xu, Xiaoming

    2016-02-01

    The repair of bone defects is still a pressing challenge in clinics. Injectable bone cement is regarded as a promising material to solve this problem because of its special self-setting property. Unfortunately, its poor mechanical conformability, unfavorable osteo-genesis ability and insufficient osteo-inductivity seriously limit its clinical application. In this study, novel experimental calcium phosphate silicate bone cement reinforced by carbon fibers (CCPSC) was fabricated and characterized. First, a compressive strength test and cell culture study were carried out. Then, the material was implanted into the femoral epiphysis of beagle dogs to further assess its osteo-conductivity using a micro-computed tomography scan and histological analysis. In addition, we implanted CCPSC into the beagles' intramuscular pouches to perform an elementary investigation of its osteo-inductivity. The results showed that incorporation of carbon fibers significantly improved its mechanical properties. Meanwhile, CCPSC had better biocompatibility to activate cell adhesion as well as proliferation than poly-methyl methacrylate bone cement based on the cell culture study. Moreover, pronounced biodegradability and improved osteo-conductivity of CCPSC could be observed through the in vivo animal study. Finally, a small amount of osteoid was found at the heterotopic site one month after implantation which indicated potential osteo-inductivity of CCPSC. In conclusion, the novel CCPSC shows promise as a bioactive bone substitute in certain load-bearing circumstances. PMID:26695113

  5. Towards an integrated materials characterization toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Schuh, Christopher A.; Vetrano, John S.; Browning, Nigel; Field, David P.; Jensen, Dorte J.; Miller, Michael K.; Baker, Ian; Dunand, David C.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal; Kabius, Bernd C.; Kelly, Tom; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Misra, Amit; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Rollett, D.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Thompson, Greg B.; Uchic, Michael; Wang, Xun-Li; Was, Gary S.

    2011-06-14

    The material characterization toolbox has recently experienced a number of parallel revolutionary advances, foreshadowing a time in the near future when material scientists can quantify material structure evolution across spatial and temporal space simultaneously. This will provide insight to reaction dynamics in four-dimensions, spanning multiple orders of magnitude in both temporal and spatial space. This study presents the authors’ viewpoint on the material characterization field, reviewing its recent past, evaluating its present capabilities, and proposing directions for its future development. Electron microscopy; atom probe tomography; x-ray, neutron and electron tomography; serial sectioning tomography; and diffraction-based analysis methods are reviewed, and opportunities for their future development are highlighted. Advances in surface probemicroscopy have been reviewed recently and, therefore, are not included [D.A.Bonnell et al.: Rev.Modern Phys. in Review]. In this study particular attention is paid to studies that have pioneered the synergetic use of multiple techniques to provide complementary views of a single structure or process; several of these studies represent the stateof- the-art in characterization and suggest a trajectory for the continued development of the field. Based on this review, a set of grand challenges for characterization science is identified, including suggestions for instrumentation advances, scientific problems in microstructure analysis, and complex structure evolution problems involving material damage. The future of microstructural characterization is proposed to be one not only where individual techniques are pushed to their limits, but where the community devises strategies of technique synergy to address complex multiscale problems in materials science and engineering.

  6. Development and Characterization of Reference Materials for Genetic Testing: Focus on Public Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Lisa V; Datta, Vivekananda; Williams, Mickey; Zook, Justin M; Salit, Marc L; Han, Jin Yeong

    2016-11-01

    Characterized reference materials (RMs) are needed for clinical laboratory test development and validation, quality control procedures, and proficiency testing to assure their quality. In this article, we review the development and characterization of RMs for clinical molecular genetic tests. We describe various types of RMs and how to access and utilize them, especially focusing on the Genetic Testing Reference Materials Coordination Program (Get-RM) and the Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) Consortium. This review also reinforces the need for collaborative efforts in the clinical genetic testing community to develop additional RMs. PMID:27578503

  7. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  8. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  9. Development and characterization of fatigue resistant Aramid reinforced aluminium laminates (ARALL) for fatigue Critical aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiser, M. H.; Umar, S.; Nauman, S.

    2014-06-01

    The structural weight of an aircraft has always been a controlling parameter that governs its fuel efficiency and transport capacity. In pursuit of achieving light-weight aircraft structures, high design stress levels have to be adopted and materials with high specific strength such as Aluminum etc. are to be deployed. However, an extensive spectrum of fatigue load exists at the aircraft wings and other aerodynamic components that may cause initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks and concludes in a catastrophic rupture. Fatigue is therefore the limiting design parameter in such cases and materials with high fatigue resistance are then required. A major improvement in the fatigue behavior was observed by laminating Kevlar fibers with Aluminum using epoxy. ARALL (Aramid Reinforced ALuminum Laminates) is a fatigue resistant hybrid composite that consists of layers of thin high strength aluminum alloy sheets surface bonded with aramid fibers. The intact aramid fibers tie up the fatigue cracks, thus reducing the stress intensity factor at the crack tip as a result of which the fatigue properties of can be enhanced with orders of magnitude as compared to monolithic high strength Aluminum alloy sheets. Significant amount of weight savings can be achieved in fatigue critical components in comparison with the traditional materials used in aircraft.

  10. Application of Acoustic Emission on the Characterization of Fracture in Textile Reinforced Cement Laminates

    PubMed Central

    Blom, J.; Wastiels, J.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of textile reinforced cementitious (TRC) composites under flexural loading. The main objective is to link specific AE parameters to the fracture mechanisms that are successively dominating the failure of this laminated material. At relatively low load, fracture is initiated by matrix cracking while, at the moment of peak load and thereafter, the fiber pull-out stage is reached. Stress modeling of the material under bending reveals that initiation of shear phenomena can also be activated depending on the shape (curvature) of the plate specimens. Preliminary results show that AE waveform parameters like frequency and energy are changing during loading, following the shift of fracturing mechanisms. Additionally, the AE behavior of specimens with different curvature is very indicative of the stress mode confirming the results of modeling. Moreover, AE source location shows the extent of the fracture process zone and its development in relation to the load. It is seen that AE monitoring yields valuable real time information on the fracture of the material and at the same time supplies valuable feedback to the stress modeling. PMID:24605050

  11. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  12. Characterization of SiC f/SiC and CNT/SiC composite materials produced by liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. K.; Lee, S. P.; Cho, K. S.; Byun, J. H.; Bae, D. S.

    2011-10-01

    This paper dealt with the microstructure and mechanical properties of SiC based composites reinforced with different reinforcing materials. The composites were fabricated using reinforcing materials of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Tyranno Lox-M SiC chopped fibers. The volume fraction of carbon nanotubes was also varied in this composite system. An Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3 powder mixture was used as a sintering additive in the consolidation of the SiC matrix. The characterization of the composites was investigated by means of SEM and three point bending tests. These composites showed a dense morphology of the matrix region, by the creation of a secondary phase. The composites reinforced with SiC chopped fibers possessed a flexural strength of about 400 MPa at room temperature. The flexural strength of the carbon nanotubes composites had a tendency to decrease with increased volume fraction of the reinforcing material.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Binder Less Mg/Mg Alloy Infiltrated SiCp Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu Kumar, S.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    SiCp-reinforced commercial pure magnesium and AZ91 alloy MMCs’ were prepared through infiltration route without the use of any special atmospheres. The preform was prepared using a mixture of reinforcement particles and the matrix metal particles. The composites were prepared with various volume percentage of the reinforcement and their properties with the variation of SiCp were analyzed. The interfacial properties of the composites were analyzed using microstructure, microhardness, and wear studies. Calculation of thermal conditions during infiltration was done to study the effect of adding matrix metal particles on the infiltration behavior and its effect on the uniformity distribution of the reinforcements.

  14. Thermal Damage Characterization of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; DeHaven, M R; Springer, H K; Maienschein, J L

    2009-08-14

    We conducted thermal damage experiments at 180?C on PBXN-9 and characterized its material properties. Volume expansion at high temperatures was very significant which led to a reduction in material density. 2.6% of weight loss was observed, which was higher than other HMX-based formulations. Porosity of PBXN-9 increased to 16% after thermal exposure. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability and density were proved to be possible at higher temperatures.

  15. Thermal Damage Characterization of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, P. C.; DeHaven, M. R.; Springer, H. K.; Maienschein, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    We conducted thermal damage experiments at 180° C on PBXN-9 and characterized its material properties. Volume expansion at high temperatures was very significant which led to a reduction in material density. 2.6% of weight loss was observed, which was higher than other HMX-based formulations. Porosity of PBXN-9 increased to 16% after thermal exposure. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability and density were proved to be possible at higher temperatures.

  16. Analytical modeling in support of the development of fiber reinforced ceramic composite materials for re-heater burners

    SciTech Connect

    Kibler, J.J.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-10-01

    Development of Continuous Fiber reinforced Ceramic Composite (CFCC) materials is a process of identifying components which will benefit from CFCC properties, and defining appropriate composite constructions which will provide materials which will meet the structural and thermal requirements of the application. Materials Sciences Corporation (MSC) has been providing analytical support to Textron Specialty Materials in the development of re-heated tubes for metal reheating furnaces. As part of this support, a study has been made of the sensitivity of composite properties to fiber orientation as well as a number of matrix properties which control the stress-strain behavior of the composite.

  17. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  18. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  19. Characterization and modeling of performance of Polymer Composites Reinforced with Highly Non-Linear Cellulosic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozite, L.; Joffe, R.; Varna, J.; Nyström, B.

    2012-02-01

    The behaviour of highly non-linear cellulosic fibers and their composite is characterized. Micro-mechanisms occurring in these materials are identified. Mechanical properties of regenerated cellulose fibers and composites are obtained using simple tensile test. Material visco-plastic and visco-elastic properties are analyzed using creep tests. Two bio-based resins are used in this study - Tribest and EpoBioX. The glass and flax fiber composites are used as reference materials to compare with Cordenka fiber laminates.

  20. Characterization of reference materials for the Barrier Materials Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.A.; Aden, G.D.; Johnston, R.G.; Jones, T.E.; Lane, D.L.; Noonan, A.F.

    1982-06-01

    Initial characterization of the geologic and engineered barrier materials for a nuclear waste repository in basalt has been completed. Data have been obtained on the characteristics of the reference waste forms which are being studied for eventual disposal in such a repository. Reference basalt entablature, colonnade, and flow top specimens have been selected from the Umtanum flow, which is the primary basalt flow under consideration for repository siting. Material from the Mabton Interbed Stratum, Pomona Flow basalt, smectite clay from the Pomona Flow, a potassium clinoptilolite, Beverly sandstone and tuff, and Grande Ronde groundwater are also included in the suite of reference geologic materials. Reference engineered barrier materials include sodium bentonite and canister metals such as carbon steel, cupronickel, Hastelloy and Inconel alloys. Spent fuel, borosilicate glass, and supercalcine ceramic comprise the reference waste forms. Analyses were made for physical, chemical, and morphological characteristics using techniques ranging from simple observations of color to sophisticated ultrastructural analysis in the electron microscope. Analyses of the elemental and phase chemistries for most of the reference materials have been completed on typical samples. Determinations of material homogeneity are currently being performed.

  1. Study on experimental characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer panel using digital image correlation: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashfuddoja, Mohammad; Prasath, R. G. R.; Ramji, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the experimental characterization of polymer-matrix and polymer based carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate by employing a whole field non-contact digital image correlation (DIC) technique is presented. The properties are evaluated based on full field data obtained from DIC measurements by performing a series of tests as per ASTM standards. The evaluated properties are compared with the results obtained from conventional testing and analytical models and they are found to closely match. Further, sensitivity of DIC parameters on material properties is investigated and their optimum value is identified. It is found that the subset size has more influence on material properties as compared to step size and their predicted optimum value for the case of both matrix and composite material is found consistent with each other. The aspect ratio of region of interest (ROI) chosen for correlation should be the same as that of camera resolution aspect ratio for better correlation. Also, an open cutout panel made of the same composite laminate is taken into consideration to demonstrate the sensitivity of DIC parameters on predicting complex strain field surrounding the hole. It is observed that the strain field surrounding the hole is much more sensitive to step size rather than subset size. Lower step size produced highly pixilated strain field, showing sensitivity of local strain at the expense of computational time in addition with random scattered noisy pattern whereas higher step size mitigates the noisy pattern at the expense of losing the details present in data and even alters the natural trend of strain field leading to erroneous maximum strain locations. The subset size variation mainly presents a smoothing effect, eliminating noise from strain field while maintaining the details in the data without altering their natural trend. However, the increase in subset size significantly reduces the strain data at hole edge due to discontinuity in

  2. Characterization of aerosols and fibers emitted from composite materials combustion.

    PubMed

    Chivas-Joly, C; Gaie-Levrel, F; Motzkus, C; Ducourtieux, S; Delvallée, A; De Lagos, F; Nevé, S Le; Gutierrez, J; Lopez-Cuesta, J-M

    2016-01-15

    This work investigates the aerosols emitted during combustion of aircraft and naval structural composite materials (epoxy resin/carbon fibers and vinyl ester/glass fibers and carbon nanotubes). Combustion tests were performed at lab-scale using a modified cone calorimeter. The aerosols emitted have been characterized using various metrological devices devoted to the analysis of aerosols. The influence of the nature of polymer matrices, the incorporation of fibers and carbon nanotubes as well as glass reinforcements on the number concentration and the size distribution of airborne particles produced, was studied in the 5 nm-10 μm range. Incorporation of carbon fibers into epoxy resin significantly reduced the total particle number concentration. In addition, the interlaced orientation of carbon fibers limited the particles production compared to the composites with unidirectional one. The carbon nanotubes loading in vinyl ester resin composites influenced the total particles production during the flaming combustion with changes during kinetics emission. Predominant populations of airborne particles generated during combustion of all tested composites were characterized by a PN50 following by PN(100-500). PMID:26348148

  3. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  4. Characterization and damage evaluation of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Milan

    Mechanical characterization of advanced materials, namely magnetostrictive and graphite/epoxy composite materials, is studied in this dissertation, with an emphasis on damage evaluation of composite materials. Consequently, the work in this dissertation is divided into two parts, with the first part focusing on characterization of the magneto-elastic response of magnetostrictlve materials, while the second part of this dissertation describes methods for evaluating the fatigue damage in composite materials. The objective of the first part of this dissertation is to evaluate a nonlinear constitutive relation which more closely depict the magneto-elastic response of magnetostrictive materials. Correlation between experimental and theoretical values indicate that the model adequately predicts the nonlinear strain/field relations in specific regimes, and that the currently employed linear approaches are inappropriate for modeling the response of this material in a structure. The objective of the second part of this dissertation is to unravel the complexities associated with damage events associated with polymeric composite materials. The intent is to characterize and understand the influence of impact and fatigue induced damage on the residual thermo-mechanical properties and compressive strength of composite systems. The influence of fatigue generated matrix cracking and micro-delaminations on thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and compressive strength is investigated for woven graphite/epoxy composite system. Experimental results indicate that a strong correlation exists between TEC and compressive strength measurements, indicating that TEC measurements can be used as a damage metric for this material systems. The influence of delaminations on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a composite laminate is also investigated. Based on the changes of these parameters as a function of damage, a methodology for determining the size and location of damage is suggested

  5. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-01

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, …) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1—contraband material in the sea containers, case 2—-explosives in soil (landmines), case 3—explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  6. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  7. Development & Characterization of Multifunctional Microfluidic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Ahmet Burak

    The field of microfluidics has been mostly investigated for miniaturized lab on a chip devices for analytical and clinical applications. However, there is an emerging class of "smart" microfluidic materials, combining microfluidics with soft polymers to yield new functionalities. The best inspiration for such materials found in nature is skin, whose functions are maintained and controlled by a vascular "microfluidic" network. We report here the development and characterization of a few new classes of microfluidic materials. First, we introduced microfluidic materials that can change their stiffness on demand. These materials were based on an engineered microchannel network embedded into a matrix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), whose channels were filled with a liquid photoresist (SU- 8). The elastomer filled with the photoresist was initially soft. The materials were shaped into a desired geometry and then exposed to UV-light. Once photocured, the material preserved the defined shape and it could be bent, twisted or stretched with a very high recoverable strain. As soon as the external force was removed the material returned back to its predefined shape. Thus, the polymerized SU-8 acted as the 'endoskeleton' of the microfluidic network, which drastically increased the composite's elastic and bending moduli. Second, we demonstrated a class of simple and versatile soft microfluidic materials that can be turned optically transparent or colored on demand. These materials were made in the form of flexible sheets containing a microchannel network embedded in PDMS, similar to the photocurable materials. However, this time the channels were filled with a glycerolwater mixture, whose refractive index was matched with that of the PDMS matrix. By pumping such dye solutions into the channel network and consecutively replacing the medium, we showed that we can control the material's color and light transmittance in the visible and near-infrared regions, which can be used for

  8. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers - polymers (epoxy) bars (GFRP) reinforced concrete for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkjk, Saeed; Jabra, Rafee; Alkhater, Salem

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP) and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm) tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long) reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  9. Strain characterization of embedded aerospace smart materials using shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Müller, Bernhard; Sinke, Jos; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-04-01

    The development of smart materials for embedding in aerospace composites provides enhanced functionality for future aircraft structures. Critical flight conditions like icing of the leading edges can affect the aircraft functionality and controllability. Hence, anti-icing and de-icing capabilities are used. In case of leading edges made of fibre metal laminates heater elements can be embedded between composite layers. However this local heating causes strains and stresses in the structure due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of the different laminated materials. In order to characterize the structural behaviour during thermal loading full-field strain and shape measurement can be used. In this research, a shearography instrument with three spatially-distributed shearing cameras is used to measure surface displacement gradients which give a quantitative estimation of the in- and out-of-plane surface strain components. For the experimental part, two GLARE (Glass Laminate Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy) specimens with six different embedded copper heater elements were manufactured: two copper mesh shapes (straight and S-shape), three connection techniques (soldered, spot welded and overlapped) and one straight heater element with delaminations. The surface strain behaviour of the specimens due to thermal loading was measured and analysed. The comparison of the connection techniques of heater element parts showed that the overlapped connection has the smallest effect on the surface strain distribution. Furthermore, the possibility of defect detection and defect depth characterisation close to the heater elements was also investigated.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and application of electrode materials

    SciTech Connect

    He, L.

    1995-07-07

    It has been known that significant advances in electrochemistry really depend on improvements in the sensitivity, selectivity, convenience, and/or economy of working electrodes, especially through the development of new working electrode materials. The advancement of solid state chemistry and materials science makes it possible to provide the materials which may be required as satisfactory electrode materials. The combination of solid state techniques with electrochemistry expands the applications of solid state materials and leads to the improvement of electrocatalysis. The study of Ru-Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} and Pt-Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} microelectrode arrays as introduced in paper 1 and paper 4, respectively, focuses on their synthesis and characterization. The synthesis is described by high temperature techniques for Ru or Pt microelectrode arrays within a conductive Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} ceramic matrix. The characterization is based on the data obtained by x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, voltammetry and amperometry. These microelectrode arrays show significant enhancement in current densities in comparison to solid Ru and Pt electrodes. Electrocatalysis at pyrochlore oxide Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7.3} and Bi{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} electrodes are described in paper 2 and paper 3, respectively. Details are reported for the synthesis and characterization of composite Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7.3} electrodes. Voltammetric data are examined for evidence that oxidation can occur with transfer of oxygen to the oxidation products in the potential region corresponding to anodic discharge of H{sub 2}O with simultaneous evolution of O{sub 2}. Paper 3 includes electrocatalytic activities of composite Bi{sub 2}Ir{sub 2}O{sub 7} disk electrodes for the oxidation of I{sup -} and the reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup -}.

  11. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  12. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  13. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningli

    2011-12-01

    Wave propagation in porous media is studied in a wide range of technological applications. In the manufacturing industry, determining porosity of materials in the manufacturing process is required for strict quality control. In the oil industry, acoustic signals and seismic surveys are used broadly to determine the physical properties of the reservoir rock which is a porous media filled with oil or gas. In porous noise control materials, a precise prediction of sound absorption with frequency and evaluation of tortuosity are necessary. Ultrasonic nondestructive methods are a very important tool for characterization of porous materials. The dissertation deals with two types of porous media: materials with relatively low and closed porosity and materials with comparatively high and open porosity. Numerical modeling, Finite Element simulations and experimental characterization are all discussed in this dissertation. First, ultrasonic scattering is used to determine the porosity in porous media with closed pores. In order get a relationship between the porosity in porous materials and ultrasonic scattering independently and to increase the sensitivity to obtain scattering information, ultrasonic imaging methods are applied and acoustic waves are focused by an acoustic lens. To verify the technique, engineered porous acrylic plates with varying porosity are measured by ultrasonic scanning and ultrasonic array sensors. Secondly, a laser based ultrasonic technique is explored for predicting the mechanical integrity and durability of cementitious materials. The technique used involves the measurement of the phase velocity of fast and slow longitudinal waves in water saturated cement paste. The slow wave velocity is related to the specimen's tortuosity. The fast wave speed is dependent on the elastic properties of porous solid. Experimental results detailing the generation and detection of fast and slow wave waves in freshly prepared and aged water-saturated cement samples

  14. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  15. Stereocomplex poly (methyl methacrylate) fibers and self-reinforced composites, and, Structural color of butterflies and beetles - characterization, replication and mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crne, Matija

    This thesis is divided into two parts. Part A describes our efforts in producing stereocomplex PMMA fibers for the purpose of reinforcing PMMA materials. These kinds of composites are known as "self-reinforced" composites. We were successful in producing stereocomplex PMMA fibers with three different methods---wet spinning, gel spinning and electrospinning. Gel spinning and electrospinning produced the most crystalline fibers. Stereocomplex PMMA fibers were further shown to be resistant to high temperature and also to hot monomer solvent during bulk polymerization. Part B describes our efforts in characterizing, replicating and mimicking structural color features of butterflies and beetles. We have developed a simple method of characterizing the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of microscopic objects such as butterfly wing scales. We used this method to characterize structural color features resulting from the replication of butterfly Morpho rhetenor, mimicry of butterfly Papilio palinurus and also the native structural color features of Chrysina gloriosa, which were shown to be cholesteric focal conic defects lined on the surface.

  16. Conservative Approach for Restoring Posterior Missing Tooth with Fiber Reinforcement Materials: Four Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Emine Sirin; Ertas, Ertan; Ozsevik, Semih; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Adhesively luted, fiber-reinforced, composite-inlay, retained fixed-partial dentures can be a clinical alternative for the replacement of missing posterior teeth in selective situations. This type of restoration allows for satisfactory esthetics and reduced tooth preparation compared to a conventional, fixed-partial denture. This clinical report describes the use of a fiber-reinforced, composite-inlay, retained fixed-partial denture as a conservative alternative for the replacement of missing posterior teeth. PMID:21912503

  17. Characterization of Infrastructure Materials using Nonlinear Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghe

    In order to improve the safety, reliability, cost, and performance of civil and mechanical structures/components, it is necessary to develop techniques that are capable of characterizing and quantifying the amount of distributed damage in engineering materials before any detectable discontinuities (cracks, delaminations, voids, etc.) appear. In this dissertation, novel nonlinear ultrasonic NDE methods are developed and applied to characterize cumulative damage such as fatigue damage in metallic materials and degradation of cement-based materials due to chemical reactions. First, nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves are used to measure the near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened aluminum alloy (AA 7075) samples. Results show that the nonlinear Rayleigh wave is very sensitive to near-surface residual stresses, and has the potential to quantitatively detect them. Second, a novel two-wave mixing method is theoretically developed and numerically verified. This method is then successfully applied to detect the fatigue damage in aluminum alloy (AA 6061) samples subjected to monotonic compression. In addition to its high sensitivity to fatigue damage, this collinear wave mixing method allows the measurement over a specific region of interest in the specimen, and this capability makes it possible to obtain spatial distribution of fatigue damage through the thickness direction of the sample by simply timing the transducers. Third, the nonlinear wave mixing method is used to characterize the degradation of cement-based materials caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). It is found that the nonlinear ultrasonic method is sensitive to detect ASR damage at very early stage, and has the potential to identify the different damage stages. Finally, a micromechanics-based chemo-mechanical model is developed which relates the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to ASR damage. This model provides a way to quantitatively predict the changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter due to ASR

  18. Opto-nanomechanical spectroscopic material characterization.

    PubMed

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Thundat, T; Davison, B H

    2015-10-01

    The non-destructive, simultaneous chemical and physical characterization of materials at the nanoscale is an essential and highly sought-after capability. However, a combination of limitations imposed by Abbe diffraction, diffuse scattering, unknown subsurface, electromagnetic fluctuations and Brownian noise, for example, have made achieving this goal challenging. Here, we report a hybrid approach for nanoscale material characterization based on generalized nanomechanical force microscopy in conjunction with infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. As an application, we tackle the outstanding problem of spatially and spectrally resolving plant cell walls. Nanoscale characterization of plant cell walls and the effect of complex phenotype treatments on biomass are challenging but necessary in the search for sustainable and renewable bioenergy. We present results that reveal both the morphological and compositional substructures of the cell walls. The measured biomolecular traits are in agreement with the lower-resolution chemical maps obtained with infrared and confocal Raman micro-spectroscopies of the same samples. These results should prove relevant in other fields such as cancer research, nanotoxicity, and energy storage and production, where morphological, chemical and subsurface studies of nanocomposites, nanoparticle uptake by cells and nanoscale quality control are in demand. PMID:26258550

  19. Opto-nanomechanical spectroscopic material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetard, L.; Passian, A.; Farahi, R. H.; Thundat, T.; Davison, B. H.

    2015-10-01

    The non-destructive, simultaneous chemical and physical characterization of materials at the nanoscale is an essential and highly sought-after capability. However, a combination of limitations imposed by Abbe diffraction, diffuse scattering, unknown subsurface, electromagnetic fluctuations and Brownian noise, for example, have made achieving this goal challenging. Here, we report a hybrid approach for nanoscale material characterization based on generalized nanomechanical force microscopy in conjunction with infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. As an application, we tackle the outstanding problem of spatially and spectrally resolving plant cell walls. Nanoscale characterization of plant cell walls and the effect of complex phenotype treatments on biomass are challenging but necessary in the search for sustainable and renewable bioenergy. We present results that reveal both the morphological and compositional substructures of the cell walls. The measured biomolecular traits are in agreement with the lower-resolution chemical maps obtained with infrared and confocal Raman micro-spectroscopies of the same samples. These results should prove relevant in other fields such as cancer research, nanotoxicity, and energy storage and production, where morphological, chemical and subsurface studies of nanocomposites, nanoparticle uptake by cells and nanoscale quality control are in demand.

  20. Microstructural characterization, visualization, and simulation of titanium-boron materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Scott I.

    Additions of boron in modified titanium alloys and Ti-B composites result in the in situ formation during high temperature processing of TiB reinforcement phases that improve the mechanical properties and wear resistance of unreinforced titanium alloys, while still utilizing the high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance of titanium. Several boron-modified titanium alloys and Ti-B composites in a Ti-6Al-4V matrix have been investigated to determine the effect of processing parameters on the TiB reinforcement phases and resultant microstructures and mechanical properties. Using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, conventional characterization techniques, and newly developed methodologies for three-dimensional visualization, the microstructures of these Ti-B materials have been studied. Observations included a similar anisotropic whisker morphology with roughly hexagonal cross-sections among all TiB phases; alignment of all TiB phases with extrusion, with the extent of alignment affected by thermomechanical processing parameters; brittle fracture behavior of TiB whiskers, with fracture down the length of whiskers not aligned in the tensile direction and across the width of whiskers aligned in the tensile direction; and discoveries of the anisotropic morphologies of the coarse primary TiB phase and the sub-micron precipitated TiB phase. It has been observed that extruded boron-modified alloys with compositions in the hypoeutectic regime of the quaternary system of titanium, alloying elements aluminum and vanadium, and boron, containing a unimodal size distribution of eutectic TiB whiskers, significantly improve the strength and stiffness compared to unreinforced Ti-6Al-4V alloy while also demonstrating tensile elongation to failure within the fracture-critical limits required for aerospace structural applications. Materials design methodologies have been developed using Ti-B materials, and they show promise for predicting the

  1. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic method for the nondestructive characterization of mechanical properties of engineering material is described. The method utilizes the nonlinearity parameter measurement which describes the anharmonic behavior of the solid through measurements of amplitudes of the fundamental and of the generated second harmonic ultrasonic waves. The nonlinearity parameter is also directly related to the acoustoelastic constant of the solid which can be determined by measuring the linear dependence of ultrasonic velocity on stress. A major advantage of measurements of the nonlinearity parameter over that of the acoustoelastic constant is that it may be determined without the application of stress on the material, which makes it more applicable for in-service nondestructive characterization. The relationships between the nonlinearity parameter of second-harmonic generation and the percentage of solid solution phase in engineering materials such as heat treatable aluminum alloys was established. The acoustoelastic constants are measured on these alloys for comparison and confirmation. A linear relationship between the nonlinearity parameter and the volume fraction of second phase precipitates in the alloys is indicated.

  2. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  3. Mechanical properties of several neat polymer matrix materials and unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of three neat matrix materials, i.e., PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, Hexcel F155 rubber-toughened epoxy and Hercules 8551-7 rubber-toughened epoxy, were experimentally determined. Twelve unidirectional carbon fiber composites, incorporating matrix materials characterized in this or earlier studies (with one exception; the PISO(sub 2)-TPI matrix itself was not characterized), were also tested. These composite systems included AS4/2220-1, AS4/2220-3, T500/R914, IM6/HX1504, T300/4901A (MDA), T700/4901A (MDA), T300/4901B (MPDA), T700/4901B (MPDA), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, ICI), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, Langley Research Center), AS4/8551-7, and AS4/PISO(sub 2)-TPI. For the neat matrix materials, the tensile, shear, fracture toughness, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were measured as a function of both temperature and moisture content. For the unidirectional composites, axial and transverse tensile, longitudinal shear, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were determined, at room temperature and 100 C.

  4. Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for characterizing optical materials, using steps and equipment for generating a coherent laser light, filtering the light to remove high order spatial components, collecting the filtered light and forming a parallel light beam, splitting the parallel beam into a first direction and a second direction wherein the parallel beam travelling in the second direction travels toward the material sample so that the parallel beam passes through the sample, applying various physical quantities to the sample, reflecting the beam travelling in the first direction to produce a first reflected beam, reflecting the beam that passes through the sample to produce a second reflected beam that travels back through the sample, combining the second reflected beam after it travels back though the sample with the first reflected beam, sensing the light beam produced by combining the first and second reflected beams, and processing the sensed beam to determine sample characteristics and properties.

  5. Characterization of thermally degraded energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Renlund, A.M.; Miller, J.C.; Trott, W.M.; Erickson, K.L.; Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Wellman, G.W.; Baer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Characterization of the damage state of a thermally degraded energetic material (EM) is a critical first step in understanding and predicting cookoff behavior. Unfortunately, the chemical and mechanical responses of heated EMs are closely coupled, especially if the EM is confined. The authors have examined several EMs in small-scale experiments (typically 200 mg) heated in both constant-volume and constant-load configurations. Fixtures were designed to minimize free volume and to contain gas pressures to several thousand psi. The authors measured mechanical forces or displacements that correlated to thermal expansion, phase transitions, material creep and gas pressurization as functions of temperature and soak time. In addition to these real-time measurements, samples were recovered for postmortem examination, usually with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. The authors present results on EMs (HMX and TATB), with binders (e.g., PBX 9501, PBX 9502, LX-14) and propellants (Al/AP/HTPB).

  6. Fabrication, nanomechanical characterization, and cytocompatibility of gold-reinforced chitosan bio-nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimitt G; Kumar, Ajeet; Jayawardana, Veroni N; Woodworth, Craig D; Yuya, Philip A

    2014-11-01

    Chitosan, a naturally derived polymer represents one of the most technologically important classes of active materials with applications in a variety of industrial and biomedical fields. Gold nanoparticles (~32 nm) were synthesized via a citrate reduction method from chloroauric acid and incorporated in Chitosan matrix. Bio-nanocomposite films with varying concentrations of gold nanoparticles were prepared through solution casting process. Uniform distribution of gold nanoparticles was achieved throughout the chitosan matrix and was confirmed with SEM. Synthesis outcomes and prepared nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, TEM, EDX, SAED, UV-vis, XRD, DLS, and Zeta potential for their physical, morphological and structural properties. Nanoscale properties of materials under the influence of temperature were characterized through nanoindentation techniques. From quasi-static nanoindentation, it was observed that hardness and reduced modulus of the nanocomposites were increased significantly in direct proportion to the gold nanoparticle concentration. Gold nanoparticle concentration also showed positive impact on storage modulus and thermal stability of the material. The obtained films were confirmed to be biocompatible by their ability to support growth of human cells in vitro. In summary, the results show enhanced mechanical properties with increasing gold nanoparticle concentration, and provide better understanding of the structure-property relationships of such biocompatible materials for potential biomedical applications. PMID:25280713

  7. Photothermal speckle modulation for noncontact materials characterization.

    PubMed

    Stolyarov, Alexander M; Sullenberger, Ryan M; Crompton, David R; Jeys, Thomas H; Saar, Brian G; Herzog, William D

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a noncontact, photothermal materials characterization method based on visible-light speckle imaging. This technique is applied to remotely measure the infrared absorption spectra of materials and to discriminate materials based on their thermal conductivities. A wavelength-tunable (7.5-8.7 μm), intensity-modulated, quantum cascade pump laser and a continuous-wave 532 nm probe laser illuminate a sample surface such that the two laser spots overlap. Surface absorption of the intensity-modulated pump laser induces a time-varying thermoelastic surface deformation, resulting in a time-varying 532 nm scattering speckle field from the surface. The speckle modulation amplitude, derived from a series of visible camera images, is found to correlate with the amplitude of the surface motion. By tuning the pump laser's wavelength over a molecular absorption feature, the amplitude spectrum of the speckle modulation is found to correlate to the IR absorption spectrum. As an example, we demonstrate this technique for spectroscopic identification of thin polymeric films. Furthermore, by adjusting the rate of modulation of the pump beam and measuring the associated modulation transfer to the visible speckle pattern, information about the thermal time constants of surface and sub-surface features can be revealed. Using this approach, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish between different materials (including metals, semiconductors, and insulators) based on differences in their thermal conductivities. PMID:26670512

  8. Viscoelastic characterization of soft biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, Vinod Timothy

    Progressive and irreversible retinal diseases are among the primary causes of blindness in the United States, attacking the cells in the eye that transform environmental light into neural signals for the optic pathway. Medical implants designed to restore visual function to afflicted patients can cause mechanical stress and ultimately damage to the host tissues. Research shows that an accurate understanding of the mechanical properties of the biological tissues can reduce damage and lead to designs with improved safety and efficacy. Prior studies on the mechanical properties of biological tissues show characterization of these materials can be affected by environmental, length-scale, time, mounting, stiffness, size, viscoelastic, and methodological conditions. Using porcine sclera tissue, the effects of environmental, time, and mounting conditions are evaluated when using nanoindentation. Quasi-static tests are used to measure reduced modulus during extended exposure to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), as well as the chemical and mechanical analysis of mounting the sample to a solid substrate using cyanoacrylate. The less destructive nature of nanoindentation tests allows for variance of tests within a single sample to be compared to the variance between samples. The results indicate that the environmental, time, and mounting conditions can be controlled for using modified nanoindentation procedures for biological samples and are in line with averages modulus values from previous studies but with increased precision. By using the quasi-static and dynamic characterization capabilities of the nanoindentation setup, the additional stiffness and viscoelastic variables are measured. Different quasi-static control methods were evaluated along with maximum load parameters and produced no significant difference in reported reduced modulus values. Dynamic characterization tests varied frequency and quasi-static load, showing that the agar could be modeled as a linearly

  9. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiskumar, R.; Murugan, N.; Dinaharan, I.; Vijay, S.J.

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  10. Characterization of porous glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implant structures: porosity and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo V J; Peltola, Matti; Aro, Hannu T; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the microstructure and mechanical properties of porous fiber-reinforced composites (FRC). Implants made of the FRC structures are intended for cranial applications. The FRC specimens were prepared by impregnating E-glass fiber sheet with non-resorbable bifunctional bis-phenyl glycidyl dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate resin matrix. Four groups of porous FRC specimens were prepared with a different amount of resin matrix. Control group contained specimens of fibers, which were bound together with sizing only. Microstructure of the specimens was analyzed using a micro computed tomography (micro-CT) based method. Mechanical properties of the specimens were measured with a tensile test. The amount of resin matrix in the specimens had an effect on the microstructure. Total porosity was 59.5 % (median) in the group with the lowest resin content and 11.2 % (median) in the group with the highest resin content. In control group, total porosity was 94.2 % (median). Correlations with resin content were obtained for all micro-CT based parameters except TbPf. The tensile strength of the composites was 21.3 MPa (median) in the group with the highest resin content and 43.4 MPa (median) in the group with the highest resin content. The tensile strength in control group was 18.9 MPa (median). There were strong correlations between the tensile strength of the specimens and most of the micro-CT based parameters. This experiment suggests that porous FRC structures may have the potential for use in implants for cranial bone reconstructions, provided further relevant in vitro and in vivo tests are performed. PMID:23929214