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Sample records for material model modelling

  1. Materials modelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciudad, David

    2016-04-01

    Angelos Michaelides, Professor in Theoretical Chemistry at University College London (UCL) and co-director of the Thomas Young Centre (TYC), explains to Nature Materials the challenges in materials modelling and the objectives of the TYC.

  2. Sandia Material Model Driver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-09-28

    The Sandia Material Model Driver (MMD) software package allows users to run material models from a variety of different Finite Element Model (FEM) codes in a standalone fashion, independent of the host codes. The MMD software is designed to be run on a variety of different operating system platforms as a console application. Initial development efforts have resulted in a package that has been shown to be fast, convenient, and easy to use, with substantialmore » growth potential.« less

  3. Modeling Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2000-11-01

    Granular materials are often cited as examples of systems with complex and unusual properties. Much of this complexity is captured by computational models in which the actual material properties of individual grains are idealized and simplified. Because material properties can be important under extreme conditions, we consider assemblies of grains with more realistic properties. Our model grains may deform, their resulting stresses are computed from elastic / plastic constitutive models, and their interactions with each other include Coulomb friction and bonding. Our model equations are solved using a particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which combines a Lagrangian representation of the materials with an adaptive grid [1]. Our contact model between grains is linear in the number of grains, and we model assemblies with statistically significant numbers of grains. With our model, we have studied the response of dense granular material to shear, with especial attention to the probability density function governing the volume distribution of stress for mono- and poly-disperse samples, circular and polygonal grains, and various values of microscopic friction coefficients, yield stresses, and packing fractions [2]. Remarkably, PDF's are similar in form for all cases simulated, and similar to those observed in experiments with granular materials under both compression and shear. Namely, the simulations yield an exponential probability of large stresses above the mean, and there is a finite chance that a few grains in a large assembly are subjected to extreme stresses at any given time, even at low strain rates. For energetic materials, such as explosives, this is a signficant finding. We have also studied the relationship between distributions of boundary tractions and volume distributions of stress. The ratio of normal and tangential components of traction on the boundary defines a bulk frictional response, which we find increases with the inter-granular friction coefficient

  4. Cryogenic Model Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, W. M.; Kuhn, N. S.; Berry, R. F.; Newman, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    An overview and status of current activities seeking alternatives to 200 grade 18Ni Steel CVM alloy for cryogenic wind tunnel models is presented. Specific improvements in material selection have been researched including availability, strength, fracture toughness and potential for use in transonic wind tunnel testing. Potential benefits from utilizing damage tolerant life-prediction methods, recently developed fatigue crack growth codes and upgraded NDE methods are also investigated. Two candidate alloys are identified and accepted for cryogenic/transonic wind tunnel models and hardware.

  5. Global nuclear material control model

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-05-01

    The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of a disposition program for special nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool that treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. Such a tool must represent the fundamental data, information, and capabilities of the fuel cycle including an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, and a framework supportive of national or international perspective. They have developed a prototype global nuclear material management and control systems analysis capability, the Global Nuclear Material Control (GNMC) model. The GNMC model establishes the framework for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material.

  6. DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL MANAGEMENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    US Army Corps of Engineers public web site with computer models, available for download, used in evaluating various aspects of dredging and dredged material disposal. (landfill and water Quality models are also available at this site.) The site includes the following dredged mate...

  7. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The third and fourth years of a 4-year research program, part of the NASA HOST Program, are described. The program goals were: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analysis of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation were those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. The unified approach for elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations is a viable method for representing and predicting material response characteristics in the range where strain rate and temperature dependent inelastic deformations are experienced. This conclusion is reached by extensive comparison of model calculations against the experimental results of a test program of two high temperature Ni-base alloys, B1900+Hf and Mar-M247, over a wide temperature range for a variety of deformation and thermal histories including uniaxial, multiaxial, and thermomechanical loading paths. The applicability of the Bodner-Partom and the Walker models for structural applications has been demonstrated by implementing these models into the MARC finite element code and by performing a number of analyses including thermomechanical histories on components of hot sections of gas turbine engines and benchmark notch tensile specimens. The results of the 4-year program have been published in four annual reports. The results of the base program are summarized in this report. The tasks covered include: (1) development of material test procedures, (2) thermal history effects, and (3) verification of the constitutive model for an alternative material.

  8. Materials Analysis and Modeling of Underfill Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, Nicholas B; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-01

    The thermal-mechanical properties of three potential underfill candidate materials for PBGA applications are characterized and reported. Two of the materials are a formulations developed at Sandia for underfill applications while the third is a commercial product that utilizes a snap-cure chemistry to drastically reduce cure time. Viscoelastic models were calibrated and fit using the property data collected for one of the Sandia formulated materials. Along with the thermal-mechanical analyses performed, a series of simple bi-material strip tests were conducted to comparatively analyze the relative effects of cure and thermal shrinkage amongst the materials under consideration. Finally, current knowledge gaps as well as questions arising from the present study are identified and a path forward presented.

  9. Micromechanical modeling of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.; Taylor, P.A.; Wise, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

    1994-04-01

    Funded as a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project, the work reported here focuses on the development of a computational methodology to determine the dynamic response of heterogeneous solids on the basis of their composition and microstructural morphology. Using the solid dynamics wavecode CTH, material response is simulated on a scale sufficiently fine to explicitly represent the material`s microstructure. Conducting {open_quotes}numerical experiments{close_quotes} on this scale, the authors explore the influence that the microstructure exerts on the material`s overall response. These results are used in the development of constitutive models that take into account the effects of microstructure without explicit representation of its features. Applying this methodology to a glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) composite, the authors examined the influence of various aspects of the composite`s microstructure on its response in a loading regime typical of impact and penetration. As a prerequisite to the microscale modeling effort, they conducted extensive materials testing on the constituents, S-2 glass and epoxy resin (UF-3283), obtaining the first Hugoniot and spall data for these materials. The results of this work are used in the development of constitutive models for GRP materials in transient-dynamics computer wavecodes.

  10. Catastrophic models of materials destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Taipova, B. G.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.; Fursa, T. V.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of concentration and type of fillers on mechanical properties of composite material based on polyimide were studied. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET, polyester), polycarbonate (PCAR) and montmorillonite (MM) were used as the fillers. The samples were prepared by mechanically blending the polyimide-based lacquer solutions with different concentrations of the second component. The concentration of filler and its class, especially their internal structure and technology of synthesis determine features of physical and mechanical properties of obtained materials. Models of catastrophic failure of material satisfactorily describe the main features depending on tension ct from deformation e.

  11. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.

    1985-01-01

    The objective is to develop a unified constitutive model for finite element structural analysis of turbine engine hot-section components. This effort constitutes a different approach for non-linear finite-element computer codes which have heretofore been based on classical inelastic methods. The unified constitutive theory to be developed will avoid the simplifying assumptions of classical theory and should more accurately represent the behavior of superalloy materials under cyclic loading conditions and high temperature environments. During the first two years of the program, extensive experimental correlations were made with two representative unified models. The experiments were both uniaxial and biaxial at temperatures up to 1093 C (2000 F). In addition, the unified models were adopted to the MARC finite element code and used for stress analysis of notched bar and turbine blade geometries.

  12. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the program is to evaluate and develop existing constitutive models for use in finite-element structural analysis of turbine engine hot section components. The class of constitutive equation studied is considered unified in that all inelastic deformation including plasticity, creep, and stress relaxation are treated in a single term rather than a classical separation of plasticity (time independent) and creep (time dependent) behavior. The unified theories employed also do not utilize the classical yield surface or plastic potential concept. The models are constructed from an appropriate flow law, a scalar kinetic relation between strain rate, temperature and stress, and evolutionary equations for internal variables describing strain or work hardening, both isotropic and directional (kinematic). This and other studies have shown that the unified approach is particularly suited for determining the cyclic behavior of superalloy type blade and vane materials and is entirely compatible with three-dimensional inelastic finite-element formulations. The behavior was examined of a second nickel-base alloy, MAR-M247, and compared it with the Bodner-Partom model, further examined procedures for determining the material-specific constants in the models, and exercised the MARC code for a turbine blade under simulated flight spectrum loading. Results are summarized.

  13. Modeling of Laser Material Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    Irradiation of a substrate by laser light initiates the complex chemical and physical process of ablation where large amounts of material are removed. Ablation has been successfully used in techniques such as nanolithography and LASIK surgery, however a fundamental understanding of the process is necessary in order to further optimize and develop applications. To accurately describe the ablation phenomenon, a model must take into account the multitude of events which occur when a laser irradiates a target including electronic excitation, bond cleavage, desorption of small molecules, ongoing chemical reactions, propagation of stress waves, and bulk ejection of material. A coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) protocol with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) scheme has been developed which effectively addresses each of these events during the simulation. Using the simulation technique, thermal and chemical excitation channels are separately studied with a model polymethyl methacrylate system. The effects of the irradiation parameters and reaction pathways on the process dynamics are investigated. The mechanism of ablation for thermal processes is governed by a critical number of bond breaks following the deposition of energy. For the case where an absorbed photon directly causes a bond scission, ablation occurs following the rapid chemical decomposition of material. The study provides insight into the influence of thermal and chemical processes in polymethyl methacrylate and facilitates greater understanding of the complex nature of polymer ablation.

  14. HYPERELASTIC MODELS FOR GRANULAR MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Humrickhouse, Paul W; Corradini, Michael L

    2009-01-29

    A continuum framework for modeling of dust mobilization and transport, and the behavior of granular systems in general, has been reviewed, developed and evaluated for reactor design applications. The large quantities of micron-sized particles expected in the international fusion reactor design, ITER, will accumulate into piles and layers on surfaces, which are large relative to the individual particle size; thus, particle-particle, rather than particle-surface, interactions will determine the behavior of the material in bulk, and a continuum approach is necessary and justified in treating the phenomena of interest; e.g., particle resuspension and transport. The various constitutive relations that characterize these solid particle interactions in dense granular flows have been discussed previously, but prior to mobilization their behavior is not even fluid. Even in the absence of adhesive forces between particles, dust or sand piles can exist in static equilibrium under gravity and other forces, e.g., fluid shear. Their behavior is understood to be elastic, though not linear. The recent “granular elasticity” theory proposes a non-linear elastic model based on “Hertz contacts” between particles; the theory identifies the Coulomb yield condition as a requirement for thermodynamic stability, and has successfully reproduced experimental results for stress distributions in sand piles. The granular elasticity theory is developed and implemented in a stand- alone model and then implemented as part of a finite element model, ABAQUS, to determine the stress distributions in dust piles subjected to shear by a fluid flow. We identify yield with the onset of mobilization, and establish, for a given dust pile and flow geometry, the threshold pressure (force) conditions on the surface due to flow required to initiate it. While the granular elasticity theory applies strictly to cohesionless granular materials, attractive forces are clearly important in the interaction of

  15. EPR-based material modelling of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Alani, Amir M.

    2013-04-01

    In the past few decades, as a result of the rapid developments in computational software and hardware, alternative computer aided pattern recognition approaches have been introduced to modelling many engineering problems, including constitutive modelling of materials. The main idea behind pattern recognition systems is that they learn adaptively from experience and extract various discriminants, each appropriate for its purpose. In this work an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR). EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial tests are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well-known conventional material models and it is shown that EPR-based models can provide a better prediction for the behaviour of soils. The main benefits of using EPR-based material models are that it provides a unified approach to constitutive modelling of all materials (i.e., all aspects of material behaviour can be implemented within a unified environment of an EPR model); it does not require any arbitrary choice of constitutive (mathematical) models. In EPR-based material models there are no material parameters to be identified. As the model is trained directly from experimental data therefore, EPR-based material models are the shortest route from experimental research (data) to numerical modelling. Another advantage of EPR-based constitutive model is that as more experimental data become available, the quality of the EPR prediction can be improved by learning from the additional data, and therefore, the EPR model can become more effective and robust. The developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis.

  16. Material modeling and structural analysis with the microplane constitutive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocca, Michele

    The microplane model is a versatile and powerful approach to constitutive modeling in which the stress-strain relations are defined in terms of vectors rather than tensors on planes of all possible orientations. Such planes are called the microplanes and are representative of the microstructure of the material. The microplane model with kinematic constraint has been successfully employed in the past in the modeling of concrete, soils, ice, rocks, fiber composites and other quasibrittle materials. The microplane model provides a powerful and efficient numerical and theoretical framework for the development and implementation of constitutive models for any kind of material. The dissertation presents a review of the background from which the microplane model stems, highlighting differences and similarities with other approaches. The basic structure of the microplane model is then presented, together with its extension to finite strain deformation. To show the effectiveness of the microplane model approach, some examples are given demonstrating applications of microplane models in structural analysis with the finite element method. Some new constitutive models are also introduced for materials characterized by very different properties and microstructures, showing that the approach is indeed very versatile and provides a robust basis for the study of a broad range of problems. New models are introduced for metal plasticity, shape memory alloys and cellular materials. The new models are compared quantitatively with the existing models and experimental data. In particular, the newly introduced microplane models for metal plasticity are compared with the classical J2-flow theory for incremental plasticity. An existing microplane model for concrete is employed in finite element analysis of the 'tube-squash' test, in which concrete undergoes very large deviatoric deformation, and of the size effect in compressive failure of concrete columns. The microplane model for shape

  17. Modeling of laser interactions with composite materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Boley, Charles D.

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we develop models of laser interactions with composite materials consisting of fibers embedded within a matrix. A ray-trace model is shown to determine the absorptivity, absorption depth, and optical power enhancement within the material, as well as the angular distribution of the reflected light. We also develop a macroscopic model, which provides physical insight and overall results. We show that the parameters in this model can be determined from the ray trace model.

  18. Material model library for explicit numerical codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.; Dial, B.W.

    1982-08-01

    A material model logic structure has been developed which is useful for most explicit finite-difference and explicit finite-element Lagrange computer codes. This structure has been implemented and tested in the STEALTH codes to provide an example for researchers who wish to implement it in generically similar codes. In parallel with these models, material parameter libraries have been created for the implemented models for materials which are often needed in DoD applications.

  19. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, U. S.

    1984-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review of applicable constitutive models with selection of two for detailed comparison with a wide range of experimental tests was conducted. The experimental matrix contained uniaxial and biaxial tensile, creep, stress relaxation, and cyclic fatigue tests at temperatures to 1093 C and strain rates from .0000001 to .001/sec. Some nonisothermal cycles will also be run. The constitutive models will be incorporated into the MARC finite element structural analysis program with a demonstration computation made for advanced turbine blade configuration. In the code development work, particular emphasis is being placed on developing efficient integration algorithms for the highly nonlinear and stiff constitutive equations. Another area of emphasis is the appropriate and efficient methodology for determing constitutive constants from a minimum extent of experimental data.

  20. Modeling of materials supply, demand and prices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The societal, economic, and policy tradeoffs associated with materials processing and utilization, are discussed. The materials system provides the materials engineer with the system analysis required for formulate sound materials processing, utilization, and resource development policies and strategies. Materials system simulation and modeling research program including assessments of materials substitution dynamics, public policy implications, and materials process economics was expanded. This effort includes several collaborative programs with materials engineers, economists, and policy analysts. The technical and socioeconomic issues of materials recycling, input-output analysis, and technological change and productivity are examined. The major thrust areas in materials systems research are outlined.

  1. A constitutive mechanical model for energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1994-06-01

    Cookoff modeling of energetic materials has traditionally addressed reactive heat flow with the goal of defining the onset of runaway combustion behavior. Current modeling efforts are now aimed toward predicting the violence of the event. Combined thermal, chemical, and mechanical response must be modeled, since confinement results in pressure buildup which can breach confinement or enhance gas-phase combustion rates leading to runaway combustion behavior. Thermally induced stresses can also cause gaps which inhibit heat flow. These mechanical effects must also be included in cookoff modeling. A new reactive elastic-plastic constitutive model for micromechanical response has been developed which represents a stress-strain relation for reacting materials such as explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics, or burning foams. This micromechanical model is based on bubble mechanics. A local force balance, with mass continuity constraints, forms the basis of the constitutive model requiring input of temperature and reacted fraction. This constitutive material model has been incorporated into a quasistatic mechanics code, SANTOS. To provide temperature and reacted gas fraction, the thermal-chemical solver, XCHEM, has been coupled to SANTOS. This paper summarizes the development of the micromechanical model with material property estimates for conventional energetic materials. This study shows that large pressures can arise from small reacted fractions which implies that cookoff modeling must consider the strong interaction between thermochemistry and mechanics.

  2. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. Stockman

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17).

  3. Modelling Shock Waves in Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Campbell, J. C.; Bourne, N.; Matic, Ognjen; Djordjevic, Nenad

    2007-12-01

    Composite materials have been of significant interest due to widespread application of anisotropic materials in aerospace and civil engineering problems. For example, composite materials are one of the important types of materials in the construction of modern aircraft due to their mechanical properties. The strain rate dependent mechanical behaviour of composite materials is important for applications involving impact and dynamic loading. Therefore, we are interested in understanding the composite material mechanical properties and behaviour for loading rates between quasistatic and 1×108 s-1. This paper investigates modelling of shock wave propagation in orthotropic materials in general and a specific type of CFC composite material. The determination of the equation of state and its coupling with the rest of the constitutive model for these materials is presented and discussed along with validation from three dimensional impact tests.

  4. Modeling of shear localization in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; LeBlanc, M.; Riddle, B.; Jorgensen, B.

    1998-02-11

    The deformation response of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, has been studied during shear localization. The study has involved well-controlled laboratory tests involving a double-notch shear sample. The results have been used to provide a comparison between experiment and the predicted response using DYNA2D and two material models (the Johnson-Cook model and an isotropic elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic model). The work will serve as the basis for the development of a new material model which represents the different deformation mechanisms active during shear localization.

  5. Improvements to constitutive material model for fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Mihai I.

    2011-12-01

    The high strength to weight ratio of woven fabric offers a cost effective solution to be used in a containment system for aircraft propulsion engines. Currently, Kevlar is the only Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved fabric for usage in systems intended to mitigate fan blade-out events. This research builds on an earlier constitutive model of Kevlar 49 fabric developed at Arizona State University (ASU) with the addition of new and improved modeling details. Latest stress strain experiments provided new and valuable data used to modify the material model post peak behavior. These changes reveal an overall improvement of the Finite Element (FE) model's ability to predict experimental results. First, the steel projectile is modeled using Johnson-Cook material model and provides a more realistic behavior in the FE ballistic models. This is particularly noticeable when comparing FE models with laboratory tests where large deformations in projectiles are observed. Second, follow-up analysis of the results obtained through the new picture frame tests conducted at ASU provides new values for the shear moduli and corresponding strains. The new approach for analysis of data from picture frame tests combines digital image analysis and a two-level factorial optimization formulation. Finally, an additional improvement in the material model for Kevlar involves checking the convergence at variation of mesh density of fabrics. The study performed and described herein shows the converging trend, therefore validating the FE model.

  6. Structural Modelling of Two Dimensional Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avishek

    The continuous random network (CRN) model of network glasses is widely accepted as a model for materials such as vitreous silica and amorphous silicon. Although it has been more than eighty years since the proposal of the CRN, there has not been conclusive experimental evidence of the structure of glasses and amorphous materials. This has now changed with the advent of two-dimensional amorphous materials. Now, not only the distribution of rings but the actual atomic ring structure can be imaged in real space, allowing for greater charicterization of these types of networks. This dissertation reports the first work done on the modelling of amorphous graphene and vitreous silica bilayers. Models of amorphous graphene have been created using a Monte Carlo bond-switching method and MD method. Vitreous silica bilayers have been constructed using models of amorphous graphene and the ring statistics of silica bilayers has been studied.

  7. Modeling of fatigue for cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1998-12-31

    Dimensional arguments are used to analyze the fatigue of cellular materials. A modeling describing the fatigue of foams with or without macrocrack is derived and compared to the existing experimental data of cementitious foams and phenolic foams; agreement is good.

  8. Computer Model Buildings Contaminated with Radioactive Material

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-05-19

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material.

  9. Material characterization and modeling with shear ography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Callahan, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Shearography has emerged as a useful technique for nondestructible evaluation and materials characterization of aerospace materials. A suitable candidate for the technique is to determine the response of debonds on foam-metal interfaces such as the TPS system on the External Tank. The main thrust is to develop a model which allows valid interpretation of shearographic information on TPS type systems. Confirmation of the model with shearographic data will be performed.

  10. ASPH modeling of Material Damage and Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, J M

    2010-04-30

    We describe our new methodology for Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ASPH) and its application to problems in modeling material failure. We find that ASPH is often crucial for properly modeling such experiments, since in most cases the strain placed on materials is non-isotropic (such as a stretching rod), and without the directional adaptability of ASPH numerical failure due to SPH nodes losing contact in the straining direction can compete with or exceed the physical process of failure.

  11. Constitutive Modeling of Crosslinked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    A non-linear, continuum-based constitutive model is developed for carbon nanotube materials in which bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes have varying amounts of crosslinks between the nanotubes. The model accounts for the non-linear elastic constitutive behavior of the material in terms of strain, and is developed using a thermodynamic energy approach. The model is used to examine the effect of the crosslinking on the overall mechanical properties of variations of the crosslinked carbon nanotube material with varying degrees of crosslinking. It is shown that the presence of the crosslinks has significant effects on the mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube materials. An increase in the transverse shear properties is observed when the nanotubes are crosslinked. However, this increase is accompanied by a decrease in axial mechanical properties of the nanotube material upon crosslinking.

  12. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    corrosion by limiting the transport of water and oxygen to the ceramic-metal interface. Thermal spray techniques for ceramic coating metallic structures are currently being explored. The mechanics of thermal spray resembles spray painting in many respects, allowing large surfaces and contours to be covered smoothly. All of the relevant thermal spray processes use a high energy input to melt or partially melt a powdered oxide material, along with a high velocity gas to impinge the molten droplets onto a substrate where they conform, quench, solidify and adhere mechanically. The energy input can be an arc generated plasma, an oxy-fuel flame or an explosion. The appropriate feed material and the resulting coating morphologies vary with technique as well as with application parameters. To date on this project, several versions of arc plasma systems, a detonation coating system and two variations of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) fired processes have been investigated, operating on several different ceramic materials.

  13. Materials and techniques for model construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The problems confronting the designer of models for cryogenic wind tunnel models are discussed with particular reference to the difficulties in obtaining appropriate data on the mechanical and physical properties of candidate materials and their fabrication technologies. The relationship between strength and toughness of alloys is discussed in the context of maximizing both and avoiding the problem of dimensional and microstructural instability. All major classes of materials used in model construction are considered in some detail and in the Appendix selected numerical data is given for the most relevant materials. The stepped-specimen program to investigate stress-induced dimensional changes in alloys is discussed in detail together with interpretation of the initial results. The methods used to bond model components are considered with particular reference to the selection of filler alloys and temperature cycles to avoid microstructural degradation and loss of mechanical properties.

  14. Multiscale Materials Modeling in an Industrial Environment.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Horst; Deglmann, Peter; In 't Veld, Pieter J; Cetinkaya, Murat; Schreiner, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we sketch the materials modeling process in industry. We show that predictive and fast modeling is a prerequisite for successful participation in research and development processes in the chemical industry. Stable and highly automated workflows suitable for handling complex systems are a must. In particular, we review approaches to build and parameterize soft matter systems. By satisfying these prerequisites, efficiency for the development of new materials can be significantly improved, as exemplified here for formulation polymer development. This is in fact in line with recent Materials Genome Initiative efforts sponsored by the US government. Valuable contributions to product development are possible today by combining existing modeling techniques in an intelligent fashion, provided modeling and experiment work hand in hand. PMID:26927661

  15. Modeling ready biodegradability of fragrance materials.

    PubMed

    Ceriani, Lidia; Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Boethling, Robert; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, quantitative structure activity relationships were developed for predicting ready biodegradability of approximately 200 heterogeneous fragrance materials. Two classification methods, classification and regression tree (CART) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN), were applied to perform the modeling. The models were validated with multiple external prediction sets, and the structural applicability domain was verified by the leverage approach. The best models had good sensitivity (internal ≥80%; external ≥68%), specificity (internal ≥80%; external 73%), and overall accuracy (≥75%). Results from the comparison with BIOWIN global models, based on group contribution method, show that specific models developed in the present study perform better in prediction than BIOWIN6, in particular for the correct classification of not readily biodegradable fragrance materials. PMID:25663647

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Tikare, Veena; Bartel, Timothy; Besmann, Theodore M; Stan, Marius; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We review the state of modeling and simulation of nuclear fuels with emphasis on the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2. The hierarchical scheme presented represents a science-based approach to modeling nuclear fuels by progressively passing information in several stages from ab initio to continuum levels. Such an approach is essential to overcome the challenges posed by radioactive materials handling, experimental limitations in modeling extreme conditions and accident scenarios and small time and distance scales of fundamental defect processes. When used in conjunction with experimental validation, this multiscale modeling scheme can provide valuable guidance to development of fuel for advanced reactors to meet rising global energy demand.

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Chartier, Alan; Gueneau, Christine; Mattsson, Ann E.; Tikare, Veena; Bartel, Timothy; Besmann, T. M.; Stan, Marius; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2010-10-01

    We review the state of modeling and simulation of nuclear fuels with emphasis on the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2. The hierarchical scheme presented represents a science-based approach to modeling nuclear fuels by progressively passing information in several stages from ab initio to continuum levels. Such an approach is essential to overcome the challenges posed by radioactive materials handling, experimental limitations in modeling extreme conditions and accident scenarios, and the small time and distance scales of fundamental defect processes. When used in conjunction with experimental validation, this multiscale modeling scheme can provide valuable guidance to development of fuel for advanced reactors to meet rising global energy demand.

  18. Modeling segregation of bidisperse granular materials: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi; Schlick, Conor; Umbanhowar, Paul; Ottino, Julio; Lueptow, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Predicting segregation of size bidisperse granular materials is a challenging problem. In this talk, we present a theoretical model that captures the interplay between advection, segregation, and diffusion. The fluxes associated with these three driving factors depend on the underlying kinematics, whose characteristics play key roles in determining final particle segregation configurations. Unlike previous models of segregation, our model uses parameters based on kinematic measures instead of arbitrarily adjustable fitting parameters. This permits the theoretical prediction of species concentration within the entire flowing layer as particles segregate in the depth direction while they flow downhill. The model achieves quantitative agreement with both experimental and DEM simulation results when applied to quasi-two-dimensional bounded heaps, and can be readily adapted to other flow geometries. Y.F. was funded by The Dow Chemical Company. C.P.S. was supported by NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  19. Modeling of Irradiation Hardening of Polycrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Garmestani, Hamid; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-14

    High energy particle irradiation of structural polycrystalline materials usually produces irradiation hardening and embrittlement. The development of predict capability for the influence of irradiation on mechanical behavior is very important in materials design for next generation reactors. In this work a multiscale approach was implemented to predict irradiation hardening of body centered cubic (bcc) alpha-iron. The effect of defect density, texture and grain boundary was investigated. In the microscale, dislocation dynamics models were used to predict the critical resolved shear stress from the evolution of local dislocation and defects. In the macroscale, a viscoplastic self-consistent model was applied to predict the irradiation hardening in samples with changes in texture and grain boundary. This multiscale modeling can guide performance evaluation of structural materials used in next generation nuclear reactors.

  20. The Model 9977 Radioactive Material Packaging Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.

    2015-10-09

    The Model 9977 Packaging is a single containment drum style radioactive material (RAM) shipping container designed, tested and analyzed to meet the performance requirements of Title 10 the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A radioactive material shipping package, in combination with its contents, must perform three functions (please note that the performance criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations have alternate limits for normal operations and after accident conditions): Containment, the package must “contain” the radioactive material within it; Shielding, the packaging must limit its users and the public to radiation doses within specified limits; and Subcriticality, the package must maintain its radioactive material as subcritical

  1. Modeling shocks in periodic lattice materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark; Barham, Matthew; Barton, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Periodic lattice materials have an excellent density-to-stiffness ratio, with the elastic stiffness of stretch dominated lattices scaling linearly with relative density. Recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques enable the use of lattice materials in situations where the response of the material to shock loading may become significant. Current continuum models do not describe the response of such lattice materials subject to shocks. This presentation details the development of continuum models suitable for representing shock propagation in periodic lattice materials, particularly focusing on the transition between elastic and plastic response. In the elastic regime, the material retains its periodic structure and equivalent continuum models of infinite, periodic truss structures accurately reproduce characteristics of stretch-dominated lattices. At higher velocities, the material tends to lose its initial lattice structure and begins to resemble a foam or a solid with dispersed voids. Capturing the transition between these regimes can be computationally challenging. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Ultraporous Nonmetallic Reticulated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Cherepanov, V. V.; Morzhukhina, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an imitation statistical mathematical model reflecting the structure and the thermal, electrophysical, and optical properties of nonmetallic ultraporous reticulated materials. This model, in combination with a nonstationary thermal experiment and methods of the theory of inverse heat transfer problems, permits determining the little-studied characteristics of the above materials such as the radiative and conductive heat conductivities, the spectral scattering and absorption coefficients, the scattering indicatrix, and the dielectric constants, which are of great practical interest but are difficult to investigate.

  3. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Lindholm, Ulric S.; Bodner, S. R.; Hill, Jeff T.; Weber, R. M.; Meyer, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the third year of work on a program which is part of the NASA Hot Section Technology program (HOST) are presented. The goals of this program are: (1) the development of unified constitutive models for rate dependent isotropic materials; and (2) the demonstration of the use of unified models in structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. A test procedure was developed for assisting the generation of a data base for the Bodner-Partom model using a relatively small number of specimens. This test procedure involved performing a tensile test at a temperature of interest that involves a succession of strain-rate changes. The results for B1900+Hf indicate that material constants related to hardening and thermal recovery can be obtained on the basis of such a procedure. Strain aging, thermal recovery, and unexpected material variations, however, preluded an accurate determination of the strain-rate sensitivity parameter is this exercise. The effects of casting grain size on the constitutive behavior of B1900+Hf were studied and no particular grain size effect was observed. A systematic procedure was also developed for determining the material constants in the Bodner-Partom model. Both the new test procedure and the method for determining material constants were applied to the alternate material, Mar-M247 . Test data including tensile, creep, cyclic and nonproportional biaxial (tension/torsion) loading were collected. Good correlations were obtained between the Bodner-Partom model and experiments. A literature survey was conducted to assess the effects of thermal history on the constitutive behavior of metals. Thermal history effects are expected to be present at temperature regimes where strain aging and change of microstructure are important. Possible modifications to the Bodner-Partom model to account for these effects are outlined

  4. Modeling heat transfer within porous multiconstituent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezgoda, Mathieu; Rochais, Denis; Enguehard, Franck; Rousseau, Benoit; Echegut, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of our work has been to determine the effective thermal properties of materials considered heterogeneous at the microscale but which are regarded as homogenous in the macroscale environment in which they are used. We have developed a calculation code that renders it possible to simulate thermal experiments over complex multiconstituent materials from their numerical microstructural morphology obtained by volume segmentation through tomography. This modeling relies on the transient solving of the coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer in these voxelized structures.

  5. Multidimensional DDT modeling of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hertel, E.S.; Bell, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    To model the shock-induced behavior of porous or damaged energetic materials, a nonequilibrium mixture theory has been developed and incorporated into the shock physics code, CTH. The foundation for this multiphase model is based on a continuum mixture formulation given by Baer and Nunziato. This multiphase mixture model provides a thermodynamic and mathematically-consistent description of the self-accelerated combustion processes associated with deflagration-to-detonation and delayed detonation behavior which are key modeling issues in safety assessment of energetic systems. An operator-splitting method is used in the implementation of this model, whereby phase diffusion effects are incorporated using a high resolution transport method. Internal state variables, forming the basis for phase interaction quantities, are resolved during the Lagrangian step requiring the use of a stiff matrix-free solver. Benchmark calculations are presented which simulate low-velocity piston impact on a propellant porous bed and experimentally-measured wave features are well replicated with this model. This mixture model introduces micromechanical models for the initiation and growth of reactive multicomponent flow that are key features to describe shock initiation and self-accelerated deflagration-to-detonation combustion behavior. To complement one-dimensional simulation, two-dimensional numerical calculations are presented which indicate wave curvature effects due to the loss of wall confinement. This study is pertinent for safety analysis of weapon systems.

  6. Integrated finite element model of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teply, Jan L.; Herbein, William C.

    1989-05-01

    Two problems traditionally addressed in the area of micromechanics of composite materials can be briefly summarized as follows: (1) for a macroscopically uniform volume of composite material, which is subjected to macroscopically uniform boundary tractions, displacements or heat influx, find overall thermomechanical properties in terms of the thermomechanical properties of the individual constituents; and (2) for the same material volume and boundary conditions as above, find the local stress, strain, and temperature fields in the constituents and on the interfaces. Two different types of micromechanical models are usually applied to the solutions of these two types of problems. For linear elastic materials, the micromechanical models to solve problem (1) offer simple solutions of overall thermomechanical properties either in terms of bound which are derived from periodic or random microstructures, or in terms of single estimates, which are derived from a solution of an isolated inclusion. The finite element variational approaches are applied to integrate the solutions of problems (1) and (2) into one model. The application of displacement and equilibrium variational approaches to the calculation of overall elastic-plastic properties, are extended to the solution of the second problem. The integrated model is then applied to calculate the overall properties and local stress and strain fields of boron-aluminum composites subjected to transverse tension, in-plane shear and bending.

  7. Mathematical and physical modelling of materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical and physical modeling of turbulence phenomena in metals processing, electromagnetically driven flows in materials processing, gas-solid reactions, rapid solidification processes, the electroslag casting process, the role of cathodic depolarizers in the corrosion of aluminum in sea water, and predicting viscoelastic flows are described.

  8. Material model for physically based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robart, Mathieu; Paulin, Mathias; Caubet, Rene

    1999-09-01

    In computer graphics, a complete knowledge of the interactions between light and a material is essential to obtain photorealistic pictures. Physical measurements allow us to obtain data on the material response, but are limited to industrial surfaces and depend on measure conditions. Analytic models do exist, but they are often inadequate for common use: the empiric ones are too simple to be realistic, and the physically-based ones are often to complex or too specialized to be generally useful. Therefore, we have developed a multiresolution virtual material model, that not only describes the surface of a material, but also its internal structure thanks to distribution functions of microelements, arranged in layers. Each microelement possesses its own response to an incident light, from an elementary reflection to a complex response provided by its inner structure, taking into account geometry, energy, polarization, . . ., of each light ray. This model is virtually illuminated, in order to compute its response to an incident radiance. This directional response is stored in a compressed data structure using spherical wavelets, and is destined to be used in a rendering model such as directional radiosity.

  9. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, U. S.; Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the second year of work on a problem which is part of the NASA HOST Program. Its goals are: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are that of Bodner-Partom and Walker. For model evaluation purposes, a large constitutive data base is generated for a B1900 + Hf alloy by performing uniaxial tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relation, and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests as well as biaxial (tension/torsion) tests under proportional and nonproportional loading over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. Systematic approaches for evaluating material constants from a small subset of the data base are developed. Correlations of the uniaxial and biaxial tests data with the theories of Bodner-Partom and Walker are performed to establish the accuracy, range of applicability, and integability of the models. Both models are implemented in the MARC finite element computer code and used for TMF analyses. Benchmark notch round experiments are conducted and the results compared with finite-element analyses using the MARC code and the Walker model.

  10. Viscoelastic models for explosive binder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Harstad, E.N.; Maudlin, P.J.; Gray, G.T.; Foster, J.C. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can he idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. This paper is a continuation of previous work in modeling polyurethane at moderately high strain rates and for large deformations. Simulation of a large deformation (strains in excess of 100%) Taylor Anvil experiment revealed numerical difficulties which have been addressed. Additional experimental data have been obtained including improved resolution Taylor Anvil data, and stress relaxation data at various strain rates. A thorough evaluation of the candidate viscoelastic constitutive model is made and possible improvements discussed.

  11. Parameter Estimation for Viscoplastic Material Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Gendy, Atef S.; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A key ingredient in the design of engineering components and structures under general thermomechanical loading is the use of mathematical constitutive models (e.g. in finite element analysis) capable of accurate representation of short and long term stress/deformation responses. In addition to the ever-increasing complexity of recent viscoplastic models of this type, they often also require a large number of material constants to describe a host of (anticipated) physical phenomena and complicated deformation mechanisms. In turn, the experimental characterization of these material parameters constitutes the major factor in the successful and effective utilization of any given constitutive model; i.e., the problem of constitutive parameter estimation from experimental measurements.

  12. Viscoelastic Models for Explosive Binder Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenhagen, S. G.; Harstad, E. N.; Maudlin, P. J.; Gray, G. T.; Foster, J. C., Jr.

    1997-07-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can be idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. This paper is a continuation of previous work in modeling polyurethane at moderately high strain rates and for large deformations. Simulation of a large deformation (strains in excess of 100%) Taylor Anvil experiment revealed numerical difficulties which have been addressed. Additional experimental data have been obtained including improved resolution Taylor Anvil data, and stress relaxation data at various strain rates. A thorough evaluation of the candidate viscoelastic constitutive model is made and possible improvements discussed.

  13. Viscoelastic models for explosive binder materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenhagen, S. G.; Harstad, E. N.; Maudlin, P. J.; Gray, G. T.; Foster, J. C.

    1998-07-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can be idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. This paper is a continuation of previous work in modeling polyurethane at moderately high strain rates and for large deformations. Simulation of a large deformation (strains in excess of 100%) Taylor Anvil experiment revealed numerical difficulties which have been addressed. Additional experimental data have been obtained including improved resolution Taylor Anvil data, and stress relaxation data at various strain rates. A thorough evaluation of the candidate viscoelastic constitutive model is made and possible improvements discussed.

  14. A Hysteresis Model for Piezoceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of nonlinear constitutive relations and hysteresis inherent to piezoceramic materials at moderate to high drive levels. Such models are, necessary to realize the, full potential of the materials in high performance control applications, and a necessary prerequisite is the development of techniques which permit control implementation. The approach employed here is based on the qualification of reversible and irreversible domain wall motion in response to applied electric fields. A comparison with experimental data illustrates that because the resulting ODE model is physics-based, it can be employed for both characterization and prediction of polarization levels throughout the range of actuator operation. Finally, the ODE formulation is amenable to inversion which facilitates the development of an inverse compensator for linear control design.

  15. Computational Materials: Modeling and Simulation of Nanostructured Materials and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper provides details on the structure and implementation of the Computational Materials program at the NASA Langley Research Center. Examples are given that illustrate the suggested approaches to predicting the behavior and influencing the design of nanostructured materials such as high-performance polymers, composites, and nanotube-reinforced polymers. Primary simulation and measurement methods applicable to multi-scale modeling are outlined. Key challenges including verification and validation of models are highlighted and discussed within the context of NASA's broad mission objectives.

  16. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  17. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  18. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-11-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites.

  19. Viscoelastic models for polymeric composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenhagen, S. G.; Harstad, E. N.; Foster, J. C.; Maudlin, P. J.

    1996-05-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can be idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. A Taylor Cylinder impact test, and uniaxial stress tension and compression tests at various strain rates, have been performed on the polyurethane. Evident from time resolved Taylor Cylinder profiles, the material undergoes very large strains (>100%) and yet recovers its initial configuration. A viscoelastic constitutive law is proposed for the polyurethane and was implemented in the finite element, explicit, continuum mechanics code EPIC. The Taylor Cylinder impact experiment was simulated and the results compared with experiment. Modeling improvements are discussed.

  20. Stochastic multiscale modeling of polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin

    provides a new outlook to multi-scale materials modeling accounting for microstructure and process uncertainties. Predictive materials modeling will accelerate the development of new materials and processes for critical applications in industry.

  1. Computational modeling of composite material fires.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alexander L.; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Hubbard, Joshua Allen; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2010-10-01

    Composite materials behave differently from conventional fuel sources and have the potential to smolder and burn for extended time periods. As the amount of composite materials on modern aircraft continues to increase, understanding the response of composites in fire environments becomes increasingly important. An effort is ongoing to enhance the capability to simulate composite material response in fires including the decomposition of the composite and the interaction with a fire. To adequately model composite material in a fire, two physical model development tasks are necessary; first, the decomposition model for the composite material and second, the interaction with a fire. A porous media approach for the decomposition model including a time dependent formulation with the effects of heat, mass, species, and momentum transfer of the porous solid and gas phase is being implemented in an engineering code, ARIA. ARIA is a Sandia National Laboratories multiphysics code including a range of capabilities such as incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, energy transport equations, species transport equations, non-Newtonian fluid rheology, linear elastic solid mechanics, and electro-statics. To simulate the fire, FUEGO, also a Sandia National Laboratories code, is coupled to ARIA. FUEGO represents the turbulent, buoyantly driven incompressible flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and combustion. FUEGO and ARIA are uniquely able to solve this problem because they were designed using a common architecture (SIERRA) that enhances multiphysics coupling and both codes are capable of massively parallel calculations, enhancing performance. The decomposition reaction model is developed from small scale experimental data including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) in both nitrogen and air for a range of heating rates and from available data in the literature. The response of the composite material subject to a radiant heat flux boundary

  2. Coarse-Grain Modeling of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical and thermal loading of energetic materials can incite responses over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales due to inherent nano- and microscale features. Many energy transfer processes within these materials are atomistically governed, yet the material response is manifested at the micro- and mesoscale. The existing state-of-the-art computational methods include continuum level approaches that rely on idealized field-based formulations that are empirically based. Our goal is to bridge the spatial and temporal modeling regimes while ensuring multiscale consistency. However, significant technical challenges exist, including that the multiscale methods linking the atomistic and microscales for molecular crystals are immature or nonexistent. To begin addressing these challenges, we have implemented a bottom-up approach for deriving microscale coarse-grain models directly from quantum mechanics-derived atomistic models. In this talk, a suite of computational tools is described for particle-based microscale simulations of the nonequilibrium response of energetic solids. Our approach builds upon recent advances both in generating coarse-grain models under high strains and in developing a variant of dissipative particle dynamics that includes chemical reactions.

  3. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  4. Anisotropic Cloth Modeling for Material Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingmin; Pan, Zhigengx; Mi, Qingfeng

    Physically based cloth simulation has been challenging the graphics community for more than three decades. With the developing of virtual reality and clothing CAD, it has become the key technique of virtual garment and try-on system. Although it has received considerable attention in computer graphics, due to its flexible property and realistic feeling that the textile engineers pay much attention to, there is not a successful methodology to simulate cloth both in visual realism and physical accuracy. We present a new anisotropic textile modeling method based on physical mass-spring system, which models the warps and wefts separately according to the different material fabrics. The simulation process includes two main steps: firstly the rigid object simulation and secondly the flexible mass simulation near to be equilibrium. A multiresolution modeling is applied to enhance the tradeoff fruit of the realistic presentation and computation cost. Finally, some examples and the analysis results show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. Modeling Bamboo as a Functionally Graded Material

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Emilio Carlos Nelli; Walters, Matthew C.; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2008-02-15

    Natural fibers are promising for engineering applications due to their low cost. They are abundantly available in tropical and subtropical regions of the world, and they can be employed as construction materials. Among natural fibers, bamboo has been widely used for housing construction around the world. Bamboo is an optimized composite material which exploits the concept of Functionally Graded Material (FGM). Biological structures, such as bamboo, are composite materials that have complicated shapes and material distribution inside their domain, and thus the use of numerical methods such as the finite element method and multiscale methods such as homogenization, can help to further understanding of the mechanical behavior of these materials. The objective of this work is to explore techniques such as the finite element method and homogenization to investigate the structural behavior of bamboo. The finite element formulation uses graded finite elements to capture the varying material distribution through the bamboo wall. To observe bamboo behavior under applied loads, simulations are conducted considering a spatially-varying Young's modulus, an averaged Young's modulus, and orthotropic constitutive properties obtained from homogenization theory. The homogenization procedure uses effective, axisymmetric properties estimated from the spatially-varying bamboo composite. Three-dimensional models of bamboo cells were built and simulated under tension, torsion, and bending load cases.

  6. Estimating proportions of materials using mixture models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, R. P.; Basu, R.

    1983-01-01

    An approach to proportion estimation based on the notion of a mixture model, appropriate parametric forms for a mixture model that appears to fit observed remotely sensed data, methods for estimating the parameters in these models, methods for labelling proportion determination from the mixture model, and methods which use the mixture model estimates as auxiliary variable values in some proportion estimation schemes are addressed.

  7. Materials Database Development for Ballistic Impact Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    A set of experimental data is being generated under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Supersonics project to help create and validate accurate computational impact models of jet engine impact events. The data generated will include material property data generated at a range of different strain rates, from 1x10(exp -4)/sec to 5x10(exp 4)/sec, over a range of temperatures. In addition, carefully instrumented ballistic impact tests will be conducted on flat plates and curved structures to provide material and structural response information to help validate the computational models. The material property data and the ballistic impact data will be generated using materials from the same lot, as far as possible. It was found in preliminary testing that the surface finish of test specimens has an effect on measured high strain rate tension response of AL2024. Both the maximum stress and maximum elongation are greater on specimens with a smoother finish. This report gives an overview of the testing that is being conducted and presents results of preliminary testing of the surface finish study.

  8. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  9. Modeling spherical explosions with aluminized energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoni, J.; Saurel, R.; Lefrançois, A.; Baudin, G.

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with the numerical solution and validation of a reactive flow model dedicated to the study of spherical explosions with an aluminized energetic material. Situations related to air blast as well as underwater explosions are examined. Such situations involve multiscale phenomena associated with the detonation reaction zone, the aluminium reaction zone, the shock propagation distance and the bubble oscillation period. A detonation tracking method is developed in order to avoid the detonation structure computation. An ALE formulation is combined to the detonation tracking method in order to solve the material interface between detonation products and the environment as well as shock propagation. The model and the algorithm are then validated over a wide range of spherical explosions involving several types of explosives, both in air and liquid water environment. Large-scale experiments have been done in order to determine the blast wave effects with explosive compositions of variable aluminium content. In all situations the agreement between computed and experimental results is very good.

  10. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the first year of work on a program to validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials utilized in high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and to demonstrate their usefulness in computing stress-strain-time-temperature histories in complex three-dimensional structural components. The unified theories combine all inelastic strain-rate components in a single term avoiding, for example, treating plasticity and creep as separate response phenomena. An extensive review of existing unified theories is given and numerical methods for integrating these stiff time-temperature-dependent constitutive equations are discussed. Two particular models, those developed by Bodner and Partom and by Walker, were selected for more detailed development and evaluation against experimental tensile, creep and cyclic strain tests on specimens of a cast nickel base alloy, B19000+Hf. Initial results comparing computed and test results for tensile and cyclic straining for temperature from ambient to 982 C and strain rates from 10(exp-7) 10(exp-3) s(exp-1) are given. Some preliminary date correlations are presented also for highly non-proportional biaxial loading which demonstrate an increase in biaxial cyclic hardening rate over uniaxial or proportional loading conditions. Initial work has begun on the implementation of both constitutive models in the MARC finite element computer code.

  11. Quantum Mechanics Based Multiscale Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2013-03-01

    We present two quantum mechanics based multiscale approaches that can simulate extended defects in metals accurately and efficiently. The first approach (QCDFT) can treat multimillion atoms effectively via density functional theory (DFT). The method is an extension of the original quasicontinuum approach with DFT as its sole energetic formulation. The second method (QM/MM) has to do with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics coupling based on the constrained density functional theory, which provides an exact framework for a self-consistent quantum mechanical embedding. Several important materials problems will be addressed using the multiscale modeling approaches, including hydrogen-assisted cracking in Al, magnetism-controlled dislocation properties in Fe and Si pipe diffusion along Al dislocation core. We acknowledge the support from the Office of Navel Research and the Army Research Office.

  12. Numerical modeling of flowing soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Federico; Benzi, Roberto; Bernaschi, Massimo; Perlekar, Prasad; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Succi, Sauro

    2012-11-01

    The structural properties of soft-flowing and non-ergodic materials, such as emulsions, foams and gels shares similarities with the three basic states of matter (solid, liquid and gas). The macroscopic properties are characterized by non-standard features such as non-Newtonian rheology, long-time relaxation, caging effects, enhanced viscosity, structural arrest, hysteresis, dynamic disorder, aging and related phenomena. Large scale non-homogeneities can develop, even under simple shear conditions, by means of the formation of macroscopic bands of widely different viscosities (``shear banding'' phenomena). We employ a numerical model based on the Lattice Boltzmann method to perform numerical simulations of soft-matter under flowing conditions. Results of 3d simulations are presented and compared to previous 2d investigations.

  13. Constitutive modeling of inelastic anisotropic material response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A constitutive equation was developed to predict the inelastic thermomechanical response of single crystal turbine blades. These equations are essential for developing accurate finite element models of hot section components and contribute significantly to the understanding and prediction of crack initiation and propagation. The method used was limited to unified state variable constitutive equations. Two approaches to developing an anisotropic constitutive equation were reviewed. One approach was to apply the Stouffer-Bodner representation for deformation induced anisotropy to materials with an initial anisotropy such as single crystals. The second approach was to determine the global inelastic strain rate from the contribution of the slip in each of the possible crystallographic slip systems. A three dimensional finite element is being developed with a variable constitutive equation link that can be used for constitutive equation development and to predict the response of an experiment using the actual specimen geometry and loading conditions.

  14. Radioactive materials in biosolids : dose modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarst, A. B.; Chiu, W. A; Yu, C.; Aiello, K.; Bachmaier, J. T.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J. -J.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhartt, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. EPA; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. DOE; U.S. NRC; NE Ohio Regional Sewer District

    2006-01-01

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible transport of radioactivity from sludge into the local environment and the subsequent exposure of humans. A stochastic environmental pathway model was applied separately to seven hypothetical, generic sludge-release scenarios, leading to the creation of seven tables of Dose-to-Source Ratios (DSR), which can be used in translating from specific activity in sludge into dose to an individual. These DSR values were then combined with the results of an ISCORS survey of sludge and ash at more than 300 publicly owned treatment works, to explore the potential for radiation exposure of sludge workers and members of the public. This paper provides a brief overview of the pathway modeling methodology employed in the exposure and dose assessments and discusses technical aspects of the results obtained.

  15. Initial investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel model filler materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.; Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Various filler materials are being investigated for applicability to cryogenic wind tunnel models. The filler materials will be used to fill surface grooves, holes and flaws. The severe test environment of cryogenic models precludes usage of filler materials used on conventional wind tunnel models. Coefficients of thermal expansion, finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability of several candidate filler materials were examined. Promising filler materials are identified.

  16. Modeling ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, B. H.; Balling, P.

    2009-04-15

    An approach to modeling ablation thresholds and depths in dielectric materials is proposed. The model is based on the multiple-rate-equation description suggested by Rethfeld [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 187401 (2004)]. This model has been extended to include a description of the propagation of the light into the dielectric sample. The generic model is based on only a few experimental quantities that characterize the native material. A Drude model describing the evolution of the dielectric constant owing to an excitation of the electrons in the material is applied. The model is compared to experimental ablation data for different dielectric materials from the literature.

  17. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  18. Minimum risk route model for hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtakala, B.; Eno, L.A.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the minimum risk route for transporting a specific hazardous material (HM) between a point of origin and a point of destination (O-D pair) in the study area which minimizes risk to population and environment. The southern part of Quebec is chosen as the study area and major cities are identified as points of origin and destination on the highway network. Three classes of HM, namely chlorine gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and sulfuric acid, are chosen. A minimum risk route model has been developed to determine minimum risk routes between an O-D pair by using population or environment risk units as link impedances. The risk units for each link are computed by taking into consideration the probability of an accident and its consequences on that link. The results show that between the same O-D pair, the minimum risk routes are different for various HM. The concept of risk dissipation from origin to destination on the minimum risk route has been developed and dissipation curves are included.

  19. Initial Investigation of Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Model Filler Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Filler materials are used for surface flaws, instrumentation grooves, and fastener holes in wind tunnel models. More stringent surface quality requirements and the more demanding test environment encountered by cryogenic wind tunnels eliminate filler materials such as polyester resins, plaster, and waxes used on conventional wind tunnel models. To provide a material data base for cryogenic models, various filler materials are investigated. Surface quality requirements and test temperature extremes require matching of coefficients of thermal expansion or interfacing materials. Microstrain versus temperature curves are generated for several candidate filler materials for comparison with cryogenically acceptable materials. Matches have been achieved for aluminum alloys and austenitic steels. Simulated model surfaces are filled with candidate filler materials to determine finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability when subjected to cryogenic cycling. Filler material systems are identified which meet requirements for usage with aluminum model components.

  20. Model of plasticity of amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. I.; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2011-08-01

    Starting from a classical Kröener-Rieder kinematic picture for plasticity, we derive a set of dynamical equations describing plastic flow in a Lagrangian formulation. Our derivation is a natural and straightforward extension of simple fluids, elastic, and viscous solids theories. These equations contain the Maxwell model as a special limit. This paper is inspired by the particularly important work of Langer and coworkers. We shall show that our equations bear some resemblance with the shear-transformation zones model developed by Langer and coworkers. We shall point out some important differences. We discuss some results of plasticity, which can be described by the present model. We exploit the model equations for the simple examples: straining of a slab and a rod. We find that necking manifests always itself (not as a result of instability), except if the very special constant-velocity stretching process is imposed.

  1. Exploring the interdependencies between parameters in a material model.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Fermen-Coker, Muge

    2014-01-01

    A method is investigated to reduce the number of numerical parameters in a material model for a solid. The basis of the method is to detect interdependencies between parameters within a class of materials of interest. The method is demonstrated for a set of material property data for iron and steel using the Johnson-Cook plasticity model.

  2. A Material Model for FE-Simulation of UD Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Composite materials are being increasingly used for industrial applications. CFRP is particularly suitable for lightweight construction due to its high specific stiffness and strength properties. Simulation methods are needed during the development process in order to reduce the effort for prototypes and testing. This is particularly important for CFRP, as the material is costly. For accurate simulations, a realistic material model is needed. In this paper, a material model for the simulation of UD-composites including non-linear material behaviour and damage is developed and implemented in Abaqus. The material model is validated by comparison with test results on a range of test specimens.

  3. Magnetic properties modeling of soft magnetic composite materials using two-dimensional vector hybrid hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dandan; Liu, Fugui; Li, Yongjian; Zhao, Zhigang; Zhang, Changgeng; Yang, Qingxin

    2014-05-01

    A 2-D vector hybrid hysteresis model for a soft magnetic composite (SMC) material is established, which is combined with classical Preisach model and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. The rotational magnetic properties of SMC materials were studied using the vector model, and the computed results were compared with the experimental measurement. It is shown that the vector hybrid model can effectively simulate the rotational magnetic properties under low magnetization fields.

  4. Modeling and characterization of recompressed damaged materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Cazamias, J U; Kalantar, D H; LeBlanc, M M; Springer, H K

    2004-02-11

    Experiments have been performed to explore conditions under which spall damage is recompressed with the ultimate goal of developing a predictive model. Spall is introduced through traditional gas gun techniques or with laser ablation. Recompression techniques producing a uniaxial stress state, such as a Hopkinson bar, do not create sufficient confinement to close the porosity. Higher stress triaxialities achieved through a gas gun or laser recompression can close the spall. Characterization of the recompressed samples by optical metallography and electron microscopy reveal a narrow, highly deformed process zone. At the higher pressures achieved in the gas gun, little evidence of spall remains other than differentially etched features in the optical micrographs. With the very high strain rates achieved with laser techniques there is jetting from voids and other signs of turbulent metal flow. Simulations of spall and recompression on micromechanical models containing a single void suggest that it might be possible to represent the recompression using models similar to those employed for void growth. Calculations using multiple, randomly distributed voids are needed to determine if such models will yield the proper behavior for more realistic microstructures.

  5. Thinking Skills: Meanings, Models, and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presseisen, Barbara Z.

    In order for educators to plan for thinking skills in the curriculum, what is meant by thinking must first be determined. Drawing from current research, this report provides working definitions of thinking skills and practical models to explain the working relationships among different levels and different kinds of thought processes. These…

  6. Strength and failure models for epoxy mortar polymer concrete materials

    SciTech Connect

    Salami, M.R.; Zhao, S.

    1995-06-01

    Since the polymer concrete materials are used in construction, there is a need for developing a fundamental failure and constitutive model for predicting material behavior. The present research is undertaken as an initial step toward developing a fundamental failure and constitutive model for polymer concrete materials, as well as providing benchmark data on the strength and failure characteristics of material specimens for future work. The failure model will be developed based on introducing a failure function. This model will predict the changes in constitutive properties and resistance values in aggressive environments.

  7. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  8. Process modeling for carbon-phenolic nozzle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.; Remus, Walter M., III; Clinton, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    A thermochemical model based on the SINDA heat transfer program is developed for carbon-phenolic nozzle material processes. The model can be used to optimize cure cycles and to predict material properties based on the types of materials and the process by which these materials are used to make nozzle components. Chemical kinetic constants for Fiberite MX4926 were determined so that optimization of cure cycles for the current Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor nozzle rings can be determined.

  9. Creep characterization of gels and nonlinear viscoelastic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kiyotaka; Fujikawa, Masaki; Makabe, Chobin; Tanaka, Kou

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we examine gel creep behavior and develop a material model for useful and simple numerical simulation of this behavior. This study has three stages and aims: (1) gel creep behavior is examined; (2) the material model is determined and the material constants are identified; and (3) the versatility of the material model and the constants are evaluated. The creep behavior is found to be independent of the initial stress level in the present experiment. Thus, the viscoelastic model proposed by Simo is selected, and its material constants are identified using the results of creep tests. Moreover, from the results of numerical calculations and experiments, it is found that the chosen material model has good reproducibility, predictive performance and high versatility.

  10. Shock Propagation Modeling in Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Shock compression of foams is an intriguing research area that challenges our abilities to model experiments using computer simulations that span 9 orders of magnitude in spatial scales from the atomistic scale through the mesoscale and up to the continuum levels. Experiments test shock compression of dense polymers, polymer foams, and high-Z doped foams. Random distributions of polymer fibers, variations in pore size, and non-uniformities in the bulk properties of the foam (such as mean density) lead to spread in the experimental data. Adding dopants to foams introduces new complexities and the effect of the distribution and sizes of dopant particles must be characterized and understood. Therefore we turn to computer simulation to illumine the intricacies of the experiments that cannot be directly measured. This paper overviews of our range of methods to model pure and platinum-doped poly-methyl-pentene (PMP) foams. At the nanometer scale, hydrodynamic simulations compare favorably to classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of porous foams, verifying models of foam vaporization under strong shock conditions. Inhomogeneous mesoscale and homogenized continuum simulations present contrasting pictures of shocked foams. Mesoscale simulations at the micron scale have diffuse shock widths that depend upon the pore size, and post-shock vorticity results in fluctuations about the mean post-shock state and lower mean pressures and temperatures. Homogenized simulations, in the limit of zero pore size, have narrow shock widths, steady post-shock states, and higher mean pressures and temperature that compare favorably with 1D analysis of experiments. We reconcile the contrasting mesoscale and continuum views using theoretical turbulent corrections to the Hugoniot jump condition to show a consistent picture of shocked foams over 9 orders of spatial scale. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  11. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The main goals of the research under this grant consist of the development of mathematical tools and measurement of transport properties necessary for high fidelity modeling of crystal growth from the melt and solution, in particular, for the Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and the solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS). Of the tasks described in detail in the original proposal, two remain to be worked on: (1) development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems; and (2) diffusivity measurements on concentrated and supersaturated TGS solutions. Progress made during this seventh half-year period is reported.

  12. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The main goals of the research consist of the development of mathematical tools and measurement of transport properties necessary for high fidelity modeling of crystal growth from the melt and solution, in particular for the Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and the solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS). Of the tasks described in detail in the original proposal, two remain to be worked on: development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems, and diffusivity measurements on concentrated and supersaturated TGS solutions. During this eighth half-year period, good progress was made on these tasks.

  13. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1992-01-01

    The development is examined of mathematical tools and measurement of transport properties necessary for high fidelity modeling of crystal growth from the melt and solution, in particular for the Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and the solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS). The tasks include development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems, kinematic viscosity measurements on liquid MCT at temperatures close to the melting point, and diffusivity measurements on concentrated and supersaturated TGS solutions. A detailed description is given of the work performed for these tasks, together with a summary of the resulting publications and presentations.

  14. Selection of Instructional Materials. A Model Policy and Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Larry D.; And Others

    This model prepared by the State of Iowa Department of Public Instruction is intended to provide assistance to schools in developing their own policy and procedures for the selection of library media and text materials. A brief model statement of policy is followed by a model statement of rules which includes (1) responsibility for selection of…

  15. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-05-05

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

  16. Contaminant leaching model for dredged material disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, P.R.; Aziz, N.M.

    1999-09-01

    This paper describes the hydrologic evaluation of leachate production and quality model, a screening-level tool to simulate contaminant leaching from a confined disposal facility (CDF) for dredged material. The model combines hydraulics, hydrology, and equilibrium partitioning, using site-specific design specifications, weather data, and equilibrium partitioning coefficients from the literature or from sequential batch or column leach tests of dredged material. The hydraulics and hydrology are modeled using Version 3 of the hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance model. The equilibrium partitioning model includes provisions for estuarine sediments that have variable distribution coefficients resulting from saltwater washout. Model output includes contaminant concentrations in the CDF profile, contaminant concentration and mass releases through the bottom of the CDF, and contaminant concentrations and masses captured by leachate collection systems. The purpose of the model is to provide sound information for evaluating the potential leachate impacts on ground water at dredged material CDFs and the effectiveness of leachate control measures.

  17. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  18. Material parameter computation for multi-layered vocal fold models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bastian; Stingl, Michael; Leugering, Günter; Berry, David A.; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Today, the prevention and treatment of voice disorders is an ever-increasing health concern. Since many occupations rely on verbal communication, vocal health is necessary just to maintain one’s livelihood. Commonly applied models to study vocal fold vibrations and air flow distributions are self sustained physical models of the larynx composed of artificial silicone vocal folds. Choosing appropriate mechanical parameters for these vocal fold models while considering simplifications due to manufacturing restrictions is difficult but crucial for achieving realistic behavior. In the present work, a combination of experimental and numerical approaches to compute material parameters for synthetic vocal fold models is presented. The material parameters are derived from deformation behaviors of excised human larynges. The resulting deformations are used as reference displacements for a tracking functional to be optimized. Material optimization was applied to three-dimensional vocal fold models based on isotropic and transverse-isotropic material laws, considering both a layered model with homogeneous material properties on each layer and an inhomogeneous model. The best results exhibited a transversal-isotropic inhomogeneous (i.e., not producible) model. For the homogeneous model (three layers), the transversal-isotropic material parameters were also computed for each layer yielding deformations similar to the measured human vocal fold deformations. PMID:21476672

  19. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  20. Micromechanical modeling of heterogeneous energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Kipp, M.E.; Swol, F. van

    1998-09-01

    In this work, the mesoscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction of shocked porous energetic materials are studied using shock physics analysis of impact on a collection of discrete HMX crystals. High resolution three-dimensional CTH simulations indicate that rapid deformation occurs at material contact points causing large amplitude fluctuations of stress states having wavelengths of the order of several particle diameters. Localization of energy produces hot-spots due to shock focusing and plastic work near grain boundaries as material flows to interstitial regions. These numerical experiments demonstrate that hot-spots are strongly influenced by multiple crystal interactions. Chemical reaction processes also produce multiple wave structures associated with particle distribution effects. This study provides new insights into the micromechanical behavior of heterogeneous energetic materials strongly suggesting that initiation and reaction of shocked heterogeneous materials involves states distinctly different than single jump state descriptions.

  1. Calibrating the Abaqus Crushable Foam Material Model using UNM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schembri, Philip E.; Lewis, Matthew W.

    2014-02-27

    Triaxial test data from the University of New Mexico and uniaxial test data from W-14 is used to calibrate the Abaqus crushable foam material model to represent the syntactic foam comprised of APO-BMI matrix and carbon microballoons used in the W76. The material model is an elasto-plasticity model in which the yield strength depends on pressure. Both the elastic properties and the yield stress are estimated by fitting a line to the elastic region of each test response. The model parameters are fit to the data (in a non-rigorous way) to provide both a conservative and not-conservative material model. The model is verified to perform as intended by comparing the values of pressure and shear stress at yield, as well as the shear and volumetric stress-strain response, to the test data.

  2. EPR-based material modelling of soils considering volume changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Javadi, Akbar A.; Alani, Amir M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), taking into account its volumetric behaviour. EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial test are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well known conventional material models. In particular, the capability of the developed EPR models in predicting volume change behaviour of soils is illustrated. It is also shown that the developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis. Two geotechnical examples are presented to verify the developed EPR-based FE model (EPR-FEM). The results of the EPR-FEM are compared with those of a standard FEM where conventional constitutive models are used to describe the material behaviour. The results show that EPR-FEM can be successfully employed to analyse geotechnical engineering problems. The advantages of the proposed EPR models are highlighted.

  3. Research on infrared imaging illumination model based on materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hai-he; Feng, Chao-yin; Guo, Chang-geng; Zheng, Hai-jing; Han, Qiang; Hu, Hai-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to effectively simulate infrared features of the scene and infrared high light phenomenon, Based on the visual light illumination model, according to the optical property of all material types in the scene, the infrared imaging illumination models are proposed to fulfill different materials: to the smooth material with specular characteristic, adopting the infrared imaging illumination model based on Blinn-Phone reflection model and introducing the self emission; to the ordinary material which is similar to black body without highlight feature, ignoring the computation of its high light reflection feature, calculating simply the material's self emission and its reflection to the surrounding as its infrared imaging illumination model, the radiation energy under zero range of visibility can be obtained according to the above two models. The OpenGl rendering technology is used to construct infrared scene simulation system which can also simulate infrared electro-optical imaging system, then gets the synthetic infrared images from any angle of view of the 3D scenes. To validate the infrared imaging illumination model, two typical 3D scenes are made, and their infrared images are calculated to compare and contrast with the real collected infrared images obtained by a long wave infrared band imaging camera. There are two major points in the paper according to the experiment results: firstly, the infrared imaging illumination models are capable of producing infrared images which are very similar to those received by thermal infrared camera; secondly, the infrared imaging illumination models can simulate the infrared specular feature of relative materials and common infrared features of general materials, which shows the validation of the infrared imaging illumination models. Quantitative analysis shows that the simulation images are similar to the collected images in the aspects of main features, but their histogram distribution does not match very well, the

  4. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1994-01-01

    The main goals of the research under this grant consist of the development of mathematical tools and measurement techniques for transport properties necessary for high fidelity modelling of crystal growth from the melt and solution. Of the tasks described in detail in the original proposal, two remain to be worked on: development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems, and development of an expedient diffusivity measurement technique for concentrated and supersaturated solutions. We have focused on developing a code to solve for interface shape, heat and species transport during directional solidification. The work involved the computation of heat, mass and momentum transfer during Bridgman-Stockbarger solidification of compound semiconductors. Domain decomposition techniques and preconditioning methods were used in conjunction with Chebyshev spectral methods to accelerate convergence while retaining the high-order spectral accuracy. During the report period we have further improved our experimental setup. These improvements include: temperature control of the measurement cell to 0.1 C between 10 and 60 C; enclosure of the optical measurement path outside the ZYGO interferometer in a metal housing that is temperature controlled to the same temperature setting as the measurement cell; simultaneous dispensing and partial removal of the lower concentration (lighter) solution above the higher concentration (heavier) solution through independently motor-driven syringes; three-fold increase in data resolution by orientation of the interferometer with respect to diffusion direction; and increase of the optical path length in the solution cell to 12 mm.

  5. Modeling the dynamic crush of impact mitigating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; McMichael, L.D.

    1995-05-12

    Crushable materials are commonly utilized in the design of structural components to absorb energy and mitigate shock during the dynamic impact of a complex structure, such as an automobile chassis or drum-type shipping container. The development and application of several finite-element material models which have been developed at various times at LLNL for DYNA3D will be discussed. Between the models, they are able to account for several of the predominant mechanisms which typically influence the dynamic mechanical behavior of crushable materials. One issue we addressed was that no single existing model would account for the entire gambit of constitutive features which are important for crushable materials. Thus, we describe the implementation and use of an additional material model which attempts to provide a more comprehensive model of the mechanics of crushable material behavior. This model combines features of the pre-existing DYNA models and incorporates some new features as well in an invariant large-strain formulation. In addition to examining the behavior of a unit cell in uniaxial compression, two cases were chosen to evaluate the capabilities and accuracy of the various material models in DYNA. In the first case, a model for foam filled box beams was developed and compared to test data from a 4-point bend test. The model was subsequently used to study its effectiveness in energy absorption in an aluminum extrusion, spaceframe, vehicle chassis. The second case examined the response of the AT-400A shipping container and the performance of the overpack material during accident environments selected from 10CFR71 and IAEA regulations.

  6. On the sensitivity analysis of porous material models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouisse, Morvan; Ichchou, Mohamed; Chedly, Slaheddine; Collet, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Porous materials are used in many vibroacoustic applications. Different available models describe their behaviors according to materials' intrinsic characteristics. For instance, in the case of porous material with rigid frame, and according to the Champoux-Allard model, five parameters are employed. In this paper, an investigation about this model sensitivity to parameters according to frequency is conducted. Sobol and FAST algorithms are used for sensitivity analysis. A strong parametric frequency dependent hierarchy is shown. Sensitivity investigations confirm that resistivity is the most influent parameter when acoustic absorption and surface impedance of porous materials with rigid frame are considered. The analysis is first performed on a wide category of porous materials, and then restricted to a polyurethane foam analysis in order to illustrate the impact of the reduction of the design space. In a second part, a sensitivity analysis is performed using the Biot-Allard model with nine parameters including mechanical effects of the frame and conclusions are drawn through numerical simulations.

  7. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.

  8. Interatomic Potential Models for Ionic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Julian D.

    Ionic materials are present in many key technological applications of the modern era, from solid state batteries and fuel cells, nuclear waste immobiliza tion, through to industrial heterogeneous catalysis, such as that found in automotive exhaust systems. With the boundless possibilities for their utilization, it is natural that there has been a long history of computer simulation of their structure and properties in order to understand the materials science of these systems at the atomic level.

  9. User-Defined Material Model for Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F. Jr.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    An overview of different types of composite material system architectures and a brief review of progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model (or UMAT) for use with the ABAQUS/Standard1 nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details and use of the UMAT subroutine are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented.

  10. On predicting and modeling material failure under impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.

    1998-09-01

    A method for predicting and modeling material failure in solids subjected to impact loading is outlined. The method uses classical void growth models of Gurson and Tvergaard in a material point method (MPM). Because of material softening, material stability is lost. At this point, the character of the governing partial differential equations changes, and localization occurs. This localization results in mesh dependence for many problems of interest. For many problems, predicting the occurrence of material failure and its extent is necessary. To enable this modeling, it is proposed that a discontinuity be introduced into the displacement field. By including a dissipation-based force-displacement relationship, the mesh dependence of energy dissipation can be avoided. Additionally, the material point method provides a means of allowing large deformations without mesh distortion or introduction of error through remapping.

  11. A generalized methodology to characterize composite materials for pyrolysis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Mark B.

    The predictive capabilities of computational fire models have improved in recent years such that models have become an integral part of many research efforts. Models improve the understanding of the fire risk of materials and may decrease the number of expensive experiments required to assess the fire hazard of a specific material or designed space. A critical component of a predictive fire model is the pyrolysis sub-model that provides a mathematical representation of the rate of gaseous fuel production from condensed phase fuels given a heat flux incident to the material surface. The modern, comprehensive pyrolysis sub-models that are common today require the definition of many model parameters to accurately represent the physical description of materials that are ubiquitous in the built environment. Coupled with the increase in the number of parameters required to accurately represent the pyrolysis of materials is the increasing prevalence in the built environment of engineered composite materials that have never been measured or modeled. The motivation behind this project is to develop a systematic, generalized methodology to determine the requisite parameters to generate pyrolysis models with predictive capabilities for layered composite materials that are common in industrial and commercial applications. This methodology has been applied to four common composites in this work that exhibit a range of material structures and component materials. The methodology utilizes a multi-scale experimental approach in which each test is designed to isolate and determine a specific subset of the parameters required to define a material in the model. Data collected in simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were analyzed to determine the reaction kinetics, thermodynamic properties, and energetics of decomposition for each component of the composite. Data collected in microscale combustion calorimetry experiments were analyzed to

  12. Developing Interactive Instructional Materials: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Craig; And Others

    Many colleges and departments at Tennessee Technological University, as well as most other major universities, are progressing toward more interactive instructional materials. The benefits of implementing instructional technology are numerous and diverse. However, because of increasingly austere budgets, a focused and cost-effective approach to…

  13. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS IN BIOSOLIDS: DOSE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible tra...

  14. Extended Jiles-Atherton model for modelling the magnetic characteristics of isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk, Roman; Bieńkowski, Adam; Salach, Jacek

    This paper presents the idea of the extension of the Jiles-Atherton model applied for modelling of the magnetic characteristics of Mn-Zn, as well as Ni-Zn ferrites. The presented extension of the model takes into account changes of the parameter k during the magnetisation process, what is physically judged. The extended Jiles-Atherton model gives novel possibility of modelling the hysteresis loops of isotropic materials. For one set of the extended model parameters, a good agreement between experimental data and modelled hysteresis loops is observed, for different values of maximal magnetising field. As a result, the extended Jiles-Atherton model presented in the paper may be applied for both technical applications and fundamental research, focused on understanding the physical aspects of the magnetisation process of anisotropic soft magnetic materials.

  15. The sphere-in-contact model of carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Zeinalipour-Yazdi, Constantinos D; Pullman, David P; Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-01-01

    A sphere-in-contact model is presented that is used to build physical models of carbon materials such as graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes and fullerene. Unlike other molecular models, these models have correct scale and proportions because the carbon atoms are represented by their atomic radius, in contrast to the more commonly used space-fill models, where carbon atoms are represented by their van der Waals radii. Based on a survey taken among 65 undergraduate chemistry students and 28 PhD/postdoctoral students with a background in molecular modeling, we found misconceptions arising from incorrect visualization of the size and location of the electron density located in carbon materials. Based on analysis of the survey and on a conceptual basis we show that the sphere-in-contact model provides an improved molecular representation of the electron density of carbon materials compared to other molecular models commonly used in science textbooks (i.e., wire-frame, ball-and-stick, space-fill). We therefore suggest that its use in chemistry textbooks along with the ball-and-stick model would significantly enhance the visualization of molecular structures according to their electron density. Graphical Abstract A sphere-in-contact model of C60-fullerene. PMID:26791534

  16. Diffusion in Condensed Matter: Methods, Materials, Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitjans, Paul; Kärger, Jög

    This comprehensive, handbook-style survey of diffusion in condensed matter gives detailed insight into diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement. It is understood and presented as a phenomenon of crucial relevance for a large variety of processes and materials. In this book, all aspects of the theoretical fundamentals, experimental techniques, highlights of current developments and results for solids, liquids and interfaces are presented.

  17. Designing and modeling doubly porous polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, H.-B.; Le Droumaguet, B.; Monchiet, V.; Grande, D.

    2015-07-01

    Doubly porous organic materials based on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) are synthetized through the use of two distinct types of porogen templates, namely a macroporogen and a nanoporogen. Two complementary strategies are implemented by using either sodium chloride particles or fused poly(methyl methacrylate) beads as macroporogens, in conjunction with ethanol as a porogenic solvent. The porogen removal respectively allows for the generation of either non-interconnected or interconnected macropores with an average diameter of about 100-200 μm and nanopores with sizes lying within the 100 nm order of magnitude, as evidenced by mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Nitrogen sorption measurements evidence the formation of materials with rather high specific surface areas, i.e. higher than 140 m2.g-1. This paper also addresses the development of numerical tools for computing the permeability of such doubly porous materials. Due to the coexistence of well separated scales between nanopores and macropores, a consecutive double homogenization approach is proposed. A nanoscopic scale and a mesoscopic scale are introduced, and the flow is evaluated by means of the Finite Element Method to determine the macroscopic permeability. At the nanoscopic scale, the flow is described by the Stokes equations with an adherence condition at the solid surface. At the mesoscopic scale, the flow obeys the Stokes equations in the macropores and the Darcy equation in the permeable polymer in order to account for the presence of the nanopores.

  18. Modeling of sorption characteristics of backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chitra, S.; Sasidhar, P.; Lal, K.B.; Ahmed, J.

    1998-06-01

    Sorption data analysis was carried out using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Modified Freundlich isotherms for the uptake of sodium and potassium in an initial concentration range of 10--100 mg/L on backfill materials, viz., bentonite, vermiculite, and soil samples. The soil samples were collected from a shallow land disposal facility at Kalpakkam. The Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of K{sup +} by all the selected backfill materials. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred mathematical tool for representing the sorption of Na{sup +} by the soil samples. Since a negative sorption was observed for the uptake of Na{sup +} by commercial clay minerals (vermiculite and bentonite clay in the laboratory experiments), sorption analysis could not be carried out using the above-mentioned isotherm equations. Hill plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation (10--40 mg/L), sorption of K{sup +} by vermiculite is impeded by interaction among sorption sites. In the region of higher saturation (60--100 mg/L), sorption of K{sup +} by all three backfill materials is enhanced by interaction among sorption sites. The Hill plot of the sorption data for Na{sup +} by soil suggests that irrespective of Na{sup +} concentration, sorption of Na{sup +} at one exchange size enhances sorption at other exchange sites.

  19. Material point method modeling in oil and gas reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Vanderheyden, William Brian; Zhang, Duan

    2016-06-28

    A computer system and method of simulating the behavior of an oil and gas reservoir including changes in the margins of frangible solids. A system of equations including state equations such as momentum, and conservation laws such as mass conservation and volume fraction continuity, are defined and discretized for at least two phases in a modeled volume, one of which corresponds to frangible material. A material point model technique for numerically solving the system of discretized equations, to derive fluid flow at each of a plurality of mesh nodes in the modeled volume, and the velocity of at each of a plurality of particles representing the frangible material in the modeled volume. A time-splitting technique improves the computational efficiency of the simulation while maintaining accuracy on the deformation scale. The method can be applied to derive accurate upscaled model equations for larger volume scale simulations.

  20. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qiang

    2014-11-12

    The rational design of materials, the development of accurate and efficient material simulation algorithms, and the determination of the response of materials to environments and loads occurring in practice all require an understanding of mechanics at disparate spatial and temporal scales. The project addresses mathematical and numerical analyses for material problems for which relevant scales range from those usually treated by molecular dynamics all the way up to those most often treated by classical elasticity. The prevalent approach towards developing a multiscale material model couples two or more well known models, e.g., molecular dynamics and classical elasticity, each of which is useful at a different scale, creating a multiscale multi-model. However, the challenges behind such a coupling are formidable and largely arise because the atomistic and continuum models employ nonlocal and local models of force, respectively. The project focuses on a multiscale analysis of the peridynamics materials model. Peridynamics can be used as a transition between molecular dynamics and classical elasticity so that the difficulties encountered when directly coupling those two models are mitigated. In addition, in some situations, peridynamics can be used all by itself as a material model that accurately and efficiently captures the behavior of materials over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Peridynamics is well suited to these purposes because it employs a nonlocal model of force, analogous to that of molecular dynamics; furthermore, at sufficiently large length scales and assuming smooth deformation, peridynamics can be approximated by classical elasticity. The project will extend the emerging mathematical and numerical analysis of peridynamics. One goal is to develop a peridynamics-enabled multiscale multi-model that potentially provides a new and more extensive mathematical basis for coupling classical elasticity and molecular dynamics, thus enabling next

  1. A Model Framework for Science and Other Course Materials Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    A model is presented to provide guidance for Coast Guard writers, curriculum developers, course coordinators, and instructors who intend to update, or draft course materials. Detailed instructions are provided for developing instructor's guides and student's guides. (CS)

  2. Probabilistic constitutive relationships for cyclic material strength models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology is developed that provides a probabilistic treatment for the lifetime of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to fatigue. Material strength degradation models, based on primitive variables, include both a fatigue strength reduction model and a fatigue crack growth model. Probabilistic analysis is based on simulation, and both maximum entropy and maximum penalized likelihood methods are used for the generation of probability density functions. The resulting constitutive relationships are included in several computer programs.

  3. A bespoke single-band Hubbard model material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S. M.; Staar, P.; Schulthess, T. C.; Troyer, M.; Spaldin, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Hubbard model, which augments independent-electron band theory with a single parameter to describe electron-electron correlations, is widely regarded to be the "standard model" of condensed-matter physics. The model has been remarkably successful at addressing a range of correlation phenomena in solids, but it neglects many behaviors that occur in real materials, such as phonons, long-range interactions, and, in its simplest form, multiorbital effects. Here, we use ab initio electronic structure methods to design a material whose Hamiltonian matches as closely as possible that of the single-band Hubbard model. Our motivation is to compare the measured properties of our new material to those predicted by reliable theoretical solutions of the Hubbard model to determine the relevance of the model in the description of real materials. After identifying an appropriate crystal class and several appropriate chemistries, we use density-functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory to screen for the desired electronic band structure and metal-insulator transition. We then explore the most promising candidates for structural stability and suitability for doping, and we propose specific materials for subsequent synthesis. Finally, we identify a regime—that should manifest in our bespoke material—in which the single-band Hubbard model on a triangular lattice exhibits exotic d -wave superconductivity.

  4. Learning to Apply Models of Materials While Explaining Their Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose: This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials.…

  5. A Model Framework for Course Materials Construction (Second Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Designed for use by Coast Guard course writers, curriculum developers, course coordinators, and instructors as a decision-support system, this publication presents a model that translates the Intraservices Procedures for Instructional Systems Development curriculum design model into materials usable by classroom teachers and students. Although…

  6. A Model Framework for Course Materials Construction. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    A model framework for course materials construction is presented as an aid to Coast Guard course writers and coordinators, curriculum developers, and instructors who must modify a course or draft a new one. The model assumes that the instructor or other designated person has: (1) completed a task analysis which identifies the competencies, skills…

  7. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  8. Stochastic Modeling of Radioactive Material Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Andrus, Jason; Pope, Chad

    2015-09-01

    Nonreactor nuclear facilities operated under the approval authority of the U.S. Department of Energy use unmitigated hazard evaluations to determine if potential radiological doses associated with design basis events challenge or exceed dose evaluation guidelines. Unmitigated design basis events that sufficiently challenge dose evaluation guidelines or exceed the guidelines for members of the public or workers, merit selection of safety structures, systems, or components or other controls to prevent or mitigate the hazard. Idaho State University, in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratory, has developed a portable and simple to use software application called SODA (Stochastic Objective Decision-Aide) that stochastically calculates the radiation dose associated with hypothetical radiological material release scenarios. Rather than producing a point estimate of the dose, SODA produces a dose distribution result to allow a deeper understanding of the dose potential. SODA allows users to select the distribution type and parameter values for all of the input variables used to perform the dose calculation. SODA then randomly samples each distribution input variable and calculates the overall resulting dose distribution. In cases where an input variable distribution is unknown, a traditional single point value can be used. SODA was developed using the MATLAB coding framework. The software application has a graphical user input. SODA can be installed on both Windows and Mac computers and does not require MATLAB to function. SODA provides improved risk understanding leading to better informed decision making associated with establishing nuclear facility material-at-risk limits and safety structure, system, or component selection. It is important to note that SODA does not replace or compete with codes such as MACCS or RSAC, rather it is viewed as an easy to use supplemental tool to help improve risk understanding and support better informed decisions. The work was

  9. On the accuracy and fitting of transversely isotropic material models.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Okamoto, Ruth J; Genin, Guy M; Bayly, Philip V

    2016-08-01

    Fiber reinforced structures are central to the form and function of biological tissues. Hyperelastic, transversely isotropic material models are used widely in the modeling and simulation of such tissues. Many of the most widely used models involve strain energy functions that include one or both pseudo-invariants (I4 or I5) to incorporate energy stored in the fibers. In a previous study we showed that both of these invariants must be included in the strain energy function if the material model is to reduce correctly to the well-known framework of transversely isotropic linear elasticity in the limit of small deformations. Even with such a model, fitting of parameters is a challenge. Here, by evaluating the relative roles of I4 and I5 in the responses to simple loadings, we identify loading scenarios in which previous models accounting for only one of these invariants can be expected to provide accurate estimation of material response, and identify mechanical tests that have special utility for fitting of transversely isotropic constitutive models. Results provide guidance for fitting of transversely isotropic constitutive models and for interpretation of the predictions of these models. PMID:27136091

  10. Measurement and modeling of terahertz spectral signatures from layered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffin, G. P.; Schecklman, S.,; Chen, J.; Henry, S. C.; Zurk, L. M.; Pejcinovic, B.; Timchenko, A. I.

    2010-04-01

    Many materials such as drugs and explosives have characteristic spectral signatures in the terahertz (THz) band. These unique signatures hold great promise for potential detection utilizing THz radiation. While such spectral features are most easily observed in transmission,real life imaging systems will need to identify materials of interest from reflection measurements,often in non-ideal geometries. In this work we investigate the interference effects introduced by layered materials,whic h are commonly encountered in realistic sensing geometries. A model for reflection from a layer of material is presented,along with reflection measurements of single layers of sample material. Reflection measurements were made to compare the response of two materials; α-lactose monohydrate which has sharp absorption features,and polyethylene which does not. Finally,the model is inverted numerically to extract material parameters from the measured data as well as simulated reflection responses from the explosive C4.

  11. A perspective on modeling the multiscale response of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-06-01

    The response of an energetic material to insult is perhaps one of the most difficult processes to model due to concurrent chemical and physical phenomena occurring over scales ranging from atomistic to continuum. Unraveling the interdependencies of these complex processes across the scales through modeling can be done only within a multiscale framework. In this talk, I will describe our philosophy and progress in the development of a predictive, experimentally validated multiscale reactive modeling capability for energetic materials. I will also describe new opportunities and challenges that have arisen in the course of our development that will be pursued in the future.

  12. The Constitutive Modeling of Thin Films with Randon Material Wrinkles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphey, Thomas W.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2001-01-01

    Material wrinkles drastically alter the structural constitutive properties of thin films. Normally linear elastic materials, when wrinkled, become highly nonlinear and initially inelastic. Stiffness' reduced by 99% and negative Poisson's ratios are typically observed. This paper presents an effective continuum constitutive model for the elastic effects of material wrinkles in thin films. The model considers general two-dimensional stress and strain states (simultaneous bi-axial and shear stress/strain) and neglects out of plane bending. The constitutive model is derived from a traditional mechanics analysis of an idealized physical model of random material wrinkles. Model parameters are the directly measurable wrinkle characteristics of amplitude and wavelength. For these reasons, the equations are mechanistic and deterministic. The model is compared with bi-axial tensile test data for wrinkled Kaptong(Registered Trademark) HN and is shown to deterministically predict strain as a function of stress with an average RMS error of 22%. On average, fitting the model to test data yields an RMS error of 1.2%

  13. A model of material flow during friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Carter Dymek, Stanislaw; Blicharski, Marek

    2008-09-15

    Tin plated 6061-T6 aluminum extrusions were friction stir welded in a 90 deg. butt-weld configuration. A banded microstructure of interleaved layers of particle-rich and particle-poor material comprised the weld nugget. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the strong presence of tin within the particle-rich bands, but TEM foils taken from the TMAZ, HAZ and base material showed no indication of Sn-containing phases. Since tin is limited to the surface of the pre-weld extrusions, surface material flowed into the nugget region, forming the particle-rich bands. Similarly, the particle-poor bands with no tin originated from within the thickness of the extrusions. A model of material flow during friction stir welding is proposed for which the weld nugget forms as surface material extrudes from the retreating side into a plasticized zone surrounding the FSW pin. The extruded column buckles between the extrusion force driving the material into the zone and the drag force of the in-situ material resisting its entry. A banded microstructure of interleaved surface material and in-situ material, therefore, develops. The model successfully describes several of the experimentally observed weld characteristics, but the model is limited to specific conditions of material flow and assumptions regarding steady-state.

  14. Multiscale modeling of carbon nanotube materials with distinct element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostanin, Igor Aleksandrovich

    Mesoscale simulation techniques are becoming increasingly important due to the interest in complex mechanical problems involving nanoscale structures and materials. This work is devoted to the development of a novel mesoscopic modeling technique based on an extension of the distinct element method and its application to the problem of mechanical modeling of carbon nanotube materials. Starting from an atomistic description, the important interactions between segments of the tubes are encapsulated into two types of contact models. The nanomechanics of intratube bonds is characterized by the parallel bond contact model. Intertube interactions are accounted for by an anisotropic vdW contact model. Energy dissipation is formulated in a top-down manner, based on the macroscopic mechanical properties of carbon nanotube materials. The developed model is applied to the analysis of various mesoscopic structures and materials - self-folded nanotube configurations, nanotube bundles and ropes, nanotube papers and films. The results of mesoscopic simulations not only are in good agreement with experimental observations, but they also provide interesting insights on the roles of effects of morphology, vdW adhesion and registry, cross-linking and energy dissipation on the nanomechanics of carbon nanotube based materials.

  15. A model for heterogeneous materials including phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Clements, B.E.; Williams, T.O.

    2005-04-15

    A model is developed for particulate composites, which includes phase transformations in one or all of the constituents. The model is an extension of the method of cells formalism. Representative simulations for a single-phase, brittle particulate (SiC) embedded in a ductile material (Ti), which undergoes a solid-solid phase transformation, are provided. Also, simulations for a tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) are included. In the WHA analyses a particulate composite, composed of tungsten particles embedded in a tungsten-iron-nickel alloy matrix, is modeled. A solid-liquid phase transformation of the matrix material is included in the WHA numerical calculations. The example problems also demonstrate two approaches for generating free energies for the material constituents. Simulations for volumetric compression, uniaxial strain, biaxial strain, and pure shear are used to demonstrate the versatility of the model.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  17. Artificial neural network model for material characterization by indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, K. K.; Swaddiwudhipong, S.; Liu, Z. S.; Hua, J.

    2004-09-01

    Analytical methods to interpret the indentation load-displacement curves are difficult to formulate and solve due to material and geometric nonlinearities as well as complex contact interactions. In this study, large strain-large deformation finite element analyses were carried out to simulate indentation experiments. An artificial neural network model was constructed for the interpretation of indentation load-displacement curves. The data from finite element analyses were used to train and validate the artificial neural network model. The artificial neural network model was able to accurately determine the material properties when presented with the load-displacement curves that were not used in the training process. The proposed artificial neural network model is robust and directly relates the characteristics of the indentation load-displacement curve to the elasto-plastic material properties.

  18. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  19. An investigation of the material and model parameters for a constitutive model for MSMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikes, Jason; Feigenbaum, Heidi; Ciocanel, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    A two dimensional constitutive model capable of predicting the magneto-mechanical response of a magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) has been developed and calibrated using a zero field-variable stress test1. This calibration approach is easy to perform and facilitates a faster evaluation of the three calibration constants required by the model (vs. five calibration constants required by previous models2,3). The calibration constants generated with this approach facilitate good model predictions of constant field-variable stress tests, for a wide range of loading conditions1. However, the same calibration constants yield less accurate model predictions for constant stress-variable field tests. Deployment of a separate calibration method for this type of loading, using a varying field-zero stress calibration test, also didn't lead to improved model predictions of this loading case. As a result, a sensitivity analysis was performed on most model and material parameters to identify which of them may influence model predictions the most, in both types of loading conditions. The sensitivity analysis revealed that changing most of these parameters did not improve model predictions for all loading types. Only the anisotropy coefficient was found to improve significantly field controlled model predictions and slightly worsen model predictions for stress controlled cases. This suggests that either the value of the anisotropy coefficient (which is provided by the manufacturer) is not accurate, or that the model is missing features associated with the magnetic energy of the material.

  20. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling of Nano-Structured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for modeling structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with an equivalent-continuum model. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As an important example with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the model has been applied to determine the effective continuum geometry of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the equivalent-continuum model has been developed with an effective thickness. This effective thickness has been shown to be similar to, but slightly smaller than, the interatomic spacing of graphite.

  1. System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Voskuilen, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.

  2. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  3. A multifluid mix model with material strength effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Scannapieco, A. J.

    2012-04-23

    We present a new multifluid mix model. Its features include material strength effects and pressure and temperature nonequilibrium between mixing materials. It is applicable to both interpenetration and demixing of immiscible fluids and diffusion of miscible fluids. The presented model exhibits the appropriate smooth transition in mathematical form as the mixture evolves from multiphase to molecular mixing, extending its applicability to the intermediate stages in which both types of mixing are present. Virtual mass force and momentum exchange have been generalized for heterogeneous multimaterial mixtures. The compression work has been extended so that the resulting species energy equations are consistent with the pressure force and material strength.

  4. Analytical Model for Thermal Elastoplastic Stresses of Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, P. C.; Chen, G.; Liu, L. S.; Fang, C.; Zhang, Q. J.

    2008-02-15

    A modification analytical model is presented for the thermal elastoplastic stresses of functionally graded materials subjected to thermal loading. The presented model follows the analytical scheme presented by Y. L. Shen and S. Suresh [6]. In the present model, the functionally graded materials are considered as multilayered materials. Each layer consists of metal and ceramic with different volume fraction. The ceramic layer and the FGM interlayers are considered as elastic brittle materials. The metal layer is considered as elastic-perfectly plastic ductile materials. Closed-form solutions for different characteristic temperature for thermal loading are presented as a function of the structure geometries and the thermomechanical properties of the materials. A main advance of the present model is that the possibility of the initial and spread of plasticity from the two sides of the ductile layers taken into account. Comparing the analytical results with the results from the finite element analysis, the thermal stresses and deformation from the present model are in good agreement with the numerical ones.

  5. Computer-Aided Process Model For Carbon/Phenolic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Computer program implements thermochemical model of processing of carbon-fiber/phenolic-matrix composite materials into molded parts of various sizes and shapes. Directed toward improving fabrication of rocket-engine-nozzle parts, also used to optimize fabrication of other structural components, and material-property parameters changed to apply to other materials. Reduces costs by reducing amount of laboratory trial and error needed to optimize curing processes and to predict properties of cured parts.

  6. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  7. Using the split Hopkinson pressure bar to validate material models

    PubMed Central

    Church, Philip; Cornish, Rory; Cullis, Ian; Gould, Peter; Lewtas, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives a discussion of the use of the split-Hopkinson bar with particular reference to the requirements of materials modelling at QinetiQ. This is to deploy validated material models for numerical simulations that are physically based and have as little characterization overhead as possible. In order to have confidence that the models have a wide range of applicability, this means, at most, characterizing the models at low rate and then validating them at high rate. The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) is ideal for this purpose. It is also a very useful tool for analysing material behaviour under non-shock wave loading. This means understanding the output of the test and developing techniques for reliable comparison of simulations with SHPB data. For materials other than metals comparison with an output stress v strain curve is not sufficient as the assumptions built into the classical analysis are generally violated. The method described in this paper compares the simulations with as much validation data as can be derived from deployed instrumentation including the raw strain gauge data on the input and output bars, which avoids any assumptions about stress equilibrium. One has to take into account Pochhammer–Chree oscillations and their effect on the specimen and recognize that this is itself also a valuable validation test of the material model. PMID:25071238

  8. Using the split Hopkinson pressure bar to validate material models.

    PubMed

    Church, Philip; Cornish, Rory; Cullis, Ian; Gould, Peter; Lewtas, Ian

    2014-08-28

    This paper gives a discussion of the use of the split-Hopkinson bar with particular reference to the requirements of materials modelling at QinetiQ. This is to deploy validated material models for numerical simulations that are physically based and have as little characterization overhead as possible. In order to have confidence that the models have a wide range of applicability, this means, at most, characterizing the models at low rate and then validating them at high rate. The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) is ideal for this purpose. It is also a very useful tool for analysing material behaviour under non-shock wave loading. This means understanding the output of the test and developing techniques for reliable comparison of simulations with SHPB data. For materials other than metals comparison with an output stress v strain curve is not sufficient as the assumptions built into the classical analysis are generally violated. The method described in this paper compares the simulations with as much validation data as can be derived from deployed instrumentation including the raw strain gauge data on the input and output bars, which avoids any assumptions about stress equilibrium. One has to take into account Pochhammer-Chree oscillations and their effect on the specimen and recognize that this is itself also a valuable validation test of the material model. PMID:25071238

  9. New material model for simulating large impacts on rocky bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonge, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ramesh, K.

    2014-07-01

    Large impact craters on an asteroid can provide insights into its internal structure. These craters can expose material from the interior of the body at the impact site [e.g., 1]; additionally, the impact sends stress waves throughout the body, which interrogate the asteroid's interior. Through a complex interplay of processes, such impacts can result in a variety of motions, the consequence of which may appear as lineaments that are exposed over all or portions of the asteroid's surface [e.g., 2,3]. While analytic, scaling, and heuristic arguments can provide some insight into general phenomena on asteroids, interpreting the results of a specific impact event, or series of events, on a specific asteroid geometry generally necessitates the use of computational approaches that can solve for the stress and displacement history resulting from an impact event. These computational approaches require a constitutive model for the material, which relates the deformation history of a small material volume to the average force on the boundary of that material volume. In this work, we present a new material model that is suitable for simulating the failure of rocky materials during impact events. This material model is similar to the model discussed in [4]. The new material model incorporates dynamic sub-scale crack interactions through a micro-mechanics-based damage model, thermodynamic effects through the use of a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state, and granular flow of the fully damaged material. The granular flow model includes dilatation resulting from the mutual interaction of small fragments of material (grains) as they are forced to slide and roll over each other and includes a P-α type porosity model to account for compaction of the granular material in a subsequent impact event. The micro-mechanics-based damage model provides a direct connection between the flaw (crack) distribution in the material and the rate-dependent strength. By connecting the rate

  10. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy. PMID:25817474

  11. Local Debonding and Fiber Breakage in Composite Materials Modeled Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    A prerequisite for full utilization of composite materials in aerospace components is accurate design and life prediction tools that enable the assessment of component performance and reliability. Such tools assist both structural analysts, who design and optimize structures composed of composite materials, and materials scientists who design and optimize the composite materials themselves. NASA Glenn Research Center's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package (http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/LPB/mac) addresses this need for composite design and life prediction tools by providing a widely applicable and accurate approach to modeling composite materials. Furthermore, MAC/GMC serves as a platform for incorporating new local models and capabilities that are under development at NASA, thus enabling these new capabilities to progress rapidly to a stage in which they can be employed by the code's end users.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  13. New material model for simulating large impacts on rocky bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonge, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ramesh, K.

    2014-07-01

    Large impact craters on an asteroid can provide insights into its internal structure. These craters can expose material from the interior of the body at the impact site [e.g., 1]; additionally, the impact sends stress waves throughout the body, which interrogate the asteroid's interior. Through a complex interplay of processes, such impacts can result in a variety of motions, the consequence of which may appear as lineaments that are exposed over all or portions of the asteroid's surface [e.g., 2,3]. While analytic, scaling, and heuristic arguments can provide some insight into general phenomena on asteroids, interpreting the results of a specific impact event, or series of events, on a specific asteroid geometry generally necessitates the use of computational approaches that can solve for the stress and displacement history resulting from an impact event. These computational approaches require a constitutive model for the material, which relates the deformation history of a small material volume to the average force on the boundary of that material volume. In this work, we present a new material model that is suitable for simulating the failure of rocky materials during impact events. This material model is similar to the model discussed in [4]. The new material model incorporates dynamic sub-scale crack interactions through a micro-mechanics-based damage model, thermodynamic effects through the use of a Mie-Gruneisen equation of state, and granular flow of the fully damaged material. The granular flow model includes dilatation resulting from the mutual interaction of small fragments of material (grains) as they are forced to slide and roll over each other and includes a P-α type porosity model to account for compaction of the granular material in a subsequent impact event. The micro-mechanics-based damage model provides a direct connection between the flaw (crack) distribution in the material and the rate-dependent strength. By connecting the rate

  14. Durability evaluation techniques and modeling for highway materials

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, M.; Muchane, G.K.

    1995-06-01

    For satisfactory long-term performance of highway facilities, the authors are concerned about durability of materials, in addition to their initial strength. Besides conventional materials, such as Portland cement concrete and asphalt concrete, their interests include high-performance materials such as polymer concrete and polymer modified concrete. Degradation of materials may occur over time due to exposure to a number of aggravating conditions and environments. For investigation of durability, the aggravating exposures that the authors have considered include repeated loading, freeze-thaw cycling. Methods of evaluation of performance of materials include application of vibration spectral techniques for evaluating of material stiffness and damage. Materials are modeled to characterize their performance under repeated loads and other aggravating exposures.

  15. Enhanced micropolar model for wave propagation in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Aurélien; Luding, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In the description of material elastic behavior, the classical theory of elasticity consists of a macroscopic material description. The material is not described at the micro-level by considering the displacement of the different particles in interaction, but is described as a continuum by considering macroscopic quantities as stress and strain. The classical elasticity theory can be viewed as first gradient of the displacement field approximation of the solid state theory and is valid in the long wavelength limit. Granular media, due to their micro-inhomogeneous character, are not well described by the standard continuum theory of elasticity. By contrast to classical continua where the sizes of the vibrating particles are assumed to be negligible compared to the distance between the particles, the sizes of the particles in a granular assembly are comparable to the distance between neighbors. In addition, considering the sliding, torsion and rolling resistances at the level of the contacts between the particles, a consistent description of the elasticity of a granular medium needs to take into account the rotational degrees of freedom of each individual particle. The elastic behavior of crystalline structures of monodisperse beads can be efficiently described by a discrete model, where the displacement and rotation of each individual bead are taken into account. Nevertheless, the discrete model can be solved analytically only for well-know regular crystalline structure, the case of a random assembly of beads is too complex for large systems. A continuum formulation is more suitable for random assemblies of beads different from the ideal crystalline case. The generalization of the classical elasticity theory accounting for the rotational degrees of freedom of point bodies is known as the Cosserat or micropolar theory. In this work, the vibration properties of a face-centered cubic structure of monodisperse granular crystal are predicted using a discrete model as

  16. Modeling of metal cutting as purposeful fracture of work material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushawashi, Yalla Mussa

    Metal cutting, or simply machining, is one of the oldest processes for shaping components in the manufacturing industry. It is widely quoted that 15% of the value of all mechanical components manufactured worldwide is derived from machining operations. The most influential model for metal cutting is the single-shear plane model (SSPM) of chip formation. The common notion is that new surfaces are formed simply by `plastic flow around the tool tip' so that metal cutting is one of the deforming processes. A number of cutting theories and the finite element method (FEM) models have been developed based on this concept. Metal cutting simulation models are available in commercial FEM packages. However, these model predictions and numerical simulations do not agree with the trends and phenomena observed in metal cutting experiments. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to have a physically sound model of metal cutting. This thesis is based on the concept that metal cutting is the purposeful fracture of the work material. To reduce the energy required for fracture, one should minimize the energy of plastic deformation of the work material in its transformation into the chip because this energy constitutes up to 80% of the total energy required by the cutting system. Increased tool life and machining efficiency are the outcomes of such an optimization. To investigate this concept requires a work material model which considers the entire process from plastic deformation, damage initiation to final fracture. In this thesis, a work material model was developed based on the recent advancement in ductile fracture of metals. The model parameters must be determined under conditions that are pertinent to metal cutting. In machining, the work material experiences a complex, evolving multi-axial stress history. The existing testing specimens such as the notched bars and flat grooved specimens do not cover the stress triaxiality range found in machining. To generate material

  17. Pore-scale Modelling of Capillarity in Swelling Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Sweijen, T.; Nikooee, E.; Chareyre, B.

    2015-12-01

    Capillarity in granular porous media is a common and important phenomenon in earth materials and industrial products, and therefore has been studied extensively. To model capillarity in granular porous media, one needs to go beyond current models which simulate either two-phase flow in porous media or mechanical behaviour in granular media. Current pore-scale models for two-phase flow such as pore-network models are tailored for rigid pore-skeletons, even though in many applications, namely hydro-mechanical coupling in soils, printing, and hygienic products, the porous structure does change during two-phase flow. On the other hand, models such as Discrete Element Method (DEM), which simulate the deformable porous media, have mostly been employed for dry or saturated granular media. Here, the effects of porosity change and swelling on the retention properties was studied, for swelling granular materials. A pore-unit model that was capable to construct the capillary pressure - saturation curve was coupled to DEM. Such that the capillary pressure - saturation curve could be constructed for varying porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The study material was super absorbent polymer particles, which are capable to absorb water 10's to 200 times their initial weight. We have simulated quasi-static primary imbibition for different porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The results reveal a 3 dimensional surface between capillary pressure, saturation, and porosity, which can be normalized by means of the entry pressure and the effective water saturation to a unique curve.

  18. Learning to apply models of materials while explaining their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpin, Tiia; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Background:Applying structural models is important to chemistry education at the upper secondary level, but it is considered one of the most difficult topics to learn. Purpose:This study analyses to what extent in designed lessons students learned to apply structural models in explaining the properties and behaviours of various materials. Sample:An experimental group is 27 Finnish upper secondary school students and control group included 18 students from the same school. Design and methods:In quasi-experimental setting, students were guided through predict, observe, explain activities in four practical work situations. It was intended that the structural models would encourage students to learn how to identify and apply appropriate models when predicting and explaining situations. The lessons, organised over a one-week period, began with a teacher's demonstration and continued with student experiments in which they described the properties and behaviours of six household products representing three different materials. Results:Most students in the experimental group learned to apply the models correctly, as demonstrated by post-test scores that were significantly higher than pre-test scores. The control group showed no significant difference between pre- and post-test scores. Conclusions:The findings indicate that the intervention where students engage in predict, observe, explain activities while several materials and models are confronted at the same time, had a positive effect on learning outcomes.

  19. Finite Element Modeling of the Thermographic Inspection for Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucinell, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of composite materials is dependent on the constituent materials selected, material structural geometry, and the fabrication process. Flaws can form in composite materials as a result of the fabrication process, handling in the manufacturing environment, and exposure in the service environment to anomalous activity. Often these flaws show no indication on the surface of the material while having the potential of substantially degrading the integrity of the composite structure. For this reason it is important to have available inspection techniques that can reliably detect sub-surface defects such as inter-ply disbonds, inter-ply cracks, porosity, and density changes caused by variations in fiber volume content. Many non-destructive evaluation techniques (NDE) are capable of detecting sub-surface flaws in composite materials. These include shearography, video image correlation, ultrasonic, acoustic emissions, and X-ray. The difficulty with most of these techniques is that they are time consuming and often difficult to apply to full scale structures. An NDE technique that appears to have the capability to quickly and easily detect flaws in composite structure is thermography. This technique uses heat to detect flaws. Heat is applied to the surface of a structure with the use of a heat lamp or heat gun. A thermographic camera is then pointed at the surface and records the surface temperature as the composite structure cools. Flaws in the material will cause the thermal-mechanical material response to change. Thus, the surface over an area where a flaw is present will cool differently than regions where flaws do not exist. This paper discusses the effort made to thermo-mechanically model the thermography process. First the material properties and physical parameters used in the model will be explained. This will be followed by a detailed discussion of the finite element model used. Finally, the result of the model will be summarized along with

  20. Constitutive modeling of solid propellant materials with evolving microstructural damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Aravas, N.; Sofronis, P.

    Solid propellants are composite materials with complex microstructure. In a generic form, the material consists of polymeric binder, crystal oxidizer (e.g., ammonium perchlorate), and fuel particles (e.g., aluminum). Severe stressing and extreme temperatures induce damage which is manifested in particle cracking, dewetting along particle/polymer interfaces, void nucleation and growth. Damage complicates the overall constitutive response of a solid propellant over and above the complexities associated with the differing constitutive properties of the particle and binder phases. Using rigorous homogenization theory for composite materials, we propose a general 3-D nonlinear macroscopic constitutive law that models microstructural damage evolution upon straining through continuous void formation and growth. The law addresses the viscous deformation rate within the framework of additive decomposition of the deformation rate and the concept of back stress is used to improve the model performance in stress relaxation. No restriction is placed on the magnitude of the strains. Experimental data from the standard relaxation and uniaxial tension tests are used to calibrate the model parameters in the case of a high elongation solid propellant. It is emphasized that the model parameters are descriptors of individual phase constitutive response and criticality conditions for particle decohesion which can systematically be determined through experiment. The model is used to predict the response of the material under more complex loading paths and to investigate the effect of crack tip damage on the mechanical behavior of a compact tension fracture specimen.

  1. Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

  2. Expert model process control of composite materials in a press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Quinter, Suzanne R.; Abrams, Frances L.

    An expert model for the control of the press processing of thermoset composite materials has been developed. The knowledge base written using the PC PLUS expert system shell was interfaced with models written in FORTRAN. The expert model, which is running on a single computer with a single processor, takes advantage of the symbol-crunching capability of LISP and the number crunching capability of FORTRAN. The Expert Model control system is a qualitative-quantitative process automation (QQPA) system since it includes both quantitative model-based and qualitative rule-based expert system operations. Various physical and mechanical properties were measured from panels processed using the two cycles. Using QQPA, processing time has been reduced significantly without altering product quality.

  3. A theoretical model for lunar surface material thermal conductivity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khader, M. S.; Vachon, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical thermal conductivity model for the uppermost layer of lunar surface material under the lunar vacuum environment. The model assumes that the lunar soil can be simulated by spherical particles in contact with each other and that the effective thermal conductivity is a function of depth, temperature, porosity, particle dimension, and mechanical-thermal properties of the solid particles. Two modes of heat transport are considered, conduction and radiation - with emphasis on the contact resistance between particles. The model gives effective conductivity values that compare favorably with the experimental data from lunar surface samples obtained on Apollo 11 and 12 missions.

  4. Mathematical modeling and stochastic simulation of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yun

    Soft materials are all around us; they may appear as consumer products, foods, or biological materials. The interest in studying the properties of soft materials both experimentally and theoretically has steadily increased due to their wide range of industrial applications. One example of a soft material is wormlike micellar solutions. Depending on the temperature and composition, these solvent-surfactant-salt mixtures may exhibit close to mono-exponential or, alternatively, power-law or stretched-exponential stress decay. Of particular interest to this thesis is the development of stochastic models that can capture the stress relaxation behavior of such materials in the small strain limit, which is non-exponential in time as opposed to exponential. Continuous time random walk (CTRW) or subordinated Langevin processes are utilized to model systems exhibiting non-exponential relaxation behavior or anomalous diffusion. Stochastic simulations using the CTRW approach or the subordination method are carried out in this thesis for one-dimensional systems in which the probability density distribution of particle positions is described by a fractional Fokker-Planck equation (FFPE). The equivalence of the CTRW simulation and the subordination simulation with that of the FFPE is analyzed through the simulation of an ensemble of particle trajectories. The simulated particle dynamics suggest that CTRW processes or subordinated Langevin dynamics can be included in soft material mesoscale dynamics to capture the anomalous transport. To model the non-exponential stress relaxation dynamics of soft gel systems (three-dimensional fluids), stochastic models are simulated using transient network theory as developed and combined with the CTRW and subordinated Langevin processes. This approach enables us to connect the microstructural dynamics of certain soft gel-like materials with macroscale experimental observations by examining the material properties under homogeneous shear flow

  5. Hysteresis Modeling in Magnetostrictive Materials Via Preisach Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenological characterization of hysteresis in magnetostrictive materials is presented. Such hysteresis is due to both the driving magnetic fields and stress relations within the material and is significant throughout, most of the drive range of magnetostrictive transducers. An accurate characterization of the hysteresis and material nonlinearities is necessary, to fully utilize the actuator/sensor capabilities of the magnetostrictive materials. Such a characterization is made here in the context of generalized Preisach operators. This yields a framework amenable to proving the well-posedness of structural models that incorporate the magnetostrictive transducers. It also provides a natural setting in which to develop practical approximation techniques. An example illustrating this framework in the context of a Timoshenko beam model is presented.

  6. Validation of an Advanced Material Model for Simulating the Impact and Shock Response of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.; Nahme, Hartwig

    2002-07-01

    Composite materials are now commonly used as ballistic and hypervelocity protection materials and the demand for simulation of impact on these materials is increasing. A new material model specifically designed for the shock response of anisotropic materials has been developed and implemented in the hydrocode AUTODYN. The model allows for the representation of non-linear shock effects in combination with anisotropic material stiffness and damage. The coupling of the equation of state and anisotropic response is based on the methodology proposed by Anderson et al. [2]. An overview of the coupled formulation is described in order to point out the important assumptions, key innovations and basic theoretical framework. The coupled model was originally developed by Century Dynamics and Fhg-EMI for assessing the hypervelocity impact response of composite satellite protection systems [1]. It was also identified that the developed model should also offer new possibilities and capabilities for modelling modern advanced armour materials. Validation of the advanced composite model is firstly shown via simulations of uniaxial strain flyer plate experiments on aramid and polyethylene fibre composite systems. Finally, practical application of the model as implemented in AUTODYN is demonstrated through the simulation of ballistic and hypervelocity impact events. Comparison with experiment is given where possible.

  7. Hierarchical Material Models for Fragmentation Modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A; Masters, N; Koniges, A; Anderson, R; Gunney, B; Wang, P; Becker, R; Benson, D; Dixit, P

    2007-08-28

    Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. However, there are not enough computational resources to model the entire NIF target at this microscopic scale. In order to accomplish these calculations, a hierarchical material model (HMM) is being developed. The HMM will allow fine-scale modeling of the initial fragmentation using computationally expensive crystal plasticity, while the elements at the mesoscale can use polycrystal models, and the macroscopic elements use analytical flow stress models. The HMM framework is built upon an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability. We present progress in implementing the HMM in the NIF-ALE-AMR code. Additionally, we present test simulations relevant to NIF targets.

  8. Hierarchical Material Models for Fragmentation Modeling in NIF-ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; Masters, N D; Dixit, P; Benson, D J; Koniges, A E; Anderson, R W; Gunney, B N; Wang, P; Becker, R

    2008-01-10

    Fragmentation is a fundamental process that naturally spans micro to macroscopic scales. Recent advances in algorithms, computer simulations, and hardware enable us to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes in a real simulation through a heterogeneous multiscale mathematical model. We apply this model to the problem of predicting how targets in the NIF chamber dismantle, so that optics and diagnostics can be protected from damage. The mechanics of the initial material fracture depend on the microscopic grain structure. In order to effectively simulate the fragmentation, this process must be modeled at the subgrain level with computationally expensive crystal plasticity models. However, there are not enough computational resources to model the entire NIF target at this microscopic scale. In order to accomplish these calculations, a hierarchical material model (HMM) is being developed. The HMM will allow fine-scale modeling of the initial fragmentation using computationally expensive crystal plasticity, while the elements at the mesoscale can use polycrystal models, and the macroscopic elements use analytical flow stress models. The HMM framework is built upon an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability. We present progress in implementing the HMM in the NIF-ALE-AMR code. Additionally, we present test simulations relevant to NIF targets.

  9. Properties of granular analogue model materials: A community wide survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkmüller, Matthias; Schreurs, Guido; Rosenau, Matthias; Kemnitz, Helga

    2016-04-01

    We report the material properties of 26 granular analogue materials used in 14 analogue modelling laboratories. We determined physical characteristics such as bulk density, grain size distribution, and grain shape, and performed ring shear tests to determine friction angles and cohesion, and uniaxial compression tests to evaluate the compaction behaviour. Mean grain size of the materials varied between (c. 100 and 400 micrometer). Analysis of grain shape factors show that the four different classes of granular materials (14 quartz sands, 5 dyed quartz sands, 4 heavy mineral sands and 3 size fractions of glass beads) can be broadly divided into two groups consisting of 12 angular and 14 rounded materials. Grain shape has an influence on friction angles, with most angular materials having higher internal friction angles (between c. 35° and 40°) than rounded materials, whereas well-rounded glass beads have the lowest internal friction angles (between c. 25° and 30°). We interpret this as an effect of intergranular sliding versus rolling . Most angular materials have also higher basal friction angles (tested for a specific foil) than more rounded materials, suggesting that angular grains scratch and wear the foil., Most materials have a cohesion in the order of 10-100 Pa except for well-rounded glass beads, which show a trend towards a quasi-cohesionless (C <10 Pa) Coulomb-type material. The uniaxial confined compression tests reveal that rounded grains generally show less compaction than angular grains. We interpret this to be related to the initial packing density reached during sieving which is higher for rounded grains than for angular grains. Ring-shear test data show that angular grains undergo a longer strain-hardening phase than more rounded materials. This might explain why analogue models consisting of angular grains accommodate deformation in a more distributed manner prior to strain localisation than models consisting of rounded grains. Also, models

  10. Physics and Process Modeling (PPM) and Other Propulsion R and T. Volume 1; Materials Processing, Characterization, and Modeling; Lifting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This CP contains the extended abstracts and presentation figures of 36 papers presented at the PPM and Other Propulsion R&T Conference. The focus of the research described in these presentations is on materials and structures technologies that are parts of the various projects within the NASA Aeronautics Propulsion Systems Research and Technology Base Program. These projects include Physics and Process Modeling; Smart, Green Engine; Fast, Quiet Engine; High Temperature Engine Materials Program; and Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion. Also presented were research results from the Rotorcraft Systems Program and work supported by the NASA Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund. Authors from NASA Lewis Research Center, industry, and universities conducted research in the following areas: material processing, material characterization, modeling, life, applied life models, design techniques, vibration control, mechanical components, and tribology. Key issues, research accomplishments, and future directions are summarized in this publication.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of the sorption of radioelements onto cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, T.G.; Ilett, D.J.; Tweed, C.J.

    1996-08-01

    A model has been developed for the sorption of radioelements onto cementitious materials based on the diffuse-layer modeling approach. The model assumes that silicon sites (>SiOH) and calcium sites (>CaOH) dominate the surface chemistry and the sorption of radioelements onto the cementitious materials. Both types of site may undergo surface protonation and deprotonation reactions. Cement-based systems vary greatly in their chemistry depending on their calcium-to-silicon molar ratio, and the corresponding variation in the surface chemistry has been incorporated by allowing sorption of calcium ions onto silicon sites. This process results in a change from a silica-type surface, at very low calcium-silicon ratios, to a calcium hydroxide-type surface for high-calcium cement-based materials. The predicted variation in the surface chemistry is consistent with literature data on measured zeta potentials of cements. The model has been applied successfully to describe the sorption of simple caesium and iodide ions at varying calcium-silicon ratios. In a Nirex repository for low and intermediate level wastes, a high-calcium cementitious backfill would be specified. This model has allowed a consistent interpretation of experimental data for sorption of key radioelements, including uranium and plutonium, onto the backfill, under saline and non-saline conditions.

  12. A dynamic model for material removal in ultrasonic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.Y.; Rojurkar, K.P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper proposes a dynamic model of the material removal mechanism and provides a relationship between material removal rate and operation parameters in ultrasonic machining (USM). The model incorporates effect of high values of vibration amplitude, frequency and grit size. The effect of non-uniformity of abrasive grits is also considered by using a probability distribution for the diameter of the abrasive particles. The model is able to predict accurately the increasing rate of material removal for increasing values of amplitude and frequency. It can also be used to determine the reducing rate of material removal, after a certain maximum level is attained, for further increments of vibration amplitude and frequency. Equations representing the dynamic normal stress and elastic displacement of work-piece caused by the impact of an arbitrary grit are used in developing a model considering the dynamic impact phenomena of grits on the work-piece. The analysis shows that there is an effective speed zone for the tool. Within this range, grits in the cutting zone can obtain the maximum momentum and energy from the tool. During the machining process, only those grits whose sizes are in the range of the effective speed zone, can abrade work-piece most effectively.

  13. Cataloging, Processing, Administering AV Materials. A Model for Wisconsin Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Robert D., Ed.

    The objective of this cataloging manual is to recommend specific methods for cataloging audiovisual materials for use in individual school media centers. The following types of audiovisual aids are included: educational games, filmstrips, flat graphics, kits, models, motion pictures, realia, records, slides, sound filmstrips, tapes,…

  14. MODELING THE FATE OF TOXIC ORGANIC MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Documentation is given for PEST, a dynamic simulation model for evaluating the fate of toxic organic materials (TOM) in freshwater environments. PEST represents the time-varying concentration (in ppm) of a given TOM in each of as many as 16 carrier compartments; it also computes ...

  15. CALIBRATION OF A PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR INSTANTANEOUSLY DISCHARGED DREDGED MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes modifications to a computer model originally developed by R.C.Y. Koh and Y.C. Chang for predicting the physical fate of dredged material instantaneously released into a water column. Changes to the simulation include the calibration and verification of the p...

  16. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  17. Modeling plasma/material interactions during a tokamak disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1994-10-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are still of serious concern and present a potential obstacle for successful operation and reliable design. Erosion of plasma-facing materials due to thermal energy dump during a disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components, therefore diminishing the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive disruption erosion model which takes into account the interplay of major physical processes during plasma-material interaction has been developed. The initial burst of energy delivered to facing-material surfaces from direct impact of plasma particles causes sudden ablation of these materials. As a result, a vapor cloud is formed in front of the incident plasma particles. Shortly thereafter, the plasma particles are stopped in the vapor cloud, heating and ionizing it. The energy transmitted to the material surfaces is then dominated by photon radiation. It is the dynamics and the evolution of this vapor cloud that finally determines the net erosion rate and, consequently, the component lifetime. The model integrates with sufficient detail and in a self-consistent way, material thermal evolution response, plasma-vapor interaction physics, vapor hydrodynamics, and radiation transport in order to realistically simulate the effects of a plasma disruption on plasma-facing components. Candidate materials such as beryllium and carbon have been analyzed. The dependence of the net erosion rate on disruption physics and various parameters was analyzed and is discussed.

  18. Coupled transport/hyperelastic model for nastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homison, Chris; Weiland, Lisa M.

    2006-03-01

    Nastic materials are high energy density active materials that mimic processes used in the plant kingdom to produce large deformations through the conversion of chemical energy. These materials utilize the controlled transport of charge and fluid across a selectively-permeable membrane to achieve bulk deformation in a process referred to in the plant kingdom as nastic movements. The nastic material being developed consists of synthetic membranes containing biological ion pumps, ion channels, and ion exchangers surrounding fluid-filled cavities embedded within a polymer matrix. In this paper the formulation of a biological transport model and its coupling with a hyperelastic finite element model of the polymer matrix is discussed. The transport model includes contributions from ion pumps, ion exchangers, and solvent flux. This work will form the basis for a feedback loop in material synthesis efforts. The goal of these studies is to determine the relative importance of the various parameters associated with both the polymer matrix and the biological transport components.

  19. Modeling of Material Removal by Solid State Heat Capacity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-04-17

    Pulsed lasers offer the capability of rapid material removal. Here we present simulations of steel coupon tests by two solid state heat capacity lasers built at LLNL. Operating at 1.05 pm, these deliver pulse energies of about 80 J at 10 Hz, and about 500 J at 20 Hz. Each is flashlamp-pumped. The first laser was tested at LLNL, while the second laser has been delivered to HELSTF, White Sands Missile Range. Liquid ejection appears to be an important removal mechanism. We have modeled these experiments via a time-dependent code called THALES, which describes heat transport, melting, vaporization, and the hydrodynamics of liquid, vapor, and air. It was previously used, in a less advanced form, to model drilling by copper vapor lasers [1] . It was also used to model vaporization in beam dumps for a high-power laser [2]. The basic model is in 1D, while the liquid hydrodynamics is handled in 2D.

  20. Finite element modelling for materials with size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaddiwudhipong, S.; Hua, J.; Tho, K. K.; Liu, Z. S.

    2006-10-01

    This paper involves the formulation of the C0 finite elements incorporating the conventional mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity theory. Higher-order variables and consequently higher-order continuity conditions are not required allowing the direct applications of conventional plasticity algorithms in the existing finite element package. Implementation of the model whether analytically or computationally is efficient and straightforward as the strain gradient effect is confined in the material constitutive relation. The accuracy of the proposed elements in simulating the response of materials with strong size effect is verified through several numerical examples. The approach is applicable and valid to any materials with non-uniform plastic deformation larger than about 100 nm onwards. The proposed model becomes imperative when the deformation is less than 10 µm as classical plasticity is unable to describe the phenomenon comprehensively at this low level of deformation.

  1. Quantitative property-structural relation modeling on polymeric dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke

    Nowadays, polymeric materials have attracted more and more attention in dielectric applications. But searching for a material with desired properties is still largely based on trial and error. To facilitate the development of new polymeric materials, heuristic models built using the Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPR) techniques can provide reliable "working solutions". In this thesis, the application of QSPR on polymeric materials is studied from two angles: descriptors and algorithms. A novel set of descriptors, called infinite chain descriptors (ICD), are developed to encode the chemical features of pure polymers. ICD is designed to eliminate the uncertainty of polymer conformations and inconsistency of molecular representation of polymers. Models for the dielectric constant, band gap, dielectric loss tangent and glass transition temperatures of organic polymers are built with high prediction accuracy. Two new algorithms, the physics-enlightened learning method (PELM) and multi-mechanism detection, are designed to deal with two typical challenges in material QSPR. PELM is a meta-algorithm that utilizes the classic physical theory as guidance to construct the candidate learning function. It shows better out-of-domain prediction accuracy compared to the classic machine learning algorithm (support vector machine). Multi-mechanism detection is built based on a cluster-weighted mixing model similar to a Gaussian mixture model. The idea is to separate the data into subsets where each subset can be modeled by a much simpler model. The case study on glass transition temperature shows that this method can provide better overall prediction accuracy even though less data is available for each subset model. In addition, the techniques developed in this work are also applied to polymer nanocomposites (PNC). PNC are new materials with outstanding dielectric properties. As a key factor in determining the dispersion state of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix

  2. Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Frank; Newkirk, Joseph; Fan, Zhiqiang; Sparks, Todd; Chen, Xueyang; Fletcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunlu; Kumar, Kannan Suresh; Karnati, Sreekar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this proposed project is to research and develop a prediction tool for advanced additive manufacturing (AAM) processes for advanced materials and develop experimental methods to provide fundamental properties and establish validation data. Aircraft structures and engines demand materials that are stronger, useable at much higher temperatures, provide less acoustic transmission, and enable more aeroelastic tailoring than those currently used. Significant improvements in properties can only be achieved by processing the materials under nonequilibrium conditions, such as AAM processes. AAM processes encompass a class of processes that use a focused heat source to create a melt pool on a substrate. Examples include Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Direct Metal Deposition. These types of additive processes enable fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. To achieve the desired material properties and geometries of the final structure, assessing the impact of process parameters and predicting optimized conditions with numerical modeling as an effective prediction tool is necessary. The targets for the processing are multiple and at different spatial scales, and the physical phenomena associated occur in multiphysics and multiscale. In this project, the research work has been developed to model AAM processes in a multiscale and multiphysics approach. A macroscale model was developed to investigate the residual stresses and distortion in AAM processes. A sequentially coupled, thermomechanical, finite element model was developed and validated experimentally. The results showed the temperature distribution, residual stress, and deformation within the formed deposits and substrates. A mesoscale model was developed to include heat transfer, phase change with mushy zone, incompressible free surface flow, solute redistribution, and surface tension. Because of excessive computing time needed, a parallel computing approach was also tested. In addition

  3. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  4. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  5. A projection method to extract biological membrane models from 3D material models.

    PubMed

    Roohbakhshan, Farshad; Duong, Thang X; Sauer, Roger A

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a projection method for deriving membrane models from the corresponding three-dimensional material models. As a particular example the anisotropic Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden model is considered. The projection procedure is based on the kinematical and constitutive assumptions of a general membrane theory, considering the membrane to be a general two-dimensional manifold. By assuming zero transverse stress, the Lagrange multiplier associated with the incompressibility constraint can be eliminated from the formulation. The resulting nonlinear model is discretized and linearized within the finite element method. Several numerical examples are shown, considering quadratic Lagrange and NURBS finite elements. These show that the proposed model is in very good agreement with analytical solutions and with full 3D finite element computations. PMID:26455810

  6. Modeling the nanoscratching of self-healing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duki, Solomon F.; Kolmakov, German V.; Yashin, Victor V.; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    2011-02-01

    We use computational modeling to determine the mechanical response of crosslinked nanogels to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip that is moved through the sample. We focus on two-dimensional systems where the nanogels are interconnected by both strong and labile bonds. To simulate this system, we modify the lattice spring model (LSM) to extend the applicability of this method to a broader range of elastic materials. Via this modified LSM, we model each nanogel as a deformable particle. We utilize the Bell model to describe the bonds between these nanogel particles, and subsequently, simulate the rupturing of bonds due to the force exerted by the moving indenter. The ruptured labile bonds can readily reform and thus can effectively mend the cavities formed by the moving AFM tip. We determine how the fraction of labile bonds, the nanogel stiffness, and the size and velocity of the moving tip affect the self-healing behavior of the material. We find that samples containing just 10% of labile bonds can heal to approximately 90% of their original, undeformed morphology. Our results provide guidelines for creating reconfigurable materials that can undergo self-repair and thereby withstand greater mechanical stress under everyday use.

  7. Microstructural model of mechanical initiation of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.V.

    1995-09-01

    Mechanical initiation of chemical reactions in energetic materials depends on microstructural details of the materials. Several models are described in the literature that are appropriate for a continuum, such as energy dissipation from plastic flow, or shear bands. A technique is presented here for developing initiation models using relations between macroscopic variables and conditions at inter-grain contact areas in a granular material. The chemical processes that lead to initiation are included by using a 2-D numerical heat transfer model of energy flux on a surface spot of a half-space medium with multiple species chemical reactions. A number of calculations are done and the time to ignition at a given fluence is obtained as a function of spot size. Then simple kinematic relations between macroscopic stresses and the inter-grain contact forces are developed and the shearing velocity at the contact region is related to the macroscopic shear strain rate. Combining these relations leads to an ignition criterion in terms of macroscopic pressure, shear-strain rate and time. Even though very simple approximations for most relations are used, the overall result is similar to commonly used detonation initiation criterion. Experiments to define the constants in the model are under development and will be described.

  8. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  9. Modeling organohalide perovskites for photovoltaic applications: From materials to interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    The field of hybrid/organic photovoltaics has been revolutionized in 2012 by the first reports of solid-state solar cells based on organohalide perovskites, now topping at 20% efficiency. First-principles modeling has been widely applied to the dye-sensitized solar cells field, and more recently to perovskite-based solar cells. The computational design and screening of new materials has played a major role in advancing the DSCs field. Suitable modeling strategies may also offer a view of the crucial heterointerfaces ruling the device operational mechanism. I will illustrate how simulation tools can be employed in the emerging field of perovskite solar cells. The performance of the proposed simulation toolbox along with the fundamental modeling strategies are presented using selected examples of relevant materials and interfaces. The main issue with hybrid perovskite modeling is to be able to accurately describe their structural, electronic and optical features. These materials show a degree of short range disorder, due to the presence of mobile organic cations embedded within the inorganic matrix, requiring to average their properties over a molecular dynamics trajectory. Due to the presence of heavy atoms (e.g. Sn and Pb) their electronic structure must take into account spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in an effective way, possibly including GW corrections. The proposed SOC-GW method constitutes the basis for tuning the materials electronic and optical properties, rationalizing experimental trends. Modeling charge generation in perovskite-sensitized TiO2 interfaces is then approached based on a SOC-DFT scheme, describing alignment of energy levels in a qualitatively correct fashion. The role of interfacial chemistry on the device performance is finally discussed. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme [FP7/2007 2013] under Grant Agreement No. 604032 of the MESO project.

  10. Models for predicting temperature dependence of material properties of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marla, Deepak; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.; Joshi, Suhas S.

    2014-03-01

    A number of processes such as laser ablation, laser welding, electric discharge machining, etc involve high temperatures. Most of the processes involve temperatures much higher than the target melting and normal boiling point. Such large variation in target temperature causes a significant variation in its material properties. Due to the unavailability of experimental data on material properties at elevated temperatures, usually the data at lower temperatures is often erroneously extrapolated during modelling of these processes. Therefore, this paper attempts to evaluate the variation in material properties with temperature using some general and empirical theories, along with the available experimental data for aluminum. The evaluated properties of Al using the proposed models show a significant variation with temperature. Between room temperature and near-critical temperature (0.9Tc), surface reflectivity of Al varies from more than 90% to less than 50%, absorption coefficient decreases by a factor of 7, thermal conductivity decreases by a factor of 5, density decreases by a factor of 4, specific heat and latent heat of vapourization vary by a factor between 1.5 and 2. Applying these temperature-dependent material properties for modelling laser ablation suggest that optical properties have a greater influence on the process than thermophysical properties. The numerical predictions of the phase explosion threshold in laser ablation are within 5% of the experimental values.

  11. Modeling multiscale evolution of numerous voids in shocked brittle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yin; Wang, Wenqiang; He, Hongliang; Lu, Tiecheng

    2014-04-01

    The influence of the evolution of numerous voids on macroscopic properties of materials is a multiscale problem that challenges computational research. A shock-wave compression model for brittle material, which can obtain both microscopic evolution and macroscopic shock properties, was developed using discrete element methods (lattice model). Using a model interaction-parameter-mapping procedure, qualitative features, as well as trends in the calculated shock-wave profiles, are shown to agree with experimental results. The shock wave splits into an elastic wave and a deformation wave in porous brittle materials, indicating significant shock plasticity. Void collapses in the deformation wave were the natural reason for volume shrinkage and deformation. However, media slippage and rotation deformations indicated by complex vortex patterns composed of relative velocity vectors were also confirmed as an important source of shock plasticity. With increasing pressure, the contribution from slippage deformation to the final plastic strain increased. Porosity was found to determine the amplitude of the elastic wave; porosity and shock stress together determine propagation speed of the deformation wave, as well as stress and strain on the final equilibrium state. Thus, shock behaviors of porous brittle material can be systematically designed for specific applications.

  12. Force models for particle-dynamics simulations of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.

    1994-12-01

    Engineering-mechanics contact models are utilized to describe the inelastic, frictional interparticle forces acting in dry granular systems. Simple analyses based on one-dimensional chains are utilized to illustrate wave propagation phenomena in dense and dilute discrete particulates. The variation of restitution coefficient with impact velocity is illustrated for a variety of viscous and hysteretic normal force models. The effects of interparticle friction on material strength in discrete-particle simulations are much closer to measured values than are theories that do not allow article rotations.

  13. Development of a hyperelastic material model of subsynovial connective tissue using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yusuke; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most common disorders of the hand. Assessment of carpal tunnel tissue mechanical behavior, especially that of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT), is important to better understand the mechanisms of CTS. The aim of this study was to develop a hyperelastic material model of human SSCT using mechanical test data and finite element modeling (FEM). Experimental shear test data of SSCT from 7 normal subjects and 7 CTS patients collected in a prior study was used to define material response. Hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) from the first-order Ogden material property definition were iteratively solved using specimen-specific FEM models simulating the mechanical test conditions. A typical Ogden hyperelastic response for the normal and CTS SSCT was characterized by doing the same with data from all samples averaged together. The mean Ogden coefficients (μ/α) for the normal cadaver and CTS patient SSCT were 1.25×10(-5)MPa/4.51 and 1.99×10(-6)MPa/10.6, respectively when evaluating coefficients for individual specimens. The Ogden coefficients for the typical (averaged data) model for normal cadaver and CTS patient SSCT were 1.63×10(-5)MPa/3.93 and 5.00×10(-7)MPa/9.55, respectively. Assessment of SSCT mechanical response with a hyperelastic material model demonstrated significant differences between patient and normal cadaver. The refined assessment of these differences with this model may be important for future model development and in understanding clinical presentation of CTS. PMID:26482734

  14. Computational Modeling of Heterogeneous Reactive Materials at the Mesoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Mel R.

    1999-06-01

    Nearly all energetic materials, including explosives, pyrotechnics, propellants and intermetallics are heterogeneous and typically consist of a mixture of crystalline constituents and binders. These materials exhibit distinctly different thermal/mechanical/chemical behavior than pure materials because microstructure introduces internal boundary effects at the mesoscale. For example, the threshold to reaction is known to be greatly influenced by changes in crystal morphology, size, defect content and particle distribution. Much of current work in computational modeling describes macroscale behavior based on continuum theory or microscopic/atomistic behavior using molecular dynamics methods. The mesoscale has not been as extensively studied yet it is the level that bridges continuum and atomistic scales. Shock physics analysis can now take advantage of new parallel computing machines to provide improved resolution of shock processes at the mesoscale. This presentation discusses three-dimensional numerical simulations of shock impact on a realistic ensemble of crystalline grains. Detailed wave fields are resolved including the effects of material strength, thermal dissipation and reaction. Numerical simulations demonstrate that rapid material distortion occurs at crystal boundaries and the localization of energy produces hot-spots due to the effects of shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions. These studies provide new insights into the micromechanical behavior of heterogeneous energetic materials strongly suggesting that initiation and reaction of shocked heterogeneous materials involve states distinctly different from single jump states. The recent enhancements in numerical modeling due to massively-parallel computing pose new challenges for the development of novel experimental capabilities that can provide the detailed information of appropriate material descriptions and interface conditions at the mesoscale.

  15. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  16. Fatigue life prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Meyer, T. G.; Nelson, R. S.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the fatigue and fracture efforts under the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program was to significantly improve the analytic life prediction tools used by the aeronautical gas turbine engine industry. This was achieved in the areas of high-temperature thermal and mechanical fatigue of bare and coated high-temperature superalloys. The cyclic crack initiation and propagation resistance of nominally isotropic polycrystalline and highly anisotropic single crystal alloys were addressed. Life prediction modeling efforts were devoted to creep-fatigue interaction, oxidation, coatings interactions, multiaxiality of stress-strain states, mean stress effects, cumulative damage, and thermomechanical fatigue. The fatigue crack initiation life models developed to date include the Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP) for nominally isotropic materials, and the Tensile Hysteretic Energy Model for anisotropic superalloys. A fatigue model is being developed based upon the concepts of Path-Independent Integrals (PII) for describing cyclic crack growth under complex nonlinear response at the crack tip due to thermomechanical loading conditions. A micromechanistic oxidation crack extension model was derived. The models are described and discussed.

  17. Fatigue life prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Meyer, T. G.; Nelson, R. S.; Nissley, D. M.; Swanson, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A major objective of the fatigue and fracture efforts under the NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) program was to significantly improve the analytic life prediction tools used by the aeronautical gas turbine engine industry. This was achieved in the areas of high-temperature thermal and mechanical fatigue of bare and coated high-temperature superalloys. The cyclic crack initiation and propagation resistance of nominally isotropic polycrystalline and highly anisotropic single crystal alloys were addressed. Life prediction modeling efforts were devoted to creep-fatigue interaction, oxidation, coatings interactions, multiaxiality of stress-strain states, mean stress effects, cumulative damage, and thermomechanical fatigue. The fatigue crack initiation life models developed to date include the Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and the Total Strain Version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP) for nominally isotropic materials, and the Tensile Hysteretic Energy Model for anisotropic superalloys. A fatigue model is being developed based upon the concepts of Path-Independent Integrals (PII) for describing cyclic crack growth under complex nonlinear response at the crack tip due to thermomechanical loading conditions. A micromechanistic oxidation crack extension model was derived. The models are described and discussed.

  18. Modelling for the mechanical behavior of cementitious granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoxiong

    Crack damages due to load application are commonly observed in cementitious granular materials such as concrete, cemented sand, and ceramic materials. Previous analytical models for these types of materials have been developed based on continuum mechanics using a phenomenological approach. However, the theories of continuum mechanics have limitations when used for analyzing fracture mechanism and localized damages at a micro-scale level. Therefore, a microstructural approach is desirable for the analysis of these types of materials. In this dissertation, a contact law was derived for the inter-particle behavior of two particles connected by a cement binder. Microcracking process within binder was fully taken into account by regarding crack length as a basic damage factor. The binder initially contains small-size cracks which propagate and grow under external loading. As a result the binder is weakened with lower strength in shear and tension. Theory of fracture mechanics was employed to model the propagation and growth of these microcracks for both the shear fracture mode and normal fracture mode. The contact law was then incorporated in the analysis for the overall damage behaviors of cementitious granular material using the statistical micromechanics approach and the distinct element method. These overall damage behaviors include the stress-strain relationship, fracture strength, development of damage zone, and fatigue deformation. The micro-parameters affecting these behaviors are mainly the microcrack length and density, binder toughness, and binder elastic constants. In the numerical simulations, the cementitious granular materials were represented by 2-D random assemblies of rods bonded by cement binders with preexisting microcracks. Stress-strain relationships were modeled and validated for the uniaxial tension and compression tests, biaxial tension and compression tests, and double cantilever beam test. Force-deflection relationship and fatigue deformation

  19. Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, V.C.

    1992-12-01

    This special issues on Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior represents an outgrowth of presentations given at a symposium of the same title held at the 1991 ASME Applied Mechanics and Biomechanics Summer Conference at the Ohio State University. The symposium was organized to promote communication between researchers in three materials groups: rock, cementitious materials, ceramics and related composites. The enthusiastic response of both speakers and attendants at the ASME symposium convinced the organizer that it would be useful to put together a coherent volume which can reach a larger audience. It was decided that the papers individually and as a volume ought to provide a broader view, so that as much as possible, the work contained in each paper would be accessible to readers working in any of the three materials groups. Applied Mechanics Reviews presents an appropriate platform for achieving these objectives.

  20. Scratch modeling of polymeric materials with molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbig, Travis

    It is impossible to determine the amount of money that is spent every replacing products damaged from wear, but it is safe to assume that it is in the millions of dollars. With metallic materials, liquid lubricants are often used to prevent wear from materials rubbing against one another. However, with polymeric materials, liquid lubricants cause swelling, creating an increase in friction and therefore increasing the wear. Therefore, a different method or methods to mitigate wear in polymers should be developed. For better understanding of the phenomenon of wear, scratch resistance testing can be used. For this project, classic molecular dynamics is used to study the mechanics of nanometer scale scratching on amorphous polymeric materials. As a first approach, a model was created for polyethylene, considering intramolecular and intermolecular interactions as well as mass and volume of the CH 2 monomers in a polymer chain. The obtained results include analysis of penetration depth and recovery percentage related to indenter force and size.

  1. Multi-Material ALE with AMR for Modeling Hot Plasmas and Cold Fragmenting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alice, Koniges; Nathan, Masters; Aaron, Fisher; David, Eder; Wangyi, Liu; Robert, Anderson; David, Benson; Andrea, Bertozzi

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new 3D multi-physics multi-material code, ALE-AMR, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to the microstructural regimes. The code is unique in its ability to model hot radiating plasmas and cold fragmenting solids. New numerical techniques were developed for many of the physics packages to work efficiently on a dynamically moving and adapting mesh. We use interface reconstruction based on volume fractions of the material components within mixed zones and reconstruct interfaces as needed. This interface reconstruction model is also used for void coalescence and fragmentation. A flexible strength/failure framework allows for pluggable material models, which may require material history arrays to determine the level of accumulated damage or the evolving yield stress in J2 plasticity models. For some applications laser rays are propagating through a virtual composite mesh consisting of the finest resolution representation of the modeled space. A new 2nd order accurate diffusion solver has been implemented for the thermal conduction and radiation transport packages. One application area is the modeling of laser/target effects including debris/shrapnel generation. Other application areas include warm dense matter, EUV lithography, and material wall interactions for fusion devices.

  2. An Overview of Mesoscale Material Modeling with Eulerian Hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David

    2013-06-01

    Eulerian hydrocodes were originally developed for simulating strong shocks in solids and fluids, but their ability to handle arbitrarily large deformations and the formation of new free surfaces makes them attractive for simulating the deformation and failure of materials at the mesoscopic scale. A summary of some of the numerical techniques that have been developed to address common issues for this class of problems is presented with the shock compression of powders used as a model problem. Achieving the correct packing density with the correct statistical distribution of particle sizes and shapes is, in itself, a challenging problem. However, since Eulerian codes permit multiple materials within each element, or cell, the material interfaces do not have to follow the mesh lines. The use of digital image processing to map the pixels of micrographs to the Eulerian mesh has proven to be a popular and useful means of creating accurate models of complex microstructures. Micro CT scans have been used to extend this approach to three dimensions for several classes of materials. The interaction between the particles is of considerable interest. During shock compression, individual particles may melt and form jets, and the voids between them collapse. Dynamic interface ordering has become a necessity, and many codes now have a suite of options for handling multi-material mechanics. True contact algorithms are now replacing multi-material approximations in some cases. At the mesoscale, material properties often vary spatially due to sub-scale effects. Using a large number of material species to represent the variations is usually unattractive. Directly specifying the properties point-wise as history variables has not proven successful because the limiters in the transport algorithms quickly smooth out the variations. Circumventing the limiter problem is shown to be relatively simple with the use of a reference configuration and the transport of the initial coordinates

  3. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  4. Large scale molecular dynamics modeling of materials fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1994-02-01

    An atomistic molecular dynamics model of materials fabrication processes is presented. Several material removal processes are shown to be within the domain of this simulation method. Results are presented for orthogonal cutting of copper and silicon and for crack propagation in silica glass. Both copper and silicon show ductile behavior, but the atomistic mechanisms that allow this behavior are significantly different in the two cases. The copper chip remains crystalline while the silicon chip transforms into an amorphous state. The critical stress for crack propagation in silica glass was found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment and a novel stick-slip phenomenon was observed.

  5. Modeling interfaces between solids: Application to Li battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepley, N. D.; Holzwarth, N. A. W.

    2015-12-01

    We present a general scheme to model an energy for analyzing interfaces between crystalline solids, quantitatively including the effects of varying configurations and lattice strain. This scheme is successfully applied to the modeling of likely interface geometries of several solid state battery materials including Li metal, Li3PO4 , Li3PS4 , Li2O , and Li2S . Our formalism, together with a partial density of states analysis, allows us to characterize the thickness, stability, and transport properties of these interfaces. We find that all of the interfaces in this study are stable with the exception of Li3PS4/Li . For this chemically unstable interface, the partial density of states helps to identify mechanisms associated with the interface reactions. Our energetic measure of interfaces and our analysis of the band alignment between interface materials indicate multiple factors, which may be predictors of interface stability, an important property of solid electrolyte systems.

  6. Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2010-04-01

    Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

  7. Computational modelling of cohesive cracks in material structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, J.; Jarošová, P.

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of crack formation, considered as the creation of new surfaces in a material sample due to its microstructure, leads to nontrivial physical, mathematical and computational difficulties even in the rather simple case of quasistatic cohesive zone modelling inside the linear elastic theory. However, quantitative results from such evaluations are required in practice for the development and design of advanced materials, structures and technologies. Although most available software tools apply ad hoc computational predictions, this paper presents the proper formulation of such model problem, including its verification, and sketches the more-scale construction of finite-dimensional approximation of solutions, utilizing the finite element or similar techniques, together with references to original simulations results from engineering practice.

  8. Explicit particle-dynamics model for granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.

    1982-05-01

    Discrete-particle simulation of granular-material motion is developing into a viable method for studying how various interparticulate forces affect the bulk behavior of granular solids. A two-dimensional, polygonal-particle computer model, developed from the ideas of Cundall (1976), and incorporating other techniques from molecular dynamics, is being used in a study of the flow behavior of rubblized oil shale. Direct comparison with physical tests involving multiblock systems have verified the model's ability to predict the motion of real materials. Computer generated movies and high-speed motion pictures of physical tests involving gravity flow of 2-dimensional polygonal particles show formation of temporary arches followed by dynamic rupture and reformation of new arches. Direct shear tests on oil-shale rubble involving very large displacements indicate significant circulatory motion in the rubble. Computer simulation of the direct shear tests show similar behavior.

  9. Bayesian methods for characterizing unknown parameters of material models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Emery, J. M.; Grigoriu, M. D.; Field Jr., R. V.

    2016-02-04

    A Bayesian framework is developed for characterizing the unknown parameters of probabilistic models for material properties. In this framework, the unknown parameters are viewed as random and described by their posterior distributions obtained from prior information and measurements of quantities of interest that are observable and depend on the unknown parameters. The proposed Bayesian method is applied to characterize an unknown spatial correlation of the conductivity field in the definition of a stochastic transport equation and to solve this equation by Monte Carlo simulation and stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). As a result, the Bayesian method is also employed tomore » characterize unknown parameters of material properties for laser welds from measurements of peak forces sustained by these welds.« less

  10. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement. PMID:26110494

  11. Materials constitutive models for nonlinear analysis of thermally cycled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hunt, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of inelastic materials models on computed stress-strain solutions for thermally loaded structures were studied by performing nonlinear (elastoplastic creep) and elastic structural analyses on a prismatic, double edge wedge specimen of IN 100 alloy that was subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic kinematic, and combined plus transient creep) were exercised for the problem by using the MARC nonlinear, finite element computer program. Maximum total strain ranges computed from the elastic and nonlinear analyses agreed within 5 percent. Mean cyclic stresses, inelastic strain ranges, and inelastic work were significantly affected by the choice of inelastic constitutive model. The computing time per cycle for the nonlinear analyses was more than five times that required for the elastic analysis.

  12. Extended model of the photoinitiation mechanisms in photopolymer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shui; Gleeson, Michael R.; Sabol, Dusan; Sheridan, John T.

    2009-11-15

    In order to further improve photopolymer materials for applications such as data storage, a deeper understanding of the photochemical mechanisms which are present during the formation of holographic gratings has become ever more crucial. This is especially true of the photoinitiation processes, since holographic data storage requires multiple sequential short exposures. Previously, models describing the temporal variation in the photosensitizer (dye) concentration as a function of exposure have been presented and applied to two different types of photosensitizer, i.e., Methylene Blue and Erythrosine B, in a polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide based photopolymer. These models include the effects of photosensitizer recovery and bleaching under certain limiting conditions. In this paper, based on a detailed study of the photochemical reactions, the previous models are further developed to more physically represent these effects. This enables a more accurate description of the time varying dye absorption, recovery, and bleaching, and therefore of the generation of primary radicals in photopolymers containing such dyes.

  13. Universality and depinning models for plastic yield in amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Fernandez Castellano, David; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano

    Plastic yield in amorphous materials occurs as a result of complex collective dynamics of local reorganizations, which gives rise to rich phenomena such as strain localization, intermittent dynamics and power-law distributed avalanches. While such systems have received considerable attention, both theoretical and experimental, controversy remains over the nature of the yielding transition. We present a new fully-tensorial coarsegrained model in 2D and 3D, and demonstrate that the exponents describing avalanche distributions are universal under a variety of loading conditions, system dimensionality and size, and boundary conditions. Our results show that while depinning-type models in general are apt to describe the system, mean field depinning models are not.

  14. Numerical modeling of materials processes with fluid-fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanke, Jeffrey Michael

    A numerical model has been developed to study material processes that depend on the interaction between fluids with a large discontinuity in thermophysical properties. A base model capable of solving equations of mass, momentum, energy conservation, and solidification has been altered to enable tracking of the interface between two immiscible fluids and correctly predict the interface deformation using a volume of fluid (VOF) method. Two materials processes investigated using this technique are Electroslag Remelting (ESR) and plasma spray deposition. ESR is a secondary melting technique that passes an AC current through an electrically resistive slag to provide the heat necessary to melt the alloy. The simulation tracks the interface between the slag and metal. The model was validated against industrial scale ESR ingots and was able to predict trends in melt rate, sump depth, macrosegregation, and liquid sump depth. In order to better understand the underlying physics of the process, several constant current ESR runs simulated the effects of freezing slag in the model. Including the solidifying slag in the imulations was found to have an effect on the melt rate and sump shape but there is too much uncertainty in ESR slag property data at this time for quantitative predictions. The second process investigated in this work is the deposition of ceramic coatings via plasma spray deposition. In plasma spray deposition, powderized coating material is injected into a plasma that melts and carries the powder towards the substrate were it impacts, flattening out and freezing. The impacting droplets pile up to form a porous coating. The model is used to simulate this rain of liquid ceramic particles impacting the substrate and forming a coating. Trends in local solidification time and porosity are calculated for various particle sizes and velocities. The predictions of decreasing porosity with increasing particle velocity matches previous experimental results. Also, a

  15. Modeling of InGaSb thermophotovoltaic cells and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zierak, M.; Borrego, J.M.; Bhat, I.; Gutmann, R.J.; Charache, G.

    1997-05-01

    A closed form computer program has been developed for the simulation and optimization of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}Sb thermophotovoltaic cells operating at room temperature. The program includes material parameter models of the energy bandgap, optical absorption constant, electron and hole mobility, intrinsic carrier concentration and index of refraction for any composition of GaInSb alloys.

  16. Modeling the Nano-indentation of Self-healing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duki, Solomon F.; Kolmakov, German V.; Yashin, Victor V.; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    2011-03-01

    We use computational modeling to determine the mechanical response of crosslinked nanogels to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip that is moved through the sample. We focus on two-dimensional systems where the nanogels are interconnected by both strong and labile bonds. We model each nanogel as a deformable particle using the modified lattice spring model that is applicable to a broad range of elastic materials.We utilize the Bell model to describe the bonds between these nanogel particles, and subsequently, simulate the rupturing of bonds due the force exerted by the moving indenter. The ruptured labile bonds can readily reform and thus, can effectively mend the cavities formed by the moving AFM tip. We determine how the fraction of labile bonds, the nanogel stiffness, and the size and velocity of the moving tip affect the self-healing behavior of the material. We find that samples containing just 10 % of labile bonds can heal to approximately 90 % of their original, undeformed morphology.

  17. Modeling of radiation effects on nuclear waste package materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    A methodology is developed for the assessment of radiation effects on nuclear waste package materials. An assessment of the current status of understanding with regard to waste package materials and their behavior in radiation environments is presented. The methodology is used to make prediction as to the chemically induced changes in the groundwater surrounding nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff. The predictions indicate that mechanisms not currently being pursued by the Department of Energy may be a factor in the long-term performance of nuclear waste packages. The methodology embodies a physical model of the effects of radiation on aqueous solutions. Coupled to the physical model is a method for analyzing the complex nature of the physical model using adjoint sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity aid in both the physical understanding of the processes involved as well as aiding in eliminating portions of the model that have no bearing on the desired results. A computer implementation of the methodology is provided. 128 refs.

  18. Predictive modeling of infrared detectors and material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin

    Detectors sensitive to thermal and reflected infrared radiation are widely used for night-vision, communications, thermography, and object tracking among other military, industrial, and commercial applications. System requirements for the next generation of ultra-high-performance infrared detectors call for increased functionality such as large formats (> 4K HD) with wide field-of-view, multispectral sensitivity, and on-chip processing. Due to the low yield of infrared material processing, the development of these next-generation technologies has become prohibitively costly and time consuming. In this work, it will be shown that physics-based numerical models can be applied to predictively simulate infrared detector arrays of current technological interest. The models can be used to a priori estimate detector characteristics, intelligently design detector architectures, and assist in the analysis and interpretation of existing systems. This dissertation develops a multi-scale simulation model which evaluates the physics of infrared systems from the atomic (material properties and electronic structure) to systems level (modulation transfer function, dense array effects). The framework is used to determine the electronic structure of several infrared materials, optimize the design of a two-color back-to-back HgCdTe photodiode, investigate a predicted failure mechanism for next-generation arrays, and predict the systems-level measurables of a number of detector architectures.

  19. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  20. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines.

    PubMed

    Miskin, Marc Z; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material's configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26684770

  1. Micromechanical modeling of dynamic fracture in heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jun

    Fracture is the principal mode of failure for a variety of materials under dynamic conditions. The mathematical complexity precludes analytical solution to be obtained. The difficulty is especially pronounced when material inhomogeneities and anisotropy need to be considered. Recently, alumina/titanium diboride (Al2O3/TiB 2) composites with a wide range of micro and nano phase sizes and phase morphologies have been developed in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech. In order to understand failure mechanisms in this material system and the influence of phase morphologies and phase size on fracture resistance, a numerical framework is needed to explicitly account for arbitrary microstructures and fracture patterns. Micromechanical modeling and simulation provide an important approach for analyzing the effects of material inhomogeneity and anisotropy over a range of microscopic length scales. A framework is proposed in this research for explicit modeling and simulation of microscopic damage/fracture/failure processes. The model and approach account for the real arbitrary microstructural morphologies. A cohesive finite element method (CFEM) based on cohesive surface theory is used. A fully dynamic kinetic framework and finite deformation kinematic formulation are used. Mesh independence of solution is studied and verified. Idealized microstructures containing circular and elliptical particles and real microstructures with arbitrary morphologies are used to investigate the effects of phase morphologies, phase size and phase anisotropy on fracture of this ceramic composite system. Numerical results show that rnicrostructural variations give rise to a range of fracture resistance. Higher fracture resistance is obtained from microstructures with fine evenly distributed microstructural reinforcement entities. The failure mode is found to be significantly influenced by the interfacial bonding strength between the phases. Two distinct failure modes

  2. Materials modeling by design: applications to amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Parthapratim; Tafen, D. N.; Inam, F.; Cai, Bin; Drabold, D. A.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we review a host of methods used to model amorphous materials. We particularly describe methods which impose constraints on the models to ensure that the final model meets a priori requirements (on structure, topology, chemical order, etc). In particular, we review work based on quench from the melt simulations, the 'decorate and relax' method, which is shown to be a reliable scheme for forming models of certain binary glasses. A 'building block' approach is also suggested and yields a pleading model for GeSe1.5. We also report on the nature of vulcanization in an Se network cross-linked by As, and indicate how introducing H into an a-Si network develops into a-Si:H. We also discuss explicitly constrained methods including reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) and a novel method called 'Experimentally Constrained Molecular Relaxation'. The latter merges the power of ab initio simulation with the ability to impose external information associated with RMC.

  3. Materials modeling by design: applications to amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Parthapratim; Tafen, D N; Inam, F; Cai, Bin; Drabold, D A

    2009-02-25

    In this paper, we review a host of methods used to model amorphous materials. We particularly describe methods which impose constraints on the models to ensure that the final model meets a priori requirements (on structure, topology, chemical order, etc). In particular, we review work based on quench from the melt simulations, the 'decorate and relax' method, which is shown to be a reliable scheme for forming models of certain binary glasses. A 'building block' approach is also suggested and yields a pleading model for GeSe(1.5). We also report on the nature of vulcanization in an Se network cross-linked by As, and indicate how introducing H into an a-Si network develops into a-Si:H. We also discuss explicitly constrained methods including reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) and a novel method called 'Experimentally Constrained Molecular Relaxation'. The latter merges the power of ab initio simulation with the ability to impose external information associated with RMC. PMID:21817359

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Structurally-Graded Materials Using Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Models and Continuum Crystal Plasticity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology that combines the predictive capability of discrete dislocation plasticity and the computational efficiency of continuum crystal plasticity is developed. Single crystal configurations of different grain sizes modeled with periodic boundary conditions are analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity (DD) to obtain grain size-dependent stress-strain predictions. These relationships are mapped into crystal plasticity parameters to develop a multiscale DD/CP model for continuum level simulations. A polycrystal model of a structurally-graded microstructure is developed, analyzed and used as a benchmark for comparison between the multiscale DD/CP model and the DD predictions. The multiscale DD/CP model follows the DD predictions closely up to an initial peak stress and then follows a strain hardening path that is parallel but somewhat offset from the DD predictions. The difference is believed to be from a combination of the strain rate in the DD simulation and the inability of the DD/CP model to represent non-monotonic material response.

  5. Cubical Mass-Spring Model design based on a tensile deformation test and nonlinear material model.

    PubMed

    San-Vicente, Gaizka; Aguinaga, Iker; Tomás Celigüeta, Juan

    2012-02-01

    Mass-Spring Models (MSMs) are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of deformable bodies such as soft tissues in medical applications. Although they are fast to compute, they lack accuracy and their design remains still a great challenge. The major difficulties in building realistic MSMs lie on the spring stiffness estimation and the topology identification. In this work, the mechanical behavior of MSMs under tensile loads is analyzed before studying the spring stiffness estimation. In particular, the performed qualitative and quantitative analysis of the behavior of cubical MSMs shows that they have a nonlinear response similar to hyperelastic material models. According to this behavior, a new method for spring stiffness estimation valid for linear and nonlinear material models is proposed. This method adjusts the stress-strain and compressibility curves to a given reference behavior. The accuracy of the MSMs designed with this method is tested taking as reference some soft-tissue simulations based on nonlinear Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results show that MSMs can be designed to realistically model the behavior of hyperelastic materials such as soft tissues and can become an interesting alternative to other approaches such as nonlinear FEM. PMID:22156291

  6. Life prediction and constitutive models for anisotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The intent of this program is to develop a basic understanding of cyclic creep-fatigue deformation mechanisms and damage accumulation, a capability for reliable life prediction, and the ability to model the constitutive behavior of anisotropic single crystal (SC) and directionally solidified or recrystallized (DSR) comprise the program, and the work breakdown for each option reflects a distinct concern for two classes of anisotropic materials, SC and DSR materials, at temperatures encountered in the primary gas path (airfoil temperatures), and at temperatures typical of the blade root attachment and shank area. Work directed toward the higher temperature area of concern in the primary gas path includes effects of coatings on the behavior and properties of the materials of interest. The blade root attachment work areas will address the effects of stress concentrations associated with attachment features.

  7. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  8. Three-dimensional micromechanical modeling of voided polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, M.; Parks, D. M.; Boyce, M. C.

    2002-02-01

    A three-dimensional micromechanical unit cell model for particle-filled materials is presented. The cell model is based on a Voronoi tessellation of particles arranged on a body-centered cubic (BCC) array. The three-dimensionality of the present cell model enables the study of several deformation modes, including uniaxial, plane strain and simple shear deformations, as well as arbitrary principal stress states. The unit cell model is applied to studies on the micromechanical and macromechanical behavior of rubber-toughened polycarbonate. Different load cases are examined, including plane strain deformation, simple shear deformation and principal stress states. For a constant macroscopic strain rate, the different load cases show that the macroscopic flow strength of the blend decreases with an increase in void volume fraction, as expected. The main mechanism for plastic deformation is broad shear banding across inter-particle ligaments. The distributed nature of plastic straining acts to reduce the amount of macroscopic strain softening in the blend as the initial void volume fraction is increased. In the case of plane strain deformation, the plastic flow is observed to initiate across inter-particle ligaments in the direction of constraint. This particular mode of deformation could not have been captured using a two-dimensional, plane strain idealization of cylindrical voids in a matrix. The potential for localized crazing and/or cavitation in the matrix is addressed. It is observed that the introduction of voids acts to relieve hydrostatic stress in the matrix material, compared to the homopolymer. It is also seen that the predicted peak hydrostatic stress in the matrix is higher under plane strain deformation than under triaxial tension (with equal lateral stresses), for the same macroscopic stress triaxiality. The effect of void volume fraction on the macroscopic uniaxial tension behavior of the different blends is examined using a Considère construction for

  9. Exascale Co-design for Modeling Materials in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, Timothy C.

    2014-07-08

    Computational materials science has provided great insight into the response of materials under extreme conditions that are difficult to probe experimentally. For example, shock-induced plasticity and phase transformation processes in single-crystal and nanocrystalline metals have been widely studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, and many of these predictions are beginning to be tested at advanced 4th generation light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). I will describe our simulation predictions and their recent verification at LCLS, outstanding challenges in modeling the response of materials to extreme mechanical and radiation environments, and our efforts to tackle these as part of the multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx). ExMatEx has initiated an early and deep collaboration between domain (computational materials) scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and hardware architects, in order to establish the relationships between algorithms, software stacks, and architectures needed to enable exascale-ready materials science application codes within the next decade. We anticipate that we will be able to exploit hierarchical, heterogeneous architectures to achieve more realistic large-scale simulations with adaptive physics refinement, and are using tractable application scale-bridging proxy application testbeds to assess new approaches and requirements. Such current scale-bridging strategies accumulate (or recompute) a distributed response database from fine-scale calculations, in a top-down rather than bottom-up multiscale approach.

  10. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material’s configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26684770

  11. Analytic Thermoelectric Couple Modeling: Variable Material Properties and Transient Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the operation of a thermoelectric couple a set of analytic solutions have been derived for a variable material property couple and a transient couple. Using an analytic approach, as opposed to commonly used numerical techniques, results in a set of useful design guidelines. These guidelines can serve as useful starting conditions for further numerical studies, or can serve as design rules for lab built couples. The analytic modeling considers two cases and accounts for 1) material properties which vary with temperature and 2) transient operation of a couple. The variable material property case was handled by means of an asymptotic expansion, which allows for insight into the influence of temperature dependence on different material properties. The variable property work demonstrated the important fact that materials with identical average Figure of Merits can lead to different conversion efficiencies due to temperature dependence of the properties. The transient couple was investigated through a Greens function approach; several transient boundary conditions were investigated. The transient work introduces several new design considerations which are not captured by the classic steady state analysis. The work helps to assist in designing couples for optimal performance, and also helps assist in material selection.

  12. Material modeling for multistage tube hydroforming process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboori, Mehdi

    strain on the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids are investigated through a new user material for burst prediction during tube hydroforming. A numerical procedure for both plasticity and fracture is developed and implemented into 3D explicit commercial finite element software (LS-DYNA) through a new user material subroutine. The FLDs and predicted bursting pressure results are compared to the experimental data to validate the models. Finally, the new user material model is used to predict the bursting point of some real tube hydroforming parts such as round to square and round to V parts. Then, the predicted bursting pressure results are compared to the experimental data to validate the models in real and multistep tube hydroforming processes.

  13. A Reproducible Oral Microcosm Biofilm Model for Testing Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rudney, J.D.; Chen, R.; Lenton, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Jones, R.S.; Reilly, C.; Fok, A.S.; Aparicio, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Methods and Results Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite disks were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms were analyzed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose-pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veilonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. Conclusions This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. PMID:22925110

  14. Model for temperature-dependent magnetization of nanocrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2015-01-07

    A magnetization model of nanocrystalline materials incorporating intragrain anisotropies, intergrain interactions, and texture effects has been extended to include the thermal fluctuations. The method relies on the stochastic Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert theory of magnetization dynamics and permits to study the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline materials at arbitrary temperature below the Currie temperature. The model has been used to determine the intergrain exchange constant and grain boundary anisotropy constant of nanocrystalline Ni at 100 K and 298 K. It is found that the thermal fluctuations suppress the strength of the intergrain exchange coupling and also reduce the grain boundary anisotropy. In comparison with its value at 2 K, the interparticle exchange constant decreases by 16% and 42% and the grain boundary anisotropy constant decreases by 28% and 40% at 100 K and 298 K, respectively. An application of the model to study the grain size-dependent magnetization indicates that when the thermal activation energy is comparable to the free energy of grains, the decrease in the grain size leads to the decrease in the magnetic permeability and saturation magnetization. The mechanism by which the grain size influences the magnetic properties of nc–Ni is discussed.

  15. Model for temperature-dependent magnetization of nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2015-01-01

    A magnetization model of nanocrystalline materials incorporating intragrain anisotropies, intergrain interactions, and texture effects has been extended to include the thermal fluctuations. The method relies on the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory of magnetization dynamics and permits to study the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline materials at arbitrary temperature below the Currie temperature. The model has been used to determine the intergrain exchange constant and grain boundary anisotropy constant of nanocrystalline Ni at 100 K and 298 K. It is found that the thermal fluctuations suppress the strength of the intergrain exchange coupling and also reduce the grain boundary anisotropy. In comparison with its value at 2 K, the interparticle exchange constant decreases by 16% and 42% and the grain boundary anisotropy constant decreases by 28% and 40% at 100 K and 298 K, respectively. An application of the model to study the grain size-dependent magnetization indicates that when the thermal activation energy is comparable to the free energy of grains, the decrease in the grain size leads to the decrease in the magnetic permeability and saturation magnetization. The mechanism by which the grain size influences the magnetic properties of nc-Ni is discussed.

  16. Mooney-Rivlin biomechanical modeling of lung with Inhomogeneous material.

    PubMed

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the Mooney-Rivlin material with hyperelastic strain energy was proposed for biomechanical modeling of the lung. We modeled the lung as an inhomogeneous Mooney-Rivlin material with uncoupled deviatoric and volumetric behavior. The proposed method was evaluated on the lungs of eight lung cancer patients. For each patient, the lung was segmented from the 4D-CT images and tetrahedral volume mesh of the lung in phase 50% was created by using the adaptive mesh generation toolkit. The demons deformable registration algorithm was used to extract the displacement vector fields (DVFs). The Jacobian of the deformation gradient was calculated from DVFs, and the lung strain energy function was optimized to improve the tumor center of mass (TCM) motion simulation accuracy between respiratory phase 50% and 0%. The average TCM motion simulation error for the proposed strategy is 1.95 mm for eight patients. We observed 13% improvement in the TCM position prediction compared with the homogeneous Mooney-Rivlin modeling. PMID:26738123

  17. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  18. Predictive Modeling of Terrestrial Radiation Exposure from Geologic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.; Haber, Daniel University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela; Marsac, Kara; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are important for those working in nuclear security and industry for determining locations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radionuclides. During an aerial gamma ray survey, a low flying aircraft, such as a helicopter, flies in a linear pattern across the survey area while measuring the gamma emissions with a sodium iodide (NaI) detector. Currently, if a gamma ray survey is being flown in an area, the only way to correct for geologic sources of gamma rays is to have flown the area previously. This is prohibitively expensive and would require complete national coverage. This project’s goal is to model the geologic contribution to radiological backgrounds using published geochemical data, GIS software, remote sensing, calculations, and modeling software. K, U and Th are the three major gamma emitters in geologic material. U and Th are assumed to be in secular equilibrium with their daughter isotopes. If K, U, and Th abundance values are known for a given geologic unit the expected gamma ray exposure rate can be calculated using the Grasty equation or by modeling software. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport software (MCNP), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, is modeling software designed to simulate particles and their interactions with matter. Using this software, models have been created that represent various lithologies. These simulations randomly generate gamma ray photons at energy levels expected from natural radiologic sources. The photons take a random path through the simulated geologic media and deposit their energy at the end of their track. A series of nested spheres have been created and filled with simulated atmosphere to record energy deposition. Energies deposited are binned in the same manner as the NaI detectors used during an aerial survey. These models are used in place of the simplistic Grasty equation as they take into account absorption properties of the lithology which the

  19. A variable polytrope index applied to planet and material models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weppner, S. P.; McKelvey, J. P.; Thielen, K. D.; Zielinski, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a new approach to a century-old assumption which enhances not only planetary interior calculations but also high-pressure material physics. We show that the polytropic index is the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We then augment the traditional polytrope theory by including a variable polytrope index within the confines of the Lane-Emden differential equation. To investigate the possibilities of this method, we create a high-quality universal equation of state, transforming the traditional polytrope method to a tool with the potential for excellent predictive power. The theoretical foundation of our equation of state is the same elastic observable which we found equivalent to the polytrope index, the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We calculate the density-pressure of six common materials up to 1018 Pa, mass-radius relationships for the same materials, and produce plausible density-radius models for the rocky planets of our Solar system. We argue that the bulk modulus and its derivatives have been underutilized in previous planet formation methods. We constrain the material surface observables for the inner core, outer core, and mantle of planet Earth in a systematic way including pressure, bulk modulus, and the polytrope index in the analysis. We believe that this variable polytrope method has the necessary apparatus to be extended further to gas giants and stars. As supplemental material we provide computer code to calculate multi-layered planets.

  20. A variable polytrope index applied to planet and material models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielen, Kevin; Weppner, Stephen; Zielinski, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to a century-old assumption which enhances not only planetary interior calculations but also high-pressure material physics. We show that the polytropic index is the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We then augment the traditional polytrope theory by including a variable polytrope index within the confines of the Lane-Emden differential equation. To investigate the possibilities of this method, we create a high-quality universal equation of state, transforming the traditional polytrope method to a tool with the potential for excellent predictive power. The theoretical foundation of our equation of state is the same elastic observable which we found equivalent to the polytrope index, the derivative of the bulk modulus with respect to pressure. We calculate the density-pressure of six common materials up to 1018 Pa, mass-radius relationships for the same materials, and produce plausible density-radius models for the rocky planets of our Solar system. We argue that the bulk modulus and its derivatives have been underutilized in previous planet formation methods. We constrain the material surface observables for the inner core, outer core, and mantle of planet Earth in a systematic way including pressure, bulk modulus, and the polytrope index in the analysis. We believe that this variable polytrope method has the necessary apparatus to be extended further to gas giants and stars. As supplemental material we provide computer code to calculate multi-layered planets.

  1. Constitutive models for static and dynamic response of geotechnical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1983-11-01

    The objective of this research program has been to develop realistic macroscopic constitutive relations which describe static and dynamic properties of geotechnical materials (soils and rocks). To this end a coordinated theoretical and experimental activity has been followed. The theoretical work includes a balanced combination of statistical microscopic (at the grain size level) modeling and a nonclassical elasto-plastic macroscopic formulation. The latter includes the effects of internal friction, plastic compressibility, and pressure sensitivity, as well as anisotropy which is commonly observed in geotechnical materials. The following specific goals have been sought: (1) to develop three-dimensional constitutive relations under ordinary or high pressures (such as those induced by blasting or tectonic forces which may cause a large amount of densification by relative motion and possible crushing of grains); and (2) to examine and characterize the behavior of saturated granular materials under dynamic loading. The latter item includes characterization of possible liquefaction and subsidence which may be induced in granular materials under confining pressure by ground vibration or passage of waves. The theoretical work has been carefully coordinated with key experiments in order to: (1) understand the basic physics of the process, both at macroscopic and microscopic levels; (2) to verify the corresponding theoretical predictions; and (3) to establish relevant material parameters.

  2. Modelling challenges for battery materials and electrical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Richard P.; Schultz, Peter A.

    2013-10-01

    Many vital requirements in world-wide energy production, from the electrification of transportation to better utilization of renewable energy production, depend on developing economical, reliable batteries with improved performance characteristics. Batteries reduce the need for gasoline and liquid hydrocarbons in an electrified transportation fleet, but need to be lighter, longer-lived and have higher energy densities, without sacrificing safety. Lighter and higher-capacity batteries make portable electronics more convenient. Less expensive electrical storage accelerates the introduction of renewable energy to electrical grids by buffering intermittent generation from solar or wind. Meeting these needs will probably require dramatic changes in the materials and chemistry used by batteries for electrical energy storage. New simulation capabilities, in both methods and computational resources, promise to fundamentally accelerate and advance the development of improved materials for electric energy storage. To fulfil this promise significant challenges remain, both in accurate simulations at various relevant length scales and in the integration of relevant information across multiple length scales. This focus section of Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering surveys the challenges of modelling for energy storage, describes recent successes, identifies remaining challenges, considers various approaches to surmount these challenges and discusses the potential of these methods for future battery development. Zhang et al begin with atoms and electrons, with a review of first-principles studies of the lithiation of silicon electrodes, and then Fan et al examine the development and use of interatomic potentials to the study the mechanical properties of lithiated silicon in larger atomistic simulations. Marrocchelli et al study ionic conduction, an important aspect of lithium-ion battery performance, simulated by molecular dynamics. Emerging high

  3. Damage Prediction Models for Advanced Materials and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Ming; Ahmad, Jalees; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the assessment and evaluation of various acoustic tile designs were conducted using three-dimensional finite element analysis, which included static analysis, thermal analysis and modal analysis of integral and non-integral tile design options. Various benchmark specimens for acoustic tile designs, including CMC integral T-joint and notched CMC plate, were tested in both room and elevated temperature environment. Various candidate ceramic matrix composite materials were used in the numerical modeling and experimental study. The research effort in this program evolved from numerical modeling and concept design to a combined numerical analysis and experimental study. Many subjects associated with the design and performance of the acoustic tile in jet engine exhaust nozzle have been investigated.

  4. A multimodal location and routing model for hazardous materials transportation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanchang; Lu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Quadrifoglio, Luca

    2012-08-15

    The recent US Commodity Flow Survey data suggest that transporting hazardous materials (HAZMAT) often involves multiple modes, especially for long-distance transportation. However, not much research has been conducted on HAZMAT location and routing on a multimodal transportation network. Most existing HAZMAT location and routing studies focus exclusively on single mode (either highways or railways). Motivated by the lack of research on multimodal HAZMAT location and routing and the fact that there is an increasing demand for it, this research proposes a multimodal HAZMAT model that simultaneously optimizes the locations of transfer yards and transportation routes. The developed model is applied to two case studies of different network sizes to demonstrate its applicability. The results are analyzed and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:22633882

  5. Model of heterogeneous material dissolution in simulated biological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, A. G.; Gutmanas, E. Y.

    2015-11-01

    In orthopedic research, increasing attention is being paid to bioresorbable/biodegradable implants as an alternative to permanent metallic bone healing devices. Biodegradable metal based implants possessing high strength and ductility potentially can be used in load bearing sites. Biodegradable Mg and Fe are ductile and Fe possess high strength, but Mg degrades too fast and Fe degrades too slow, Ag is a noble metal and should cause galvanic corrosion of the more active metallic iron - thus, corrosion of Fe can be increased. Nanostructuring should results in higher strength and can result in higher rate of dissolution/degradation from grain boundaries. In this work, a simple dissolution model of heterogeneous three phase nanocomposite material is considered - two phases being metal Fe and Ag and the third - nanopores. Analytical solution for the model is presented. Calculations demonstrate that the changes in the relative amount of each phase depend on mass exchange and diffusion coefficients. Theoretical results agree with preliminary experimental results.

  6. Seismoelectric wave propagation numerical modelling in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, S.; Garambois, S.; Jouniaux, L.; Brito, D.; Sailhac, P.; Bordes, C.

    2013-09-01

    To better understand and interpret seismoelectric measurements acquired over vadose environments, both the existing theory and the wave propagation modelling programmes, available for saturated materials, should be extended to partial saturation conditions. We propose here an extension of Pride's equations aiming to take into account partially saturated materials, in the case of a water-air mixture. This new set of equations was incorporated into an existing seismoelectric wave propagation modelling code, originally designed for stratified saturated media. This extension concerns both the mechanical part, using a generalization of the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the electromagnetic part, for which dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity were expressed against water saturation. The dynamic seismoelectric coupling was written as a function of the streaming potential coefficient, which depends on saturation, using four different relations derived from recent laboratory or theoretical studies. In a second part, this extended programme was used to synthesize the seismoelectric response for a layered medium consisting of a partially saturated sand overburden on top of a saturated sandstone half-space. Subsequent analysis of the modelled amplitudes suggests that the typically very weak interface response (IR) may be best recovered when the shallow layer exhibits low saturation. We also use our programme to compute the seismoelectric response of a capillary fringe between a vadose sand overburden and a saturated sand half-space. Our first modelling results suggest that the study of the seismoelectric IR may help to detect a sharp saturation contrast better than a smooth saturation transition. In our example, a saturation contrast of 50 per cent between a fully saturated sand half-space and a partially saturated shallow sand layer yields a stronger IR than a stepwise decrease in saturation.

  7. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.

  8. Modeling Material Flow Characteristics Over Multiple Recrystallization Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A. D.; Lin, J.; Dean, T. A.; Farrugia, D. C. J.

    2007-04-07

    The evolution of steel microstructure during multi-pass hot rolling processes may include several recrystallization (RX) stages. Assuming a sufficient dislocation density is present at the exit of the roll, RX will occur during the interpass time between rolling stages. This will result in the material reaching the next rolling stand in either a full recrystallized or part recrystallized state. In this study an equation set is proposed in which complex RX cycles may be modeled, including overlapping cycles. Other microstructure information such as grain size evolution may be mapped.

  9. Modeling aspects of the dynamic response of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ionita, Axinte; Clements, Brad; Mas, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In numerical simulations of engineering applications involving heterogeneous materials capturing the local response coming from a distribution of heterogeneities can lead to a very large model thus making simulations difficult. The use of homogenization techniques can reduce the size of the problem but will miss the local effects. Homogenization can also be difficult if the constituents obey different types of constitutive laws. Additional complications arise if inelastic deformation. In such cases a two-scale approach is prefened and tills work addresses these issues in the context of a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM). Examples of using two-scale FEM approaches are presented.

  10. On Lagrangian stochastic modelling of material transport in oceanic gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A. M.

    2002-11-01

    The introduction of ‘spin’ into second-order Lagrangian stochastic models (LSM) for stationary turbulence with broken reflectional symmetry is shown to result in the prediction of super-diffusive transport at intermediate times and the occurrence of anomalously large normal diffusion at later times. These characteristic features of material transport in oceanic gyres cannot be reproduced by two-dimensional first-order LSM. A correspondence is established between high-dimensional, low-order LSM and lower-dimensional, higher-order LSM. It is found that time-dependent spin statistics allow for the coexistence of rotating particle trajectories and non-oscillatory Lagrangian velocity autocorrelation functions.