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Sample records for material properties processing

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance of material properties and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper demonstrates, primarily for the non-specialist and within the context of new and recent achievements, the diagnostic value of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the study of material properties and processes. I have selected three EPR studies which demonstrate the elegance and uniqueness of EPR in atomic defect studies and exemplify unusual achievements through the use of new techniques for material measurement and preparation. A brief introduction into the origin, interaction, and detection of unpaired electrons is included.

  2. Food material properties and early hominin processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Zink, Katherine D; Lieberman, Daniel E; Lucas, Peter W

    2014-12-01

    Although early Homo is hypothesized to have used tools more than australopiths to process foods prior to consumption, it is unknown how much the food processing techniques they used altered the material properties of foods, and therefore the masticatory forces they generated, and how well they were able to comminute foods. This study presents experimental data on changes to food material properties caused by mechanical tenderization (pounding with a stone tool) and cooking (dry roasting) of two foods likely to have been important components of the hominin diet: meat and tubers. Mechanical tenderization significantly decreased tuber toughness by 42%, but had no effect on meat toughness. Roasting significantly decreased several material properties of tubers correlated with masticatory effort including toughness (49%), fracture stress (28%) and elastic modulus (45%), but increased the toughness (77%), fracture stress (50%-222%), and elastic modulus of muscle fibers in meat (308%). Despite increasing many material properties of meat associated with higher masticatory forces, roasting also decreased measured energy loss by 28%, which likely makes it easier to chew. These results suggest that the use of food processing techniques by early Homo probably differed for meat and tubers, but together would have reduced masticatory effort, helping to relax selection to maintain large, robust faces and large, thickly enameled teeth. PMID:25439707

  3. PROPERTIES AND NANOSTRUCTURES OF MATERIALS PROCESSED BY SPD TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Xiaoshan; Huang, J.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    Metallic materials usually exhibit higher strength but lower ductility after being plastically deformed by conventional techniques such as rolling, drawing and extrusion. In contrast, nanostructured metals and alloys processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) have demonstrated both high strength and high ductility. This extraordinary mechanical behavior is attributed to the unique nanostructures generated by SPD processing. It demonstrates the possibility of tailoring the microstructures of metals and alloys by SPD to obtain superior mechanical properties. The SPD-generated nanostructures have many features related to deformation, including high dislocation densities, and high- and low-angle grain boundaries in equilibrium or non-equilibrium states. This paper reviews the mechanical properties and the defect structures of SPD-processed nanostructured materials. Keywords: strength, ductility, nanostructures, SPD, non-equilibrium grain boundary

  4. Bridging Microstructure, Properties and Processing of Polymer Based Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a guest editorial for a special issue in Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. The papers collected in this special issue emphasize significant challenges, current approaches and future strategies necessary to advance the development of polymer-based materials. They were partly presented at the symposium of 'Bridging microstructure, properties and processing of polymer based advanced materials' in the TMS 2011 annual conference meeting, which was held in San Diego, US, on Feb 28 to March 3, 2011. This symposium was organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (USA) and the Institute of Mechanics of Fluids and Solids of the University of Strasbourg (France). The organizers were D.S. Li, S. Ahzi, and M. Khaleel.

  5. Processing and nanostructure influences on mechanical properties of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert David

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials are materials that can generate an electric current from a thermal gradient, with possible service in recovery of waste heat such as engine exhaust. Significant progress has been made in improving TE conversion efficiency, typically reported according to the figure of merit, ZT, with several recent papers publishing ZT values above 2. Furthermore, cost reductions may be made by the use of lower cost elements such as Mg, Si, Sn, Pb, Se and S in TE materials, while achieving ZT values between 1.3 and 1.8. To be used in a device, the thermoelectric material must be able to withstand the applied thermal and mechanical forces without failure. However, these materials are brittle, with low fracture toughness typically less than 1.5 MPa-m1/2, and often less than 0.5 MPa-m1/2. For comparison, window glass is approximately 0.75 MPa-m1/2. They have been optimized with nanoprecipitates, nanoparticles, doping, alterations in stoichiometry, powder processing and other techniques, all of which may alter the mechanical properties. In this study, the effect of SiC nanoparticle additions in Mg2Si, SnTe and Ag nanoparticle additions in the skutterudite Ba0.3Co 4Sb12 on the elastic moduli, hardness and fracture toughness are measured. Large changes (˜20%) in the elastic moduli in SnTe 1+x as a function of x at 0 and 0.016 are shown. The effect on mechanical properties of doping and precipitates of CdS or ZnS in a PbS or PbSe matrix have been reported. Changes in sintering behavior of the skutterudite with the Ag nanoparticle additions were explored. Possible liquid phase sintering, with associated benefits in lower processing temperature, faster densification and lower cost, has been shown. A technique has been proposed for determining additional liquid phase sintering aids in other TE materials. The effects of porosity, grain size, powder processing method, and sintering method were explored with YbAl3 and Ba0.3Co4Sb 12, with the porosity dependence of

  6. Synthesis, processing and properties of materials for SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Armstrong, T.A.; Kingsley, J.J.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-03-01

    The synthesis and processing methods of complex oxide materials can significantly influence use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This paper discusses (1) effects of powder synthesis and conditioning on fabrication, i.e., sintering, where close, reproducible control of composition and structure are required, and (2) influences on electrical, mechanical, structural and electrochemical properties that can influence SOFC performance. Examples are given for chromites, manganites and related oxides used as interconnections and electrodes in SOFCs. Materials, from source to incorporation into the fuel cell and generator, is a major issue in the development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). An integral part of this is the synthesis from chemicals and other virgin materials, generally as an oxide or metal powder, which can become a SOFC component. In some instances, such as with electrochemical vapor deposition, the component is formed directly from the chemicals. The synthesized materials are then conditioned and processes prior to fabrication into the fuel cell component, either separately or in conjunction with other material components.

  7. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-04

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  8. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-01

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  9. Properties and processing of nanocrystalline materials. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, R.Z.

    1996-01-22

    The present Report completes the investigations in the frame of the project for the first year. It is important to estimate our achievements in the investigation of properties of nanocrystalline materials obtained by severe plastic deformation and their production. We think that the main results obtained can be summarized as follows: (1) We performed an improvement of the die-set for equal channel (ECA) pressing and torsion under high pressure with the aim to increase dimensions of the samples produced and to conduct processing of low ductile materials. (2) It was established that in pure metals severe plastic deformation led to the formation of an ultra fine-grained structure with a mean grain size of 100-200 nm, while in alloys due to severe plastic deformation and/or special methods of treatment (a decrease in the temperature of deformation, an increase of the pressure applied etc.) the grain size could be decreased down to a few tens of manometers.

  10. Processing and property evaluation of metal matrix superconducting materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Appajosula S.

    1995-01-01

    Metal - superconductor (YBCO) systems have been prepared and characterized by resistivity, ac susceptibility and dc SQUID magnetic moment measurements. The silver composites showed superconducting transition for all the composites processed and the superconducting transition temperature tends to depend upon the concentration of the silver in the composite. Aluminum composites showed an unusual resistivity results with two transitions around 90 K and 120 K. The superconducting property of silver composites can be explained qualitatively in terms of the proximity theory that has been suggested for the low temperature superconductors.

  11. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  12. Acquisition of material properties in production for sheet metal forming processes

    SciTech Connect

    Heingärtner, Jörg; Hora, Pavel; Neumann, Anja; Hortig, Dirk; Rencki, Yasar

    2013-12-16

    In past work a measurement system for the in-line acquisition of material properties was developed at IVP. This system is based on the non-destructive eddy-current principle. Using this system, a 100% control of material properties of the processed material is possible. The system can be used for ferromagnetic materials like standard steels as well as paramagnetic materials like Aluminum and stainless steel. Used as an in-line measurement system, it can be configured as a stand-alone system to control material properties and sort out inapplicable material or as part of a control system of the forming process. In both cases, the acquired data can be used as input data for numerical simulations, e.g. stochastic simulations based on real world data.

  13. Acquisition of material properties in production for sheet metal forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heingärtner, Jörg; Neumann, Anja; Hortig, Dirk; Rencki, Yasar; Hora, Pavel

    2013-12-01

    In past work a measurement system for the in-line acquisition of material properties was developed at IVP. This system is based on the non-destructive eddy-current principle. Using this system, a 100% control of material properties of the processed material is possible. The system can be used for ferromagnetic materials like standard steels as well as paramagnetic materials like Aluminum and stainless steel. Used as an in-line measurement system, it can be configured as a stand-alone system to control material properties and sort out inapplicable material or as part of a control system of the forming process. In both cases, the acquired data can be used as input data for numerical simulations, e.g. stochastic simulations based on real world data.

  14. Dielectric properties of pharmaceutical materials relevant to microwave processing: effects of field frequency, material density, and moisture content.

    PubMed

    Heng, Paul W S; Loh, Z H; Liew, Celine V; Lee, C C

    2010-02-01

    The rising popularity of microwaves for drying, material processing and quality sensing has fuelled the need for knowledge concerning dielectric properties of common pharmaceutical materials. This article represents one of the few reports on the density and moisture content dependence of the dielectric properties of primary pharmaceutical materials and their relevance to microwave-assisted processing. Dielectric constants (epsilon') and losses (epsilon'') of 13 pharmaceutical materials were measured over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz at 23 +/- 1 degrees C using a parallel-electrode measurement system. Effects of field frequency, material density and moisture content on dielectric properties were studied. Material dielectric properties varied considerably with frequency. At microwave frequencies, linear relationships were established between cube-root functions of the dielectric parameters [symbols: see text] and density which enabled dielectric properties of materials at various densities to be estimated by regression. Moisture content was the main factor that contributed to the disparities in dielectric properties and heating capabilities of the materials in a laboratory microwave oven. The effectiveness of a single frequency density-independent dielectric function for moisture sensing applications was explored and found to be suitable within low ranges of moisture contents for a model material. PMID:19708060

  15. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project were studied to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Materials for study were chosen on the basis of existing knowledge of generic chemical types having high resistance to environmental weathering. The materials varied from rubbers to thermoplastics and presented a broad range of mechanical properties and processing requirements. Basic physical and optical properties were measured on the polymers and were redetermined after exposure to indoor artificial accelerated aging conditions covering four time periods. Strengths and weaknesses of the various materials were revealed and data was accumulated for the development of predictive methodologies. To date, silicone rubbers, fluorocarbons, and acrylic polymers appear to have the most promising combination of characteristics. The fluorocarbons may be used only as films, however, because of their high cost.

  16. Processing and properties of a lightweight fire resistant core material for sandwich structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, K.N.; Argade, S.D.; Sadler, R.L.; Sharpe, M.M.; Dunn, L.; Swaminathan, G.; Sorathia, U.

    2006-01-15

    A process for syntactic foam made from fly ash, a waste product of coal combustion from thermal power plants, has been developed using phenolic resin binders at low levels. The fly ash consists of hollow glass or ceramic microspheres and needs to be treated to remove contaminants. The production process is easily scalable and can be tailored to produce foams of desired properties for specific applications. Complex shaped parts also are possible with appropriate compression mold tooling. Mechanical properties, compression, tension, shear and fracture toughness, have been determined in this preliminary investigation on this syntactic material and are found to be comparable or better than commercially available core materials. Initial testing for fire resistance has indicated very encouraging results. Further work is being continued to develop this core material with superior mechanical and fire resistance properties.

  17. Effect of electric pulse processing on physical and chemical properties of inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakipova, S. E.; Nussupbekov, B. R.; Ospanova, D.; Khassenov, A.; Sakipova, Sh E.

    2015-04-01

    This article analyzes various aspects of the practical application of electric pulse technology of industrial raw materials processing as a result of a spark electric discharge in a liquid solution of the raw material under processing. The object of the study are samples of technogenic materials from a deposit in Central Kazakhstan, which are crushed and ground to particles with a preset degree of fragmentation. The electric pulse processing is performed by using different numbers of discharges. The effect of electric pulse processing with different electrical parameters is carried out on the basis of comparison of the properties and structure of metal-containing and industrial raw materials after machining and electric pulse processing. The X-ray spectral microanalysis was performed using a scanning microscope. The researchers obtained data on changes in the microstructure and elemental composition of inorganic material samples as a result of electric pulse processing. It was established that the technology of electric pulse crushing and grinding of inorganic materials makes it possible to obtain not only a final product with desired size of dispersed particles, but also to change their physical and chemical properties.

  18. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  19. PROPERTIES AND NANOSTRUCTURES OF NANO-MATERIALS PROCESSED BY SEVERE PLASTIC DEFORMATION (SPD)

    SciTech Connect

    Y. T. ZHU

    2001-03-01

    Metallic materials usually exhibit higher strength but lower ductility after being plastically deformed by conventional techniques such as rolling, drawing and extrusion. In contrast, nanostructured metals and alloys processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) have demonstrated both high strength and high ductility. This extraordinary mechanical behavior is attributed to the unique nanostructures generated by SPD processing. The combination of ultrafine grain size and high-density dislocations appears to enable deformation by new mechanisms not active in coarse-grained metals and alloys. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the microstructures of metals and alloys by SPD to obtain superior mechanical properties. Nanostructured metals and alloys processed by SPD techniques have unique nanostructures not observed in nano-materials synthesized by other techniques such as the consolidation of nanopowders. The SPD-generated nanostructures have many features related to deformation, including high dislocation densities, and high- and low-angle grain boundaries in equilibrium or non-equilibrium states. Future studies are needed to investigate the deformation mechanisms that relate the unique nanostructures with the superior mechanical properties exhibited by SPD-processed metals and alloys.

  20. Using Material Processing Simulation Software To Predict A Part ``In Use'' Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducloux, R.; Lasne, P.; Wey, E.

    2004-06-01

    Today, material processing simulation software is commonly used in the metal and polymer transformation industry for forging, casting and injection mold filling. In addition, classical FEM packages are also used to compute the behaviour of the final formed part under different loading conditions. Until now, there were very few bridges between these two types of computations, even though it is common knowledge that the stress analysis of a mechanical part in use could be more precisely computed using as input for the material characteristics the results derived from the forming process. In this paper, we give some examples where the results of the material process simulation are used to define more precisely the part "in use" properties. These examples cover hot and cold forming of metals, glass forming and quenching with FORGE2® and FORGE3®, casting with THERCAST® and polymer injection mold filling with REM3D®, studying the effects of the real shape deviation, of the residual stresses and damage and of the metallurgy resulting from the forming process.

  1. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The historical development of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is presented, including the functional requirements, polymer selection, curing, stabilization, production and module processing. The construction and use of a new method for the accelerated aging of polymers is detailed. The method more closely resembles the conditions that may be encountered in actual module field exposure and additionally may permit service life to be predicted accurately. The use of hardboard as a low cost candidate substrate material is studied. The performance of surface antisoiling treatments useful for imparting a self cleaning property to modules is updated.

  2. Processing, properties and applications of gamma titanium aluminide sheet and foil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, H.; Martinz, H.P.; Knabl, W.; Glatz, W.; Eberhardt, N.

    1997-12-31

    Intermetallic {gamma}-TiAl based alloys ({gamma}-alloys) have a great potential to become important materials for advanced applications in aerospace, automotive and related industries. Research and development on {gamma}-alloys have progressed significantly within the last decade. This research has led to a better understanding of the fundamental correlations between alloy composition and microstructure, processing behavior and mechanical properties. This paper describes the progress in sheet rolling of {gamma}-TiAl based alloys on industrial scale. Employing an advanced hot-rolling process sheets with lengths >1,000 mm have been rolled. Furthermore, first results of foil rolling are presented. The mechanical properties of {gamma}-TiAl sheet material with regard to processing route, alloy composition and microstructure are summarized and discussed. Sheet forming by means of superplastic forming and conventional metal forming techniques has successfully been conducted. Different joining techniques have been studied for {gamma}-alloys including solid-state diffusion bonding. The oxidation resistance of {gamma}-alloys is higher than that of Ti-alloys, however, for long-term applications at temperatures >700 C the need for reliable oxidation protective coatings is anticipated. Recent results of cyclic oxidation tests on coated {gamma}-TiAl sheet are presented. Finally, the results of a stability test conducted on a {gamma}-TiAl panel at 750 C are summarized. 60 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. PROPERTIES AND NANOSTRUCTURES OF NANO-MATERIALS PROCESSED BY SEVERE PLASTIC DEFORMATION (SPD).

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    Metallic materials usually exhibit higher strength but lower ductility after being plastically deformed by conventional techniques such as rolling, drawing and extrusion. In contrast, nanostructured metals and alloys processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) have demonstrated both high strength and high ductility. This extraordinary mechanical behavior is attributed to the unique nanostructures generated by SPD processing. The combination of ultrafine grain size and high-density dislocations appears to enable deformation by new mechanisms not active in coarse-grained metals and alloys. These results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the microstructures of metals and alloys by SPD to obtain superior mechanical properties. Nanostructured metals and alloys processed by SPD techniques have unique nanostructures not observed in nanomaterials synthesized by other techniques such as the consolidation of nanopowders. The SPD-generated nanostructures have many features related to deformation, including high dislocation densities, and high- and low-angle grain boundaries in equilibrium or nonequilibrium states. Future studies are needed to investigate the deformation mechanisms that relate the unique nanostructures with the superior mechanical properties exhibited by SPD-processed metals and alloys.

  4. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in solar energy technology is reported in the following areas: aging and life prediction methodology and devices for solar cell encapsulation; the function of adhesion chemistry, primers, and a new diagnostic technique for estimations of bond durability; a study of fire retardant formulations for decreasing the potential flammability of solar modules; initial studies of the electrical insulating properties of encapsulation materials and measurement of the intrinsic dielectric strength; antisoiling compounds for the prevention of soil build-up on the outer surface of the module; and low temperature processing encapsulants that permit module fabrication at temperatures less than 100 C. Another area of study has been added to determine the degree to which formulation and processes affect the module quality and manufacturing yield.

  5. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Ninth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of: aging and life prediction methodology and devices for solar cell encapsulation; the function of adhesion chemistry, primers, and a new diagnostic technique for estimations of bond durability; a study of fire retardant formulations for decreasing the potential flammability of solar modules; initial studies of the electrical insulating properties of encapsulation materials and measurement of the intrinsic dielectric strength; anti-soiling compounds for the prevention of soil build-up on the outer surface of the module; and low temperature processing encapsulants that permit module fabrication at temperatures less than 100/sup 0/C. Another area of study has been added to determine the degree to which formulation and processes affect the module quality and manufacturing yield.

  6. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams and Their Potential as TPS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams with compositions that have potential as a thermal protection material. The use of pre-ceramic polymers with the addition of sacrificial blowing agents or sacrificial fillers offers a viable approach to form either open or closed cell insulation. Our work demonstrates that this is a feasible method to form refractory ceramic foams at relatively low processing temperatures. It is possible to foam complex shapes then pyrolize the system to form a ceramic while retaining the shape of the unfired foam. Initial work focused on identifying suitable pre-ceramic polymers with desired properties such as ceramic yield and chemical make up of the pyrolysis product after firing. We focused on making foams in the Si system (Sic, Si02, Si-0-C), which is in use in current acreage TPS systems. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies and the characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties are presented. We have conducted preliminary arc jet testing on selected foams with the materials being exposed to typical re-entry conditions for acreage TPS and these results will be discussed. Foams processed using these approaches have bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g/cm3 and cell sizes ranging from 5 to 500 pm. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these systems. Finally, preliminary oxidation studies have been conducted on selected systems and will be discussed.

  7. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  8. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  9. Processing of lunar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisl, W. Howard; Fabes, B. D.

    1994-07-01

    A variety of products made from lunar resources will be required for a lunar outpost. These products might be made by adapting existing processing techniques to the lunar environment, or by developing new techniques unique to the moon. In either case, processing techniques used on the moon will have to have a firm basis in basic principles of materials science and engineering, which can be used to understand the relationships between composition, processing, and properties of lunar-derived materials. These principles can also be used to optimize the properties of a product, once a more detailed knowledge of the lunar regolith is obtained. Using three types of ceramics (monolithic glasses, glass fibers, and glass-ceramics) produced from lunar simulants, we show that the application of materials science and engineering priciples is useful in understanding and optimizing the mechanical properties of ceramics on the moon. We also demonstrate that changes in composition and/or processing can have a significant effect on the strength of these materials.

  10. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  11. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat-Plate Solar Array project is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations included studies of aging and degradation of candidate encapsulation materials, continued identification of primers for durable bonding of module interfaces, continued evaluation of soil resistant treatments for the sunlit surface of the module and testing of corrosion protective coatings for use low cost mild steel substrates.

  12. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron) Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zemtsova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3) pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based) materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology. PMID:24695459

  13. Processing and mechanical properties of {gamma}-TiAl based alloy sheet material

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, H.; Schretter, P.; Glatz, W.; Koeppe, C.; Bartels, A.; Behr, R.; Wanner, A.

    1995-12-31

    The status of rolling of Ti-48Al-2Cr and Ti-47Al-2Cr-0.2Si on industrial scale is described. Defect-free sheet material up to {approximately}800x300x1.5 mm has been produced with grain sizes in the range of 5--20 {micro}m. Tensile properties of Ti-48Al-2Cr sheet material after different heat treatments have been measured at room temperature and 700 C. Fracture elongations at room temperature are in the range of 2.5--5% which proves the good homogeneity of the microstructure. Crack growth characteristics and K{sub IC}-values for different microstructures were determined. The superplastic behavior with respect to grain size was investigated in the temperature range of 950--1,200 C. Initial experiments clearly demonstrate that superplastic forming methods can be applied for shaping of {gamma}-TiAl sheet materials.

  14. The Effects of Ground and Space Processing on the Properties of Organic, Polymeric, and Colloidal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossain A.; Witherow, W. K.; Smith, D.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and phototonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic materials which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials as thin film wave-guides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualifies by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organic-based materials have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices, such as high second-and third-order nonlinearity, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. We discuss the potential role of microgravity processing of a few organic and polymeric materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second-and third-order NLO behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics. The goal of minimizing optical loss obviously depends on processing methods. For solution-based processes, such as solution crystal growth and solution photopolymerization, it is well known that thermal and solutal density gradients can initiate buoyancy-driven convection. Resultant fluid flows can affect transport of material to and from growth interfaces and become manifest in the morphology and homogeneity of the growing film or crystal. Likewise

  15. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules were investigated. The following areas were explored: (1) soil resistant surface treatment; (2) corrosion protecting coatings from mild steel substrates; (3) primers for bonding module interfaces; and (4) RS/4 accelerated aging of candidate encapsulation compounds

  16. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost-effective and long life solar modules. Of the $18 (1948 $) per square meter allocated for the encapsulation components approximately 50% of the cost ($9/sq m) may be taken by the load bearing component. Due to the proportionally high cost of this element, lower costing materials were investigated. Wood based products were found to be the lowest costing structural materials for module construction, however, they require protection from rainwater and humidity in order to acquire dimensional stability. The cost of a wood product based substrate must, therefore, include raw material costs plus the cost of additional processing to impart hygroscopic inertness. This protection is provided by a two step, or split process in which a flexible laminate containing the cell string is prepared, first in a vacuum process and then adhesively attached with a back cover film to the hardboard in a subsequent step.

  17. Rhenium material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaglow, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile data were obtained from four different types of rhenium at ambient and elevated temperatures. The four types of rhenium included chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and three powder metallurgy (PM) types, i.e., rolled sheet and pressed and sintered bars, with and without hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. Results revealed a wide range of values with ultimate strengths at ambient temperatures varying from 663 MPa for CVD rhenium to 943 MPa for rolled sheet. A similar spread was also obtained for material tested at 1088 K and 1644 K. The wide variance observed with the different materials indicated that the rhenium manufacturing process, material composition and prior handling strongly dictated its properties. In addition to tensile properties, CVD, pressed and sintered material and HIP rhenium successfully completed 100 cycles of low cycle fatigue. Creep data were also obtained showing that CVD and pressed and sintered rhenium could sustain five hours of testing under a tension of 27.5 MPa at 1922 K.

  18. Rhenium material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Tensile data were obtained from four different types of rhenium at ambient and elevated temperatures. The four types of rhenium included chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and three powder metallurgy (PM) types, i.e., rolled sheet and pressed and sintered bars, with and without hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. Results revealed a wide range of values with ultimate strengths at ambient temperatures varying from 663 MPa for CVD rhenium to 943 MPa for rolled sheet. A similar spread was also obtained for material tested at 1088 K and 1644 K. The wide variance observed with the different materials indicated that the rhenium manufacturing process, material composition and prior handling strongly dictated its properties. In addition to tensile properties, CVD, pressed and sintered material and HIP rhenium successfully completed 100 cycles of low cycle fatigue. Creep data were also obtained showing that CVD and pressed and sintered rhenium could sustain five hours of testing under a tension of 27.5 MPa at 1922 K.

  19. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  20. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  1. Ultrasonic material property determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabian, S.

    1986-01-01

    The use and potential offered by ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to determine and/or monitor material properties is explored. The basis for such unique measurements along with examples of materials from a variety of industries are presented.

  2. Photochromic organic-inorganic composite materials prepared by sol-gel processing: Properties and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L. |; Mennig, M.; Schmidt, H.

    1994-12-31

    The sol-gel method which features a low-temperature wet-chemical process opens vast possibilities to incorporating organic dyes into solid matrices for various optical applications. In this paper the authors present their experimental results on the sol-gel derived photochromic organic-inorganic composite (Ormocer) materials following an introductory description of the sol-gel process and a brief review on the state of the art of the photochromic solids prepared using this method. Their photochromic spirooxazine-Ormocer gels and coatings possess better photochromic response and color-change speed than the corresponding photochromic polymer coatings and similar photochemical stability to the latter. Further developments are proposed as to tackle the temperature dependence problem and further tap the potentialities of the photochromic dye-Ormocer material for practical applications.

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

  4. Study on the fabricating process monitoring of thermoplastic based materials packaged OFBG and their sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Zhichun; Ou, Jinping

    2007-04-01

    As common materials or engineering materials, thermoplastic resin based materials can be used not only directly fabricating products but also FRTP(fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymer) materials for other uses. As one kind of FRTP material, GFRPP(glass fiber reinforced polypropylene) has lots of merits, such as: light weight, high strength, high tenacity, high elongation percentage, good durability, reshaping character and no environmental pollution characters. And they also can be conveniently formed hoop rebar in civil engineering. While a new kind of GFRPP-OFBG smart rod which combined GFRPP and OFBG together can be used as not only structure materials but also sensing materials. Meanwhile, PP packaged OFBG strain sensor can be expected for its low modulus, good sensitivity and good durability. Furthermore, it can be used for large strain measuring. In this paper, we have successfully fabricated a new kind of GFRPP-OFBG(Glass Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene-Optic Fiber Bragg Grating) rod by our own thermoplastic pultrusion production line and a new kind of PP packaged OFBG strain sensor by extruding techniques. And we monitored the inner strain and temperature changes with tow OFBG simultaneously of the fabricating process. The results show that: OFBG can truly reflect the strain and temperature changes in both the GFRPP rod and the PP packaged OFBG, these are very useful to modify our processing parameters. And we also find that because of the shrinkage of PP, this new kind of PP packaged OFBG have -13000μɛ storage, and the strain sensing performance is still very well, so which can be used for large strain measuring. Besides these, GFRPP-OFBG smart rod has good sensing performance in strain sensing just like that of FRSP-OFBG rod, the strain sensitivity coefficient is about1.19pm/μɛ. Besides these, the surface of GFRPP-OFBG rods can be handled just as steel bars and also can be bended and reshaped. These are all very useful and very important for the use

  5. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  6. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  7. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  8. Influence of material selection and fabrication process repeatability on mechanical properties of glass-polymer matrix composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Charles

    This study has aimed to evaluate property uniformity from data obtained utilizing one design of a single layup composite plaque, three sources of glass fibers and a single, industry accepted resin to produce a repeatable fabrication process. This thesis has investigated the following: (1) Whether the type of glass (E-Glass, S-Glass, and R-Glass) influences the property values of individually tested samples compared between glass types. (2) Whether the type of glass influences the property uniformity throughout the set of tested samples. (3) Whether the composite plaque design and resulting performance, as defined by ASTM Standards or industry accepted parameters, is adequate for use in the defined military application or wind specific application. The resulting data showed trends that established the relationship between the mechanical properties of the materials used in constructing the composites and the properties of fabricated composite test plaques. The S-glass resulted in the highest ultimate fracture strength and modulus, yet had the highest properties per cost value. The E-glass demonstrated the worst mechanical properties of the three grades, however had the highest value comparing properties to cost. All of the composites were fabricated at <2% void content and considered a quality test sample.

  9. Optical property measurements as a diagnostic tool for control of materials processing in space and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. Richard; Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    A new method is described, including results, to measure, control, and follow containerless processing in ground based levitators. This technique enables instantaneous optical property measurements from a transient solid or liquid surface concurrent with true temperature measurement. This was used successfully as a diagnostic tool to follow processing of Al, Si, and Ti during electromagnetic levitation. Experiments on Al show the disappearance of the oxide (emittance 0.33) at ca. 1300 C leaving a liquid surface with an emittance of 0.06. Electromagnetic levitation of silicon shows a liquid with a constant emittance (0.2) but with a solid whose emittance decreases very rapidly with increasing temperature. Consequently, the processing of materials at high temperatures can be controlled quite well through the control of surface optical properties.

  10. Induction thermal plasma process modifies the physicochemical properties of materials used for carbon nanotube production, influencing their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alinejad, Yasaman; Faucheux, Nathalie; Soucy, Gervais

    2013-11-01

    The effect of radio frequency induction thermal plasma (RFITP) process on the cytotoxicity of materials used for single-walled carbon nanotube production remains unknown. In this study, the influence of RFITP process on physicochemical and cytotoxic properties of commercial Co, Ni, Y₂O₃, Mo catalysts and carbon black was investigated. The cytotoxic assays (MTS, LDH, neutral red, TUNEL) revealed the strongest effect of commercial Co on murine Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts affecting their viability in a dose-dependent manner within 24 h. The cells contained also less actin stress fibres. Although RFITP affects the properties of each catalyst (size, morphology, chemistry), only cytotoxicity of Ni catalyst was increased. The plasma-treated Ni induced apoptosis. Comparing Ni particles before and after RFITP process with commercial nanoparticles of Ni revealed that the particles with similar surface area have different cytotoxicities. Interestingly, the observed toxicity of the catalysts was not mainly due to the release of ions. PMID:22998219

  11. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules are identified, and evaluated. Ethylene vinyl acetate lamination pottant studies are conducted with respect to the time/temperature cure requirements for successful use of this compound. The time needed to produce successful gel contents are redetermined at a variety of temperatures and are related to the peroxide half life temperature curve. Formulation of the butyl acrylate syrup casting pottant is complete. The formulation contains an ultraviolet stabilizer system and is cured with an initiator that presents no shipping or handling hazards. The catalyzed syrup is stable at room temperature and has a pot life of at least an eight hour period of time. The syrup cures to a transparent rubber in 18 minutes at a temperature of 60 C.

  12. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility and possible advantages of processing materials in a nongravitational field are considered. Areas of investigation include biomedical applications, the processing of inorganic materials, and flight programs and funding.

  13. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  14. Effect of Processing Variables on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Microporous Carbon Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dacek, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Microporous carbon materials with different pore and strut sizes have been fabricated by the pyrolysis of furfuryl alcohol resin, triethylene glycol, and p-toluene sulfonic acid mixtures. The resulting materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and density measurements. The room temperature flexural strength and modulus of these materials decreases with increasing amount of acid curing agent.

  15. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  16. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, R. D.; Criswell, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-refining of raw materials from extraterrestrial sources is detailed for a space materials handling facility. The discussion is constrained to those steps necessary to separate desired components from raw or altered input ores, semi-purified feedstocks, or process scrap and convert the material into elements, alloys, and consumables. The materials are regarded as originating from dead satellites and boosters, lunar materials, and asteroids. Strong attention will be given to recycling reagent substances to avoid the necessity of transporting replacements. It is assumed that since no aqueous processes exist on the moon, the distribution of minerals will be homogeneous. The processing-refining scenario will include hydrochemical, pyrochemical, electrochemical, and physical techniques selected for the output mass rate/unit plant mass ratio. Flow charts of the various materials processing operations which could be performed with lunar materials are provided, noting the necessity of delivering several alloying elements from the earth due to scarcities on the moon.

  17. Computer signal processing for ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements for material property characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1979-01-01

    Instrumentation and computer programming concepts that were developed for ultrasonic materials characterization are described. Methods that facilitate velocity and attenuation measurements are outlined. The apparatus described is based on a broadband, buffered contact probe using a pulse-echo approach for simultaneously measuring velocity and attenuation. Instrumentation, specimen condition, and signal acquisition and acceptance criteria are discussed. Typical results with some representative materials are presented.

  18. Solid recovered fuel: materials flow analysis and fuel property development during the mechanical processing of biodried waste.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Wagland, Stuart; Longhurst, Phil; Robson, Bryce; Sinfield, Keith; Wise, Stephen; Pollard, Simon

    2013-03-19

    Material flows and their contributions to fuel properties are balanced for the mechanical section of a mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant producing solid recovered fuel (SRF) for the UK market. Insights for this and similar plants were secured through a program of sampling, manual sorting, statistics, analytical property determination, and material flow analysis (MFA) with error propagation and data reconciliation. Approximately three-quarters of the net calorific value (Q(net,p,ar)) present in the combustible fraction of the biodried flow is incorporated into the SRF (73.2 ± 8.6%), with the important contributors being plastic film (30.7 MJ kg(ar)(-1)), other packaging plastic (26.1 MJ kg(ar)(-1)), and paper/card (13.0 MJ kg(ar)(-1)). Nearly 80% w/w of the chlorine load in the biodried flow is incorporated into SRF (78.9 ± 26.2%), determined by the operation of the trommel and air classifier. Through the use of a novel mass balancing procedure, SRF quality is understood, thus improving on the understanding of quality assurance in SRF. Quantification of flows, transfer coefficients, and fuel properties allows recommendations to be made for process optimization and the production of a reliable and therefore marketable SRF product. PMID:23398118

  19. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During this quarter the technical activities were directed toward the reformulation of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a compound in solar cell module fabrication. Successful formulations were devised that lowered the temperature required for cure and raised the gel content. A major volatile component was also eliminated (acrylate crosslinking agent) which should aid in the production of bubble free laminates. Adhesive strengths and primers for the bonding of ethylene/vinyl acetate to supersyrate and substrate materials was assessed with encouraging results. The incorporation of silane compounds gave high bond strengths. A survey of scrim materials was also conducted.

  20. Structure-Processing-Property Relationships at the Fiber-Matrix Interface in Electron-Beam Cured Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this project was to characterize the properties of the resin and the fiber- resin interface in electron beam cured materials by evaluating several structural and processing parameters. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently determined that the interlaminar shear strength properties of electron beam cured composites were 19-28% lower than for autoclave cured composites. Low interlaminar shear strength is widely acknowledged as the key barrier to the successfid acceptance and implementation of electron beam cured composites in industry. In this project we found that simple resin modification and process improvements are unlikely to substantially improve the interlaminar shear strength properties of electron beam cured composites. However, sizings and coatings were shown to improve these properties and there appears to be significant potential for further improvement. In this work we determined that the application of epoxy-based, electron beam compatible sizings or coatings onto surface- treated, unsized carbon fibers improved the composite interlaminar shear strength by as much as 55% compared to composites fabricated from surface-treated, unsized carbon fibers and 11 YO compared to composites made from surface-treated, GP sized carbon fibers. This work has identified many promising pathways for increasing the interlaminar shear strength of electron beam cured composites. As a result of these promising developments we have recently submitted a U.S. Department of Energy-Energy Research (DOE-ER) sponsored Laboratory Technical Research-Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (LTR- CRADA) proposal entitled, "Interracial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites", to continue this work. If funded, ORNL will lead a 3-year, $2.6 million effort involving eight industrial partners, NASA-Langley, and the U.S. Air Force. The principal objective of this CRADA is to significantly improve the interracial properties of carbon

  1. Mechanical properties of nanophase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.; Fougere, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has become possible in recent years to synthesize new materials under controlled conditions with constituent structures on a nanometer size scale (below 100 nm). These novel nanophase materials have grain-size dependent mechanical properties significantly different than those of their coarser-grained counterparts. For example, nanophase metals are much stronger and apparently less ductile than conventional metals, while nanophase ceramics are more ductile and more easily formed than conventional ceramics. The observed mechanical property changes are related to grain size limitations and/or the large percentage of atoms in grain boundary environments; they can also be affected by such features as flaw populations, strains and impurity levels that can result from differing synthesis and processing methods. An overview of what is presently known about the mechanical properties of nanophase materials, including both metals and ceramics, is presented. Some possible atomic mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior in these materials are considered in light of their unique structures.

  2. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-04-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  4. Effects of processing and materials variations on mechanical properties of lightweight cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.B.; Yoon, E.S.; Lee, B.I.

    1999-02-01

    Low-density/low-cost cement composites were fabricated. Carbon and alkali-resistant glass fibers were used to reinforce the matrix of industrial by-products; fly ash with silica fume, Portland cement, and calcium silicates were mixed in different proportions. The additional low density was obtained by adding perlite and foaming agents followed by hot water curing. The composites also were prepared by autoclave curing for comparison. The mechanical properties were improved by increasing the amount of silica fume, fly ash, and fibers.Both carbon fibers and alkali-resistant glass fibers were effective in reinforcing the matrices, but carbon fibers were superior to glass fibers. Fabrication techniques for producing lightweight cement composites that can substitute for autoclaved lightweight concrete was developed.

  5. Femtosecond Laser Materials Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Komashko, A.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    2000-03-06

    The use of femtosecond lasers allows materials processing of practically any material with extremely high precision and minimal collateral damage. Advantages over conventional laser machining (using pulses longer than a few tens of picoseconds) are realized by depositing the laser energy into the electrons of the material on a time scale short compared to the transfer time of this energy to the bulk of the material, resulting in increased ablation efficiency and negligible shock or thermal stress. The improvement in the morphology by using femtosecond pulses rather than nanosecond pulses has been studied in numerous materials from biologic materials to dielectrics to metals. During the drilling process, we have observed the onset of small channels which drill faster than the surrounding material.

  6. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technical activities were directed toward the assessment of encapsulation processes for use with ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer as the pottant. Potentially successful formulations were prepared by compounding the raw polymer with ultraviolet absorbers and crosslinking agents to give stabilized and curable compositions. The compounded resin was then converted to a more useful form with an extruder to give pottant in sheets that could be more easily used in lamination. After experimenting with various techniques, the vacuum-bag process was found to be an excellent encapsulation method. Miniature single-celled and multi-celled solar modules of both substrate and superstrate designs were prepared by this technique. The resulting modules were of good appearance, were bubble-free, and successfully passed the thermal cycle test.

  7. Laser Processing Architecture for Improved Material Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Frank E.; Helvajian, Henry

    This chapter presents a novel architecture and software-hardware design system for materials processing techniques that are widely applicable to laser direct-write patterning tools. This new laser material processing approach has been crafted by association with the genome and genotype concepts, where predetermined and prescribed laser pulse scripts are synchronously linked with the tool path geometry, and each concatenated pulse sequence is intended to induce a specific material transformation event and thereby express a particular material attribute. While the experimental approach depends on the delivery of discrete amplitude modulated laser pulses to each focused volume element with high fidelity, the architecture is highly versatile and capable of more advanced functionality. The capabilities of this novel architecture fall short of the coherent spatial control techniques that are now emerging, but can be readily applied to fundamental investigations of complex laser-material interaction phenomena, and easily integrated into commercial and industrial laser material processing applications. Section 9.1 provides a brief overview of laser-based machining and materials processing, with particular emphasis on the advantages of controlling energy deposition in light-matter interactions to subtly affect a material's thermodynamic properties. This section also includes a brief discussion of conventional approaches to photon modulation and process control. Section 9.2 comprehensively describes the development and capabilities of our novel laser genotype pulse modulation technique that facilitates the controlled and precise delivery of photons to a host material during direct-write patterning. This section also reviews the experimental design setup and synchronized photon control scheme, along with performance tests and diagnostic results. Section 9.3 discusses selected applications of the new laser genotype processing technique, including optical property variations

  8. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1979-01-01

    The reformulation of a commercial grade of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a pottant in solar cell module manufacture was investigated. Potentially successful formulations were prepared by compounding the raw polymer with antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers and crosslinking agents to yield stabilized and curable compositions. The resulting elastomer was found to offer low cost (approximately $0.80/lb.), low temperature processability, high transparency (91% transmission), and low modulus. Cured specimens of the final formulation endured 4000 hours of fluorescent sunlamp radiation without change which indicates excellent stability.

  9. Mechanical properties and production quality of hand-layup and vacuum infusion processed hybrid composite materials for GFRP marine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Young; Shim, Chun Sik; Sturtevant, Caleb; Kim, Dave (Dae-Wook); Song, Ha Cheol

    2014-09-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) structures are primarily manufactured using hand lay-up or vacuum infusion techniques, which are cost-effective for the construction of marine vessels. This paper aims to investigate the mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of the hybrid GFRP composites, formed by applying the hand lay-up processed exterior and the vacuum infusion processed interior layups, providing benefits for structural performance and ease of manufacturing. The hybrid GFRP composites contain one, two, and three vacuum infusion processed layer sets with consistent sets of hand lay-up processed layers. Mechanical properties assessed in this study include tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties. Hybrid composites with three sets of vacuum infusion layers showed the highest tensile mechanical properties while those with two sets had the highest mechanical properties in compression. The batch homogeneity, for the GFRP fabrication processes, is evaluated using the experimentally obtained mechanical properties

  10. Influence of Processing Conditions and Material Properties on Electrohydrodynamic Direct Patterning of a Polymer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shin; Kim, Yeongjun; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-04-01

    An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) patterning method was utilized to obtain high-resolution line patterns in a low electric field regime without an additional mechanical drawing process. Molecular weight and weight percent of a polymer were selected as key parameters to reduce the voltage. EHD patterning was performed using polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions. The threshold voltages (V th) to initiate jet ejection are almost the same for all solutions. A method verified in this study, reducing the driving voltage (V d) just after the initiation of the jet at the threshold voltage, can make a very thin, continuous jet, while increasing molecular weight and weight percent were enabled to further reduce the input voltage. As the voltage reduction ratio (V d/ V th) is decreased, the jet behaves like a solid rather than a liquid due to its fast solidification. The line width of the resultant line pattern could be tuned from 50 nm to 10 μm depending on the substrate moving speed. Contour maps were also developed that show the pattern mode variation as a function of the voltage reduction ratio and key parameters. The results show that well-defined PEO line and grid patterns can be fabricated via the proposed EHD direct patterning under appropriate conditions.

  11. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B. C., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to making high-aspect ratio cuts in metals with no heat-affected zone are made possible by this technology For material removal at reasonable rates, we developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  12. Materials property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.; Green, E.R.; Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.

    1990-04-19

    An in-depth review of the measurement techniques that could be used in materials characterization is presented. The measurement techniques to non-destructively determine the in-service or time-related aging of materials considered include ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, eddy current conductivity, neutron scattering and absorption, conventional and tomographic imaging for ultrasonic and radiation imaging, x-ray scattering, thermal impedance, and magnetic hysteresis. The three sections of the report include a review of failure mechanisms in steel and a discussion of nondestructive evaluation techniques and fracture mechanics, a description of a chart on Measurement Techniques versus Material Properties, and recommendations on the techniques and tests to be performed for the experimental investigations and analysis task of the project. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Extraterrestrial materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    The first year results of a multi-year study of processing extraterrestrial materials for use in space are summarized. Theoretically, there are potential major advantages to be derived from the use of such materials for future space endeavors. The types of known or postulated starting raw materials are described including silicate-rich mixed oxides on the Moon, some asteroids and Mars; free metals in some asteroids and in small quantities in the lunar soil; and probably volatiles like water and CO2 on Mars and some asteroids. Candidate processes for space materials are likely to be significantly different from their terrestrial counterparts largely because of: absence of atmosphere; lack of of readily available working fluids; low- or micro-gravity; no carbon-based fuels; readily available solar energy; and severe constraints on manned intervention. The extraction of metals and oxygen from lunar material by magma electrolysis or by vapor/ion phase separation appears practical.

  14. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  15. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation of high-energy ultrasonic vibration in metals and alloys generates oscillating strain and stress fields in solids, and introduces nonlinear effects such as cavitation, acoustic streaming, and radiation pressure in molten materials. These nonlinear effects can be utilized to assist conventional material processing processes. This article describes recent research at Oak Ridge National Labs and Purdue University on using high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations for degassing molten aluminum, processing particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites, refining metals and alloys during solidification process and welding, and producing bulk nanostructures in solid metals and alloys. Research results suggest that high-intensity ultrasonic vibration is capable of degassing and dispersing small particles in molten alloys, reducing grain size during alloy solidification, and inducing nanostructures in solid metals.

  16. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  17. Processing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested program of material processing experiments in space described in 81 page report. For each experiment, report discusses influence of such gravitational effects as convection, buoyancy, sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure. Report contains estimates of power and mission duration required for each experiment. Lists necessary equipment and appropriate spacecraft.

  18. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-02-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas.

  19. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  20. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  1. Femtosecond laser ablation properties of transparent materials: impact of the laser process parameters on the machining throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matylitsky, V. V.; Hendricks, F.; Aus der Au, J.

    2013-03-01

    High average power, high repetition rate femtosecond lasers with μJ pulse energies are increasingly used for bio-medical and material processing applications. With the introduction of femtosecond laser systems such as the SpiritTM platform developed by High Q Lasers and Spectra-Physics, micro-processing of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses have obtained new perspectives for industrial applications [1]. The unique advantage of material processing with subpicosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition, which leads to high ablation efficiency and accuracy in nearly all kinds of solid materials. The study on the impact of the laser processing parameters on the removal rate for transparent substrate using femtosecond laser pulses will be presented. In particular, examples of micro-processing of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) - bio-degradable polyester and XensationTM glass (Schott) machined with SpiritTM ultrafast laser will be shown.

  2. Material properties of oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The differences between the old (inter-) metallic superconductors and the new oxide superconductors are not limited to the much higher values of {Tc} attainable in the latter. There are many pervasive differences caused directly by oxide chemistry, quasi-perovskite local coordination configurations, and layered metal-semiconductor-metal{prime}-semiconductor-structures. When these differences are ignored, for instance in theoretical models which make effective medium approximations, many experiments appear to present anomalous results. These anomalies largely disappear when account is taken of the real materials properties of the cuprates and other new oxide superconductors, for instance in theoretical models which treat transport as a partially percolative process. This percolative process directly reflects the fact that the highest values of {Tc}, as well as the most anomalous normal-state transport properties, occur in materials vicinal to a metal-insulator transition. As the metallic and insulating regions alternate even in single-crystal samples, effective medium models, and most effective-medium parameters, lose their significance. Examples of attempts to measure microscopic properties illustrate the importance of filamentary effects on both normal-state and superconductive properties.

  3. FNAS materials processing and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golben, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Research on melt-sintered high temperature superconducting materials is presented. The vibrating sample magnetometer has become a useful characterization tool for the study of high temperature superconductors. Important information regarding the superconducting properties of a sample can be obtained without actually making contact with the sample itself. A step toward microgravity processing of high temperature superconductors was taken. In the future, the samples need to be optimized prior to this processing of the sample before the specific effects of the microgravity environment can be isolated. A series of melt-sintered samples show that bulk processing of high temperature superconductors is getting better.

  4. Innovative industrial materials processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.; Abarcar, R.; Hauser, S.G.; Williams, T.A.

    1983-08-01

    This paper reviews innovative industrial materials processes that have the potential for significant improvements in energy use, yet require long-term research to achieve that potential. Potential revolutionary alternatives are reviewed for the following industries: iron and steel; aluminum; petroleum refining; paper and pulp; food and kindred products; stone, clay and glass; textiles; and chemicals. In total, 45 candidate processes were identified. Examples of these processes include direct steelmaking and ore-to-powder systems that potentially require 30% and 40% less energy, respectively, than conventional steelmaking systems; membrane separations and freeze crystallization that offer up to 90% reductions in energy use when compared with distillation; cold processing of cement that offers a 50% reduction in energy requirements; and dry forming of paper that offers a 25% reduction in the energy needed for papermaking.

  5. Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2005-02-28

    Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

  6. Materials properties data base computerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baur, R. G.; Donthnier, M. L.; Moran, M. C.; Mortman, I.; Pinter, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Material property data plays a key role in the design of jet engine components. Consistency, accuracy and efficient use of material property data is of prime importance to the engineering community. The system conception, development, implementation, and future plans for computer software that captures the Material Properties Handbook into a scientific data base are described. The engineering community is given access to raw data and property curves, display of multiple curves for material evaluation and selection, direct access by design analysis computer programs, display of the material specification, and a historical repository for the material evolution. The impact of this activity includes significant productivity gains and cost reductions; all users have access to the same information nd provides consistent, rapid response to the needs of the engineering community. Future plans include incorporating the materials properties data base into a network environment to access information from other data bases and download information to engineering work stations.

  7. Micro-materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. G.; Kaplan, R. A.; Arthurs, E. G.

    1982-06-01

    A model analysis of the absorption of laser energy in the millijoule range by a thin film on a substrate is presented to illustrate the underlying physical mechanism of laser micro-materials processing. The analysis is followed by a discussion of several applications from the electronics and semiconductor industries, including resistor trimming, laserscribing, laser damage gettering, laser marking, ablation of metal films, and mask repair. Finally, several uses of lasers in the diamond industry, such as removal of flaws from gemstone diamonds, diamond sawing, and diamond inscription, are briefly reviewed.

  8. Lunar materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper surveys current information, describes some important unknowns about lunar materials, and discusses ways to gain more scientific and engineering knowledge concerning the industrial processes that could be used on the moon for the production of products useful in future enterprises in space. Lunar rocks and soils are rich in oxygen, but it is mostly chemically bound in silicates, so that chemical or thermal energy must be supplied to recover it. Iron and titanium are abundant and, in some of their known forms, readily recoverable; aluminum is plentiful but harder to extract. Methods for recovering lunar oxygen and metals fall into three classes: chemical, electrolytic, and dissociative, broadly characterized by their respective process temperatures. Examples of these methods are briefly discussed.

  9. Synthesis and properties of nanophase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    Nanophase materials, with their grain sizes or phase dimensions in the nanometer size regime, are now being produced by a wide variety of synthesis and processing methods. The interest in these new ultrafine-grained materials results primarily from the special nature of their various physical, chemical, and mechanical properties and the possibilities to control these properties during the synthesis and subsequent processing procedures. Since it is now becoming increasingly apparent that their properties can be engineered effectively during synthesis and processing, and that they can also be produced in quantity, nanophase materials should have considerable potential for technological development in a variety of applications. Some of the recent research on nanophase materials related to their synthesis and properties is briefly reviewed and the future potential of these new materials is considered.

  10. Impact of Materials Processing on Microstructural Evolution and Hydrogen Isotope Storage Properties of Pd-Rh Alloy Powders.

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Joshua K

    2015-02-01

    Cryomilled Pd - 10Rh was investiga ted as potential solid - state storage material of hydrogen. Pd - 10Rh was first atomized, and then subsequently cryomilled. The cryomilled Pd - 10Rh was then examined using microstructural characterization techniques including op tical microscopy, electron microscopy, and X - ray diffraction. Pd - 10Rh particles were significantly flattened, increasing the apparent surface area. Microstructural refinement was observed in the cryomilled Pd - 10Rh, generating grains at the nanom etric scale through dislocation - based activity. Hydrogen sorption properties were also characterized, generating both capacity as well as kinetics measurements. It was found that the microstructural refinement due to cryomilling did not play a significant role on hyd rogen sorption properties until the smallest grain size (on the order of %7E25 nm) was achieved. Additionally, the increased surface area and other changes in particle morphology were associated with cryomilling changed the kinetics of hydrogen absorption.

  11. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  12. Acoustical properties of double porosity granular materials.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Granular materials have been conventionally used for acoustic treatment due to their sound absorptive and sound insulating properties. An emerging field is the study of the acoustical properties of multiscale porous materials. An example of these is a granular material in which the particles are porous. In this paper, analytical and hybrid analytical-numerical models describing the acoustical properties of these materials are introduced. Image processing techniques have been employed to estimate characteristic dimensions of the materials. The model predictions are compared with measurements on expanded perlite and activated carbon showing satisfactory agreement. It is concluded that a double porosity granular material exhibits greater low-frequency sound absorption at reduced weight compared to a solid-grain granular material with similar mesoscopic characteristics. PMID:22087905

  13. Electrochemical Properties of Chemically Processed SiOx as Coating Material in Lithium-Ion Batteries with Si Anode

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hee-June; Yang, Hyeon-Woo; Yun, Kang-Seop; Noh, Eul; Kang, Wooseung

    2014-01-01

    A SiOx coating material for Si anode in lithium-ion battery was processed by using SiCl4 and ethylene glycol. The produced SiOx particles after heat treatment at 725°C for 1 h were porous and irregularly shaped with amorphous structure. Pitch carbon added to SiOx was found to strongly affect solid electrolyte interphase stabilization and cyclic stability. When mixed with an optimal amount of 30 wt% pitch carbon, the SiOx showed a high charge/discharge cyclic stability of about 97% for the 2nd to the 50th cycle. The initial specific capacity of the SiOx was measured to be 1401 mAh/g. On the basis of the evaluation of the SiOx coating material, the process utilized in this study is considered an efficient method to produce SiOx with high performance in an economical way. PMID:25050401

  14. Synthesis, properties, and applications of nanophase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W. |

    1995-04-01

    Work on the synthesis, properties, and applications of nanophase materials has developed rapidly during the past decade. A wide variety of methods now exist for their production, including several plasma-based processes. The possibilities for engineering new materials with unique or improved properties for a number of applications is now evident from the extant research results. A brief review is presented here along with some examples of useful application areas and some thoughts for the future of this field.

  15. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  16. Interdisciplinary research on the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Several investigations concerning the properties and processing of brittle ceramic materials as related to design considerations are briefly described. Surface characterization techniques, fractography, high purity materials, creep properties, impact and thermal shock resistance, and reaction bonding are discussed.

  17. Transparent materials processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetherington, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    A zero gravity processing furnace system was designed that will allow acquisition of photographic or other visual information while the sample is being processed. A low temperature (30 to 400 C) test model with a flat specimen heated by quartz-halide lamps was constructed. A high temperature (400 to 1000 C) test model heated by resistance heaters, utilizing a cylindrical specimen and optics, was also built. Each of the test models is discussed in detail. Recommendations are given.

  18. Property Status of Lunar Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, V.

    Most of the lunar material in private hands is of meteoric origin, and its property sta- tus does not present many challenges. The intention of Applied Space Resources, Inc, to fly a commercial lunar sample return mission and to subsequently offer lunar ma- terial for sale, raises the issue of the legality of exploitation and private ownership of retrieved lunar material. Lunar samples have been returned in the past by means of the Apollo (US) and Luna (USSR) missions and, while most of the material re- mains government property and is used for scientific means, a small fraction has been transferred abroad and some has entered the private market. Apollo-collected moon- rocks have been offered, symbolically, to heads of States, and some foreign nations have subsequently transferred ownership to private individuals. The same, lunar ma- terial of Soviet provenience has entered the private market, this forming a valuable legal precedent for the lawfulness of sale of lunar material. Recently, plans were made public to award the Apollo astronauts with lunar rocks. While in the US there is a popular misconception that it is illegal to own lunar material, the truth lies elsewhere. As the Apollo samples are the property of the US government and a small fraction was stolen, lost, or misplaced, the US government intends to recover this material, unlawfully owned. In the same time, a significant number of individuals have been prosecuted for offering for sale fake lunar rocks. The present paper will analyse the different categories of lunar material according to its ownership status, and will as- sert that private property of lunar material is lawful, and lunar material that will be returned in the future will be able to enter the market without hindrances.

  19. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  20. Properties of aircraft tire materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Richard N.; Clark, Samuel K.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of measured elastomeric composite response suitable for linear structural and thermoelastic analysis in aircraft tires. Both real and loss properties are presented for a variety of operating conditions including the effects of temperature and frequency. Suitable micro-mechanics models are used for predictions of these properties for other material combinations and the applicability of laminate theory is discussed relative to measured values.

  1. Functional Properties of Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassing, Rainer; Petkov, Plamen; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Popov, Cyril

    This book, based on the lectures and contributions of the NATO ASI on "Functional Properties of Nanostructured Materials", gives a broad overview on this topic, as it combines basic theoretical articles, papers dealing with experimental techniques, and contributions on advanced and up-to-date applications in fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, electrochemistry, sensorics, and biotechnology. In addition, it presents an interdisciplinary approach since the authors came from such different fields as physics, chemistry, engineering, materials science and biology.

  2. Interdisciplinary research on the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The advancement of material performance and design methodology as related to brittle materials was investigated. The processing and properties of ceramic materials as related to design requirements was also studied.

  3. Spacecraft Charging Sensitivity to Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating spacecraft charging behavior of a vehicle in the space environment requires knowledge of the material properties relevant to the charging process. Implementing surface and internal charging models requires a user to specify a number of material electrical properties including electrical resistivity parameters (dark and radiation induced), dielectric constant, secondary electron yields, photoemission yields, and breakdown strength in order to correctly evaluate the electric discharge threat posed by the increasing electric fields generated by the accumulating charge density. In addition, bulk material mass density and/or chemical composition must be known in order to analyze radiation shielding properties when evaluating internal charging. We will first describe the physics of spacecraft charging and show how uncertainties in material properties propagate through spacecraft charging algorithms to impact the results obtained from charging models. We then provide examples using spacecraft charging codes to demonstrate their sensitivity to material properties. The goal of this presentation is to emphasize the importance in having good information on relevant material properties in order to best characterize on orbit charging threats.

  4. Telerobotic electronic materials processing experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, Stanford

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Commercial Programs (OCP), working in conjunction with NASA engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, is supporting research efforts in robot technology and microelectronics materials processing that will provide many spinoffs for science and industry. The Telerobotic Materials Processing Experiment (TRMPX) is a Shuttle-launched materials processing test payload using a Get Away Special can. The objectives of the project are to define, develop, and demonstrate an automated materials processing capability under realistic flight conditions. TRMPX will provide the capability to test the production processes that are dependent on microgravity. The processes proposed for testing include the annealing of amorphous silicon to increase grain size for more efficient solar cells, thin film deposition to demonstrate the potential of fabricating solar cells in orbit, and the annealing of radiation damaged solar cells.

  5. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  6. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  7. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  8. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700 cm(-1)) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K geranium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  9. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Wise, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Controlled impact methods have been employed to obtain dynamic response properties of armor materials. Experimental data have been obtained for high-strength ceramics. Continued analysis of time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements has produced systematic material-property data for Hugoniot and release response, initial and post-yield strength, pressure-induced phase transformation, and dynamic fracture strength. A new technique has been developed to measure hydrodynamic properties of ceramic through shock-wave experiments on metal-ceramic composites and data obtained for silicon carbide. Additional data on several titanium diboride ceramics and high-quality aluminum oxide ceramic have been acquired, and issues regarding the influence of microstructure on dynamic properties have emerged. Comparison of dynamic (Hugoniot elastic limit) strength and indentation hardness data has been performed and important correlations revealed. Innovative impact experiments on confined and unconfined alumina rods using axial and transverse VISAR diagnostics have been demonstrated which permit acquisition of multiaxial dynamic response data. Dynamic failure properties of a high-density aluminosilicate glass, similar in composition to the intergranular glassy phase of some aluminas, have been investigated with regard to yield, spall, and failure-wave propagation.

  10. Effect of Weathering Processes on Mineralogical and Mechanical Properties of Volcanic Rocks Used as Ballast Material for Railway Between Sabuncupinar and Kütahya in Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal; Adıgüzel, Ömer; Derman, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    Geomaterials used in engineering projects and man-made structures such as railway ballasts, buildings, historical structures, monuments and tombstones naturally weather as a result of various physico-chemical factors. Due to being long-term exposure to the anthroposphere, geomaterials used for these purposes provides important information to the researchers for understanding the effect of weathering processes on their time dependent physical, mineralogical and mechanical changes. Thus, researchers frequently can take advantage of available engineering time of man-made structures to assess weathering properties of the geomaterials used in their construction in terms of time dependent durability and stability of these structures. Considering the fact that railway ballasts produced from natural deposits of limestone, dolomite, granite, basalt etc., supply an important contribution for evaluation weathering processes, a research was carried out to determine the effect of weathering as a function of time on physical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of ballasts used for railway between Kütahya and Sabuncupınar in western Turkey. For this purpose, fresh and weathered rock samples exposed to physical and chemical weathering processes at different times were collected from quarry located in Sabuncupınar and nearby railway. This volcanic rock was previously classified as basalt based on the detailed mineralogical and geochemical analyses performed at the laboratories of the Mineral Research & Exploration General Directorate located in Ankara (Turkey). In-situ characteristics of sampling site were also investigated at different locations of quarry site by line surveying technique to describe the influence of discontinuity conditions on the weathering rate of selected rocks. Several techniques were utilized to determine time dependent deterioration in mineralogical and chemical composition of these samples for understanding their weathering rate. The porosity, water

  11. Processes for treating cellulosic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladisch, Michael R. (Inventor); Kohlman, Karen L. (Inventor); Westgate, Paul L. (Inventor); Weil, Joseph R. (Inventor); Yang, Yiqi (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for pretreating cellulosic materials in liquid water by heating the materials in liquid water at a temperature at or above their glass transition temperature but not substantially exceeding 220.degree. C., while maintaining the pH of the reaction medium in a range that avoids substantial autohydrolysis of the cellulosic materials. Such pretreatments minimize chemical changes to the cellulose while leading to physical changes which substantially increase susceptibility to hydrolysis in the presence of cellulase.

  12. Heat and mass transfer in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Lior, Noam

    Various papers on heat and mass transfer in materials processing are presented. The topics addressed include: heat transfer in plasma spraying, structure of ultrashort pulse plasma for CVD processing, heat flow and thermal contraction during plasma spray deposition, metal melting process by laser heating, improved electron beam weld design and control with beam current profile measurements, transport phenomena in laser materials processing, perspectives on integrated modeling of transport processes in semiconductor crystal growth, numerical simulation of natural convection in crystal growth in space and on the earth, conjugate heat transfer in crystal growth, effects of convection on the solidification of binary mixtures. Also discussed are: heat transfer in in-rotating-liquid-spinning process, thermal oscillations in materials processing, modeling and simulation of manufacturing processes of advanced composite materials, reaction engineering principles of combustion synthesis of advanced materials, numerical evaluation of the physical properties of magnetic fluids suitable for heat transfer control, and measurement techniques of thermophysical properties of high temperature melts. (For individual items see A93-10827 to A93-10843)

  13. Laser Material Processing in Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marshall

    2014-03-01

    This presentation will address some of the past, present, and potential uses of lasers for material processing in manufacturing. Laser processing includes welding, drilling, cutting, cladding, etc. The U.S. was the hot bed for initial uses of lasers for material processing in the past with Europe, especially Germany, presently leading the way. The future laser processing leader may still be Germany. Selected uses, past and present, of lasers within GE will also be highlighted as seen in such business units as Aviation, Lighting, Power and Water, Healthcare, and Transportation.

  14. Energy Implications of Materials Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Earl T.

    1976-01-01

    Processing of materials could become energy-limited rather than resource-limited. Methods to extract metals, industrial minerals, and energy materials and convert them to useful states requires more than one-fifth of the United States energy budget. Energy accounting by industries must include a total systems analysis of costs to insure net energy…

  15. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  16. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  17. Process feasibility study in support of silicon material task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaws, C. L.; Li, K. Y.; Hopper, J. R.; Fang, C. S.; Hansen, K. C.

    1981-01-01

    Results for process system properties, chemical engineering and economic analyses of the new technologies and processes being developed for the production of lower cost silicon for solar cells are presented. Analyses of process system properties are important for chemical materials involved in the several processes under consideration for semiconductor and solar cell grade silicon production. Major physical, thermodynamic and transport property data are reported for silicon source and processing chemical materials.

  18. Tailoring of materials properties under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, Thomas

    Materials can be driven far from equilibrium e. g. with intense pules of lasers and ions, in mostly destructive processes. When combined with micro- and nano-structuring, the ability to rapidly excite and then quench local excitations opens up. Now opportunities emerge to form and stabilize novel materials phases and to tailor materials properties for applications. Examples are color centers in diamond and silicon carbide for sensing and qubit applications and proposed ordered dopant structures in cuprate superconductors. Results from studies of materials processing under transient extreme conditions, far from equilibrium will be presented. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  20. Determination of Thermal Properties of Composting Bulking Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of compost bulking materials affect temperature and biodegradation during the composting process. Well determined thermal properties of compost feedstocks will therefore contribute to practical thermodynamic approaches. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric hea...

  1. Determination of Thermal Properties of Composting Bulking Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of compost bulking materials affect temperature and biodegradation during the composting process. Well-determined thermal properties of compost feedstocks will therefore contribute to practical thermodynamic approaches. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric hea...

  2. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Eighteenth quarterly progress report, August 12-November 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Davis, M.

    1980-12-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. A survey was made of elastomers for use as gaskets for the photovoltaic module. Of the wide variety of materials examined EPDM offered the optimum combination of low compression set and low cost. The preference for EPDM is borne out by its long history of use as an automobile gasket. The commercial availability of materials that would be useful for sealants between the edge of the module and the gasket was investigated. Butyl sealants have the best combination of physical properties, low cost and a well-documented history of performance. A preferred composition has not yet been identified. One laminating type pottant ethylene/methyl acrylate copolymer (EMA), and two casting polymers, polybutyl acrylate and polyurethane, have been under investigation this past quarter. An EMA formulation has been developed which is easily extrudable and cures to a high gel content. So far only one commercial US source (Quinn) of aliphatic polyurethane has been located. Work is continuing to improve reaction rate as well as to eliminate source(s) of bubble formation during module fabrication. Considerable effort was spent in developing an improved polybutyl acrylate casting formulation providing high gel. Many viable curing systems are now available: however, the best formulation considering physical properties, freedom from bubbles as well as cure time utilizes Lupersol II (aliphatic peroxide) initiator. This initiator gives the desired gel after 20 minute cure at 45/sup 0/C or 12 minute cure at 55/sup 0/C.

  3. Systems and methods for predicting materials properties

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Fischer, Chris; Tibbetts, Kevin; Morgan, Dane; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2007-11-06

    Systems and methods for predicting features of materials of interest. Reference data are analyzed to deduce relationships between the input data sets and output data sets. Reference data includes measured values and/or computed values. The deduced relationships can be specified as equations, correspondences, and/or algorithmic processes that produce appropriate output data when suitable input data is used. In some instances, the output data set is a subset of the input data set, and computational results may be refined by optionally iterating the computational procedure. To deduce features of a new material of interest, a computed or measured input property of the material is provided to an equation, correspondence, or algorithmic procedure previously deduced, and an output is obtained. In some instances, the output is iteratively refined. In some instances, new features deduced for the material of interest are added to a database of input and output data for known materials.

  4. The materials processing sciences glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traweek, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Processing Sciences Glovebox is a rack mounted workstation which allows on orbit sample preparation and characterization of specimens from various experiment facilities. It provides an isolated safe, clean, and sterile environment for the crew member to work with potentially hazardous materials. It has to handle a range of chemicals broader than even PMMS. The theme is that the Space Station Laboratory experiment preparation and characterization operations provide the fundamental glovebox design characteristics. Glovebox subsystem concepts and how internal material handling operations affect the design are discussed.

  5. Failure processes unidirectional composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Failure processes in unidirectional composite materials subjected to quasi-static tensile load along the fiber direction are investigated. The emphasis in this investigation is to identify the physical processes taking place during the evolution of failure in these materials. An extensive literature review is conducted and the information relevant to the present topic is summarized. The nature of damage growth in five different commercially available composite systems are studied. In-situ scanning electron microscopy is employed for identifying the failure events taking place at the microscopic level. Acoustic emission monitoring is used for estimating the rate of damage growth on a global scale and determining the size of individual failure events. Results show the important roles of the matrix material and the interphase in determining the tensile strength of unidirectional composite materials. Several failure modes occurring at the microscopic scale are revealed for the first time. Further, the results indicate that dynamic fracture participates to a significant extent in determining the failure process in these materials. Based on the results the influence of various parameters in determining the composite strength is described.

  6. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John M.; Strickland, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. Consisting of various database segments, MAPTIS provides the user with information such as material properties, test data derived from tests specifically conducted for qualification of materials for use in space, verification and control, project management, material information, and various administrative requirements. A recent addition to the project management segment consists of materials data derived from the LDEF flight. This tremendous quantity of data consists of both pre-flight and post-flight data in such diverse areas as optical/thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, atomic concentration surface analysis data, as well as general data such as sample placement on the satellite, A-O flux, equivalent sun hours, etc. Each data point is referenced to the primary investigator(s) and the published paper from which the data was taken. The MAPTIS system is envisioned to become the central location for all LDEF materials data. This paper consists of multiple parts, comprising a general overview of the MAPTIS System and the types of data contained within, and the specific LDEF data element and the data contained in that segment.

  7. Advances in Processing of Bulk Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galassi, Carmen

    The development of ferroelectric bulk materials is still under extensive investigation, as new and challenging issues are growing in relation to their widespread applications. Progress in understanding the fundamental aspects requires adequate technological tools. This would enable controlling and tuning the material properties as well as fully exploiting them into the scale production. Apart from the growing number of new compositions, interest in the first ferroelectrics like BaTiO3 or PZT materials is far from dropping. The need to find new lead-free materials, with as high performance as PZT ceramics, is pushing towards a full exploitation of bariumbased compositions. However, lead-based materials remain the best performing at reasonably low production costs. Therefore, the main trends are towards nano-size effects and miniaturisation, multifunctional materials, integration, and enhancement of the processing ability in powder synthesis. Also, in control of dispersion and packing, to let densification occur in milder conditions. In this chapter, after a general review of the composition and main properties of the principal ferroelectric materials, methods of synthesis are analysed with emphasis on recent results from chemical routes and cold consolidation methods based on the colloidal processing.

  8. Space processing of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1975-01-01

    Materials and processes for the testing of aluminum-base fiber and particle composites, and of metal foams under extended-time low-g conditions were investigated. A wetting and dispersion technique was developed, based on the theory that under the absence of a gas phase all solids are wetted by liquids. The process is characterized by a high vacuum environment and a high temperature cycle. Successful wetting and dispersion experiments were carried out with sapphire fibers, whiskers and particles, and with fibers of silicon carbide, pyrolytic graphite and tungsten. The developed process and facilities permit the preparation of a precomposite which serves as sample material for flight experiments. Low-g processing consists then merely in the uniform redistribution of the reinforcements during a melting cycle. For the preparation of metal foams, gas generation by means of a thermally decomposing compound was found most adaptable to flight experiments. For flight experiments, the use of compacted mixture of the component materials limits low-g processing to a simple melt cycle.

  9. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The final report of the Materials Processing in Low Gravity Program in which The University of Alabama in Huntsville designed, fabricated and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing from November 7, 1989 through November 6, 1990 is presented. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. During the performance of this contract, the utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing experiments have been instrumental in providing the opportunity to determine the feasibility of performing a number of experiments in the microgravity of Space, without the expense of a space-based experiment. Since the KC-135 was out for repairs during the latter part of the reporting period, a number of the KC-135 activities concentrated on repair and maintenance of the equipment that normally is flown on the aircraft. A number of periodic reports were given to the TCOR during the course of this contract, hence this final report is meant only to summarize the many activities performed and not redundantly cover materials already submitted.

  10. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2011-12-13

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  11. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  12. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  13. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  14. Structure, processing, and properties of potatoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Isabel K.; Kolos, Kimberly R.; Menegaux, Edmond C.; Luo, Huy; Mccuen, Richard H.; Regan, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this experiment and lesson intended for high school students in an engineering or materials science course or college freshmen is to demonstrate the relation between processing, structure, and thermodynamic and physical properties. The specific objectives are to show the effect of structure and structural changes on thermodynamic properties (specific heat) and physical properties (compressive strength); to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics; to compare boiling a potato in water with cooking it in a microwave in terms of the rate of structural change and the energy consumed to 'process' the potato; and to demonstrate compression testing.

  15. Process Feasibility Study in Support of Silicon Material, Task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Hansen, K. C.; Yaws, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    During this reporting period, major activies were devoted to process system properties, chemical engineering and economic analyses. Analyses of process system properties was continued for materials involved in the alternate processes under consideration for solar cell grade silicon. The following property data are reported for silicon tetrafluoride: critical constants, vapor pressure, heat of varporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat of formation and Gibb's free energy of formation. Chemical engineering analysis of the BCL process was continued with primary efforts being devoted to the preliminary process design. Status and progress are reported for base case conditions; process flow diagram; reaction chemistry; material and energy balances; and major process equipment design.

  16. Materials Properties Research at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presson, Joan B.; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    MSFC is currently planning, organizing and directing test coupon fabrication and subsequent CTE testing for two mirror materials of specific interest to the AMSD and NGST programs, Beryllium 0-30H (Be 0-30H) and Ultra Low Expansion glass (ULE). The ULE test coupons are being fabricated at MSFC from AMSD core residuals provided by Kodak, The Be 0-30H test coupons are being fabricated at Brush Wellman using residuals from the SBMD. Both sets of test coupons will be sent to a test vendor selected through the NASA competitive proposal process with the test results being provided by written report to MSFC by the end of the fiscal year. The test results will become model input data for the AMSD analysts, both MSFC and contractor, providing an enhancement to the historical CTE data currently available.

  17. Optical properties of photochromic and thermochromic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yeon-Gon

    The optical properties of some thin film materials can be altered by an external stimulus. Photochromic and thermochromic materials, including inorganic and organic substances, have optical properties that can be changed in a reversible manner by irradiation and temperature respectively. These materials can be used in applications such as radiation or thermal sensors, information storage devices and smart window applications in buildings and cars. In this work, major effort was concentrated on passive thermal control coatings based on photochromic and thermochromic materials. The inorganic photochromic materials were based on tungsten and molybdenum oxide films and the organic photochromic materials included spiropyrans and spirooxazines. In addition, photochromic composite organic-inorganic films and thermochromic vanadium oxide films were prepared. The samples were synthesized using sputtering, sol-gel process, and thermal oxidation. The optical properties were investigated for the first time by ultraviolet/visible/infrared (UV/VIS/IR) spectroscopic ellipsometry, attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared ellipsometry, spectrophotometry, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). For amorphous oxide films, the oxygen deficiency was important in determining the photochromic properties of the films. In the mid-infrared region, no photochromism was observed for the films. The optical properties of organic-inorganic composite films changed in the VIS/NIR wavelength region markedly in a reversible process, with UV irradiation. The composite films containing tungsten heteropolyoxometalate (HPOM) showed faster coloration and bleaching than pure tungsten oxide films. The composite films with molybdenum HPOM showed faster coloration and much slower bleaching than tungsten HPOM. The spiropyran and spirooxazine doped polymeric films were investigated for the first time using infrared and ATR ellipsometry. The infrared optical functions obtained by ATR measurements were a little smaller

  18. Improved electrochemical properties of LiFe0.5Mn0.5PO4/C composite materials via a surface coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Hung, Yen-Wei; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a LiFe0.5Mn0.5PO4/C (LFMP/C) material was prepared by a simple solid-state ball-mill method by using LiH2PO4, γ-MnO2, and hollow α-Fe2O3 nano-sized materials. Both γ-MnO2 and hollow α-Fe2O3 were synthesized by a hydrothermal process. LFMP/C composites coated with different amounts (1-3wt%) of Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) were synthesized by a sol-gel method. Their typical properties are studied using X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, the AC impedance method, and the galvanostatic charge-discharge method. The results revealed that a 1 wt%-LTO-coated LFMP/C composite shows the highest performance among all LFMP/C composite samples. The long-term cycling performance of the LFMP/C composite improves considerably when the LTO ionic conductor is applied on it. Moreover, the 1 wt%-LTO-coated LFMP/C composite, which has the lowest fading rate, maintains high cycling stability at 1 C (141 mAh g-1) and 10 C (133 mAh g-1) at 55 °C after 100 cycles; by contrast, a bare LFMP/C sample, which demonstrates the highest fading rate, exhibits an unfavorable life cycle, and its discharge capacity decreases rapidly. The ionic conductor coating thus improves the high-temperature performance of LFMP/C composites. A LFMP/C-KS6/SiO2 full cell is assembled and tested.

  19. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  20. Computational Material Processing in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Working with Professor David Matthiesen at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) a computer model of the DPIMS (Diffusion Processes in Molten Semiconductors) space experiment was developed that is able to predict the thermal field, flow field and concentration profile within a molten germanium capillary under both ground-based and microgravity conditions as illustrated. These models are coupled with a novel nonlinear statistical methodology for estimating the diffusion coefficient from measured concentration values after a given time that yields a more accurate estimate than traditional methods. This code was integrated into a web-based application that has become a standard tool used by engineers in the Materials Science Department at CWRU.

  1. Effect of Process Temperature and Reaction Cycle Number on Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 Thin Films Using TiCl4 and H2O Precursors: Correlation Between Material Properties and Process Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappim, W.; Testoni, G. E.; de Lima, J. S. B.; Medeiros, H. S.; Pessoa, Rodrigo Sávio; Grigorov, K. G.; Vieira, L.; Maciel, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of process temperature and reaction cycle number on atomic layer-deposited TiO2 thin films onto Si(100) using TiCl4 and H2O precursors was investigated in order to discuss the correlation between the growth per cycle (GPC), film structure (crystallinity), and surface roughness as well as the dependence of some of these properties with gas phase environment such as HCl by-product. In this work, these correlations were studied for two conditions: (i) process temperatures in the range of 100-500 °C during 1000 reaction cycles and (ii) number of cycles in the range of 100-2000 for a fixed temperature of 250 °C. To investigate the material properties, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used. Mass spectrometry technique was used to investigate the time evolution of gas phase species HCl and H2O during ALD process. Results indicate that the GPC does not correlate well with film crystallinity and surface roughness for the evaluated process parameters. Basically, the film crystallinity relies solely on grain growth kinetics of the material. This occurs due to higher HCl by-product content during each purge step. Furthermore, for films deposited at variable cycle number, the evolution of film thickness and elemental composition is altered from an initial amorphous structure to a near stoichiometric TiO2-x and, subsequently, becomes fully stoichiometric TiO2 at 400 cycles or above. At this cycle value, the GIXRD spectrum indicates the formation of (101) anatase orientation.

  2. Property Data Summaries for Advanced Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 150 NIST Property Data Summaries for Advanced Materials (Web, free access)   Property Data Summaries are topical collections of property values derived from surveys of published data. Thermal, mechanical, structural, and chemical properties are included in the collections.

  3. NIST Materials Properties Databases for Advanced Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Munro, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    The NIST Ceramics Division maintains two databases on the physical, mechanical, thermal, and other properties of high temperature superconductors and structural ceramics. Crystallographic data are featured prominently among the physical property data and serve several important functions in the classification and evaluation of the property values. The scope of materials, properties, and data evaluation protocols are discussed for the two databases.

  4. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  5. Computer-Aided Process Model For Carbon/Phenolic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Computer program implements thermochemical model of processing of carbon-fiber/phenolic-matrix composite materials into molded parts of various sizes and shapes. Directed toward improving fabrication of rocket-engine-nozzle parts, also used to optimize fabrication of other structural components, and material-property parameters changed to apply to other materials. Reduces costs by reducing amount of laboratory trial and error needed to optimize curing processes and to predict properties of cured parts.

  6. Integrated lunar materials manufacturing process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Michael A. (Inventor); Knudsen, Christian W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A manufacturing plant and process for production of oxygen on the moon uses lunar minerals as feed and a minimum of earth-imported, process materials. Lunar feed stocks are hydrogen-reducible minerals, ilmenite and lunar agglutinates occurring in numerous, explored locations mixed with other minerals in the pulverized surface layer of lunar soil known as regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO.sub.3) and agglutinates contain ferrous (Fe.sup.+2) iron reducible by hydrogen to yield H.sub.2 O and metallic Fe at about 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. The H.sub.2 O is electrolyzed in gas phase to yield H.sub.2 for recycle and O.sub.2 for storage and use. Hydrogen losses to lunar vacuum are minimized, with no net hydrogen (or any other earth-derived reagent) consumption except for small leaks. Feed minerals are surface-mined by front shovels and transported in trucks to the processing area. The machines are manned or robotic. Ilmenite and agglutinates occur mixed with silicate minerals which are not hydrogen-reducible at 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. and consequently are separated and concentrated before feeding to the oxygen generation process. Solids rejected from the separation step and reduced solids from the oxygen process are returned to the mine area. The plant is powered by nuclear or solar power generators. Vapor-phase water electrolysis, a staged, countercurrent, fluidized bed reduction reactor and a radio-frequency-driven ceramic gas heater are used to improve thermal efficiency.

  7. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Encapsulation task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    During this quarter, flat-plate solar collector systems were considered and six basic construction elements were identified: outer coatings, superstrates, pottants, substrates, undercoats, and adhesives. Materials surveys were then initiated to discover either generic classes or/and specific products to function as each construction element. Cost data included in the surveys permit ready evaluation of each material. Silicones, fluorocarbons, glass, and acrylic polymers have the highest inherent weatherability of materials studied to date. Only acrylics, however, combine low costs, environmental resistance, and potential processability. This class will receive particular emphasis.

  8. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  9. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-02-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  10. Investigation of Zerodur material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-07-01

    The Final Report of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO), of The University of Alabama (UAH) study entitled 'Investigation of Zerodur Material Processing' is presented. The objectives of the effort were to prepare glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing block Zerodur to desired specifications using equipment located in the optical shop located in the Optical System Branch at NASA/MSFC; characterize samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness; utilize Zerodur samples for coating investigations; and perform investigations into enhanced optical fabrication and metrology techniques. The results of this investigation will be used to support the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) program as well as other NASA/MSFC research programs. The results of the technical effort are presented and discussed.

  11. Investigation of Zerodur material processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO), of The University of Alabama (UAH) study entitled 'Investigation of Zerodur Material Processing' is presented. The objectives of the effort were to prepare glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing block Zerodur to desired specifications using equipment located in the optical shop located in the Optical System Branch at NASA/MSFC; characterize samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness; utilize Zerodur samples for coating investigations; and perform investigations into enhanced optical fabrication and metrology techniques. The results of this investigation will be used to support the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) program as well as other NASA/MSFC research programs. The results of the technical effort are presented and discussed.

  12. Process modeling for carbon-phenolic nozzle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.; Remus, Walter M., III; Clinton, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    A thermochemical model based on the SINDA heat transfer program is developed for carbon-phenolic nozzle material processes. The model can be used to optimize cure cycles and to predict material properties based on the types of materials and the process by which these materials are used to make nozzle components. Chemical kinetic constants for Fiberite MX4926 were determined so that optimization of cure cycles for the current Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor nozzle rings can be determined.

  13. Molybdenum silicide based materials and their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Z.; Stiglich, J.; Sudarshan, T.S.

    1999-06-01

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is a promising candidate material for high temperature structural applications. It is a high melting point (2030 C) material with excellent oxidation resistance and a moderate density (6.24 g/cm{sup 3}). However, low toughness at low temperatures and high creep rates at elevated temperatures have hindered its commercialization in structural applications. Much effort has been invested in MoSi{sub 2} composites as alternatives to pure molybdenum disilicide for oxidizing and aggressive environments. Molybdenum disilicide-based heating elements have been used extensively in high-temperature furnaces. The low electrical resistance of silicides in combination with high thermal stability, electron-migration resistance, and excellent diffusion-barrier characteristics is important for microelectronic applications. Projected applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include turbine airfoils, combustion chamber components in oxidizing environments, missile nozzles, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing. On this paper, synthesis, fabrication, and properties of the monolithic and composite molybdenum silicides are reviewed.

  14. Process for Self-Repair of Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured reactants witlun the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  15. Process for self-repair of insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  16. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  17. Materials and processes control for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and processes control relative to space applications is discussed. The components of a total material and process control system are identified, contamination control issues are listed, and recommendations are made.

  18. NBS (National Bureau of Standards): Materials measurements. [space processing experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Work directed toward the measurement of materials properties important to the design and interpretation of space processing experiments and determinations of how the space environment may offer a unique opportunity for performing improved measurements and producing materials with improved properties is reported. Surface tensions and their variations with temperature and impurities; convection during undirectional solidification; and measurement of the high temperature thermophysical properties of tungsten group liquids and solids are discussed and results are summarized.

  19. Anti-wear properties of the molluscan shell Scapharca subcrenata: influence of surface morphology, structure and organic material on the elementary wear process.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Tian, Ximei; Wang, Yinci; Hu, Guangliang; Ren, Luquan

    2014-09-01

    As a typical natural biological mineralisation material, molluscan shells have excellent wear-resistance properties that result from the interactions amongst biological coupling elements such as morphology, structure and material. The in-depth study of the wear-resistance performance of shells and the contribution made by each coupling element may help to promote the development of new bionic wear-resistant devices. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of surface morphology (rib distribution on the shell), structure (rib coupled with nodules) and material (organic matter) on the anti-wear performance of the molluscan Scapharca subcrenata shell. The effect and contribution of each of these biological coupling elements were systematically investigated using the comparative experiment method. All three were found to exert significant effects on the shell's wear-resistance ability, and their individual contributions to that ability were revealed. Organic material can be classified as the principal coupling element, rib morphology as the secondary coupling element and the combined rib-nodule structure as the general coupling element. PMID:25063085

  20. Design of materials with prescribed nonlinear properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Sigmund, O.; Jensen, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    We systematically design materials using topology optimization to achieve prescribed nonlinear properties under finite deformation. Instead of a formal homogenization procedure, a numerical experiment is proposed to evaluate the material performance in longitudinal and transverse tensile tests under finite deformation, i.e. stress-strain relations and Poissons ratio. By minimizing errors between actual and prescribed properties, materials are tailored to achieve the target. Both two dimensional (2D) truss-based and continuum materials are designed with various prescribed nonlinear properties. The numerical examples illustrate optimized materials with rubber-like behavior and also optimized materials with extreme strain-independent Poissons ratio for axial strain intervals of εi∈[0.00, 0.30].

  1. Learning targeted materials properties from data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, Turab; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Dezhen, Xue; Theiler, James; Hogden, John

    We compare several strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young's (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The strategy is decomposed into two steps: a regressor is trained to predict elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material with desired elastic properties. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the results.

  2. Chemistry and Processing of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G A; Baumann, T F; Hope-Weeks, L J; Vance, A L

    2002-01-18

    Nanostructured materials can be formed through the sol-gel polymerization of inorganic or organic monomer systems. For example, a two step polymerization of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) was developed such that silica aerogels with densities as low as 3 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx} two times the density of air) could be achieved. Organic aerogels based upon resorcinol-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde can also be prepared using the sol-gel process. Materials of this type have received significant attention at LLNL due to their ultrafine cell sizes, continuous porosity, high surface area and low mass density. For both types of aerogels, sol-gel polymerization depends upon the transformation of these monomers into nanometer-sized clusters followed by cross-linking into a 3-dimensional gel network. While sol-gel chemistry provides the opportunity to synthesize new material compositions, it suffers from the inability to separate the process of cluster formation from gelation. This limitation results in structural deficiencies in the gel that impact the physical properties of the aerogel, xerogel or nanocomposite. In order to control the properties of the resultant gel, one should be able to regulate the formation of the clusters and their subsequent cross-linking. Towards this goal, we are utilizing dendrimer chemistry to separate the cluster formation from the gelation so that new nanostructured materials can be produced. Dendrimers are three-dimensional, highly branched macromolecules that are prepared in such a way that their size, shape and surface functionality are readily controlled. The dendrimers will be used as pre-formed clusters of known size that can be cross-linked to form an ordered gel network.

  3. Application of the Materials-by-Design Methodology to Redesign a New Grade of the High-Strength Low-Alloy Class of Steels with Improved Mechanical Properties and Processability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional trial-and-error empirical approach for the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach. Within the latter approach, a material is treated as a complex system and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools, and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to redesign a grade of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) class of steels with improved mechanical properties (primarily strength and fracture toughness), processability (e.g., castability, hot formability, and weldability), and corrosion resistance. Toward that end, a number of material thermodynamics, kinetics of phase transformations, and physics of deformation and fracture computational models and databases have been developed/assembled and utilized within a multi-disciplinary, two-level material-by-design optimization scheme. To validate the models, their prediction is compared against the experimental results for the related steel HSLA100. Then the optimization procedure is employed to determine the optimal chemical composition and the tempering schedule for a newly designed grade of the HSLA class of steels with enhanced mechanical properties, processability, and corrosion resistance.

  4. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Wall, J. A.; Cotts, D. B.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of spacecraft charging is reviewed, and criteria for selecting and testing semiinsulating polymers (SIPs) to avoid charging are discussed and illustrated. Chapters are devoted to the required properties of dielectric materials, the charging process, discharge-pulse phenomena, design for minimum pulse size, design to prevent pulses, conduction in polymers, evaluation of SIPs that might prevent spacecraft charging, and the general response of dielectrics to space radiation. SIPs characterized include polyimides, fluorocarbons, thermoplastic polyesters, poly(alkanes), vinyl polymers and acrylates, polymers containing phthalocyanine, polyacene quinones, coordination polymers containing metal ions, conjugated-backbone polymers, and 'metallic' conducting polymers. Tables summarizing the results of SIP radiation tests (such as those performed for the NASA Galileo Project) are included.

  5. Understanding and Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of LIGA Fabricated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Lavan, D.A.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-25

    LIGA fabricated materials and components exhibit several processing issues affecting their metallurgical and mechanical properties, potentially limiting their usefulness for MEMS applications. For example, LIGA processing by metal electrodeposition is very sensitive to deposition conditions which causes significant processing lot variations of mechanical and metallurgical properties. Furthermore, the process produces a material with a highly textured lenticular rnicrostructural morphology suggesting an anisotropic material response. Understanding and controlling out-of-plane anisotropy is desirable for LIGA components designed for out-of-plane flexures. Previous work by the current authors focused on results from a miniature servo-hydraulic mechanical test frame constructed for characterizing LIGA materials. Those results demonstrated microstructural and mechanical properties dependencies with plating bath current density in LIGA fabricated nickel (LIGA Ni). This presentation builds on that work and fosters a methodology for controlling the properties of LIGA fabricated materials through processing. New results include measurement of mechanical properties of LIGA fabricated copper (LIGA Cu), out-of-plane and localized mechanical property measurements using compression testing and nanoindentation of LIGA Ni and LIGA Cu.

  6. IMAP: Interferometry for Material Property Measurement in MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.D.; Miller, S.L.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-03-10

    An interferometric technique has been developed for non-destructive, high-confidence, in-situ determination of material properties in MEMS. By using interferometry to measure the full deflection curves of beams pulled toward the substrate under electrostatic loads, the actual behavior of the beams has been modeled. No other method for determining material properties allows such detailed knowledge of device behavior to be gathered. Values for material properties and non-idealities (such as support post compliance) have then been extracted which minimize the error between the measured and modeled deflections. High accuracy and resolution have been demonstrated, allowing the measurements to be used to enhance process control.

  7. Materials processing in space: Early experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Herring, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of the space environment were reviewed. Potential applications of space processing are discussed and include metallurgical processing, and processing of semiconductor materials. The behavior of fluid in low gravity is described. The evolution of apparatus for materials processing in space was reviewed.

  8. Inline quality prognosis of material condition induced process variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzler, Felix A.; Wortberg, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    The main variation in a good quality production are induced by material condition. Processing technical polymers like PA, ABS or PBT possible influences are residual moisture conditions of the material or minor variations of raw material charges. Small changes in the material properties are difficult to detect at first quality controls and can be within the property tolerances. But even these small differences cause defects. The effects range from viscosity variations to varied crystalline properties. The influence of material properties on the processing have to be detected inline and combined with material analysis to a quality prognosis. The equipped sensors at injection molding machines enable an adequate process performance. The recently available solutions for power consumption monitoring enhance the available process control opportunities. Because of the high process speed of injection molding machines, the required sampling rate has to be minimal 500 Hz. A setup of high bandwidth data processing linked to the machine control enables precise characterization of the production. Identified index numbers, energetic data and characteristic development of measured process figures enable a high resolution detection of material induced variations. This prognosis enables inline classification of the produced parts and a compensation by correlating quality requirements with adjusted filling and packing parameters.

  9. Defect properties and processing of high-technology nonmetallic materials: Proceedings of the Symposium, Boston, MA, November 14-17, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.H. Jr.; Chen, Y.; Sibley, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are diffusion mechanisms in transition metal oxides, shortcircuit diffusion processes in oxidation films, aspects of the reliability of ceramics, dislocation dissociation in MgO(n)Al2O3 spinel, metal colloids in oxides, special grain boundaries in alumina, the effect of ionizing radiation on Ni-doped MgO, HgCdTe photoplasticity, ion implantation in LiNbO3, refractory materials for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion, and physical structure and the electrochromic effect in tungsten oxide films. Also discussed are the sinterability of agglomerated powders, the hydrothermal preparation and sintering of fine ceramic powders, plasma sintering of ceramics, the densification of shock-treated Al oxide and Al nitride, TEM of shock-modified and annealed rutile, advances in solid state laser materials, and the use of structural ceramics in advanced heat engines.

  10. Processes and Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Marshall

    The field of organic photovoltaics is driven by the desire for better and cheaper solar cells. While showing much promise, current generations of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices do not exhibit properties that are suited for wide scale commercialization. While much research has been dedicated towards this goal, more yet needs to be done before it can be clear whether this is an achievable goal. This thesis describes new materials investigations for higher efficiency better stability organic photovoltaics, as well as new processes that broaden the application and fabrication space for these devices. The application of electro-polymerization, a deposition process, towards organic thin-film fabrication is discussed. This novel process for OPVs is followed by an analysis of new and interesting materials for OPV devices, including a higher efficiency hole-transporting material, and two hole-transporting molecules that exhibit self-assembly during OPV fabrication. The results of these investigations indicate the possibility for increased fabrication freedom and control, molecular species design that could allow higher efficiency devices, as well as indications of the role that molecular interactions in OPV heterojunctions play. In addition, the possibilities of integrating graphene, the two-dimensional form of carbon, into OPV architectures is discussed. A new process for graphene transfer that allows the integration of graphene into chemically and physically more fragile systems including those composed of small molecule semiconductors is described and experimentally verified. Graphene is then integrated as a cathode in OPVs, and a modeling and experimental investigation is performed to evaluate the potential for integrating graphene as a recombination layer in tandem OPVs. Based on this investigation, the integration of graphene into tandem OPVs could enable higher efficiency devices and significantly broadened architectural freedom for tandem fabrication.

  11. Properties of Extruded PS-212 Type Self-Lubricating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J.; Sliney, H. E.; Soltis, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    Research has been underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center since the 1960's to develop high temperature, self-lubricating materials. The bulk of the research has been done in-house by a team of researchers from the Materials Division. A series of self-lubricating solid material systems has been developed over the years. One of the most promising is the composite material system referred to as PS-212 or PM-212. This material is a powder metallurgy product composed of metal bonded chromium carbide and two solid lubricating materials known to be self-lubricating over a wide temperature range. NASA feels this material has a wide potential in industrial applications. Simplified processing of this material would enhance its commercial potential. Processing changes have the potential to reduce processing costs, but tribological and physical properties must not be adversely affected. Extrusion processing has been employed in this investigation as a consolidation process for PM-212/PS-212. It has been successful in that high density bars of EX-212 (extruded PM-212) can readily be fabricated. Friction and strength data indicate these properties have been maintained or improved over the P.M. version. A range of extrusion temperatures have been investigated and tensile, friction, wear, and microstructural data have been obtained. Results indicate extrusion temperatures are not critical from a densification standpoint, but other properties are temperature dependent.

  12. Materials-based process tolerances for neutron generator encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Ryan S.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Stavig, Mark Edwin

    2007-10-01

    Variations in the neutron generator encapsulation process can affect functionality. However, instead of following the historical path in which the effects of process variations are assessed directly through functional tests, this study examines how material properties key to generator functionality correlate with process variations. The results of this type of investigation will be applicable to all generators and can provide insight on the most profitable paths to process and material improvements. Surprisingly, the results at this point imply that the process is quite robust, and many of the current process tolerances are perhaps overly restrictive. The good news lies in the fact that our current process ensures reproducible material properties. The bad new lies in the fact that it would be difficult to solve functional problems by changes in the process.

  13. Models for predicting temperature dependence of material properties of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marla, Deepak; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.; Joshi, Suhas S.

    2014-03-01

    A number of processes such as laser ablation, laser welding, electric discharge machining, etc involve high temperatures. Most of the processes involve temperatures much higher than the target melting and normal boiling point. Such large variation in target temperature causes a significant variation in its material properties. Due to the unavailability of experimental data on material properties at elevated temperatures, usually the data at lower temperatures is often erroneously extrapolated during modelling of these processes. Therefore, this paper attempts to evaluate the variation in material properties with temperature using some general and empirical theories, along with the available experimental data for aluminum. The evaluated properties of Al using the proposed models show a significant variation with temperature. Between room temperature and near-critical temperature (0.9Tc), surface reflectivity of Al varies from more than 90% to less than 50%, absorption coefficient decreases by a factor of 7, thermal conductivity decreases by a factor of 5, density decreases by a factor of 4, specific heat and latent heat of vapourization vary by a factor between 1.5 and 2. Applying these temperature-dependent material properties for modelling laser ablation suggest that optical properties have a greater influence on the process than thermophysical properties. The numerical predictions of the phase explosion threshold in laser ablation are within 5% of the experimental values.

  14. Nonlinear optical properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, Joseph W.; Inguva, Ramarao

    1991-01-01

    The optical properties of a new class of composite nonlinear materials composed of coated grains, such as cadmium sulfide with a silver coating, are examined. These materials exhibit intrinsic optical bistability and resonantly enhanced conjugate reflectivity. The threshold for intrinsic optical bistability is low enough for practical applications in optical communications and optical computing. Some problems associated with the fabrication of these materials are addressed. Based on preliminary results, switching times are expected to be in the subpicosecond range.

  15. Polymers for nuclear materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Benicewicz, B.; Duke, J.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The use of open-celled microcellular foams as solid sorbents for metal ions and other solutes could provide a revolutionary development in separation science. Macroreticular and gel-bead materials are the current state-of-the-art for solid sorbents to separate metal ions and other solutes from solution. The new polymer materials examined in this effort offer a number of advantages over the older materials that can have a large impact on industrial separations. The advantages include larger usable surface area in contact with the solution, faster sorption kinetics, ability to tailor the uniform cell size to a specific application, and elimination of channeling and packing instability.

  16. Effect of thermo-mechanical processing on the material properties at low temperature of a large size Al-Ni stabilized Nb-Ti/Cu superconducting cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslag, S. A. E.; Curé, B.; Sgobba, S.; Dudarev, A.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Neuenschwander, J.; Jerjen, I.

    2014-01-01

    For future high-resolution particle experiments, a prototype for a 60 kA at 5 T, 4.2 K class conductor is realized by co-extrusion of a large, 40-strand Nb-Ti/Cu superconducting cable with a precipitation type Al-0.1wt.%Ni stabilizer. Microalloying with nickel contributes to the strength of the stabilizer, and avoids significant degradation in residual resistivity ratio, owing to its low solid solubility in aluminum. Sections of the conductor are work hardened to increase the mechanical properties of the as-extruded temper. Mechanical and resistivity characteristics are assessed as function of the amount of work hardening, at room temperature as well as at 4.2 K. Thermal treatments, like resin curing after coil winding, can cause partial annealing of the cold-worked material and reverse the strengthening effect. However, targeted thermal treatments, applied at relatively low temperature can result in precipitation hardening. The depletion of nickel in the aluminum-rich matrix around the precipitates results in an increased strength and a decreased effect of nickel on the thermal and electrical resistivity of the material. The present work aims at identifying an optimal work hardening sequence, and an optimal thermal treatment, possibly coinciding with a suitable coil resin curing cycle, for the Al-Ni stabilized superconductor.

  17. Repair material properties for effective structural application

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, P.S.; Limbachiya, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    Strength and engineering properties of three generic repair materials which are likely to influence long-term performance of repaired concrete structures were studied. Measured properties include strength, stiffness, shrinkage and creep deformations, together with the complete compressive stress-strain characteristics including post-cracking behavior. The repair materials considered in this investigation are commercially available and widely used. These included a high performance non-shrinkable concrete, a mineral based cementitious material with no additives or coarse aggregate size particles, and a cementitious mortar containing styrene acrylic copolymer with fiber additives. Performance comparisons are also made between these materials and plain concrete mixes of similar strength and stiffness, suitable for repair applications. The results show that shrinkage of the repair materials was significantly greater than the shrinkage of normal concrete. Moreover, the shrinkage of those modified with a polymer admixture was found to be very sensitive to the relative humidity of the exposure compared to normal concrete. The post-peak strain capacity of the material modified with a polymer admixture was markedly improved leading to a more pronounced falling branch of stress-strain curve. The ultimate stress level (at a maximum load) of specially formulated repair materials varies significantly, the lowest ultimate stress being recorded for the porous mineral-based material. The inclusion of aggregates improves the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of repair materials.

  18. Surface engineering of glazing materials and structures using plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Monteiro, Othon R.

    2003-04-10

    A variety of coatings is commercially produced on a very large scale, including transparent conducting oxides and multi-layer silver-based low-emissivity and solar control coatings. A very brief review of materials and manufacturing process is presented and illustrated by ultrathin silver films and chevron copper films. Understanding the close relation between manufacturing processes and bulk and surface properties of materials is crucial for film growth and self-assembly processes.

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventeenth quarterly progress report, May 12-August 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1980-09-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Development efforts have emphasized the reformulation of polybutyl acrylate, a liquid pottant used in the casting encapsulation process. This material has been modified to yield a composition with much faster cure at lower temperatures. Minimodules have been successfully prepared from this low cost compound and are currently being evaluated by thermal/humidity cycling. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was used for the examination of thermal stability in some of the pottant compounds of current interest. This method was useful in determining the temperatures at which oxidative or pyrolysis reactions resulted in degradation of the polymers. All the candidate pottants showed degradation onsets of over 200/sup 0/C. The effectiveness of a new primer was determined during this period. This formulation was similar to the silane coupling agent used in past experimentation but was modified with a peroxide to enhance the activity. Excellent bound strengths were obtained to glass, and mild steel that were resistant to immersion in boiling water. EVA to low iron glass gave an average bond strength of 35 lbs per inch of width. This new primer was also evaluated for the corrosion protection that could be provided to metal surfaces when primed and encapsulated in EVA. (WHK)

  20. From Microstructures to Predict Properties of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Gang

    2010-03-01

    Understanding the precise and fundamental manner in which materials structures (nanostructures or microstructures) and their evolution influences properties and service lifetimes of advanced materials profoundly impacts material design and today materials design plays an increasingly important rôle in many engineering applications. Linking structures to properties and predicting properties of materials is fundamental step for materials design. First, a framework of applications of multiscale modeling to property prediction of advanced materials will be briefly presented. As an example, a methodology will be shown to link micro-scale to the continuum scale, integrating microstructure modeling with the large Thermo-Calc^ database. This paradigm was successfully applied to the case of Fe-12Ni-6Mn maraging steel. Next, methodology for integrating first-principle calculation into simulations of microstructure evolution will be reviewed. Our methods are sufficiently reliable to permit control and fabrication of quantum-dots structures, nanocrystals, and particle-reinforced nanocomposites, as well as assist in the predictive behavior of macro-scale colloids, aerosols, and other soft matter systems.

  1. Processing and properties of advanced metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Alan Harold

    Since the development of the first aluminum foams in the middle of the 20th century [178], great advances have been made in the processing and fundamental understanding of metallic foams. As a result of these advances, metallic foams are now penetrating a number of applications where their unique suite of properties makes them superior to solid materials, such as lightweight structures, packaging and impact protection, and filtration and catalysis [3]. The purpose of this work is to extend the use of metallic foams in such applications by expanding their processing to include more sophisticated base alloys and architectures. The first four chapters discuss replacement of conventional crystalline metal foams with ones made from high-strength, low-melting amorphous metals, a substitution that offers potential for achieving mechanical properties superior to those of the best crystalline metal foams, without sacrificing the simplicity of processing methods made for low-melting crystalline alloys. Three different amorphous metal foams are developed in these chapters, and their structures and properties characterized. It is shown for the first time that amorphous metal foams, due to stabilization of shear bands during bending of their small strut-like features, are capable of compressive ductility comparable to that of ductile crystalline metal foams. A two-fold improvement in mechanical energy absorption relative to crystalline aluminum foams is shown experimentally to result from this stabilization. The last two chapters discuss modifications in foam processing that are designed to introduce controllable and continuous gradients in local foam density, which should improve mass efficiency by mimicking the optimized structures found in natural cellular materials [64], as well as facilitate the bonding and joining of foams with solid materials in higher-order structures. Two new processing methods are developed, one based on replication of nonuniformly-compressed polymer

  2. Antimicrobial thermoplastic materials for biomedical applications prepared by melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R.; Ceraulo, M.; Gallo, G.

    2014-05-01

    In this work thermoplastic polymers with antimicrobial properties were prepared by incorporating an antibiotic, i.e., ciprofloxacin (CFX), by melt processing. Two different polymers were used as matrices, i.e., polypropylene (PP) and poly(lactid acid) (PLA) and different concentrations of CFX have been incorporated. The antimicrobial properties, the release kinetic and the mechanical performances of the prepared materials were evaluated.

  3. Tactual perception of liquid material properties.

    PubMed

    Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, studies into the tactual perception of two liquid material properties, viscosity and wetness, are reviewed. These properties are very relevant in the context of interaction with liquids, both real, such as cosmetics or food products, and simulated, as in virtual reality or teleoperation. Both properties have been the subject of psychophysical characterisation in terms of magnitude estimation experiments and discrimination experiments, which are discussed. For viscosity, both oral and manual perception is discussed, as well as the perception of the viscosity of a mechanical system. For wetness, the relevant cues are identified and factors affecting perception are discussed. Finally, some conclusions are drawn pertaining to both properties. PMID:25128819

  4. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  5. Thermal protection materials: Thermophysical property data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.; Curry, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    This publication presents a thermophysical property survey on materials that could potentially be used for future spacecraft thermal protection systems (TPS). This includes data that was reported in the 1960's as well as more current information reported through the 1980's. An attempt was made to cite the manufacturers as well as the data source in the bibliography. This volume represents an attempt to provide in a single source a complete set of thermophysical data on a large variety of materials used in spacecraft TPS analysis. The property data is divided into two categories: ablative and reusable. The ablative materials have been compiled into twelve categories that are descriptive of the material composition. An attempt was made to define the Arrhenius equation for each material although this data may not be available for some materials. In a similar manner, char data may not be available for some of the ablative materials. The reusable materials have been divided into three basic categories: thermal protection materials (such as insulators), adhesives, and structural materials.

  6. Surface Intensive Materials Processing for Multi-Functional Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Ila, D.; Williams, E.K.; Muntele, C.I.; George, M.A.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.; Larkin, D.J.

    2000-03-06

    We have chosen silicon carbide (SiC) as a multi-functional material to demonstrate the application of surface intensive processing for device fabrication. We will highlight two devices which are produced in house at the Center for Irradiation of materials of Alabama A and M university: (A) High temperature electronic gas sensor, (B) High temperature optical properties/sensor.

  7. Material properties of novel polymeric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gene

    This dissertation will study the material properties of two types of novel polymer films (polyelectrolyte multilayer films and photolithographic polymer films). The formation of polylelectrolyte multilayer films onto functionalized aluminum oxide surfaces and functionalized poly(ethylene terephthaltate) (PET) were studied. Functionalization of the aluminum oxide surfaces was achieved via silane coupling. Functionalization of PET surfaces was achieved via hydrolysis and amidation. Surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic contact angle measurements were used to monitor the polyelectrolyte multilayer formation. Mechanical properties of the aluminum oxide supported polyelectrolyte multilayer films were tested using a simplified peel test. XPS was used to analyze the surfaces before and after peel. Single lap shear joint specimens were constructed to test the adhesive shear strength of the PET-supported polyelectrolyte multilayer film samples with the aid of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. The adhesive shear strength and its relation with the type of functionalization, number of polyelectrolyte layers, and the effect of polyelectrolyte conformation using added salt were explored. Also, characterization on the single lap joints after adhesive failure was carried out to determine the locus of failure within the multilayers by using XPS and SEM. Two types of photolithographic polymers were formulated and tested. These two polymers (photocrosslinkable polyacrylate (PUA), and a photocrosslinkable polyimide (HRP)) were used to investigate factors that would affect the structural integrity of these particular polymers under environmental variables such as processing (time, UV cure, pressure, and temperature) and ink exposure. Thermomechanical characterization was carried out to see the behavior of these two polymers under these environmental variables. Microscopic techniques were employed to study the morphological behavior of

  8. Materials processing in space bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Literature dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground based activities that provide supporting research is listed. Included are Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles. Subdivisions of the bibliography include the five categories: crystal growth; metals, alloys, and composites, fluids and transport; glasses and ceramics; and Ultrahigh Vacuum and Containerless Processing Technologies, in addition to a list of patents and a compilation of anonymously authored collections and reports and a cross reference index.

  9. Investigation of test methods material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Fifteenth quarterly progress report, November 12, 1979-February 12, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1980-03-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Work performed during this quarter included the development of anti-blocking treatments for EVA sheet intended for use as a lamination pottant. Initial evaluation studies were begun on a new pottant compound, polybutyl acrylate, to assess its preparation and handling characteristics. Corrosion studies using a standard salt spray test wre conducted to determine the degree of protection afforded to a number of metals when encapsulated in candidate pottant compounds. Pottants and outer cover candidates were exposed to intervals of accelerated uv stress aging using the RS/4 fluorescent sunlamp. Results are discussed. (WHK)

  10. Alternative processing methods for tungsten-base composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    Tungsten composite materials contain large amounts of tungsten distributed in a continuous matrix phase. Current commercial materials include the tungsten-nickel-iron with cobalt replacing some or all of the iron, and also tungsten-copper materials. Typically, these are fabricated by liquid-phase sintering of blended powders. Liquid-phase sintering offers the advantages of low processing costs, established technology, and generally attractive mechanical properties. However, liquid-phase sintering is restricted to a very limited number of matrix alloying elements and a limited range of tungsten and alloying compositions. In the past few years, there has been interest in a wider range of matrix materials that offer the potential for superior composite properties. These must be processed by solid-state processes and at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid undesired reactions between the tungsten and the matrix phase. These processes, in order of decreasing process temperature requirements, include hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing), hot extrusion, and dynamic compaction. The HIPing and hot extrusion processes have also been used to improve mechanical properties of conventional liquid-phase-sintered materials. Results of laboratory-scale investigations of solid-state consolidation of a variety of matrix materials, including titanium, hafnium, nickel aluminide, and steels are reviewed. The potential advantages and disadvantages of each of the possible alternative consolidation processes are identified. Postconsolidation processing to control microstructure and macrostructure is discussed, including novel methods of controlling microstructure alignment.

  11. Atomic-Scale Theoretical Studies of Fundamental Properties and Processes in CHNO Plastic-Bonded Explosive Constituent Materials under Static and Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The results of recent theoretical atomic-scale studies of CHNO plastic-bonded explosive constituent materials will be presented, emphasizing the effects of static and dynamic compression on structure, vibrational spectroscopy, energy redistribution, and dynamic deformation processes. Among the chemical compounds to be discussed are pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-s-triazine (RDX), nitromethane, and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Specific topics to be discussed include pressure-dependent terahertz IR absorption spectra in crystalline PETN and RDX, microscopic material flow characteristics and energy localization during and after pore collapse in shocked (100)-oriented RDX, establishment of local thermodynamic temperature and the approach to thermal equilibrium in shocked (100)-oriented nitromethane, and structural changes and relaxation phenomena that occur in shocked amorphous cis-HTPB. In the case of shocked HTPB, comparisons will be made between results obtained using fully-atomic and coarse-grained (united atom) molecular dynamics force field models. Rather than attempting to discuss any given topic in extended detail, 3-4 vignettes will be presented that highlight outstanding scientific questions and the predictive methods and tools we are developing to answer them. The U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Office of Naval Research supported this research.

  12. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  13. Possibilities of Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi

    Nowadays, lasers are applied in many industrial processes: the most developed technologies include such processes as laser welding, hybrid welding, laser cutting of steel, etc. In addition to laser processing of metallic materials, there are also many industrial applications of laser processing of non-metallic materials, like laser welding of polymers, laser marking of glass and laser cutting of wood-based materials. It is commonly known that laser beam is suitable for cutting of paper materials as well as all natural wood-fiber based materials. This study reveals the potential and gives overview of laser application in processing of paper materials. In 1990's laser technology increased its volume in papermaking industry; lasers at paper industry gained acceptance for different perforating and scoring applications. Nowadays, with reduction in the cost of equipment and development of laser technology (especially development of CO2 technology), laser processing of paper material has started to become more widely used and more efficient. However, there exists quite little published research results and reviews about laser processing of paper materials. In addition, forest industry products with pulp and paper products in particular are among major contributors for the Finnish economy with 20% share of total exports in the year 2013. This has been the standpoint of view and motivation for writing this literature review article: when there exists more published research work, knowledge of laser technology can be increased to apply it for processing of paper materials.

  14. Space processing of electronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    The bulk growth of solid solution alloys of mercury telluride and cadmium telluride is discussed. These alloys are usually described by the formula Hg1-xCdxTe, and are useful for the construction of infrared detectors. The electronic energy band gap can be controlled between zero and 1.6 electron volts by adjusting the composition x. The most useful materials are at x approximately 20%, suitable for detection wavelengths of about 10 micrometers. The problems of growing large crystals are rooted in the wide phase diagram of the HgTe-CdTe pseudobinary system which leads to exaggerate segregation in freezing, constitutional supercooling, and other difficulties, and in the high vapor pressure of mercury at the growth temperatures, which leads to loss of stoichiometry and to the necessity of working in strong, pressure resistant sealed containers.

  15. Electrochemical processing of a new class of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, J.C.; Bouteillon, J.; Poignet, J.C.; Roman, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    Ceramic layer coatings obtained by air plasma spraying processes contain pores and cracks. By filling the open pores of these layers with an element having physical and chemical properties complementary and compatible with those of the ceramics, the authors developed a simple process for producing a new class of materials. Two examples illustrating possible applications of this process for corrosion-protection and autolubrication purposes are presented in the second part of this paper. ZrO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic layer coatings present interesting properties which were improved or modified by adding specific materials to their open pores.

  16. Ultrasonic processing of hard materials for conformal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, Edward; Bechtold, Rob; Bechtold, Mike; Wolfs, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Hard ceramic optical materials such as sapphire, ALON, Spinel, or PCA can present a significant challenge in manufacturing precision optical components due to their tough mechanical properties. These are also the same mechanical properties that make them desirable materials when used in harsh environments. Tool wear and tool loading conditions during the grinding process for these materials can be especially problematic. Because of this, frequent dressing and reshaping of grinding wheels is often required. OptiPro systems is developing an ultrasonic grinding process called OptiSonic to minimize the forces during grinding and make the grinding process more efficient. The ultrasonic vibration of the grinding wheel allows for a grinding process that has the capacity for longer tool life and reduced tool wear for a more deterministic process. This presentation will discuss the OptiSonic process and present current results.

  17. Laser Material Processing for Microengineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helvajian, H.

    1995-01-01

    The processing of materials via laser irradiation is presented in a brief survey. Various techniques currently used in laser processing are outlined and the significance to the development of space qualified microinstrumentation are identified. In general the laser processing technique permits the transferring of patterns (i.e. lithography), machining (i.e. with nanometer precision), material deposition (e.g., metals, dielectrics), the removal of contaminants/debris/passivation layers and the ability to provide process control through spectroscopy.

  18. ESTEC wiring test programme materials related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wires are considered as EEE parts and are covered within the ESA SCC specification series (ESA SCC 3901/XXX). This specification defines the principal properties of the wires including insulation/lay-up and electrical properties. Some additional space related materials requirements are also included, requirements such as outgassing and silver plating thickness. If a project has additional materials requirements over and above those covered by the relevant SCC specification, then additional testing is required. This is especially true for crewed spacecraft. The following topics are discussed in this context: additional requirements for manned spacecraft; flammability; arc tracking; thermal decomposition; microbial surface growth; and ageing.

  19. Upgrades to the TPSX Material Properties Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, T. H.; Milos, F. S.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The TPSX Material Properties Database is a web-based tool that serves as a database for properties of advanced thermal protection materials. TPSX provides an easy user interface for retrieving material property information in a variety of forms, both graphical and text. The primary purpose and advantage of TPSX is to maintain a high quality source of often used thermal protection material properties in a convenient, easily accessible form, for distribution to government and aerospace industry communities. Last year a major upgrade to the TPSX web site was completed. This year, through the efforts of researchers at several NASA centers, the Office of the Chief Engineer awarded funds to update and expand the databases in TPSX. The FY01 effort focuses on updating correcting the Ames and Johnson thermal protection materials databases. In this session we will summarize the improvements made to the web site last year, report on the status of the on-going database updates, describe the planned upgrades for FY02 and FY03, and provide a demonstration of TPSX.

  20. Effect of processing on Polymer/Composite structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the vitality and economic health of the field of polymer forecasting are discussed. A consistent and rational point of view which considers processing as a participant in the underlying triad of relationships which comprise materials science and engineering is outlined. This triad includes processing as it influences material structure, and ultimately properties. Methods in processing structure properties, polymer science and engineering, polymer chemistry and synthesis, structure and modification and optimization through processing, and methods of melt flow modeling in processing structure property relations of polymer were developed. Mechanical properties of composites are considered, and biomedical materials research to include polymer processing effects are studied. An analysis of the design technology of advances graphite/epoxy composites is also reported.

  1. Infrared Database for Process Support Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K. E.; Boothe, R. E.; Burns, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    Process support materials' compatibility with cleaning processes is critical to ensure final hardware cleanliness and that performance requirements are met. Previous discovery of potential contaminants in process materials shows the need for incoming materials testing and establishment of a process materials database. The Contamination Control Team of the Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing (MP&M) Department at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has initiated the development of such an infrared (IR) database, called the MSFC Process Materials IR database, of the common process support materials used at MSFC. These process support materials include solvents, wiper cloths, gloves, bagging materials, etc. Testing includes evaluation of the potential of gloves, wiper cloths, and other items to transfer contamination to handled articles in the absence of solvent exposure, and the potential for solvent exposure to induce material degradation. This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the initial testing completed through December 2002. It is anticipated that additional testing will be conducted with updates provided in future TMs.Materials were analyzed using two different IR techniques: (1) Dry transference and (2) liquid extraction testing. The first of these techniques utilized the Nicolet Magna 750 IR spectrometer outfitted with a horizontal attenuated total reflectance (HATR) crystal accessory. The region from 650 to 4,000 wave numbers was analyzed, and 50 scans were performed per IR spectrum. A dry transference test was conducted by applying each sample with hand pressure to the HATR crystal to first obtain a spectrum of the parent material. The material was then removed from the HATR crystal and analyzed to determine the presence of any residues. If volatile, liquid samples were examined both prior to and following evaporation.The second technique was to perform an extraction test with each sample in five different solvents.Once the scans were complete for

  2. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  3. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  4. Mathematical and physical modelling of materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical and physical modeling of turbulence phenomena in metals processing, electromagnetically driven flows in materials processing, gas-solid reactions, rapid solidification processes, the electroslag casting process, the role of cathodic depolarizers in the corrosion of aluminum in sea water, and predicting viscoelastic flows are described.

  5. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  6. Mechanical properties of low dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika

    Recent advances in low dimensional materials (LDMs) have paved the way for unprecedented technological advancements. The drive to reduce the dimensions of electronics has compelled researchers to devise newer techniques to not only synthesize novel materials, but also tailor their properties. Although micro and nanomaterials have shown phenomenal electronic properties, their mechanical robustness and a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationship are critical for their use in practical applications. However, the challenges in probing these mechanical properties dramatically increase as their dimensions shrink, rendering the commonly used techniques inadequate. This dissertation focuses on developing techniques for accurate determination of elastic modulus of LDMs and their mechanical responses under tensile and shear stresses. Fibers with micron-sized diameters continuously undergo tensile and shear deformations through many phases of their processing and applications. Significant attention has been given to their tensile response and their structure-tensile properties relations are well understood, but the same cannot be said about their shear responses or the structure-shear properties. This is partly due to the lack of appropriate instruments that are capable of performing direct shear measurements. In an attempt to fill this void, this dissertation describes the design of an inexpensive tabletop instrument, referred to as the twister, which can measure the shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of micron-sized individual fibers. An automated system applies a pre-determined twist to the fiber sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and KevlarRTM 119, were found to have G = 17 and 2.4 GPa, respectively. In addition to measuring the shear

  7. Achieving process control through improved grinding techniques for ferrite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, J.

    1995-09-01

    In manufacturing soft ferrite materials the particle size of the raw material has a significant impact on the reactivity of calcination. The control of particle size distribution and final formulation at wet milling after calcining impacts the reactivity during sintering and the magnetic properties of the final product. This paper will deal with steps taken to improve process control during the grinding operations of raw material and calcine in soft ferrite production. Equipment modifications as well as changes to the grinding and material handling techniques will be included. All examples of process control and improvements will be supported by data.

  8. High-energy ion processing of materials for improved hardcoatings

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Rhoades, R.L.; Oliver, W.C.; Riester, L.; Tsui, T.Y.

    1994-02-01

    Research has been directed toward use of economically viable ion processing strategies for production and improvement of hardcoatings. Processing techniques were high-energy ion implantation and electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma processing. Subject materials were boron suboxides, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, CoCrMo alloy (a Stellite{trademark}), and electroplated Cr. These materials may be regarded either as coatings themselves (which might be deposited by thermal spraying, plasma processing, etc.) or in some cases, as substrates whose surfaces can be improved. hardness and other properties in relation to process variables are reported.

  9. Intellectual property analysis of holographic materials business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingand, Nadya; Hunt, David

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents an overview of intellectual property in the field of holographic photosensitive materials and highlights the possibilities offered by patent searching and analysis. Thousands of patent documents relevant to holographic materials have been uncovered by the study. The search was performed in the following databases: U.S. Patent Office, European Patent Office, and Japanese Patent Office for the time frame of 1971 through November 2005. The patent analysis has unveiled trends in patent temporal distribution, leading IP portfolios, companies competition within the holographic materials market and other interesting insights.

  10. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  11. Electromagnetic properties of material coated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, L.; Berrie, J.; Burkholder, R.; Dominek, A.; Walton, E.; Wang, N.

    1989-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of material coated conducting surfaces were investigated. The coating geometries consist of uniform layers over a planar surface, irregularly shaped formations near edges and randomly positioned, electrically small, irregularly shaped formations over a surface. Techniques to measure the scattered field and constitutive parameters from these geometries were studied. The significance of the scattered field from these geometries warrants further study.

  12. Thermal Property Parameter Estimation of TPS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddren, Jesse

    1998-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the thermophysical properties of TPS (thermal protection system) materials is necessary for pre-flight design and post-flight data analysis. Thermal properties, such as thermal conductivity and the volumetric specific heat, can be estimated from transient temperature measurements using non-linear parameter estimation methods. Property values are derived by minimizing a functional of the differences between measured and calculated temperatures. High temperature thermal response testing of TPS materials is usually done in arc-jet or radiant heating facilities which provide a quasi one-dimensional heating environment. Last year, under the NASA-ASEE-Stanford Fellowship Program, my work focused on developing a radiant heating apparatus. This year, I have worked on increasing the fidelity of the experimental measurements, optimizing the experimental procedures and interpreting the data.

  13. Studies of molecular properties of polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace environment effects (high energy electrons, thermal cycling, atomic oxygen, and aircraft fluids) on polymeric and composite materials considered for structural use in spacecraft and advanced aircraft are examined. These materials include Mylar, Ultem, and Kapton. In addition to providing information on the behavior of the materials, attempts are made to relate the measurements to the molecular processes occurring in the material. A summary and overview of the technical aspects are given along with a list of the papers that resulted from the studies. The actual papers are included in the appendices and a glossary of technical terms and definitions is included in the front matter.

  14. Effective Mechanical Properties of Lattice Material Fabricated by Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Seung-kyum; Rosen, David W; Duty, Chad E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a two-step homogenization method is proposed and implemented for evaluating effective mechanical properties of lattice structured material fabricated by the material extrusion additive manufacturing process. In order to consider the characteristics of the additive manufacturing process in estimation procedures, the levels of scale for homogenization are divided into three stages the levels of layer deposition, structural element, and lattice structure. The method consists of two transformations among stages. In the first step, the transformation between layer deposition and structural element levels is proposed to find the geometrical and material effective properties of structural elements in the lattice structure. In the second step, the method to estimate effective mechanical properties of lattice material is presented, which uses a unit cell and is based on the discretized homogenization method for periodic structure. The method is implemented for cubic lattice structure and compared to experimental results for validation purposes.

  15. Neural networks as tools for predicting materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Materials science is of fundamental significance to science and technology because our industrial base and society depend upon our ability to develop advanced materials. Materials and materials processing cuts across almost every sector of industry. The key in all of these areas is the ability to rapidly screen possible designs which will have significant impact. However up to now materials design and processing have been to a large extent empirical sciences. In addition we are still unable to design new alloys and polymers to meet application specific requirements. Being able to do so quickly and at minimum cost would provide an incredible advantage. Obviously, the ability to predict physical, chemical, or mechanical properties of compounds prior to their synthesis is of great technological value in optimizing their design, processing, or recycling. In addition, in order to realize the ultimate goal of materials by computational design, the reverse problem, prediction of chemical structure based on desired properties, has to be resolved. Research at ORNL has lead to the development of a novel computational paradigm (coupling computational neural networks with graph theory, genetic algorithms, wavelet theory, fuzzy logic, molecular dynamics, and quantum chemistry) capable of performing accurate computational synthesis (both predictions of properties or the design of compounds that have specified performance criteria). The computational paradigm represents a hybrid of a number of emerging technologies and has proven to work very well for test compounds ranging from small organic molecules to polymeric materials. Fundamental to the method is the neural network-based formulation of the correlations between structure and properties. The advantages of this method is in its ease of use, speed, accuracy, and that it can be used to predict both properties from structure, and also structure from properties.

  16. Engineering processing and properties of nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic compounds of iron, nickel, and titanium are materials recently under development for structural applications. Among these, Ni/sub 3/Al has been made reasonably ductile by the addition of small amounts of boron. Further additions of zirconium and chromium have been utilized for enhancement of high temperature strength and intermediate temperature ductility. Nickel aluminide alloys based on Ni/sub 3/Al are near commercialization. This paper describes the melting, processing, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, and weldability of these alloys. Applications for nickel aluminides have been identified. Potential suppliers who have recently licensed the nickel aluminide technology from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are also listed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Properties of five toughened matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of toughened matrix composite materials offers an attractive solution to the problem of poor damage tolerance associated with advanced composite materials. In this study, the unidirectional laminate strengths and moduli, notched (open-hole) and unnotched tension and compression properties of quasi-isotropic laminates, and compression-after-impact strengths of five carbon fiber/toughened matrix composites, IM7/E7T1-2, IM7/X1845, G40-800X/5255-3, IM7/5255-3, and IM7/5260 have been evaluated. The compression-after-impact (CAI) strengths were determined primarily by impacting quasi-isotropic laminates with the NASA Langley air gun. A few CAI tests were also made with a drop-weight impactor. For a given impact energy, compression after impact strengths were determined to be dependent on impactor velocity. Properties and strengths for the five materials tested are compared with NASA data on other toughened matrix materials (IM7/8551-7, IM6/1808I, IM7/F655, and T800/F3900). This investigation found that all five materials were stronger and more impact damage tolerant than more brittle carbon/epoxy composite materials currently used in aircraft structures.

  18. Powder processing and mechanical properties of Silver0.86Lead19Antimony telluride20 (LAST) and Lead0.95Tin0.05Tellurium - Lead sulfide 8% (Lead telluride -Lead sulfide) thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jennifer Elisabeth

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials convert between thermal and electrical energy and when used with existing processes will increase the efficiency via waste heat recovery. Ag0.86Pb19SbTe20 (LAST) and Pb0.95Sn0.05Te - PbS 8% (PbTe-PbS) materials exhibit good thermoelectric (TE) properties and have potential applications as thermoelectric generators in waste heat recovery. However, to fully characterize the thermo-mechanical behavior of LAST and PbTe-PbS materials under in-service conditions, knowledge is needed of the mechanical and thermal properties at room and high temperature. As fracture strength is inversely proportional to the square root of grain size, cast ingots were powder processed to reduce powder particle size. Three different powder processing methods were used (1) dry milling only, (2) wet milling only, or (3) dry milling and wet milling The specimens were fabricated using hot pressing or pulsed electric current sintering (PECS) from planetary ball milled powders. In this study, elastic moduli, including Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio, were measured dynamically using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) at room temperature and as a function of temperature up to 663 K. The room temperature porosity dependence for Young's modulus followed the empirical exponential relationships common for brittle materials, with a material dependent constant bPE of 3.5 and 1.3 for LAST and PbTe-PbS, respectively. The room temperature Young's modulus for a theoretically dense specimen was 58.4 +/- 0.6 GPa and 56.2 +/- 0.4 GPa for for LAST and PbTe-PbS, respectively. For hot pressed PbTe-PbS specimens, the Vickers indentations mean hardness and fracture toughness was 1.18 + 0.09 GPa and 0.35 +/- 0.04 MPa·m 1/2. The coefficient of thermal expansion is important for understanding the mechanical response of a material to a thermal gradient or a thermal transient. For PbTe-PbS the coefficient of thermal expansion measured using dilatometry and high

  19. Structure-property relationships in silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Derzon, D.K.; Wang, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    The simultaneous formation of a filler phase and a polymer matrix via in situ sol-gel techniques provides silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials of high strength. This study concentrates on the effects of temperature and relative humidity on a trimodal polymer system in an attempt to accelerate the reaction as well as evaluate subtle process- structure-property relations. It was found that successful process acceleration is only viable for high humidity systems when using the tin(IV) catalyst dibutyltin dilaurate. Processes involving low humidity were found to be very temperature and time dependent. Bimodal systems were investigated and demonstrated that the presence of a short-chain component led to enhanced material strength. This part of the study also revealed a link between the particle size and population density and the optimization of material properties.

  20. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  1. Repair materials and processes for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Bonnar, Gerard R.

    This paper describes field and depot level repair methods for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone. The repair materials, processing methods, and mechanical properties of the test specimens and subcomponents are discussed. According to recent tests, the dry carbon cloth and the liquid resin matrix that can be cured under 93 C have better processing and mechanical properties than the 121 C curing prepregs and film adhesives. The moisture in the parent CFRP is the main cause of creating voids in the adhesive layer during the 121 C/vacuum pressure cure cycle. The lower processing temperature (wet layup) showed better results than higher processing temperature (prepreg/adhesive layup) for composite repair.

  2. Fluid bed technology in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, C.K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    1999-01-01

    The author explores the various aspects of fluidization engineering and examines its applications in a multitude of materials processing techniques. Topics include process metallurgy, fluidization in nuclear engineering, and the pros and cons of various fluidization equipment. Gupta emphasizes fluidization engineering in high temperature processing, and high temperature fluidized bed furnaces.

  3. Understanding Thermal Behavior in Lens Processing of Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ensz, M.T.; Greene, D.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Hofmeister, W.H.; Nelson, D.V.; Robino, C.V.; Schlienger, M.E.; Smugeresky, J.E.; Wert, M.J.

    1998-11-05

    In direct laser metal deposition technologies, such as the Laser (LENS) process, it is important to understand and control the Engineered Net Shaping thermal behavior during fabrication. With this control, components can be reliably fabricated with desired structural material properties. This talk will describe the use of contact and imaging techniques to monitor the thermal signature during LENS processing. Recent results show a direct correlation between thermal history and material properties, where the residual stress magnitude decreases as the laser power, and therefore thermal signature, increases. Development of an understanding of solidification behavior, residual stress, and microstructural evolution with respect to thermal behavior will be discussed.

  4. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  5. Planning for Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A systems design study to describe the conceptual evolution, the institutional interrelationshiphs, and the basic physical requirements to implement materials processing in space was conducted. Planning for a processing era, rather than hardware design, was emphasized. Product development in space was examined in terms of fluid phenomena, phase separation, and heat and mass transfer. The effect of materials processing on the environment was studied. A concept for modular, unmanned orbiting facilities using the modified external tank of the space shuttle is presented. Organizational and finding structures which would provide for the efficient movement of materials from user to space are discussed.

  6. Processing, texture and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landfermann, H.; Hausner, H.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to its favorable properties, in particular those shown at high temperatures, silicon carbide is of great interest for applications related to the construction of engines and turbines. Thus, silicon carbide could replace heat-resisting alloys with the objective to achieve a further increase in operational temperature. The present investigation is concerned with approaches which can provide silicon carbide material with suitable properties for the intended applications, taking into account the relations between characteristics of the raw material, material composition, sinter conditions, and results of the sintering process. The effects of density and texture formation on the mechanical properties are studied. It is found that a dense material with a fine-grained microstructure provides optimal mechanical properties, while any deviation from this ideal condition can lead to a considerable deterioration with respect to the material properties.

  7. First principles simulation of materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, W.A.; Stocks, G.M.; Pinski, F.J.; Jordan, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Qui, L.L.; Staunton, J.B.; Johnson, D.D.; Ginatempo, B.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a hybrid, parallel computer code for calculating the electronic structure of both ordered and substitutionally disordered materials. By using PVM3.3, we can integrate into our local computer environment multiple parallel and vector superconductors as well as high performance workstations. Without this approach, calculations of materials properties of large systems would be otherwise untenable due to a lack of computer resources. For example, we have determined the short-range order intensity and its electronic origin for the Ag-Mg alloy system, including an estimate of the order-disorder (spinodal) temperature.

  8. Temperature dependent phonon properties of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Broido, David; Fultz, Brent

    2015-03-01

    We present recent developments using the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP) to model thermoelectric materials. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to generate an effective Hamiltonian that reproduce neutron scattering spectra, thermal conductivity, phonon self energies, and heat capacities. Results are presented for (among others) SnSe, Bi2Te3, and Cu2Se proving the necessity of careful modelling of finite temperature properties for strongly anharmonic materials. Supported by the Swedish Research Council (VR) Project Number 637-2013-7296.

  9. First principles simulation of materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, W.A.; Stocks, G.M.; Jordan, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Qui, L.; Johnson, D.D.; Pinski, F.J.; Staunton, J.B.; Ginatempo, B.

    1994-08-01

    We have developed a hybrid, parallel computer code for calculating the electronic structure of both ordered and substitutionally disordered materials. By using PVM3.3, we can integrate into our local computer environment multiple parallel and vector supercomputers as well as high performance workstations. Without this approach, calculations of materials properties of large systems would be otherwise untenable due to a lack of computer resources. For example, we have determined the short-range order intensity and its electronic origin for the Ag-Mg alloy system, including an estimate of the order-disorder (spinodal) temperature.

  10. Thermal expansion properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.; Mackey, G. B.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal expansion data for several composite materials, including generic epoxy resins, various graphite, boron, and glass fibers, and unidirectional and woven fabric composites in an epoxy matrix, were compiled. A discussion of the design, material, environmental, and fabrication properties affecting thermal expansion behavior is presented. Test methods and their accuracy are discussed. Analytical approaches to predict laminate coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) based on lamination theory and micromechanics are also included. A discussion is included of methods of tuning a laminate to obtain a near-zero CTE for space applications.

  11. Material Property Characterization of AS4/VRM-34 Textile Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenoble, Ray W.; Johnston, William M

    2013-01-01

    Several material properties (modulus, strengths, and fracture toughness) of a textile composite have been evaluated to provide input data to analytical models of Pultruded Rod Stiffened Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS). The material system is based on warp-knitted preforms of AS4 carbon fibers and VRM-34 epoxy resin, which have been processed via resin infusion and oven curing. Tensile, compressive, shear, and fracture toughness properties have been measured at ambient and elevated temperatures. All specimens were tested in as-fabricated (dry) condition. Specimens were tested with and without through-thickness stitching.

  12. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  13. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  14. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  15. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  16. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  17. Aqueous processing in materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooiman, Michael B.; Sole, Kathryn C.

    1994-06-01

    Reviews of aqueous processing in JOM have traditionally focused on hydrometallurgical process routes. This article, however, addresses the application of aqueous processing in materials engineering and presents some promising developments that employ aqueous-based routes for the manufacture of high-tech components and specialty products. Such applications include producing metallic and ceramic powders; etching; surface modification by electroplating and electroless plating; manufacturing jewelry and intricate components by electroforming; and producing advanced ceramics, composites, and nanophase materials by sol-gel and biomimetic processing.

  18. The processing of materials in outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Colling, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Zero-gravity environment may lead to fabrication of new and improved materials. According to comprehensive study of application of this promising technology to superconducting and electrical contact materials, outer space processing could improve microstructure and homogeneity of many single and multicomponent systems formed from solidification of fluid phases. New structures that are impossible to form terrestrially may also be accessible in space environment.

  19. ATMOSPHERIC PROCESSES AND EFFECTS ON MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These two chapters summarize the effects expected from the depletion of stratospheric ozone by the presence of CFCs. he two areas considered by these two reports are materials damage and atmospheric processes. ncreased UV can affect materials in the following ways: (1) corrosion ...

  20. Material removal processes: Engineering mechanics consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the material removal process called machining, a layer of material of constant thickness is removed from the workpiece by a wedge-shaped tool that travels parallel to the workpiece at a preselected depth. Even though the speed of relative movement between workpiece and tool is low (typical 1--10 M/S), the strain-rates in the workpiece near the tool can be high, on the order of 10[sup 4]-10[sup 5] s[sup [minus]1]. When machining brittle materials or unlubricated ductile materials at low speed, the removed metal (or chip) will be discontinuous and made up of small fractured segments. On the other hand, when machining ductile material under lubricated conditions, the removed material forms a continuous coil. In this case, we can represent the material removal process as a steady-state process. In this presentation, we will restrict ourselves to orthogonal machining where the cutting edge is perpendicular to the relative motion-a situation also approximated by other material removal processes such as planing and broaching, and turning on a lathe.

  1. Material removal processes: Engineering mechanics consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1993-04-01

    In the material removal process called machining, a layer of material of constant thickness is removed from the workpiece by a wedge-shaped tool that travels parallel to the workpiece at a preselected depth. Even though the speed of relative movement between workpiece and tool is low (typical 1--10 M/S), the strain-rates in the workpiece near the tool can be high, on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}. When machining brittle materials or unlubricated ductile materials at low speed, the removed metal (or chip) will be discontinuous and made up of small fractured segments. On the other hand, when machining ductile material under lubricated conditions, the removed material forms a continuous coil. In this case, we can represent the material removal process as a steady-state process. In this presentation, we will restrict ourselves to orthogonal machining where the cutting edge is perpendicular to the relative motion-a situation also approximated by other material removal processes such as planing and broaching, and turning on a lathe.

  2. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction. [space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.; Mckenzie, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three different chemical processing schemes were identified for separating lunar soils into the major oxides and elements. Feedstock production for space industry; an HF acid leach process; electrorefining processes for lunar free metal and metal derived from chemical processing of lunar soils; production and use of silanes and spectrally selective materials; glass, ceramics, and electrochemistry workshops; and an econometric model of bootstrapping space industry are discussed.

  3. Electronic materials processing and the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and origin of deficiencies in bulk electronic materials for device fabrication are analyzed. It is found that gravity generated perturbations during their formation account largely for the introduction of critical chemical and crystalline defects and, moreover, are responsible for the still existing gap between theory and experiment and thus for excessive reliance on proprietary empiricism in processing technology. Exploration of the potential of reduced gravity environment for electronic materials processing is found to be not only desirable but mandatory.

  4. DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS NANOCOMPOSITE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, E.; Polizos, G.; James, D. R.; Sauers, I.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Composite materials based on polymers are used in various engineering applications due to their ability to be tailored for a specific application. As a result a composite could be selected or designed for a high performance part such as field grading applications in high voltage technology. Presently, there exists no commercially available material for electric field control. For this reason in this study we characterize a polymeric system composed of a thermoplast polymer filled with nanometer size ceramic particles. Since it is hard to tailor or to predict properties of composites theoretically, an Edisonian approach is employed. Composites with different filler weight concentrations are prepared and their dielectric performance are characterized. Impedance spectroscopy technique at a constant frequency is used to determine the dielectric properties of the composites at low temperatures. Measurement results and potential applications of the composite systems are presented.

  5. Dielectric properties of various nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; James, David Randy; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Composite materials based on polymers are used in various engineering applications due to their ability to be tailored for a specific application. As a result a composite could be selected or designed for a high performance part such as field grading applications in high voltage technology. Presently, there exists no commercially available material for electric field control. For this reason in this study we characterize a polymeric system composed of a thermoplast polymer filled with nanometer size ceramic particles. Since it is hard to tailor or to predict properties of composites theoretically, an Edisonian approach is employed. Composites with different filler weight concentrations are prepared and their dielectric performance are characterized. Impedance spectroscopy technique at a constant frequency is used to determine the dielectric properties of the composites at low temperatures. Measurement results and potential applications of the composite systems are presented.

  6. Plasma-assisted microwave processing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin (Inventor); Ylin, Tzu-yuan (Inventor); Jackson, Henry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A microwave plasma assisted method and system for heating and joining materials. The invention uses a microwave induced plasma to controllably preheat workpiece materials that are poorly microwave absorbing. The plasma preheats the workpiece to a temperature that improves the materials' ability to absorb microwave energy. The plasma is extinguished and microwave energy is able to volumetrically heat the workpiece. Localized heating of good microwave absorbing materials is done by shielding certain parts of the workpiece and igniting the plasma in the areas not shielded. Microwave induced plasma is also used to induce self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) process for the joining of materials. Preferably, a microwave induced plasma preheats the material and then microwave energy ignites the center of the material, thereby causing a high temperature spherical wave front from the center outward.

  7. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-07-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  8. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-03-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  9. Flow-induced properties of nanotube-filled polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, Semen B; Douglas, Jack F; Obrzut, Jan; Grulke, Eric A; Migler, Kalman B

    2004-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are under intense investigation in materials science owing to their potential for modifying the electrical conductivity sigma, shear viscosity eta, and other transport properties of polymeric materials. These particles are hybrids of filler and nanoscale additives because their lengths are macroscopic whereas their cross-sectional dimensions are closer to molecular scales. The combination of extended shape, rigidity and deformability allows CNTs to be mechanically dispersed in polymer matrices in the form of disordered 'jammed' network structures. Our measurements on representative network-forming multiwall nanotube (MWNT) dispersions in polypropylene indicate that these materials exhibit extraordinary flow-induced property changes. Specifically, sigma and eta both decrease strongly with increasing shear rate, and these nanocomposites exhibit impressively large and negative normal stress differences, a rarely reported phenomenon in soft condensed matter. We illustrate the practical implications of these nonlinear transport properties by showing that MWNTs eliminate die swell in our nanocomposites, an effect crucial for their processing. PMID:15273745

  10. Chemistry and properties of blends of acetylene terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to develop new high temperature/high performance structural materials, the chemistry and properties of acetylene-containing materials and their cured resins are under investigation. The objective of this work is to develop materials that are readily processable (i.e., 200-300 C and about 1.4 MPa or less) and possess usable mechanical properties at temperatures as high as 177 C. An acetylene-terminated aspartimide (ATA) was blended with an equal weight of an acetylene-terminated arylene ether (ATAE) oligomer. The blend was subsequently thermally cured to yield a resin which was evaluated in the form of neat resin moldings, adhesive specimens, and laminates. Adhesive specimens and laminates gave good mechanical properties to temperatures as high as 177 C. In addition, preliminary laminate work is presented on the resin from a blend of a new N-methyl substituted ATA and an ATAE.

  11. Process for hot briquetting of organic solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Janusch, A.

    1982-11-23

    For the purpose of briquetting organic solid materials, such as brown coal or bituminous coal, the materials are heated by hot water and/or steam and under super-atmospheric pressure to temperatures exceeding 160/sup 0/ C. After discharging the organic solid materials, which have become dried to a great extent, the generated steam is separated by sucking off the steam without substantially cooling effect, bitumen-forming substances present within the organic solid materials thereby rapidly becoming homogeneously distributed. These homogeneously distributed binding agents give the compressed briquettes obtained a high strength and good mechanical properties when using substantially reduced compacting pressures as compared with known briquetting processes.

  12. Aircraft gas turbine materials and processes.

    PubMed

    Kear, B H; Thompson, E R

    1980-05-23

    Materials and processing innovations that have been incorporated into the manufacture of critical components for high-performance aircraft gas turbine engines are described. The materials of interest are the nickel- and cobalt-base superalloys for turbine and burner sections of the engine, and titanium alloys and composites for compressor and fan sections of the engine. Advanced processing methods considered include directional solidification, hot isostatic pressing, superplastic foring, directional recrystallization, and diffusion brazing. Future trends in gas turbine technology are discussed in terms of materials availability, substitution, and further advances in air-cooled hardware. PMID:17772808

  13. Materials Processing in Space (MPS) program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Insight is provided into the scientific rotationale for materials processing in space (MPS), and a comprehensive and cohesive approach for implementation and integration of the many, diverse aspects of MPS is described. The programmatic and management functions apply to all projects and activities implemented under MPS. It is intended that specific project plans, providing project unique details, will be appended to this document for endeavors such as the Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) Project, the Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) Project, the MPS/Spacelab (MPS/SL) Project, and the Materials Experiment Carrier (MEC) Payloads.

  14. Process feasibility study in support of silicon material task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Hansen, K. C.; Yaws, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Process system properties are analyzed for materials involved in the alternate processes under consideration for solar cell grade silicon. The following property data are reported for trichlorosilane: critical constants, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, gas heat capacity, liquid heat capacity, density, surface tension, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat of formation, and Gibb's free energy of formation. Work continued on the measurement of gas viscosity values of silicon source materials. Gas phase viscosity values for silicon tetrafluoride between 40 C and 200 C were experimentally determined. Major efforts were expended on completion of the preliminary economic analysis of the silane process. Cost, sensitivity and profitability analysis results are presented based on a preliminary process design of a plant to produce 1,000 metric tons/year of silicon by the revised process.

  15. Wetting properties of molten carbonate fuel cell electrode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.M.; Bennett, P.S.; Pignon, J.F. ); Makkus, R.C.; Weewer, R.; Hemmes, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are of interest for their potentially highly efficient conversion of chemical energy into electrical energy. This paper discusses how the wetting properties of electrode materials by molten carbonate have a high relevance for the performance of the porous electrodes. When internal reforming of the fuel gas at the anode is performed, the wetting properties also influence the efficiency of the reforming process. Distribution of the electrolyte in an MCFC stack is mainly determined by the wetting properties of the porous MCFC materials, such as electrodes and tile in contact with the electrolyte. The quality of the wet seal areas of the separator plates in an MCFC stack to prevent gas leakage also depends on the wetting properties.

  16. Magnetic properties of Martian surface material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis that the magnetic properties of the Martian surface material are due to the production of a magnetic phase in the clay mineral nontronite by transient shock heating is examined. In the course of the investigation a magnetic material is produced with rather unusual properties. Heating from 900 C to 1000 C, of natural samples of nontronite leads first to the production of what appears to be Si doped maghemite gamma (-Fe2O3). Although apparently metastable, the growth of gamma -Fe2O3 at these temprtures is unexpected, and its relative persistence of several hours at 1000 C is most surprising. Continued annealing of this material for longer periods promote the crystallization of alpha Fe2O3 and cristobalite (high temperature polymorph of SiO2). All available data correlate this new magnetic material with the cristobalite hence our naming it magnetic ferri cristobalite. Formation of this magnetic cristobalite, however, may require topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  17. Magnetic properties of Martian surface material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-06-01

    The hypothesis that the magnetic properties of the Martian surface material are due to the production of a magnetic phase in the clay mineral nontronite by transient shock heating is examined. In the course of the investigation a magnetic material is produced with rather unusual properties. Heating from 900 C to 1000 C, of natural samples of nontronite leads first to the production of what appears to be Si doped maghemite gamma (-Fe2O3). Although apparently metastable, the growth of gamma -Fe2O3 at these temprtures is unexpected, and its relative persistence of several hours at 1000 C is most surprising. Continued annealing of this material for longer periods promote the crystallization of alpha Fe2O3 and cristobalite (high temperature polymorph of SiO2). All available data correlate this new magnetic material with the cristobalite hence our naming it magnetic ferri cristobalite. Formation of this magnetic cristobalite, however, may require topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  18. Acoustical properties of highly porous fibrous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Highly porous, fibrous bulk sound absorbing materials are studied with a view toward understanding their acoustical properties and performance in a wide variety of applications including liners of flow ducts. The basis and criteria for decoupling of acoustic waves in the pores of the frame and compressional waves in the frame structure are established. The equations of motion are recast in a form that elucidates the coupling mechanisms. The normal incidence surface impedance and absorption coefficient of two types of Kevlar 29 and an open celled foam material are studied. Experimental values and theoretical results are brought into agreement when the structure factor is selected to provide a fit to the experimental data. A parametric procedure for achieving that fit is established. Both a bulk material quality factor and a high frequency impedance level are required to characterize the real and imaginary part of the surface impedance and absorption coefficient. A derivation of the concepts of equivalent density and dynamic resistance is presented.

  19. MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF COMMON SUTURE MATERIALS IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Najibi, S; Banglmeier, R; Matta, JM; Tannast, M

    2010-01-01

    Suture materials in orthopaedic surgery are used for closure of wounds, repair of fascia, muscles, tendons, ligaments, joint capsules, and cerclage or tension band of certain fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of eleven commonly used sutures in orthopaedic surgery. Three types of braided non-absorbable and one type of braided absorbable suture material with different calibers (n=77) underwent biomechanical testing for maximum load to failure, strain, and stiffness. All samples were tied by one surgeon with a single SMC (Seoul Medical Center) knot and three square knots. The maximum load to failure and strain were highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #0 Ethibond Excel (p<0.001). The stiffness was highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #2-0 Vicryl (p<0.001). In all samples, the failure of the suture material occurred at the knot There was no slippage of the knot in any of the samples tested. This data will assist the orthopaedic surgeon in selection and application of appropriate suture materials and calibers to specific tasks. PMID:21045977

  20. Commercial use of materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.; Brown, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the scientific and commercial aspects of Materials Processing in the Space program. The elimination of gravity driven convection in molten materials can preclude undesirable stirring and mixing during crystal growth, and improve the casting of alloys and composites, chemical reactions, and the separation of biological materials. The elimination of hydrostatic pressure will allow alloy heat-treatment without distortion and growth of heavy crystals, such as thorium oxide, and containerless processing of liquids and molten materials. On the other hand, more sophisticated process control and diagnostic methods in sample preparation and temperature control must be developed, concluding that space made products of commercial interest are likely to be low volume, high value items.

  1. Processing and characterization of novel biobased and biodegradable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilla, Srikanth

    Human society has benefited tremendously from the use of petroleum-based plastics. However, there are growing concerns with their adverse environmental impacts and volatile costs attributed to the skyrocketing oil prices. Additionally most of the petroleum-based polymers are non-biodegradable causing problems about their disposal. Thus, during the last couple of decades, scientists ail over the world have been focusing on developing new polymeric materials that are biobased and biodegradable, also termed as green plastics . This study aims to develop green materials based on polylactide (PLA) biopolymer that can be made from plants. Although PLA can provide important advantages in terms of sustainability and biodegradability, it has its own challenges such as high cost, brittleness, and narrow processing window. These challenges are addressed in this study by investigating both new material formulations and processes. To improve the material properties and control the material costs, PLA was blended with various fillers and modifiers. The types of fillers investigated include carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoparticles and various natural fibers such as pine-wood four, recycled-wood fibers and flax fiber. Using natural fibers as fillers for PLA can result in fully biodegradable and eco-friendly biocomposites. Also due to PLA's sensitivity to moisture and temperature, molecular degradation can occur during processing leading to inferior material properties. To address this issue, one of the approaches adopted by this study was to incorporate a multifunctional chain-extender into PLA, which increased the molecular weight of PLA thereby improving the material properties. To improve the processability and reduce the material cost, both microcellular injection molding and extrusion processes have been studied. The microcellular technology allows the materials to be processed at a lower temperature, which is attractive for thermo- and moisture-sensitive materials like PLA. They

  2. Fibrous random materials: From microstructure to macroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdchi, K.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite materials, fuel cells, heat exchangers and (biological)filters. Fluid flow through these materials plays an important role in many engineering applications and processes, such as textiles and paper manufacturing or transport of (under)ground water and pollutants. While most porous materials have complex geometry, some can be seen as two-dimensional particulate/fibrous systems, in which we introduce several microscopic quantities, based on Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations, to characterize their microstructure. In particular, by analyzing the topological properties of Voronoi polygons, we observe a smooth transition from disorder to order, for increasing packing fraction. Using fully resolved finite element (FE) simulations of Newtonian, incompressible fluid flow perpendicular to the fibres, the macroscopic permeability is calculated in creeping flow regimes. The effect of fibre arrangement and local crystalline regions on the macroscopic permeability is discussed and the macroscopic property is linked to the microscopic structural quantities.

  3. Symbolic derivation of material property matrices in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H. Q.

    1988-01-01

    The principles and operation of MMAX, a symbolic-computation program which automates the process of generating property matrices for structural materials, are briefly described and illustrated with sample analyses of a rubberlike material and an elastoplastic material. MMAX is written in LISP under the symbolic finite-element generator FINGER and the general symbolic manipulator MACSYMA; it first derives the formulas required by mathematical manipulation, and then translates the formulas into FORTRAN code, adapted to the particular type of machine to be used for the numerical calculations. This approach is shown to combine efficiently the advantages of symbolic and numerical computation for engineering applications.

  4. Concurrent materials and process selection in conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Stephen D.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.

    2000-08-16

    A method for concurrent selection of materials and a joining process based on product requirements using a knowledge-based, constraint satisfaction approach facilitates the product design and manufacturing process. Using a Windows-based computer video display and a data base of materials and their properties, the designer can ascertain the preferred composition of two parts based on various operating/environmental constraints such as load, temperature, lifetime, etc. Optimum joinder of the two parts may simultaneously be determined using a joining process data base based upon the selected composition of the components as well as the operating/environmental constraints.

  5. Microwave processing of radioactive materials-I

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Berry, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers that reviews the major past and present applications of microwave energy for processing radioactive materials, with particular emphasis on processing radioactive wastes. Microwave heating occurs through the internal friction produced inside a dielectric material when its molecules vibrate in response to an oscillating microwave field. For this presentation, we shall focus on the two FCC-approved microwave frequencies for industrial, scientific, and medical use, 915 and 2450 MHz. Also, because of space limitations, we shall postpone addressing plasma processing of hazardous wastes using microwave energy until a later date. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Space Environmental Effects on Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabbann, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    The Materials and Processes (M&P) Branch of the Structural Engineering Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) seeks to uphold the production of dependable space hardware through materials research, which fits into NASA's purpose of advancing human exploration, use, and development of space. The Space Environmental Effects projects fully support these Agency goals. Two tasks were assigned to support M&P. Both assignments were to further the research of material behavior outside of Earth's atmosphere in order to determine which materials are most durable and safe to use in space for mitigating risks. One project, the Materials on International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) task, was to compile data from International Space Station (ISS) experiments to pinpoint beneficial space hardware. The other project was researching the effects on composite materials of exposure to high doses of radiation for a Lunar habitat project.

  7. Artificial intelligence in the materials processing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials science and engineering provides a vast arena for applications of artificial intelligence. Advanced materials research is an area in which challenging requirements confront the researcher, from the drawing board through production and into service. Advanced techniques results in the development of new materials for specialized applications. Hand-in-hand with these new materials are also requirements for state-of-the-art inspection methods to determine the integrity or fitness for service of structures fabricated from these materials. Two problems of current interest to the Materials Processing Laboratory at UAH are an expert system to assist in eddy current inspection of graphite epoxy components for aerospace and an expert system to assist in the design of superalloys for high temperature applications. Each project requires a different approach to reach the defined goals. Results to date are described for the eddy current analysis, but only the original concepts and approaches considered are given for the expert system to design superalloys.

  8. Process Feasibility Study in Support of Silicon Material Task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Hansen, K. C.; Yaws, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of process system properties was continued for silicon source materials under consideration for producing silicon. The following property data are reported for dichlorosilane which is involved in processing operations for silicon: critical constants, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, thermal conductivity, heat of formation and Gibb's free energy of formation. The properties are reported as a function of temperature to permit rapid engineering usage. The preliminary economic analysis of the process is described. Cost analysis results for the process (case A-two deposition reactors and six electrolysis cells) are presented based on a preliminary process design of a plant to produce 1,000 metric tons/year of silicon. Fixed capital investment estimate for the plant is $12.47 million (1975 dollars) ($17.47 million, 1980 dollars). Product cost without profit is 8.63 $/kg of silicon (1975 dollars)(12.1 $/kg, 1980 dollars).

  9. An investigation of the influence of the core material properties on the compression and properties of dry-coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W I; Rowley, G; Doveston, G

    1998-10-01

    The effect of core material properties on the process of compression and physical properties of compression-coated tablets were investigated using microcrystalline cellulose as the coating material (mantle). Three model core materials: borosilicate glass, silicone rubber, and steel, each of different Young's modulus, were selected to give a range of core mechanical properties. Coated tablets were prepared using a single-punch press, with facilities for monitoring the compression cycle and analysis of data using the Heckel (1) equation. This analysis showed a considerable effect of different core materials on the compression process, (i) as an unanchored core, and (ii) due to core material type with differing Young's modulus. PMID:9876552

  10. An overview of laminate materials with enhanced dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumby, Stephen J.

    1989-03-01

    This report focuses on laminate materials (resins and reinforcements) having potential applications in the manufacture of multi-layer printed wiring boards (PWBs) that are required to efficiently transmit high-speed digital pulses. It is intended to be a primer and a reference for selection of candidate materials for such high-performance PWBs. Included are dielectric and physical properties, and where available chemical composition and/or structure, commercial availability, compatibility with typical PWB processing schemes and approximate relative cost. Recommendations are made as to the most viable candidate materials for this type of PWB application, based on a comparison of electrical and physical properties together with processing and cost considerations. The cyanate ester resin system appears promising. Such a resin may be reinforced with regular E-glass, or the more newly available S-glass, to produce a laminate useful for intermediate performance applications. For more demanding applications the E-glass will have to be replaced by a material of much lower relative permittivity. The expanded-PTFE reinforced laminates from W. L. Gore appear to be a good choice for these applications. The processing of the Gore materials can be expected to deviate from that used with FR-4 type materials, but is likely to be less problematic than laminates comprised of a fluorinated resin. Processing is a key obstacle to the implementation of any of the new materials herein. If implementation is to be successful, programs must be established to develop and optimize processing procedures. Cost will remain an important issue. However, the higher cost of the new materials may be justified in high-end products by the performance they deliver.

  11. Magnetic properties of frictional volcanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan; Biggin, Andrew; Ferk, Annika; Leonhardt, Roman

    2015-04-01

    During dome-building volcanic eruptions, highly viscous magma extends through the upper conduit in a solid-like state. The outer margins of the magma column accommodate the majority of the strain, while the bulk of the magma is able to extrude, largely undeformed, to produce magma spines. Spine extrusion is often characterised by the emission of repetitive seismicity, produced in the upper <1 km by magma failure and slip at the conduit margins. The rheology of the magma controls the depth at which fracture can occur, while the frictional properties of the magma are important in controlling subsequent marginal slip processes. Upon extrusion, spines are coated by a carapace of volcanic fault rocks which provide insights into the deeper conduit processes. Frictional samples from magma spines at Mount St. Helens (USA), Soufriere Hills (Montserrat) and Mount Unzen (Japan) have been examined using structural, thermal and magnetic analyses to reveal a history of comminution, frictional heating, melting and cooling to form volcanic pseudotachylyte. Pseudotachylyte has rarely been noted in volcanic materials, and the recent observation of its syn-eruptive formation in dome-building volcanoes was unprecedented. The uniquely high thermal conditions of volcanic environments means that frictional melt remains at elevated temperatures for longer than usual, causing slow crystallisation, preventing the development of some signature "quench" characteristics. As such, rock-magnetic tests have proven to be some of the most useful tools in distinguishing pseudotachylytes from their andesite/ dacite hosts. In volcanic pseudotachylyte the mass normalised natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) when further normalised with the concentration dependent saturation remanence (Mrs) was found to be higher than the host rock. Remanence carriers are defined as low coercive materials across all samples, and while the remanence of the host rock displays similarities to an anhysteretic remanent

  12. The role of material properties in adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When two solid surfaces are brought into contact strong adhesive bond forces can develop between the materials. The magnitude of the forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between solids is addressed from a theoretical consideration of the electronic nature of the surfaces and experimentally relating bond forces to the nature of the interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties correlated with adhesion include, atomic or molecular orientation, reconstruction and segregation as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where dissimilar solids are in contact the contribution of each is considered as is the role of their interactive chemistry on bond strength. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation and state. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include metals, alloys, ceramics, polymers and diamond. They are reviewed both in single and polycrystalline form. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  13. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  14. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated from LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux) and author(s) or principal investigator(s). Tne LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which has been computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. The LDEF Materials Data Base is described and step-by-step example searches using the data base are included. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF DAMAGED ENERGETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P C; Hust, G; Dehaven, M; Chidester, S; Glascoe, L; Hoffman, M; Maienschein, J L

    2010-03-10

    We recently conducted damaged experiments on three explosives (mechanical damage on LX-04 and thermal experiments on HPP and PBXN-9) and characterized the effect of damage on some material properties. The MTS equipment was used to apply compressive cycling to LX-04 pressed parts and the results showed that older LX-04 parts became mechanically weaker than newer parts. After repeated compressive cycling for over 20,000 times, older LX-04 parts failed but newer LX-04 parts survived. Thermal insults were applied to PBXN-9 and HPP at 180 C and 200 C, respectively in unconfined conditions for several hours. The thermally-damaged HPP sample suffered 12.0% weight losses and a volume expansion of 20% was observed. Porosity of the damaged HPP increased to 25% after thermal exposure, which led to higher gas permeability. Burn rates of damaged PBXN-9 were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of pristine samples but burn rates of damaged HPP were only slightly higher than those of pristine HPP. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability at high temperatures were made on HPP samples and the results showed that the gas permeability increased by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude.

  16. Particle properties and processes in Uranus' rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Brahic, A.; Burns, J. A.; Marouf, Essam A.

    1991-01-01

    The particle properties and processes in the Uranian rings are analyzed from Voyager observations and ground-based data. Occultation observations of the epsilon ring are interpreted to yield an effective size of the ring particles that exceeds 70 cm, a surface mass density that exceeds 80 g/sq cm, and a ring vertical thickness greater than tens of meters for solid ice particles. The particles forming the classic rings are dark and gray, with albedo of 0.014 +/-0.004. It is argued that the small amount of dust that exists in the classical rings and between the rings in bands is created by erosion of ring particles and unseen satellites resulting from collisions and micrometeoroid bombardment. As proposed for regions of the other known ring systems, new ring material can be continually created by the destruction of small moons near the rings, which may explain the youthful appearance of the Uranian rings.

  17. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  18. Chalcogenide material strengthening through the lens molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Lucas, Pierre; Coleman, Garrett J.

    2016-05-01

    The demand for infrared transmitting materials has grown steadily for several decades as markets realize new applications for longer wavelength sensing and imaging. With this growth has come the demand for new and challenging material requirements that cannot be satisfied with crystalline products alone. Chalcogenide materials, with their unique physical, thermal, and optical properties, have found acceptance by designers and fabricators to meet these demands. No material is perfect in every regard, and chalcogenides are no exception. A cause for concern has been the relatively low fracture toughness and the propensity of the bulk material to fracture. This condition is amplified when traditional subtractive manufacturing processes are employed. This form of processing leaves behind micro fractures and sub surface damage, which act as propagation points for both local and catastrophic failure of the material. Precision lens molding is not a subtractive process, and as a result, micro fractures and sub surface damage are not created. This results in a stronger component than one produced by traditional methods. New processing methods have also been identified that result in an even stronger surface that is more resistant to breakage, without the need for post processing techniques that may compromise surface integrity. This paper will discuss results achieved in the process of lens molding development at Edmund Optics that result in measurably stronger chalcogenide components. Various metrics will be examined and data will be presented that quantifies component strength for different manufacturing processes.

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Twenty-third quarterly progress report for period ending February 12, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.; Baum, B.

    1982-04-01

    During the past quarter technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings. These treatments have been applied to Sunadex glass, Tedlar and oriented acrylic film. The treatments are based on silicone, acrylic, and fluorosilane chemistries. After one year of outdoor exposure, the most effective treatment of Sunadex glass appears to be a fluorosilane designated L-1668, and for both the organic films a silane modified adduct of perfluoric acid gave the best results. After one year of time there is evidence that the treatments are slowly being lost and consequently a maintenance schedule may be required to maintain effectiveness over long periods of time. An accelerated aging test program is underway for the dual purpose of generating practical and empirical data relating to the service life of candidate encapsulation materials, and to provide data that may be useful in a predictive type of analysis.

  20. Investigations of test methods, material properties, and processes, for solar-cell encapsulants. Twenty-second quarterly progress report for period ending November 12, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Investigations were continued into pottants, soil resistant coatings and low cost substrate materials. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups for use as solar module pottants were evaluated for suitability on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics. One formulation was selected as being acceptable for industrial evaluation. This urethane is characterized by high transparency, low mix viscosity, fast cure time and surprising lack of moisture sensitivity that has given trouble with previous urethane compositions. This material is produced with an ultraviolet stabilizer system already blended in. An experimental program was continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings. These treatments have been applied to Sunadex glass, Tedlar and oriented acrylic film. The treatments are based on silicone, acrylic and fluorosilane chemistries. Test specimens are being exposed to outdoor soiling conditions with subsequent testing for short circuit-current loss using a standard cell device. After nine months of outdoor exposure, the most effective treatment appears to be a silane modified adduct of perfluorodecanoic acid. The degree of soiling also appears to correlate to the amount of rainfall that results in a natural cleaning of the surface. Wood products, such as hardboard, are potentially the lowest cost candidate substrates identified to date. The difficulty with the use of these materials lies in the very high hygroscopic expansion coefficients. Periods of dryout followed by subsequent moisture regain results in large expansions and contractions that result in cell fracture. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings to prevent this effect. Both metal foils and organic films bonded to the hardboard with appropriate adhesives were found to dramatically decrease the hygroscopic response and lower the expansion coefficient by four orders of magnitude.

  1. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  2. Encapsulation task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; White, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an investigation of solar module encapsulation systems applicable to the Low-Cost Solar Array Project 1986 cost and performance goals are presented. Six basic construction elements were identified and their specific uses in module construction defined. A uniform coating basis was established for each element. The survey results were also useful in revealing price ranges for classes of materials and estimating the cost allocation for each element within the encapsulating cost goal. The six construction elements were considered to be substrates, superstrates, pottants, adhesives, outer covers and back covers.

  3. Physical Properties of Thin Film Semiconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, N.; Djebbouri, M.; Outemzabet, R.; Sali, S.; Zerrouki, H.; Zouaoui, A.; Kesri, N.

    2005-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of semiconducting materials is a continuous question of debate. We can find a large stock of well-known properties but at the same time, many things are not understood. In recent years, porous silicon (PS-Si), diselenide of copper and indium (CuInSe2 or CIS) and metal oxide semiconductors like tin oxide (SnO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been subjected to extensive studies because of the rising interest their potential applications in fields such as electronic components, solar panels, catalysis, gas sensors, in biocompatible materials, in Li-based batteries, in new generation of MOSFETS. Bulk structure and surface and interface properties play important roles in all of these applications. A deeper understanding of these fundamental properties would impact largely on technological application performances. In our laboratory, thin films of undoped and antimony-doped films of tin oxide have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition. Spray pyrolysis was used for ZnO. CIS was prepared by flash evaporation or close-space vapor transport. Some of the deposition parameters have been varied, such as substrate temperature, time of deposition (or anodization), and molar concentration of bath preparation. For some samples, thermal annealing was carried out under oxygen (or air), under nitrogen gas and under vacuum. Deposition and post-deposition parameters are known to strongly influence film structure and electrical resistivity. We investigated the influence of film thickness and thermal annealing on structural optical and electrical properties of the films. Examination of SnO2 by x-ray diffraction showed that the main films are polycrystalline with rutile structure. The x-ray spectra of ZnO indicated a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Characterizations of CIS films with compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy, spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence were carried out.

  4. New Monolayered Materials Exhibiting Unusual Electronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Martin, Ivar; Littlewood, Peter B.

    Computationally based approaches are allowing to progress in the discovery and design of nano-scaled materials. Here we propose a series of new mono-layered compounds with exotic properties. By means of density functional theory calculations we demonstrate that the pentagonal arrangement of SiC2 yields an inverted distribution of the p-bands which leads to an unusual electronic behaviour of the material under strain [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2015, 119 (33), pp 19469]. A different pentagonal arrangement of C atoms enables the formation of Dirac cones which, unlike graphene, exhibit a strain-mediated tunable band gap. This work is supported by DOE-BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Robot development for nuclear material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrotti, L.R.; Armantrout, G.A.; Allen, D.C.; Sievers, R.H. Sr.

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Energy is seeking to modernize its special nuclear material (SNM) production facilities and concurrently reduce radiation exposures and process and incidental radioactive waste generated. As part of this program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) lead team is developing and adapting generic and specific applications of commercial robotic technologies to SNM pyrochemical processing and other operations. A working gantry robot within a sealed processing glove box and a telerobot control test bed are manifestations of this effort. This paper describes the development challenges and progress in adapting processing, robotic, and nuclear safety technologies to the application. 3 figs.

  6. Simulation of materials processing: Fantasy or reality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Thomas J.; Bright, Victor M.

    1994-01-01

    This experiment introduces students to the application of computer-aided design (CAD) and analysis of materials processing in the context of integrated circuit (IC) fabrication. The fabrication of modern IC's is a complex process which consists of several sequential steps. These steps involve the precise control of processing variables such as temperature, humidity, and ambient gas composition. In essence, the particular process employed during the fabrication becomes a 'recipe'. Due to economic and other considerations, CAD is becoming an indispensable part of the development of new recipes for IC fabrication. In particular, this experiment permits the students to explore the CAD of the thermal oxidation of silicon.

  7. Coprecal: materials accounting in the modified process

    SciTech Connect

    Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Shipley, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    This report presents the design and evaluation of an advanced materials accounting system for a uranium-plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility based on the General Electric Coprecal process as modified by Savannah River Laboratory and Plant and DuPont Engineering. The modifications include adding small aliquot tanks to feed the process and reconfiguring the calciner filter systems. Diversion detection sensitivities for the modified Coprecal process are somewhat better than the original Coprecal design, but they are still significantly worse than a same-sized conversion facility based on the oxalate (III) precipitation process.

  8. Heat and mass transfer in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasawa, I. . Inst. of Industrial Science); Lior, N. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics)

    1992-01-01

    This book contains forty papers presented at the seminar. The papers are representative of the seminar's scope, and include plasma spraying, laser and electron beam processing, crystal growth, solidification, steel processing, casting and molding, and papermaking, as well as fundamental heat transfer issues and physical properties underlying all of the above. The seminar emphasized thorough discussion of the presentations and of the subfields. Brief summaries of the discussions are presented in the rapporteurs' reports.

  9. Quantitative characterization of spatial distribution of particles in materials: Application to materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parse, J. B.; Wert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Most engineering materials contain second phase particles or fibers which serve to reinforce the matrix phase. The effect of reinforcements on material properties is usually analyzed in terms of the average volume fraction and spacing of reinforcements, quantities which are global microstructural characteristics. However, material properties can also depend on local microstructural characteristics; for example, on how uniformly the reinforcing phase is distributed in the material. The analysis method will then be applied to a materials processing problem to discover how processing parameters can be selected to maximize redistribution of the reinforcing phase during processing. Several mathematical analysis methods could be adapted to the problem of characterizing the distribution of particles in materials. A tessellation-based method was selected. In the first phase of the investigation, a software package was written to automate the analysis. Typical results are shown. The analysis technique allows the degree to which particles are clustered together, the size and spacing of particle clusters, and the particle density in clusters to be found. The analysis methods were applied to computer-generated distributions and to a few real particle-containing materials. Methods for analyzing a nonuniform particle distribution in a material can be applied to two broad classes of materials science problems: understanding how the resulting particle distribution affects properties. The analysis method described is applied to a materials processing problem: how to select extrusion conditions to maximize the redistribution of reinforcing particles that are initially nonuniformly distributed. In addition, the tessellation-based method to analyze star distributions in spiral galaxies was adapted, illustrating the diverse types of problems to which the analysis method can be applied.

  10. Materials Science and Technology, Volume 18, Processing of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Han E. H.

    1997-06-01

    Polymer processing has a profound effect on the final properties and thus the applications of plastics. Leading international scientists and engineers have contributed to this unique self- contained handbook making it indispensable to polymer scientists and engineers. Contents: Meijer: Processing for Properties. Agassant: General Principles of Polymer Processing Modeling. Janssen: Emulsions: The Dynamics of Liquid-Liquid Mixing. Keller/Kolnaar: Flow-Induced Orientation and Structure Formation. Janeschitz-Kriegl/Eder: Crystallization. Hu/Lambla: Fundamentals of Reactive Extrusion. Dusek: Network Formation. Maréchal/Inoue: Reactive Processing of Polymer Blends: Polymer-Polymer Interface Aspects. Stanford/Ryan/Elwell: Structure Development in Reactive Systems. Lemstra/Meijer: Processing of Polymers Using Reactive Solvents. Bastiaansen: High-Modulus and High-Strength Fibers Based on Flexible Macromolecules. van der Sanden: Deformation and Toughness of Polymers. Decker: Photopolymerization and UV-Curing of Multifunctional Monomers. Wilson: Conducting Polymers and Applications. Creton: Materials Science of Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives. Ward: New Processing Technologies.

  11. Laser materials processing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    The interest in laser processing has been driven by Sandia`s responsibility to design, prototype, manufacture, and steward high reliability defense hardware for the Department of Energy. The system requirements for the hardware generally necessitate hermetic sealing for ensured long life operation. With the advent of miniaturized electronic devices, traditional welding processes were no longer practical choices because of their limited ability to make very small weld closures without heat damage to the hardware. Gas and solid state lasers offered the opportunity to make hermetic closure welds in small, heat sensitive hardware. In order to consistently produce quality product, the Sandia laser materials processing team performed research aimed at identifying those critical parameters which controlled the laser welding process. This has been directed towards both the development of quantitative engineering data needed in product design and process control, and research to achieve fundamental process understanding. In addition, they have developed novel diagnostic systems to measure these important parameters, pioneered the use of calorimetric techniques to measure energy transfer efficiencies, and correlated the occurrence of welding defects with alloy compositions and type of laser welding process. Today, Sandia`s laser materials processing team continues to advance the state of laser processing technology in many areas, including aluminum laser welding, the design of novel optics for specific laser processing needs, laser micromachining of silicon and diamond for microelectronics applications, and fluxless laser soldering. This paper will serve to highlight some examples of where Sandia has made contributions to the field of laser materials processing and will indicate the directions where they expect to focus their future efforts.

  12. Micro-mechanical properties of bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiev, V.; Markovsky, A.; Aznakayev, E.; Zakiev, I.; Gursky, E.

    2005-09-01

    Investigation of physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (ceramics for crowns, silver amalgam, cements and materials on a polymeric basis) properties by the modern methods and correspondence their physical-mechanical properties to the physical-mechanical properties of native teeth is represented. The universal device "Micron-Gamma" is built for this purpose. This device allows investigate the physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (an elastic modulus, micro-hardness, destruction energy, resistance to scratching) by the methods of continuous indentation, scanning and pricking. A new effective method as well as its device application for the investigation of surface layers of materials and their physical-mechanical properties by means of the constant indenting of an indenter is realized. This method is based on the automatic registration of loading (P) on the indenter with the simultaneous measurement of its indentation depth (h). The results of investigations are presented on a loading diagram P=f(h) and as a digital imaging on the PC. This diagram allows get not only more diverse characteristics in the real time regime but also gives new information about the stomatologic material properties. Therefore, we can to investigate the wide range of the physical-mechanical properties of stomatologic materials. "Micron-alpha" is digital detection device for light imaging applications. It enables to detect the very low material surface relief heights and restoration of surface micro topography by a sequence data processing of interferential data of partially coherent light also. "Micron-alpha" allows: to build 2D and 3D imaging of a material surface; to estimate the quantitatively characteristics of a material surface; to observe the imaging interferential pictures both in the white and in the monochromatic light; to carry out the investigation of blood cells, microbes and biological macromolecules profiles. The method allows

  13. Applications of membrane processes for in-process materials recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Thornton, R.F.; Shapiro, A.P.; Freshour, A.R.; El-Shoubary, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Zero discharge of wastes should be the ultimate goal of manufacturers. Waste reduction lowers costs and lessens liability associated with plant effluents. One approach toward this goal is elimination or minimization of wastes by in-process recycling of waste materials. We have examined opportunities for waste minimization for many equipment manufacturing plants and have evaluated membrane processes for in-process recycling. Membrane processes evaluated include vibrating membranes for suspended solid removal, ion exchange membranes for acid recovery, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis for dissolved salt removal, microporous membranes for recycling of machining coolants, oil emulsions, alkaline cleaners and others. This paper presents several examples of evaluations of membrane processes for materials recycling in manufacturing plants. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Characterization of the electromechanical properties of EAP materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrita, Stewart; Bhattachary, Kaushik; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh

    2001-01-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAP) are an emerging class of actuation materials. Their large electrically induced strains (longitudinal or bending), low density, mechanical flexibility, and ease of processing offer advantages over traditional electroactive materials. However, before the capability of these materials can be exploited, their electrical and mechanical behavior must be properly quantified. Two general types of EAP can be identified. The first type is ionic EAP, which requires relatively low voltages (<10V) to achieve large bending deflections. This class usually needs to be hydrated and electrochemical reactions may occur. The second type is Electronic-EAP and it involves electrostrictive and/or Maxwell stresses. This type of materials requires large electric fields (>100MV/m) to achieve longitudinal deformations at the range from 4 - 360%. Some of the difficulties in characterizing EAP include: nonlinear properties, large compliance (large mismatch with metal electrodes), nonhomogeneity resulting from processing, etc. To support the need for reliable data, the authors are developing characterization techniques to quantify the electroactive responses and material properties of EAP materials. The emphasis of the current study is on addressing electromechanical issues related to the ion-exchange type EAP also known as IPMC. The analysis, experiments and test results are discussed in this paper.

  15. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.A., Schwenk, E.B. ); Divine, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO{sub 3}, some of the process streams that are high in F{sup {minus}} and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60{degrees}C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived. PMID:24921828

  17. Automation in a material processing/storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.; Gordon, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will be used to minimize worker exposure. Other benefits derived from automation of the facility include increased throughput capacity and enhanced security. The diversity of materials and packaging geometries to be handled poses challenges to the automation of facility processes. In addition, the nature of the materials to be processed underscores the need for safety, reliability and serviceability. The application of automation in this facility must, therefore, be accomplished in a rational and disciplined manner to satisfy the strict operational requirements of the facility. Among the functions to be automated are the transport of containers between process and storage areas via an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV), and various processes in the Shipping Package Unpackaging (SPU) area, the Accountability Measurements (AM) area, the Special Isotope Storage (SIS) vault and the Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) vault. Other areas of the facility are also being automated, but are outside the scope of this paper.

  18. Residual stresses calculation in autofrettage using variable material properties method

    SciTech Connect

    Jahed, H.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Autofrettaged cylinders are used for variety of applications in chemical and nuclear industries where large internal pressures have to be withstood. Autofrettage is in the process by which beneficial residual stresses are introduced into thick-walled tubes by initially subjected the tube to high internal pressure which causes inelastic deformation. Here, the variable material properties method is employed to obtain elastic-plastic analysis of an autofrettaged tube. This method develops inelastic solution from the elastic solution by treating the material properties as field variables. The distribution of these parameters are obtained in an iterative manner as a part of the solution. An energy based scheme is used to update these variables. The residual stress field of autofrettaged tubes based on the actual material curve and isotropic and kinematic hardening models are obtained. The results are shown to be in good agreement with the published experimental and finite element results.

  19. Synthesis and properties of the materials obtained by SHS mode for radiation protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachenko, D. S.; Dolmatov, O. Yu; Semenov, A. O.; Chursin, S. S.; Kuznetsov, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The article shows the process of protective composite materials manufacturing. Also, the analysis of experimental results concerning the composite materials protective properties is given. The advantages of SHS method are considered in comparison with traditional materials. The uniqueness of SHS obtained products based on combination of nuclear-physical properties and parameters is presented.

  20. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-01-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology. Images PMID:11607260

  1. The use of containerless processing in researching reactive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, Shankar; Nordine, Paul C.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently become possible to perform containerless, high-temperature liquid-phase processing of many nonvolatile materials without resort to orbital microgravity, thereby facilitating the conduct of materials research in conjunction with noncontact diagnostic instruments. The melt-levitation techniques are electromagnetic, aerodynamic, acoustic, aeroacoustic, and electrostatic; nonorbital microgravity conditions are obtainable aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft on parabolic flight paths, as well as in drop tubes and towers. Applications encompass the purification of metals and the creation of nonequilibrium and metastable structures. Process control and property measurements include optical pyrometry and emissivity, laser polarimetry, and drop calorimetry.

  2. Microwave processing of lunar materials: potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T.T.; Cocks, F.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wright, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The microwave processing of lunar materials holds promise for the production of either water, oxygen, primary metals, or ceramic materials. Extra high frequency microwave (EHF) at between 100 and 500 gigahertz have the potential for selective coupling to specific atomic species and a concomitant low energy requirement for the extraction of specific materials, such as oxygen, from lunar ores. The coupling of ultra high frequency (UHF) (e.g., 2.45 gigahertz) microwave frequencies to hydrogen-oxygen bonds might enable the preferential and low energy cost removal (as H/sub 2/O) of implanted protons from the sun or of adosrbed water which might be found in lunar dust in permanently shadowed polar areas. Microwave melting and selective phase melting of lunar materials could also be used either in the preparation of simplified ceramic geometries (e.g., bricks) with custom-tailored microstructures, or for the direct preparation of hermetic walls in underground structures. Speculatively, the preparation of photovoltaic devices based on lunar materials, especially ilmenite, may be a potential use of microwave processing on the moon. Preliminary experiments on UHF melting of terrestrial basalt, basalt/ilmenite and mixtures show that microwave processing is feasible.

  3. Structure-Property Relationships of Solids in Pharmaceutical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of solid dosage forms is witnessing a seismic shift in the recent years. In contrast to the earlier days when drug development was empirical, now there is a significant emphasis on a more scientific and structured development process, primarily driven by the Quality-by-Design (QbD) initiatives of US Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA). Central to such an approach is the enhanced understanding of solid materials using the concept of Materials Science Tetrahedron (MST) that probes the interplay between four elements, viz., the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. In this thesis work, we have investigated the relationships between the structure and those properties of pharmaceutical solids that influence their processing behavior. In all cases, we have used material-sparing approaches to facilitate property assessment using very small sample size of materials, which is a pre-requisite in the early stages of drug development when the availability of materials, drugs in particular, is limited. The influence of solid structure, either at the molecular or bulk powder levels, on crystal plasticity and powder compaction, powder flow, and solid-state amorphization during milling, has been investigated in this study. Through such a systematic evaluation, we have captured the involvement of structure-property correlations within a wide spectrum of relevant processing behaviors of pharmaceutical solids. Such a holistic analysis will be beneficial for addressing both regulatory and scientific issues in drug development.

  4. Tailoring material properties of sputtered beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    Doped beryllium is a material of considerable interest to both the ICF and the weapons communities, as well as finding application in specialized industrial settings (e.g., x-ray windows and mirrors). Some of these uses require conformal coating of thin films on (possibly) irregularly-shaped surfaces. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) is often used to accomplish this, and sputtering is often the technique of choice. Among its advantages are that the depositing atoms are relatively energetic, leading to more compact films. Moreover, by simply applying a voltage bias to the substrate, ambient noble gas ions will bombard the growing film, which can cause further densification and other modifications to the microstructure. Sputtering is also well suited to the introduction of dopants, even those that are insoluble. Most applications of these novel materials will require fundamental knowledge of their properties. Because so many can be devised, such information is generally unavailable. The objective of the effort has been to systematically study the properties of films produced under different conditions, with an emphasis on surface finish and permeability. They have made extensive use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy to determine the microstructure of the films, along with composition probes (mainly x-ray fluorescence) to quantify the chemical structure. The studies can be roughly divided into three categories. First, there are those in which the properties of pure or Cu-doped Be films have been investigated, especially on randomly-agitated spherical capsules. Included are studies of the effects of a constant substrate bias ranging from 0 to 120 v and application of an intermittent bias during deposition. Second, there are experiments in which the structure of the depositing films has been modified via the incorporation of dopants, primarily boron. Finally, there have been numerous attempts to characterize the permeability of Be coatings at

  5. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The history, strategy, and overall goal of NASA's Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications program for materials processing in space are described as well as the organizational structures and personnel involved. An overview of each research task is presented and recent publications are listed.

  6. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TOOLS FOR MATERIAL AND PROCESS SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of tools are being used within the Sustainable Technology Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide decision-makers with information on environmentally favorable materials and processes. These tools include LCA (Life Cycle Assessment), GREENSCOPE (...

  8. Materials processing in space program support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin; Vanalstine, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Activities in support of NASA's Materials Processing in Space (MPS) program are reported. The overall task of the MPS project support contract was to provide the organization and administration of colloquiums, science reviews, workshops, technical meetings, bibliographic services, and visiting scientist programs. The research objectives and accomplishments of the University Space Research Association visiting scientist team are also summarized.

  9. PREFACE: Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yu Lung; Chen, John J. J.; Hodgson, Michael A.; Thambyah, Ashvin

    2009-07-01

    A workshop on Processing, Microstructure and Performance of Materials was held at the University of Auckland, School of Engineering, on 8-9 April 2009. Organised by the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, this meeting consisted of international participants and aimed at addressing the state-of-the-art research activities in processing, microstructure characterization and performance integrity investigation of materials. This two-day conference brought together scientists and engineers from New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, France, and the United Kingdom. Undoubtedly, this diverse group of participants brought a very international flair to the proceedings which also featured original research papers on areas such as Materials processing; Microstructure characterisation and microanalysis; Mechanical response at different length scales, Biomaterials and Material Structural integrity. There were a total of 10 invited speakers, 16 paper presentations, and 14 poster presentations. Consequently, the presentations were carefully considered by the scientific committee and participants were invited to submit full papers for this volume. All the invited paper submissions for this volume have been peer reviewed by experts in the various fields represented in this conference, this in accordance to the expected standards of the journal's Peer review policy for IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The works in this publication consists of new and original research as well as several expert reviews of current state-of-the art technologies and scientific developments. Knowing some of the real constraints on hard-copy publishing of high quality, high resolution images, the editors are grateful to IOP Publishing for this opportunity to have the papers from this conference published on the online open-access platform. Listed in this volume are papers on a range of topics on materials research, including Ferguson's high strain

  10. Clinical Biospecimens: Reference Materials, Certified for Nominal Properties?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This report makes the case for clinical biospecimens to be certified for nominal properties, in particular the diagnosis, and to attain the level of Reference Materials. Clinical certified biospecimens that are collected, processed, characterized, stored, and distributed by biobanks are urgently needed to facilitate diagnostic test development, evaluation, and quality assurance. Four examples are provided to illustrate this purpose and the certification approaches that could be applied are proposed. PMID:24749878

  11. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  12. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  13. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  14. Materials properties: heterogeneity and appropriate sampling modes.

    PubMed

    Esbensen, Kim H

    2015-01-01

    The target audience for this Special Section comprises parties related to the food and feed sectors, e.g., field samplers, academic and industrial scientists, laboratory personnel, companies, organizations, regulatory bodies, and agencies who are responsible for sampling, as well as project leaders, project managers, quality managers, supervisors, and directors. All these entities face heterogeneous materials, and the characteristics of heterogeneous materials needs to be competently understood by all of them. Before delivering analytical results for decision-making, one form or other of primary sampling is always necessary, which must counteract the effects of the sampling target heterogeneity. Up to five types of sampling error may arise as a specific sampling process interacts with a heterogeneous material; two sampling errors arise because of the heterogeneity of the sampling target, and three additional sampling errors are produced by the sampling process itself-if not properly understood, reduced, and/or eliminated, which is the role of Theory of Sampling. This paper discusses the phenomenon and concepts involved in understanding, describing, and managing the adverse effects of heterogeneity in sampling. PMID:25807041

  15. Defect-related luminescent materials: synthesis, emission properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuimiao; Lin, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Luminescent materials have found a wide variety of applications, including information displays, lighting, X-ray intensification and scintillation, and so on. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to exploring novel luminescent materials so far. In the past decade, defect-related luminescent materials have inspired intensive research efforts in their own right. This kind of luminescent material can be basically classified into silica-based materials, phosphate systems, metal oxides, BCNO phosphors, and carbon-based materials. These materials combine several favourable attributes of traditional commercially available phosphors, which are stable, efficient, and less toxic, being free of the burdens of intrinsic toxicity or elemental scarcity and the need for stringent, intricate, tedious, costly, or inefficient preparation steps. Defect-related luminescent materials can be produced inexpensively and on a large scale by many approaches, such as sol-gel process, hydro(solvo)thermal reaction, hydrolysis methods, and electrochemical methods. This review article highlights the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and luminescent properties of the defect-related materials, together with their control and tuning, and emission mechanisms (solid state physics). We also speculate on their future and discuss potential developments for their applications in lighting and biomedical fields. PMID:23019577

  16. Powder processing of nitrides (excluding hot isostatic processing). (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the properties and processing of metal nitride ceramics and refractories. Citations consider compacting and sintering processes. Phase transformations, crystallization, and devitrification processes are considered. Aluminum nitride, boron nitride, silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and titanium nitride are among materials discussed. The use of hot isostatic pressing is considered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-01

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, …) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1—contraband material in the sea containers, case 2—-explosives in soil (landmines), case 3—explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  18. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  19. Materials for Conoco zinc chloride hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of zinc chloride to augment hydrogenation of coal and yield a high-octane gasoline product is the most significant feature of a coal liquefaction process being developed by Conoco Coal Development Company. The zinc chloride catalyst is regenerated in a fluidized sand bed, where the spent melt is mixed with air and hydrogen chloride at about 1000/sup 0/C. Recovery is completed at 370/sup 0/C in a condenser, where the zinc chloride is collected and the oxygen and sulfur are separated as H/sub 2/O and SO/sub 2/. The economic viability of the entire process is highly dependent on almost complete recovery of the zinc chloride. The severe environmental conditions of this recovery process cause unique materials problems. Although high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation are being studied in related programs, suitable materials to resist their combined effects along with those of chlorides have not yet been specifically addressed. Common engineering materials, such as the austenitic stainless steels and many nickel-base alloys, are unsuitable because of their inability to tolerate the elevated temperatures and sulfidation, respectively. The objectives of this task are to screen various metallic and ceramic materials for resistance to the zinc chloride recovery system environment and to determine the nature of the attack by exposing coupons to the simulated environment in the laboratory.

  20. Early space experiments in materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the flight experiments conducted in conjunction with the United States Materials Processing in Space Program is presented. Also included are a brief description of the conditions prevailing in an orbiting spacecraft and the research implications provided by this unique environment. What was done and what was learned are summarized in order to serve as a background for future experiments. It is assumed that the reader has some knowledge of the physical sciences but no background in spaceflight experimentation or in the materials science per se.

  1. Helium retention properties of plasma facing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihara, H.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamashina, T.

    1997-02-01

    In a fusion reactor, the continuous removal of helium from the core plasma is needed in order to sustain the ignition condition. For this purpose, it has been proposed to place helium selective pumping metals, which can trap more helium than hydrogen, in the vicinity of the divertor. In this study, the helium and hydrogen trapping properties of nickel, tungsten, molybdenum, SS 304 and Inconel 625 were examined. Namely, the dependencies of irradiation temperature on the amount of trapped helium and hydrogen were obtained by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), after helium or hydrogen plasma irradiation. In those metals, nickel showed the most suitable selective pumping capability. Nickel had the helium selective pumping property above 100°C. The maximum amount of trapped helium was (2-3) × 10 16He/ cm2 at an irradiation temperature of 200°C and 600°C. The optimum temperature becomes about 600°C when nickel is used for a selective pumping material.

  2. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  3. 76 FR 72902 - Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Materials Processing Equipment Technical Advisory Committee (MPETAC) will meet... controls applicable to materials processing equipment and related technology. Agenda Open Session...

  4. Processing and characterization of functionally gradient ceramic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, M.E.; Sengupta, L.C.; Ngo, E.; Stowell, S.; Lancto, R.

    1994-02-01

    Tape casting of ceramic materials offers the flexibility of gradually altering the electronic or structural properties of two dissimilar systems in order to improve their compatibility. This research outlines the processing and fabrication of two systems-of functionally gradient materials. The systems are both electronic ceramic composites consisting Ba(1-x)Sr(x)TiO3 (BSTO) and alumina or a second oxide additive. These composites would be used in phased array antenna systems, therefore, the electronic properties of the material have specific requirements in the microwave frequency regions. The composition of the tapes are varied to provide a graded dielectric constant, which gradually increases from that of air (dielectric constant = 1) to that of the ceramic (dielectric constant = 1500). This allows maximum penetration of incident microwave radiation as well as minimum energy dissipation and insertion loss into the entire phase shifting device.

  5. Limited reaction processing for semiconductor materials preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, J. L.

    1991-07-01

    Limited Reaction Processing (LRP) is a layer deposition technique based upon a combination of rapid thermal processing (RTP) and chemical vapor deposition. The versatility of LRP was shwon in research on epitaxial growth in three different materials systems. Research was spurred at several other laboratories in the area of epitaxial growth and applications involving RTP techniques, particularly in the Si(1-x)Ge(x) materials system. The first CVD grown Si/Si(1-x)Ge(x) heterojunction bipolar transistors were fabricated using this technique, with maximum oscillation frequencies on the order of 40 GHz. In the III-V area, arsine alternative sources were explored for GaAs expitaxy which greatly improve the safety of MOCVD. A new atomic layer growth technique was developed by combining LRP with an alternating gas pulse method.

  6. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A list of active research tasks as of the end of 1978 of the Materials Processing in Space Program of the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications, involving several NASA Centers and other organizations is reported. An overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university and government communities is provided. The program, its history, strategy and overall goal; the organizational structures and people involved; and each research task are described. Tasks are categorized by ground based research according to four process areas. Cross references to the performing organizations and principal investigators are provided.

  7. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 10(13) W/cm(2) has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  8. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M.; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 1013 W/cm2 has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  9. Computational Modeling in Structural Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High temperature materials such as silicon carbide, a variety of nitrides, and ceramic matrix composites find use in aerospace, automotive, machine tool industries and in high speed civil transport applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used in processing such structural materials. Variations of CVD include deposition on substrates, coating of fibers, inside cavities and on complex objects, and infiltration within preforms called chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Our current knowledge of the process mechanisms, ability to optimize processes, and scale-up for large scale manufacturing is limited. In this regard, computational modeling of the processes is valuable since a validated model can be used as a design tool. The effort is similar to traditional chemically reacting flow modeling with emphasis on multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, large sets of homogeneous reactions, and surface chemistry. In the case of CVI, models for pore infiltration are needed. In the present talk, examples of SiC nitride, and Boron deposition from the author's past work will be used to illustrate the utility of computational process modeling.

  10. Study on processing immiscible materials in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reger, J. L.; Mendelson, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate mixing immiscible metal combinations under several process conditions. Under one-gravity, these included thermal processing, thermal plus electromagnetic mixing, and thermal plus acoustic mixing. The same process methods were applied during free fall on the MSFC drop tower facility. The design is included of drop tower apparatus to provide the electromagnetic and acoustic mixing equipment, and a thermal model was prepared to design the specimen and cooling procedure. Materials systems studied were Ca-La, Cd-Ga and Al-Bi; evaluation of the processed samples included the morphology and electronic property measurements. The morphology was developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and microprobe analyses. Electronic property characterization of the superconducting transition temperatures were made using an impedance change-tuned coil method.

  11. Properties of magnetorheological fluid with stable processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Guang-ming; Zhang, Deng-you; Yang, Bai-lian

    2012-04-01

    Stability of magnetorheological (MR) fluids are important in practical application, such as oxidation resistance, antiwear properties, temperature independence, stability of sedimentation and aggregation. Ferrous particles surface nitriding and different additives were used to improve MR fluid's stability .The synthesis process and properties of MR fluid were described briefly.

  12. Properties of magnetorheological fluid with stable processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Guang-ming; Zhang, Deng-you; Yang, Bai-lian

    2011-11-01

    Stability of magnetorheological (MR) fluids are important in practical application, such as oxidation resistance, antiwear properties, temperature independence, stability of sedimentation and aggregation. Ferrous particles surface nitriding and different additives were used to improve MR fluid's stability .The synthesis process and properties of MR fluid were described briefly.

  13. Process optimization electrospinning fibrous material based on polyhydroxybutyrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Tyubaeva, P. M.; Staroverova, O. V.; Mastalygina, E. E.; Popov, A. A.; Ischenko, A. A.; Iordanskii, A. L.

    2016-05-01

    The article analyzes the influence of the main technological parameters of electrostatic spinning on the morphology and properties of ultrathin fibers on the basis of polyhydroxybutyrate. It is found that the electric conductivity and viscosity of the spinning solution affects the process of forming fibers macrostructure. The fiber-based materials PHB lets control geometry and optimize the viscosity and conductivity of a spinning solution. The resulting fibers have found use in medicine, particularly in the construction elements musculoskeletal.

  14. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  15. Nonlinear optical properties and nonlinear optical probes of organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Gerald R.

    1992-02-01

    Nonlinear optical processes and electro-optical effects are expected to have increasing importance as the information age matures and photonics augment electronics in various high density and high bandwidth technologies. Whereas for electronics the emphasis is in construction of smaller device structures from a few parent materials, for organic materials the direction of materials research has been reversed. For some time it's been known that some molecular structures engender exceptionally large molecular nonlinear-polarization responses. If such molecules could be assembled in convenient, versatile, and reliable ways, the resulting materials would be very useful or even enabling in various photonics applications. The mature science and art of chemistry allows very good control over molecular composition and structure and, as will be illustrated in this talk, our knowledge of hyperpolarizability structure- property relationships is advancing rapidly. However, the science of fabrication and arrangement in molecular ensembles and polymers is rather primitive. Thus the goal to develop the appropriately structured materials for utilization in nonlinear and electro-optics has fostered the widespread use of nonlinear optical processes to probe the nature of supramolecular order and assembly. Examples of intrinsic and artificially assembled structures of crystals, molecular aggregates, polymeric orientational electrets and molecular mono- and multi-layer thin films will be shown. Nonlinear optical processes, primarily second-harmonic generation, provide unique probes of these structures, their assembly, and evolution.

  16. A Decade of Progress in Earth's Internal Properties and Processes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O L

    1981-07-01

    A major component of the Inter-Union Commission on Geodynamics Project, labeled "Internal Properties and Processes," included certain experimental and theoretical research in tectonophysics, seismology, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology, and planetology. This review focuses on a few research areas in which there have been surprises and reversals. In particular, attention is given to the attempts to quantify the thermal profile in the earth's interior and the material properties of the earth's interior. PMID:17741172

  17. Development of materials and process technology for dual alloy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, J. M.; Kortovich, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques for the preparation of dual alloy disks were developed and evaluated. Four material combinations were evaluated in the form of HIP consolidated and heat treated cylindrical and plate shapes in terms of elevated temperature tensile, stress rupture and low cycle fatigue properties. The process evaluation indicated that the pe-HIP AF-115 rim/loose powder Rene 95 hub combination offered the best overall range of mechanical properties for dual disk applications. The feasibility of this dual alloy concept for the production of more complex components was demonstrated by the scale up fabrication of a prototype CFM-56 disk made from this AF-115/Rene 95 combination. The hub alloy ultimate tensile strength was approximately 92 percent of the program goal of 1520 MPa (220 ksi) at 480 C (900 F) and the rim alloy stress rupture goal of 300 hours at 675 C (1250 F)/925 MPa (134 ksi) was exceeded by 200 hours. The low cycle fatigue properties were equivalent to those exhibited by HIP and heat treated alloys. There was an absence of rupture notch sensitivity in both alloys. The joint tensile properties were approximately 85 percent of the weaker of the two materials (Rene 95) and the stress rupture properties were equivalent to those of the weaker of the two materials (Rene 95).

  18. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  19. Polarization Processes of Nanocomposite Silicate-EVA and PP Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Gian Carlo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Testa, Luigi; Motori, Antonio; Saccani, Andrea; Patuelli, Francesca

    Recent works indicate that polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) filled by nanosilicates may present low content of space charge and high electric strength. Investigations are being made to explain nanocomposite behaviour and characterize their electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this paper, the results of broad-band dielectric spectroscopy performed on EVA and PP filled by layered nanosized silicates are reported. Isochronal and isothermal curves of complex permittivity, as well as activation energies of the relaxation processes, are presented and discussed. Nanostructuration gives rise to substantial changes in the polarisation and dielectric loss behaviour. While the relaxation process of EVA, associated with glass transition of the material amorphous phase, results unchanged from base to nanostructured material, nanocomposites EVA and PP have shown the rise of a new process at higher temperatures respect to the typical host material processes, as well as a different distribution of relaxation processes. Changes in space charge accumulation in relation to the effectiveness of the purification process performed upon nanostructured materials are also reported: while the dispersion of the clean clays leads to a reduction of the space charge, especially at high fields, an unclean filler gives rise to significant homo-charge accumulation and interfacial polarisation phenomena.

  20. Technology Assessment of Laser-Assisted Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Taminger, Karen M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, shock processing, and surface treatments. These attributes are attractive for the supportability of longer-term missions in space due to the multi-functionality of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications, specifically size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials. A review of recent laser developments will be used to show how these issues may be reduced and indicate where further improvement is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in diode-pumped solid-state lasers and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques is increasing significantly. Lasers with suitable wavelengths and beam properties have tremendous potential for supporting future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond.

  1. Process Control in Laser Material Processing for the Micro and Nanometer Scale Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvajian, Henry

    An array of laser material processing techniques is presented for fabricating structures in the micro and nanometer scale length domains. For the past 20 years, processes have been demonstrated where the use of the inherent properties of lasers has led to increased fidelity in the processing of materials. These demonstrated processes often use inventive approaches that rely on derivative aspects of established primary principles that govern laser/material interaction phenomena. The intent of this overview is to explore the next generation of processes and techniques that could be applied in industry because of the need for better precision, higher resolution, smaller feature size, true 3D fabrication, and higher piece-part fabrication throughput.

  2. Femtosecond laser processing of fuel injectors - a materials processing evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B C; Wynne, A

    2000-12-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a new laser-based machining technology that utilizes ultrashort-pulse (0.1-1.0 picosecond) lasers to cut materials with negligible generation of heat or shock. The ultrashort pulse laser, developed for the Department of Energy (Defense Programs) has numerous applications in operations requiring high precision machining. Due to the extremely short duration of the laser pulse, material removal occurs by a different physical mechanism than in conventional machining. As a result, any material (e.g., hardened steel, ceramics, diamond, silicon, etc.) can be machined with minimal heat-affected zone or damage to the remaining material. As a result of the threshold nature of the process, shaped holes, cuts, and textures can be achieved with simple beam shaping. Conventional laser tools used for cutting or high-precision machining (e.g., sculpting, drilling) use long laser pulses (10{sup -8} to over 1 sec) to remove material by heating it to the melting or boiling point (Figure 1.1a). This often results in significant damage to the remaining material and produces considerable slag (Figure 1.2a). With ultrashort laser pulses, material is removed by ionizing the material (Figure 1.1b). The ionized plasma expands away from the surface too quickly for significant energy transfer to the remaining material. This distinct mechanism produces extremely precise and clean-edged holes without melting or degrading the remaining material (Figures 1.2 and 1.3). Since only a very small amount of material ({approx} <0.5 microns) is removed per laser pulse, extremely precise machining can be achieved. High machining speed is achieved by operating the lasers at repetition rates up to 10,000 pulses per second. As a diagnostic, the character of the short-pulse laser produced plasma enables determination of the material being machined between pulses. This feature allows the machining of multilayer materials, metal on metal or metal on

  3. Processing, properties and some novel applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, D.; Giri, J.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.; Sriharsha, T.; Pradhan, P.; Prasad, N. K.; Barick, K. C.; Ambashta, R. D.

    2005-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been prepared by various soft chemical methods including self-assembly. The bare or surface-modified particles find applications in areas such as hyperthermia treatment of cancer and magnetic field-assisted radioactive chemical separation. We present here some of the salient features of processing of nanostructured magnetic materials of different sizes and shapes, their properties and some possible applications. The materials studied included metals, metal--ceramic composites, and ferrites.

  4. Materials and processes for space shuttle's engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that over 50 different alloys are used in construction of the space shuttle main engines (SSME). Primary construction of the SSME is by welding or brazing of wrought and cast components. Welding processes involve both gas tungsten-arc welds and electron-beam welds. Electroforming has been developed as a process to fabricate and bond structural members for the SSME. Important aspects in the selection of materials and processes are related to weight saving considerations and the high-pressure hydrogen environment. Special problems and their solution in the case of various engine components are discussed, giving attention to the oxidizer preburner, the high pressure oxidizer turbopump, and the heat exchanger.

  5. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  6. Materials processing in space program tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Active research areas as of the end of the fiscal year 1982 of the Materials Processing in Space Program, NASA-Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications, involving several NASA centers and other organizations are highlighted to provide an overview of the program scope for managers and scientists in industry, university, and government communities. The program is described as well as its history, strategy and overall goal; the organizational structures and people involved are identified and each research task is described together with a list of recent publications. The tasks are grouped into four categories: crystal growth; solidification of metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, transports, and chemical processes; and ultrahigh vacuum and containerless processing technologies.

  7. Viscoelastic properties and compaction behaviour of pharmaceutical particulate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsardaka, Ekaterini D.

    1990-01-01

    The viscoelastic behaviour of particulate solids is of major relevance in powder compaction. When designing a pharmaceutical tablet formulation, it is highly undesirable for the tablet properties to be markedly affected by changes in compaction rate on different tablet presses, if problems are to be avoided during scale-up and manufacture. In order to be able to predict and minimise the time-dependent deformation of pharmaceutical powders, a full understanding of such behaviour is needed. For comparative purposes, a range of materials with differing compaction properties were studied. Heckel plots were extended in order to study the consolidation behaviour of materials during compression, decompression and after ejection. A number of derived parameters were proposed as a useful means of assessing the viscoelastic characteristics of materials. The mechanical properties of the tablets produced were assessed by means of both a diametral loading test and a direct tension test, in order to study the homogeneity of tablets with respect to strength and toughness. Fitting stress relaxation data to a hyperbolic equation enabled the asymptotic value of relaxed stress and the rate of stress relaxation at short times to be determined. Creep analysis was found to be a most useful method in quantifying the viscoelastic properties of materials. Creep experiments were used to separately quantify the ability of a material to undergo elastic, viscoelastic and plastic deformation at constant stress. Analysis of the viscoelastic compliance provided a time constant and an equilibrium value. Spectral analysis of the creep data was an alternative method of studying viscoelastic behaviour, since analysis in the frequency domain revealed hidden periodicities of mechanisms possibly related to viscoelastic behaviour. A detailed study of several forms of modified starch addressed factors which may influence its viscoelastic behaviour, including manufacturing process variables such as particle

  8. Organic/inorganic nanocomposite materials by electrospinning and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures, such as nanowires, nanobelts, nanofibers and nanotubes, have been the focus of intensive research due to their peculiar structures and resultant fascinating properties. However, the applications of 1D nanostructures have been hindered by the slow progress of the synthesis and characterization methods for these nanoscaled materials. Well controlled dimensionality, tailorable morphology and assembly, high phase purity and controllable crystallinity are major concerns when generating these nanostructures. In this work, a relatively simple technique---electrospinning---has been introduced for the preparation of 1D organic/inorganic nanocomposite materials. Materials under investigation include polymer/metal oxide (WO 3, MoO3) composite nanofibers and polymer/MWNT composite nanofibers. Notably, peculiar nanostructures, such as polycrystalline nanowires, nanoplatelets and nanobelts, can also be obtained after post-calcination processing on the nanocomposite materials. Spectroscopy techniques, such as XRD, SEM, TEM, AFM and Raman have been carried out to obtain structural and morphological information from the electrospun composite nanofibers. Meanwhile, some advanced characterization methods and measurements have been developed and designed to investigate the nanofibers from a basic science view point as to their properties. Specific designs of experiment include: synchrotron-based in situ XRD for phase transition monitoring; gas flow control bench for sensitivity measurement; three-point-bending by AFM for mechanical property measurement. In summary, the electrospinning technique provides a versatile method for synthesizing and assembling 1D nanocomposite structures. The electrospun composite nanofibers showed promising electrical and mechanical properties, which may find applications for gas sensors, reinforced fibrous materials and nano-electrical devices.

  9. Evaluation of nonaqueous processes for nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, B.C.; Grens, J.Z.; Knighton, J.B.; Coops, M.S.

    1983-12-01

    A working group was assigned the task of evaluating the status of nonaqueous processes for nuclear materials and the prospects for successful deployment of these technologies in the future. In the initial evaluation, the study was narrowed to the pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical processes closely related to the processes used for purification of plutonium and its conversion to metal. The status of the chemistry and process hardware were reviewed and the development needs in both chemistry and process equipment technology were evaluated. Finally, the requirements were established for successful deployment of this technology. The status of the technology was evaluated along three lines: (1) first the current applications were examined for completeness, (2) an attempt was made to construct closed-cycle flow sheets for several proposed applications, (3) and finally the status of technical development and future development needs for general applications were reviewed. By using these three evaluations, three different perspectives were constructed that together present a clear picture of how complete the technical development of these processes are.

  10. Manned Spacecraft Requirements for Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    A major cause of project failure can be attributed to an emphasized focus on end products and inadequate attention to resolving development risks during the initial phases of a project. The initial phases of a project, which we will call the "study period", are critical to determining project scope and costs, and can make or break most projects. If the requirements are not defined adequately, how can the scope be adequately determined, also how can the costs of the entire project be effectively estimated, and how can the risk of project success be accurately assessed? Using the proper material specifications and standards and incorporating these specifications and standards in the design process should be considered inherently crucial to the technical success of a project as just as importantly, crucial to the cost and schedule success. This paper will intertwine several important aspects or considerations for project success: 1) Characteristics of a "Good Material Requirement"; 2) Linking material requirements to the implementation of "Design for Manufacturing"; techniques and 3) The importance of decomposing materials requirements during the study phase/development phase to mitigate project risk for the maturation of technologies before the building of hardware.

  11. Electrochemical properties of yolk-shell structured ZnFe2O4 powders prepared by a simple spray drying process as anode material for lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Min; Choi, Seung Ho; Hong, Young Jun; Ko, You Na; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-01-01

    ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell powders were prepared by applying a simple spray-drying process. Dextrin was used as a drying additive and carbon source material, and thus played a key role in the preparation of the powders. The combustion of precursor powders consisting of zinc and iron salts and dextrin obtained by a spray-drying process produced the yolk-shell-structured ZnFe2O4 powders even at a low post-treatment temperature of 350 °C. The ZnFe2O4 powders prepared from the spray solution without dextrin had a filled and pockmarked structure. The initial discharge capacities of the ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell and filled powders post-treated at 450 °C at a current density of 500 mA g(-1) were 1226 and 993 mA h g(-1), respectively, and the corresponding initial Coulombic efficiencies were 74 and 58%. The discharge capacities of the ZnFe2O4 powders with yolk-shell and filled structures post-treated at 450 °C after 200 cycles were 862 and 332 mA h g(-1), respectively. The ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell powders with high structural stability during cycling had superior electrochemical properties to those of the powders with filled structure. PMID:25168407

  12. Electrochemical properties of yolk-shell structured ZnFe2O4 powders prepared by a simple spray drying process as anode material for lithium-ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jong Min; Choi, Seung Ho; Hong, Young Jun; Ko, You Na; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-01-01

    ZnFe2O4 yolk–shell powders were prepared by applying a simple spray-drying process. Dextrin was used as a drying additive and carbon source material, and thus played a key role in the preparation of the powders. The combustion of precursor powders consisting of zinc and iron salts and dextrin obtained by a spray-drying process produced the yolk–shell-structured ZnFe2O4 powders even at a low post-treatment temperature of 350°C. The ZnFe2O4 powders prepared from the spray solution without dextrin had a filled and pockmarked structure. The initial discharge capacities of the ZnFe2O4 yolk–shell and filled powders post-treated at 450°C at a current density of 500 mA g−1 were 1226 and 993 mA h g−1, respectively, and the corresponding initial Coulombic efficiencies were 74 and 58%. The discharge capacities of the ZnFe2O4 powders with yolk–shell and filled structures post-treated at 450°C after 200 cycles were 862 and 332 mA h g−1, respectively. The ZnFe2O4 yolk–shell powders with high structural stability during cycling had superior electrochemical properties to those of the powders with filled structure. PMID:25168407

  13. Electrochemical properties of yolk-shell structured ZnFe2O4 powders prepared by a simple spray drying process as anode material for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Jong Min; Choi, Seung Ho; Hong, Young Jun; Ko, You Na; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-08-01

    ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell powders were prepared by applying a simple spray-drying process. Dextrin was used as a drying additive and carbon source material, and thus played a key role in the preparation of the powders. The combustion of precursor powders consisting of zinc and iron salts and dextrin obtained by a spray-drying process produced the yolk-shell-structured ZnFe2O4 powders even at a low post-treatment temperature of 350°C. The ZnFe2O4 powders prepared from the spray solution without dextrin had a filled and pockmarked structure. The initial discharge capacities of the ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell and filled powders post-treated at 450°C at a current density of 500 mA g-1 were 1226 and 993 mA h g-1, respectively, and the corresponding initial Coulombic efficiencies were 74 and 58%. The discharge capacities of the ZnFe2O4 powders with yolk-shell and filled structures post-treated at 450°C after 200 cycles were 862 and 332 mA h g-1, respectively. The ZnFe2O4 yolk-shell powders with high structural stability during cycling had superior electrochemical properties to those of the powders with filled structure.

  14. Research on lunar materials. [optical, chemical, and electrical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, T.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 14 research reports relating to investigations of lunar samples are presented. The principal topics covered include: (1) optical properties of surface and core samples; (2) chemical composition of the surface layers of lunar grains: Auger electron spectroscopy of lunar soil and ground rock samples; (3) high frequency electrical properties of lunar soil and rock samples and their relevance for the interpretation of lunar radar observations; (4) the electrostatic dust transport process; (5) secondary electron emission characteristics of lunar soil samples and their relevance to the dust transportation process; (6) grain size distribution in surface soil and core samples; and (7) the optical and chemical effects of simulated solar wind (2keV proton and a particle radiation) on lunar material.

  15. Lunar fiberglass: Properties and process design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, Robert; Nichols, Todd

    1987-01-01

    A Clemson University ceramic engineering design for a lunar fiberglass plant is presented. The properties of glass fibers and metal-matrix composites are examined. Lunar geology is also discussed. A raw material and site are selected based on this information. A detailed plant design is presented, and summer experiments to be carried out at Johnson Space Center are reviewed.

  16. Materials processing with superposed Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.; Lei, Shuting

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results of femtosecond laser processing on the surface of glass and metal thin film using superposed Bessel beams. These beams are generated by a combination of a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an axicon with >50% efficiency, and they possess the long depth-of-focus (propagation-invariant) property as found in ordinary Bessel beams. Through micromachining experiments using femtosecond laser pulses, we show that multiple craters can be fabricated on glass with single-shot exposure, and the 1+(-1) superposed beam can reduce collateral damage caused by the rings in zero-order Bessel beams in the scribing of metal thin film.

  17. Skylab materials processing facility experiment developer's report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the Skylab M512 Materials Processing Facility is traced from the design of a portable, self-contained electron beam welding system for terrestrial applications to the highly complex experiment system ultimately developed for three Skylab missions. The M512 experiment facility was designed to support six in-space experiments intended to explore the advantages of manufacturing materials in the near-zero-gravity environment of Earth orbit. Detailed descriptions of the M512 facility and related experiment hardware are provided, with discussions of hardware verification and man-machine interfaces included. An analysis of the operation of the facility and experiments during the three Skylab missions is presented, including discussions of the hardware performance, anomalies, and data returned to earth.

  18. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  19. Microwave processing of materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Garard, R.S.

    1997-11-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Lambda Technologies, Inc. (Lambda) of Raleigh, N.C., was initiated in May 1995. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Corp. (LMER) has replaced LMES]. The completion data for the Agreement was December 31, 1996. The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace (VFMF); and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The VFMF, whose initial conception and design was funded by the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies.

  20. 2010 Membranes: Materials & Processes Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Lin

    2010-07-30

    The GRC series on Membranes: Materials and Processes have gained significant international recognition, attracting leading experts on membranes and other related areas from around the world. It is now known for being an interdisciplinary and synergistic meeting. The next summer's edition will keep with the past tradition and include new, exciting aspects of material science, chemistry, chemical engineering, computer simulation with participants from academia, industry and national laboratories. This edition will focus on cutting edge topics of membranes for addressing several grand challenges facing our society, in particular, energy, water, health and more generally sustainability. During the technical program, we want to discuss new membrane structure and characterization techniques, the role of advanced membranes and membrane-based processes in sustainability/environment (including carbon dioxide capture), membranes in water processes, and membranes for biological and life support applications. As usual, the informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the oral presentations and posters, and ample opportunity to meet many outstanding colleagues make this an excellent conference for established scientists as well as for students. A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) on the weekend prior to the GRC meeting will provide young researchers an opportunity to present their work and network with outstanding experts. It will also be a right warm-up for the conference participants to join and enjoy the main conference.

  1. Properties of materials using acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1984-10-01

    Our goal of characterizing materials using acoustic waves was forwarded through a number of projects: (1) We have refined our modulated radiation pressure technique for characterizing the interfaces between liquids so that we can automatically track changes in interfacial tension over time due to contaminants, surfactants, etc. (2) We have improved and simplified our acoustic scattering apparatus for measuring distributions of the properties of microparticle samples, which will allow us to distinguish particulates in liquids by size, compressibility, and density. (3) We are continuing work on theoretical approaches to nonlinear acoustics which should permit us to cast problems with geometric and other complexities into a manageable form. (4) Our studies of cavitation have enabled us to derive an analytic expression which predicts the acoustic pressure threshold for cavitation at the micrometer scale - where surface tension effects are important. This work has relevance to the consideration of possible bioeffects from diagnostic ultrasound. (5) Other projects include the calibration of hydrophones using acoustically levitated samples, and the investigation of solitary waves of the sort discovered by Wu, Keolian and Rudnick.

  2. Processing of magnesia pyrochlore composites for inert matrix materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J.; Xu, P.; Wang, J.; Tulenko, J. S.; Nino, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    Inert matrix (IM) materials for nuclear fuel in light water reactors must meet several critical requirements that include high temperature stability, good irradiation behaviour, high thermal conductivity, and hot water corrosion resistance. MgO possesses all of the necessary requirements for an ideal IM candidate, except hot water corrosion resistance. A composite approach is being investigated in order to improve the corrosion resistance of MgO, while simultaneously taking advantage of the high thermal conductivity of MgO and its ability to be reprocessed in nitric acid. MgO-pyrochlore composite compositions are fabricated based on neutronic property simulations for assessment as potential IM materials. The selected pyrochlore compositions are synthesized by both sol gel and solid state processing, and how composite processing affects the microstructure will be discussed. Among the multiple composite processing approaches investigated, ball milling produces the most homogeneous and consistent microstructures.

  3. Factors Influencing the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural and Food Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of materials are defined, and the major factors that influence these properties of agricultural and food materials, namely, frequency of the applied radio-frequency or microwave electric fields, and water content, temperature, and density of the materials, are discussed on the ...

  4. Rheological properties of granular materials - Critical parameters and mixing rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, Alisa Victoria

    2011-12-01

    Granular materials can be found at any stage of processing in many industries, such as food, pharmaceuticals, catalysts, and chemicals. These materials exhibit a variety of flow patterns, and their state and behavior differ from application to application. Since there is a lack of fundamental understanding of particulate or powder behavior, multiple problems can be encountered during routine manufacturing. Scale-up can also be a challenge, as the lack of constitutive equations for granular materials forces most scaleup efforts to follow the trial-and-error route. Powder characterization measurements are employed as both a selection tool and a predictive method for the material's process performance. Therefore, it plays a very important role in process and product development. The numerous existing methods used to characterize the flow properties of powders are mostly application-specific and it is not clear how they correlate with each other or with process performance. Moreover, understanding the relationships between the material properties and the processing conditions is necessary for a successful design of a continuous manufacturing system, which has been a major focus for pharmaceutical industry in the recent years. Before such changes can be implemented, a better understanding of fundamental physical phenomena governing powder flow behavior must be developed. In this work we study particulate/powder flow behavior experimentally using several characterization methods, including the Gravitational Displacement Rheometer (an avalanching tester), the rotational shear cell, and the compressibility tester. We establish the variables of interest through correlative comparison and study the differences and similarities between the methods in order to investigate particulate/powder flow behavior during processing and characterization. A mixing rule for principal stresses is developed through investigation of shear behavior of binary mixtures in a shear cell. In order

  5. Active material based active sealing technology: Part 1. Active seal requirements vs. active material actuator properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Christopher P.; Carter, William; Herrera, Guillermo A.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Bazzi, Imad F.

    2010-04-01

    Current seals used for vehicle closures/swing panels are essentially flexible, frequently hollow structures whose designs are constrained by numerous requirements, many of them competing, including door closing effort (both air bind and seal compression), sound isolation, prevention of water leaks, and accommodation of variations in vehicle build. This paper documents the first portion of a collaborative research study/exploration of the feasibility of and approaches for using active materials with shape and stiffness changing attributes to produce active seal technologies, seals with improved performance. An important design advantage of an active material approach compared to previous active seal technologies is the distribution of active material regions throughout the seal length, which would enable continued active function even with localized failure. Included as a major focus of this study was the assessment of polymeric active materials because of their potential ease of integration into the current seal manufacturing process. In Part 1 of this study, which is documented in this paper, potential materials were evaluated in terms of their cost, activation mechanisms, and mechanical and actuation properties. Based on these properties, simple designs were proposed and utilized to help determine which materials are best suited for active seals. Shape memory alloys (SMA) and electroactive polymers (EAP) were judged to be the most promising.

  6. A thermodynamic approach to obtain materials properties for engineering applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Y. Austin

    1993-01-01

    With the ever increases in the capabilities of computers for numerical computations, we are on the verge of using these tools to model manufacturing processes for improving the efficiency of these processes as well as the quality of the products. One such process is casting for the production of metals. However, in order to model metal casting processes in a meaningful way it is essential to have the basic properties of these materials in their molten state, solid state as well as in the mixed state of solid and liquid. Some of the properties needed may be considered as intrinsic such as the density, heat capacity or enthalpy of freezing of a pure metal, while others are not. For instance, the enthalpy of solidification of an alloy is not a defined thermodynamic quantity. Its value depends on the micro-segregation of the phases during the course of solidification. The objective of the present study is to present a thermodynamic approach to obtain some of the intrinsic properties and combining thermodynamics with kinetic models to estimate such quantities as the enthalpy of solidification of an alloy.

  7. Novel DDR process and materials for front-edge NTD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigaki, Shuhei; Takeda, Satoshi; Shibayama, Wataru; Onishi, Ryuji; Nakajima, Makoto; Sakamoto, Rikimaru

    2016-03-01

    We developed the novel process and material which can prevent the pattern collapse issue perfectly. The process was Dry Development Rinse (DDR) process, and the material used in this process was DDR Material (DDRM). DDRM was containing siloxane polymer which could be replaced the space area of the photo resist pattern. And finally, the reversed pattern would be created by dry etching process without any pattern collapse issue. This novel process was useful not only in positive tone development (PTD) process but also in negative tone development (NTD) process. We newly developed DDRM for NTD process. Novel DDRM consist of special polymer and it used organic solvent system. So, new DDRM showed no mixing property with NTD photo resist and it has enough etch selectivity against NTD photo resist. Image reversal was successfully achieved by combination of NTD process and DDR process keeping good pattern quality. Tone reverse pattern below hp 18nm was obtained without any pattern collapse issue, which couldn't be created by just using normal NTD process.

  8. Effective Materials Property Information Management for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Cebon, David; Barabash, Oleg M

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses key principles for the development of materials property information management software systems. There are growing needs for automated materials information management in various organizations. In part these are fuelled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing, product design and engineering analysis. But equally important, organizations are being driven by the needs for consistency, quality and traceability of data, as well as control of access to proprietary or sensitive information. Further, the use of increasingly sophisticated nonlinear, anisotropic and multi-scale engineering analyses requires both processing of large volumes of test data for development of constitutive models and complex materials data input for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software. And finally, the globalization of economy often generates great needs for sharing a single gold source of materials information between members of global engineering teams in extended supply-chains. Fortunately material property management systems have kept pace with the growing user demands and evolved to versatile data management systems that can be customized to specific user needs. The more sophisticated of these provide facilities for: (i) data management functions such as access, version, and quality controls; (ii) a wide range of data import, export and analysis capabilities; (iii) data pedigree traceability mechanisms; (iv) data searching, reporting and viewing tools; and (v) access to the information via a wide range of interfaces. In this paper the important requirements for advanced material data management systems, future challenges and opportunities such as automated error checking, data quality characterization, identification of gaps in datasets, as well as functionalities and business models to fuel database growth and maintenance are discussed.

  9. Effective Materials Property Information Management for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Weiju; Cebon, David; Arnold, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses key principles for the development of materials property information management software systems. There are growing needs for automated materials information management in various organizations. In part these are fueled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing, product design and engineering analysis. But equally important, organizations are being driven by the need for consistency, quality and traceability of data, as well as control of access to sensitive information such as proprietary data. Further, the use of increasingly sophisticated nonlinear, anisotropic and multi-scale engineering analyses requires both processing of large volumes of test data for development of constitutive models and complex materials data input for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software. And finally, the globalization of economy often generates great needs for sharing a single "gold source" of materials information between members of global engineering teams in extended supply chains. Fortunately, material property management systems have kept pace with the growing user demands and evolved to versatile data management systems that can be customized to specific user needs. The more sophisticated of these provide facilities for: (i) data management functions such as access, version, and quality controls; (ii) a wide range of data import, export and analysis capabilities; (iii) data "pedigree" traceability mechanisms; (iv) data searching, reporting and viewing tools; and (v) access to the information via a wide range of interfaces. In this paper the important requirements for advanced material data management systems, future challenges and opportunities such as automated error checking, data quality characterization, identification of gaps in datasets, as well as functionalities and business models to fuel database growth and maintenance are discussed.

  10. Construction material processed using lunar simulant in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Stan; Ocallaghan-Hay, Bridget; Housman, Ralph; Kindig, Michael; King, John; Montegrande, Kevin; Norris, Raymond; Vanscotter, Ryan; Willenborg, Jonathan; Staubs, Harry

    1995-01-01

    The manufacture of construction materials from locally available resources in space is an important first step in the establishment of lunar and planetary bases. The objective of the CoMPULSIVE (Construction Material Processed Using Lunar Simulant In Various Environments) experiment is to develop a procedure to produce construction materials by sintering or melting Johnson Space Center Simulant 1 (JSC-1) lunar soil simulant in both earth-based (1-g) and microgravity (approximately 0-g) environments. The characteristics of the resultant materials will be tested to determine its physical and mechanical properties. The physical characteristics include: crystalline, thermal, and electrical properties. The mechanical properties include: compressive tensile, and flexural strengths. The simulant, placed in a sealed graphite crucible, will be heated using a high temperature furnace. The crucible will then be cooled by radiative and forced convective means. The core furnace element consists of space qualified quartz-halogen incandescent lamps with focusing mirrors. Sample temperatures of up to 2200 C are attainable using this heating method.

  11. Holographic femtosecond laser manipulation for advanced material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2016-02-01

    Parallel femtosecond laser processing using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator, known as holographic femtosecond laser processing, provides the advantages of high throughput and high-energy use efficiency. Therefore, it has been widely used in many applications, including laser material processing, two-photon polymerization, two-photon microscopy, and optical manipulation of biological cells. In this paper, we review the development of holographic femtosecond laser processing over the past few years from the perspective of wavefront and polarization modulation. In particular, line-shaped and vector-wave femtosecond laser processing are addressed. These beam-shaping techniques are useful for performing large-area machining in laser cutting, peeling, and grooving of materials and for high-speed fabrication of the complex nanostructures that are applied to material-surface texturing to control tribological properties, wettability, reflectance, and retardance. Furthermore, issues related to the nonuniformity of diffraction light intensity in optical reconstruction and wavelength dispersion from a computer-generated hologram are addressed. As a result, large-scale holographic femtosecond laser processing over 1000 diffraction spots was successfully demonstrated on a glass sample.

  12. Material properties from contours: New insights on object perception.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Deiana, Katia

    2015-10-01

    In this work we explored phenomenologically the visual complexity of the material attributes on the basis of the contours that define the boundaries of a visual object. The starting point is the rich and pioneering work done by Gestalt psychologists and, more in detail, by Rubin, who first demonstrated that contours contain most of the information related to object perception, like the shape, the color and the depth. In fact, by investigating simple conditions like those used by Gestalt psychologists, mostly consisting of contours only, we demonstrated that the phenomenal complexity of the material attributes emerges through appropriate manipulation of the contours. A phenomenological approach, analogous to the one used by Gestalt psychologists, was used to answer the following questions. What are contours? Which attributes can be phenomenally defined by contours? Are material properties determined only by contours? What is the visual syntactic organization of object attributes? The results of this work support the idea of a visual syntactic organization as a new kind of object formation process useful to understand the language of vision that creates well-formed attribute organizations. The syntax of visual attributes can be considered as a new way to investigate the modular coding and, more generally, the binding among attributes, i.e., the issue of how the brain represents the pairing of shape and material properties. PMID:26072333

  13. Solar Energy: Materials, Materials Handling, and Fabrication Processes: Student Material. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, William Everet; Orsak, Charles G., Jr.

    Designed for student use in "Materials, Materials Handling, and Fabrication Processes," one of 11 courses in a 2-year associate degree program in solar technology, this manual provides readings, exercises, worksheets, bibliographies, and illustrations for 13 course modules. The manual, which corresponds to an instructor guide for the same course,…

  14. Multi-material processing by LENS{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Romero, J.T.; Schlienger, E.; Atwood, C.L.; Smugeresky, J.E.

    1997-10-01

    During the past few years, solid freeform fabrication has evolved into direct fabrication of metallic components using computer aided design (CAD) solid models. Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}) is one such technique being developed at Sandia to fabricate high strength, near net shape metallic components. In the past two years a variety of components have been fabricated using LENS{trademark} for applications ranging from prototype parts to injection mold tooling. To advance direct fabrication capabilities, a process must be able to accommodate a wide range of materials, including alloys and composites. This is important for tailoring certain physical properties critical to component performance. Examples include graded deposition for matching coefficient of thermal expansion between dissimilar materials, layered fabrication for novel mechanical properties, and new alloy design where elemental constituents and/or alloys are blended to create new materials. In this paper, the authors will discuss the development of precise powder feeding capabilities for the LENS{trademark} process to fabricate graded or layered material parts. They also present preliminary results from chemical and microstructural analysis.

  15. Temporal properties of material categorization and material rating: visual vs non-visual material features.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takehiro; Matsushima, Toshiki; Koida, Kowa; Tani, Yusuke; Kitazaki, Michiteru; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2015-10-01

    Humans can visually recognize material categories of objects, such as glass, stone, and plastic, easily. However, little is known about the kinds of surface quality features that contribute to such material class recognition. In this paper, we examine the relationship between perceptual surface features and material category discrimination performance for pictures of materials, focusing on temporal aspects, including reaction time and effects of stimulus duration. The stimuli were pictures of objects with an identical shape but made of different materials that could be categorized into seven classes (glass, plastic, metal, stone, wood, leather, and fabric). In a pre-experiment, observers rated the pictures on nine surface features, including visual (e.g., glossiness and transparency) and non-visual features (e.g., heaviness and warmness), on a 7-point scale. In the main experiments, observers judged whether two simultaneously presented pictures were classified as the same or different material category. Reaction times and effects of stimulus duration were measured. The results showed that visual feature ratings were correlated with material discrimination performance for short reaction times or short stimulus durations, while non-visual feature ratings were correlated only with performance for long reaction times or long stimulus durations. These results suggest that the mechanisms underlying visual and non-visual feature processing may differ in terms of processing time, although the cause is unclear. Visual surface features may mainly contribute to material recognition in daily life, while non-visual features may contribute only weakly, if at all. PMID:25536464

  16. Effective Materials Property Information Management for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Cebon, David; Arnold, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses key principles for the development of materials property information management software systems. There are growing needs for automated materials information management in industry, research organizations and government agencies. In part these are fuelled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing, product design and development and engineering analysis. But equally important, organizations are being driven to employ sophisticated methods and software tools for managing their mission-critical materials information by the needs for consistency, quality and traceability of data, as well as control of access to proprietary or sensitive information. Furthermore the use of increasingly sophisticated nonlinear, anisotropic and multi-scale engineering analysis approaches, particularly for composite materials, requires both processing of much larger volumes of test data for development of constitutive models and much more complex materials data input requirements for Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software. And finally, the globalization of engineering processes and outsourcing of design and development activities generates much greater needs for sharing a single gold source of materials information between members of global engineering teams in extended supply-chains. Fortunately material property management systems have kept pace with the growing user demands. They have evolved from hard copy archives, through simple electronic databases, to versatile data management systems that can be customized to specific user needs. The more sophisticated of these provide facilities for: (i) data management functions such as access control, version control, and quality control; (ii) a wide range of data import, export and analysis capabilities; (iii) mechanisms for ensuring that all data is traceable to its pedigree sources: details of testing programs, published sources, etc; (iv) tools for searching, reporting and viewing the data; and (v

  17. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

    PubMed Central

    Finot, Eric; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    , we use continuum mechanics, which is justified according to the ratio between the cantilever thickness and the grain size of the materials. We will also address other potential applications such as the ageing process of nuclear materials, building materials, and optical fibers, which can be investigated by monitoring their mechanical changes with time. In summary, by virtue of the dynamic response of a miniaturized cantilever shaped material, we present useful measurements of the associated elastic properties.

  18. Materials, design and processing of air encapsulated MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Nathan T.

    This work uses a three-dimensional air cavity technology to improve the fabrication, and functionality of microelectronics devices, performance of on-board transmission lines, and packaging of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). The air cavity process makes use of the decomposition of a patterned sacrificial polymer followed by the diffusion of its by-products through a curing polymer overcoat to obtain the embedded air structure. Applications and research of air cavities have focused on simple designs that concentrate on the size and functionality of the particular device. However, a lack of guidelines for fabrication, materials used, and structural design has led to mechanical stability issues and processing refinements. This work investigates improved air gap cavities for use in MEMS packaging processes, resulting in fewer fabrication flaws and lower cost. The identification of new materials, such as novel photo-definable organic/inorganic hybrid polymers, was studied for increased strength and rigidity due to their glass-like structure. A novel epoxy polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) material was investigated and characterized for use as a photodefineable, permanent dielectrics with improved mechanical properties. The POSS material improved the air gap fabrication because it served as a high-selectivity etch mask for patterning sacrificial materials as well as a cavity overcoat material with improved rigidity. An investigation of overcoat thickness and decomposition kinetics provided a fundamental understanding of the properties that impart mechanical stability to cavities of different shape and volume. Metallization of the cavities was investigated so as to provide hermetic sealing and improved cavity strength. The improved air cavity, wafer-level packages were tested using resonator-type devices and chip-level lead frame packaging. The air cavity package was molded under traditional lead frame molding pressures and tested for mechanical

  19. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews material properties of adhesion, friction and wear of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. The tribological properties in the metal removal processes are divided into properties which remove metal by adhesion between sliding surfaces, and metal removal by silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows. The paper also deals with fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface; the adhesion, friction and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion and friction properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear decrease as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases.

  20. Expert model process control of composite materials in a press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Quinter, Suzanne R.; Abrams, Frances L.

    An expert model for the control of the press processing of thermoset composite materials has been developed. The knowledge base written using the PC PLUS expert system shell was interfaced with models written in FORTRAN. The expert model, which is running on a single computer with a single processor, takes advantage of the symbol-crunching capability of LISP and the number crunching capability of FORTRAN. The Expert Model control system is a qualitative-quantitative process automation (QQPA) system since it includes both quantitative model-based and qualitative rule-based expert system operations. Various physical and mechanical properties were measured from panels processed using the two cycles. Using QQPA, processing time has been reduced significantly without altering product quality.

  1. Processing of thermal insulation materials with controlled porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Lyckfeldt, O.; Liden, E.; Carlsson, R.

    1995-08-01

    Slip-cast cordierite-based materials with reduced thermal conductivity have been manufactured with controlled introduction of porosity. The porosity was obtained by addition of different kinds of fillers (hollow Al-silicate spheres, paraffin, polystyrene, carbon black or starch particles). The processing and the ultimate thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated. The results showed that additions of corn or potato starch gave the most favourable concept, considering the processing and porosity control. A homogeneous distribution of spherical pores with the sizes 5-25 or 15-40 {mu}m was obtained after sintering. Slip-cast cordierite with 37% porosity had a thermal conductivity of 1.7 W/mK (compared with 3.7 W/mK for fully dense cordierite), and a bending strength above 50 MPa. The porosity effect correlated very well to theoretical models by Maxwell and, hence, the thermal conductivity of the porous ceramic material could be predicted.

  2. Supercritical nitrogen processing for the purification of reactive porous materials.

    PubMed

    Stadie, Nicholas P; Callini, Elsa; Mauron, Philippe; Borgschulte, Andreas; Züttel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction and drying methods are well established in numerous applications for the synthesis and processing of porous materials. Herein, nitrogen is presented as a novel supercritical drying fluid for specialized applications such as in the processing of reactive porous materials, where carbon dioxide and other fluids are not appropriate due to their higher chemical reactivity. Nitrogen exhibits similar physical properties in the near-critical region of its phase diagram as compared to carbon dioxide: a widely tunable density up to ~1 g ml(-1), modest critical pressure (3.4 MPa), and small molecular diameter of ~3.6 Å. The key to achieving a high solvation power of nitrogen is to apply a processing temperature in the range of 80-150 K, where the density of nitrogen is an order of magnitude higher than at similar pressures near ambient temperature. The detailed solvation properties of nitrogen, and especially its selectivity, across a wide range of common target species of extraction still require further investigation. Herein we describe a protocol for the supercritical nitrogen processing of porous magnesium borohydride. PMID:26066492

  3. Containerless processing of materials by acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. R.; Cao, C. D.; Wei, B.

    1999-01-01

    A single-axis ultrasonic levitator which can be applied to containerless processing of materials was described. Analytical expressions of acoustic pressure, acoustic radiation potential and force were derived from the velocity potential function of the applied acoustic field. The levitation region and the levitation stability were then discussed. A sphere of liquid crystal, 4-pentylphenyl-4‧-methylbenzoate, was also selected for containerless melting and solidification using the levitator. The results showed that rapid heating of the sample is necessary so as to avoid its escape from the levitation region. However, the measured bulk undercooling of the melt is smaller than that obtained using a container. It was supposed that ultrasonic cavitation produce a local undercooling large enough to initiate solidification of the melt, thus leading to a limited bulk undercooling.

  4. Cytocompatibility and antibacterial properties of capping materials.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Arciola, Carla Renata; Beltrami, Riccardo; Monaco, Annachiara; Dagna, Alberto; Lombardini, Marco; Visai, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), and Biodentine (Septodont). To evaluate antimicrobial activity, materials were challenged in vitro with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus sanguis in the agar disc diffusion test. Cytocompatibility of the assayed materials towards rat MDPC-23 cells was evaluated at different times by both MTT and apoptosis assays. Results significantly differed among the different materials tested. Both bacterial growth inhibition halos and cytocompatibility performances were significantly different among materials with different composition. MTA-based products showed lower cytotoxicity and valuable antibacterial activity, different from calcium hydroxide-based materials, which exhibited not only higher antibacterial activity but also higher cytotoxicity. PMID:24959601

  5. Cytocompatibility and Antibacterial Properties of Capping Materials

    PubMed Central

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Monaco, Annachiara; Lombardini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), and Biodentine (Septodont). To evaluate antimicrobial activity, materials were challenged in vitro with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus sanguis in the agar disc diffusion test. Cytocompatibility of the assayed materials towards rat MDPC-23 cells was evaluated at different times by both MTT and apoptosis assays. Results significantly differed among the different materials tested. Both bacterial growth inhibition halos and cytocompatibility performances were significantly different among materials with different composition. MTA-based products showed lower cytotoxicity and valuable antibacterial activity, different from calcium hydroxide-based materials, which exhibited not only higher antibacterial activity but also higher cytotoxicity. PMID:24959601

  6. 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M. B. (Editor); Stanley, D. Cross (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Records are presented from the 5th Conference on Aerospace Materials, Processes, and Environmental Technology. Topics included pollution prevention, inspection methods, advanced materials, aerospace materials and technical standards,materials testing and evaluation, advanced manufacturing,development in metallic processes, synthesis of nanomaterials, composite cryotank processing, environmentally friendly cleaning, and poster sessions.

  7. Absorption properties of waste matrix materials

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J.B.

    1997-06-01

    This paper very briefly discusses the need for studies of the limiting critical concentration of radioactive waste matrix materials. Calculated limiting critical concentration values for some common waste materials are listed. However, for systems containing large quantities of waste materials, differences up to 10% in calculated k{sub eff} values are obtained by changing cross section data sets. Therefore, experimental results are needed to compare with calculation results for resolving these differences and establishing realistic biases.

  8. Hygrothermal Simulations of Foundations: Part 1 - Soil Material Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pallin, Simon B; Kehrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is a complicated process. The computational approach for heat transfer via the ground is well defined (EN-ISO-13370:, 2007) together with simplified methods (Staszczuk, Radon, & Holm). Though the soil moisture transfer is generally ignored, it is proven not negligible (Janssen, Carmeliet, & Hens, 2004). Even though reliable material properties of soils are required to perform realistic hygrothermal calculations of soils coupled to buildings, such material properties have not been well defined in hygrothermal calculations tools. Typical building constructions which are greatly influenced by soils are basements, crawl spaces and slab on grade and reliable hygrothermal performance of such construction are highly requested; as it is ranked within the top 10 Building America Enclosure Research Ideas according to Enclosures STC - Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting, February 29, 2012 Austin, TX. There exists an extensive amount of measurements on soil properties in Soil Science though this information must be gathered as well as adapted to be applicable in Building Science and for hygrothermal simulation purposes. Soil properties are important when analyzing and designing both new building constructions and retrofitting measures, where the outer boundary of the buildings enclosure consists of soil materials. Concerning basement energy retrofits, interior solutions of improving the energy demand has to cooperate with the existing soil properties and must therefore be designed thereafter. In concerns of exterior retrofits, the soil material can be replaced, if needed, with a more suitable filling material, though this approach applies only for basement walls. The soil material beneath the basement floor can naturally not be replaced hence the soil properties of this part of the buildings enclosure still must be taken into consideration. This study is divided into several parts. The intention of the first

  9. Integration mockup and process material management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verble, Adas James, Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Work to define and develop a full scale Space Station Freedom (SSF) mockup with the flexibility to evolve into future designs, to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify human task allocations and support trade studies is described. This work began in early 1985 and ended in August, 1991. The mockups are presently being used at MSFC in Building 4755 as a technology and design testbed, as well as for public display. Micro Craft also began work on the Process Material Management System (PMMS) under this contract. The PMMS simulator was a sealed enclosure for testing to identify liquids, gaseous, particulate samples, and specimen including, urine, waste water, condensate, hazardous gases, surrogate gasses, liquids, and solids. The SSF would require many trade studies to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify system task allocations; it was necessary to develop a full scale mockup which would be representative of current SSF design with the ease of changing those designs as the SSF design evolved and changed. The tasks defined for Micro Craft were to provide the personnel, services, tools, and materials for the SSF mockup which would consist of four modules, nodes, interior components, and part task mockups of MSFC responsible engineering systems. This included the Engineering Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) testbed. For the initial study, the mockups were low fidelity, soft mockups of graphics art bottle, and other low cost materials, which evolved into higher fidelity mockups as the R&D design evolved, by modifying or rebuilding, an important cost saving factor in the design process. We designed, fabricated, and maintained the full size mockup shells and support stands. The shells consisted of cylinders, end cones, rings, longerons, docking ports, crew airlocks, and windows. The ECLSS required a heavier cylinder to support the ECLSS systems test program. Details of this activity will be covered. Support stands were

  10. Integration mockup and process material management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, Adas James, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Work to define and develop a full scale Space Station Freedom (SSF) mockup with the flexibility to evolve into future designs, to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify human task allocations and support trade studies is described. This work began in early 1985 and ended in August, 1991. The mockups are presently being used at MSFC in Building 4755 as a technology and design testbed, as well as for public display. Micro Craft also began work on the Process Material Management System (PMMS) under this contract. The PMMS simulator was a sealed enclosure for testing to identify liquids, gaseous, particulate samples, and specimen including, urine, waste water, condensate, hazardous gases, surrogate gasses, liquids, and solids. The SSF would require many trade studies to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify system task allocations; it was necessary to develop a full scale mockup which would be representative of current SSF design with the ease of changing those designs as the SSF design evolved and changed. The tasks defined for Micro Craft were to provide the personnel, services, tools, and materials for the SSF mockup which would consist of four modules, nodes, interior components, and part task mockups of MSFC responsible engineering systems. This included the Engineering Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) testbed. For the initial study, the mockups were low fidelity, soft mockups of graphics art bottle, and other low cost materials, which evolved into higher fidelity mockups as the R&D design evolved, by modifying or rebuilding, an important cost saving factor in the design process. We designed, fabricated, and maintained the full size mockup shells and support stands. The shells consisted of cylinders, end cones, rings, longerons, docking ports, crew airlocks, and windows. The ECLSS required a heavier cylinder to support the ECLSS systems test program. Details of this activity will be covered. Support stands were

  11. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  12. Mechanical properties of composite materials with integrated embedded sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Kristin; Cook, Ben; Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Starr, Anthony; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2005-05-01

    We present efforts to develop structural composite materials which include networks of embedded sensors with decision-making capabilities that extend the functionality of the composite materials to be information-aware. The next generation of structural systems will include the capability to acquire, process, and if necessary respond to structural or other types of information. We present work related to the development of embedded arrays of miniature electronic-based microsensors within a structural composite materials, such as GFRP. Although the scale and power consumption of such devices continues to decrease while increasing the functionality, the size of these devices remain large relative the typical scale of the reinforcing fibers and the interlayer spacing. Therefore, the question of the impact of those devices on the various mechanical properties is relevant and important. We present work on characterizing some of those effects in specific systems where sensors, or suitable dummy sensors, are arrayed with ~1 cm spacing between elements. The typical size of the microelectronic sensing element is ~1 mm, and here is orthorhombic. Of particular importance are the effects of inclusion of such devices on strength or fatigue properties of the base composite. Our work seeks to characterize these effects for 1 and 2 dimensional arrays lying in planes normal to the thickness direction in laminated composites. We also seek to isolate the effects due to the sensing elements and the required interconnections that represent the power-carrying and data communications capabilities of the embedded network.

  13. Infrared optical properties of Mars soil analog materials: Palagonites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.

    1992-01-01

    The globally distributed bright soils on Mars represent products of chemical alteration of primary igneous materials. As such, understanding the chemistry and mineralogy of these soils provides clues about the nature of the parent materials and the type, duration, and extent of the chemical weathering environments on Mars. Such clues are key in developing an understanding of the interior and surficial processes that have operated throughout Mars' history to yield the surface as it is currently observed. The generally homogeneous nature of these soils is illustrated by a variety of observational data. These data include (1) direct determination of elemental abundances by the X-ray fluorescence instruments on both Viking Landers, (2) Earth-based telescopic observations, and (3) space-based observations. Based on their spectral properties in the visible and near-infrared, terrestrial palagonitic soils have been suggested as analogs for the bright regions on Mars. Palagonites represent the weathering products of basaltic glass and as such are composed of a variety of minerals/materials. In order to gain an understanding regarding the chemical, mineralogical, and spectral properties of a broad suite of palagonites, several samples were collected from the eastern and central regions of the island of Hawaii.

  14. Thermal Imaging System For Material Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auric, Daniel; Hanonge, Eric; Kerrand, Emmanuel; de Miscault, Jean-Claude; Cornillault, Jean

    1987-09-01

    In the field of lasers for welding and surface processing, we need to measure the map of temperatures in order to control the processing in real time by adjusting the laser power, the beam pointing and focussing and the workpiece moving speed. For that purpose, we studied, realized and evaluated a model of thermal imaging system at 2 wavelengths in the mid-infrared. The device is connected to a 3 axis table and to a 3 kW CO2 laser. The range of measured temperatures is 800 C to 1 500 C. The device includes two AGEMA infrared cameras fixed to the welding torch each operating with a choice of filters in the 3, 4 and 5 micrometre band. The field of view of each is about 14 mm by 38 mm. The cameras are connected to an M68000 microprocessor family based microcomputer in which the images enter at the rate of 6. 25 Hz with 64 x 128 pixels by image at both wavelengths. The microcomputer stores the pictures into memory and floppy disk, displays them in false colours and calculates for each pixel the surface temperature of the material with the grey body assumption. The results have been compared with metallurgic analysis of the samples. The precision is about 20 C in most cases and depends on the sample surface state. Simplifications of the laboratory device should lead to a cheap, convenient and reliable product.

  15. Analysis of material properties for MEMS using interferometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Martin; Mathewson, Alan

    2003-03-01

    As the scope and depth of research into microelectromechanical systems increases, the issue of mechanical characterisation has emerged as a major consideration in device design. It is now common to include a set of test structures on a MEMS wafer for extraction of thin film material properties (in particular, residual stress and Young's modulus). These structures usually consist of micromachined beams and strain gauges, and measurement techniques include tensile testing, electromechanical characterisation, SEM imaging, and Raman spectroscopy. However, some of these tests are destructive and difficult to carry out at wafer scale. This work uses electrostatic actuation to pull fixed-fixed beams towards the substrate, and a white-light interferometer to record the beam deflection profile. Finite-element simulation software is employed to model this deflection, and to estimate the material properties which minimise the difference between the measured and simulated profiles. The test is non-destructive, suitable for wafer-level characterisation, and the structures involved require less die space than other methods. We have developed a 1.5mm surface micromachining process for the fabrication of composite and monolayer structures with applications in relay switching, optical imaging and radio-frequency components. This work presents results obtained using interferometric analysis for both monolayer (titanium) and composite (SiOx - metal) thin films fabricated with this process.

  16. Strain weakening and localisation: material properties or boundary effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Malte C.; Leever, Karen; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2015-04-01

    Strain weakening is commonly seen as one of the major causes of localisation of deformation into shear zones in brittle media. Several studies, both numerical and physical experiments, investigate its influence. Typically, these studies choose a certain model configuration and test various material properties and their influence on localisation in that particular configuration. This approach, however, does not take into account the fundamental importance of boundary conditions on the processes of localisation, weakening and overall shear zone evolution. To address this issue, we perform physical experiments in granular materials. We create shear fractures within a sample of granular material (sand) using different experimental apparatuses that apply different boundary conditions. Among them are standard machines such as a Ring-Shear Tester and the classical Riedel set up, as well as a newly designed set up. Boundary conditions can be varied from purely kinematic to more dynamically controlled and from laterally confined to unconfined. Nevertheless, the final result of deformation is an approximately straight strike-slip shear zone in all cases. We monitor boundary force (i. e. material strength) and, where experimentally accessible, strain, at high temporal resolution during deformation. With our different set ups we are able to produce very different patterns of deformation and weakening in the same material under the same constant rate of shearing and with the same final result. Observed patterns span from nearly instantaneous formation of one single through-going shear zone to slow, step-wise growth of a complex network of interacting cracks. Weakening in all cases matches well the structural evolution. Variations of weakening for a given material in different set ups are larger than for different materials in a given set up. Our results show that for a given material the style and rate of localisation can change drastically, depending on only slight changes of

  17. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, Achim Spadaro, Marcel

    2015-12-17

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix or of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.

  18. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Achim; Spadaro, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix or of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.

  19. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  20. Dielectric properties of agricultural materials and their application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is prepared as a comprehensive source of information on dielectric properties of agricultural materials for scientific researchers and engineers involved in practical application of radio-frequency and microwave energy for potential problem solutions. Dielectric properties of materials det...

  1. Ceramic transactions: Microwaves - theory and application in materials processing III. Volume 49

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This symposium continued the series on microwave processing of materials initiated in 1988. Papers are presented on the following topics: steps to commercialization, manufacturing with microwaves, waste remediation, processing equipment, microwave/materials interactions, dielectric properties, process modeling, joining, processing and thermal effects, chemical and reaction synthesis, and current issues and future activities. Individual papers have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  2. Structure and Thermal Properties of Porous Geological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Simon; Williamson, David

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of porous geological materials is important for developing models of the explosive loading of rock in mining applications. To this end it is essential to first characterise its complex internal structure. Knowing the structure shows how the properties of the component materials relate to the overall properties of rock. The structure and mineralogy of Gosford sandstone was investigated and this information was used to predict its thermal properties. The thermal properties of the material were measured experimentally and compared against these predictions.

  3. Exposure effects on the optical properties of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Sarah; Cathcart, J. Michael; Harrell, J. Timothy

    2008-04-01

    Georgia Tech recently initiated a weathering effects measurement program to monitor the optical properties of several common building materials. A set of common building materials were placed outdoors and optical property measurements made over a series of weeks to assess the impact of exposure on these properties. Both reflectivity and emissivity measurements were made. Materials in this program included aluminum flashing, plastic sheets, bricks, roof shingles, and tarps. This paper will discuss the measurement approach, experimental setup, and present preliminary results from the optical property measurements.

  4. Interfacial properties and design of functional energy materials.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality and performance. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly, a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately noncovalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, for example, lithographic, approach. However, while function in simple systems such as single crystals can often be evaluated a priori, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various support substrates. Typical molecular self-assembly involves noncovalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions. These interactions remain poorly understood, due to the combination of many-body interactions compounded by local or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice and electronic structure. Progress toward unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling, and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. Theory, modeling, and simulation can accelerate the process of materials understanding and design

  5. A Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman

    2011-08-01

    Biomass Torrefaction is gaining attention as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties and chemical composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of approximately 300 C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200-280 C. Thus, the process can be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, which produces a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. The present review work looks into (a) torrefaction process and different products produced during the process and (b) solid torrefied material properties which include: (i) physical properties like moisture content, density, grindability, particle size distribution and particle surface area and pelletability; (ii) chemical properties like proximate and ultimate composition; and (iii) storage properties like off-gassing and spontaneous combustion.

  6. Calculation of material properties and ray tracing in transformation media.

    PubMed

    Schurig, D; Pendry, J B; Smith, D R

    2006-10-16

    Complex and interesting electromagnetic behavior can be found in spaces with non-flat topology. When considering the properties of an electromagnetic medium under an arbitrary coordinate transformation an alternative interpretation presents itself. The transformed material property tensors may be interpreted as a different set of material properties in a flat, Cartesian space. We describe the calculation of these material properties for coordinate transformations that describe spaces with spherical or cylindrical holes in them. The resulting material properties can then implement invisibility cloaks in flat space. We also describe a method for performing geometric ray tracing in these materials which are both inhomogeneous and anisotropic in their electric permittivity and magnetic permeability. PMID:19529371

  7. "TPSX: Thermal Protection System Expert and Material Property Database"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas H.; Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Thermal Protection Branch at NASA Ames Research Center has developed a computer program for storing, organizing, and accessing information about thermal protection materials. The program, called Thermal Protection Systems Expert and Material Property Database, or TPSX, is available for the Microsoft Windows operating system. An "on-line" version is also accessible on the World Wide Web. TPSX is designed to be a high-quality source for TPS material properties presented in a convenient, easily accessible form for use by engineers and researchers in the field of high-speed vehicle design. Data can be displayed and printed in several formats. An information window displays a brief description of the material with properties at standard pressure and temperature. A spread sheet window displays complete, detailed property information. Properties which are a function of temperature and/or pressure can be displayed as graphs. In any display the data can be converted from English to SI units with the click of a button. Two material databases included with TPSX are: 1) materials used and/or developed by the Thermal Protection Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, and 2) a database compiled by NASA Johnson Space Center 9JSC). The Ames database contains over 60 advanced TPS materials including flexible blankets, rigid ceramic tiles, and ultra-high temperature ceramics. The JSC database contains over 130 insulative and structural materials. The Ames database is periodically updated and expanded as required to include newly developed materials and material property refinements.

  8. Materials processing using a variable frequency microwave furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Maddox, S.R.; Everleigh, C.A.; Espinosa, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.

    1993-12-31

    We describe a materials processing system that uses a high power traveling wave tube (TWT) as the microwave source. The TWT provides approximately one octave bandwidth and variable power levels up to 2 kW into a multimode cavity. By controlling the frequency, efficient coupling to the load can be maintained even as the load`s dielectric properties change. Alternatively, can be used as a means of mode stirring at rates far beyond those attainable through mechanical stirring. The system has been tested for sintering alumina ceramics, annealing a tungsten penetrator alloy, curing epoxy resin, and depositing diamond films from a microwave plasma.

  9. Materials processing threshold report. 1: Semiconductor crystals for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, E. V.; Thompson, T. R.; Nagler, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive search was performed of the open literature pertaining to infrared detectors to determine what constitutes a good detector and in what way performance is limited by specific material properties. Interviews were conducted with a number of experts in the field to assess their perceptions of the state of the art and of the utility of zero-gravity processing. Based on this information base and on a review of NASA programs in crystal growth and infrared sensors, NASA program goals were reassessed and suggestions are presented as to possible joint and divergent efforts between NASA and DOD.

  10. Hygrothermal Simulation of Foundations: Part 1 - Soil Material Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kehrer, Manfred; Pallin, Simon B

    2012-10-01

    The hygrothermal performance of soils coupled to buildings is a complicated process. A computational approach for heat transfer through the ground has been well defined (EN ISO 13370:2007, 2007), and simplified methods have been developed (Staszczuk, Radon, and Holm 2010). However, these approaches generally ignore the transfer of soil moisture, which is not negligible (Janssen, Carmeliet, and Hens 2004). This study is divided into several parts. The intention of the first part is to gather, comprehend and adapt soil properties from Soil Science. The obtained information must be applicable to related tasks in Building Science and validated with hygrothermal calculation tools. Future parts of this study will focus on the validation aspect of the soil properties to be implemented. Basic changes in the software code may be requested at this time. Different types of basement construction will be created with a hygrothermal calculation tool, WUFI. Simulations from WUFI will be compared with existing or ongoing measurements. The intentions of the first part of this study have been fulfilled. The soil properties of interest in Building Science have been defined for 12 different soil textures. These properties will serve as input parameters when performing hygrothermal calculations of building constructions coupled to soil materials. The reliability of the soil parameters will be further evaluated with measurements in Part 2.

  11. Piezoelectric properties of rhombohedral ferroelectric materials with phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaofang; Soh, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution of domain structure and its piezoelectric behavior of ferroelectric material BaTiO3 during the transition process from rhombohedral to tetragonal phase under an applied electric field have been studied by employing Landau-Ginzburg theory and the phase-field method. The results obtained show that, during the transformation process, the intermediate phase was monoclinic MA phase, and several peak values of piezoelectric coefficient appeared at the stage where obvious change of domain pattern occurred. In addition, by comparing the cases of applied electric field with different frequencies, it was found that the maximum piezoelectric coefficient obtained decreased with increasing frequency value. These results are of great significance in tuning the properties of engineering domains in ferroelectrics, and could provide more fundamentals to the design of ferroelectric devices.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of actin networks influence material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Weirich, Kimberly; Gardel, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Directed flows of cytoplasmic material are important in a variety of biological processes including assembly of a mitotic spindle, retraction of the cell rear during migration, and asymmetric cell division. Networks of cytoskeletal polymers and molecular motors are known to be involved in these events, but how the network mechanical properties are tuned to perform such functions is not understood. Here, we construct networks of either semiflexible actin filaments or rigid bundles with varying connectivity. We find that solutions of rigid rods, where unimpeded sliding of filaments may enhance transport in comparison to unmoving tracks, are the fastest at transporting network components. Entangled solutions of semiflexible actin filaments also transport material, but the entanglements provide resistance. Increasing the elasticity of the actin networks with crosslinking proteins slows network deformation further. However, the length scale of correlated transport in these networks is increased. Our results reveal how the rigidity and connectivity of biopolymers allows material transport to occur over time and length scales required for physiological processes. This work was supported by the U. Chicago MRSEC

  13. Unraveling the Material Processing Conditions for Optimizing FSW Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This environmentally friendly, solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path and velocity is required. In this study the metal flow fields are marked by the use of thin (0.001? tungsten) wires embedded in the weld seam at various locations. X-ray radiographs record the position and segmentation of the wire and are used to elucidate the flow field. Microstructures observed in a FSW cross-section in an aluminum alloy are related to their respective strain-strain rate-temperature histories along their respective flow trajectories. Two kinds of trajectories, each subjecting the weld metal to a distinct thermomechanical process and imparting a distinct microstructure, can be differentiated within the weld structure.

  14. Quantifying the Material Processing Conditions for an Optimized FSW Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edgs of the seam together. This environmentally friendly, solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path and velocity is required. In this study the metal flow fields are marked by the use of thin (0.001 in. tungsten) wires embedded in the weld seam at various locations. X-ray radiographs record the position and segmentation of the wire and are used to elucidate the flow field. Microstructures observed in a FSW cross-section in an aluminum alloy are related to their respective strain-strain rate-temperature histones along their respective flow trajectories. Two kinds of trajectories, each subjecting the weld metal to a distinct thermomechanical process and imparting a distinct microstructure, can be differentiated within the weld structure.

  15. Supercritical fluid processing: opportunities for new resist materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher-Wetmore, Paula M.; Ober, Christopher K.; Gabor, Allen H.; Allen, Robert D.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past two decades supercritical fluids have been utilized as solvents for carrying out separations of materials as diverse as foods, polymers, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, natural products, and explosives. More recently they have been used for non-extractive applications such as recrystallization, deposition, impregnation, surface modification, and as a solvent alternative for precision parts cleaning. Today, supercritical fluid extraction is being practiced in the foods and beverage industries; there are commercial plants for decaffeinating coffee and tea, extracting beer flavoring agents from hops, and separating oils and oleoresins from spices. Interest in supercritical fluid processing of polymers has grown over the last ten years, and many new purification, fractionation, and even polymerization techniques have emerged. One of the most significant motivations for applying this technology to polymers has been increased performance demands. More recently, with increasing scrutiny of traditional solvents, supercritical fluids, and in particular carbon dioxide, are receiving widespread attention as 'environmentally conscious' solvents. This paper describes several examples of polymers applications, including a few involving photoresists, which demonstrate that as next- generation advanced polymer systems emerge, supercritical fluids are certain to offer advantages as cutting edge processing tools.

  16. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  17. Numerical modeling of materials processes with fluid-fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanke, Jeffrey Michael

    A numerical model has been developed to study material processes that depend on the interaction between fluids with a large discontinuity in thermophysical properties. A base model capable of solving equations of mass, momentum, energy conservation, and solidification has been altered to enable tracking of the interface between two immiscible fluids and correctly predict the interface deformation using a volume of fluid (VOF) method. Two materials processes investigated using this technique are Electroslag Remelting (ESR) and plasma spray deposition. ESR is a secondary melting technique that passes an AC current through an electrically resistive slag to provide the heat necessary to melt the alloy. The simulation tracks the interface between the slag and metal. The model was validated against industrial scale ESR ingots and was able to predict trends in melt rate, sump depth, macrosegregation, and liquid sump depth. In order to better understand the underlying physics of the process, several constant current ESR runs simulated the effects of freezing slag in the model. Including the solidifying slag in the imulations was found to have an effect on the melt rate and sump shape but there is too much uncertainty in ESR slag property data at this time for quantitative predictions. The second process investigated in this work is the deposition of ceramic coatings via plasma spray deposition. In plasma spray deposition, powderized coating material is injected into a plasma that melts and carries the powder towards the substrate were it impacts, flattening out and freezing. The impacting droplets pile up to form a porous coating. The model is used to simulate this rain of liquid ceramic particles impacting the substrate and forming a coating. Trends in local solidification time and porosity are calculated for various particle sizes and velocities. The predictions of decreasing porosity with increasing particle velocity matches previous experimental results. Also, a

  18. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  19. Concepts and techniques for ultrasonic evaluation of material mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1980-01-01

    The ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques discussed in the present paper indicate potentials for material characterization and property prediction. Stress wave interaction and material transfer function concepts are examined as a basis for explaining correlations between material mechanical behavior and ultrasonically measured quantities. It is observed that the effect and criticality of any discrete flaw, such as crack, inclusion, or any other stress raiser, is definable only in terms of its material microstructural environment. This underscores the importance of ultrasonic techniques capable of characterizing the stress wave energy transfer properties of a material.

  20. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrystalline silicon solar cells are summarized. Very small grain or short minority-carrier diffusion length silicon was used. Hydrogenated solar cells fabricated from this material appear to have effective minority-carrier diffusion lengths that are still not very long, as shown by the open-circuit voltages of passivated cells that are still significantly less than those of single-crystal solar cells. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. However, the open-circuit voltage, which is sensitive to grain boundary recombination, is sometimes 20 to 40 mV less. The goal was to minimize variations in open-circuit voltage and fill-factor caused by defects by passivating these defects using a hydrogenation process. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystaline silicon solar cells.

  1. Integration of advanced nuclear materials separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Berg, J.M.; Neu, M.P.; Reilly, S.D.; Buelow, S.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has examined the fundamental chemistry of plutonium that affects the integration of hydrothermal technology into nuclear materials processing operations. Chemical reactions in high temperature water allow new avenues for waste treatment and radionuclide separation.Successful implementation of hydrothermal technology offers the potential to effective treat many types of radioactive waste, reduce the storage hazards and disposal costs, and minimize the generation of secondary waste streams. The focus has been on the chemistry of plutonium(VI) in solution with carbonate since these are expected to be important species in the effluent from hydrothermal oxidation of Pu-containing organic wastes. The authors investigated the structure, solubility, and stability of the key plutonium complexes. Installation and testing of flow and batch hydrothermal reactors in the Plutonium Facility was accomplished. Preliminary testing with Pu-contaminated organic solutions gave effluent solutions that readily met discard requirements. A new effort in FY 1998 will build on these promising initial results.

  2. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 {mu}m) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm{sup 2}) of these short-pulsed ({le} 1 {mu}s) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10{sup 10} K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology.

  3. 46 CFR 164.013-3 - Material properties and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal Pattern) § 164.013-3 Material properties and workmanship. (a) General. The unicellular.... Unicellular polyethylene foam must comply with the requirements of UL 1191, sections 24, 25, and 26 and...

  4. 46 CFR 164.013-3 - Material properties and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal Pattern) § 164.013-3 Material properties and workmanship. (a) General. The unicellular.... Unicellular polyethylene foam must comply with the requirements of UL 1191, sections 24, 25, and 26 and...

  5. 46 CFR 164.013-3 - Material properties and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal Pattern) § 164.013-3 Material properties and workmanship. (a) General. The unicellular.... Unicellular polyethylene foam must comply with the requirements of UL 1191, sections 24, 25, and 26 and...

  6. 46 CFR 164.013-3 - Material properties and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal Pattern) § 164.013-3 Material properties and workmanship. (a) General. The unicellular.... Unicellular polyethylene foam must comply with the requirements of UL 1191, sections 24, 25, and 26 and...

  7. 46 CFR 164.013-3 - Material properties and workmanship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Foam, Unicellular Polyethylene (Buoyant, Slab, Slitted Trigonal Pattern) § 164.013-3 Material properties and workmanship. (a) General. The unicellular.... Unicellular polyethylene foam must comply with the requirements of UL 1191, sections 24, 25, and 26 and...

  8. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  9. The space technology demand on materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauphin, J.

    1983-01-01

    Space technology requires a rational and accurate policy of materials and processes selection. This paper examines some areas of space technology where materials and process problems have occurred in the past and how they can be solved in the future.

  10. Viking landing sites, remote-sensing observations, and physical properties of Martian surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the relations between the physical properties of the surface materials at Viking landing sites, the physical properties of other Martian surfaces inferred from radar observations from earth and thermal observations from orbit, and the geological processes that formed the materials and shaped the surfaces. The radar and thermal remote-sensing signatures of the landing site surface materials are estimated and compared with the thermal and radar measurements for the entire planet. It is shown that the surface materials at the landing sites are good analogs for the materials in most of the Martian equatorial regions.

  11. Viking landing sites, remote-sensing observations, and physical properties of Martian surface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, H. J.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1989-09-01

    Consideration is given to the relations between the physical properties of the surface materials at Viking landing sites, the physical properties of other Martian surfaces inferred from radar observations from earth and thermal observations from orbit, and the geological processes that formed the materials and shaped the surfaces. The radar and thermal remote-sensing signatures of the landing site surface materials are estimated and compared with the thermal and radar measurements for the entire planet. It is shown that the surface materials at the landing sites are good analogs for the materials in most of the Martian equatorial regions.

  12. Development of Processing Techniques for Advanced Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna; Cox, Michael; Srinivasan, Vijayakumar

    1997-01-01

    Thermal Protection Materials Branch (TPMB) has been involved in various research programs to improve the properties and structural integrity of the existing aerospace high temperature materials. Specimens from various research programs were brought into the analytical laboratory for the purpose of obtaining and refining the material characterization. The analytical laboratory in TPMB has many different instruments which were utilized to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of materials. Some of the instruments that were utilized by the SJSU students are: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray Diffraction Spectrometer (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultra Violet Spectroscopy/Visible Spectroscopy (UV/VIS), Particle Size Analyzer (PSA), and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). The above mentioned analytical instruments were utilized in the material characterization process of the specimens from research programs such as: aerogel ceramics (I) and (II), X-33 Blankets, ARC-Jet specimens, QUICFIX specimens and gas permeability of lightweight ceramic ablators. In addition to analytical instruments in the analytical laboratory at TPMB, there are several on-going experiments. One particular experiment allows the measurement of permeability of ceramic ablators. From these measurements, physical characteristics of the ceramic ablators can be derived.

  13. Fish gelatin: Material properties and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main difference between fish gelatin and mammalian gelatin is fish gelatin’s lower gelation temperature. This property limits the use of fish gelatin in applications that currently utilize mammalian gelatin. However, fish gelatin remains an attractive alterative to mammalian gelatin due to relig...

  14. Effects of tritium on material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The effecs of tritium on deformation and fracture of metals are reviewed with emphasis on similarities and differences between tritium and the other hydrogen isotopes. Helium generated by radioactive decay of tritium introduces time dependent property changes not observed with protium or deuterium. On-going studies and topics for further investigations are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

    1995-05-02

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

  16. Pulsed RF Plasma Source for Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiruddin, Abutaher Mohammad

    A pulsed rf plasma source was evaluated for materials processing. A pulsed rf discharge of carbon tetrafluoride (CF_4), sulfur hexafluoride (SF _6), oxygen (O_2), or acetylene (C_2H_2 ) created the plasmas. The frequency and duration of the rf discharge were about 290 kHz and 30 musec, respectively. The repetition rate was 1 discharge per minute. Plasma diagnostics included Langmuir probes, a photodiode dectector, an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA), and a microwave interferometer. Langmuir probe measurements showed that at a position 67 cm away from the rf coil, CF_4 plasma arrived in separate packets. Plasma densities and electron temperatures at this position were in the range 4 times 10^{11} cm ^{-3} to 1.8 times 10^{13} cm ^{-3} and 2 eV to 8.3 eV, respectively. The OMA measurements identified neutral atomic fluorine in the CF_4 plasma and neutral atomic oxygen in the O_2 plasma. A plasma slab model of the microwave interferometer was applied to predict the interferometer response. The measured response was found to be almost identical to the predicted response. The influence of different reactor parameters on plasma parameters was studied. Metal barriers of different geometry were used to control the ratio of charged particles to atomic neutrals in the plasma chamber. Four plasma structures were identified: precursor plasma, shock induced plasma, driver plasma, and delayed glow plasma. Pulsed CF _4 and SF_6 plasmas were used to etch silicon dioxide (SiO_2 ) grown on silicon wafers. The SF_6 plasma etched SiO_2 at a rate of about 0.71 A per discharge and the CF_4 plasma deposited a non-uniform film (possibly polymer) instead of etching. The C_2H _2 plasma deposited plasma polymerized acetylene on a KBr pellet with a deposition rate of 127 A per discharge. An FT-IR spectrum of the deposited film showed that carbon -to-carbon double bonds as well as carbon-to-hydrogen bonds were present. This device can be used in plasma assisted deposition and/or synthesis

  17. Reactor Materials Program -- weldment component toughness of SRS PWS piping materials. [Process Water System

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    The mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel materials from the reactor systems in the unirradiated (baseline) and the irradiated conditions have been developed previously for structural and fracture analyses of the pressure boundary of the SRS reactor Process Water System (PWS) components. Individual mechanical specimen test results were compiled into three separate weldment components or regions, namely, the base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ), for two orientations (L-C and C-L) with respect to the pipe axis of the source materials and for two test temperatures of 25 and 125[degrees]C. Twelve separate categories were thus defined to assess the effect of test conditions on the mechanical properties and to facilitate selection of properties for structural and fracture analyses. The testing results show high fracture toughness of the materials and support the demonstration of PWS pressure boundary structural integrity under all conditions of reactor operation. The fracture toughness of a fourth weldment component, namely, the weld fusion line region, has been measured to evaluate the potential for a region of low toughness in the interface between the Type 308 stainless steel weld metal and the Type 304 stainless steel pipe. The testing details and results of the weld fusion line toughness are contained in this report.

  18. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided. PMID:27376498

  19. Early differential processing of material images: Evidence from ERP classification.

    PubMed

    Wiebel, Christiane B; Valsecchi, Matteo; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the temporal dynamics of natural image processing using event-related potentials (ERPs) has a long tradition in object recognition research. In a classical Go-NoGo task two characteristic effects have been emphasized: an early task independent category effect and a later task-dependent target effect. Here, we set out to use this well-established Go-NoGo paradigm to study the time course of material categorization. Material perception has gained more and more interest over the years as its importance in natural viewing conditions has been ignored for a long time. In addition to analyzing standard ERPs, we conducted a single trial ERP pattern analysis. To validate this procedure, we also measured ERPs in two object categories (people and animals). Our linear classification procedure was able to largely capture the overall pattern of results from the canonical analysis of the ERPs and even extend it. We replicate the known target effect (differential Go-NoGo potential at frontal sites) for the material images. Furthermore, we observe task-independent differential activity between the two material categories as early as 140 ms after stimulus onset. Using our linear classification approach, we show that material categories can be differentiated consistently based on the ERP pattern in single trials around 100 ms after stimulus onset, independent of the target-related status. This strengthens the idea of early differential visual processing of material categories independent of the task, probably due to differences in low-level image properties and suggests pattern classification of ERP topographies as a strong instrument for investigating electrophysiological brain activity. PMID:24961247

  20. Concurrent materials and process selection in conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, S.D.

    1998-07-01

    The sequential manner in which materials and processes for a manufactured product are selected is inherently less than optimal. Designers` tendency to choose processes and materials with which they are familiar exacerbate this problem. A method for concurrent selection of materials and a joining process based on product requirements using a knowledge-based, constraint satisfaction approach is presented.

  1. Tribology: Properties of materials. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tribological properties of composite materials, plastics, metals, and ceramics. Test apparatus and design techniques for evaluating the effects of temperature, load, sliding speed, surface contact, lubricants, and additives on tribological behavior of materials are discussed. Tribological assessment of materials and wear processes on tribologically loaded material surfaces are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Design of materials configurations for enhanced phononic and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraio, Chiara

    The discovery of novel nonlinear dynamic and electronic phenomena is presented for the specific cases of granular materials and carbon nanotubes. This research was conducted for designing and constructing optimized macro-, micro- and nano-scale structural configurations of materials, and for studying their phononic and electronic behavior. Variation of composite arrangements of granular elements with different elastic properties in a linear chain-of-sphere, Y-junction or 3-D configurations led to a variety of novel phononic phenomena and interesting physical properties, which can be potentially useful for security, communications, mechanical and biomedical engineering applications. Mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes with different atomic arrangements and microstructures were also investigated. Electronic properties of Y-junction configured carbon nanotubes exhibit an exciting transistor switch behavior which is not seen in linear configuration nanotubes. Strongly nonlinear materials were designed and fabricated using novel and innovative concepts. Due to their unique strongly nonlinear and anisotropic nature, novel wave phenomena have been discovered. Specifically, violations of Snell's law were detected and a new mechanism of wave interaction with interfaces between NTPCs (Nonlinear Tunable Phononic Crystals) was established. Polymer-based systems were tested for the first time, and the tunability of the solitary waves speed was demonstrated. New materials with transformed signal propagation speed in the manageable range of 10-100 m/s and signal amplitude typical for audible speech have been developed. The enhancing of the mitigation of solitary and shock waves in 1-D chains were demonstrated and a new protective medium was designed for practical applications. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D strongly nonlinear system have been investigated providing a broad impact on the whole area of strongly nonlinear wave dynamics and creating experimental basis for new

  3. The effects of material property assumptions on predicted meltpool shape for laser powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chong; Ashby, Kathryn; Phan, Nam; Pal, Deepankar; Stucker, Brent

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to provide guidance on material specifications for powders used in laser powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing (AM) processes. The methodology was to investigate how different material property assumptions in a simulation affect meltpool prediction and by corrolary how different material properties affect meltpool formation in AM processes. The sensitvity of meltpool variations to each material property can be used as a guide to help drive future research and to help prioritize material specifications in requirements documents. By identifying which material properties have the greatest affect on outcomes, metrology can be tailored to focus on those properties which matter most; thus reducing costs by eliminating unnecessary testing and property charaterizations. Futhermore, this sensitivity study provides insight into which properties require more accurate measurements, thus motivating development of new metrology methods to measure those properties accurately.

  4. Advanced materials for geothermal energy processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1985-08-01

    The primary goal of the geothermal materials program is to ensure that the private sector development of geothermal energy resources is not constrained by the availability of technologically and economically viable materials of construction. This requires the performance of long-term high risk GHTD-sponsored materials R and D. Ongoing programs described include high temperature elastomers for dynamic sealing applications, advanced materials for lost circulation control, waste utilization and disposal, corrosion resistant elastomeric liners for well casing, and non-metallic heat exchangers. 9 refs.

  5. An application of neural networks to process and materials control

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whiteson, R.

    1991-01-01

    Process control consists of two basic elements: a model of the process and knowledge of the desired control algorithm. In some cases the level of the control algorithm is merely supervisory, as in an alarm-reporting or anomaly-detection system. If the model of the process is known, then a set of equations may often be solved explicitly to provide the control algorithm. Otherwise, the model has to be discovered through empirical studies. Neural networks have properties that make them useful in this application. They can learn (make internal models from experience or observations). The problem of anomaly detection in materials control systems fits well into this general control framework. To successfully model a process with a neutral network, a good set of observables must be chosen. These observables must in some sense adequately span the space of representable events, so that a signature metric can be built for normal operation. In this way, a non-normal event, one that does not fit within the signature, can be detected. In this paper, we discuss the issues involved in applying a neural network model to anomaly detection in materials control systems. These issues include data selection and representation, network architecture, prediction of events, the use of simulated data, and software tools. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Elucidating the role of interfacial materials properties in microfluidic packages.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thayne L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to discover a method to investigate the properties of interfaces as described by a numerical physical model. The model used was adopted from literature and applied to a commercially available multiphysics software package. By doing this the internal properties of simple structures could be elucidated and then readily applied to more complex structures such as valves and pumps in laminate microfluidic structures. A numerical finite element multi-scale model of a cohesive interface comprised of heterogeneous material properties was used to elucidate irreversible damage from applied strain energy. An unknown internal state variable was applied to characterize the damage process. Using a constrained blister test, this unknown internal state variable could be determined for an adherend/adhesive/adherend body. This is particularly interesting for laminate systems with microfluidic and microstructures contained within the body. A laminate structure was designed and fabricated that could accommodate a variety of binary systems joined using nearly any technique such as adhesive, welding (solvent, laser, ultrasonic, RF, etc.), or thermal. The adhesive method was the most successful and easy to implement but also one of the more difficult to understand, especially over long periods of time. Welding methods are meant to achieve a bond that is similar to bulk properties and so are easier to predict. However, methods of welding often produce defects in the bonds.. Examples of the test structures used to elucidate the internal properties of the model were shown and demonstrated. The real life examples used this research to improve upon current designs and aided in creating complex structures for sensor and other applications.

  7. Data base for crack growth properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Lawrence, Victor B.; Nguy, Henry L.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized data base of crack growth properties of materials was developed for use in fracture control analysis of rocket engine components and other NASA space hardware. The software system has files of basic crack growth rate data, other fracture mechanics material properties such as fracture toughness and environmental crack growth threshold values, and plotting and fitting routines for deriving material properties for use in fracture control analysis. An extensive amount of data was collected and entered, and work is continuing on compiling additional data. The data base and software codes are useful both for fracture control analysis and for evaluation or development of improved crack growth theories.

  8. Properties of materials using acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    Our goal of characterizing materials using acoustic waves was forwarded through a number of projects: (1) We have derived a theory, and tested it on tissues, for predicting the composition of composite materials using mixture rules, such as the one we derived for the nonlinear parameter two years ago; (2) We have published one article and another is in review on our use of modulated acoustic radiation pressure on levitated drops to characterize interfaces with and without surfactants. We have begun to study in a systematic way the nonlinear dynamics of drops, including drop fission: (3) we have improved apparatus for 30 MHz ultrasonic scattering from microparticles (approx. micron size), which should allow us to discriminate between different microparticles in a liquid; (4) We have begun to study the nonlinear mechanics of hydrodynamic solitons in cylindrical (2-d) geometry; and (5) We have been studying the use of acoustic levitation for transducer calibration.

  9. Properties of cathode materials in alkaline cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkind, A. J.; McBreen, J.; Freeman, R.; Parkhurst, W. A.

    1984-04-01

    Conventional and new cathode materials in primary and secondary alkaline cells were investigated for stability, structure, electrochemical reversibility and efficiency. Included were various forms of AgO for reserve type silver zinc batteries, a new material - AgNiO2 and several nickel electrodes for nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells for aerospace applications. A comparative study was made of the stability of electroformed and chemically prepared AgO. Stability was correlated with impurities. After the first discharge AgNiO2 can be recharged to the monovalent level. The discharge product is predominantly silver. Plastic bonded nickel electrodes display a second plateau on discharge. Additions of Co(OH)2 largely eliminate this.

  10. Mapping the fracture properties of engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Mike

    2013-09-01

    Among Alan Cottrell's many extraordinary talents was that of an inspirational teacher. He had a masterful ability to explain the underlying physics of the Science of Materials and at the same time to simplify and to present the big picture. His teaching-texts live on, still among the clearest and most insightful expositions of the subject. This paper surveys part of one of the fields to which he contributed so much - Fracture - with education and the big picture in mind.

  11. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Whitley, Von H.; Brown, Kathryn E.; Ahmed, Towfiq; Sorensen, Christian J.; Moore, David S.

    2016-04-01

    Reliable detection of energetic materials is still a formidable challenge which requires further investigation. The remote standoff detection of explosives using molecular fingerprints in the terahertz spectral range has been an evolving research area for the past two decades. Despite many efforts, identification of a particular explosive remains difficult as the spectral fingerprints often shift due to the working conditions of the sample such as temperature, crystal orientation, presence of binders, etc. In this work, we investigate the vibrational spectrum of energetic materials including RDX, PETN, AN, and 1,3-DNB diluted in a low loss PTFE host medium using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at cryogenic temperatures. The measured absorptions of these materials show spectral shifts of their characteristic peaks while changing their operating temperature from 300 to 7.5 K. We have developed a theoretical model based on first principles methods, which is able to predict most of the measured modes in 1, 3-DNB between 0.3 to 2.50 THz. These findings may further improve the security screening of explosives.

  12. Optical techniques for determining dynamic material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Miniature plates are laser-launched with a 10-Joule Nd:YAG for one-dimensional (1-D) impacts on to target materials much like gas gun experiments and explosive plane wave plate launch. By making the experiments small, flyer plates (3 mm diameter x 50 micron thick) and targets (10 mm diameter x 200 micron thick), 1-D impact experiments can be performed in a standard laser-optical laboratory with minimum confinement and collateral damage. The laser-launched plates do not require the traditional sabot on gas guns nor the explosives needed for explosive planewave lenses, and as a result are much more amenable to a wide variety of materials and applications. Because of the small size very high pressure gradients can be generated with relative ease. The high pressure gradients result in very high strains and strain rates that are not easily generated by other experimental methods. The small size and short shock duration (1 - 20 ns) are ideal for dynamically measuring bond strengths of micron-thick coatings. Experimental techniques, equipment, and dynamic material results are reported.

  13. Thermo-Mechanical Processing and Properties of a Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, R.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-07-14

    Thermo-mechanical processing of ductile irons is a potential method for enhancing their mechanical properties. A ductile cast iron containing 3.6% C, 2.6% Si and 0.045% Mg was continuously hot-and-warm rolled or one-step press-forged from a temperature in the austenite range (900{degrees}C-1100{degrees}C) to a temperature below the A, temperature. Various amounts of reduction were used (from 60% to more than 90%) followed by a short heat ent at 600`C. The heat ent lead to a structure of fine graphite in a matrix of ferrite and carbides. The hot-and- warm worked materials developed a pearlitic microstructure while the press-forged material developed a spheroidite-like carbide microstructure in the matrix. Cementite-denuded ferrite zones were developed around graphite stringers in the hot-and-warm worked materials, but such zones were absent in the press-forged material. Tensile properties including tensile strength and total elongation were measured along the direction parallel and transverse to the rolling direction and along the direction transverse to the press-forging direction. The tensile ductility and strength both increased with a decrease in the amount of hot-and-warm working. The press- forged materials showed higher strength (645 MPa) than the hot-and-warrn worked materials (575 MPa) when compared at the same ductility level (22% elongation).

  14. Hydrogenation process for solid carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Wilcox, Wayne A.

    1979-01-01

    Coal or other solid carbonaceous material is contacted with an organic solvent containing both hydrogen and a transition metal catalyst in solution to hydrogenate unsaturated bonds within the carbonaceous material. This benefaction step permits subsequent pyrolysis or hydrogenolysis of the carbonaceous fuel to form gaseous and liquid hydrocarbon products of increased yield and quality.

  15. Investigation of Aging Processes of Ti-6Al-4 V Powder Material in Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyda, V.; Kaufmann, N.; Emmelmann, C.

    Laser melting of titanium material, e.g. Ti-6Al-4 V, offers great potential in manufacturing automotive components, lightweight structures and medical implants. In order to achieve required mechanical properties of laser melted components quality of powder materials is essential. Unmelted powder is recycled and reused in a subsequent process. Due to repeated recycling it is suggested that powder material changes. In this paper aging processes of Ti-6Al-4 V powder are studied. It was observed that powder particles coarsen and flowability increases. Comparing examined powder characteristics to bulk material properties it was noticed that there are significant effects of aged powder on laser melted components.

  16. Methods of Measurement for Semiconductor Materials, Process Control, and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reported. Significant accomplishments include: (1) Completion of an initial identification of the more important problems in process control for integrated circuit fabrication and assembly; (2) preparations for making silicon bulk resistivity wafer standards available to the industry; and (3) establishment of the relationship between carrier mobility and impurity density in silicon. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; characterization of generation-recombination-trapping centers, including gold, in silicon; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; study of scanning electron microscopy for wafer inspection and test; measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices; determination of S-parameters and delay time in junction devices; and characterization of noise and conversion loss of microwave detector diodes.

  17. Vanadium oxide based materials: Synthesis, characterization and gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayesh, Samar I.

    In recent years, the demand for gas sensors based on safety and process control requirements has been expanding. The reason for such demand sterns from environmental and safety concerns since the toxic gases released from automobile exhausts and chemical plants can directly or indirectly pollute our environment and affect our health. Among the chemicals studied, nitrogen oxide (NOx) gases are among the most dangerous air pollutants. Transition metal oxide clusters (or polyoxometalates) provide an exciting opportunity for the design and synthesis of a new generation of materials for efficient NOx sensing. Polyoxometalates are an important and fast emerging class of compounds that exhibit many remarkable properties. Chapter 1 provides introduction and background of chemical sensors. It describes the need for gas sensors and the current status of research in the area of NOx gas sensors in particular. A description of polyoxmetalates and their relevance as potential novel gas sensor materials is also given. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis and characterization by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, manganometric titration, bond valence sum calculation, temperature dependent magnetic properties studies, electron paramagnetic resonance, and complete single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of newly prepared vanadium oxide based-systems that have been discovered during the course of this work. First, the system containing arrays of decavanadates networked by extensive hydrogen bonding with cyclic nitrogen bases are described. This is followed by the mixed-valence vanadium oxide cluster, [VV 13VIV3O42(Cl)]-7, containing a hitherto unknown vanadium oxide framework structure. Finally the synthesis of 3D-framework materials is described. These compounds have highly symmetrical closely related three-dimensional framework structures consisting vanadium oxide shells {V18O42(XO4)} linked via heterometallic atoms {M' = Cd, Zn} into three

  18. Program to investigate advanced laser processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinan, E. M.; Snow, D. B.; Brown, C. O.

    1981-01-01

    This program included two major areas of research. In the processing area, a LAYERGLAZE (trade name) apparatus using a powder feed was developed and used to produce a 13.2 cm diameter by 3 cm thick cylindrical blank which was used as a preform for a scale model gas turbine disk. In addition to demonstrating that the process was capable of fabricating model size parts, mechanical testing and microstructural analysis of LAYERGLAZED material indicated that LAYERGLAZED parts exhibit good structural integrity and that the process produces no sizable or serious fabrication flaws provided that the alloy has adequate 'weldability' at high cooling rates. In a second major area, design of a LAYERGLAZE-processable superalloy was undertaken. With the system Ni-Al-Mo - X, numerous processable compositions were found, however, these compositions were characterized by embrittling phase transformations in the 600-800 deg temperature range. The research efforts in the alloy design area aimed at understanding and controlling this instability produced several alloys in the Ni-Al-Mo + X family which appeared to demonstrate the necessary characteristics of processability and phase stability. The mechanical properties of these alloys are being evaluated under an additional program. In addition to alloys from the above system, a number of additional alloys with high strength potentials have been developed based on other systems.

  19. Nanomedicine crystals-inspired optoelectronic device materials and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yan; Wang, Fangzhang; Wu, Rong

    2012-02-01

    Aim: Organic, biological materials and soft matters with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are postulated to be novel optoelectronic device materials. Methods: Molecular self-assemblies of nanomedicine crystals are employed by inelastic electron tunneling interaction force, which is a quantum force to make basic units of organic, biological and soft matter with optoelectronic donors and acceptors to be enlarged from nanometers to micrometers on silicon chips. Results: Self-assembled topographic structures and corresponding conducting with kondo effects and photoluminescence properties of self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks are demonstrated by conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) images and current-voltage curves, and laser micro- photoluminescence (PL) spectra. By contrast to top-down processing, the bottom-up processing of molecular self-assembly is low cost on large scale industrial manufacturing. Conclusion: The self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are candidates of novel optoelectronic device materials to be in the emerging discipline of information technology (IT) in its broadest sense, i.e. bioelectronics & biosensors, optoelectronic devices, data storage devices; simple to complex quantum entanglements and superposition for quantum bits computing, a novel strategy for 2020 IT and beyond.

  20. Nanomedicine crystals-inspired optoelectronic device materials and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yan; Wang, Fangzhang; Wu, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Aim: Organic, biological materials and soft matters with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are postulated to be novel optoelectronic device materials. Methods: Molecular self-assemblies of nanomedicine crystals are employed by inelastic electron tunneling interaction force, which is a quantum force to make basic units of organic, biological and soft matter with optoelectronic donors and acceptors to be enlarged from nanometers to micrometers on silicon chips. Results: Self-assembled topographic structures and corresponding conducting with kondo effects and photoluminescence properties of self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks are demonstrated by conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) images and current-voltage curves, and laser micro- photoluminescence (PL) spectra. By contrast to top-down processing, the bottom-up processing of molecular self-assembly is low cost on large scale industrial manufacturing. Conclusion: The self-assembled nanomedicine crystal building blocks with optoelectronic donors and acceptors are candidates of novel optoelectronic device materials to be in the emerging discipline of information technology (IT) in its broadest sense, i.e. bioelectronics & biosensors, optoelectronic devices, data storage devices; simple to complex quantum entanglements and superposition for quantum bits computing, a novel strategy for 2020 IT and beyond.

  1. Interfacial Properties and Design of Functional Energy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolai, Adrien; Meunier, V.

    2014-01-01

    The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality, such as efficient energy conversion/storage/transmission, over multiple length scales. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately non-covalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, e.g., lithographic approach. However, while function (e.g., charge mobility) in simple systems such as single crystals can often be predicted, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale (long-range) order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various substrates. Typically molecular self-assembly involves poorly understood non-covalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions compounded by local and/or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice (symmetry and/or topological features) and electronic structure. Thus, progress towards unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. In this mode, theory and simulation can greatly accelerate the

  2. Particulate Processing and Properties of High Performance Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver. E.; Tang, W.; McCallum, R.W.

    2004-07-01

    High-performance permanent magnets (HPPM) are based on several intermetallic compounds of rare earth and transition metals, along with metalloid additions. This review will focus on magnetic materials based on Sm-Co (SmCo{sub 5} and Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17}) and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B intermetallics, the most well-known and well-commercialized representatives. These useful compounds generally have extremely high crystallographic anisotropy and are brittle, not generally acceptable properties for most metallurgical applications. However, their outstanding intrinsic magnetic properties and well-tailored microstructures were developed from extensive work on alloy design and advanced materials processing methods and prospects for their continued commercial development are strong. This review first gives a brief introduction to the basics of ferromagnetism to provide an understanding for the design foundations of HPPM materials. Next, the complex relationships between processing methods, resulting microstructures, and magnetic property responses will be examined for the two families of compounds cited. Brief descriptions of recent research activity in this field will also be presented.

  3. Material Property Correlations: Comparisons between FRAPCON-3.4, FRAPTRAN 1.4, and MATPRO

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.

    2010-08-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) uses the computer codes FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN to model steady state and transient fuel behavior, respectively, in regulatory analysis. In order to effectively model fuel behavior, material property correlations must be used for a wide range of operating conditions (e.g. temperature and burnup). In this sense, a 'material property' is a physical characteristic of the material whose quantitative value is necessary in the analysis process. Further, the property may be used to compare the benefits of one material versus another. Generally speaking, the material properties of interest in regulatory analysis of nuclear fuel behavior are mechanical or thermodynamic in nature. The issue of what is and is not a 'material property' will never be universally resolved. In this report, properties such as thermal conductivity are included. Other characteristics of the material (e.g. fission gas release) are considered 'models' rather than properties, and are discussed elsewhere. Still others (e.g., neutron absorption cross-section) are simply not required in this specific analysis. The material property correlations for the FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN computer codes were documented in NUREG/CR-6534 and NUREG/CR-6739, respectively. Some of these have been modified or updated since the original code documentation was published. The primary purpose of this report is to consolidate the current material property correlations used in FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN into a single document. Material property correlations for oxide fuels, including uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, are described in Section 2. Throughout this document, the term MOX will be used to describe fuels that are blends of uranium and plutonium oxides, (U,Pu)O2. The properties for uranium dioxide with other additives (e.g., gadolinia) are also discussed. Material property correlations for cladding materials and gases are described in Sections 3 and 4, respectively

  4. Interdisciplinary research concerning the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The nature and properties of ceramic materials as they relate to solid state physics and metallurgy are studied. Special attention was given to the applications of ceramics to NASA programs and national needs.

  5. Study of materials for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Materials were selected for device applications and their commercial use. Experimental arrangements were also made for electrical characterization of single crystals using electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements. The experimental set-up was tested with some standard samples.

  6. Material properties of concentrated pectin networks.

    PubMed

    Zsivanovits, Gabor; MacDougall, Alistair J; Smith, Andrew C; Ring, Stephen G

    2004-05-17

    We have examined the mechanical behaviour of different types of pectin at high concentrations (> 30% w/w), relevant to the behaviour of pectin in the plant cell wall, and as a film-forming agent. Mechanical properties were examined as a function of counterion type (K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)), concentration and extent of hydration. Hydration was controlled in an osmotic stress experiment where pectin films were exposed to concentrated polyethylene glycol [PEG] solutions of known osmotic pressure. We investigated the mechanical behaviour under simple extension. The results show that the swelling and stiffness of the films are strongly dependent on pectin source and ionic environment. At a fixed osmotic stress, both Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) counterions reduce swelling and increase the stiffness of the film. PMID:15113669

  7. Some functional properties of composite material based on scrap tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesuma, Renate; Malers, Laimonis

    2013-09-01

    The utilization of scrap tires still obtains a remarkable importance from the aspect of unloading the environment from non-degradable waste [1]. One of the most prospective ways for scrap tires reuse is a production of composite materials [2] This research must be considered as a continuation of previous investigations [3, 4]. It is devoted to the clarification of some functional properties, which are considered important for the view of practical applications, of the composite material. Some functional properties of the material were investigated, for instance, the compressive stress at different extent of deformation of sample (till 67% of initial thickness) (LVS EN 826) [5] and the resistance to UV radiation (modified method based on LVS EN 14836) [6]. Experiments were realized on the purposefully selected samples. The results were evaluated in the correlation with potential changes of Shore C hardness (Shore scale, ISO 7619-1, ISO 868) [7, 8]. The results showed noticeable resistance of the composite material against the mechanical influence and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The correlation with the composition of the material, activity of binder, definite technological parameters, and the conditions supported during the production, were determined. It was estimated that selected properties and characteristics of the material are strongly dependent from the composition and technological parameters used in production of the composite material, and from the size of rubber crumb. Obtained results show possibility to attain desirable changes in the composite material properties by changing both the composition and technological parameters of examined material.

  8. Novel thermal properties of nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J. A.

    1999-01-13

    A new class of heat transfer fluids, termed nanofluids, has been developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids. Due to the orders-of-magnitude larger thermal conductivities of solids compared to those of liquids such as water, significantly enhanced thermal properties are obtained with nanofluids. For example, an approximately 20% improvement in effective thermal conductivity is observed when 5 vol.% CuO nanoparticles are added to water. Even more importantly, the heat transfer coefficient of water under dynamic flow conditions is increased more than 15% with the addition of less than 1 vol.% CuO particles. The use of nanofluids could impact many industrial sectors, including transportation, energy supply and production, electronics, textiles, and paper production by, for example, decreasing pumping power needs or reducing heat exchanger sizes. In contrast to the enhancement in effective thermal transport rates that is obtained when nanoparticles are suspended in fluids, nanocrystalline coatings are expected to exhibit reduced thermal conductivities compared to coarse-grained coatings. Reduced thermal conductivities are predicted to arise because of a reduction in the mean free path of phonons due to presence of grain boundaries. This behavior, combined with improved mechanical properties, makes nanostructured zirconia coatings excellent candidates for future applications as thermal barriers. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films are being produced by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition techniques. Preliminary results have indicated that the thermal conductivity is reduced by approximately a factor-of-two at room temperature in 10 nm grain-sized YSZ compared to coarse-grained or single crystal YSZ.

  9. Solution-processing of chalcogenide materials for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yunlai

    Chalcogenide glasses are well-known for their desirable optical properties, which have enabled many infrared applications in the fields of photonics, medicine, environmental sensing and security. Conventional deposition methods such as thermal evaporation, chemical vapor deposition, sputtering or pulse laser deposition are efficient for fabricating structures on flat surfaces. However, they have limitations in deposition on curved surfaces, deposition of thick layers and component integration. In these cases, solution-based methods, which involve the dissolution of chalcogenide glasses and processing as a liquid, become a better choice for their flexibility. After proper treatment, the associated structures can have similar optical, chemical and physical properties to the bulk. This thesis presents an in-depth study of solution-processing chalcogenide glasses, starting from the "solution state" to the "film state" and the "structure state". Firstly, chalcogenide dissolution is studied to reveal the mechanisms at molecular level and build a foundation for material processing. Dissolution processes for various chalcogenide solvent pairs are reviewed and compared. Secondly, thermal processing, in the context of high temperature annealing, is explained along with the chemical and physical properties of the annealed films. Another focus is on nanopore formation in propylamine-processed arsenic sulfide films. Pore density changes with respect to annealing temperatures and durations are characterized. Base on a proposed vacancy coalescence theory, we have identified new dissolution strategies and achieved the breakthrough of pore-free film deposition. Thirdly, several solution methods developed along with the associated photonic structures are demonstrated. The first example is "spin-coating and lamination", which produces thick (over 10 mum) chalcogenide structures. Both homogeneous thick chalcogenide structures and heterogeneous layers of different chalcogenide glasses

  10. Electrical properties of commercial sheet insulation materials for cryogenic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Pace, Marshall O

    2008-01-01

    Dielectric properties of electrical insulation materials are needed for low-temperature power applications. Performance of materials and their compatibility determine the size of the electrical insulation in power equipment. In this work we report the dielectric properties of some commercially available materials in sheet form. The selected materials are polypropylene laminated paper from Sumitomo Electric U.S.A., Inc., porous polyethylene (Tyvek\\texttrademark) from Dupont, and polyamide paper (Nomex\\texttrademark) from Dupont. The dielectric properties are characterized with an electrical impedance analyzer in the frequency domain. The impedances are recorded in a cryocooler in the temperature range from 50 to 300 K. The dielectric breakdown characteristics of the materials are measured in a liquid nitrogen bath at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Thermal Properties of Structural Materials Used in LWR Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson

    2011-01-01

    High temperature material property data for structural materials used in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are limited. Often, extrapolated values recommended in the literature differ significantly. To reduce uncertainties in predictions relying upon extrapolated data for LWR vessel and penetration materials, high temperature tests were completed on SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) low alloy steel, Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), and Inconel 600 using material property measurement systems available in the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Properties measured include thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity for temperatures up to 1200 °C. From these results, thermal conductivity and density were calculated. Results show that, in some cases, previously recommended values for these materials differ significantly from measured values at high temperatures.

  12. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova, N. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Nikov, Ru. G.; Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Fukata, N.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm-2 for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm-2 and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm-2. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain number of pulses of 8 is different for every wavelength irradiation as the values increase from 1.0 for 266 nm up to 16 J cm-2 for 1064 nm. The incubation and the ablation processes occur in the PDMS elastomer material during its pulsed laser treatment are a complex function of the wavelength, fluence, number of pulses and the material properties as well.

  13. Determining significant material properties: A discovery approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to further understanding of materials science. The experiment itself can be informative for persons of any age past elementary school, and even for some in elementary school. The preparation of the plastic samples is readily accomplished by persons with resonable dexterity in the cutting of paper designs. The completion of the statistical Design of Experiments, which uses Yates' Method, requires basic math (addition and subtraction). Interpretive work requires plotting of data and making observations. Knowledge of statistical methods would be helpful. The purpose of this experiment is to acquaint students with the seven classes of recyclable plastics, and provide hands-on learning about the response of these plastics to mechanical tensile loading.

  14. Enhanced peak power CO2 laser processing of PCB materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, C. J.; Villarreal, F.; Wendland, J. J.; Baker, H. J.; Hall, D. R.; Hand, D. P.

    2005-06-01

    Laser drilling has become a common processing step in the fabrication of printed circuit boards (PCB's). For this work, a recently developed enhanced peak power CO2 laser (~2.5 kW peak power, 200W average) or ultra-super pulse (USP) laser is used to drill alumina and copper coated dielectric laminate materials. The higher peak power and faster response times (than conventional CO2 lasers) produced by the USP laser are used to produce high speed alumina laser scribing and copper coated laminate microvia drilling processes. Alumina is a common PCB material used for applications, where its resistance to mechanical and thermal stresses is required. Here we present a comprehensive study of the melt eject mechanisms and recast formation to optimise the speed and quality of alumina laser scribing. Scribe speeds of up to 320 mms-1 (1.8 times current scribe rate) have been achieved using novel temporal pulse shapes unique to the USP laser. Also presented is the microvia drilling process of copper dielectric laminates, where the multi-level configuration presents different optical and thermal properties complicating their simultaneous laser ablation. In our experiments the USP laser has been used to drill standard thickness copper films (up to 50 μm thick) in a single shot. This investigation concentrates on understanding the mechanisms that determine the dielectric undercut dimensions.

  15. Material modeling for multistage tube hydroforming process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboori, Mehdi

    The Aerospace industries of the 21st century demand the use of cutting edge materials and manufacturing technology. New manufacturing methods such as hydroforming are relatively new and are being used to produce commercial vehicles. This process allows for part consolidation and reducing the number of parts in an assembly compared to conventional methods such as stamping, press forming and welding of multiple components. Hydroforming in particular, provides an endless opportunity to achieve multiple crosssectional shapes in a single tube. A single tube can be pre-bent and subsequently hydroformed to create an entire component assembly instead of welding many smaller sheet metal sections together. The knowledge of tube hydroforming for aerospace materials is not well developed yet, thus new methods are required to predict and study the formability, and the critical forming limits for aerospace materials. In order to have a better understanding of the formability and the mechanical properties of aerospace materials, a novel online measurement approach based on free expansion test is developed using a 3D automated deformation measurement system (AramisRTM) to extract the coordinates of the bulge profile during the test. These coordinates are used to calculate the circumferential and longitudinal curvatures, which are utilized to determine the effective stresses and effective strains at different stages of the tube hydroforming process. In the second step, two different methods, a weighted average method and a new hardening function are utilized to define accurately the true stress-strain curve for post-necking regime of different aerospace alloys, such as inconel 718 (IN 718), stainless steel 321 (SS 321) and titanium (Ti6Al4V). The flow curves are employed in the simulation of the dome height test, which is utilized for generating the forming limit diagrams (FLDs). Then, the effect of stress triaxiality, the stress concentration factor and the effective plastic

  16. Analytic Thermoelectric Couple Modeling: Variable Material Properties and Transient Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the operation of a thermoelectric couple a set of analytic solutions have been derived for a variable material property couple and a transient couple. Using an analytic approach, as opposed to commonly used numerical techniques, results in a set of useful design guidelines. These guidelines can serve as useful starting conditions for further numerical studies, or can serve as design rules for lab built couples. The analytic modeling considers two cases and accounts for 1) material properties which vary with temperature and 2) transient operation of a couple. The variable material property case was handled by means of an asymptotic expansion, which allows for insight into the influence of temperature dependence on different material properties. The variable property work demonstrated the important fact that materials with identical average Figure of Merits can lead to different conversion efficiencies due to temperature dependence of the properties. The transient couple was investigated through a Greens function approach; several transient boundary conditions were investigated. The transient work introduces several new design considerations which are not captured by the classic steady state analysis. The work helps to assist in designing couples for optimal performance, and also helps assist in material selection.

  17. Chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelsberger, Troy A.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage is the sought after hydrogen storage media for automotive applications because of the expected low pressure operation (<20 atm), moderate temperature operation (<200 °C), system gravimetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/kgsystem), and system volumetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/Lsystem). Currently, the primary shortcomings of chemical hydrogen storage are regeneration efficiency, fuel cost and fuel phase (i.e., solid or slurry phase). Understanding the required material properties to meet the DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems is a critical knowledge gap in the hydrogen storage research community. This study presents a set of fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications meeting the 2017 DOE technical targets. Viable material properties were determined using a boiler-plate automotive system design. The fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage media considered in this study were neat liquids, solutions, and non-settling homogeneous slurries. Material properties examined include kinetics, heats of reaction, fuel-cell impurities, gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities, and regeneration efficiency. The material properties, although not exhaustive, are an essential first step in identifying viable chemical hydrogen storage material properties-and most important, their implications on system mass, system volume and system performance.

  18. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center. Report for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The work described, while involving research in the broad field of materials processing, has two common features: the problems are closed related to space precessing of materials and have both practical and fundamental significance. An interesting and important feature of many of the projects is that the interdisciplinary nature of the problem mandates complementary analytical modeling/experimental approaches. An other important aspect of many of the projects is the increasing use of mathematical modeling techniques as one of the research tools. The predictive capability of these models, when tested against measurements, plays a very important role in both the planning of experimental programs and in the rational interpretation of the results. Many of the projects described have a space experiment as their ultimate objective. Mathematical models are proving to be extremely valuable in projecting the findings of ground - based experiments to microgravity conditions.

  19. MIDAS (Material Implementation, Database, and Analysis Source): A comprehensive resource of material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M; Norquist, P; Barton, N; Durrenberger, K; Florando, J; Attia, A

    2010-12-13

    MIDAS is aimed to be an easy-to-use and comprehensive common source for material properties including both experimental data and models and their parameters. At LLNL, we will develop MIDAS to be the central repository for material strength related data and models with the long-term goal to encompass other material properties. MIDAS will allow the users to upload experimental data and updated models, to view and read materials data and references, to manipulate models and their parameters, and to serve as the central location for the application codes to access the continuously growing model source codes. MIDAS contains a suite of interoperable tools and utilizes components already existing at LLNL: MSD (material strength database), MatProp (database of materials properties files), and MSlib (library of material model source codes). MIDAS requires significant development of the computer science framework for the interfaces between different components. We present the current status of MIDAS and its future development in this paper.

  20. Characterization of temperature-dependent optical material properties of polymer powders

    SciTech Connect

    Laumer, Tobias; Stichel, Thomas; Bock, Thomas; Amend, Philipp; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-05-22

    In former works, the optical material properties of different polymer powders used for Laser Beam Melting (LBM) at room temperature have been analyzed. With a measurement setup using two integration spheres, it was shown that the optical material properties of polymer powders differ significantly due to multiple reflections within the powder compared to solid bodies of the same material. Additionally, the absorption behavior of the single particles shows an important influence on the overall optical material properties, especially the reflectance of the powder bed. Now the setup is modified to allow measurements at higher temperatures. Because crystalline areas of semi-crystalline thermoplastics are mainly responsible for the absorption of the laser radiation, the influence of the temperature increase on the overall optical material properties is analyzed. As material, conventional polyamide 12 and polypropylene as new polymer powder material, is used. By comparing results at room temperature and at higher temperatures towards the melting point, the temperature-dependent optical material properties and their influence on the beam-matter interaction during the process are discussed. It is shown that the phase transition during melting leads to significant changes of the optical material properties of the analyzed powders.

  1. Pulse thermal processing of functional materials using directed plasma arc

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Ronald D.; Blue, Craig A.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Harper, David C.

    2007-05-22

    A method of thermally processing a material includes exposing the material to at least one pulse of infrared light emitted from a directed plasma arc to thermally process the material, the pulse having a duration of no more than 10 s.

  2. Laser hearth melt processing of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard Weber, J. K.; Felten, J. J.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1996-02-01

    A new technique for synthesizing small batches of oxide-based ceramic and glass materials from high purity powders is described. The method uses continuous wave CO2 laser beam heating of material held on a water-cooled copper hearth. Contamination which would normally result during crucible melting is eliminated. Details of the technique are presented, and its operation and use are illustrated by results obtained in melting experiments with a-aluminum oxide, Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor material, and the mixtures, Al2O3-SiO2, Bi2O3-B2O3, Bi2O3-CuO. Specimen masses were 0.05-1.5 g.

  3. Materials processing in space bibliography, 1983, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or ground based activities that provide supporting research are compiled. Six major categories: crystal growth; solidification of metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, transports, and chemical processes; glasses and ceramics; ultrahigh vacuum and containerless processing technologies; and combustion are included. A list of patents and appendices providing a compilation of anonymously authored collections and reports and a cross reference index are included.

  4. Materials processing in zero gravity. [space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuenscher, H. F.

    1973-01-01

    Manufacturing processes which are expected to show drastic changes in a space environment due to the absence of earth gravity are classified according to (1) buoyancy and thermal convection sensitive processes and (2) processes where molecular forces like cohesion and adhesion remain as the relatively strongest and hence controlling factors. Some specific process demonstration experiments carried out during the Apollo 14 mission and in the Skylab program are described. These include chemical separation by electrophoresis, the M551 metals melting experiment, the M552 exothermic brazing experiment, the M553 sphere forming experiment, the M554 composite casting experiment, and the M555 gallium arsenide crystal growth experiment.

  5. Use of material dielectric properties for agricultural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of materials for applications in agriculture are reviewed, and research findings on use of dielectric heating of materials and on sensing of product moisture content and other quality factors are discussed. Dielectric heating applications, include treatment of seed...

  6. Heat Transmission Properties of Insulating and Building Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 81 NIST Heat Transmission Properties of Insulating and Building Materials (Web, free access)   NIST has accumulated a valuable and comprehensive collection of thermal conductivity data. Version 1.0 of the database includes data for over 2000 measurements, covering several categories of materials including concrete, fiberboard, plastics, thermal insulation, and rubber.

  7. Material Properties for Fiber-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rouanet, Stephane; Moses, John; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic fiber-reinforced silica aerogels are novel materials for high performance insulation, including thermal protection materials. Experimental data are presented for the thermal and mechanical properties, showing the trends exhibited over a range of fiber loadings and silica aerogel densities. Test results are compared to that of unreinforced bulk aerogels.

  8. The design and modeling of periodic materials with novel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jonathan Bernard

    Cellular materials are ubiquitous in our world being found in natural and engineered systems as structural materials, sound and energy absorbers, heat insulators and more. Stochastic foams made of polymers, metals and even ceramics find wide use due to their novel properties when compared to monolithic materials. Properties of these so called hybrid materials, those that combine materials or materials and space, are derived from the localization of thermomechanical stresses and strains on the mesoscale as a function of cell topology. The effects of localization can only be generalized in stochastic materials arising from their inherent potential complexity, possessing variations in local chemistry, microstructural inhomogeneity and topological variations. Ordered cellular materials on the other hand, such as lattices and honeycombs, make for much easier study, often requiring analysis of only a single unit-cell. Theoretical bounds predict that hybrid materials have the potential to push design envelopes offering lighter stiffer and stronger materials. Hybrid materials can achieve very low and even negative coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) while retaining a relatively high stiffness -- properties completely unmatched by monolithic materials. In the first chapter of this thesis a two-dimensional lattice is detailed that possess near maximum stiffness, relative to the tightest theoretical bound, and low, zero and even appreciably negative thermal expansion. Its CTE and stiffness are given in closed form as a function of geometric parameters and the material properties. This result is confirmed with finite elements (FE) and experiment. In the second chapter the compressive stiffness of three-dimensional ordered foams, both closed and open cell, are predicted with FE and the results placed in property space in terms of stiffness and density. A novel structure is identified that effectively achieves theoretical bounds for Young's, shear and bulk modulus

  9. Materials and Processes for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul W.; Richardson, Rod W.

    2004-01-01

    The single greatest threat to material availability over the last decade has been Compliance to New Environmental Regulations. Federal Regulations: a) Clean Air Acts Amendments - 1990 - Titles I, III and VI; b) NASA Interim Policy- 1995 end date; c) Montreal Protocol - 2000 and 2005 end dates; d) Industrial Toxics Project - HAP emissions by 1995; e) Florida DER - VOC limits by 1995 (CA); f) OSHA Health Related Regulations 1) Carcinogens 2) Mutagens 3). Material availability is complicated by local and state regulations and their own compliance schedules.

  10. Perspective: Interactive material property databases through aggregation of literature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ram; Sparks, Taylor D.

    2016-05-01

    Searchable, interactive, databases of material properties, particularly those relating to functional materials (magnetics, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, etc.) are curiously missing from discussions of machine-learning and other data-driven methods for advancing new materials discovery. Here we discuss the manual aggregation of experimental data from the published literature for the creation of interactive databases that allow the original experimental data as well additional metadata to be visualized in an interactive manner. The databases described involve materials for thermoelectric energy conversion, and for the electrodes of Li-ion batteries. The data can be subject to machine-learning, accelerating the discovery of new materials.

  11. Processing solubility enhancement and Nanoparticles dispersion enhanced Performance Materials through thermomagnetic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger A; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Manuel, Michele Viola; Manuel, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This research demonstrates that significantly enhanced materials microstructures and improved performance can be achieved by coupling two previously independent materials research concepts, namely, the thermo-magnetic processing (T-MP)1 and the electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT)2 technologies. In prior, separate NHMFL research endeavors, ORNL researchers have demonstrated that: (1) thermo-magnetic processing (T-MP) can significantly enhance Ni solubility in Fe by up to 30%; and (2) using the electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) technology can significantly improve cast product homogeneity. Based on these earlier successful results, we proposed simultaneously coupling these two R&D approaches/eff ects (i.e., T-MP with EMAT), in order to simultaneously achieve: (1) enhanced elemental solid-solubility in Mg and in at least one Fe-based alloy; and (2) uniform dispersion of intentional additions of inert nanoparticles in Mg. Developing homogeneous dispersions of inert nanoparticles is and has been pursued as one of the holy grails for achieving unprecedented materials performance and highly desired mechanical properties, e.g., in creep and oxidation resistant alloys. Successfully coupling these two technologies would provide the ability to create uniquely controlled nano-scale microstructures that currently are unachievable by any other materials processing technologies.

  12. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO2, shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10-19 m2; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10-17 m2; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens' permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  13. Incoloy 908 database report: On process -- structure -- property relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, L.S.; Hwang, I.S.; Steeves, M.M.

    1993-05-01

    Incoloy 908 is a nickel-iron base superalloy with a coefficient of expansion (COE) and mechanical properties that have been optimized for use in Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets. It has been proposed for use as a conduit material for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) magnets. The relationship between manufacturing processes, microstructures and mechanical properties of Incoloy 908 are characterized in support of the magnet fabrication and quality control. This report presents microhardness, microstructure, and yield and ultimate tensile strengths as functions of thermomechanical process variables including heat treatment, annealing and cold work for laboratory prepared Incoloy 908 specimens. Empirical correlations have been developed for the microhardness at room temperature and tensile strength at room temperature and at 4K. These results may be used for manufacturing quality control or for design.

  14. Material, process, and product design of thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Heming

    Thermoplastic composites made of polypropylene (PP) and E-glass fibers were investigated experimentally as well as theoretically for two new classes of product designs. The first application was for reinforcement of wood. Commingled PP/glass yarn was consolidated and bonded on wood panel using a tie layer. The processing parameters, including temperature, pressure, heating time, cooling time, bonding strength, and bending strength were tested experimentally and evaluated analytically. The thermoplastic adhesive interface was investigated with environmental scanning electron microscopy. The wood/composite structural design was optimized and evaluated using a Graphic Method. In the second application, we evaluated use of thermoplastic composites for explosion containment in an arrester. PP/glass yarn was fabricated in a sleeve form and wrapped around the arrester. After consolidation, the flexible composite sleeve forms a solid composite shell. The composite shell acts as a protection layer in a surge test to contain the fragments of the arrester. The manufacturing process for forming the composite shell was designed. Woven, knitted, and braided textile composite shells made of commingled PP/glass yarn were tested and evaluated. Mechanical performance of the woven, knitted, and braided composite shells was examined analytically. The theoretical predictions were used to verify the experimental results.

  15. Processing and applications of carbon based nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Aiping

    Carbon-based nanomaterials, including single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs, multi-layer graphene), possess exceptional electrical, thermal and mechanical properties coupled with high aspect ratio and high temperature stability. These unique properties have attracted increased attention during the past decade. These materials form the basis of the work presented here, which includes research targeting fabrication, processing and applications in new composites and devices. As-prepared SWNTs are typically contaminated with amorphous carbon as well as metal catalyst and graphitic nanoparticles. We have demonstrated an efficient approach for removing most of these impurities by the combination of nitric acid treatment and both low speed (2000 g) and high speed centrifugation (20,000 g). This approach gives rise to the highest-purified arc-discharge SWNTs which are almost free from impurities, and in addition are left in a low state of aggregation. The new purification process offers a convenient way to obtain different grade of SWNTs and allows the study of the effect purity on the thermal conductivity of SWNT epoxy composite. Purified functionalized SWNTs provide a significantly greater enhancement of the thermal conductivity, whereas AP-SWNTs allow the best electrical properties because of their ability to form efficient percolating network. We found that purified SWNTs provide ˜5 times greater enhancement of the thermal conductivity than the impure SWNT fraction demonstrating the significance of SWNTs quality for thermal management. The introduced GNPs have directed the thermal management project to a new avenue due to the significant improvement of the thermal conductivity of the composites in comparison with that of SWNTs. A novel process was demonstrated to achieve a 4-graphene layer structure referred to GNPs with a thickness of ˜2 nm. This material was embedded in an epoxy resin matrix and the measured thermal conductivity of

  16. Thermophysical Properties of Polymer Materials with High Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. M.; Gefle, O. S.; Dneprovskii, S. N.; Amitov, E. T.

    2015-06-01

    Results of studies on the main thermophysical properties of new thermally conductive polymer materials are presented. It is shown that modification of polymer dielectrics by micron-sized fillers allows thermally conductive materials with thermal conductivity not less than 2 W/(m K) to be produced, which makes it possible to use such materials as cooling elements of various electrical engineering and semiconductor equipment and devices.

  17. MATERIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY IN CERAMIC PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Materials Characterization
    The density of 3124 Ferro Frit and Mason Chrome Free Black Pigment was measured to be 2.4911 g/cm3 and 5.0703 g/cm3 respectively. The single point, BET and Langmuir surface area of 3124 Ferro Frit was deter...

  18. Electrochromic materials, devices and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2003-11-11

    Thin films of transition metal compositions formed with magnesium that are metals, alloys, hydrides or mixtures of alloys, metals and/or hydrides exhibit reversible color changes on application of electric current or hydrogen. Thin films of these materials are suitable for optical switching elements, thin film displays, sun roofs, rear-view mirrors and architectural glass.

  19. Properties of ns-laser processed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, P. A.; Stankova, N. E.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Nikov, Ru G.; Fukata, N.; Gerlach, J. W.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2016-03-01

    The medical-grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is a widely used biomaterial in medicine and for preparation of high-tech devices because of its remarkable properties. In this work, we present the experimental results on drilling holes on the PDMS surface by using ultraviolet, visible or near-infrared ns-laser pulses and on studying the changes of the chemical composition and structure inside the processed areas. The material in the zone of the holes is studied by XRD, ?-Raman analyses and 3D laser microscopy in order to obtain information on the influence of different processing laser parameters, as wavelength, fluence and number of consecutive pulses on the material transformation and its modification.

  20. Characterization of the physical properties for solid granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jonathan R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Guenther, Chris; Benyahia, Sofiane; Mei, Joseph S.; Banta, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the behavior of a system is strongly governed by the components within that system. For multiphase systems incorporating solid powder-like particles, there are many different physical properties which need to be known to some level of accuracy for proper design, modeling, or data analysis. In the past, the material properties were determined initially as a secondary part of the study or design. In an attempt to provide results with the least level of uncertainty, a procedure was developed and implemented to provide consistent analysis of several different types of materials. The properties that were characterized included particle sizing and size distributions, shape analysis, density (particle, skeletal and bulk), minimum fluidization velocities, void fractions, particle porosity, and assignment within the Geldart Classification. In the methods used for this experiment, a novel form of the Ergun equation was used to determine the bulk void fractions and particle density. Materials of known properties were initially characterized to validate the accuracy and methodology, prior to testing materials of unknown properties. The procedures used yielded valid and accurate results, with a high level of repeatability. A database of these materials has been developed to assist in model validation efforts and future designs. It is also anticipated that further development of these procedures wil be expanded increasing the properties included in the database.