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Sample records for material provenance clays

  1. Provenance of unknown plutonium material.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, G

    2008-10-01

    The determination of the provenance of 'unknown' plutonium material is demonstrated through a simulation study based on an isotopic fingerprinting approach. Plutonium of known provenance was considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to evaluate the potential of the approach and verify its predictive capabilities. Factor analysis was used to compare the Pu isotopic composition of the 'unknown' material with Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. The provenance of the 'unknown material' is assigned to the commercial fuel with which exhibits the highest degree of similarity with respect to the Pu composition. The approach appears promising since it accurately predicted the provenance of the one 'unknown' sample considered; nevertheless, the approach is still at the development stage. Important challenging issues related to the simulation uncertainties and its testing on real laboratory samples have to be explored prior to evaluating the potential of the approach. PMID:18639370

  2. Provenance of the upper Miocene-Pliocene Red Clay deposits of the Chinese loess plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Junsheng; Peng, Wenbin; Möller, Andreas; Song, Yougui; Stockli, Daniel F.; Stevens, Thomas; Horton, Brian K.; Liu, Shanpin; Bird, Anna; Oalmann, Jeffrey; Gong, Hujun; Fang, Xiaomin

    2014-12-01

    A clear understanding of the provenance of late Cenozoic Chinese loess and the underlying Red Clay deposits will shed light on the history and mechanisms of Asian aridification. Although much progress has been made in understanding the source of Quaternary loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), the provenance of the underlying upper Miocene-Pliocene Red Clay sequence is largely unknown. Here we present the first provenance history of the Red Clay sequence based on zircon U-Pb ages from the central CLP. Visual and statistical analyses of the U-Pb age populations and comparison with results from potential source regions reveals that (1) the lowermost Red Clay of the late Miocene (depositional age of ∼8 Ma) is likely sourced from the nearby Liupan Mountains and the Qaidam Basin; (2) the middle Red Clay (5.5-4 Ma) of the early-mid Pliocene is sourced mainly from the Taklamakan desert, transported via lower-level westerly winds; (3) the upper Red Clay of the late Pliocene (∼3 Ma) is sourced from mixed areas, although western source materials from middle-northern Tibetan plateau (including Qaidam Desert sediments and materials eroded from the Qilian Mountains) sediments appear to dominate; and (4) the Quaternary loess is also sourced from mixed source regions, albeit with dominant northern CLP proximal desert sediments transported via winter monsoon winds, which in turn may be transported from mountain source regions of the northeastern Tibet and Gobi Altai via major river systems. This long term shift in sources suggests a progressive eastward aridification during the Pliocene in Asia with the specific timing of provenance shifts synchronous with large-scale climatic transitions and Tibetan uplift, demonstrating that Asian desertification is controlled by both factors.

  3. On Estimating Provenances of Lunar Highland Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Jolliff, Brad L.

    1998-01-01

    That even relatively small impacts can spread material across the face of the Moon is evident from the rays of Tycho. Tycho ejecta triggered the landslide that produced the light mantle deposit at Apollo 17 and perhaps excavated the Central Valley craters there. Basin-sized impacts appear to follow the same scaling laws as smaller impacts, as indicated by the satisfaction of a geophysical model. These giant impacts rearranged huge amounts of premare material, complicating the determination of provenance of materials collected from the highlands. We have developed a model to estimate the probability that material at a particular location might derive from a given basin or large crater. This model is based on crater scaling laws, and effects of secondary cratering. Because it accounts for the volume of primary ejecta from the basin-forming transient craters and the excavating and mixing effects of these ejecta with the substrate onto which they fall, it gives much thicker deposits than an early work. Our modeling takes into account the distribution of sizes of primary ejecta fragments (PriFrags) to obtain the probability at a given site for a deposit of a particular thickness and with a fraction of PriFrags.

  4. Mineralogy and provenance of clays in miarolitic cavities of the Pikes Peak Batholith, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Clay samples from 105 cavities within miarolitic granitic pegmatites throughout the Pikes Peak batholith, in Colorado, were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Smectite (beidellite), illite, and kaolinite were found within the cavities. Calculation of crystallite-thickness distribution (CTD), mean thickness of the crystallites, and variance in crystallite thickness, as deduced from XRD patterns, allowed a determination of provenance and mode of formation for illite and smectite. Authigenic miarolitic-cavity illite and smectite show lognormal CTDs and larger mean thicknesses of crystallites than do their soil-derived counterparts; non-lognormal illite in a cavity results from mixing of cavity and soil illite. Analysis of mean thickness and thickness variance shows that crystal growth of illite is initiated by a nucleation event of short duration, followed by surface-controlled kinetics. Crystallization of the miarolitic cavity clays is presumed to occur by neoformation from hydrothermal fluids. The assessment of provenance allows a determination of regional and local distributions of clay minerals in miarolitic cavities within the Pikes Peak batholith.

  5. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  6. Clay mineral distribution and provenance in the Heuksan mud belt, Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyen Goo; Kim, Soon-Oh; Kwak, Kyeong Yoon; Choi, Hunsoo; Khim, Boo-Keun

    2015-12-01

    The Heuksan mud belt (HMB), located in the southeastern Yellow Sea, runs parallel to the southwest coast of Korea. In this study, the distribution and relative contribution of four major clay minerals are investigated using 101 surface sediment samples collected in the course of KIOST (2001, 2010, 2011) and KIGAM (2012) cruises, as well as 33 river sediment samples (four from the Huanghe River, three from the Changjiang River, and 26 from Korean rivers) in order to clarify the provenance of fine-grained sediments in the HMB. Based on this currently largest and most robust dataset available for interpretation, the clay mineral assemblages of the fine-grained sediments in the HMB are found to be on average composed of 64.7% illite, 17.9% chlorite, 11.4% kaolinite, and 5.9% smectite. Overall, the clay mineral assemblages are similar in both the northern and the southern parts of the HMB, although smectite seems to be relatively enriched in the southern part, whereas kaolinite is slightly more dominant in the northern part. This clearly indicates that the clays are mostly derived from Korean rivers and, in the southern part of the HMB, partly also from the Huanghe River in China. The new data thus confirm and strengthen the tentative interpretation of some earlier work based on a more limited dataset.

  7. Provenance variations in the Holocene deposits from the southern Yellow Sea: Clay mineralogy evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Hu, Bangqi; Wei, Helong; Zhao, Jingtao; Zou, Liang; Bai, Fenglong; Dou, Yanguang; Wang, Libo; Fang, Xisheng

    2014-11-01

    We present a provenance study of two cores (YSC-1 and YSC-4) from the Central Yellow Sea Mud (CYSM) to investigate the source and transport processes of clay minerals during the Holocene. Clay mineral assemblages of Cores YSC-1 and YSC-4 mainly consist of illite, followed by chlorite and kaolinite, and scarce smectite. Combined with other published data, it is found that the fine sediments in the CYSM are most likely a mixing product of the Changjiang and Korean Peninsula small rivers sediments. In contrast, the influence of Huanghe sediments is rather limited and only appears in the bottom part of Core YSC-1. Decreased contribution of terrigenous supply from the Changjiang to the CYSM since 6.4 ka may be related to the formation of modern ocean circulation pattern. After 6.4 ka, the finer sediments of Taedong and Chongchon Rivers from the northern Korean Peninsula are dominated in the CYSM. The oceanic fronts likely prevent both the suspended sediments of the west (modern and older Huanghe) and east (southern Korean Peninsula small rivers) sides from dispersing into the central Yellow Sea. Our results thus highlight the highly complex nature of sediment source and dispersal pattern in the Yellow Sea during the Holocene. More detailed studies are needed to better understand the sediment source-to-sink history of Yellow Sea.

  8. Provenance of Pliocene clay deposits from the Iberian Atlantic Margin and compositional changes during recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinis, Pedro; Oliveira, Álvaro

    2016-05-01

    The XRD mineralogy and geochemistry of recycled fine-grained deposits from the West Iberia Atlantic Margin are used to establish sediment provenance and evaluate the features that most closely reflect the nature of the source areas and the transformations during the last depositional cycle. A set of Pliocene sediment samples is organized according to grain size distribution, geochemistry, and mineralogy, and their chemical composition is compared with the composition of possible source rocks. Most deposits located to the north of the Mondego River were derived from the uplifted Precambrian metapelites of the basin edge, while to the south of the Mondego River they result mainly from recycling of Cretaceous and Cenozoic clastic units, which, in turn, were derived from Precambrian-Paleozoic granitoids and metasedimentary rocks. This differentiation is supported by several element ratios and biplots involving La, Sm, Gd, Sc, Th, U, Y, Yb, and Zr. For the specific grain size range of the deposits studied, which are mainly made up of silt and clay particles, composition is not substantially affected by the grain size distribution of the sediment. Multi-element diagrams designed to discriminate the tectonic setting and the nature of source rocks are of little use in the interpretation of provenance but help to trace geochemical and mineralogical transformations during the last depositional cycles. Despite the evidence of element leaching during the Pliocene depositional cycle, the geochemical and mineralogical indicators of weathering intensities are largely determined by the nature of the previous cycle units.

  9. Variations in the provenance of the late Neogene Red Clay deposits in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yuan; Beets, Christiaan J.; Tang, Hui; Prins, Maarten A.; Lahaye, Yann; van Elsas, Roel; Sukselainen, Leena; Kaakinen, Anu

    2016-04-01

    The voluminous loess-Red Clay deposits in northern China forming part of the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) are valuable terrestrial archives of climatic evolution for the late Cenozoic Era. Fundamental in reconstructing the late Miocene and Pliocene wind patterns and aridification history is a detailed knowledge of the provenance of these deposits. This paper provides end member modelling of bulk grain-size distributions and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons for three distant Red Clay sequences in the northeastern (Baode), southern (Lantian) and western (Dongwan) CLP. Data show that these different sections each display a distinctive compositional structure indicating variable depositional processes, but they also share two significant zircon age populations of 200-300 Ma and 400-500 Ma. While the Permian-Triassic (200-300 Ma) group accounts for a larger proportion of zircons' ages in the northeastern (NE) CLP, the Ordovician-Silurian (400-500 Ma) component is dominant in the southern and western CLP. It is suggested that the Red Clay in the southern and western CLP was mainly derived from the Northern Tibetan Plateau (NTP) and the Taklimakan desert by low-level westerly winds. Samples of the NE CLP show an increased signature of sediments transported by near-surface northwesterly winds from the broad area of the Central Asian Orogen Belt (CAOB). This spatial transport and deposition pattern is supported by the results from the backtrace trajectory modelling of the dominant dust transport pathways in the CLP. It is noted that the Red Clay sample of around 3.6 Ma obtained from the NE CLP shows increased detrital contributions from its west, possibly indicating an intensified westerly wind strength and/or aridity of the NTP and Taklimakan desert due to the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and Tianshan Mountains in the Pliocene. The onset of enhanced drainage of the Yellow River caused by the increased denudation of the NETP since 3.6 Ma could also have contributed to this.

  10. Contribution of Clay mineralogy of Bengal Fan deposits at 8°N for understanding of Himalayan provenance and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyghe, Pascale; France-Lanord, Christian; IODP Expedition 354 Scientists

    2016-04-01

    The IODP 354 expedition (February-March 2015) focused on the middle part of the Bengal Fan (8°N). Seven sites were drilled along a 320 km- long transect and provided good recovery and excellent data to study both provenance of the material from the Himalayan orogeny and palaeoceanography linked to the Asian monsoon. Neogene sediments consist of an alternation of rapidly deposited, silty to muddy turbidites (10-100 cm/kyr) forming levees of channels intercalated with minor slowly deposited hemipelagic clays (1-2 cm/kyr), which may be found over the whole investigated area. Thick interlevee sand sheet units also occur between channel levees. The turbiditic sand, silt and clay have mineralogical signatures very similar to those of the modern Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers and are therefore relevant for reconstructing time series of erosion, weathering, and changes in Himalayan sources regions. Hemipelagic calcareous clays may provide additional information on environmental conditions throughout the Himalayan basin. Preliminar shipboard XRD analysis revealed that the clayey assemblages of sediments are relatively constant through the Neogene. Turbidite clay assemblages are dominated by detrital illite and chlorite as observed in the modern Himalayan rivers, suggesting that erosion conditions were relatively steady over the last 25 Ma. Hemipelagic clay assemblages vary from 1) identical to the illite-chlorite rich clays of turbidites, characteristic for Himalayan rivers, to 2) smectite rich assemblages enriched in iron and depleted in potassium, representing either more extreme sorting of the same material or input from another source. Further detailed investigation using decomposition of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns reveals much more complex clay assemblages, especially great quantities of mixed-layers, the quantity and mineralogy of which varies and differs in the three depositional units as determined by turbidites levees, hemipelagic clayey beds and interlevees

  11. Clay mineral contribution from various provenances in the northern South China Sea over the past 400 kyr: implications for the East Asian monsoon evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Quan; Liu, Zhifei; Xie, Xin; Kissel, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Clay mineralogy of Core MD12-3432 taken at 2125 m water depth (CIRCEA cruise on board the R.V. Marion Dufresne, IPEV) in the northern South China Sea was investigated in order to understand the time series contribution of terrigenous sediments from various provenances. With calibration of a low-resolution analysis on carbonate concentration and major elements, we converted the XRF core scanned calcium data into a high-resolution carbonate content records. Through referring to the well-dated carbonate record of nearby Core MD05-2904, we established a reliable age model, indicating about 400 kyr ago at the bottom of Core MD12-3432. The clay mineral assemblage is dominated by smectite (23-59%) and illite (22-43%), with minor chlorite (13-27%) and kaolinite (4-13%). The time series variation of clay mineral assemblages indicates strong glacial-interglacial cyclicity. In general, the variation in smectite content is similar to that of carbonate concentration, with higher values during interglacials than during glacials, while illite and chlorite contents showing opposite patterns. The change in kaolinite content shows an independent pattern with high values during glacials, corresponding well with the illite crystallinity variation. The provenance analysis of these clay minerals suggests three end-member sources: all smectites derive from Luzon, all kaolinites originate from the Pearl River, and illite and chlorite are coming from both the Pearl River and Taiwan. Using the linear separation method of illite crystallinity, a time series of the clay mineral contribution from the three major provenances to the northern South China Sea was reconstructed. Combined with spectral analyses, we suggest the clay mineral contribution from Pearl River was mainly influenced by sea level change, while the East Asian summer monsoon controlled the contribution from Luzon. The strong precipitation rate related to intensive East Asian summer monsoon would have enhanced the denudation and

  12. Clay minerals in surface sediment of the north Yellow Sea and their implication to provenance and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Li, An-Chun; Huang, Peng; Xu, Fang-Jian; Zheng, Xu-Feng

    2014-11-01

    The clay minerals in surface sediments of the north Yellow Sea have been identified with X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis to constrain the provenance and sediment transportation system in the area. Illite, with an average abundance of 58%, is the dominant mineral, followed by smectite (20% on average), chlorite (16% on average) and kaolinite (6% on average). The result of the a K-mean clustering analysis for the clay minerals show a close relationship between sedimentary types and clay mineral assemblages: there is more kaolinite and smectite in the muddy area in the western part of the north Yellow Sea and more chlorite in the sandy area in the eastern part. The Huanghe (Yellow River) is considered to provide most of the clay minerals, and in particular, rich kaolinite and smectite to the muddy area, whereas the Yalujiang provides large amounts of illite and chlorite. The spatial distribution characteristics of the clay minerals are closely related with the local circulation system, including the Shandong Coastal Current and Yellow Sea Warm Current. The former transports the outflow of the Huanghe to the north Yellow Sea, whereas the intrusion of the latter in wintertime is responsible for the annular enrichment of smectite in central part, as well as poor classification near Dalian Bay.

  13. Clay mineralogy of the riverine sediments of Hainan Island, South China Sea: Implications for weathering and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bangqi; Li, Jun; Cui, Ruyong; Wei, Helong; Zhao, Jingtao; Li, Guogang; Fang, Xisheng; Ding, Xue; Zou, Liang; Bai, Fenglong

    2014-12-01

    Clay mineralogy of 54 fluvial samples collected from 20 major rivers on Hainan Island are investigated in order to determine compositional changes of clay minerals and to assess the weathering processes. The clay mineral assemblages consist dominantly of kaolinite (31-66%), with a lesser abundance of chlorite (22-44%) and illite (4-33%), and a trace amount of smectite (0-15%). Fluvial sediments from the east and northwest of Hainan Island are characterized by a higher kaolinite content and illite chemical index and poorer illite crystallinity than those from southwest Hainan. Only minor smectite (mean of 7%) occurs in the sediments from west Hainan; smectite is total lacking in east Hainan. Compared with the adjacent basins, Hainan Island is characterized by moderate to intensive chemical weathering with strong hydrolysis. Our results suggest that rainfall is the principal factor controlling the intensity of chemical weathering on Hainan Island, with more intense chemical weathering occurring in eastern and northwestern Hainan. Another practical implication of this study is that it provides a "missing" end member (Hainan Island) in the provenance discrimination study focused on the northern South China Sea (SCS). Hainan fine-grained sediments likely play an important role in providing clay minerals to the northern SCS carried by the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC) during the summer.

  14. A global renewable mix with proven technologies and common materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, J.; Garcia-Olivares, A.; Garcia-Ladona, E.; Turiel, A.

    2012-04-01

    A global alternative mix to fossil fuels is proposed, based on proven renewable energy technologies that do not use scarce materials. Taking into account the availability of materials, the resulting mix consists of a combination of onshore and offshore wind turbines, concentrating solar power stations, hydroelectricity and wave power devices attached to the offshore turbines. Solar photovoltaic power could contribute to the mix if its dependence on scarce materials is solved. Material requirements are studied for the generation, power transport and for some future transport systems. The order of magnitude of copper, aluminium, neodymium, lithium, nickel, zinc and platinum that might be required for the proposed solution is obtained and compared with available reserves. While the proposed global alternative to fossil fuels seems technically feasible, lithium, nickel and platinum could become limiting materials for future vehicles fleet if no global recycling system were implemented and rechargeable zinc-air batteries could not be developed. As much as 60% of the current copper reserves would have to be employed in the implementation of the proposed solution. Altogether, the availability of materials may become a long-term physical constraint, preventing the continuation of the usual exponential growth of energy consumption.

  15. Composite clay materials for removal of SOx from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.; Polansky, C.A.; Amarasekera, J.

    1993-07-06

    A method is described for preparing a composite material capable of removing SO[sub x] from a gas stream comprising the steps of: (a) providing a suspension containing a smectite clay in water; (b) dissolving an amount of sodium carbonate in the suspension of the clay; (c) adding a soluble alkaline earth metal salt in stoichiometric amount for reaction with the sodium carbonate to form an alkaline earth metal carbonate precipitate in the suspension with the clay; and (d) drying the suspension to provide the composite material, wherein when the composite material is heated, the SO[sub x], is removed from the gas. A method is described in accordance with claim 3 wherein the alkaline earth metal carbonate and clay are mixed with an iron salt selected from the group consisting of ferric chloride and ferric nitrate. A method is described in accordance with claim 3 wherein the alkaline earth metal is selected from the group consisting of magnesium and calcium.

  16. Modification of clay-based waste containment materials

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Whang, J.M.; McDevitt, M.F.

    1997-12-31

    Bentonite clays are used extensively for waste containment barriers to help impede the flow of water in the subsurface because of their low permeability characteristics. However, they do little to prevent diffusion of contaminants, which is the major transport mechanism at low water flows. A more effective way of minimizing contaminant migration in the subsurface is to modify the bentonite clay with highly sorptive materials. Batch sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the sorptive capabilities of organo-clays and humic- and iron-based materials. These materials proved to be effective sorbents for the organic contaminants 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, and aniline in water, humic acid, and methanol solution media. The sorption capacities were several orders of magnitude greater than that of unmodified bentonite clay. Modeling results indicate that with small amounts of these materials used as additives in clay barriers, contaminant flux through walls could be kept very small for 100 years or more. The cost of such levels of additives can be small compared to overall construction costs.

  17. Fate and Tranport of MTBE in Clay-Rich Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lenczewski, m e

    2001-12-01

    A recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey identified methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a constituent of reformulated gasoline, as the most common contaminant of urban aquifers in the United States. MTBE has been released into groundwater supplies by leaking underground fuel tanks. In Illinois, it has been found in 26 of the 1,800 public water supplies and although detection was intermittent, levels were high enough to be offensive to users in some Illinois communities. MTBE is also being used in Mexico to solve the problem of air quality; however, it has the potential to harm the drinking water quality in the process. Early research on MTBE considered it resistant to biodegradation and unable to adsorb to soils and sediments. However, recent evidence indicates that biodegradation does occur under certain conditions and that sorption can occur to organic materials. This research project will investigate the biodegradation of MTBE and its sorption to the clay-rich glacial till found in northern Illinois and lacustrine clays found in the Chalco Basin, Mexico City, Mexico whose interaction with MTBE has not previously been studied. The principal hypothesis of this research is that the microorganisms and environmental factors in clay-rich materials will increase the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE as compared to sandy materials. The experiments will simulate a spill of MTBE or downgradient from a gasoline spill. Microcosms and batch isotherm experiments will be used to demonstrate the potential for biodegradation and sorption in these materials; however, laboratory results are not considered reliable estimates of actual field sorption and biodegradation rates. Therefore long-term column experiments will also be conducted in which large sample volumes of material that simulate the heterogeneities naturally observed in the environment. This research will increase understanding of the biodegradation and sorption of MTBE and lay the necessary groundwork to implement

  18. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-12-31

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material.

  19. Provenance and distribution of clay minerals in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnachandra Rao, V.; Ramalingeswara Rao, B.

    1995-12-01

    The distribution of clay minerals from 156 surficial sediments of the western continental margin of India, ranging from 17 to 2000 m water depth, indicate that there are three principal sources of sediments. The illite and chlorite-rich assemblage derived from the Indus (Indus Province) is predominant in the continental margin sediments to the north of the Gulf of Kachchh. An assemblage of smectite with minor kaolinite, illite and chlorite, mostly derived from the Deccan Trap basalts (Deccan Trap Province), occurs all along the inner shelf from Saurashtra to Goa. Illite, however, dominates smectite in the outer shelf of Saurashtra and on the continental slope from Saurashtra to Goa. Some samples on the outer shelf of the Gulf of Cambay-Goa show trace contents of all clay minerals, while others from the same region show the dominance of smectite over illite. A smectite and kaolinite-rich assemblage with minor illite, chlorite and gibbsite derived from the Gneissic Province occurs both on the shelf and slope between Goa and Cochin. It appears that the Indus derived sediments are transported onto the continental slope and, to a lesser extent, the outer shelf of western India by a southerly surface current and admix with clays transported from the hinterland. The influence of the Indus borne sediments on the continental slope decreases from north to south and cross shelf transport processes dominate in the southwestern continental margin between Goa and Cochin.

  20. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  1. Fluoride content of clay minerals and argillaceous earth materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J., Jr.; Glass, H.D.; White, W.A.; Trandel, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable method, utilizing a fluoride ion-selective electrode, is described for the determination of fluoride in clays and shales. Interference by aluminum and iron is minimal. The reproducibility of the method is about ??5% at different levels of fluoride concentration. Data are presented for various clay minerals and for the <2-??m fractions of marine and nonmarine clays and shales. Fluoride values range from 44 ppm (0.0044%) for nontronite from Colfax, WA, to 51,800 ppm (5.18%) for hectorite from Hector, CA. In general, clays formed under hydrothermal conditions are relatively high in fluoride content, provided the hydrothermal waters are high in fluoride content. Besides hectorite, dickite from Ouray, CO, was found to contain more than 50 times as much fluoride (6700 ppm) as highly crystalline geode kaolinite (125 ppm). The clay stratum immediately overlying a fluorite mineralized zone in southern Illinois was found to have a higher fluoride content than the same stratum in a nonmineralized zone approximately 1 mile away. Nonmarine shales in contact with Australian coals were found to be lower in fluoride content than were marine shales in contact with Illinois coals. It is believed that, in certain instances, peak shifts on DTA curves of similar clay minerals are the result of significant differences in their fluoride content. ?? 1977.

  2. Enhancing removal efficiency of anionic dye by combination and calcination of clay materials and calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Vimonses, Vipasiri; Jin, Bo; Chow, Christopher W K; Saint, Chris

    2009-11-15

    We explored a feasible approach to enhance removal capacity of three natural clays for removing anionic dye from aqueous solution. Optimal mixing proportions of the clay materials and temperature range for the calcination were investigated. We found that the removal efficiency can be improved significantly when the clay materials were mixed at certain ratio with the addition of lime and the mixed clay materials were calcined 100-300 degrees C. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of initial concentration, material dosage, contact time and pH on dye elimination. Kinetic study showed that more than 80% dye removal took place in 5 min. A high removal capacity (>575 mg g(-1)) of the mixed clay materials can be achieved at a low adsorbent dose. The mixed clay materials can be easily recovered by thermal treatment. The recovered mixtures demonstrated an enhanced removal capability after a few cycles of removal and regeneration. The results revealed that use of these clay materials could develop a low-cost treatment process for industrial wastewater. PMID:19604637

  3. Polyimide-Clay Composite Materials for Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.; Connell, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of nanometer-sized clay particles into a polyimide matrix has been shown to enhance the physical properties of specific polymer systems. The clay comprises large stacked platelets of the oxides of aluminum and silicon. These sheets have long dimensions on the order of tenths of a micrometer and thicknesses of several nanometers. Homogeneous dispersion of the clay platelets in the polymer matrix is necessary to achieve those enhancements in polymer properties. Natural montmorillonite with the empirical formula Na0.33Mg0.33Al1.67(OH)2(Si4O10) contains exchangeable inorganic cations. The clay lamellae stack together with the positive sodium ions situated between the surfaces of the individual sheets to balance negatively charged oxygen atoms that are on the surfaces of the sheets. These surface charges contribute to strong electrostatic forces which hold the sheets together tightly. Exfoliation can be accomplished only with unusual measures. In preparing clay nanocomposites, we have taken two steps to try to reduce these interlamellar forces in order to promote the separation (exfoliation) of the sheets and the dispersion of the individual clay particles throughout the organic polymer matrix. In the first step, some of the surface Na(+) ions are replaced with Li(+) ions. Unlike sodium cations, the lithium cations migrate into the interior of the lamellae when the system is heated. Their departure from the surface reduces the surface charge and therefore the attractive forces between the sheets. The loss of alkali metal cations from the surface can be measured as the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay. For example, we found that the CEC of montmorillonite clay was reduced by almost two thirds by treating it with lithium ions and heating to 250 C for 24 hr. Lesser heating has a smaller effect on the CEC. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the d-spacing decreased from ca. 1.34 to 0.97 nm, apparently a consequence of a collapse of the clay

  4. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  5. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation. PMID:25739840

  6. The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, V.A.; Purnell, P. . E-mail: pp@eng.warwick.ac.uk; Still, G.T.; Thomas, T.H.

    2007-05-15

    The cost of building materials in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) is one of the single largest contributing factors to housing costs. They are often transported over relatively large distances at considerable expense. Local sands may contain significant amounts of clay, considered by local artisans to be detrimental to concrete strength; however, in an LEDC context, there is little evidence to support this. In this study, the compressive strength and workability of representative LEDC clay-contaminated concrete was determined. Clay-cement interactions were studied using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Different clays appeared to have fundamentally different effects on both workability and strength. No chemical interactions were detected. It was concluded that satisfactory concrete could be made from clay-contaminated sand.

  7. Assessment of the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials. Topical report, September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Advancements have been made during the past five years to not only increase the strength of the as-manufactured clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials, but also to improve their high temperature creep resistance properties. This report reviews these developments, and describes the results of preliminary qualification testing which has been conducted at Westinghouse prior to utilizing the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide filters in high temperature, pressurized, coal-fired combustion and/or gasification applications.

  8. Laboratory reflectance spectra of clay minerals mixed with Mars analog materials: Toward enabling quantitative clay abundances from Mars spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Bishop, Janice L.; Brown, Adrian J.; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas F.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative estimates of clay minerals on the martian surface, via remote sensing observations, provide constraints on activity, timing, duration, and extent of aqueous processes and the geochemical environment in martian history. We describe an analytical study to begin enabling quantitative estimates of phyllosilicates when mixed with martian analog materials. We characterize the chemistry, mineralogy, particle size distribution, and reflectance spectra of the end-member materials: saponite, montmorillonite, pyroxene, and palagonitic soil. Reflectance spectra were obtained for physical mixtures of saponite and montmorillonite with pyroxene, and saponite with palagonitic soil. We analyzed the diagnostic phyllosilicate spectral signatures in the 2.2-2.4 μm wavelength region in detail for the mixtures. This involved fitting the observed ∼2.3 or ∼2.2 μm band depth, associated with the presence of saponite and montmorillonite, respectively, as a function of the abundance of these materials in the mixtures. Based upon the band depth of the spectral features we find that 3-5 wt.% of the clay minerals in the mixture with pyroxene can be recognized and at 25 wt.% their presence is indisputable in the mixtures. When the saponite is mixed with the lower albedo palagonitic soil, its presence is clearly distinguishable via the 1.4 and 2.3 μm features at 25 wt.% abundance. These relationships, between abundance and band depth, provide an ability to quantitatively address the amount of these materials in mixtures. The trends described here provide guidance for estimating the presence of phyllosilicates in matrices on the martian surface.

  9. Physical-chemical characterization of Tunisian clays for the synthesis of geopolymers materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmani, S.; Essaidi, N.; Gouny, F.; Bouaziz, S.; Joussein, E.; Driss, A.; Sdiri, A.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-03-01

    Natural clay materials from Tunisia were examined as an aluminosilicate source for the synthesis of consolidated materials at low temperatures. Three clay samples were collected from the El Kef, Douiret and Gafsa basins and calcined at different temperatures. All of the samples were characterized using chemical and mineralogical analyses, thermogravimetry, dilatometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The chemical (XRF) and mineralogical analyses (XRD and FTIR) indicated that all of the samples contained various amounts of kaolinite and quartz, followed by calcite, mica, palygorskite and gypsum. Curing produced a binder which did not significantly affect the physic-chemical properties of these clays. The obtained materials heterogeneous did not reach the geopolymerization stage, most likely because of their low kaolinite content. The addition of a suitable aluminosilicate to these clays is therefore recommended to produce homogeneous consolidated geopolymers. The synthesized materials obtained after the addition of metakaolin to the formulation to improve reactivity have interesting properties, thereby providing good potential for Tunisian clays in the synthesis of geopolymers.

  10. Materials derived from synthetic organo-clay complexes as novel hydrodesulfurization catalyst supports.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Marshall, C. L.; Brenner, J. R.; Song, K.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    A series of mesoporous synthetic organo-clay complexes has been prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice, followed by calcination to remove the organics. The organic serves to impart structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. The choice of organic modifier can be used to control the pore structure of the resulting mesoporous materials. Pore size distributions appear in some cases to be related to the type of polymer packing upon clay formation in situ. These materials are being explored as Co Mo hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary HDS results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysis for the mesoporous materials when a model heavy oil feed is used (1 wt% S as dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). Temperature programmed reduction experiments of used catalysts suggest a relationship between HDS activity and ease of reduction of the CoMo/clay catalysts. Reactivity of the CoMo clay also correlates with the percentage of mesopore volume remaining after reaction. Losses in mesopore volume are largely recouped by recalcination, suggesting that reversible coke is formed inside the pore structure of clays faster than inside conventional alumina.

  11. Further studies on the problems of geomagnetic field intensity determination from archaeological baked clay materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova-Avramova, M.; Kovacheva, M.

    2015-10-01

    heterogeneous due to variable heating conditions in the different parts of the archaeological structures. The study draws attention to the importance of multiple heating for the stabilization of grain size distribution in baked clay materials and the need of elucidation of this question.

  12. New way of measurement of thermophysical properties of clay loam materials by transient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháč, Vlastimil; Dieška, Peter; Vretenár, Viliam; Lukáč, Vladimír

    2016-07-01

    The problem of the measurement of clay loam materials in plastic consistency is more or less difficult as they can change the shape during the long time measurements. The specimen thickness is expected as the constant during all the experiment measured by transient pulse method. In a case of plastic clay loam, it can change the form during the measurement because of the squeeze of the material even under the gravity condition. Thus the specimen surface wall should be reinforced by special dimensionally well-defined thin wall container. In this paper the special container in a form of thin tube rings bounded by central annular ring was constructed and used for the measurements. The heat source was inserted into the tube rings through the nozzle in the middle part and the thermocouple was inserted through the drilled openings at defined distance from the heat source. System clamped the heat source together with the rings at desired distance from the thermocouple. This distance represents the thickness of tested specimen. The soft plastic material fill the inner space of tube rings in such a way to fulfill the geometry conditions for this method. The need of soft clay loam material measurement is to test its thermal properties because of the interest to use it as the heat storage material below the buildings. The measured clay loam containing some moisture has quite high values of specific heat and thus the use of it as the heat storage material is promising.

  13. Mechanism of Exfoliation and Prediction of Materials Properties of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites from Multiscale Modeling.

    PubMed

    Suter, James L; Groen, Derek; Coveney, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    We describe the mechanism that leads to full exfoliation and dispersion of organophilic clays when mixed with molten hydrophilic polymers. This process is of fundamental importance for the production of clay-polymer nanocomposites with enhanced materials properties. The chemically specific nature of our multiscale approach allows us to probe how chemistry, in combination with processing conditions, produces such materials properties at the mesoscale and beyond. In general agreement with experimental observations, we find that a higher grafting density of charged quaternary ammonium surfactant ions promotes exfoliation, by a mechanism whereby the clay sheets slide transversally over one another. We can determine the elastic properties of these nanocomposites; exfoliated and partially exfoliated morphologies lead to substantial enhancement of the Young's modulus, as found experimentally. PMID:26575149

  14. Development of biodegradable foamlike materials based on casein and sodium montmorillonite clay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable foamlike materials based on a naturally occurring polymer (casein protein) and sodium montmorillonite clay (Na+-MMT) were produced through a simple freeze-drying process. By utilizing DL-glyceraldehyde (GC) as a chemical cross-linking agent, the structural integrity of these new aeroge...

  15. Clay mineralogy of the ocean sediments from the Wilkes Land margin, east Antarctica: implications on the paleoclimate, provenance and sediment dispersal pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kamlesh; Bhattacharya, Sanjeeb; Biswas, P.; Shrivastava, Prakash K.; Pandey, Mayuri; Pant, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    Core U1359 collected from the continental rise off Wilkes Land, east Antarctica, is analyzed for the clay mineralogy and carbon content. The temporal variation of the clay mineralogical data shows a dominance of illite with chlorite, smectite and kaolinite in decreasing concentration. Clay mineral illite is negatively correlated with smectite which shows enrichment during 6.2-6.8, 5.5-5.8, 4.5 and 2.5 Ma. The mineralogical analyses on the silt size fraction (2-53 μm) of some selected samples were also carried out. The combined result of both the size fractions shows the presence of chlorite and illite in both size fractions, smectite and kaolinite only in clay size fraction (<2 μm) and similarity in the crystallinity and chemistry of illite in both fractions. Similar nature of illite in both fractions suggests negligible role of sorting probably due to the deposition from the waxing ice sheet. During times of ice growth, nearby cratonic east Antarctica shield provided biotite-rich sediments to the depositional site. On the other hand, the presence of smectite, only in the clay size fraction, suggests the effective role of sorting probably due to the deposition from distal source in ice retreat condition. During times of ice retreat, smectite-rich sediment derived from Ross Orogen is transported to the core site through surface or bottom water currents. Poor crystallinity of illite due to degradation further corroborates the ice retreat condition. The ice sheet proximal sediments of U1359 show that in the eastern part of Wilkes Land, the `warming' was initiated during late Miocene.

  16. Use of ground clay brick as a pozzolanic material to reduce the alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Turanli, L.; Bektas, F.; Monteiro, P.J.M

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this experimental study was to use ground clay brick (GCB) as a pozzolanic material to minimize the alkali-silica reaction expansion. Two different types of clay bricks were finely ground and their activity indices were determined. ASTM accelerated mortar bar tests were performed to investigate the effect of GCB when used to replace cement mass. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the GCBs meet the strength activity requirements of ASTM. In addition, the GCBs were found to be effective in suppressing the alkali-silica reaction expansion. The expansion decreased as the amount of GCBs in the mortar increased.

  17. Mesoporous materials derived from synthetic organo-clays as novel hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.; Marshall, C.L.; Brenner, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Various pore size distributions are found for synthetic organo-clay complexes from which the organic portion has been removed via calcination. The clays are prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice. The organic serves to impart long-range structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. Mesoporous materials are prepared from a host of organic modifiers. For example, pore diameters of 40-50{Angstrom} result from tetraethyl ammonium and celluloses, and polydimethyl diallyl ammonium imparts diameters of about 110{Angstrom} on average. These materials have begun to be explored as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysts for the mesoporous materials when a model oil feed is used (1% dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). The target application is HDS of an actual heavy crude oil from California.

  18. Mechanical properties of materials obtained via alkaline activation of illite-based clays of Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperberga, I.; Rundans, M.; Cimmers, A.; Krage, L.; Sidraba, I.

    2015-04-01

    Materials has been synthesized in the temperature range from 60-100 °C from two illite based clays of Latvia under activation of KOH and NaOH solutions (4-6 M). Compressive strength and apparent porosity were measured. The effect of concentration of KOH and NaOH solutions on the material mechanical properties was investigated by means of infrared spectroscopy (IR). Compressive strength data of the materials showed that via such activation could obtain building materials with good quality.

  19. Temperature and moisture distributions in a clay buffer material due to thermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N.; Kjartanson, B.

    1993-12-31

    Several series of one-dimensional tests were used to investigate the nature of transient heat and moisture movements in a clay buffer under different imposed temperature gradients. The measured temperature and moisture profiles were used to calculate the diffusion parameters governing heat and moisture movement in the buffer material. The diffusion parameters are shown to depend on the moisture content, temperature and moisture equilibrium time.

  20. Gas permeability of biochar-amended clay: potential alternative landfill final cover material.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2016-04-01

    Compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as an alternative landfill final cover material in this study. Biochar has long been proposed to promote crop growth, mitigate odor emission, and promote methane oxidation in field soils. However, previous studies showed that soil-gas permeability was increased upon biochar application, which will promote landfill gas emission. The objective of the present study is to investigate the possibility of using compacted BAC as an alternative material in landfill final cover by evaluating its gas permeability. BAC samples were prepared by mixing 425-μm-sieved peanut shell biochar with kaolin clay in different ratios (0, 5, 10, and 15 %, w/w) and compacting at different degrees of compactions (DOC) (80, 85, and 90 %) with an optimum water content of 35 %. The gas permeability of the BACs was measured by flexible wall gas permeameter and the microstructure of the BACs was analyzed by SEM with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that the effects of biochar content on BAC gas permeability is highly dependent on the DOC. At high DOC (90 %), the gas permeability of BAC decreases with increasing biochar content due to the combined effect of the clay aggregation and the inhibition of biochar in the gas flow. However, at low DOC (80 %), biochar incorporation has no effects on gas permeability because it no longer acts as a filling material to the retard gas flow. The results from the present study imply that compacted BAC can be used as an alternative final cover material with decreased gas permeability when compared with clay. PMID:26092359

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of the Hybrid Clay- Based Material Montmorillonite-Melanoidin: A Potential Soil Model

    SciTech Connect

    V Vilas; B Matthiasch; J Huth; J Kratz; S Rubert de la Rosa; P Michel; T Schäfer

    2011-12-31

    The study of the interactions among metals, minerals, and humic substances is essential in understanding the migration of inorganic pollutants in the geosphere. A considerable amount of organic matter in the environment is associated with clay minerals. To understand the role of organic matter in the environment and its association with clay minerals, a hybrid clay-based material (HCM), montmorillonite (STx-1)-melanoidin, was prepared from L-tyrosine and L-glutamic acid by the Maillard reaction. The HCM was characterized by elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), and thermal analysis. The presence of organic materials on the surface was confirmed by XPS and STXM. The STXM results showed the presence of organic spots on the surface of the STx-1 and the characterization of the functional groups present in those spots. Thermal analysis confirmed the existence of organic materials in the montmorillonite interlayer, indicating the formation of a composite of melanoidin and montmorillonite. The melanoidin appeared to be located partially between the layers of montmorillonite and partially at the surface, forming a structure that resembles the way a cork sits on the top of a champagne bottle.

  2. A mechanism of basal spacing reduction in sodium smectitic clay materials in contact with DNAPL wastes.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Cinar, Derya; Otero-Diaz, Margarita; Demond, Avery H

    2016-09-01

    There has been concern regarding the possible attack of clays in aquitards, slurry walls and landfill liners by dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) wastes, resulting in cracking. Despite the fact that a reduction in basal spacing in sodium smectitic clay materials has been linked to cracking, no plausible mechanism by which this reduction occurs in contact with waste DNAPLs has been formulated. To elucidate a mechanism, screening studies were conducted that showed that the combination of an anionic surfactant (AOT), a nonionic surfactant (TritonX-100) and a chlorinated solvent, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), could replicate the basal spacing reduction and cracking behavior of water-saturated bentonite caused by two waste DNAPLs obtained from the field. FTIR measurements of this system showed a displacement of the HOH bending band of water symptomatic of desiccation. Sorption measurements showed that the uptake of AOT by bentonite increased eight fold in the presence of TritonX-100 and PCE. The evidence presented here supports a mechanism of syneresis, involving the extraction of water from the interlayer space of the clay through the synergistic sorption of a nonionic and anionic surfactant mixture. It is speculated that the solvation of water in reverse micellar aggregates is the process driving the syneresis. PMID:27343864

  3. Mars: electric properties of clay materials in martian-like conditions to refine radar investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantuono, Luca; Baliva, Antonio; Lauro, Sebastian; Mattei, Elisabetta; Marinangeli, Lucia; Pettinelli, Elena; Seu, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The orbital radar instruments are giving new opportunities for planetary geological investigation regarding subsurface layering and geometry. Sedimentary deposits of paleolacustrine environments on Mars have shown the presence of various clay minerals . These clay deposits are very important in planetary exploration because they are strictly linked to the presence of water and to the capability of the analyzed environment to develop life and, as a consequence, to preserve fossilized life marker. The subsurface stratigraphy and geometry of sedimentary deposits on Mars are investigated by two orbiting radar instruments (SHARAD and MARSIS) and in the next future another radar instrument, a landing one, will be send on Mars (WISDOM). For small grain size sediments, like clay minerals, the dielectric properties have a strong impact on the penetration depth of the radar signal. We studied the correct evaluation of these properties and their correlation with chemical and mineralogical phases. The focus of this research is on the dielectric properties of natural clayey materials at different frequencies and temperature, evaluating the correlation among water content , temperature and electric properties. Several natural clayey material samples, considered as analogues to the Martian ones, have been collected from different geological settings in Italy and we analyzed their water content, mineralogical assemblage and chemical content and the correlation with the permittivity at different frequencies and temperatures using the Network Analyzer technique. We also changed the water content of the samples, and using the SHARAD, MARSIS and WISDOM operating frequencies, we measured the variation of permittivity and electric properties in the thermal range of 180 K to 298 K. The goal of the study is to refine the sounding depths of the radar investigation on Mars, exploring the possibility to identify clayey sedimentary layers analyzing the differences between the electric

  4. Interfacial reactions between humic-like substances and lateritic clay: application to the preparation of "geomimetic" materials.

    PubMed

    Goure-Doubi, Herve; Martias, Céline; Lecomte-Nana, Gisèle Laure; Nait-Ali, Benoît; Smith, Agnès; Thune, Elsa; Villandier, Nicolas; Gloaguen, Vincent; Soubrand, Marilyne; Konan, Léon koffi

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the strengthening of "geomimetic" materials, especially the chemical bonding between clay and humic substances. The mineral matter is lateritic clay which mainly consists in kaolinite, goethite, hematite and quartz. The other starting products are fulvic acid (FA) and lime. The preparation of these geomimetic materials is inspired from the natural stabilization of soils by humic substances occurring over thousands of years. The present process involves acidic and alkaline reactions followed by a curing period of 18days at 60°C under a water saturated atmosphere. The acceleration of the strengthening process usually observed in soils makes this an original process for treatment of soils. The consolidation of the "geomimetic" materials could result from two major phenomena: (i) chemical bonding at the interface between the clay particles and iron compounds and the functional groups of the fulvic acid, (ii) a partial dissolution of the clay grains followed by the precipitation of the cementitious phases, namely calcium silicate hydrates, calcium aluminate hydrates and mixed calcium silicum and aluminum hydrates. Indeed, the decrease of the BET specific area of the lateritic clay after 24 h of reaction with FA added to the structural reorganization observed between 900 and 1000°C in the "geomimetic" material, and to the results of adsorption measurements, confirm the formation of organo-ferric complexes. The presence of iron oxides in clay, in the form of goethite, appears to be another parameter in favor of a ligand exchange process and the creation of binding bridges between FA and the mineral matter. Indeed all faces of goethite are likely to be involved in complexation reactions whereas in lateritic clay only lateral faces could be involved. The results of the adsorption experiments realized at a local scale will improve our understandings about the process of adsorption of FA on lateritic

  5. Effects of two organomodified clays intended to food contact materials on the genomic instability and gene expression of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    Globally, food industries have made significant progress in order to increase the shelf-life of food products and have fewer economic losses. In this sense, the use of organomodified clays destined to be incorporated in polymer matrices play a novel role, leading to improved materials named nanocomposites with enhanced technological profiles. Due to the presence of these clays into the package, the safety of the consumers is a main concern. Cloisite(®)30B and Clay1 are two organomodified clays containing quaternary ammonium salts as modifiers, that can be potentially used to reinforce packaging polymers. Available toxicity data about these clays, specifically genotoxicity, is still limited and inconclusive in some aspects. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluate both clays ability to induce genomic instability through the cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay (CBMN) and for the first time, their influence in the modulation of several genes involved in genotoxicity and cell death mechanisms. Overall, no genotoxicity response was obtained in any case at the conditions tested. On the other hand, significant expression changes were observed on the genes selected. Nevertheless, further studies are highly needed to elucidate and increase the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of clays toxicity. PMID:26721448

  6. Insight into removal kinetic and mechanisms of anionic dye by calcined clay materials and lime.

    PubMed

    Vimonses, Vipasiri; Jin, Bo; Chow, Christopher W K

    2010-05-15

    Our recent work reported that a mixed adsorbent with natural clay materials and lime demonstrated an enhanced capacity and efficiency to remove anionic Congo Red dye from wastewater. This study aims to investigate the removal kinetic and mechanisms of the mixed materials involved in the decolourisation of the dye to maximise their prospective applications for industrial wastewater treatment. The experimental results showed that dye removal was governed by combined physiochemical reactions of adsorption, ion-exchange, and precipitation. Ca-dye precipitation contributed over 70% total dye removal, followed by adsorption and ion-exchange. The dye removal kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order expression and was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. This study indicated pH was a key parameter to govern the removal mechanisms, i.e. adsorption/coagulation at acidic pH and precipitation at basic condition. Yet, the overall removal efficiency was found to be independent to the operation conditions, resulting in more than 94% dye removal. This work revealed that the mixed clays and lime can be applied as alternative low-cost adsorbents for industrial wastewater treatment. PMID:20079967

  7. Thermal conductivity measurement in clay dominant consolidated material by Transient Hot-Wire method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J. P.; Gallier, J.; Mercx, B.; Dudoignon, P.; Milcent, D.

    2010-06-01

    The transient hot-wire (THW) technique is widely used for measurements of the thermal-conductivity of most fluids and some attempts have also been carried out for simultaneous measurements of the thermal-diffusivity with the same hot wire. This technique was also tried to determine thermal properties of soils by the mean of probes which can be considered as wire with some assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to validate the thermal conductivity measurement by the THW technique in geomaterials, composed of compacted sand + clay mineral that can be used for earth construction (Compacted Earth Brick). The thermal transfer behaviors are mainly governed by the texture and moisture of the geomaterials. Thus the investigations were performed (1) in media made of glass beads of different diameters in dry and saturated state in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation state on the wire temperature (Δt) measurements and (2) in the compacted clay-geomaterial at different moisture states. The Δt / ln(t) diagrams allow the calculation of two thermal conductivities. The first one, measured in the short time acquisition (< 1s), characterizes the microtexture of the material and its hydrated state. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean thermal conductivity of the material.

  8. Provenance analysis using Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material: A case study in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibourel, Lukas; Herman, Frédéric; Cox, Simon; Beyssac, Olivier; Lavé, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Detrital provenance analyses in orogenic settings, in which sediments are collected at the outlet of a catchment, have become an important tool to estimate how erosion varies in space and time. Here we present how Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) can be used for provenance analysis. RSCM provides an estimate of the peak temperature (RSCM-T) experienced during metamorphism. We show that we can infer modern erosion patterns in a catchment by combining new measurements on detrital sands with previously acquired bedrock data. We focus on the Whataroa catchment in the Southern Alps of New Zealand and exploit the metamorphic gradient that runs parallel to the main drainage direction. To account for potential sampling biases, we also quantify abrasion properties using flume experiments and measure the total organic carbon content in the bedrock that produced the collected sands. Finally, we integrate these parameters into a mass-conservative model. Our results first demonstrate that RSCM-T can be a powerful tool for detrital studies. The relative ease of data acquisition allows for a robust statistical provenance analysis with a high spatial resolution. Second, we find that spatial variations in tracer concentration and erosion intensity have a first-order control on the RSCM-T distributions, even though our flume experiments reveal that weak lithologies produce substantially more fine particles than do more durable lithologies. This result implies that sand specimens are good proxies for mapping spatial variations in erosion when the bedrock concentration of the target mineral is quantified. The modeling suggests highest present-day erosion rates (in Whataroa catchment) are not situated at the range front, as might be expected from the long-term metamorphic rock exhumation pattern, but about 10 km into the mountain belt. This closely matches the pattern of maximum rain fall and highest short-term (contemporary) inter-seismic uplift.

  9. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  10. Biocompatible high performance hyperbranched epoxy/clay nanocomposite as an implantable material.

    PubMed

    Barua, Shaswat; Dutta, Nipu; Karmakar, Sanjeev; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Aidew, Lipika; Buragohain, Alak K; Karak, Niranjan

    2014-04-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are in extensive use in the domain of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. High performance hyperbranched epoxy is projected here as a potential biomaterial for tissue regeneration. Thermosetting hyperbranched epoxy nanocomposites were prepared with Homalomena aromatica rhizome oil-modified bentonite as well as organically modified montmorillonite clay. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques confirmed the strong interfacial interaction of clay layers with the epoxy matrix. The poly(amido amine)-cured thermosetting nanocomposites exhibited high mechanical properties like impact resistance (>100 cm), scratch hardness (>10 kg), tensile strength (48-58 MPa) and elongation at break (11.9-16.6%). Cytocompatibility of the thermosets was found to be excellent as evident by MTT and red blood cell hemolytic assays. The nanocomposites exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632), Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536), Mycobacterium smegmatis (ATCC14468) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) strains. In vivo biocompatibility of the best performing nanocomposite was ascertained by histopathological study of the brain, heart, liver and skin after subcutaneous implantation in Wistar rats. The material supported the proliferation of dermatocytes without induction of any sign of toxicity to the above organs. The adherence and proliferation of cells endorse the nanocomposite as a non-toxic biomaterial for tissue regeneration. PMID:24495981

  11. Influence of Clay Content, Mineralogy and Fabric On Radar Frequency Response of Aquifer Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    High frequency electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) are widely employed to measure water saturation in the vadose zone and water filled porosity in the saturated zone. However, previous work has shown that radar frequency dielectric properties are strongly influenced by clay as well as by water content. They have also shown that that the dielectric response of clay minerals is strongly frequency dependent, and that even a small proportion of clay such as that present in many sandstone aquifers can have a large effect at typi- cal GPR frequencies (around 100MHz). Hence accurate water content/porosity deter- mination requires clay type and content to be taken into account. Reported here are dielectric measurements on clay-sand mixtures, aimed at investigating the influence of clay mineralogy, particle shape, and the geometrical arrangement of the mixture constituents on GPR and TDR response. Dielectric permittivity (at 50-1000MHz) was measured for mixtures of Ottawa Sand and various clay minerals or clay size quartz rock flour, using a specially constructed dielectric cell. Both homogeneous and layered mixtures were tested. The influence of pore water salinity, clay type, and particle arrangement on the dielectric response is interpreted in terms of dielectric dispersion mechanisms. The appropriateness of var- ious dielectric mixing rules such as the Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) for determination of water content or porosity from field GPR and TDR data are dis- cussed.

  12. Impact of DNAPL contact on the structure of smectitic clay materials.

    PubMed

    Ayral, Derya; Otero, Margarita; Goltz, Mark N; Demond, Avery H

    2014-01-01

    Smectitic clays have a flexible structure that may be impacted by contact with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) present at hazardous waste sites. Measurements of the basal spacing of air-dry clays contacted with pure chlorinated solvents and chlorinated DNAPL wastes showed that the intraparticle spacing is similar to that in air. Basal spacings of water-saturated clays contacted with pure chlorinated solvents are similar to those in contact with water, even after extended equilibration times (300 d). In contrast, contact with chlorinated DNAPL wastes reduced the basal spacing of water-saturated sodium smectites in a relatively short time frame, resulting in cracks that were as large as 1mm in aperture. The penetration of these wastes into the intraparticle spacing of clay and the resultant cracking may contribute to the accumulation of chlorinated compounds in clay layers observed in the field and the extended remediation times associated with this mass storage. PMID:24054135

  13. Influence of dispersing medium on grafting of aminopropyltriethoxysilane in swelling clay materials.

    PubMed

    Shanmugharaj, A M; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Ryu, Sung Hun

    2006-06-15

    Functionalization of montmorillonite clay has been done using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in the presence of various solvent media. Qualitative evidence of the presence of aminosilane attached to the clay platelets have been identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 29Si and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Grafting yield has been calculated using thermogravimetric analysis and total grafting yield increases with the solvent surface energy. X-ray diffraction studies of the silane functionalized montmorillonite clay exhibits two peaks, which may be attributed to intercalation and surface interaction with the broken edge platelets. Functionalized clay has been characterized by surface area measurements to understand the influence of solvents on the surface area of the functionalized clay. PMID:16427648

  14. Characterization of Two Different Clay Materials by Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dilatometry (DIL) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) - 12215

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Ekkehard; Henderson, Jack B.

    2012-07-01

    An illitic clay containing higher amounts of organic materials was investigated by dilatometry, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetric. The evolved gases were studied during simultaneous TG-DSC (STA) and dilatometer measurements with simultaneous mass spectrometry in inert gas and oxidizing atmosphere. The dilatometer results were compared with the STA-MS results which confirmed and explained the reactions found during heating of the clay, like dehydration, dehydroxylation, shrinkage, sintering, quartz phase transition, combustion or pyrolysis of organics and the solid state reactions forming meta-kaolinite and mullite. The high amount of organic material effects in inert gas atmosphere most probably a reduction of the oxides which leads to a higher mass loss than in oxidizing atmosphere. Due to this reduction an additional CO{sub 2} emission at around 1000 deg. C was detected which did not occur in oxidizing atmosphere. Furthermore TG-MS results of a clay containing alkali nitrates show that during heating, in addition to water and CO{sub 2}, NO and NO{sub 2} are also evolved, leading to additional mass loss steps. These types of clays showed water loss starting around 100 deg. C or even earlier. This relative small mass loss affects only less shrinkage during the expansion of the sample. The dehydroxylation and the high crystalline quartz content result in considerable shrinkage and expansion of the clay. During the usual solid state reaction where the clay structure collapses, the remaining material finally shrinks down to a so-called clinker. With the help of MS the TG steps can be better interpreted as the evolved gases are identified. With the help of the MS it is possible to distinguish between CO{sub 2} and water (carbonate decomposition, oxidation of organics or dehydration/dehydroxylation). The MS also clearly shows that mass number 44 is found during the TG step of the illitic clay at about 900 deg. C in inert gas, which was interpreted

  15. Contact of clay-liner materials with acidic tailings. II. Chemical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R.; Krupka, K.M.

    1981-09-01

    The ion speciation-solubility model WATEQ3 was used to model original aqueous solutions and solutions resulting from liner materials contacted with uranium mill tailings, synthetic mill tailings or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The modeling results indicate solution species which are in apparent equilibrium with respect to particular solids. These solids provide potential solubility controls for their corresponding dissolved constituents. The disequilibrium indices computed by WATEQ3 indicate amorphic Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), Al0HO/sub 4/, alunite (KA1/sub 3/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/(OH)/sub 6/), gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O), celestite (SrSO/sub 4/), anglesite (PbSO/sub 4/) and MnHPO/sub 4/ may have precipitated in the contacted liner materials and may also provide solubility controls for their dissolved constituents. The disequilibrium indices also show that the solutions resulting from the interaction of Highland Mill tailings are oversaturated with K-, H-, and Na-jarosites ((K,H,Na)Fe/sub 3/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/(OH)/sub 6/). Because jarosite has been identified by x-ray diffraction as a precipitate in these reacted liner materials, it would appear that there is a kinetic barrier which prohibits jarosite from being an effective solubility control. Results of this study also show that the solubilities of many solid phases were pH dependent. This exploratory use of geochemical modeling has demonstrated its capability to test solubility hypotheses for clay liners reacted with tailings solutions and to guide the analyses of important constituents and parameters for these solutions. Geochemical modeling can be used, in parallel with characterization techniques for the solid phases, to support the presence of the solid phase and to guide the search for further solid phases. Geochemical modeling is also an effective tool in delineating the chemical causes for changes in permeability of liner materials.

  16. Adsorption-regeneration by heterogeneous Fenton process using modified carbon and clay materials for removal of indigo blue.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Sánchez, Perla Tatiana; Solache-Ríos, Marcos J; Linares-Hernández, Ivonne; Martínez-Miranda, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Indigo blue dye is mainly used in dyeing of denim clothes and its presence in water bodies could have adverse effects on the aquatic system; for this reason, the objective of this study was to promote the removal of indigo blue dye from aqueous solutions by iron and copper electrochemically modified clay and activated carbon and the saturated materials were regenerated by a Fenton-like process. Montmorillonite clay was modified at pH 2 and 7; activated carbon at pH 2 and pH of the system. The elemental X-ray dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the optimum pH for modification of montmorillonite with iron and copper was 7 and for activated carbon was 2. The dye used in this work was characterized by infrared. Unmodified and modified clay samples showed the highest removal efficiencies of the dye (90-100%) in the pH interval from 2 to 10 whereas the removal efficiencies decrease as pH increases for samples modified at pH 2. Unmodified clay and copper-modified activated carbon at pH 2 were the most efficient activated materials for the removal of the dye. The adsorption kinetics data of all materials were best adjusted to the pseudo-second-order model, indicating a chemisorption mechanism and the adsorption isotherms data showed that the materials have a heterogeneous surface. The iron-modified clay could be regenerated by a photo-Fenton-like process through four adsorption-regeneration cycles, with 90% removal efficiency. PMID:26878687

  17. Cu(II) and Zn(II) adsorption capacity of three different clay liner materials.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Parolo, M E; Pettinari, G; Francisca, F M

    2014-12-15

    Sorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on three natural clays meeting the international requirements for use as liners was evaluated by means of batch tests. The purpose of this research was to determine the retention capacities of the clays for metal cations commonly present in urban solid waste leachates. The pH and ionic strength conditions were set at values frequently found in real leachates. The changes observed in the XRD patterns and FTIR spectra upon adsorption can be considered an evidence of clay-metal electrostatic interaction. The Langmuir model was found to best describe the sorption processes, offering maximum sorption capacities from 8.16 to 56.89 mg/g for Cu(II) and from 49.59 to 103.83 mg/g for Zn(II). All samples remove more Zn(II) than Cu(II), which may be related to the different geometry of the hydrated Cu(II) cation. The total amount of metal sorption was strongly influenced by the total specific surface area, the presence of carbonates and the smectite content of the clays. In addition to their known quality as physical barriers, the adsorbed amounts obtained indicate the suitability of the tested clays to contribute to the retardation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) transport through clay liners. PMID:25156265

  18. Constructing wetlands: measuring and modeling feedbacks of oxidation processes between plants and clay-rich material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Rémon; Dekker, Stefan C.; Griffioen, Jasper; Wassen, Martin J.

    2016-04-01

    Interest is growing in using soft sediment as a building material in eco-engineering projects. Wetland construction in the Dutch lake Markermeer is an example: here the option of dredging some of the clay-rich lake-bed sediment and using it to construct 10.000 ha of wetland will soon go under construction. Natural processes will be utilized during and after construction to accelerate ecosystem development. Knowing that plants can eco-engineer their environment via positive or negative biogeochemical plant-soil feedbacks, we conducted a six-month greenhouse experiment to identify the key biogeochemical processes in the mud when Phragmites australis is used as an eco-engineering species. We applied inverse biogeochemical modeling to link observed changes in pore water composition to biogeochemical processes. Two months after transplantation we observed reduced plant growth and shriveling as well as yellowing of foliage. The N:P ratios of plant tissue were low and were affected not by hampered uptake of N but by enhanced uptake of P. Plant analyses revealed high Fe concentrations in the leaves and roots. Sulfate concentrations rose drastically in our experiment due to pyrite oxidation; as reduction of sulfate will decouple Fe-P in reducing conditions, we argue that plant-induced iron toxicity hampered plant growth, forming a negative feedback loop, while simultaneously there was a positive feedback loop, as iron toxicity promotes P mobilization as a result of reduced conditions through root death, thereby stimulating plant growth and regeneration. Given these two feedback mechanisms, we propose that when building wetlands from these mud deposits Fe-tolerant species are used rather than species that thrive in N-limited conditions. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of studying the biogeochemical properties of the building material and the feedback mechanisms between plant and soil prior to finalizing the design of the eco-engineering project.

  19. Probing the local environment of hybrid materials designed from ionic liquids and synthetic clay by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Leonardo J. A.; Constantino, Vera R. L.; Camilo, Fernanda F.; Torresi, Roberto M.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Izumi, Celly M. S.

    2014-03-01

    Hybrid organic-inorganic material containing Laponite clay and ionic liquids forming cations have been prepared and characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis. The effect of varying the length of the alkyl side chain and conformations of cations has been investigated by using different ionic liquids based on piperidinium and imidazolium cations. The structure of the N,N-butyl-methyl-piperidinium cation and the assignment of its vibrational spectrum have been further elucidated by quantum chemistry calculations. The X-ray data indicate that the organic cations are intercalated parallel to the layers of the clay. Comparison of Raman spectra of pure ionic liquids with different anions and the resulting solid hybrid materials in which the organic cations have been intercalated into the clay characterizes the local environment experienced by the cations in the hybrid materials. The Raman spectra of hybrid materials suggest that the local environment of all confined cations, in spite of this diversity in properties, resembles the liquid state of ionic liquids with a relatively disordered structure.

  20. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  1. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, four companies including H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay, Old Hickory Clay and Unimin mined ball clay in four states. Based on a preliminary survey of the ball clay industry, production reached 1.32 Mt valued at $53.3 million. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producer state with 61% of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky.

  2. Clays, specialty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the specialty clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. The specialty clays mined in the U.S. are ball clay, fuller's earth, bentonite, fire clay, and kaolin. Sales of specialty clays in the U.S. were around 17 Mt in 1997. Approximately 53 kt of specialty clays were imported.

  3. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  4. Materials with controlled mesoporosity derived from synthetic polyvinylpyrrolidone-clay composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Xu, L.; Chemistry

    1999-01-01

    Mesoporous synthetic clays (MSCs) are obtained when polymer-containing silicate gels are hydrothermally crystallized to form layered magnesium silicate hectorite clays containing polymers that are incorporated in situ. In this in situ technique, interlayer intercalation of different polymers over broad molecular weight and concentration ranges is achieved. The polymer loading of synthesized composites is determined by thermal analysis, and the basal spacing changes resulting from different levels of polymer intercalation are monitored by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). In some cases, intercalation occurs to such a degree as to delaminate the layers and cause loss of stacking registry. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of several average molecular weights ranging from 10x10{sup 3}-1.3x10{sup 6}, in loadings varying from 10 to 20 wt.%, were used. The organic polymer template molecules were removed from synthetic polymer-clay complexes via calcination. Pore radii, surface areas and pore volumes of the resulting porous inorganic networks (MSCs) were then measured. A direct correlation between both PVP Mw and polymer loading on the radius of the average pore was found, which varied from 21-45 Angstroms.

  5. Structure-Property Correlation in Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Clay Hybrid Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Son, You-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Kun; Soong, Yee; Martello, Donald; Chyu, Minking

    2010-03-16

    Heterostructures between montmorillonite and embedded alpha-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are explored to create new hybrid particles with high magnetic response and magnetic-field induced tunability. α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are hybridized to montmorillonite clays by using an intercalation technique. Also, stable aqueous fluids consisting of the heterostructured particles are prepared and the rheology of the fluids under external magnetic field is examined. When α-Fe2O3 a nanoparticles are embedded in the interlayer space of montmorillonite clays, the magnetization per Fe atom increases at most 60 times. This unique combination of the magnetization and the coercivity is traced to the suppressed growth of embedded α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles by the aluminosilicate layers, leading to the size control, anisotropic magnetic interaction, and uniaxial stress of two-dimensionally distributed α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Furthermore, high magnetization of heterostructured particles leads to strong dependence of fluids' viscosity on the external magnetic field. The present study indicates that the new heterostructured particles have unique magnetic fielddependent properties that are not attainable in individual clay or iron oxide particles.

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  7. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  8. Clay alteration of volcaniclastic material in a submarine geothermal system, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Michael W. A.; Hannington, Mark D.; Percival, Jeanne B.; Stoffers, Peter; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; de Ronde, C. E. J.

    2010-04-01

    The Calypso Hydrothermal Vent Field (CHVF) is located along an offshore extension of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), an area of abundant volcanism and geothermal activity on the North Island of New Zealand. The field occurs within a northeast-trending submarine depression on the continental shelf approximately 10-15 km southwest of the White Island volcano in the Bay of Plenty. The graben has been partially filled by tephra from regional subaerial volcanic eruptions, and active hydrothermal venting occurs at several locations along its length. The vents occur at water depths of 160 to 190 m and have temperatures up to 201 °C. Recovered samples from the vent field include variably cemented and veined volcaniclastic sediments containing an assemblage of clay minerals, amorphous silica, barite, As-Sb-Hg sulfides, and abundant native sulfur. The volcanic glass has been altered primarily to montmorillonite and mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite; illite, and possibly minor talc and mixed-layer chlorite-smectite or chlorite-vermiculite are also present. A hydrothermal versus diagenetic origin for the smectite is indicated by the presence of both illite and mixed-layer clays and by the correlation between the abundance of clay minerals and the abundance of native sulfur in the samples. The mineralization and alteration of the volcanic host rocks are similar to that observed in near-neutral pH geothermal systems on land in the TVZ (e.g., Broadlands-Ohaaki). However, the clay minerals in the CHVF have a higher concentration of Mg in the dioctahedral layer and a higher interlayer Na content than clay minerals from Broadlands-Ohaaki, reflecting the higher concentrations of Mg and Na in seawater compared to meteoric water. Minerals formed at very low pH (e.g., kaolinite and alunite), typical of steam-heated acid-sulfate type alteration in the TVZ geothermal environment, were not found. Mixing with seawater likely prevented the formation of such low-pH mineral assemblages. The

  9. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  10. Use of natural clays as sorbent materials for rare earth ions: Materials characterization and set up of the operative parameters.

    PubMed

    Iannicelli-Zubiani, Elena Maria; Cristiani, Cinzia; Dotelli, Giovanni; Gallo Stampino, Paola; Pelosato, Renato; Mesto, Ernesto; Schingaro, Emanuela; Lacalamita, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Two mineral clays of the montmorillonite group were tested as sorbents for the removal of Rare Earths (REs) from liquid solutions. Lanthanum and neodymium model solutions were used to perform uptake tests in order to: (a) verify the clays sorption capability, (b) investigate the sorption mechanisms and (c) optimize the experimental parameters, such as contact time and pH. The desorption was also studied, in order to evaluate the feasibility of REs recovery from waters. The adsorption-desorption procedure with the optimized parameters was also tested on a leaching solution obtained by dissolution of a dismantled NdFeB magnet of a hard-disk. The clays were fully characterized after REs adsorption and desorption by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); the liquid phase was characterized via Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analyses. The experimental results show that both clays are able to capture and release La and Nd ions, with an ion exchange mechanism. The best total efficiency (capture ≈ 50%, release ≈ 70%) is obtained when the uptake and release processes are performed at pH=5 and pH=1 respectively; in real leached scrap solutions, the uptake is around 40% but release efficiency is strongly decreased passing from a mono-ion system to a real system (from 80% to 5%). Furthermore, a strong matrix effect is found, with the matrix largely affecting both the uptake and the release of neodymium. PMID:26403388

  11. Element distribution patterns in the ordovician Galena group, Southeastern Minnesota: Indicators of fluid flow and provenance of terrigenous material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Morey, G.B.; Mossler, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a regional geochemical investigation of lower Paleozoic strata in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota, elemental concentrations in acid-insoluble residues were determined for carbonate rock in the Middle Ordovician Galena Group. Elemental distribution patterns within the insoluble residues, particularly those of Ti, Al, and Zr, show that the Wisconsin dome and the Wisconsin arch, which contributed sediment to the embayment prior to Galena time, continued as weak sources of sediment during this period. In contrast, trace metals commonly associated with Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization, including Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Ni, Co, As, and Mo, show dispersal patterns that are independent of those associated with primary depositional phenomena. These trace metals are concentrated in southern Minnesota in carbonate rocks near the interface between limestone- and dolostone-dominated strata. Dispersal patterns imply that the metals were carried by a north-flowing regional ground-water system. The results show that the geochemical attributes of insoluble residues can be used to distinguish provenance and transport directions of primary sediments within a depositional basin from effects of subsequent regional ground-water flow systems.

  12. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  13. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  14. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  15. Antimicrobial nanocomposites based on natural modified materials: a review of carbons and clays.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Valásková, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The review is focused on the recent research and development of antimicrobial nanocomposites based on selected carbon nanomaterials and natural nanoclay minerals. The nanocomposites comprised of two or several components, where at least one presents antimicrobial properties, are discussed. Yet the most popular agent remains silver as nanoparticle or in ionic form. Second, broadly studied group, are organics as additives or polymeric matrices. Both carbons and clays in certain forms possess antimicrobial properties. A lot of interest is put on to research graphene oxide. The low-environmental impact technologies-based on sustainable biopolymers have been studied. Testing of antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials is performed most frequently on E. coli and S. aureus bacterias. PMID:24730289

  16. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  17. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  18. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  19. The composition and origin of Ghana medicine clays

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, Bart E.; Fraser, Sharon E.; Insoll, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    The mineral, organic and elemental composition of medicine clays from three shrines in the Tong Hills in northern Ghana (Gbankil, Kusanaab, and Yaane) are assessed to ascertain what additives they might contain and the implications for their recognition, for example in archaeological contexts. These are clays that are widely used for healing purposes being perceived efficacious in curing multiple ailments and which are given a divine provenance, but their collection is ascribed human agency. The Yaane clay is also supplied as part of the process of obtaining the right to operate the shrine elsewhere making it widely dispersed. Organic geochemical analyses revealed a predominance of plant-derived material with a substantial contribution of microbial origin. Based on these (supported by elemental and mineral analyses), no unnatural organic material could be detected, making an exogenous contribution to these clays unlikely. The implications are that these are wholly natural medicinal substances with no anthropogenic input into their preparation, as the traditions suggest. The very similar mineralogy of all the clays, including a non-medicine clay sampled, suggests that, unless the geology radically differed, differentiating between them analytically in an archaeological contexts would be doubtful. PMID:21810043

  20. The composition and origin of Ghana medicine clays.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Bart E; Fraser, Sharon E; Insoll, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The mineral, organic and elemental composition of medicine clays from three shrines in the Tong Hills in northern Ghana (Gbankil, Kusanaab, and Yaane) are assessed to ascertain what additives they might contain and the implications for their recognition, for example in archaeological contexts. These are clays that are widely used for healing purposes being perceived efficacious in curing multiple ailments and which are given a divine provenance, but their collection is ascribed human agency. The Yaane clay is also supplied as part of the process of obtaining the right to operate the shrine elsewhere making it widely dispersed. Organic geochemical analyses revealed a predominance of plant-derived material with a substantial contribution of microbial origin. Based on these (supported by elemental and mineral analyses), no unnatural organic material could be detected, making an exogenous contribution to these clays unlikely. The implications are that these are wholly natural medicinal substances with no anthropogenic input into their preparation, as the traditions suggest. The very similar mineralogy of all the clays, including a non-medicine clay sampled, suggests that, unless the geology radically differed, differentiating between them analytically in an archaeological contexts would be doubtful. PMID:21810043

  1. The Use of Small-Particle Sized TiO2 Supported on Clays as Photocatalytic Materials: A Low- Cost Alternative Technology for the Degradation of Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibanova, D.; Trejo, M.; Destaillats, H.; Cervini-Silva, J.

    2007-05-01

    Assisted photocatalysis by TiO2 is an advanced oxidation process that has been employed for air and water remediation. Clays are natural porous materials bearing high surface areas and interlayer spacing that allows entrapment of small-sized particles. Pillared clays exchanged with small-sized TiO2 can constitute materials with interesting photocatalytic properties because high surface area values and large contents of mesospores, which enables analyte trapping. Furthermore, intercalation at the clay interlayer enables TiO2 to become more resistant to aggregation when in solution. Just recently it has been reported that clays can lead to increases in the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 when the mesopores size is adequate to host organic solutes and ensure their effective interaction with the TiO2 particles. In this paper we study the photocatalytic properties of small-sized TiO2 supported on the following clay samples: Montmorillonite [SWy-2, Na0.2Ca0.1Al2Si4O10(OH)2(H2O)10 ] from Crook Country, Wyoming, USA; Hectorite [SHCa-1, Na0.4Mg2.7Li0.3Si4O10(OH)2 ] from San Bernardino. Country, California, USA; Kaolinite [KGa-1b, Al2Si2O5(OH)4 ] from Washington Country, Georgia, USA. Deposition of TiO2 on the clay surface was conducted by using a sol-gel synthetic method. Anatase TiO2 particles transformation at the clay interlayer was achieved by thermic treatment at 180 °C. Material characterization was conducted using FTIR microspectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and XRD analysis. The organic compound used as probe was ethanol

  2. Inorganic raw materials economy and provenance of chipped industry in some stone age sites of northern and central Italy.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Amilcare; Boschian, Giovanni; Crisci, Gino Mirocle; Danese, Ermanno; De Francesco, Anna Maria; Dini, Mario; Fontana, Federica; Giampietri, Alessandra; Grifoni, Renata; Guerreschi, Antonio; Liagre, Jérémie; Negrino, Fabio; Radi, Giovanna; Tozzi, Carlo; Tykot, Robert

    2004-06-01

    An opportunistic and local choice of raw materials is typically attested in the Lower and Middle Paleolithic industries throughout Italy. The quality of the raw material usually affected the flaking technology and quality of the products. In the Upper Paleolithic and the Mesolithic, raw material procurement strategies were more complex. Flint was exploited both locally, in areas where abundant outcrops of raw materials were available (such as the Lessini mountains), and in distant localities, after which it was transported or exchanged over medium/long distances. Different routes of exchange were thus followed in the various periods; good reconstruction of these routes have been provided by a study of the Garfagnana sites in Northern Tuscany, and the Mesolithic deposit of Mondeval de Sora (Dolomites). An interesting example of a Late Upper Paleolithic flint quarry and workshop were found in Abruzzo, in the San Bartolomeo shelter. The extended trade of obsidian from Lipari, Palmarola and Sardinia to the Italian Peninsula is attested in the Neolithic, with some differences concerning the age and different areas. PMID:15636064

  3. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was applied to measure the effective pore diffusion coefficient (Dp) for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions in a silt/clay sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux" diffusion studies were conducted in which [U(VI)] in both aqueous and solid phases was measured as a function of distance in the diffusion cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed contaminant U(VI) in the solid phase containing extractable background U(VI). The effect of sorption kinetics on U(VI) interparticle diffusion was evaluated by comparing sorption-retarded diffusion models with sorption described either as equilibrium or intraparticle diffusion-limited processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that (1) a single pore diffusion coefficient can simulate the diffusion of total aqueous U(VI), and (2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling sorption-retarded diffusion under the given experimental conditions. Dp of 1.6-1.7 x 10(-6) cm2/s was estimated in aqueous solution at pH 8.0 and saturated with respect to calcite, as relevant to some subsurface regions of the Hanford site. PMID:19921882

  4. Study of sorption-retarded U(VI) diffusion in Hanford silt/clay material

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Jing; Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P.

    2009-10-15

    A diffusion cell method was developed to measure the effective aqueous diffusion coefficient for U(VI) under strictly controlled chemical conditions within the inter-particle pores of silt/clay sediment from the DOE Hanford site, WA. "Inward-flux” diffusion studies were conducted in which U(VI) concentrations in both aqueous and solid phases were measured as a function of distance into the cell under conditions of constant concentration at the cell boundaries. A sequential extraction method was developed to measure sorbed U(VI) content in the solid phase, while accounting for the non-negligible extractable background U(VI). U(VI) diffusion data were found to be consistent with a model that assumed that: 1) a single effective aqueous diffusion coefficient could be used to simulate the coupled diffusion of various aqueous U(VI) species, and 2) the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) is appropriate for modeling the effects of sorption under the given experimental conditions. An effective aqueous diffusion coefficient (De) of 1.6x10^-6 cm2/s was obtained under conditions of pH 8.0 and calcite saturation that are relevant to the subsurface conditions at some regions of the Hanford site. The developed experimental techniques provide a practical approach for measuring effective aqueous U(VI) diffusivity in sorptive porous media.

  5. Polyurethane rigid foam, a proven thermal insulating material for applications between +130°C and -196°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demharter, Anton

    Polyurethanes are high molecular weight polymers based on the polyaddition of polyfunctional hydroxyl-group containing compounds and polyisocyanates. A wide variety of properties can be tailored to fulfil the requirements of different applications: soft to hard, plastic, elastic or thermoset, compact or foamed. Compared with other insulating materials, PUR rigid foam is highly competitive. There are five product-related advantages: lowest thermal conductivity, high mechanical and chemical properties at both high and low temperatures, all major international fire safety requirements can be satisfied, the ability to form sandwich structures with various facer materials, and the new generation of PUR is CFC-free and recyclable. Rigid polyurethane foams perform well in most areas of low-temperature insulations. Products in density ranging from approximately 30 to 200 kg m -3 withstand temperatures down to -196°C. Typical applications are: refrigerated vehicles, road and rail tankers, vessels for refrigerated cargo, pipelines, liquid gas tanks for LPG and LNG and cryogenic wind tunnels. The paper presents applications, corresponding properties of the rigid foams used, and also other insulating materials in competition to PUR are discussed.

  6. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  7. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  8. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  9. Geophagic clay materials from Nigeria: a potential source of heavy metals and human health implications in mostly women and children who practice it.

    PubMed

    Lar, U A; Agene, J I; Umar, A I

    2015-04-01

    Geophagy is a common practice among certain cultural groups especially women in some rural communities in Nigeria. The safety of eating such clays in terms of their heavy metal composition has not been ascertained, neither is the link between them and disease conditions established in geophagists. The analysis of field survey data reveals that the majority (about 90 %) of the women did not go beyond secondary school education. The geology of an area has a direct influence on the chemical composition of the soils. Therefore, this research was carried out to determine the mineralogical and the heavy metal content of some geophagic clay materials from Nigeria. All the geophagic clay materials are hydrated silicates of either Al, (Na and Ca), (Al and Mg), or/and (Mg and Fe). The concentration levels of Na, Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Cu, and Zn are tolerable and apparently could serve as a veritable source of mineral nutrients deficient in the human body. An assessment of the level of contamination of heavy metals on the basis of the index of geo-accumulation (I(geo)) shows that Cr, Cu, Zn, Co, and Ni (all with I(geo) < 1) did not contaminate the clay materials. On the contrary, they are extremely contaminated by As, Cd and Se (I(geo) = >5), and are moderately to strongly contaminated by Pb and Sb (I (geo) = 2-3). In terms of health risk assessment, the presence of heavy metals such as As, Cd, Pb, Se, and Sb with a health risk index (HRI) >1, renders the geophagic clays unsafe for human consumption. Similarly, Al, Fe, and Na are in excess in the clay (HRI ⋙ 1) posing serious human health risks. Thus, the ingestion of geophagic clay materials by pregnant women and children when it contains heavy metals like Pb, As, Cd, Se, and Sb poses the risk of some medical disorders and should therefore be considered a public health problem. Since geophagic practice will persist despite civilization, we advocate finding ways of reducing heavy metal pollutants in geophagic clays through

  10. Composite TiO2/clays materials for photocatalytic NOx oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Karapati, S.; Petridis, D.; Vaimakis, T.; Trapalis, C.

    2014-11-01

    TiO2 photocatalyst received much attention for air purification applications especially for removal of air pollutants like NOx, VOCs etc. It has been established that the activity of the photocatalyst can be significantly enhanced by its immobilization onto suitable substrates like inorganic minerals, porous silica, hydroxyapatite, adsorbent materials like activated carbon, various co-catalysts such as semiconductors, graphene, reduced graphite oxide, etc. In the present work, photocatalytic composite materials consisted of mineral substrate and TiO2 in weight ratio 1:1 were manufactured and examined for oxidation and removal of nitric oxides NOx (NO and NO2). Commercial titania P25 (Evonik-Degussa) and urea-modified P25 were used as photocatalytically active components. Inorganic minerals, namely kunipia, talk and hydrotalcite were selected as supporting materials due to their layered structure and expected high NOx adsorption capability. Al3+ and Ca2+ intercalation was applied in order to improve the dispersion of TiO2 and its loading into the supporting matrix. The X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed the binary structure of the composites and homogeneous dispersion of the photocatalyst into the substrates. The photocatalytic behavior of the materials in NOx oxidation and removal was investigated under UV and visible light irradiation. The composite materials exhibited superior photocatalytic activity than the bare titania under both types of irradiation. Significant visible light activity was recorded for the composites containing urea-modified titania that was accredited to the N-doping of the semiconductor. Among the different substrates, the hydrotalcite caused highest increase in the NOx removal, while among the intercalation ions the Ca2+ was more efficient. The results were related to the improved dispersion of the TiO2 and the synergetic activity of the substrates as NOx adsorbers.

  11. Nanostructured multifunctional electromagnetic materials from the guest-host inorganic-organic hybrid ternary system of a polyaniline-clay-polyhydroxy iron composite: preparation and properties.

    PubMed

    Reena, Viswan L; Pavithran, Chorappan; Verma, Vivek; Sudha, Janardhanan D

    2010-03-01

    A nanostructured electromagnetic polyaniline-polyhydroxy iron-clay composite (PPIC) was prepared by oxidative radical emulsion polymerization of aniline in the presence of polyhydroxy iron cation (PIC) intercalated clays. Morphological observation through SEM, TEM, and AFM suggested the formation of self-assembled nanospheres of PIC with self-assembled PANI engulfed over PIC, and the presence of iron in PPIC was confirmed by the EDS analysis. XRD studies revealed that PPIC are comprised of exfoliated clay layers with PIC in the distorted spinel structure. Magnetic property measurements showed that saturation magnetization increased from 7.3 x 10(-3) to 2.5 emu/g upon varying the amount of PHIC content from 0 to 10%. Electrical conductivity measurements with the same composition were observed to be in the range of 3.0 x 10(-2) to 1.1 S/cm. Thermal stability studies using TGA in combination with DTG suggested that PPICs were thermally stable up to 350 degrees C. The interaction among clay layers, PIC, and PANI chains in PPIC were manifested from the studies made by FTIR and DSC analysis. The prospects for the direct application of this material are developing low-cost chemical sensors and also processable electromagnetic interference shielding materials for high technological applications. PMID:20136090

  12. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  13. Medical rare book provenance.

    PubMed Central

    Overmier, J A; Sentz, L

    1987-01-01

    Provenance is defined as the record of a book's ownership history. Its value and uses are explored. A survey of provenance practices in medical school rare book libraries found that only 21% of the reporting libraries maintain this important file. Examples of the uses and value of a provenance file in a medical rare book collection are presented. Decisions necessary to institute and maintain such a file are outlined and discussed. PMID:3828606

  14. Physical response of backfill materials to mineralogical changes in a basalt environment. [Sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Backfill materials surrounding waste canisters in a high-level nuclear waste repository are capable of ensuring very slow flow of groundwater past the canisters, and thereby increase the safety of the repository. However, in the design of a repository it will be necessary to allow for possible changes in the backfill. In this experimental program, changes in permeability, swelling behavior, and plastic behavior of the backfill at the temperatures, pressures, and radiation levels expected in a repository are investigated. The emphasis is on investigation of relevant phenomena and evaluation of experimental procedures for use in licensing procedures. The permeability of a slightly compacted sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite, with a dry bulk density of 1.59 g/cm/sup 3/, was determined to be 0.9 x 10/sup -18/ m/sup 2/ in liquid water at 25 and 200/sup 0/C, respectively. This is sufficiently low to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of proposed materials. In practice, fractures in the host rock may form short circuits around the backfill, so an even lower flow rate is probable. However, alteration by any of several mechanisms is expected to change the properties of the backfill. Crushed basalt plus bentonite is a leading candidate backfill for a basalt repository. Experiments show that basalt reacts with groundwater vapor or with liquid groundwater producing smectites, zeolites, silica, and other products that may be either beneficial or detrimental to the long-term performance of the backfill. Concentration of groundwater salts in the backfill by evaporation would cause immediate, but possibly reversible, reduction of the swelling abaility of bentonite. Moreover, under some circumstances, gamma radiolysis of moist air in the backfill could produce up to 0.5 mole of nitric acid or ammonia per liter of pore space. 27 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  16. Electrokinetics of pure clay minerals revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sondi, I.; Biscan, J.; Pravdic, V.

    1996-03-25

    Clay minerals have long attracted the attention of colloid scientists. This paper considers, specifically, their important role in the transport of various contaminants from land to sea, e.g., metal ions and organic detrital and man-made material in watercourses. Advance in experimental techniques have enabled precise characterization of clays and then electrokinetic experiments at high electrolyte concentrations, such as in seawater. Three of the most important clay minerals encountered in suspended matter in natural waters, montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite, were prepared in a very pure state. Electrokinetic experiments were done in pure aqueous single and complex electrolyte solutions and in solutions in which natural organic matter was simulated using a humic substance, fulvic acid, of defined provenance and properties, typical of riverine waters. An isoelectric point was found at pH 5.0 {+-} 0.2 for chlorite; none were found for illite and montmorillonite. Only Ca{sup 2+} showed a charging effect on chlorite, indeed a reversal of sign from negative to positive at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mol dm{sup {minus}3}. Addition of fulvic acid affected only chlorite, illite less, and Na montmorillonite not at all.

  17. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  18. Experimental and Modeling Study of Sorption-Retarded U(VI) Diffusion in a Hanford Silt/Clay Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Liu, C.; Ball, W. P.

    2008-12-01

    Two types of "inward-flux" diffusion cell systems immersed in finite- and infinite- volume liquid systems were designed to study U(VI) diffusion in a silt/clay size Hanford sediment material at pH 8.0 (±0.1) and in equilibrium with calcite solids and atmospheric CO2. U(VI) concentrations at the cell boundaries were monitored during the cell operation, and the spatial profiles of U(VI) concentrations in both the pore water and the solid phase in the cell media were measured at the end of the cell operation. Results show that while sorption equilibrium was maintained in the "infinite-volume" cell system, strong non-equilibrium occurred in the cells of the "finite-volume" systems, where desorption from solids near the cell-solution interface was important. Rate limitations to sorption and desorption were also independently measured in batch sorption and desorption experiments. A distributed first-order rate model was applied to model U(VI) sorption/desorption kinetics in the batch and the two types of diffusion cell systems. Sensitivity analysis on the modeling confirmed that local equilibrium of sorption was reasonably valid for the infinite-volume system, but less valid for the finite-volume case, presumably because of the greater importance of desorption, and/or the lower U(VI) in the finite-volume system. With proper accounting for non-equilibrium sorption, both types of cells provided good experimental measure of effective diffusion rates. The use of tritiated water (HTO) tracer provided independent measurement of the tortuosity factor, allowing calculation of molecular diffusion coefficients for the dominant U(VI) species, principally Ca2(UO2)(CO3)30 and Ca(UO2)(CO3)32-.

  19. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  20. Slag of Greek provenance uses in materials science and geophysics: implications for a highly potential material in the service of the development of Greek economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontakianakos, G.; Baziotis, I.; Sotiriadis, K.; Goulas, G.; Liakopoulos, S.; Karastathis, V.

    2012-04-01

    Ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) is a secondary raw material that can be used as an alternative low energy binder. Hydraulic properties can be occurred through its alkali activation. GGBS is characterized by the glassy to crystalline ratio and by its chemical and mineralogical composition. Acidic slag cannot easily get crystallized in oppose to the basic one. Crystalline phases show very low reactivity with Ca(OH)2, while amorphous phases can easily react in the presence of basic substances. The aim of the present study was to study the evolution of new advanced silicate materials presenting high durability at high temperature environments. Specimens were produced using two types of slag of Greek origin. The first type was a ferrous slag, while the second one was calcareous. Their maximum particle size was 4 mm and 0.07 mm respectively. Specimens were prepared using the above slag types and siliceous sand as an aggregate. Sand was divided according to European Standard EN 196-1 in three fractions: PG1 (1

  1. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  2. Provenance in bioinformatics workflows

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we used the PROV-DM model to manage data provenance in workflows of genome projects. This provenance model allows the storage of details of one workflow execution, e.g., raw and produced data and computational tools, their versions and parameters. Using this model, biologists can access details of one particular execution of a workflow, compare results produced by different executions, and plan new experiments more efficiently. In addition to this, a provenance simulator was created, which facilitates the inclusion of provenance data of one genome project workflow execution. Finally, we discuss one case study, which aims to identify genes involved in specific metabolic pathways of Bacillus cereus, as well as to compare this isolate with other phylogenetic related bacteria from the Bacillus group. B. cereus is an extremophilic bacteria, collected in warm water in the Midwestern Region of Brazil, its DNA samples having been sequenced with an NGS machine. PMID:24564294

  3. Provenance in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie-Graham, Allan J; Van Horn, John D; Woods, Roger P; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2008-08-01

    Provenance, the description of the history of a set of data, has grown more important with the proliferation of research consortia-related efforts in neuroimaging. Knowledge about the origin and history of an image is crucial for establishing data and results quality; detailed information about how it was processed, including the specific software routines and operating systems that were used, is necessary for proper interpretation, high fidelity replication and re-use. We have drafted a mechanism for describing provenance in a simple and easy to use environment, alleviating the burden of documentation from the user while still providing a rich description of an image's provenance. This combination of ease of use and highly descriptive metadata should greatly facilitate the collection of provenance and subsequent sharing of data. PMID:18519166

  4. Shear-wave velocity as an indicator for rheological changes in clay materials: Lessons from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainsant, G.; Jongmans, D.; Chambon, G.; Larose, E.; Baillet, L.

    2012-10-01

    Clay-rich geological formations are responsible for many landslides, the dynamics of which are still poorly understood and intensely debated. Analysis of landslide motion shows that slow clayey slope movements can suddenly accelerate and fluidize as a result of sudden loading or heavy rainfall. This solid-fluid transition, which involves disorganization of the particle network, is accompanied by a loss in rigidity that could potentially be monitored by S-wave velocity (Vs) variations. To investigate this hypothesis, two types of laboratory experiments were performed on clay samples originating from an area affected by numerous landslides (Trièves, French Alps). First, creep and oscillatory rheometric tests revealed the thixotropic behavior of the clay with a highly pronounced viscosity bifurcation at a critical stress τc. In relation with this reduction in apparent viscosity, a significant drop in Vs is also observed over τc. Second, at zero stress, acoustic surface wave propagation experiments showed a rapid linear Vs decrease with the gravimetric water content (w) in the plastic domain, and a much lower decay in the liquid domain. The geotechnically-defined liquid limit then appears as a break in the Vs-w curve. For water contents in the liquid domain in particular, both experiments gave consistent results. These laboratory results demonstrate that rheological changes in clay can be revealed through Vs variations, offering the possibility of monitoring solid-to-fluid transitions in the field.

  5. Clay Mineralogy: The clay mineral composition of soils and clays is providing an understanding of their properties.

    PubMed

    Grim, R E

    1962-03-16

    The structures of the clay minerals are reasonably well known, but greater detail and more precision are needed if the properties of clays and soils are to be fully understood. For example, the selective adsorptive and catalytic properties and the reaction with organic materials vary with the character of the clay mineral, but the structural factors that control such properties are not well understood. Research is urgently needed on the structure of pure clay minerals and on the reactions of pure clay minerals with organic and inorganic materials. Much past research on clay-mineral reactions has little fundamental value because the clay that was used was composed of a mixture of minerals which were not well characterized. It is not a simple matter to find pure samples of many of the clay minerals, and to a considerable extent progress depends on finding such pure minerals or preparing them in the laboratory. PMID:17816101

  6. GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS) IN LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low permeability, compacted clay linters are commonly required as a barrier to water infiltration in landfill covers. elatively new material, known as geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), has been proposed as an alternative to a compacted clay liner. CL has the practical advantages of ...

  7. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  8. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  9. Clay-based Nanocomposites Possibilities and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    In the last decades, clay mineral based nanocomposites and polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNC) have been proposed as very useful materials for many uses including photocatalysis, medicinal uses as tissue engineering or modified drug delivery systems. Clay minerals and especially montmorillonite, kaolinite, halloysite palygorskite and sepiolite are the most used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, colloidal dimensions of their particles and other properties. This lecture aims at reporting on very recent developments in the use of clay minerals and PCNC as materials with photocatalytic and medical interest.

  10. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  11. Provenance Store Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  12. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  13. Provenance for Environmental Cyberenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futrelle, J.

    2006-12-01

    Scientific collaboration is a complex distributed process that spans disciplinary, organizational, and spatiotemporal boundaries. As information technology (IT) is deployed in scientific communities, new techniques are required to manage these complex processes so that the digital artifacts associated with scientific knowledge can be used as effectively as possible. Cyberenvironments (CE) propose to extend current IT infrastructure to support distributed, collaborative work, comprising online collaboration tools, distributed data management, distributed processing, and social networking analysis. The Environmental Cyberinfrastructure Demonstrator (ECID) project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) is exploring cyberenvironment directions for environmental research, motivated in particular by the requirements being identified through the NSF's CLEANER/CUASHI/WATERS environmental observatory planning activities. These requirements entail providing integrated access to an evolving set of community sensor networks, data collections, models, analysis tools, literature, and community members, and tracking the relationships between them. The metadata and provenance information required to support resource discovery and information fusion to support new scientific endeavors is anticipated to come from a variety of sources including human inputs, direct reporting from individual tools, and inferences from observations of human and system activities and to evolve over time. At NCSA, we have been developing a lightweight, distributed infrastructure for managing metadata and provenance information and, through ECID, applying it in support of environmental observatory scenarios. This poster will provide an overview of the technical infrastructure being created, describe the set of tools and types of information being managed in ECID, and outline concepts such as sharing of best-practice workflows and community model validation that would leverage this

  14. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  15. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  16. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  17. Use of phosphate materials as ameliorants for acid mine drainage. Volume 2. Use of phosphate clay in revegetation of minesoils: A greenhouse study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhumbla, D.K.; Sencindiver, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Acid mine drainage from the high sulfur coal mining industry in West Virginia, western Pennsylvania, Ohio, western Kentucky and Illinois is the primary environmental problem facing this industry. Mine acid drainage has adversely affected streams and surface revegetation of abandoned mined lands. The effectiveness of application of phosphatic clay slurries in the revegetation of mine soils is examined in a greenhouse study. It is concluded that phosphatic clays have a potential for amending minesoils for revegetation purposes. Phosphatic clay treatment produced higher crop yields than treatments with rock phosphate or monocalcium phosphate. In addition, phosphatic clays improved uptake of macronutrients in plants grown on both shale and sandstone minesoils.

  18. Initiation and development of slickenlined surfaces in clay-rich material of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Schleicher, Anja

    2016-04-01

    During the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which is part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (stage 3), the drilling vessel Chikyu advanced the deep riser hole at Site C0002, located 80 km offshore of the Kii Peninsula (Japan), from a depth of 860 meters below sea floor (mbsf) to 3058.5 mbsf. Underlying the Kumano Basin sediments, the Nankai accretionary prism appears, below 975.5 mbsf. It accreted during Upper Miocene to Pliocene times and is formed mainly by turbiditic silty claystone with rarely observed sandstone intercalations. Cuttings from both the 1-4 mm and >4 mm size fractions were investigated, showing slickenlined surfaces and deformation bands together with carbonate veins throughout the entire section from 1045.5 until 3058.5 mbsf. A scaly fabric is increasingly observed below approximately 2400 mbsf. Clay-rich cuttings were selected at different depth for specific SEM-EDS analysis, in order to investigate the initiation and development of the slickenlined surfaces, from both a structural and mineralogical point of view. Two end-members of the slickenlined surface types were observed: a) isolated smooth and uniform planes, between 20 and 50 μm long, formed by single grains of smectite with marked lineations and frequently jagged boundaries and b) microfaults (longer than 100 μm) with sharp boundaries to the undeformed rock, formed by aggregates of illite and smectite and with a well-developed lineation. In transition between these two end-member types, planes that are apparently unconnected draw a single plane and show subparallel lineations. Concerning the orientation of the slickenlines, it seems to be coherent with that observed in an array of conjugated faults, i.e. all the slickenlines belong to the same plane, in turn sub-perpendicular to the intersection of conjugated planes. These observations suggest that the slickenlined surfaces initiated along single grains of smectite and that with increasing

  19. Biodegradable pectin/clay aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2013-03-13

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. The addition of multivalent cations (Ca(2+) and Al(3+)) resulted in apparent cross-linking of the polymer and enhancement of aerogel properties. The compressive properties increased as the solid contents (both pectin and clay) increased; moduli in the range of 0.04-114 MPa were obtained for materials with bulk densities ranging from 0.03 g/cm(3) to 0.19 g/cm(3), accompanied by microstructural changes from a lamellar structure to a cellular structure. Biodegradability of the aerogels was investigated by detecting CO2 release for 4 weeks in compost media. The results revealed that pectin aerogels possess higher biodegradation rates than wheat starch, which is often used as a standard for effective biodegradation. The addition of clay and multivalent cations surprisingly increased the biodegradation rates. PMID:23406325

  20. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    at the upper right, the small mesa -- a flat-topped hill -- at the center of the image is a remnant of an overlying rock layer that was eroded away. The greenish clay areas at the base of the hill were exposed by erosion of the overlying rock. The images at the upper right and lower left both show that the reddish-toned olivine occurs as sand dunes on top of the greenish clay deposits. The image at the lower right shows details of the clay-rich rock, including that they are extensively fractured into small, polygonal blocks just a few meters in size. Taken together, the CRISM and HiRISE data show that the clay-rich rocks are the oldest at the site, that they are exposed where overlying rock has been eroded away, and that the olivine is not part of the clay-rich rock. Rather it occurs in sand dunes blowing across the clay.

    Many more images of Nili Fossae and other clay-rich areas will be taken over the next two years. They will be used to try to understand the earliest climate of Mars that is recorded in the planet's rocks.

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad.

    CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits and map the geology, composition and stratigraphy of surface features. The instrument will also watch the seasonal variations in Martian dust and ice aerosols, and water content in surface materials o leading to new understanding of the climate.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the Califonia Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor and built the spacecraft.

  1. Provenance and flux of detrital materials in Lake Suigetsu sediment (SG12 core) and their temporal changes during the last 20 kyrs based on color and XRF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Tada, R.; Nakagawa, T.; Gotanda, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Nagashima, K.; Irino, T.; Sugisaki, S.; Kojima, H.; Horiuchi, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Suigetsu in Central Japan is known for its annual lamination (varve) starting from 70kys ago. Extremely precise Age-depth model is established for SG06 core based on over 800 14C dates obtained on terrestrial leaf fossils and wiggle-matched to stalagmite 14C records constrained by varve counts (Staff et al., 2013). By projecting this age model to newly drilled core from the same site, we can obtain precisely age-controlled high resolution paleoenvironmental record around the Lake Suigetsu drainage. It is likely that detrital materials in Lake Suigetsu sediments have several different sources such as soil on the slopes around the lake itself, aeolian dust from inland Asia, and suspended particles supplied from Hasu river through lake Mikata, which is located immediately upstream of Lake Suigetsu and trapping most of coarse detrital grains. However, the relative contribution from each detrital source and its temporal changes are poorly known. The lack of knowledge on relative contribution of different detrital sources limits utility of detrital materials as proxies of paleo-environments. In this study, we are aiming to reconstruct the history of precipitation changes in the drainage area of Lake Suigetsu during the Holocene to explore the relationship between precipitation in the Japan Sea side of SW Japan, behavior of Asian monsoon system as an important component of the global climate system. It is well known that flux of suspended particles in rivers increases with precipitation. In order for us to be able to use the Hasu river's flux of suspended particles as the precipitation proxy, however, we first need to establish a simple and swift way to estimate the contribution of detrital materials from Hasu River flowing through Lake Mikata into Lake Suigetsu. We carried out color measurement with 5mm resolution on split half core surface of the sediment drilled in the summer of 2012(SG12), and compared these values to chemical composition data by XRF microscanner

  2. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  3. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  4. Provenance through Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Shepherd, A.; Allison, M. D.; Kinkade, D.; Rauch, S.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to reproduce scientific results is a cornerstone of the scientific method, and access to the data upon which the results are based is essential to reproducibility. Access to the data alone is not enough though, and research communities have recognized the importance of metadata (data documentation) to enable discovery and data access, and facilitate interpretation and accurate reuse. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was first funded in late 2006 by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Biology and Chemistry Sections to help ensure that data generated during NSF OCE funded research would be preserved and available for future use. The BCO-DMO was formed by combining the formerly independent data management offices of two marine research programs: the United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (US JGOFS) and the US GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics (US GLOBEC) program. Since the US JGOFS and US GLOBEC programs were both active (1990s) there have been significant changes in all aspects of the research data life cycle, and the staff at BCO-DMO has modified the way in which we manage data contributed to the office. The supporting documentation that describes each dataset was originally displayed as a human-readable text file retrievable via a Web browser. BCO-DMO still offers that form because our primary audience is marine researchers using Web browser clients; however we are seeing an increased demand to support machine client access. Metadata records from the BCO-DMO data system are now extracted and published out in a variety of formats. The system supports ISO 19115, FGDC, GCMD DIF, schema.org Dataset extension, formal publication with a DOI, and RDF with semantic markup including PROV-O, FOAF and more. In the 1990s, data documentation helped researchers locate data of interest and understand the provenance sufficiently to determine fitness for purpose. Today, providing data

  5. Provenance of the K/T boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Boynton, W. V.

    1988-01-01

    An array of chemical, physical and isotopic evidence indicates that an impact into oceanic crust terminated the Cretaceous Period. Approximately 1500 cu km of debris, dispersed by the impact fireball, fell out globally in marine and nonmarine environments producing a 2 to 4 mm thick layer (fireball layer). In North American locales, the fireball layer overlies a 15 to 25 mm thick layer of similar but distinct composition. This 15 to 25 mm layer (ejecta layer) may represent approximately 1000 cu km of lower energy ejecta from a nearby impact site. Isotopic and chemical evidence supports a mantle provenance for the bulk of the layers. The extraordinary REE pattern of the boundary clays was modelled as a mixture of oceanic crust, mantle, and approximately 10 percent continental material. The results are presented. If the siderophiles of the ejecta layer were derived solely from the mantle, a test may be available to see if the siderophile element anomaly of the fireball layer had an extraterrestrial origin. Radiogenic Os-187 is depleted in the mantle relative to an undifferentiated chondritic source. Os-187/Os-186 ratios of 1.049 and 1.108 were calculated for the ejecta and fireball layers, respectively.

  6. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  7. Age and provenance of the target materials for tektites and possible impactites as inferred from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, H. F.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical, trace element, and isotopic compositions of tektites are consistent with production by melting of sediments derived from the old terrestrial continental crust. Each tektite group is characterized by a uniform Nd model age, interpreted as the time of formation of the crustal segment which weathered to form the parent sediment for the tektites. Sr model ages are variable within each group, reflecting Rb-Sr fractionation, and, in the favorable limit of very high Rb/Sr ratios, approach the time of sedimentation of the parent material which melted to form the tektites. Unlike tektites, which are dense homogeneous objects, sanidine spherules are porous, fine grained inhomogeneous objects. The leaching experiment employed by the present study shows that the sanidine spherules could have been formed by an oceanic impact involving basaltic crust and overlying sediments or seawater.

  8. Obsidian provenance research in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Glascock, Michael D

    2002-08-01

    The characterization of archaeological materials to support provenance research has grown rapidly over the past few decades. Volcanic obsidian has several unique properties that make it the ideal archaeological material for studying prehistoric trade and exchange. This Account describes our laboratory's development of a systematic methodology for the characterization of obsidian sources and artifacts from Mesoamerica and other regions of North and South America in support of archaeological research. PMID:12186565

  9. Design and characterization of a composite material based on Sr(II)-loaded clay nanotubes included within a biopolymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Del Buffa, Stefano; Bonini, Massimo; Ridi, Francesca; Severi, Mirko; Losi, Paola; Volpi, Silvia; Al Kayal, Tamer; Soldani, Giorgio; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-06-15

    This paper reports on the preparation, characterization, and cytotoxicity of a hybrid nanocomposite material made of Sr(II)-loaded Halloysite nanotubes included within a biopolymer (3-polyhydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) matrix. The Sr(II)-loaded inorganic scaffold is intended to provide mechanical resistance, multi-scale porosity, and to favor the in-situ regeneration of bone tissue thanks to its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The interaction of the hybrid system with the physiological environment is mediated by the biopolymer coating, which acts as a binder, as well as a diffusional barrier to the Sr(II) release. The degradation of the polymer progressively leads to the exposure of the Sr(II)-loaded Halloysite scaffold, tuning its interaction with osteogenic cells. The in vitro biocompatibility of the composite was demonstrated by cytotoxicity tests on L929 fibroblast cells. The results indicate that this composite material could be of interest for multiple strategies in the field of bone tissue engineering. PMID:25778738

  10. Communicating with Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit on clay that is centered around sign language in which students explore the slab method of working with clay. States that each student picks a letter of the sign language alphabet and fashions a clay hand to depict the letter. (CMK)

  11. Effect of clay modification on the morphological, mechanical, and thermal properties of epoxy/polypropylene/montmorillonite shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huifeng; Sun, He; Liu, Yuyan; Tong, Linbao; Du, Xingwen

    2012-04-01

    A series of montmorillonite (DK2) modified shape memory polyurethane-epoxy (UEP) composites had been prepared. The effect of DK2 modification on the morphological, mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy/polypropylene/Montmorillonite nano-composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tensile test, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The shape memory performance was investigated by fold-deploy shape memory tests. The XRD and TEM results indicated the formation of exfoliated structure for epoxy/polypropylene nano-composites had been prepared using 2~ 3wt.% DK2. On the other hand, a mixture of intercalated and exfoliated structure was found in 4~5wt.% DK2/ epoxy/polypropylene polymers. Further more, the toughness, tensile strength, enlongation at break had been improved by adding DK2, while glass transition temperature, storage modulus and shape recovery ratio was unaffected. The composite materials possessed excellent shape memory properties, they could fully recover their original shapes within 3 min under the maximum bending angle of 180°, and there were little effect by fold-deploy ten times.

  12. Effect of clay modification on the morphological, mechanical, and thermal properties of epoxy/polypropylene/montmorillonite shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huifeng; Sun, He; Liu, Yuyan; Tong, Linbao; Du, Xingwen

    2011-11-01

    A series of montmorillonite (DK2) modified shape memory polyurethane-epoxy (UEP) composites had been prepared. The effect of DK2 modification on the morphological, mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy/polypropylene/Montmorillonite nano-composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tensile test, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The shape memory performance was investigated by fold-deploy shape memory tests. The XRD and TEM results indicated the formation of exfoliated structure for epoxy/polypropylene nano-composites had been prepared using 2~ 3wt.% DK2. On the other hand, a mixture of intercalated and exfoliated structure was found in 4~5wt.% DK2/ epoxy/polypropylene polymers. Further more, the toughness, tensile strength, enlongation at break had been improved by adding DK2, while glass transition temperature, storage modulus and shape recovery ratio was unaffected. The composite materials possessed excellent shape memory properties, they could fully recover their original shapes within 3 min under the maximum bending angle of 180°, and there were little effect by fold-deploy ten times.

  13. The altarpieces of Della Robbia atelier in Marche region: investigations on technology and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadori, M. L.; Barcelli, S.; Barcaioni, S.; Bouquillon, A.; Padeletti, G.; Pallante, P.

    2013-12-01

    Dissemination of Della Robbia glazed terracotta in the Marche (Italy) region started from the third decade of the 16th century. Numerous altarpieces, some of which no longer exist, document this artistic production. The protagonists of this diffusion phase were two of Andrea Della Robbia's sons, Marco (Fra Mattia) and Francesco (Fra Ambrogio). This paper shows the results of the scientific investigations carried out on constitutive materials of different altarpieces located in South Marche belonging to the Fra Mattia's production: the Coronation of Virgin between Saints Rocco, Sebastian, Peter martyr and Antonio abbot, dated back to 1527-1530, located in the collegiate church of S. Maria Assunta in Montecassiano; the Annunciation, dated back to 1520, placed in the church of S. Maria del Soccorso in Arcevia; the fragmentary Crowned Madonna and saints altarpiece, probably realized after 1531, today preserved in Civic Museum of Ripatransone. The first altarpiece was made in Montecassiano using two different assembling or production techniques: the external part of the lunette and the pillar strips are made of glazed polychrome terracotta, while the altar step and the internal part are an interesting and uncommon example of polychrome painted terracotta. The provenance of the glazed Arcevia altarpiece is not clear yet: some historians hypothesize a local manufacture of Fra Mattia and some others a Roman or Florentine production. The remaining parts of Ripatransone altarpiece are partially glazed and partially not coated perhaps because they were unfinished and not yet painted. Clay body samples collected from the above mentioned altarpieces were investigated using different analytical techniques (OM, XRD, XRF, PIXE) to point out differences in chemical and mineralogical composition and to determine if the altarpieces were made by using local raw clay materials or other clays from Tuscany or Campania as in the Della Robbia previous production. A comparison has also been

  14. Confine Clay in an Alternating Multilayered Structure through Injection Molding: A Simple and Efficient Route to Improve Barrier Performance of Polymeric Materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feilong; Deng, Hua; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Ke; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2015-05-20

    Various methods have been devoted to trigger the formation of multilayered structure for wide range of applications. These methods are often complicated with low production efficiency or require complex equipment. Herein, we demonstrate a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of polymeric sheets containing multilayered structure with enhanced barrier property through high speed thin-wall injection molding (HSIM). To achieve this, montmorillonite (MMT) is added into PE first, then blended with PP to fabricate PE-MMT/PP ternary composites. It is demonstrated that alternating multilayer structure could be obtained in the ternary composites because of low interfacial tension and good viscosity match between different polymer components. MMT is selectively dispersed in PE phase with partial exfoliated/partial intercalated microstructure. 2D-WAXD analysis indicates that the clay tactoids in PE-MMT/PP exhibits an uniplanar-axial orientation with their surface parallel to the molded part surface, while the tactoids in binary PE-MMT composites with the same overall MMT contents illustrate less orientation. The enhanced orientation of nanoclay in PE-MMT/PP could be attributed to the confinement of alternating multilayer structure, which prohibits the tumbling and rotation of nanoplatelets. Therefore, the oxygen barrier property of PE-MMT/PP is superior to that of PE-MMT because of increased gas permeation pathway. Comparing with the results obtained for PE based composites in literature, outstanding barrier property performance (45.7% and 58.2% improvement with 1.5 and 2.5 wt % MMT content, respectively) is achieved in current study. Two issues are considered responsible for such improvement: enhanced MMT orientation caused by the confinement in layered structure, and higher local density of MMT in layered structure induced denser assembly. Finally, enhancement in barrier property by confining impermeable filler into alternating multilayer structure through such

  15. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  16. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  17. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  18. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  19. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications. PMID:26435008

  20. Discrete Analysis of Clay Layer Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, T. N. H.; Plé, O.; Villard, P.; Gotteland, P.; Gourc, J. P.

    2009-06-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used to investigate the tensile behaviour and cracks mechanisms of a clay material submitted to bending loading. It is the case of compacted clay liners in landfill cap cover application. Such as the soil tested in this study is plastic clay, the distinct elements model was calibrated with previous data results by taking into account cohesive properties. Various contact and cohesion laws are tested to show that the numerical model is able to reproduce the failure mechanism. Numerical results are extending to simulate a landfill cap cover.

  1. A Noisy 10GB Provenance Database

    SciTech Connect

    Cheah, You-Wei; Plale, Beth; Kendall-Morwick, Joey; Leake, David; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-06-06

    Provenance of scientific data is a key piece of the metadata record for the data's ongoing discovery and reuse. Provenance collection systems capture provenance on the fly, however, the protocol between application and provenance tool may not be reliable. Consequently, the provenance record can be partial, partitioned, and simply inaccurate. We use a workflow emulator that models faults to construct a large 10GB database of provenance that we know is noisy (that is, has errors). We discuss the process of generating the provenance database, and show early results on the kinds of provenance analysis enabled by the large provenance.

  2. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  3. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  4. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  5. Finicky clay divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  6. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  7. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  8. Nonspecific Compatibilization of Polymer Blends Using Functionalized Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Robert; Goldman, Michael; Rubinstein, Michael; Si, Mayu; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Ruderman, Gregory

    2003-03-01

    Binary and tertiary blends of polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) , and poletheylene terephthalate (PET) were produced by melt mixing in a Brabender twin screw extruder at 100RPM, 180C . Ten weight percent Cloisite 20A clay (Southern Clay Corp) was then added to some of the mixtures after ten minutes. In one case the clay was fist melt mixed with all three polymer components separately and then the three polymer/clay composites were melt mixed together. The samples were examined with transmission electron microscopy which revealed that the addition of clay during melt mixing produced a material that was much more homogenous than the material without clay or where the clay was first mixed individually into the components. This was confirmed by DMA analysis where the melt mixed sample with clay exhibited only one glass transition for both binary and tertiary blends, whereas the sample without clay, or where clay was first mixed into the individual components showed two glass transitions. These results were interpreted in terms of an in situ grafting model where the large surface to volume ration of the clay platelets was able to drastically reduce interfacial tension and hence domain size in the blends.

  9. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  10. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Phosphates in some missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Foord, E.E.; Keller, D.J.; Keller, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays. The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspora, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore ("burley" clay). The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality. The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore host

  12. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. PMID:24035982

  13. A clay grouting technique for granitic rock adjacent to clay bulkhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masumoto, K.; Sugita, Y.; Fujita, T.; Martino, J. B.; Kozak, E. T.; Dixon, D. A.

    Excavation and re-distribution of the stress around the tunnel lead to the development of an excavation damage zone (EDZ). While the bulkheads are keyed into the rock wall of the tunnel to act as cut-offs for the EDZ of the tunnel, clay grouting was conducted around the clay bulkhead as an additional measure to interrupt the connectivity of EDZ at the bulkhead. Clay grouting is being tested to determine if it is an effective method to reduce the permeability of fractured rock. The grouting into the EDZ is difficult because many of the fractures in the EDZ are connected with the excavation surface and cannot be filled efficiently by pressurizing the grout slurry. Therefore, the in situ injection tests of the clay grouting technique for the EDZ adjacent to the clay bulkhead were conducted to demonstrate the clay grouting technique and to estimate the ability of clay grouting to reduce permeability in the EDZ. This paper presents the results of these tests. Three in situ tests of clay grouting were performed during the Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX), conducted at Canada’s Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in the granitic rock to demonstrate technologies for tunnel sealing at full-scale. First, a clay grouting trial was conducted at a trial key in the tunnel about 25 m above the TSX tunnel. Secondly, the two series of clay grouting were performed in the TSX tunnel, on the upstream face of the key prior to the installation of the seal material of the clay key and later on the downstream side of the bulkhead. The results of these tests indicated a reduction in the permeability of granitic rock around the holes after grouting.

  14. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  15. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  16. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Canakcii, H.; Mavi, B.

    2011-12-26

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of different fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioactivity. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), external hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  17. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, I.; ćanakciı, H.; Mavi, B.; Günoǧlu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of diferent fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioacitivty. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure 226Ra, 232Th and 40K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  18. Clay Minerals are controlled by the environment - Clay Minerals control the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahr, K.; Zarei, M.

    2012-04-01

    Where clay minerals are analyzed in soils, often there is some confusion, because in the widespread loess-affected and moraine landscapes of Europe quite a variety of clay minerals is found. The sources of these minerals are inherited from the local solid rock, transported through different processes, transformed through mineral changes and inherited from paleo-environments. Very often a miserable assemblage in the clay fraction is found with mica clay, smectite, kaolinite, chlorite and also some quartz. In order to understand the current dynamic of clay mineral formation, very detailed and quantitative analysis in comparison of horizons and landscape are necessary. It is much easier to through light on the development, if conditions are looked for where a single specific mineral can be formed like short range order minerals from volcanic ashes or smectites from basaltic parent material. Old leaching land surfaces will form kaolinitic and in tropical areas gibbsitic clay fractions. In arid environments of deserts and desert fringes, palygorskite and sepiolite can dominate. In general, clay minerals buffer the environment. This is mainly due to the extraordinary large interfaces between mineral surface and pore systems. In the last years mainly the processes of buffering through charging soil solution and of buffering through mineral organic compounds have been analyzed. Development of new microscopic and spectromethods have brought great progress in understanding the role of clays in soil environments.

  19. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  20. Provenance management in Swift with implementation details.

    SciTech Connect

    Gadelha, L. M. R; Clifford, B.; Mattoso, M.; Wilde, M.; Foster, I.

    2011-04-01

    The Swift parallel scripting language allows for the specification, execution and analysis of large-scale computations in parallel and distributed environments. It incorporates a data model for recording and querying provenance information. In this article we describe these capabilities and evaluate interoperability with other systems through the use of the Open Provenance Model. We describe Swift's provenance data model and compare it to the Open Provenance Model. We also describe and evaluate activities performed within the Third Provenance Challenge, which consisted of implementing a specific scientific workflow, capturing and recording provenance information of its execution, performing provenance queries, and exchanging provenance information with other systems. Finally, we propose improvements to both the Open Provenance Model and Swift's provenance system.

  1. Designing in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1977-01-01

    What can be done to transform a lump of wet clay into something more than a lump of glaze-fired clay? It is at this point when forming techniques have been mastered that good design becomes most important. Discusses six criteria involved in the search for good design so that students can discover what good design is and how important it is.…

  2. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  3. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  4. File level provenance tracking in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.D.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Tanenbaum, W.; Riley, D.S.; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2009-05-01

    The CMS off-line framework stores provenance information within CMS's standard ROOT event data files. The provenance information is used to track how each data product was constructed, including what other data products were read to do the construction. We will present how the framework gathers the provenance information, the efforts necessary to minimize the space used to store the provenance in the file and the tools that will be available to use the provenance.

  5. Hybrid inorganic-organic materials: Novel poly(propylene oxide)-based ceramers, abrasion-resistant sol-gel coatings for metals, and epoxy-clay nanocomposites, with an additional chapter on: Metallocene-catalyzed linear polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Kurt

    1999-12-01

    The sol-gel process has been employed to generate hybrid inorganic-organic network materials. Unique ceramers were prepared based on an alkoxysilane functionalized soft organic oligomer, poly(propylene oxide (PPO), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Despite the formation of covalent bonds between the inorganic and organic constituents, the resulting network materials were phase separated, composed of a silicate rich phase embedded in a matrix of the organic oligomer chains. The behavior of such materials was similar to elastomers containing a reinforcing filler. The study focused on the influence of initial oligomer molecular weight, functionality, and tetramethoxysilane, water, and acid catalyst content on the final structure, mechanical and thermal properties. The sol-gel approach has also been exploited to generate thin, transparent, abrasion resistant coatings for metal substrates. These systems were based on alkoxysilane functionalized diethylenetriamine (DETA) with TMOS, which generated hybrid networks with very high crosslink densities. These materials were applied with great success as abrasion resistant coatings to aluminum, copper, brass, and stainless steel. In another study, intercalated polymer-clay nanocomposites were prepared based on various epoxy networks montmorillonite clay. This work explored the influence of incorporated clay on the adhesive properties of the epoxies. The lap shear strength decreased with increasing day content This was due to a reduction in the toughness of the epoxy. Also, the delaminated (or exfoliated) nanocomposite structure could not be generated. Instead, all nanocomposite systems possessed an intercalated structure. The final project involved the characterization of a series of metallocene catalyzed linear polyethylenes, produced at Phillips Petroleum. Polyolefins synthesized with such new catalyst systems are becoming widely available. The influence of molecular weight and thermal treatment on the mechanical, rheological

  6. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  7. Ontology-Driven Provenance Management in eScience: An Application in Parasite Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Weatherly, D. Brent; Mutharaju, Raghava; Anantharam, Pramod; Sheth, Amit; Tarleton, Rick L.

    Provenance, from the French word "provenir", describes the lineage or history of a data entity. Provenance is critical information in scientific applications to verify experiment process, validate data quality and associate trust values with scientific results. Current industrial scale eScience projects require an end-to-end provenance management infrastructure. This infrastructure needs to be underpinned by formal semantics to enable analysis of large scale provenance information by software applications. Further, effective analysis of provenance information requires well-defined query mechanisms to support complex queries over large datasets. This paper introduces an ontology-driven provenance management infrastructure for biology experiment data, as part of the Semantic Problem Solving Environment (SPSE) for Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi). This provenance infrastructure, called T.cruzi Provenance Management System (PMS), is underpinned by (a) a domain-specific provenance ontology called Parasite Experiment ontology, (b) specialized query operators for provenance analysis, and (c) a provenance query engine. The query engine uses a novel optimization technique based on materialized views called materialized provenance views (MPV) to scale with increasing data size and query complexity. This comprehensive ontology-driven provenance infrastructure not only allows effective tracking and management of ongoing experiments in the Tarleton Research Group at the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), but also enables researchers to retrieve the complete provenance information of scientific results for publication in literature.

  8. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  9. EFFECTS OF SELECTED INORGANIC LEACHATES ON CLAY PERMEABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic conductivity test results for three field clays exposed to two inorganic chemicals are documented. The hydraulic conductivities of clays exposed to waste chemicals is an important consideration in the selection of a liner material for a hazardous waste containment facil...

  10. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  11. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  12. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  13. PROX: Approximated Summarization of Data Provenance

    PubMed Central

    Ainy, Eleanor; Bourhis, Pierre; Davidson, Susan B.; Deutch, Daniel; Milo, Tova

    2016-01-01

    Many modern applications involve collecting large amounts of data from multiple sources, and then aggregating and manipulating it in intricate ways. The complexity of such applications, combined with the size of the collected data, makes it difficult to understand the application logic and how information was derived. Data provenance has been proven helpful in this respect in different contexts; however, maintaining and presenting the full and exact provenance may be infeasible, due to its size and complex structure. For that reason, we introduce the notion of approximated summarized provenance, where we seek a compact representation of the provenance at the possible cost of information loss. Based on this notion, we have developed PROX, a system for the management, presentation and use of data provenance for complex applications. We propose to demonstrate PROX in the context of a movies rating crowd-sourcing system, letting participants view provenance summarization and use it to gain insights on the application and its underlying data. PMID:27570843

  14. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures < 500 C, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near approx 750 C. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection

  15. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Atreya, S. K.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise ~20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000oC and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures <500oC, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near ~750oC. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the ~20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the

  16. Tracking Provenance in ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, Zachary P; Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-08-01

    Provenance is dened as information about the origin of objects, a concept that applies to both physical and digital objects and often overlaps both. The use of provenance in systems designed for research is an important but forgotten feature. Provenance allows for proper and exact tracking of information, its use, its lineage, its derivations and other metadata that are important for correctly adhering to the scien- tic method. In our project's prescribed use of provenance, researchers can determine detailed information about the use of sensor data in their experiments on ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms (FRPs). Our project's provenance system, Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS), tracks information starting with the creation of information by an FRP sensor. The system determines station information, sensor information, and sensor channel information. The system allows researchers to derive generations of experiments from the sensor data and tracks their hierarchical flow. Key points can be seen in the history of the information as part of the information's workflow. The concept of provenance and its usage in science is relatively new and while used in other cases around the world, our project's provenance diers in a key area. To keep track of provenance, most systems must be designed or redesigned around the new provenance system. Our system is designed as a cohesive but sepa- rate entity and allows for researchers to continue using their own methods of analysis without being constrained in their ways in order to track the provenance. We have designed ProvDMS using a lightweight provenance library, Core Provenance Library (CPL) v.6 In addition to keeping track of sensor data experiments and its provenance, ProvDMS also provides a web-enabled visualization of the inheritance.

  17. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  18. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  19. Capability assessment for application of clay mixture as barrier material for irradiated zirconium alloy structure elements long-term processing for storage during decommissioning of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Zakharova, E. V.; Volkova, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    The radionuclide composition and the activity level of the irradiated zirconium alloy E110, the radionuclide immobilization strength and the retention properties of the mixed clay barrier material with respect to the radionuclides identified in the alloy were investigated to perform the safety assessment of handling structural units of zirconium alloy used for the technological channels in uranium-graphite reactors. The irradiated zirconium alloy waste contained the following activation products: 93mNb and the long-lived 94Nb, 93Zr radionuclides. Radionuclides of 60Co, 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides were also present in the alloy. In the course of the runs no leaching of niobium and zirconium isotopes from the E110 alloy was detected. Leach rates were observed merely for 60Co and 137Cs present in the deposits formed on the internal surface of technological channels. The radionuclides present were effectively adsorbed by the barrier material. To ensure the localization of radionuclides in case of the radionuclide migration from the irradiated zirconium alloy into the barrier material, the sorption properties were determined of the barrier material used for creating the long-term storage point for the graphite stack from uranium-graphite reactors.

  20. Geochemically tracking provenance changes in marine sediment from the South Pacific Gyre throughout the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG), characterized by extremely slow sedimentation rates, is the world's largest oceanic desert. The little eolian dust from continents in the Southern Hemisphere must traverse great distances to reach the SPG, and the ultra-oligotrophic waters minimize the biogenic flux of sediment to the seafloor. However sparse, the pelagic sediment that is ultimately found on the seafloor retains a chemical record that can be used to trace its origin. Using cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329, we trace downcore fluctuations in major, trace, and rare earth element (REE) composition and flux to yield clues to the geological, chemical, and biological evolution of the SPG throughout the Cenozoic. The shipboard scientific party generally described the completely oxic, brown pelagic clays recovered during Exp. 329 as zeolitic metalliferous clay. The homogenous, very fine-grained nature of these sediments speaks to the challenges we face in resolving eolian detrital material ("dust"), fine-grained ash (commonly altered), and authigenic aluminosilicates from one another. Based on ICP-ES and ICP-MS analyses followed by multivariate statistical treatments, we are developing chemical records from a number of sites located throughout the SPG. Building on earlier work at DSDP Site 596 (Zhou and Kyte, 1992, Paleocean., 7, 441-465), and based on backtrack paths from 100 Ma forward, we are working to construct a regionally and temporally continuous paleoclimatological history of the SPG. Preliminary La-Th-Sc concentrations from Sites U1367, U1368, and U1369 show a distinct authigenic influence, but several refractory elements retain their original provenance signature. Sediment ages are constrained using a constant-Co model, based on the geochemically similar work that Zhou and Kyte (1992) performed in the SPG. REE concentrations normalized to post-archean average shale (PAAS) reveal a negative Ce anomaly that becomes more pronounced closer to

  1. SLIDE PRESENTATION: LIMITATIONS OF USE OF GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS (GCLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the design and construction issues pertaining to the use of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLSs) in waste containment. The presentation covers new materials, potential design and construction pitfalls and a summary of ongoing research.

  2. CALCINED CLAYS AS A LOW EMISSION CEMENT SUBSTITUTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study provides a better understanding of clay-cement materials including: (i) their associated energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions of their manufacturing and transport, (ii) their structural performance and properties, and (iii) their emission characteristics affe...

  3. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  4. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  5. Painting with Clay: A Study of the Masters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Plasticine clay is a bendable material that is easily manipulated by students of all ages. It is a great material to work with because it does not dry out from day to day, so high-school students can work on an extended project. They do not have to worry about the clay drying and cracking, and the entire work of art does not have to be completed…

  6. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  7. Special Issue: The First Provenance Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Luc; Ludaescher, Bertram T.; Altintas, Ilkay; Barga, Roger S.; Bowers, Shawn; Callahan, Steven P.; Chin, George; Clifford, Ben; Cohen, Shirley; Cohen-Boulakia, Sarah; Davidson, Susan; Deelman, Ewa; digiampietri, Luciano; Foster, Ian T.; Freire, Juliana; Frew, James; Futrelle, Joe; Gibson, Tara D.; Gil, Yolanda; Goble, Carole; Golbeck, Jennifer; Groth, Paul; Holland, David A.; Jiang, Sheng; Kim, Jihie; Koop, David; Krenek, Ales; McPhillips, Timothy; Mehta, Gaurang; Miles, Simon; Metzger, Dominic; Munroe, Steve; Myers, James D.; Plale, Beth A.; Podhorszki, norbert; Ratnakar, Varun; Emanuele , Santos; scheidegger, Carlos E.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Seltzer, Margo I.; Simmhan, Yogesh L.; Claudio, Silva T.; Slaughter, Peter; Stephan, Eric G.; Stevens, Robert; Turi, Daniele; Vo, Huy T.; Wilde, Mike J.; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Yong

    2008-04-01

    The first Provenance Challenge was set up in order to provide a forum for the community to help understand the capabilities of different provenance systems and the expressiveness of their provenance representations. To this end, a Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging workflow was defined, which participants had to either simulate or run in order to produce some provenance representation, from which a set of identified queries had to be implemented and executed. Sixteen teams responded to the challenge, and submitted their inputs. In this paper, we present the challenge workflow and queries, and summarise the participants contributions.

  8. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of polymer/clay nanocomposites has been invented in an attempt to develop transparent, lightweight, durable materials for a variety of aerospace applications. As their name suggests, polymer/ clay nanocomposites comprise organic/ inorganic hybrid polymer matrices containing platelet-shaped clay particles that have sizes of the order of a few nanometers thick and several hundred nanometers long. Partly because of their high aspect ratios and high surface areas, the clay particles, if properly dispersed in the polymer matrix at a loading level of 1 to 5 weight percent, impart unique combinations of physical and chemical properties that make these nanocomposites attractive for making films and coatings for a variety of industrial applications. Relative to the unmodified polymer, the polymer/ clay nanocomposites may exhibit improvements in strength, modulus, and toughness; tear, radiation, and fire resistance; and lower thermal expansion and permeability to gases while retaining a high degree of optical transparency.

  9. How clays weaken faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Schleicher, Anja M.; Warr, Laurence N.

    2010-05-01

    The weakness of upper crustal faults has been variably attributed to (i) low values of normal stress, (ii) elevated pore-fluid pressure, and (iii) low frictional strength. Direct observations on natural faults rocks provide new evidence for the role of frictional properties on fault strength, as illustrated by our recent work on samples from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drillhole at Parkfield, California. Mudrock samples from fault zones at ~3066 m and ~3296 m measured depth show variably spaced and interconnected networks of displacement surfaces that consist of host rock particles that are abundantly coated by polished films with occasional striations. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study of the surfaces reveal the occurrence of neocrystallized thin-film clay coatings containing illite-smectite (I-S) and chlorite-smectite (C-S) phases. X-ray texture goniometry shows that the crystallographic fabric of these faults rocks is characteristically low, in spite of an abundance of clay phases. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the illitic mix-layered coatings demonstrate recent crystallization and reveal the initiation of an "older" fault strand (~8 Ma) at 3066 m measured depth, and a "younger" fault strand (~4 Ma) at 3296 m measured depth. Today, the younger strand is the site of active creep behavior, reflecting continued activation of these clay-weakened zones. We propose that the majority of slow fault creep is controlled by the high density of thin (< 100nm thick) nano-coatings on fracture surfaces, which become sufficiently smectite-rich and interconnected at low angles to allow slip with minimal breakage of stronger matrix clasts. Displacements are accommodated by localized frictional slip along coated particle surfaces and hydrated smectitic phases, in combination with intracrystalline deformation of the clay lattice, associated with extensive mineral dissolution, mass transfer and continued growth of expandable layers. The

  10. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Prasad, M.; Nur, A.

    2001-12-01

    We present ultrasonic P- and S-waves velocity measurements on pure clay samples using three different experiment setups. These experiments provided petrophysical and acoustic properties of clay minerals as a function both of mineralogy and compaction. In the first experiment, acoustic measurements were performed on cold-pressed clay aggregates at ambient and at hydrostatic pressure conditions. Porosity and grain density values of the different clay mineralogy aggregates ranged from 4 to 43% and 2.13 to 2.83 g cm-3, respectively. In the second experiment, we measured P-wave velocity and attenuation in a kaolinite-water suspension in which clay concentration was increased up to 60%. In the third experiment, P- and S- wave velocities were measured during uniaxial stress compaction of clay powders. Results from all three experiments revealed low bulk (K) and shear (μ ) moduli for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and smectite; the values range between 6-12 GPa for K and 4-6 GPa for μ , respectively. Using these clay moduli values in effective medium and granular porous media models, velocity is predicted in saturated pure kaolinite samples, kaolinite suspension and shaly sandstones fairly well. Experimental results also showed that water interlayers play an important role in the compaction and strength of clay aggregates. Clay minerals carrying on water interlayers in their structure showed high compaction and strength. This study is relevant for a more reliable assessment of the seismic response in reservoirs and/or basins characterized by clay-bearing formations.

  11. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  12. The surface modification of clay particles by RF plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Keol

    In this study, the surface coatings of ball clay, organoclay and exfoliated clay prepared by sol-gel process were done by RF plasma polymerization to improve the surface activity of the clay filler. Characterization of the above plasma-treated clays has been carried out by various techniques. The effects of plasma-treated clays as substitute of carbon black in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) on the curing and mechanical properties were investigated. After plasma treatment, the tensile properties of organo and exfoliated clay were not unsatisfactory to that of carbon black filler system. Moreover, only 10 phr filler loading of plasma-treated organoclay in EPDM vulcanizates showed better results than 40 phr filler loading of carbon black in EPDM vulcanizates. The main objective of this study was to verify the applicability of the plasma technique for modifying clay surfaces for their use in the tire manufacturing industry. Another purpose was to reveal the advantage of the plasma technique used to obtain modified-clay and improved properties that those materials can display.

  13. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    Color is a problem for scientific study. One aspect is the vocabulary one used to describe color. Mint green, bottle green, and Kelly green are nice names but not of great utility in that people's physical perception of color is not always the same. In some industries, such as colored fabric manufacture, current use is to send a set of standard colors which are matched by the producer. This is similar to the use of the Munsell color charts in geology. None of these processes makes use of physical optical spectral studies. The reason is that they are difficult to obtain and interpret. For a geologist, color is very important but we rarely have the possibility to standardize the method of our color perception. One reason is that color is both a reflective and transmission phenomenon. The thickness of the sample is critical to any transmission characteristics. Hence, a field color determination is different from one made by using a petrographic microscope. Green glauconite in a hand specimen is not the same color in 30 μm thick thin section seen with a microscope using transmitted light.A second problem is that color in a spectral identification is the result of several absorption emissions,with overlapping signal, forming a complicated spectrum. Interpretation depends very greatly on the spectrum of the light source and the conditions of transmission-reflection of the sample. As a result, for this text, we will not attempt to analyze the physical aspect of green in green clays. In the discussion which follows, reference is made concerning color, to thin section microscopic perception.Very briefly, green clay minerals are green, because they contain iron. This is perhaps not a great revelation to mineralogists, but it is the key to understanding the origin and stability of green clay minerals. In fact, iron can color minerals either red or green or in various shades of orange and brown. The color most likely depends upon the relative abundance of the iron ion valence

  14. Launch Services, a Proven Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafton, W. C.; Simpson, J.

    2002-01-01

    From a commercial perspective, the ability to justify "leap frog" technology such as reusable systems has been difficult to justify because the estimated 5B to 10B investment is not supported in the current flat commercial market coupled with an oversupply of launch service suppliers. The market simply does not justify investment of that magnitude. Currently, next generation Expendable Launch Systems, including Boeing's Delta IV, Lockheed Martin's Atlas 5, Ariane V ESCA and RSC's H-IIA are being introduced into operations signifying that only upgrades to proven systems are planned to meet the changes in anticipated satellite demand (larger satellites, more lifetime, larger volumes, etc.) in the foreseeable future. We do not see a new fleet of ELVs emerging beyond that which is currently being introduced, only continuous upgrades of the fleet to meet the demands. To induce a radical change in the provision of launch services, a Multinational Government investment must be made and justified by World requirements. The commercial market alone cannot justify such an investment. And if an investment is made, we cannot afford to repeat previous mistakes by relying on one system such as shuttle for commercial deployment without having any back-up capability. Other issues that need to be considered are national science and security requirements, which to a large extent fuels the Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Former Soviet Union, European and United States space transportation entries. Additionally, this system must support or replace current Space Transportation Economies with across-the-board benefits. For the next 10 to 20 years, Multinational cooperation will be in the form of piecing together launch components and infrastructure to supplement existing launch systems and reducing the amount of non-recurring investment while meeting the future requirements of the End-User. Virtually all of the current systems have some form of multinational participation: Sea Launch

  15. Encapsulation of clay by ad-miniemulsion polymerization: the influence of clay size and modifier reactivity on latex morphology and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Zengeni, Eddson; Hartmann, Patrice C; Pasch, Harald

    2012-12-01

    The influence of clay platelet size and type of organic modifier (reactive or nonreactive) on highly filled hybrid latex morphology and physical properties of the resultant polymer/clay nanocomposites (PCNs) were investigated. The hybrid latexes, containing clay loadings between 30 and 50 wt % clay, were prepared using ad-miniemulsion polymerization. These materials have potential use in the packaging and coating industry since clay platelets are well-known for barrier property improvements. Comparative studies on the use of montmorillonite (MMT), a large clay platelet (average size: 50-500 nm), and Laponite (Lap), small-sized clay platelets (average size: 25-40 nm), were conducted. Two different clay modifiers were used to modify the clays, i.e., a conventional nonreactive modifier (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)) and a reactive modifier (vinylbenzyldodecyldimethylammonium chloride (VBDAC)). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of the hybrid latexes clearly showed strong morphological dependency on both the type of modifier and the clay platelet size. Furthermore, TEM together with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) showed that the extent of clay exfoliation was strongly dependent on the reactivity of the clay modifier, irrespective of the clay platelet size. Both the type of modifier and clay platelets size were found to have an influence on different physical properties of the resultant PCNs. The influence of clay size was clearly indicated by storage modulus and thermal stability behaviors, while that of the clay modifier was indicated by the T(g). Lap-based PCNs exhibited constant or increasing storage modulus and no change in thermal stability with increasing clay content, while MMT-based PCNs showed a decreasing trend in both storage modulus and thermal stability. PCNs based on clay modified with CTAB showed a decreasing T(g) with increasing clay content, while those based on clay modified with VBDAC showed an increasing trend. It was

  16. The Neoproterozoic Ceará Group, Ceará Central domain, NE Brazil: Depositional age and provenance of detrital material. New insights from U-Pb and Sm-Nd geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthaud, M. H.; Fuck, R. A.; Dantas, E. L.; Santos, T. J. S.; Caby, R.; Armstrong, R.

    2015-03-01

    From the Archean to the end of the Neoproterozoic the Borborema Province, northeast Brazil went through a complex polycyclic geologic evolution, ending, between 660 and 570 Ma, with the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny that led to West Gondwana amalgamation. Evolution of the metasedimentary covers of the Province, from the beginning of their deposition up to their involvement in the Brasiliano/Pan-African collision, is a key element in understanding formation of Gondwana and in attempts in pre-drift correlation between South America and West Africa. One of these covers, the Ceará Group, is exposed in the Ceará Central domain. Aiming to unravel the history of the Ceará Group, we carried out a geochronologic study of representative samples, combining Sm-Nd isotopic data, conventional U-Pb TIMS dating of zircon and U-Pb SHRIMP age determination of detrital zircon grains. Our results show that sedimentation of the Ceará Group started around 750 Ma, following rifting of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic basement, associated with bimodal volcanism. The interlayered basic volcanic rocks, re-crystallized into garnet amphibolites, show a concordant age of 749 ± 5 Ma interpreted as the age of crystallization. About 90% of calculated Sm-Nd TDM model ages of metasedimentary rocks are Paleoproterozoic and more than 50% of the analyzed samples have TDM between 1.95 and 2.4 Ma, with strongly negative ɛNd, consistent with provenance mainly from the Paleoproterozoic basement. Strong contrast between Paleoproterozoic TDM with negative ɛNd and young TDM (Mesoproterozoic) with slightly positive ɛNd is interpreted as a consequence of changes in detritus provenance induced by geomorphologic alterations resulting from tectonic activity during rifting. Ages of detrital zircon grains obtained by SHRIMP U-Pb analyses show three main groups: about 1800 Ma, 1000-1100 Ma and ca. 800 Ma which corresponds to the bimodal magmatism associated, respectively to the Orós-Jaguaribe domain, Cariris

  17. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  18. Clay mineralogy of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary clay. [in search for asteroid ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Reynolds, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary layer clay samples from four localities were subjected to analyses which imply that they are neither mineralogically exotic nor distinct from locally derived clays above and below the boundary. The anomalous iridium-rich ejecta component predicted by the asteroid impact scenario of Alvarez et al (1980) was not detected. It is proposed that volcanic material be considered as an explanation of the geochemical anomalies of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. A model which involves a period of intense volcanism at the end of the Cretaceous would generate a variety of climatic and biological effects consonant with the geologic history of that period.

  19. A general evaluation of the frequency distribution of clay and associated minerals in the alluvial soils of ceylon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herath, J.W.; Grimshaw, R.W.

    1971-01-01

    Clay mineral analyses were made of several alluvial clay materials from Ceylon. These studies show that the soil materials can be divided into 3 clay mineral provinces on the basis of the frequency distribution of clay and associated minerals. The provinces closely follow the climatic divisions. The characteristic feature of this classification is the progressive development of gibbsite from Dry to Wet Zone areas. Gibbsite has been used as a reliable indicator mineral. ?? 1971.

  20. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  1. Provenance for Earth Science Data Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Tilmes, C.; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Duggan, B.; Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G. J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Earth Science Data Systems across NASA play a critical role in data processing, management, and analysis of NASA observations. However, there is a growing need to provide the provenance of these datasets as scientists increasingly need more transparency of the data products to improve their understanding and trust of the science results. Lessons learned from Climategate show that there is public demand for more transparency and understanding in the science process. Science data systems are key to enabling the capture, management, and use of production provenance information. Science analysis now also may involve merging multi-sensor datasets where lineage can facilitate the understanding of the data. But there does not exist a formal recommendation for an interoperable standard for provenance representation for use in NASA's Earth Science Data Systems. The W3C Provenance Working Group has a specification for the representation of provenance information. The standard is very general and intended to support the breadth of any domain. To better serve the needs of specific domain communities, the standard has several built in points of extensibility. We will present efforts by NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Working Group (ESDSWG) on Provenance to develop an Earth Science extension to the PROV specification (PROV-ES) and how it can be used in science data system to capture, consume, and interpret provenance information.

  2. Field trip guidebook on environmental impact of clays along the upper Texas coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Theron D.; Ming, Douglas W.; Tuck, Lisa Kay

    1991-01-01

    The field trip was prepared to provide an opportunity to see first hand some the environmental hazards associated with clays in the Houston, Texas area. Because of the very high clay content in area soils and underlying Beaumont Formation clay, Houston is a fitting location to host the Clay Mineral Society. Examinations were made of (1) expansive soils, (2) subsidence and surface faulting, and (3) a landfill located southeast of Houston at the Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority where clay is part of the liner material.

  3. Molecular interactions alter clay and polymer structure in polymer clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Debashis; Katti, Kalpana S; Katti, Dinesh R

    2008-04-01

    OMMTs with three different organic modifiers further confirm the change in structural orientation of silica tetrahedra of OMMTs by organic modifiers. Thus, from our work it is evident that organic modifiers have significant influence on the structure of polymer and clay in PCNs. It appears that in nanocomposites, in addition to strong interactions at interfaces between constituents, the structure of different phases (clay and polymer) of PCN are also altered, which does not occur in conventional composite materials. Thus, the mechanisms governing composite action in nanocomposites are quite different from that of conventional macro composites. PMID:18572562

  4. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  5. From static to dynamic provenance analysis-Sedimentary petrology upgraded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    The classical approach to sandstone petrology, established in the golden years of plate tectonics and based on the axiom that "detrital modes of sandstone suites primarily reflect the different tectonic settings of provenance terranes," has represented a benchmark for decades. The composition of sand and sandstone, however, simply provides us with a distorted image of the lithological structure of source terranes and gives us little clue whether they are allochthonous or autochthonous, orogenic or anorogenic, young or old. What we may able to see reflected in detrital modes is the nature of source terranes (continental, arc, oceanic) and the tectonostratigraphic level reached by erosion in space and time. The proposed new approach to the petrology of sand and sandstone (1) starts with a simple classification scheme circulated since the 1960s, which is purely descriptive, objective, and free of ill-defined ambiguous terms and (2) focuses on the nature and tectonostratigraphic level of source terranes. Further steps are essential to upgrade provenance analysis. Acquiring knowledge from modern settings is needed to properly identify and wherever possible correct for physical and chemical processes introducing environmental and diagenetic bias and thus address nature's complexities with adequate conceptual tools. Equally important is the integration of multiple techniques, ideally including bulk-sediment, multi-mineral, and single-mineral methods. Bulk-sediment petrography remains the fundamental approach that allows us to capture the most precious source of direct provenance information, represented by the mineralogy and texture of rock fragments. Bulk-sediment geochemistry, applicable also to silt and clay carried in suspension, is a superior method to check for hydraulic sorting, chemical weathering, and fertility of detrital minerals in different sediment sources. Detrital geochronology, thermochronology, and isotope geochemistry reveal the diverse time structures

  6. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  7. Tracking Provenance of Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Yelena; Halem, Milton

    2010-01-01

    Tremendous volumes of data have been captured, archived and analyzed. Sensors, algorithms and processing systems for transforming and analyzing the data are evolving over time. Web Portals and Services can create transient data sets on-demand. Data are transferred from organization to organization with additional transformations at every stage. Provenance in this context refers to the source of data and a record of the process that led to its current state. It encompasses the documentation of a variety of artifacts related to particular data. Provenance is important for understanding and using scientific datasets, and critical for independent confirmation of scientific results. Managing provenance throughout scientific data processing has gained interest lately and there are a variety of approaches. Large scale scientific datasets consisting of thousands to millions of individual data files and processes offer particular challenges. This paper uses the analogy of art history provenance to explore some of the concerns of applying provenance tracking to earth science data. It also illustrates some of the provenance issues with examples drawn from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Data Processing System (OMIDAPS) run at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center by the first author.

  8. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Prasad, M.; Nur, A.

    We present ultrasonic P- and S-waves velocity measurements on pure clay samples us- ing three different experiment setups. These experiments provided petrophysical and acoustic properties of clay minerals as a function both of mineralogy and compaction. In the first experiment, acoustic measurements were performed on cold-pressed clay aggregates at ambient and at hydrostatic pressure conditions. Porosity and grain den- sity values of the different clay mineralogy aggregates ranged from 4 to 43% and 2.13 to 2.83 g cm-3, respectively. In the second experiment, we measured P-wave velocity and attenuation in a kaolinite-water suspension in which clay concentration was in- creased up to 60%. In the third experiment, P- and S- wave velocities were measured during uniaxial stress compaction of clay powders. Results from all three experiments revealed low bulk (K) and shear (µ) moduli for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and smec- tite; the values range between 6-12 GPa for K and 4-6 GPa for µ, respectively. Using these clay moduli values in effective medium and granular porous media (theories) models, velocity is predicted in saturated pure kaolinite samples, kaolinite suspension and shaly sandstone fairly well. Experimental results also showed that water interlay- ers play an important role in the compaction and strength of clay aggregates. Clay minerals carrying on water interlayers in their structure showed high compaction and strength. This study is relevant for a more reliable assessment of the seismic response in reservoirs and/or basins characterized by clay-bearing formations.

  9. Effects of shock metamorphism on clay mineralogy: Implications for remote sensing of martian clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, J. R.; Glotch, T. D.; Friedlander, L.; Bish, D. L.; Sharp, T. G.; Dyar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most important discoveries in recent exploration of Mars has been the detection of clay minerals within materials exhumed by meteor impact, which point to ancient subsurface alteration and possible habitable conditions at depth. These "crustal clays" occur within central peaks, ejecta, and uplifted rims of many large craters (Ehlmann et al., Nature 2011). The geologic context of phyllosilicates in these settings suggests that most of these deposits represent clays that formed in the subsurface and were later exhumed by impact, rather than clays that formed as a consequence of impact. Therefore, crustal clays exposed at the surface are likely to have experienced some effects of shock metamorphism and/or thermal alteration related to meteor impact. We are investigating the effects of shock metamorphism on the mineralogy of phyllosilicates in the laboratory. Purified, size-separated clay mineral samples were pressed into pellets to decrease internal porosity and were subsequently shocked using the Flat Plate Accelerator at NASA Johnson Space Center. Five minerals (nontronite, saponite, serpentine, chlorite, and kaolinite) were shocked to six pressure steps (10, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 GPa). The recovered, shocked samples are being analyzed by thermal infrared emission, visible/near-infrared reflectance, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results thus far suggest that shock metamorphism has little effect on the structure or infrared signature of the clay minerals at pressures <20 GPa. One exception is the decrease in 3-D ordering in chlorite at 10 GPa, which steadily decreases until it is essentially lost at 30 GPa. At shock pressures of 20 GPa and higher, all minerals show evidence for broadening of the basal 001 reflection, indicative of progressive decrease in crystallite size. Above 30 GPa, the structures are intensely altered and by 40 GPa, most structural order is lost, based on both XRD and TEM

  10. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grundl, T.; Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A.

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  11. Pillared Interlayered Clays as Adsorbents of Gases and Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, J.; Pinto, M. L.

    This chapter reviews recent works where porous materials prepared from clays, particularly pillared interlayered clays (PILCs), were studied as gas phase adsorbents. It also includes the cases which used the adsorption of gases and vapors for the nanotextural characterization of the materials, other than the usual low temperature nitrogen adsorption. This is, for instance, the case of the adsorption of molecules of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with various dimensions and shapes, which can be used as probe molecules for the characterization of the porosity or concerning the topic of the VOCs abatement. A similar situation occurs with water adsorption, whose results can be informative not only on the desiccant properties of the materials but also on their surface chemistry. A more recent line of studies of adsorption by materials prepared from clays, namely, the hydrocarbon purification from natural gas or biogas, was also addressed.

  12. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.R.; Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P.; Johnson, D.O.

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  13. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  14. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  15. Characterization of low-purity clays for geopolymer binder formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Nasser Y.; Mohsen, Q.; El-maghraby, A.

    2014-06-01

    The production of geopolymer binders from low-purity clays was investigated. Three low-purity clays were calcined at 750°C for 4 h. The calcined clays were chemically activated by the alkaline solutions of NaOH and Na2SiO3. The compressive strength was measured as a function of curing time at room temperature and 85°C. The results were compared with those of a pure kaolin sample. An amorphous aluminosilicate polymer was formed in all binders at both processing temperatures. The results show that, the mechanical properties depend on the type and amount of active aluminum silicates in the starting clay material, the impurities, and the processing temperature.

  16. Provenance in Observational Solar Physics Data Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, D.; Fox, P.; Garcia, J.; Zednik, S.

    2008-05-01

    A limiting factor for virtual observatories which intend to make diverse data sets available to a diverse user base is that the following use cases are very difficult to implement: 1. Determine which flat field calibration was applied to the image taken on January, 26, 2005 around 2100UT by the ACOS Mark IV polarimeter. 2. What processing steps were completed to obtain the ACOS PICS limb image of the day for January 26, 2005. 3. What was the cloud cover and atmospheric seeing conditions during the local morning of January 26, 2005 at MLSO. Key to addressing these use cases often requires information that was either not collected from different stages in the data processing pipeline or it was but was not carried forward when the datasets were made available on-line. Collectively, this information is called provenance and in a semantic web data framework; knowledge provenance. In this presentation, we describe the knowledge provenance requirements that have emerged in our previous work on virtual observatories as well as requirements identified from a series of uses cases collected from scientific data users and instrument scientists. We will describe the progress we are making on meeting these requirements in the context of solar physics image data processing pipelines. The Semantic Provenance Capture in Data Ingest Systems (SPCDIS) is a NSF OCI/SDCI-funded project to implement an extensible meta data provenance scheme within the Virtual Solar-Terrestrial Observatory.

  17. An R package for statistical provenance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter; Resentini, Alberto; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    This paper introduces provenance, a software package within the statistical programming environment R, which aims to facilitate the visualisation and interpretation of large amounts of sedimentary provenance data, including mineralogical, petrographic, chemical and isotopic provenance proxies, or any combination of these. provenance comprises functions to: (a) calculate the sample size required to achieve a given detection limit; (b) plot distributional data such as detrital zircon U-Pb age spectra as Cumulative Age Distributions (CADs) or adaptive Kernel Density Estimates (KDEs); (c) plot compositional data as pie charts or ternary diagrams; (d) correct the effects of hydraulic sorting on sandstone petrography and heavy mineral composition; (e) assess the settling equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition; (f) quantify the dissimilarity between distributional data using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Sircombe-Hazelton distances, or between compositional data using the Aitchison and Bray-Curtis distances; (e) interpret multi-sample datasets by means of (classical and nonmetric) Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA); and (f) simplify the interpretation of multi-method datasets by means of Generalised Procrustes Analysis (GPA) and 3-way MDS. All these tools can be accessed through an intuitive query-based user interface, which does not require knowledge of the R programming language. provenance is free software released under the GPL-2 licence and will be further expanded based on user feedback.

  18. Using the Complete Nano Engineering Geological Spectrum to Assess the Performance of Clay Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Robrecht M.; Schroeder, Christian; Thorez, Jacques; Charlier, Robert

    Clays are geomaterials used in various (over 100) applications in our society. The more common geotechnical applications are clay barriers to contain waste, slurry walls etc. But even if clays are not used as construction material, the engineering geologist encounters them frequently during construction of e.g. foundations and tunnels. As clays are end products of the weathering of silicate geomaterials they are stable as such, but within this group of clay minerals, geotechnical properties vary enormously. Some of these variations are due to chemo-plasticity e.g. reflected in the effect of the composition of the pore fluid on the mechanical properties of clay. One approach to deal with these chemo plastic effects is to separate them according to the scale or level on which they are acting. In clays one can discern the level of the clay silicate sheets (TOT or TO), the clay interlayer level and the clay particles level. This contribution aims to show how an analysis of the processes on these three levels can help to assess the geotechnical properties of clays in contact with various fluids.

  19. Sediment generation and provenance: processes and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, L.; Garzanti, E.; von Eynatten, H.; Weltje, G. J.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to trace sediments from their sources to sedimentary basins is a prerequisite for quantitative analysis of Earth-surface dynamics. The comparatively recent revival of sedimentary provenance analysis goes hand-in-hand with the ever expanding range of analytical tools available for quantifying sediment properties (isotopic, mineral, chemical, and petrographic composition, grain-size and shape distributions, age spectra, etc.), and for interpreting such data in paleo-geographic, -tectonic and -climatic terms. The breakdown of sediment budgets into source-specific contributions - one of the most important tasks of provenance analysis - permits quantification of rates of surface processes in the geological past ("deep time"), even in cases where the source areas themselves have been destroyed by global tectonics. Quantitative sedimentary provenance analysis is therefore crucial to the reconstruction of ancient sediment-routing systems, the fundamental units of mass transfer at the Earth's surface.

  20. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in 3D - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Tronberens, Sebastian; Urai, Janos; Asmus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Clay smears in sedimentary basins are important factors defining the sealing properties of faults. However, as clay smears are highly complex 3D structures, processes involved in the formation and deformation of clay smears are not well identified and understood. To enhance the prediction of sealing properties of clay smears extensive studies of these structures are necessary including the 3D information. We present extraordinary outcrop data from an open cast lignite mine (Hambach) in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have Shale Gouge Ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. Material in the fault zones is layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. We studied the 3D thickness distribution of clay smear from a series of thin-spaced incremental cross-sections and several cross-sections in larger distances along the fault. Additionally, we excavated two large clay smear surfaces. Our observations show that clay smears are strongly affected by R- and R'-shears, mostly at the footwall side of our outcrops. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes. Thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cutoffs. Investigating the 3D thickness of the clay smears shows a heterogeneous distribution, rather than a continuous thinning of the smear with increasing distance to the source layers. We found two types of layered clay smears: one with continuous sheared sand between two clay smears providing vertical pathways for fluid flow, and one which consists of overlapping clay patches separated by sheared sand that provide a tortuous pathway across the clay smear. On smaller scale we identified grain-scale mixing as an important process for the formation of clay smears. Sand can be entrained into the clay smear by mixing from the surrounding host rock as well as due to intense shearing of sand lenses that were incorporated into the smear. This causes clay smears

  1. Analysis Traceability and Provenance for HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamdasani, Jetendr; McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Kovács, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the use of the CRISTAL software in the N4U project. CRISTAL was used to create a set of provenance aware analysis tools for the Neuroscience domain. This paper advocates that the approach taken in N4U to build the analysis suite is sufficiently generic to be able to be applied to the HEP domain. A mapping to the PROV model for provenance interoperability is also presented and how this can be applied to the HEP domain for the interoperability of HEP analyses.

  2. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Simona; Mauro, Marco; Daniel, Christophe; Galimberti, Maurizio; Guerra, Gaetano

    2013-11-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT) intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT) led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS), have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  3. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Simona; Mauro, Marco; Daniel, Christophe; Galimberti, Maurizio; Guerra, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT) intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT) led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS), have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals. PMID:24790956

  4. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  5. The provenance of extreme flood induced submarine gravity flow deposits off Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Su, C.

    2012-12-01

    Gaoping Submarine Canyon (GPSC) is the major pathway for sediments disperse from Gaoping River (GPR) into deep sea. In previous studies (Su et al., 2012), the cores collected from GPSC show the catastrophic events induced by typhoon may lead to extreme export of terrestrial sediment into GPSC and temporally quick buried in the upper reach or further caused gravity flows in the canyon. For understanding the provenance of the terrestrial sediments deposited in the GPSC during the extreme flooding period, core samples collected in cruise OR1-785, OR1-851 and OR1-923 were used for clay mineral analysis. Clay minerals are one of the most useful indicators to decipher the provenance and transport of sediments in marine environments. The composition and distribution of clay minerals in sediments are related to the climate and the nature of their parent rocks. Our result shows illite is the most abundant clay mineral in the GPSC (over 70%), chlorite and kaolinite are minor (around 20%), and nearly no smectite in core samples. According to the 550°C treatment X-ray diffraction patterns, the diffraction peaks at 7Å and 3.5Å partly preserved in OR1-785-GC5A, OR1-851-GCC and OR1-923-K11A core samples and implies the existence of Mg-chlorite which is widespread in green rocks in the Central Mountain Range. We suggested the extreme flooding event may fast transport the sediment from the Central Mountain Range through GPSC into deep sea environment.

  6. Novel sensible thermal storage material from natural minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanchang; Ouyang, Jing; Yang, Huaming

    2013-10-01

    Novel sensible thermal storage materials (TSM) were first synthesized via thermally treating the green compact obtained using clay, kaolin tailings, and hematite as major raw materials. The samples were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric, X-ray diffraction, thermal conductivities, petrography analysis, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The thermal conductivity of the green compact reached 1.11-1.64 W m-1 K-1 after thermally treated at 200-1,000 °C. The clay component was proven to have a predominant effect on the thermal conductivity of the green compact. Kaolin tailings could act as a "modulator" for adjusting the thermal conductivity from 1.42 to 1.92 W m-1 K-1. Affecting mechanism of microstructural change of main components during sintering on thermal conductivity of TSM was prominently investigated. TSM could provide a potential candidate for thermal energy storage systems of concentrated solar power.

  7. Applying Content Management to Automated Provenance Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Gibson, Tara D.; Stephan, Eric G.; Chin, George

    2008-04-10

    Workflows and data pipelines are becoming increasingly valuable in both computational and experimen-tal sciences. These automated systems are capable of generating significantly more data within the same amount of time than their manual counterparts. Automatically capturing and recording data prove-nance and annotation as part of these workflows is critical for data management, verification, and dis-semination. Our goal in addressing the provenance challenge was to develop and end-to-end system that demonstrates real-time capture, persistent content management, and ad-hoc searches of both provenance and metadata using open source software and standard protocols. We describe our prototype, which extends the Kepler workflow tools for the execution environment, the Scientific Annotation Middleware (SAM) content management software for data services, and an existing HTTP-based query protocol. Our implementation offers several unique capabilities, and through the use of standards, is able to pro-vide access to the provenance record to a variety of commonly available client tools.

  8. New polyelectrolyte complex from pectin/chitosan and montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marcia Parente Melo; de Mello Ferreira, Ivana Lourenço; de Macedo Cruz, Mauricio Tavares

    2016-08-01

    A new nanocomposite hydrogel was prepared by forming a crosslinked hybrid polymer network based on chitosan and pectin in the presence of montmorillonite clay. The influence of clay concentration (0.5 and 2% wt) as well as polymer ratios (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) was investigated carefully. The samples were characterized by different techniques: transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, swelling degree and compression test. Most samples presented swelling degree above 1000%, which permits characterizing them as superabsorbent material. Images obtained by transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of clay nanoparticles into hydrogel. The hydrogels' morphological properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscope in high and low-vacuum. The micrographs showed that the samples presented porous. The incorporation of clay produced hydrogels with differentiated morphology. Thermogravimetric analysis results revealed that the incorporation of clay in the samples provided greater thermal stability to the hydrogels. The compression resistance also increased with addition of clay. PMID:27112858

  9. Enhanced sorption of trichloroethene by smectite clay exchanged with Cs+.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vaneet; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J

    2006-02-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) is one of the most common pollutants in groundwater, and Cs+ can be a cocontaminant at nuclear facilities. Smectite clays have large surface areas, are common in soils, have high affinities for some organic contaminants, and hence can potentially influence the transport of organic pollutants entering soils and sediments. The exchangeable cations present near smectite clay surfaces can radically influence the sorption of organic pollutants by soil clays. This research was undertaken to determine the effect of Cs+, and other common interlayer cations, such as K+ and Ca2+, on the sorption of TCE by a reference smectite clay saponite. Cs-saturated clay sorbed the most TCE, up to 3500 mg/kg, while Ca-saturated smectite sorbed the least. We hypothesize that the stronger sorption of TCE by the Cs-smectite can be attributed to the lower hydration energy and hence smaller hydrated radius of Cs+, which expands the lateral clay surface domains available for sorption. Also, Cs-smectite interlayers are only one or two water layers thick, which may drive capillary condensation of TCE. Our results implicate enhanced retention of TCE in aquifer materials containing smectites accompanied by Cs+ cocontamination. PMID:16509334

  10. Studies of clays and clay minerals using x-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    The Rietveld method was originally developed (Rietveld, 1967, 1969) to refine crystal structures using neutron powder diffraction data. Since then, the method has been increasingly used with X-ray powder diffraction data, and today it is safe to say that this is the most common application of the method. The method has been applied to numerous natural and synthetic materials, most of which do not usually form crystals large enough for study with single-crystal techniques. It is the ability to study the structures of materials for which sufficiently large single crystals do not exist that makes the method so powerful and popular. It would thus appear that the method is ideal for studying clays and clay minerals. In many cases this is true, but the assumptions implicit in the method and the disordered nature of many clay minerals can limit titsapplicability. This chapter will describe the Rietveld method, emphasizing the assumptions important for the study of disordered materials, and it will outline the potential applications of the method to these minerals. These applications include, in addition to the refinement of crystal structures, quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures, analysis of peak broadening, partial structure solution, and refinement of unit-cell parameters.

  11. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Komadel, P.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2009-04-01

    Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

  12. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  13. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes.

    PubMed

    Ragan, Eric D; Endert, Alex; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance information and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research. PMID:26340779

  14. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ragan, Eric; Alex, Endert; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance informationmore » and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research« less

  15. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Eric; Alex, Endert; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance information and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research

  16. PAV ontology: provenance, authoring and versioning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Provenance is a critical ingredient for establishing trust of published scientific content. This is true whether we are considering a data set, a computational workflow, a peer-reviewed publication or a simple scientific claim with supportive evidence. Existing vocabularies such as Dublin Core Terms (DC Terms) and the W3C Provenance Ontology (PROV-O) are domain-independent and general-purpose and they allow and encourage for extensions to cover more specific needs. In particular, to track authoring and versioning information of web resources, PROV-O provides a basic methodology but not any specific classes and properties for identifying or distinguishing between the various roles assumed by agents manipulating digital artifacts, such as author, contributor and curator. Results We present the Provenance, Authoring and Versioning ontology (PAV, namespace http://purl.org/pav/): a lightweight ontology for capturing “just enough” descriptions essential for tracking the provenance, authoring and versioning of web resources. We argue that such descriptions are essential for digital scientific content. PAV distinguishes between contributors, authors and curators of content and creators of representations in addition to the provenance of originating resources that have been accessed, transformed and consumed. We explore five projects (and communities) that have adopted PAV illustrating their usage through concrete examples. Moreover, we present mappings that show how PAV extends the W3C PROV-O ontology to support broader interoperability. Method The initial design of the PAV ontology was driven by requirements from the AlzSWAN project with further requirements incorporated later from other projects detailed in this paper. The authors strived to keep PAV lightweight and compact by including only those terms that have demonstrated to be pragmatically useful in existing applications, and by recommending terms from existing ontologies when plausible. Discussion

  17. Treatment with coated layer double hydroxide clays decreases the toxicity of copper-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Blake, Deanne; Nar, Mangesh; D'Souza, Nandika Anne; Glenn, J Brad; Klaine, Stephen J; Roberts, Aaron P

    2014-05-01

    Copper is a common pollutant found in watersheds that exerts toxic effects on both invertebrates and vertebrates. Layer double hydroxide (LDH) clays are able to adsorb a wide range of contaminants through ion-exchange mechanisms. Coating LDH clays with various materials alters the aggregation of clay particles into the nano-size range, thus increasing relative surface area and offering great potential for contaminant remediation. The goal of this study was to determine if treatment with coated LDH clays decreases the toxicity of copper-containing solutions to Daphnia magna. Four LDH clays with different coatings used to alter hydrophobicity were as follows: used: Na(+) montmorillonite, Zn-Al LDH-nitrate, Zn-Al LDH-stearate, and Zn-Al LDH-carbonate. It was determined that coated LDH clays decreased copper toxicity by decreasing bioavailability and that smaller aggregate sizes decreased bioavailability the most. 96 h LC50 values increased by as much as 4.2 times with the treatment of the solutions with 100 mg/L LDH clay. Copper analysis of the clay and solutions indicated that the clays work by decreasing copper bioavailability by way of a binding mechanism. Coated LDH clays hold promise as a small-scale remediation tool or as an innovative tool for toxicity identification and evaluation characterization of metals. PMID:24442186

  18. Effect of red clay on diesel bioremediation and soil bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Choi, Sungjong; Hong, Hyerim; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-08-01

    Red clay is a type of soil, the red color of which results from the presence of iron oxide. It is considered an eco-friendly material, with many industrial, cosmetic, and architectural uses. A patented method was applied to red clay in order to change its chemical composition and mineral bioavailability. The resulting product was designated processed red clay. This study evaluates the novel use of red clay and processed red clay as biostimulation agents in diesel-contaminated soils. Diesel biodegradation was enhanced in the presence of red clay and processed red clay by 4.9- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and the number of culturable bacterial cells was correlated with the amount of diesel biodegradation. The growth of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, and Cupriavidus necator was promoted by both types of red clays. Culture-independent community analysis determined via barcoded pyrosequencing indicated that Nocardioidaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Caulobacteraceae were enriched by diesel contamination. Bacterial strain isolation from naphthalene- and liquid paraffin-amended media was affiliated with enriched taxa based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity. We suggest that the biostimulating mechanism of red clay and processed red clay is able to support bacterial growth without apparent selection for specific bacterial species. PMID:24743885

  19. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  20. Quantifying the provenance of aeolian sediments using multiple composite fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Benli; Niu, Qinghe; Qu, Jianjun; Zu, Ruiping

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new fingerprinting method that uses multiple composite fingerprints for studies of aeolian sediment provenance. We used this method to quantify the provenance of sediments on both sides of the Qinghai-Tibetan Railway (QTR) in the Cuona Lake section of the Tibetan Plateau (TP), in an environment characterized by aeolian and fluvial interactions. The method involves repeatedly solving a linear mixing model based on mass conservation; the model is not limited to spatial scale or transport types and uses all the tracer groups that passed the range check, Kruskal-Wallis H-test, and a strict analytical solution screening. The proportional estimates that result from using different composite fingerprints are highly variable; however, the average of these fingerprints has a greater accuracy and certainty than any single fingerprint. The results show that sand from the lake beach, hilly surface, and gullies contribute, respectively, 48%, 31% and 21% to the western railway sediments and 43%, 33% and 24% to the eastern railway sediments. The difference between contributions from various sources on either side of the railway, which may increase in the future, was clearly related to variations in local transport characteristics, a conclusion that is supported by grain size analysis. The construction of the QTR changed the local cycling of materials, and the difference in provenance between the sediments that are separated by the railway reflects the changed sedimentary conditions on either side of the railway. The effectiveness of this method suggests that it will be useful in other studies of aeolian sediments.

  1. In situ interaction between different concretes and Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenni, A.; Mäder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    Interactions between cementitious materials and claystone are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical modifications in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, this alteration might influence safety-relevant clay properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention. In this study, interfaces of Opalinus Clay, a potential host-rock in Switzerland, and three concrete formulations emplaced in the Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) were analysed after 2.2 years of interaction. Sampling techniques with interface stabilisation followed by inclined intersection drilling were developed. Element distribution maps of the concrete-clay interfaces show complex zonations like sulphur enrichment, zones depleted in Ca but enriched in Mg, strong Mg enrichment adjacent to the interface, or carbonation. Consistently, the carbonated zone shows a reduced porosity. Properties of the complex zonation strongly depend on cement properties like water content and pH (ordinary Portland cement vs. low-pH cement). An increased Ca or Mg content in the first 100 μm next to the interface is observed in Opalinus Clay. The cation occupancy of clay exchanger phases next to the ordinary Portland cement interface is depleted in Mg, but enriched in Na, whereas porosity shows no changes at all. The current data suggests migration of CO2/HCO3-, SO42-, and Mg species from clay into cement. pH decrease in the cement next to the interface leads to instability of ettringite, and the sulphate liberated diffuses towards higher pH regions (away from the interface), where additional ettringite can form.

  2. Clay-based polymer nanocomposites: research and commercial development.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q H; Yu, A B; Lu, G Q; Paul, D R

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of clay-based polymer nanocomposites. Clay minerals, due to their unique layered structure, rich intercalation chemistry and availability at low cost, are promising nanoparticle reinforcements for polymers to manufacture low-cost, lightweight and high performance nanocomposites. We introduce briefly the structure, properties and surface modification of clay minerals, followed by the processing and characterization techniques of polymer nanocomposites. The enhanced and novel properties of such nanocomposites are then discussed, including mechanical, thermal, barrier, electrical conductivity, biodegradability among others. In addition, their available commercial and potential applications in automotive, packaging, coating and pigment, electrical materials, and in particular biomedical fields are highlighted. Finally, the challenges for the future are discussed in terms of processing, characterization and the mechanisms governing the behaviour of these advanced materials. PMID:16245517

  3. Falling for Clay Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that integrated science and art education. Explains that students create ceramic bowls by using real leaves. Discusses the process of creating the ceramic bowls, including how to glaze the bowls. Includes a list of materials. (CMK)

  4. Tracking Files Using the Kepler Provenance Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, Mouallem; Vouk, Mladen; Klasky, Scott A; Tchoua, Roselyne B; Podhorszki, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Workflow Management Systems (WFMS), such as Kepler, are proving to be an important tool in scientific problem solving. They can automate and manage complex processes and huge amounts of data produced by petascale simulations. Typically, the produced data need to be properly visualized and analyzed by scientists in order to achieve the desired scientific goals. Both run-time and post analysis may benefit from, even require, additional meta-data - provenance information. One of the challenges in this context is the tracking of the data files that can be produced in very large numbers during stages of the workflow, such as visualizations. The Kepler provenance framework collects all or part of the raw information flowing through the workflow graph. This information then needs to be further parsed to extract meta-data of interest. This can be done through add-on tools and algorithms. We show how to automate tracking specific information such as data files locations.

  5. Tracking Files Using the Kepler Provenance Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Mouallem, P. A.; Tchoua, Roselyne B; Klasky, Scott A; Podhorszki, Norbert; Vouk, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Workflow Management Systems (WFMS), such as Kepler, are prov- ing to be an important tool in scientific problem solving. They can automate and manage complex processes and huge amounts of data produced by petas- cale simulations. Typically, the produced data need to be properly visualized and analyzed by scientists in order to achieve the desired scientific goals. Both run-time and post analysis may benefit from, even require, additional meta-data provenance information. One of the challenges in this context is the tracking of the data files that can be produced in very large numbers during stages of the workflow, such as visualizations. The Kepler provenance framework collects all or part of the raw information flowing through the workflow graph. This infor- mation then needs to be further parsed to extract meta-data of interest. This can be done through add-on tools and algorithms. We show how to automate track- ing specific information such as data files locations.

  6. Tracking Files in the Kepler Provenance Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Mouallem, Pierre A; Klasky, Scott A; Podhorszki, Norbert; Vouk, Mladen

    2009-01-01

    Workflow Management Systems (WFMS), such as Kepler, are proving to be an important tool in scientific problem solving. They can automate and manage complex processes and huge amounts of data produced by petascale simulations. Typically, the produced data need to be properly visualized and analyzed by scientists in order to achieve the desired scientific goals. Both run-time and post analysis may benefit from, even require, additional meta-data - provenance information. One of the challenges in this context is the tracking of the data files that can be produced in very large numbers during stages of the workflow, such as visualizations. The Kepler provenance framework collects all or part of the raw information flowing through the workflow graph. This information then needs to be further parsed to extract meta-data of interest. This can be done through add-on tools and algorithms. We show how to automate tracking specific information such as data files locations.

  7. A research on the radiation shielding effects of clay, silica fume and cement samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, Suat; Sehhatigdiri, Arvin; Eroglu, Hayrettin; Çelik, Semet

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, as the application areas of nuclear technology increases, protection from radiation has become even more important. Especially, the importance of radiation-shielding is important for the environment and employees which are in close proximity. Clays can be used as additives for shielding the radioactive materials. In this study, the shielding properties of micronize clay-white cement, clay-silica fume, gypsum, gypsum-silica fume, cement, white cement, cement-silica fume, white cement-gypsum, white cement-silica fume, red mud-silica fume, silica fume and red mud at different energy levels were examined. Additionally, compaction and unconfined compression tests were carried out on the samples. The results of clays and other samples were compared with each other. As a result, it was found that clays, especially clay-white cement mixture were superior than other samples in radioactive shielding.

  8. The influence of clay zones on land subsidence from groundwater pumping.

    PubMed

    Budhu, Muniram; Adiyaman, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze the influence of clay zones on subsidence from groundwater pumping. Finite element analyses were conducted on a sand-only aquifer and a sand aquifer with two clay zones located at different distances from the well face. A model that accounts for recoverable and nonrecoverable strains was used to simulate the sand and clay. This model couples the groundwater flow with the stress-deformation response of the aquifer materials. Each aquifer was pumped from a single well for a period of 6 months, and then the groundwater level was lowered gradually to an elevation below the elevation of the clay zones and kept there for 10 years. The groundwater level was then raised gradually back to the original elevation over a period of 10 years. The results of the analyses show that the ground surface subsidence profile is strongly influenced by the presence of the clays zones. The ground surface sags where these clay zones are present resulting in a wavy ground surface profile. Subsidence continued when pumping is stopped, albeit at a much slower rate than during pumping, and when the groundwater level is below the elevation of the clay zones. Clay zones further away from the well face lag the subsidence of clay zones nearer the well face because of lower changes in hydrostatic head. Sags in ground surface subsidence profile from groundwater pumping are indicators of the presence of low hydraulic conductive geological materials. PMID:22536890

  9. REMOBILIZATION OF TOXIC HEAVY METALS ADSORBED TO BACTERIAL WALL-CLAY COMPOSITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant quantities of Ag(I), Cu(II), and Cr(III) were bound to isolated Bacillus subtilis 168 walls, Escherichia coli K-12 envelopes, kaolinite and smectite clays, and the corresponding organic material-clay aggregates (1:1, wt/wt). hese sorbed metals were leached with HNO3, ...

  10. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242