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Sample records for maternal protein-restricted rats

  1. Retinoic acid enhances nephron endowment in rats exposed to maternal protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Makrakis, John; Zimanyi, Monika A; Black, M Jane

    2007-11-01

    A reduced nephron complement at birth renders the kidney susceptible to renal disease in adulthood. Retinoic acid (RA; the active metabolite of vitamin A) is linked to nephrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of administration of retinoic acid in midgestation in rats on nephron endowment in offspring exposed to maternal protein restriction. Rats were fed either a normal-protein diet (NPD) or a low-protein diet (LPD) during pregnancy and lactation. Half of the dams in the LPD group were injected intraperitoneally with retinoic acid (20 mg/kg) during gestation at embryonic day 11.5. At 4 weeks of age, the offspring were anesthetized and perfusion-fixed, and nephron number estimated using unbiased stereological techniques. Body weight and kidney volume was significantly reduced in all LPD offspring. There was a significant 29% reduction in nephron number in the LPD group compared with the NPD offspring, whereas the number of nephrons in kidneys from the LPD + RA offspring was not significantly different compared with controls. In conclusion, administration of a single bolus dose of retinoic acid during midgestation restored nephron endowment to normal in offspring exposed to maternal protein restriction. PMID:17849154

  2. Effect of maternal protein restriction in rats on cardiac fibrosis and capillarization in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungjoon; Zimanyi, Monika A; Black, M Jane

    2006-07-01

    This study examines the effect of maternal protein restriction in rats on levels of cardiac fibrosis, myocardial capillarization, and media:lumen ratio of intramyocardial arteries in adult offspring. Female Wistar Kyoto rats were fed either a normal protein diet (NPD; 20% casein) or a low-protein diet (LPD; 8.7% casein) during pregnancy and lactation. Female offspring (seven per group) were weaned at 4 wk of age and grown to adulthood. At 24 wk of age, the offspring were perfusion fixed. Cardiac fibrosis and media:lumen ratio of intramyocardial arterioles was assessed using image analysis and cardiac capillarization was stereologically investigated. Body weights at 2 and 24 wk of age were significantly reduced (31% and 8%, respectively) in the LPD offspring; however, heart size was not different at 24 wk. Importantly by adulthood, there was a significant 15% increase in left ventricular interstitial fibrosis in LPD offspring. There were no differences in levels of perivascular fibrosis, myocardial capillarization, or in the media:lumen ratio of intramyocardial arteries between groups. Because cardiac fibrosis is associated with impaired cardiac contractility and arrhythmia, our results suggest that induction of interstitial fibrosis may contribute to the increased cardiac disease in adult subjects who were exposed to an adverse intrauterine environment. PMID:16690945

  3. Effect of maternal protein restriction during pregnancy and lactation on the number of cardiomyocytes in the postproliferative weanling rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungjoon; Zimanyi, Monika A; Black, M Jane

    2010-03-01

    Maternal protein restriction leads to a reduction in the number of cardiomyocytes in the rat heart at birth. However, in rats, cardiomyocytes continue to proliferate until about 2 weeks after birth. Hence, this study aimed to examine the effect of maternal protein restriction, on the number of cardiomyocytes in the young rat heart at a time point when the cardiomyocytes have ceased proliferating and are terminally differentiated. Female Wistar Kyoto rats were fed either a normal protein diet (NPD; 20% casein) or a low protein diet (LPD; 8.7% casein) during pregnancy and lactation. Offspring (seven males and seven females per group) were perfusion fixed at 4 weeks of age. Heart volume and total cardiomyocyte number were determined using stereological techniques. At 4 weeks of age, body weights in both male and female LPD offspring were significantly reduced compared with NPD controls whereas relative heart volumes were significantly increased in LPD offspring. Total number of cardiomyocytes was not significantly different between groups. In both groups, there was a significant linear correlation between cardiomyocyte number and heart volume. In conclusion, total cardiomyocyte number in the postproliferative rat heart does not appear to be affected by maternal protein restriction per se but is directly related to heart size. PMID:20091884

  4. Developmental Programming of Cardiovascular Disease Following Intrauterine Growth Restriction: Findings Utilising A Rat Model of Maternal Protein Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zohdi, Vladislava; Lim, Kyungjoon; Pearson, James T.; Black, M. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, studies have demonstrated links between risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood and adverse events that occurred very early in life during fetal development. The concept that there are embryonic and fetal adaptive responses to a sub-optimal intrauterine environment often brought about by poor maternal diet that result in permanent adverse consequences to life-long health is consistent with the definition of “programming”. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the effects of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on long-term cardiac structure and function, with particular emphasis on the effects of maternal protein restriction. Much of our recent knowledge has been derived from animal models. We review the current literature of one of the most commonly used models of IUGR (maternal protein restriction in rats), in relation to birth weight and postnatal growth, blood pressure and cardiac structure and function. In doing so, we highlight the complexity of developmental programming, with regards to timing, degree of severity of the insult, genotype and the subsequent postnatal phenotype. PMID:25551250

  5. Maternal protein restriction in the rat during pregnancy and/or lactation alters cognitive and anxiety behaviors of female offspring.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Castro, L A; Rodriguez, J S; Charco, R; Bautista, C J; Larrea, F; Nathanielsz, P W; Zambrano, E

    2012-02-01

    Maternal protein deficiencies can developmentally program offspring to lifelong dysfunction of many physiological systems. We hypothesized that maternal isocaloric low protein diet during fetal and early postnatal development would negatively affect female offspring anxiety, exploration, associative learning and motivation as measured by the elevated plus maze (EPM), open field test (OFT), operant conditioning and the progressive ratio task, respectively. Control mothers (C) received a 20% casein diet and restricted mothers (R) a 10% casein diet to provide four groups: CC, RR, CR, and RC (first letter pregnancy diet and second lactation diet) to enable evaluation of offspring effects influenced by maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation. Maternal protein restriction decreased open arm time and distance in RR and RC offspring, increased anxiety behavior, in the EPM. In the OFT, the RR and RC offspring displayed decreased exploration (increased stress) as indexed by decreased distance in the center zone. These behaviors in the EPM and OFT was associated with increased corticosterone levels during an immobilization test in the RR offspring with intermediary effects in the RC offspring. Learning impairment was observed in the RR, CR and RC offspring during fixed ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement. Motivational effects were measured in RR offspring responding less, decreased motivation, and CR offspring making more responses, increased motivation, than CC offspring. These findings reveal the negative effects of developmental protein restriction on female offspring behavior. The underlying basis for these negative outcomes remains to be elucidated. PMID:22023958

  6. Maternal protein restriction induces alterations in hepatic tumor necrosis factor-?/CYP7A1 signaling and disorders regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomei; Qi, Ying; Tian, Baoling; Chen, Dong; Gao, Hong; Xi, Chunyan; Xing, Yanlin; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that adverse events in utero impair fetal development and lead to the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in adulthood. To investigate the mechanisms linking impaired fetal growth to increased cholesterol, an important clinical risk factor characterizing the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, we examined the impact of maternal undernutrition on tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?)/c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway and the cholesterol 7?-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression in the livers of the offspring with a protein restriction model. The male offspring with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) caused by the isocaloric low-protein diet showed decreased liver weight at birth and augmented circulation and hepatic cholesterol levels at 40 weeks of age. Maternal undernutrition significantly upregulated cytokine TNF-? expression and JNK phospholytion levels in the livers from fetal age to adulthood. Elevated JNK phospholytion could be linked to downregulated hepatocyte nuclear factor-4? and CYP7A1 expression, subsequently led to higher hepatic cholesterol. This work demonstrated that intrauterine malnutrition-induced IUGR might result in intrinsic disorder in hepatic TNF-?/CYP7A1 signaling, and contribute to the development of hypercholesterolemia in later life. PMID:25120278

  7. Maternal protein restriction induces alterations in insulin signaling and ATP sensitive potassium channel protein in hypothalami of intrauterine growth restriction fetal rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomei; Qi, Ying; Gao, Hong; Jiao, Yisheng; Gu, Hui; Miao, Jianing; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that intrauterine growth restriction leads to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus in adulthood. To investigate the mechanisms behind this ”metabolic imprinting” phenomenon, we examined the impact of maternal undernutrition on insulin signaling pathway and the ATP sensitive potassium channel expression in the hypothalamus of intrauterine growth restriction fetus. Intrauterine growth restriction rat model was developed through maternal low protein diet. The expression and activated levels of insulin signaling molecules and KATP protein in the hypothalami which were dissected at 20 days of gestation, were analyzed by western blot and real time PCR. The tyrosine phosphorylation levels of the insulin receptor substrate 2 and phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase p85? in the hypothalami of intrauterine growth restriction fetus were markedly reduced. There was also a downregulation of the hypothalamic ATP sensitive potassium channel subunit, sulfonylurea receptor 1, which conveys the insulin signaling. Moreover, the abundances of gluconeogenesis enzymes were increased in the intrauterine growth restriction livers, though no correlation was observed between sulfonylurea receptor 1 and gluconeogenesis enzymes. Our data suggested that aberrant intrauterine milieu impaired insulin signaling in the hypothalamus, and these alterations early in life might contribute to the predisposition of the intrauterine growth restriction fetus toward the adult metabolic disorders. PMID:23341697

  8. Suckling a protein-restricted rat dam leads to diminished albuminuria in her male offspring in adult life: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Clive J; Jennings, Bridget J; James, Lynwen A; Hales, Charles N; Ozanne, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that in male rats, exposure to maternal protein restriction either in utero or whilst suckling can have profound effects on both longevity and kidney telomere lengths. This study monitored albuminuria longitudinally in male rats whose mothers had been protein restricted either during pregnancy or lactation. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were fed either a 20% ('control') or an 8% protein ('low protein') diet. At two days of age some of the pups were cross-fostered to dams fed the diet that was not given to their biological mothers. At weaning all pups were fed standard chow. Urine samples were collected for the measurement of albumin and creatinine at monthly intervals from two months-of-age. Longitudinal analysis was then performed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Overall estimated marginal geometric mean (95 % confidence interval) urine albumin to creatinine ratios were: control animals 79.5 (57.2~110.6) g/mol (n = 6 litters, 24 animals in total), those exposed in utero to maternal protein restriction 71.0 (47.4~106.5) (n = 4 litters, 16 animals in total), those exposed to maternal protein restriction whilst suckling 21.2 (14.7~30.4) (n = 5 litters, 20 animals in total) (p < 0.001). These latter animals had lower albumin to creatinine ratios than either of the two other groups (both p < 0.001), which had ratios that were indistinguishable from each other (p = 1.0). Similar results were gained using 24 h. urine albumin excretion rates. These differences became evident from three months-of-age and were long-lasting. Conclusion Animals exposed to maternal protein restriction whilst suckling exhibited lower urine albumin excretions during much of adult life. As urine albumin can be nephrotoxic, these rats therefore appeared to be relatively protected against future nephron damage like that previously observed in animals exposed to maternal protein restriction in utero. PMID:17010194

  9. Maternal Protein Restriction Affects Postnatal Growth and the Expression of Key Proteins Involved in Lifespan Regulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that maternal protein restriction in rodents influenced the rate of growth in early life and ultimately affected longevity. Low birth weight caused by maternal protein restriction followed by catch-up growth (recuperated animals) was associated with shortened lifespan whereas protein restriction and slow growth during lactation (postnatal low protein: PLP animals) increased lifespan. We aim to explore the mechanistic basis by which these differences arise. Here we investigated effects of maternal diet on organ growth, metabolic parameters and the expression of insulin/IGF1 signalling proteins and Sirt1 in muscle of male mice at weaning. PLP mice which experienced protein restriction during lactation had lower fasting glucose (P?=?0.038) and insulin levels (P?=?0.046) suggesting improved insulin sensitivity. PLP mice had higher relative weights (adjusted by body weight) of brain (P?=?0.0002) and thymus (P?=?0.031) compared to controls suggesting that enhanced functional capacity of these two tissues is beneficial to longevity. They also had increased expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (P?=?0.021) and protein kinase C zeta (P?=?0.046). Recuperated animals expressed decreased levels of many insulin signalling proteins including PI3 kinase subunits p85? (P?=?0.018), p110? (P?=?0.048) and protein kinase C zeta (P?=?0.006) which may predispose these animals to insulin resistance. Sirt1 protein expression was reduced in recuperated offspring. These observations suggest that maternal protein restriction can affect major metabolic pathways implicated in regulation of lifespan at a young age which may explain the impact of maternal diet on longevity. PMID:19308256

  10. Time window-dependent effect of perinatal maternal protein restriction on insulin sensitivity and energy substrate oxidation in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Agnoux, Aurore Martin; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Simard, Gilles; Poupeau, Guillaume; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia; Alexandre-Gouabau, Marie-Cécile

    2014-07-15

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that a suboptimal environment during perinatal life programs offspring susceptibility to the development of metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that the lasting impact of perinatal protein deprivation on mitochondrial fuel oxidation and insulin sensitivity would depend on the time window of exposure. To improve our understanding of underlying mechanisms, an integrative approach was used, combining the assessment of insulin sensitivity and untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in the offspring. A hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was performed in adult male rats born from dams fed a low-protein diet during gestation and/or lactation, and subsequently exposed to a Western diet (WD) for 10 wk. Metabolomics was combined with targeted acylcarnitine profiling and analysis of liver gene expression to identify markers of adaptation to WD that influence the phenotype outcome evaluated by body composition analysis. At adulthood, offspring of protein-restricted dams had impaired insulin secretion when fed a standard diet. Moreover, rats who demonstrated catch-up growth at weaning displayed higher gluconeogenesis and branched-chain amino acid catabolism, and lower fatty acid ?-oxidation compared with control rats. Postweaning exposure of intrauterine growth restriction-born rats to a WD exacerbated incomplete fatty acid ?-oxidation and excess fat deposition. Control offspring nursed by protein-restricted mothers showed peculiar low-fat accretion through adulthood and preserved insulin sensitivity even after WD-exposure. Altogether, our findings suggest a testable hypothesis about how maternal diet might influence metabolic outcomes (insulin sensitivity) in the next generation such as mitochondrial overload and/or substrate oxidation inflexibility dependent on the time window of perinatal dietary manipulation. PMID:24808498

  11. Effects of protein restriction, melatonin administration, and short daylength on brain benzodiazepine receptors in prepubertal male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kennaway, D.J.; Royles, P.; Webb, H.; Carbone, F.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that there are changes in brain benzodiazepine binding sites controlled by photoperiod was investigated in two strains of male rats. The hypothesis was tested by 3H-diazepam binding studies in various brain regions of prepubertal rats maintained in 14 or 10 h of light or treated with late-afternoon injections of melatonin (50 micrograms/day). Protein restriction was applied during the experiment to sensitize the animals to the treatments. Under the conditions employed, rats kept in short daylength throughout or kept on long photoperiod and given late-afternoon melatonin injections showed evidence of delayed puberty (seminal vesicle, ventral prostate, and testis weight decreased by 45%, 55%, and 60% respectively, compared to control rats). Binding measurements were made 1 h before and 2 and 5 h after the onset of darkness in the pubertal (42-day-old) or experimentally prepubertal rats. In the rats of the Porton strain (for which protein restriction was obligatory for the gonadal response) there was no consistent treatment or time effects on specific binding of 3H-diazepam to washed membranes of the hypothalamus, midbrain, or striatum. Similarly, there were no differences in the stimulation of 3H-diazepam binding by 100 microM GABA or the inhibition of binding by 50 microM N-acetyl 5 methoxy kynurenamine. By contrast, in Wistar rats, specific binding to midbrain membranes was reduced 5 h after dark compared to 2 h (37% saline; 20% melatonin) and the extent of stimulation by GABA in the hypothalamus was increased 5 h after darkness (35.6% to 46.7% saline; 37.4% to 50% melatonin). Melatonin treatment resulted in significantly higher specific binding in the hypothalamus 2 h after dark (10%, control fed; 20%, protein restricted) but reduced the GABA induced stimulation of binding in the midbrain (35.5% to 25%, control fed; 33.7% to 23.5%, protein restricted).

  12. Postnatal prebiotic fiber intake in offspring exposed to gestational protein restriction has sex-specific effects on insulin resistance and intestinal permeability in rats.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Megan C; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-10-01

    Maternal protein restriction (PR) during pregnancy is known to have numerous adverse effects on offspring, including increased adiposity and impaired glucose tolerance later in life. A few studies have shown that this adverse programming can be reversed by dietary or hormonal therapies early in postnatal life. The objective of this study was to determine if a weaning diet high in prebiotic fiber could mitigate some of the negative effects of maternal PR, such as increased adiposity and impaired glucose tolerance. Wistar rats were fed a low- (8%) or normal- (20%) protein diet during pregnancy. Male and female pups were weaned onto control (C; 5% fiber, 20% protein) or high (prebiotic) fiber (HF; 21% wt:wt, 1:1 ratio oligofructose and inulin at 4-10 wk; 10% wt:wt, 1:1 ratio oligofructose and inulin at 10-24 wk; 17.3% protein) diets. At 24 wk of age, glucose tolerance, body composition, satiety hormones, gut microbiota, and markers of intestinal permeability were measured in the offspring. Maternal PR reduced offspring birth weight by 5% and lean mass by 9% compared with the C offspring (P < 0.007). HF-fed offspring had lower body weights and percentage body fat (?23% in males, ?19% in females) at 24 wk than did C offspring (P < 0.02). Compared with C pups, pups fed the HF diet had greater cecal Bifidobacterium spp. (>5-fold) and plasma concentrations of the gut trophic hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) (P < 0.05). In male PR offspring fed the HF diet, insulin resistance measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was reduced by 81% compared with those fed the C diet (P = 0.02). In female PR offspring fed the HF diet, plasma endotoxin was greater and colonic tight junction protein 1 (Tjp1) expression was lower than in those fed the C diet. A high prebiotic fiber weaning diet mitigated increased adiposity and insulin resistance associated with maternal PR, which could improve health and decrease risk of chronic disease in offspring born to malnourished dams. However, the functional importance of sex-specific changes in markers of intestinal barrier function warrants further investigation. PMID:25080539

  13. Maternal protein restriction induces early-onset glucose intolerance and alters hepatic genes expression in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathway in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Maternal undernutrition during pregnancy and/or lactation can alter the offspring's response to environmental challenges, and thus increases the risk of the development of metabolic diseases at a later age. However, whether maternal protein restriction can modulate glucose metabolism in the early life of offspring is less understood. Furthermore, we explored the potential underlying mechanisms that illustrate this phenotype. Materials and Methods To test this hypothesis, we examined the offspring of C57BL/6J mice at weaning to determine the effects of feeding their mothers a low-protein diet or normal chow diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Gene array experiments and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were utilized to explore the altered hepatic genes expression. Results The offspring of dams fed a low-protein diet had a lower birthweight and bodyweight, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin sensitivity, and decreased serum cholesterol at weaning. Using gene array experiments, 253 differentially expressed genes were identified in the liver tissues of the offspring between the two groups. Bioinformatic analyses showed that all differentially expressed genes were mapped to 11 pathways. We focused on the ‘peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway,’ because peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors have emerged as central regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was utilized for the validation of genes in the pathway. Conclusions A maternal low-protein diet during pregnancy and lactation promotes early-onset glucose intolerance in the offspring mice, and the altered hepatic genes expression in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway could play role in regulating this phenomenon. PMID:25969711

  14. Nutritional Recovery with a Soybean Diet after Weaning Reduces Lipogenesis but Induces Inflammation in the Liver in Adult Rats Exposed to Protein Restriction during Intrauterine Life and Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Sílvia Regina de Lima; Feres, Naoel Hassan; Ignacio-Souza, Leticia Martins; Veloso, Roberto Vilela; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Botosso, Bárbara Laet; Reis, Marise Auxiliadora de Barros; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of postweaning nutritional recovery with a soybean flour diet on de novo hepatic lipogenesis and inflammation in adult rats exposed to protein restriction during intrauterine life and lactation. Rats from mothers fed with protein (casein) in a percentage of 17% (control, C) or 6% (low, L) during pregnancy and lactation were fed with diet that contained 17% casein (CC and LC groups, resp.) or soybean (CS and LS groups, resp.) after weaning until 90 days of age. LS and CS rats had low body weight, normal basal serum triglyceride levels, increased ALT concentrations, and high HOMA-IR indices compared with LC and CC rats. The soybean diet reduced PPAR? as well as malic enzyme and citrate lyase contents and activities. The lipogenesis rate and liver fat content were lower in LS and CS rats relative to LC and CC rats. TNF? mRNA and protein levels were higher in LS and CS rats than in LC and CC rats. NF-?B mRNA levels were lower in the LC and LS groups compared with the CC and LC groups. Thus, the soybean diet prevented hepatic steatosis at least in part through reduced lipogenesis but resulted in TNF?-mediated inflammation. PMID:25892856

  15. Antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Rat maternal behavior is a complex social behavior. Many clinically used antipsychotic drugs, including the typical drug haloperidol and the atypical drugs clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, and amisulpride, disrupt active maternal responses (e.g. pup retrieval, pup licking, and nest building) to various extents. In this review, I present a summary of recent studies on the behavioral effects and neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic action on maternal behavior in rats. I argue that antipsychotic drugs at clinically relevant doses disrupt active maternal responses primarily by suppressing maternal motivation. Atypical drug-induced sedation also contributes to their disruptive effects, especially that on pup nursing. Among many potential receptor mechanisms, dopamine D2 receptors and serotonin 5-HT2A/2C receptors are shown to be critically involved in the mediation of the maternal disruptive effects of antipsychotic drugs, with D2 receptors contributing more to typical antipsychotic-induced disruptions, whereas 5-HT2A/2C receptors contributing more to atypical drug-induced disruptions. The nucleus accumbens shell-related reward circuitry is an essential neural network in the mediation of the behavioral effects of antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior. This research not only helps understand the extent and mechanisms of impact of antipsychotic medications on human maternal care, but is also important for enhancing our understanding of the neurochemical basis of maternal behavior. It is also valuable for understanding the complete spectrum of therapeutic effects and side-effects of antipsychotic treatment. This knowledge may facilitate the development of effective intervening strategies to help patients coping with such undesirable effects. PMID:26221833

  16. Long-term modification of the excretion of prostaglandin E(2) by fetal exposure to a maternal low protein diet in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R C; Jackson, A A; Langley-Evans, S C

    1999-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to maternal undernutrition in both humans and animals is associated with long-term changes in the structure, physiological functions and metabolism of key tissues and organs. This phenomenon, termed programming, is implicated in the aetiology of cardiovascular disease. Using an established rat model of hypertension programmed by prenatal protein restriction, assessment was made of the long-term influence of maternal diet upon prostaglandin metabolism. Pregnant rats were fed isoenergetic diets containing 18% casein (control) or 9% casein (low protein) from conception until littering. The offspring of these pregnancies were studied at day 20 of gestation, full-term gestation and at 4, 7 or 12 weeks postnatal age. Prostaglandin E(2) concentrations in plasma were similar in control and low-protein diet-exposed rats at 4 weeks of age. Urinary prostaglandin E(2) excretion was, however, significantly increased by prenatal undernutrition in rats at both 4 and 12 weeks postnatal age. The principal enzyme of prostaglandin E(2) degradation, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH) exhibited significantly lower activity in the kidneys of 4-week-old rats exposed to a maternal low-protein diet. This effect was transient and absent by 12 weeks postnatal age. There was also some evidence of an altered developmental profile of PGDH activity in the lungs of low-protein diet-exposed rats. These data are consistent with the long-term programming effects of the maternal diet upon renal prostaglandin metabolism. In the rat, increased local prostaglandin E(2) concentrations associated with impaired degradation may contribute to increased renovascular resistance and hypertension. PMID:10436308

  17. MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT.
    C. Lau and J.M. Rogers, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), an environmentally persistent compound used ...

  18. Interaction of maternal separation on the UCh rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S A; Fontanelli, B A F; Stefanini, M A; Chuffa, L G A; Teixeira, G R; Lizarte, F S N; Tirapelli, L F; Quitete, V H A; Matheus, S M M; Padovani, C R; Martinez, M; Martinez, F E

    2014-01-01

    Maternal care is the main source of signals and stimuli for proper development, growth, and production of adjustment responses to stressful factors. Adverse experiences in childhood are associated with a vulnerability to developing abusive ethanol ingestion via alterations of the response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Alcoholism causes global brain abnormalities, with the cerebellum being one of the most susceptible areas. We evaluated the effect of maternal separation on the cerebellum structure of male UCh rats. Adult male UChA (low 10% ethanol consumption) and UChB (high 10% ethanol consumption) rats were divided in to four experimental groups: (1) UChA, (2) UChA maternal separation (MS), (3) UChB, and (4) UChB MS. The MS occurred between the 4th and 14th days of age, for 240 min day(-1) . Euthanasia was performed at 120 days of age. An image analysis system was used to measure cerebellar cortical height and Purkinje cellular area and height in five rats from each group. The cerebellar sections were stained with antibodies against IGFR-I. MS did not alter the ethanol consumption of UChA and UChB rats. Corticosterone level was significantly higher in UChA MS and UChB MS rats than in UChA and UChB rats. The Purkinje cellular area and height were higher in UChA MS rats. IGFR-I expression was observed in the cortical glomerular area of UChA MS and UChB MS rats. MS altered the Purkinje cells in the cerebella of male UCh rats. PMID:24203397

  19. Immune responsiveness of Japanese quail selected for egg yolk testosterone content under severe protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Kankova, Zuzana; Okuliarova, Monika; Zeman, Michal

    2014-11-01

    Yolk testosterone concentrations vary in response to environmental conditions and different testosterone contents can subsequently modify the phenotypic traits of offspring. Apart from effects on growth, proactive behaviour and secondary sexual characteristics, the possible negative impacts of maternal testosterone on the immune system are often considered a limitation for its deposition. The effects of maternal testosterone can be modulated by postnatal environmental conditions, such as the availability of food resources. However, the majority of studies considering the effects of maternal testosterone on the immune system have been conducted under optimum conditions. We evaluated the influence of genetic selection for high (HET) and low (LET) egg testosterone content in Japanese quail on immune responsiveness of offspring to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation under severe protein restriction. Protein restriction negatively influenced body weight and performance in the PHA-test. We observed an increase in Cort (corticosterone) and He/Ly (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) after LPS, while no changes occurred in total IgY levels in the protein-restricted group. HET quails showed higher body mass and total IgY levels and lower He/Ly ratio than LET quails, while the PHA index and Cort concentration did not differ between lines. No interactions were found between protein restriction and genetic line. In conclusion, the immune response was not compromised under conditions of severe protein restriction in the faster growing HET line compared with the LET line. We hypothesise that the immune responsiveness of birds with higher yolk testosterone may be linked with other maternally-derived substances in a context-dependent manner. PMID:25086332

  20. Lactating Rats Retain Nursing Behavior and Maternal Care in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Ronca, April E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, suckling mammals were flown in space for the first time as part of the NIH.R3 experiment sponsored jointly by NIH (National Institutes of Health) and NASA. Six rat dams and litters (Rattus norvegicus) were launched on an eight-day Space Shuttle mission at each of three postnatal ages (P5, P8, and P15). Dams and litters (N = 10 pups/litter) were housed within modified Animal Enclosure Modules (AEMs). Comparisons were made to ground controls. Dams and litters were videotaped daily in flight. The P8 and P15 flight litters showed excellent survival (99%) and weight gain relative to AEM ground controls, whereas P5 litters showed reduced survival (0% and 60%, respectively) and weight gain (less than 40% AEM). To examine the possibility that failures of maternal care contributed to P5 results, we analyzed the dams' in-flight nursing, licking and retrieving from four video segments ranging from twelve to fifteen minutes in length with control data derived from multiple ground segments. Video analyses revealed clear evidence of maternal care in flight. For P5 dams, frequency and duration of nursing and licking bouts fell within or above one standard deviation of control values. Retrieving was noted in the P5 and P8 groups only. The observed results suggest that factors other than maternal care contributed to the low survival rates and body weight gains of the P5 flight offspring.

  1. Long maternal separation has protective effects in rats exposed to activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Carrera, O; Cerrato, M; Sanchez, A; Gutierrez, E

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effect of three neonatal treatments of maternal separation during infancy in young adult rats exposed to standard activity-based anorexia (ABA) consisting of food restriction plus free access to an activity wheel. During the first 20 postnatal days of life rat pups were exposed to periods of either brief maternal separation (BMS, 15 min), long maternal separation (LMS, 180 min), or were non-handled (NH). Thereafter, male and female rats were exposed to ABA. Neonatal treatment produced no significant differences in the survival time of male rats, whereas survival was greater in female rats exposed to LMS than in NH rats under ABA procedure. In conclusion, prolonged maternal separation appears to promote resistance in female animals subjected to harsh ABA life-threatening conditions. PMID:19728326

  2. Protein Content and Methyl Donors in Maternal Diet Interact to Influence the Proliferation Rate and Cell Fate of Neural Stem Cells in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Amarger, Valérie; Lecouillard, Angèle; Ancellet, Laure; Grit, Isabelle; Castellano, Blandine; Hulin, Philippe; Parnet, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy and early postnatal life influences the setting up of normal physiological functions in the offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate cell differentiation during embryonic development and may mediate gene/environment interactions. We showed here that high methyl donors associated with normal protein content in maternal diet increased the in vitro proliferation rate of neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from rat E19 fetuses. Gene expression on whole hippocampi at weaning confirmed this effect as evidenced by the higher expression of the Nestin and Igf2 genes, suggesting a higher amount of undifferentiated precursor cells. Additionally, protein restriction reduced the expression of the insulin receptor gene, which is essential to the action of IGFII. Inhibition of DNA methylation in neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro increased the expression of the astrocyte-specific Gfap gene and decreased the expression of the neuron-specific Dcx gene, suggesting an impact on cell differentiation. Our data suggest a complex interaction between methyl donors and protein content in maternal diet that influence the expression of major growth factors and their receptors and therefore impact the proliferation and differentiation capacities of neural stem cells, either through external hormone signals or internal genomic regulation. PMID:25317634

  3. Stimulus Control of Maternal Responsiveness to Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Pup Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    E-print Network

    Stimulus Control of Maternal Responsiveness to Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Pup Ultrasonic ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) far more than do virgin females (W. J. Farrell & J. R. Alberts, 2002). We of the present article, mother rats' responses to infant rats' ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), might

  4. The effects of adrenalectomy and corticosterone replacement on maternal behavior in the postpartum rat

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, ON, Canada L5L 1C6 b McMaster University, St that mother rats will respond maternally to offspring by enhancing the moth- er's attraction to infant cues

  5. The Roles of Accumbal Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptors in Maternal Memory in Rats

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    The Roles of Accumbal Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptors in Maternal Memory in Rats Mayte Parada dopamine (DA) system, especially the nucleus accumbens (NA) shell. However, the relative contributions investigates the roles of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in maternal memory by infusing a selective D1 antagonist

  6. Maternal-infant separation impedes changes in feeding behavior during estrous cycle of rats

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Inoue, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic and stressful events during childhood are associated with the development of eating disorders. We conducted an animal study to test if association stress in childhood affects ingestive behavior later in life by using female rats that have an adjusted estrous cycle. First, electrical impedance of the vagina was conducted to test estrous cycle adjustment. Second, the effects of 6 h per day maternal separation from birth to weaning, which models a psychologically stressful experience in childhood, was used to test feeding behavior during an ovarian cycle in female adult rats with matched estrous cycles. Food and water intake in maternal separated and non-separated rats was measured in each estrous phase. Non-separated rats showed periodical changes, but maternal separated rats showed no significant changes in food and water intake during an estrous cycle. An opposing tendency for food and water intake was seen between maternal separated and non-separated rats. These observations suggest that electrical impedance of the vagina showed the highest value in the estrous phase of rats housed in a reversed light-dark cycle, and maternal separation was found to disturb changes in feeding behavior during the estrous cycle. PMID:26119792

  7. Maternal-infant separation impedes changes in feeding behavior during estrous cycle of rats.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Inoue, Koki

    2015-10-23

    Traumatic and stressful events during childhood are associated with the development of eating disorders. We conducted an animal study to test if association stress in childhood affects ingestive behavior later in life by using female rats that have an adjusted estrous cycle. First, electrical impedance of the vagina was conducted to test estrous cycle adjustment. Second, the effects of 6 h per day maternal separation from birth to weaning, which models a psychologically stressful experience in childhood, was used to test feeding behavior during an ovarian cycle in female adult rats with matched estrous cycles. Food and water intake in maternal separated and non-separated rats was measured in each estrous phase. Non-separated rats showed periodical changes, but maternal separated rats showed no significant changes in food and water intake during an estrous cycle. An opposing tendency for food and water intake was seen between maternal separated and non-separated rats. These observations suggest that electrical impedance of the vagina showed the highest value in the estrous phase of rats housed in a reversed light-dark cycle, and maternal separation was found to disturb changes in feeding behavior during the estrous cycle. PMID:26119792

  8. Changes in maternal and fetal nicotine distribution after maternal administration of monoclonal nicotine-specific antibody to rats.

    PubMed

    Keyler, D E; Lesage, M G; Dufek, M B; Pentel, P R

    2006-11-01

    Vaccination against nicotine to elicit the production of nicotine-specific antibodies is a potential treatment for tobacco addiction which reduces nicotine distribution from serum to brain. Vaccination of pregnant rats also reduces the distribution of maternally-administered nicotine to the fetal brain. Whether this is due to maternal antibody reducing the transfer of nicotine from mother to fetus, or to fetal antibody altering the distribution of nicotine within the fetus, is not clear. In the current study, passive immunization of rats with the murine monoclonal nicotine-specific antibody Nic311 was used as a surrogate for vaccination because antibody transfer to the fetus was anticipated to be lower than with vaccination. Pregnant rats received nicotine from gestational day (GD) 18-20 as frequent i.v. boluses to simulate nicotine exposure from smoking. Nic311 was administered at doses of 30, 80 or 240 mg/kg on GD 19. Fetal serum Nic311 levels on GD 20 were <3% of concurrent maternal levels, but concentrations of up to 20 ug/ml in fetal serum were obtained owing to the very high levels in maternal serum. Accumulation of the chronically administered nicotine, measured on GD 20, was not changed by Nic311 treatment in either maternal or fetal brain. The early distribution of nicotine to maternal brain, measured 5 min after a dose, was markedly reduced by Nic311, while the early distribution of nicotine to whole fetus and fetal brain was not substantially altered. These data suggest that the limited transfer of Nic311 to the fetus in turn limits the ability of Nic311 to reduce nicotine distribution to the fetal brain. PMID:16979120

  9. Pre-reproductive maternal enrichment influences rat maternal care and offspring developmental trajectories: behavioral performances and neuroplasticity correlates.

    PubMed

    Cutuli, Debora; Caporali, Paola; Gelfo, Francesca; Angelucci, Francesco; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Bisicchia, Elisa; Molinari, Marco; Farioli Vecchioli, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a widely used paradigm for investigating the influence of complex stimulations on brain and behavior. Here we examined whether pre-reproductive exposure to EE of female rats may influence their maternal care and offspring cognitive performances. To this aim, from weaning to breeding age enriched females (EF) were reared in enriched environments. Females reared in standard conditions were used as controls. At 2.5 months of age all females were mated and reared in standard conditions with their offspring. Maternal care behaviors and nesting activity were assessed in lactating dams. Their male pups were also behaviorally evaluated at different post-natal days (pnd). Brain BDNF, reelin and adult hippocampal neurogenesis levels were measured as biochemical correlates of neuroplasticity. EF showed more complex maternal care than controls due to their higher levels of licking, crouching and nest building activities. Moreover, their offspring showed higher discriminative (maternal odor preference T-maze, pnd 10) and spatial (Morris Water Maze, pnd 45; Open Field with objects, pnd 55) performances, with no differences in social abilities (Sociability test, pnd 35), in comparison to controls. BDNF levels were increased in EF frontal cortex at pups' weaning and in their offspring hippocampus at pnd 21 and 55. No differences in offspring reelin and adult hippocampal neurogenesis levels were found. In conclusion, our study indicates that pre-reproductive maternal enrichment positively influences female rats' maternal care and cognitive development of their offspring, demonstrating thus a transgenerational transmission of EE benefits linked to enhanced BDNF-induced neuroplasticity. PMID:25814946

  10. Pre-reproductive maternal enrichment influences rat maternal care and offspring developmental trajectories: behavioral performances and neuroplasticity correlates

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, Debora; Caporali, Paola; Gelfo, Francesca; Angelucci, Francesco; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Bisicchia, Elisa; Molinari, Marco; Farioli Vecchioli, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a widely used paradigm for investigating the influence of complex stimulations on brain and behavior. Here we examined whether pre-reproductive exposure to EE of female rats may influence their maternal care and offspring cognitive performances. To this aim, from weaning to breeding age enriched females (EF) were reared in enriched environments. Females reared in standard conditions were used as controls. At 2.5 months of age all females were mated and reared in standard conditions with their offspring. Maternal care behaviors and nesting activity were assessed in lactating dams. Their male pups were also behaviorally evaluated at different post-natal days (pnd). Brain BDNF, reelin and adult hippocampal neurogenesis levels were measured as biochemical correlates of neuroplasticity. EF showed more complex maternal care than controls due to their higher levels of licking, crouching and nest building activities. Moreover, their offspring showed higher discriminative (maternal odor preference T-maze, pnd 10) and spatial (Morris Water Maze, pnd 45; Open Field with objects, pnd 55) performances, with no differences in social abilities (Sociability test, pnd 35), in comparison to controls. BDNF levels were increased in EF frontal cortex at pups' weaning and in their offspring hippocampus at pnd 21 and 55. No differences in offspring reelin and adult hippocampal neurogenesis levels were found. In conclusion, our study indicates that pre-reproductive maternal enrichment positively influences female rats' maternal care and cognitive development of their offspring, demonstrating thus a transgenerational transmission of EE benefits linked to enhanced BDNF-induced neuroplasticity. PMID:25814946

  11. The effects of adrenalectomy and corticosterone replacement on induction of maternal behavior in the virgin female rat

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    of the adrenal gland, the source of corticosterone, decreases maternal licking and crouching in the postpartum behavior of the sensitized virgin rat is affected by approach­avoidance systems as well as by hypothalamic­pituitary­adrenal behavior; Virgin maternal sensitization; Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis; Rat Introduction Following

  12. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 30: 1264-1274, 2015. PMID:24753110

  13. Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1–21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders. PMID:26388728

  14. Maternal docosahexaenoic acid increases adiponectin and normalizes IUGR-induced changes in rat adipose deposition.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Heidi N; Wang, Yan; Campbell, Michael S; Yu, Xing; Lane, Robert H; Joss-Moore, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) predisposes to obesity and adipose dysfunction. We previously demonstrated IUGR-induced increased visceral adipose deposition and dysregulated expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor- ? 2 (PPAR ? 2) in male adolescent rats, prior to the onset of obesity. In other studies, activation of PPAR ? increases subcutaneous adiponectin expression and normalizes visceral adipose deposition. We hypothesized that maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a PPAR ? agonist, would normalize IUGR adipose deposition in association with increased PPAR ? , adiponectin, and adiponectin receptor expression in subcutaneous adipose. To test these hypotheses, we used a well-characterized model of uteroplacental-insufficiency-(UPI-) induced IUGR in the rat with maternal DHA supplementation. Our primary findings were that maternal DHA supplementation during rat pregnancy and lactation (1) normalizes IUGR-induced changes in adipose deposition and visceral PPAR ? expression in male rats and (2) increases serum adiponectin, as well as adipose expression of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors in former IUGR rats. Our novel findings suggest that maternal DHA supplementation may normalize adipose dysfunction and promote adiponectin-induced improvements in metabolic function in IUGR. PMID:23533720

  15. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-06-15

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  16. Intrauterine Growth Restricted Rats Exercised before and during Pregnancy: Maternal and Perinatal Repercussions

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, S. B.; Volpato, G. T.; Rudge, M. V. C.; Damasceno, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of swimming before and during pregnancy on rats born with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and their offspring. For this, nondiabetic and streptozotocin-induced severely diabetic (SD) pregnant rats were mated and generated offspring with appropriate (control, C) and small (IUGR) for pregnancy age, respectively. Following that, C and IUGR groups were further distributed into nonexercised control (C), exercised control (Cex), nonexercised IUGR (IUGR), and exercised IUGR (IUGRex). IUGR rats presented lower mating rate than control rats. Regardless of physical exercise IUGR rats presented decreased body weight from birth to lactation. At 90 days of life, IUGR rats presented glucose intolerance. Maternal organ weights were increased and relative adiposity of IUGRex rats was lower than Cex. IUGR and IUGRex offspring presented reduced body weight than C and Cex, respectively. IUGRex dams presented an increased rate of appropriate for pregnancy age newborns. IUGEex male and female offspring relative brain weight was increased compared with Cex. Therefore, swimming before and during pregnancy prevented glucose intolerance, reduced general adiposity, and increased maternal and offspring organ weight in rats, showing the benefit of physical exercise for IUGR rats. PMID:26345406

  17. Developmental Triclosan Exposure Decreases Maternal and Offspring Thyroxine in Rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and laboratory data have demonstrated that disruption of maternal thyroid hormones during fetal developmental may result in irreversible neurological consequences in offspring. In a short-term exposure paradigm, triclosan decreased systemic thyroxine (T4) concentr...

  18. Toxic Effects of Maternal Zearalenone Exposure on Uterine Capacity and Fetal Development in Gestation Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jia, Zhiqiang; Yin, Shutong; Gao, Rui; Qu, Zhe; Liu, Min; Nie, Shaoping

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of high-dose and early gestational exposure to zearalenone (ZEN) in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, to correlate the maternal uterus with the fetus, and to explore the development and malformation of fetuses. Pregnant female SD rats were fed diets containing 0.3, 48.5, 97.6, or 146.0 mg/kg ZEN on gestational days (GDs) 0 through 7. All the females survived until GD 20, at which point a cesarean section was performed to harvest the organs, blood, and fetuses. The results indicated that exposure to ZEN during early gestation can impact the maternal reproductive capability. Delayed fetal development was directly linked to maternal toxicity. The toxic effects of ZEN caused early deaths more frequently than late deaths, and the deleterious effects lasted through the end of pregnancy. PMID:24357638

  19. Early maternal separation increases symptoms of activity-based anorexia in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Stephanie; Grant, Virginia

    2009-07-01

    Running activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, increasing the release of stress hormones known to exert anorexic effects. HPA axis reactivity is strongly influenced by early postnatal manipulations, including removal of pups from the dam for short (handling) or prolonged (maternal separation) durations during the preweaning period. The authors examined the effects of handling and maternal separation on food intake, body weight loss, and running rates of young adult male and female rats in the activity-based anorexia (ABA) paradigm. Postnatal treatment did not affect adaptation to a 1-hr restricted feeding schedule before the introduction of wheel running. During the ABA paradigm, maternally separated animals lost weight faster, ate less, ran more, and required fewer days to reach removal criterion compared with handled rats. Females were particularly vulnerable. These findings indicate that early postnatal treatment and sex influence ABA. PMID:19594284

  20. Maternal Copper Deficiency Perpetuates Altered Vascular Function in Sprague-Dawley Rat Offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the consequences of maternal Cu (Cu) deficiency on the vascular function of offspring or on perpetuation of vascular effects to a second generation. We examined vascular functional responses in mesenteric arteries from Cu-deficient Sprague-Dawley rat dams and from offspring dir...

  1. MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCATANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT. C. Lau1, J.M. Rogers1, J.R. Thibodeaux1, R.G. Hanson1, B.E. Grey1, B.D. Barbee1, J.H. Richards2, J.L. Butenoff3. 1Reprod. Tox. Div., 2Exp. Tox. Div., NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3...

  2. LATE GESTATIONAL ATRAZINE EXPOSURE DECREASES MATERNAL BEHAVIOR IN LONG-EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Late Gestational Atrazine Exposure Alters Maternal Nursing Behavior in Rats

    Jennifer L. Rayner1 and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, DESE, Chapel Hill, NC, and 2 USEPA/ ORD/NHEERL/Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC.

    At...

  3. REPEATED MATERNAL SEPARATION IN THE NEONATAL RAT: CELLULAR MECHANISMS CONTRIBUTING TO BRAIN GROWTH SPARING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Separation of rat neonates from their dam has been shown to evoke acutely a variety of biochemical and physiological responses. n the current study, we examined whether these responses were extended to pups who were subject to daily episodes of maternal deprivation, and whether t...

  4. EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID STATUS IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) ON MATERNAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID STATUS IN THE RAT. JR Thibodeaux1, R Hanson1, B Grey1, JM Rogers1, ME Stanton2, and C Lau1. 1Reproductive Toxicology Division; 2Neurotoxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle P...

  5. Maternal obesity and post-natal high fat diet disrupt hepatic circadian rhythm in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring of obese (Ob) rat dams gain greater body wt and fat mass when fed high-fat diet (HFD) as compared to controls. Alterations of diurnal circadian rhythm are known to detrimentally impact metabolically active tissues such as liver. We sought to determine if maternal obesity (MOb) leads to p...

  6. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate during pregnancy in rat and mouse. I: maternal and prenatal evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The maternal and developmental toxicities of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, C8F17SO3-) were evaluated in the rat and mouse. PFOS is an environmentally persistent compound used as a surfactant and occurs as a degradation product of both perfluorooctane sulfonyl fluorid...

  7. EFFECTS OF CHEMICALLY-INDUCED MATERNAL TOXICITY ON PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis that chemically-induced overt maternal toxicity induces a characteristic syndrome of adverse developmental effects in the rat was investigated. regnant animals (Sprague-Dawley strain) were dosed by oral gavage with one of a series of compounds on days 6 through 15 ...

  8. Effect of Himatanthus sucuuba in Maternal Reproductive Outcome and Fetal Anomaly Frequency in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Soares, Thaigra; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava; Resende, Flávia Mayara Campos; Correa Dos Santos, Maria Aparecida; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Himatanthus sucuuba on the maternal reproductive outcome and fetal anomaly incidence in rats. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups as follows: Control = treated with water (vehicle), treated 250 = treated with H. sucuuba at dose 250 mg/kg, and treated 500 = treated with H. sucuuba at dose 500 mg/kg. The rats were orally treated, by gavage, with H. sucuuba or vehicle (water) during preimplantation and organogenic period (from gestational day 0-14). At day 21 of pregnancy, all rats were killed to obtain maternal-fetal data. The treatment with H. sucuuba at dose of 250 mg/kg caused reduction in placental efficiency and an increase preimplantation loss rate and placenta weight compared with the control. The treated 500 group presented a significant decrease in maternal weight gain, maternal weight gain minus gravid uterus weight, fetal weight, and placental efficiency compared with the control. In this group, there was a decrease in body weight at day 20 of pregnancy and metacarpus ossification and an increase in the preimplantation loss rate and skeletal anomalies compared with other groups. Himatanthus sucuuba extract caused intrauterine growth restriction, preimplantation loss, and developmental delay in the high doses tested. PMID:26339763

  9. Developmental toxicity of benzyl benzoate in rats after maternal exposure throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koçkaya, E Arzu; K?l?ç, Aysun

    2014-01-01

    The maternal and fetal toxicity of benzyl benzoate, commonly used as antiparasitic insecticide, was evaluated in pregnant rats after a daily oral dose of 25 and 100 mg/kg. Biochemical, histopathological, and morphological examinations were performed. Dams were observed for maternal body weights and food and water consumption and subjected to caesarean section on (GD) 20. Maternal and fetal liver, kidney, heart, brain, and placenta were examined histopathologically under light microscope. Maternal and fetal liver and placenta were stained immunohistochemically for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Morphometric analysis of fetal body lengths, placental measurements, and fetal skeletal stainings was performed. Statistically significant alterations in biochemical parameters and placental and skeletal measurements were determined in treatment groups. In addition to histopathological changes, considerable differences were observed in the immunolocalization of VEGF in treatment groups. These results demonstrated that benzyl benzoate and its metabolites can transport to the placenta and eventually enter the fetuses. PMID:21922633

  10. Effect of ethanol consumption during gestation on maternal-fetal amino acid metabolism in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of /sup 14/C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), administered intravenously, in maternal, fetal and placental tissues was examined in the rat on gestation-day 21. Ethanol consumption during gestation (day 6 through 21) significantly reduced the uptake of AIB by the placenta and fetus while exerting no influence on maternal tissue AIB uptake. The concentration of fetal plasma free histidine was decreased 50% as a result of maternal ethanol ingestion, but the free histidine level of maternal plasma was not altered. Since no effect on protein content of fetal tissue could be detected, it is speculated that reduced histidine to the fetus might significantly alter the amounts of histamine and carnosine formed via their precursor. The significance of these findings in relation to the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is discussed.

  11. Maternal Programming of Sexual Behavior and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Function in the Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Nicole; Del Corpo, Adina; Diorio, Josie; McAllister, Kelli; Sharma, Shakti; Meaney, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in parental care predict the age of puberty, sexual activity in adolescence and the age at first pregnancy in humans. These findings parallel descriptions of maternal effects on phenotypic variation in reproductive function in other species. Despite the prevalence of such reports, little is known about potential biological mechanisms and this especially true for effects on female reproductive development. We examined the hypothesis that parental care might alter hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function and thus reproductive function in the female offspring of rat mothers that vary pup licking/grooming (LG) over the first week postpartum. As adults, the female offspring of Low LG mothers showed 1) increased sexual receptivity; 2) increased plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone at proestrus; 3) an increased positive-feedback effect of estradiol on both plasma LH levels and gonadotropin releasing-hormone (GnRH) expression in the medial preoptic region; and 4) increased estrogen receptor ? (ER?) expression in the anterioventral paraventricular nucleus, a system that regulates GnRH. The results of a cross-fostering study provide evidence for a direct effect of postnatal maternal care as well as a possible prenatal influence. Indeed, we found evidence for increased fetal testosterone levels at embryonic day 20 in the female fetuses of High compared to Low LG mothers. Finally, the female offspring of Low LG mothers showed accelerated puberty compared to those of High LG mothers. These data suggest maternal effects in the rat on the development of neuroendocrine systems that regulate female sexual behaviour. Together with studies revealing a maternal effect on the maternal behavior of the female offspring, these findings suggest that maternal care can program alternative reproductive phenotypes in the rat through regionally-specific effects on ER? expression. PMID:18493313

  12. Chronic maternal dietary iodine deficiency but not thiocyanate feeding affects maternal reproduction and postnatal performance of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sundari, S Bala Tripura; Venu, L; Sunita, Y; Raghunath, M

    2007-07-01

    Iodine deficiency disorders affect reproductive performance in the afflicted populations. Environmental iodine deficiency (ID) and goitrogens are important in their aetiology. We observed earlier that chronic maternal dietary ID but not goitrogen feeding altered the blood-brain barrier nutrient transport in adult rats. Whether similar differences exist in their effects on reproduction of dams and postnatal performance of the offspring has been assessed. Inbred, female, weaning WNIN rats were rendered hypothyroid by feeding for 8-12 weeks, a low iodine test diet or a control diet with added potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) (@ 25 mg/rat/day). Following mating with control males, they continued on their respective diets till their pups were weaned. Indices of reproductive performance such as percentage of conception, mortality of dams during pregnancy and parturition, litter size, and survival of pups till weaning were affected markedly by ID but not thiocyanate feeding. Neither ID nor thiocyanate feeding from conception or parturition affected their reproductive performance. Nevertheless, postnatal weight gain of pups was less in all the three ID groups but not thiocyanate fed dams. Rehabilitation of chronically ID pregnant dams from conception or parturition did not improve their pregnancy weight gain, litter size or birth weight of pups but decreased abortion and mortality of mothers during pregnancy and parturition. Rehabilitation improved the pups' postnatal weight gain but the effect was only moderate. Based on the results of the present study it may be suggested that maternal ID but not thiocyanate feeding affects reproductive performance and postnatal performance of their offspring. PMID:17821855

  13. Effect of fetal growth on maternal protein metabolism in postabsorptive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, P.R.; Bistrian, B.R.; Blackburn, G.L.; Istfan, N.

    1987-03-01

    Rates of protein synthesis were measured in whole fetuses and maternal tissues at 17 and 20 days of gestation in postabsorptive rats using continuous infusion of L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine. Fetal protein degradation rates were derived from the fractional rates of synthesis and growth. Whole-body (plasma) leucine kinetics in the mother showed a significant reduction of the fraction of plasma leucine oxidized in the mothers bearing older fetuses, a slight increase in the plasma flux, with total leucine oxidation and incorporation into protein remaining similar at the two gestational ages. Estimates of fractional protein synthesis in maternal tissues revealed an increase in placental and hepatic rates at 20 days of gestation, whereas the fractional synthetic rate in muscle remained unchanged. A model for estimation of the redistribution of leucine between plasma and tissues is described in detail. This model revealed a more efficient utilization of leucine in fetal protein synthesis in comparison with other maternal tissues, a greater dependency of the fetus on plasma supply of leucine, and a significant increase (2-fold) in the release of leucine from maternal muscle as the fetal requirements increased proportionately with its size. The latter conclusion, supported by nitrogen analysis and the ratio of bound-to-free leucine in maternal tissues, confirms the importance of maternal stores in maintaining the homeostasis of essential amino acids during late pregnancy.

  14. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats.

    PubMed

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, ?lyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring's plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring's plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development. PMID:26633475

  15. Maternal Low Quality Protein Diet Alters Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations of Weaning Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kabasakal Cetin, Arzu; Dasgin, Halil; Gülec, Atila; Onbasilar, ?lyas; Akyol, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the influence of a maternal low protein diet on the fetus. However, the effect of a maternal low quality protein diet on fetal growth and development is largely unknown. Wistar rats (11 weeks old) were mated and maintained on either a chow diet with 20% casein (n = 6) as the control group (C), or a low quality protein diet with 20% wheat gluten (n = 7) as the experimental group (WG) through gestation and lactation. Maternal body weights were similar in both groups throughout the study. Birth weights were not influenced by maternal diet and offspring body weights during lactation were similar between the groups. Offspring’s plasma amino acid profiles showed that plasma methionine, glutamine and lysine were significantly lower and aspartic acid, ornithine and glycine-proline were significantly higher in the WG. Plant based protein comprises an important part of protein intake in developing countries. It is well-known that these diets can be inadequate in terms of essential amino acids. The current study shows differential effects of a maternal low quality protein diet on the offspring’s plasma amino acids. Future studies will examine further aspects of the influence of maternal low quality protein diets on fetal growth and development. PMID:26633475

  16. Electrolyte composition of fetuses, placentas, and maternal plasma during the last trimester of gestation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Greizerstein, H B; Abel, E L

    1979-01-01

    Pregnant rats were sacrificed during their last trimester of pregnancy. Maternal plasma levels of calcium and zinc decreased during gestation, whereas calcium and zinc levels increased in fetuses as gestation progressed. Although sodium and potassium levels remained relatively constant in maternal plasma, the levels of these electrolytes in fetuses decreased with gestation. Magnesium levels remained relatively unchanged in both maternal plasma and fetuses. The changes in placenta electrolyte content resembled the pattern of changes in fetuses. PMID:526489

  17. A study on fear memory retrieval and REM sleep in maternal separation and isolation stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Dayalan; Sabitha, K R; Hegde, Preethi; Jayakrishnan, H R; Kutty, Bindu M; Chattarji, Sumantra; Rangarajan, Govindan; Laxmi, T R

    2014-10-15

    As rapid brain development occurs during the neonatal period, environmental manipulation during this period may have a significant impact on sleep and memory functions. Moreover, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep plays an important role in integrating new information with the previously stored emotional experience. Hence, the impact of early maternal separation and isolation stress (MS) during the stress hyporesponsive period (SHRP) on fear memory retention and sleep in rats were studied. The neonatal rats were subjected to maternal separation and isolation stress during postnatal days 5-7 (6h daily/3d). Polysomnographic recordings and differential fear conditioning was carried out in two different sets of rats aged 2 months. The neuronal replay during REM sleep was analyzed using different parameters. MS rats showed increased time in REM stage and total sleep period also increased. MS rats showed fear generalization with increased fear memory retention than normal control (NC). The detailed analysis of the local field potentials across different time periods of REM sleep showed increased theta oscillations in the hippocampus, amygdala and cortical circuits. Our findings suggest that stress during SHRP has sensitized the hippocampus-amygdala-cortical loops which could be due to increased release of corticosterone that generally occurs during REM sleep. These rats when subjected to fear conditioning exhibit increased fear memory and increased fear generalization. The development of helplessness, anxiety and sleep changes in human patients, thus, could be related to the reduced thermal, tactile and social stimulation during SHRP on brain plasticity and fear memory functions. PMID:25084041

  18. Maternal PUFA ?-3 Supplementation Prevents Neonatal Lung Injuries Induced by Hyperoxia in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dyuti; Subayi Nkembi, Armande; Aubry, Estelle; Houeijeh, Ali; Butruille, Laura; Houfflin-Debarge, Véronique; Besson, Rémi; Deruelle, Philippe; Storme, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most common complications of prematurity, occurring in 30% of very low birth weight infants. The benefits of dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids ?-3 (PUFA ?-3) during pregnancy or the perinatal period have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation on lung injuries in newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia. Pregnant female Wistar rats (n = 14) were fed a control diet (n = 2), a PUFA ?-6 diet (n = 6), or a PUFA ?-3 diet (n = 6), starting with the 14th gestation day. At Day 1, female and newborn rats (10 per female) were exposed to hyperoxia (O2, n = 70) or to the ambient air (Air, n = 70). Six groups of newborns rats were obtained: PUFA ?-6/O2 (n = 30), PUFA ?-6/air (n = 30), PUFA ?-3/O2 (n = 30), PUFA ?-3/air (n = 30), control/O2 (n = 10), and control/air (n = 10). After 10 days, lungs were removed for analysis of alveolarization and pulmonary vascular development. Survival rate was 100%. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization and increased pulmonary vascular wall thickness in both control (n = 20) and PUFA ?-6 groups (n = 60). Maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation prevented the decrease in alveolarization caused by hyperoxia (n = 30) compared to PUFA ?-6/O2 (n = 30) or to the control/O2 (n = 10), but did not significantly increase the thickness of the lung vascular wall. Therefore, maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation may protect newborn rats from lung injuries induced by hyperoxia. In clinical settings, maternal PUFA ?-3 supplementation during pregnancy and during lactation may prevent BPD development after premature birth. PMID:26389878

  19. Contextual fear conditioning in maternal separated rats: the amygdala as a site for alterations.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Luisa A; Pereira, Natividade de Sá Couto; Laureano, Daniela P; Benitz, André N D; Noschang, Cristie; Ferreira, Andrea G K; Scherer, Emilene B; Machado, Fernanda R; Henriques, Thiago Pereira; Wyse, Angela T S; Molina, Victor; Dalmaz, Carla

    2014-02-01

    The first 2 weeks of life are a critical period for neural development in rats. Repeated long-term separation from the dam is considered to be one of the most potent stressors to which rat pups can be exposed, and permanently modifies neurobiological and behavioral parameters. Prolonged periods of maternal separation (MS) usually increase stress reactivity during adulthood, and enhance anxiety-like behavior. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of maternal separation during the neonatal period on memory as well as on biochemical parameters (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and antioxidant enzymes activities) in the amygdala of adult rats. Females and male Wistar rats were subjected to repeated maternal separation (incubator at 32 °C, 3 h/day) during postnatal days 1-10. At 60 days of age, the subjects were exposed to a Contextual fear conditioning task. One week after the behavioral task, animals were sacrificed and the amygdala was dissected for evaluation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and antioxidant enzymes activities. Student-t test showed significant MS effect, causing an increase of freezing time in the three exposures to the aversive context in both sexes. Considering biochemical parameters Student-t test showed significant MS effect causing an increase of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in both sexes. On the other hand, no differences were found among the groups on the antioxidant enzymes activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT)] in male rats, but in females, we found a significant MS effect, causing an increase of CAT activity and no differences were found among the groups on SOD and GPx activities. Our results suggest a role of early rearing environment in programming fear learning and memory in adulthood. An early stress experience such as maternal separation may increase activity in the amygdala (as pointed by the increased activity of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase), affecting behaviors related to fear in adulthood, and this effect could be task-specific. PMID:24368626

  20. Decreased maternal and fetal cholesterol following maternal bococizumab (anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibody) administration does not affect rat embryo-fetal development.

    PubMed

    Campion, Sarah N; Han, Bora; Cappon, Gregg D; Lewis, Elise M; Kraynov, Eugenia; Liang, Hong; Bowman, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Bococizumab is a humanized monoclonal IgG2?a antibody against proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. The evaluation of potential effects on embryo-fetal development was conducted in the rat. In a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study bococizumab was administered intravenously to pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 8/group) at 0, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg during organogenesis. Maternal and fetal bococizumab, total cholesterol and HDL concentrations were determined. Bococizumab was well tolerated and there were no effects on ovarian or uterine parameters. Maternal and fetal bococizumab exposure increased with increasing dose, with a corresponding dose-dependent decrease in fetal cholesterol levels. Maternal cholesterol levels were decreased significantly, with reductions that were of a similar magnitude regardless of dose. In the definitive embryo-fetal development study bococizumab was administered to pregnant SD rats (n = 20/group) at 0, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg and no adverse maternal or developmental effects were observed up to 100 mg/kg. These studies have provided an appropriate and relevant safety assessment of bococizumab in pregnant rats to inform human risk assessment, demonstrating no adverse effects on embryo-fetal development at magnitudes greater than anticipated clinical exposure and in the presence of maximal reductions in maternal cholesterol and dose-dependent reductions in fetal cholesterol. PMID:26382609

  1. Effects of treadmill exercise-intensity on short-term memory in the rats born of the lipopolysaccharide-exposed maternal rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kijeong; Sung, Yun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Lim, Baek-Vin; Lee, Choong-Yeol; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-01-01

    Maternal infection is an important factor causing neonatal brain injury and later developmental disability. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise intensity on short-term memory, hippocampal neurogenesis, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) in the rats born of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed maternal rats. The rats were divided into six groups: control group, mild-intensity exercise group, moderate-intensity exercise group, maternal LPS-exposed group, maternal LPS-exposed and mild-intensity exercise group, maternal LPS-exposed and moderate-intensity exercise group. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The exercise load consisted of running at the speed of 8 m/min for the mild-intensity exercise groups and 14 m/min for moderate-intensity exercise groups. The latency in the step-down avoidance task was deter-mined for the short-term memory. Immunohistochemistry for 5-bro-mo-2?-deoxyuridine was performed to determine hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Western blot analysis was performed for the detection of BDNF and TrkB expression. In the present study, tread-mill exercise improved short-term memory deteriorated by maternal LPS exposure. Treadmill exercise increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the rats born of the LPS-exposed maternal rats. Treadmill exercise increased BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus of the rats born of the LPS-exposed maternal rats. These effects of treadmill exercise were similarly appeared at both mild-intensity and moderate-intensity.

  2. Effects of treadmill exercise-intensity on short-term memory in the rats born of the lipopolysaccharide-exposed maternal rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kijeong; Sung, Yun-Hee; Seo, Jin-Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Lim, Baek-Vin; Lee, Choong-Yeol; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-12-01

    Maternal infection is an important factor causing neonatal brain injury and later developmental disability. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise intensity on short-term memory, hippocampal neurogenesis, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) in the rats born of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed maternal rats. The rats were divided into six groups: control group, mild-intensity exercise group, moderate-intensity exercise group, maternal LPS-exposed group, maternal LPS-exposed and mild-intensity exercise group, maternal LPS-exposed and moderate-intensity exercise group. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The exercise load consisted of running at the speed of 8 m/min for the mild-intensity exercise groups and 14 m/min for moderate-intensity exercise groups. The latency in the step-down avoidance task was deter-mined for the short-term memory. Immunohistochemistry for 5-bro-mo-2'-deoxyuridine was performed to determine hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Western blot analysis was performed for the detection of BDNF and TrkB expression. In the present study, tread-mill exercise improved short-term memory deteriorated by maternal LPS exposure. Treadmill exercise increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the rats born of the LPS-exposed maternal rats. Treadmill exercise increased BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus of the rats born of the LPS-exposed maternal rats. These effects of treadmill exercise were similarly appeared at both mild-intensity and moderate-intensity. PMID:26730379

  3. Maternal high-fat diet influences stroke outcome in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Lin, ChengCheng; Shao, Bei; Zhou, YuLei; Niu, XiaoTing; Lin, YuanShao

    2016-02-01

    Diet-induced epigenetic modifications in early life could contribute to later health problem. However, it remains to be established whether high-fat diet (HFD) consumption during pregnancy and the suckling period could predispose the offspring to stroke. The present study investigated the influence of maternal HFD on stroke outcome in adult offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal diet (5.3% fat) or a HFD (25.7% fat), just before pregnancy until the end of lactation. Male offspring were fed with the control diet or the HFD after weaning, to form four groups (control offspring fed with the control diet (C/C) or the HFD (C/HFD) and offspring of fat-fed dams fed with the control diet (HFD/C) or the HFD (HFD/HFD)). The offspring received middle cerebral artery occlusion on day 120 followed by behavioral tests (neurological deficit score, staircase-reaching test and beam-traversing test), and infarct volumes were also calculated. We found that the HFD/C rats displayed larger infarct volume and aggravated functional deficits (all P<0.05), compared with the C/C rats, indicating that maternal fat-rich diet renders the brain more susceptible to the consequences of ischemic injury. Moreover, maternal HFD offspring displayed elevated glucocorticoid concentrations following stroke, and increased glucocorticoid receptor expression. In addition, adrenalectomy reversed the effects of maternal HFD on stroke outcome when corticosterone was replaced at baseline, but not ischemic, concentrations. Furthermore, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the ipsilateral hippocampus was decreased in the HFD/C offspring (P<0.05), compared with the C/C offspring. Taken together, maternal diet can substantially influence adult cerebrovascular health, through the programming of central BDNF expression and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:26643911

  4. 26Al incorporation into the tissues of suckling rats through maternal milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Tada, W.; Horikawa, T.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2004-08-01

    Aluminium (Al) is highly neurotoxic and inhibits prenatal and postnatal development of the brain in humans and experimental animals. However, Al incorporation into the brain of sucklings through maternal milk has not yet been well clarified because Al lacks a suitable isotope for radioactive tracer experiments. Using 26Al as a tracer, we measured 26Al incorporation into the brain of suckling rats by accelerator mass spectrometry. Lactating rats were subcutaneously injected with 26AlCl3 from day 1 to day 20 postpartum. Suckling rats were weaned from day 21 postpartum. From day 5 to day 20 postpartum, the 26Al levels measured in the brain, liver, kidneys and bone of suckling rats increased significantly. After weaning, the amounts of 26Al in the liver and kidneys decreased remarkably. However, the 26Al amount in the brain had diminished only slightly up to 140 days after weaning.

  5. Incorporation of labeled ribonucleic acid precursors into maternal and fetal rat tissues during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Dorko, M.E.; Hayashi, T.T.

    1986-04-01

    Tritium-labeled ribonucleic acid precursors, including cytidine, uridine, and orotic acid, were injected into rats with dated pregnancies (14 to 21 days) and virgin rats. The acid-insoluble counts indicating incorporation into fetal and placental tissues showed that the highest incorporation occurred with cytidine, particularly earlier in pregnancy. In contrast, uridine demonstrated a minor degree of incorporation but displayed facile and enhanced transplacental passage with duration of pregnancy as represented by acid-soluble counts. Orotic acid was minimally used by both fetal and placental tissues. The incorporation of labeled precursors into maternal liver, heart, and kidney demonstrated varying responses during the course of pregnancy.

  6. Changes in memory and synaptic plasticity induced in male rats after maternal exposure to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Niu, Ruiyan; Zhu, Yuchen; Han, Haijun; Luo, Guangying; Zhou, Bingrui; Wang, Jundong

    2014-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a component of polycarbonate and epoxy resins, has been reported to adversely impact the central nervous system, especially with respect to learning and memory. However, the precise effect and specific mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered with BPA at 0.05, 0.5, 5 or 50mg/kg·body weight (BW) per day from embryonic day 9 (E 9) to E 20. We examined the effects of maternal BPA exposure on memory and synaptic structure in the hippocampus of male offspring at postnatal day (PND) 21. Maternal BPA exposure significantly affected locomotor activity, exploratory habits, and emotional behavior in open field test, and increased reference and especially working memory errors in the radial arm maze during the postnatal developing stage. Maternal BPA exposure had an adverse effect on synaptic structure, including a widened synaptic cleft, a thinned postsynaptic density (PSD), unclear synaptic surface and disappeared synaptic vesicles. Furthermore, maternal BPA exposure decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of synaptophysin, PSD-95, spinophilin, GluR1 and NMDAR1 in the hippocampus of male offspring on PND 21. These results showed that fetal growth and development was more sensitive to BPA exposure. The decreased learning and memory induced by maternal exposure to BPA in this study may be involved in synaptic plasticity alteration. PMID:24820113

  7. Maternal Style Selectively Shapes Amygdalar Development and Social Behavior in Rats Genetically Prone to High Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua L; Glover, Matthew E; Pugh, Phyllis C; Fant, Andrew D; Simmons, Rebecca K; Akil, Huda; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    The early-life environment critically influences neurodevelopment and later psychological health. To elucidate neural and environmental elements that shape emotional behavior, we developed a rat model of individual differences in temperament and environmental reactivity. We selectively bred rats for high versus low behavioral response to novelty and found that high-reactive (bred high-responder, bHR) rats displayed greater risk-taking, impulsivity and aggression relative to low-reactive (bred low-responder, bLR) rats, which showed high levels of anxiety/depression-like behavior and certain stress vulnerability. The bHR/bLR traits are heritable, but prior work revealed bHR/bLR maternal style differences, with bLR dams showing more maternal attention than bHRs. The present study implemented a cross-fostering paradigm to examine the contribution of maternal behavior to the brain development and emotional behavior of bLR offspring. bLR offspring were reared by biological bLR mothers or fostered to a bLR or bHR mother and then evaluated to determine the effects on the following: (1) developmental gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala and (2) adult anxiety/depression-like behavior. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that cross-fostering bLR rats to bHR mothers shifted developmental gene expression in the amygdala (but not hippocampus), reduced adult anxiety and enhanced social interaction. Our findings illustrate how an early-life manipulation such as cross-fostering changes the brain's developmental trajectory and ultimately impacts adult behavior. Moreover, while earlier studies highlighted hippocampal differences contributing to the bHR/bLR phenotypes, our results point to a role of the amygdala as well. Future work will pursue genetic and cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that contribute to bHR/bLR behavior either at baseline or following environmental manipulations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25791846

  8. Fetal testosterone surge: specific modulations induced in male rats by maternal stress and/or alcohol consumption

    E-print Network

    French, Jeffrey A.

    Fetal testosterone surge: specific modulations induced in male rats by maternal stress and to reductions in the fetal surge and is maximally disrupted if both the prenatal and the postparturitional; Sexual differentiation; Fetal alcohol; Androgen; Masculinization; Defeminization Male offspring of rats

  9. Serotonergic and noradrenergic lesions suppress the enhancing effect of maternal exercise during pregnancy on learning and memory in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, M M; Emami-Abarghoie, M; Safari, M; Sadighi-Moghaddam, B; Vafaei, A A; Bandegi, A R; Rashidy-Pour, A

    2008-02-19

    The beneficial effects of exercise on learning and memory are well documented but the effects of prenatal exposure to maternal exercise on offspring are not clear yet. Using a two-trial-per-day Morris water maze for five consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial 2 days later we showed that maternal voluntary exercise (wheel running) by pregnant rats increased the acquisition phase of the pups' learning. Maternal forced swimming by pregnant rats increased both acquisition and retention phases of the pups' learning. Also we found that the rat pups whose mother was submitted to forced-swimming during pregnancy had significantly higher brain, liver, heart and kidney weights compared with their sedentary counterparts. On the other hand we estimated the cell number of different regions of the hippocampus in the rat pups. We found that both exercise models during pregnancy increased the cell number in cornus ammonis subregion 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rat pups. To determine the role that noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors hold in mediation of the maternal exercise in offspring, we used N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) and MK-801 to eliminate or block the above systems, respectively. Blocking the NMDA receptors, significantly abolished learning and memory in rat pups from all three experimental groups. Elimination of noradrenergic or serotonergic input did not significantly attenuate the learning and memory in rat pups whose mothers were sedentary, while it significantly reversed the positive effects of maternal exercise during pregnancy on rat pups' learning and memory. The presented results suggest that noradrenergic and serotonergic systems in offspring brain seem to have a crucial specific role in mediating the effects of maternal physical activity during pregnancy on rat pups' cognitive function in both models of voluntary and forced exercise. PMID:18207332

  10. Transplacental passage of 26Al from pregnant rats to fetuses and 26Al transfer through maternal milk to suckling rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Tada, W.; Ohki, Y.; Kakimi, S.; Kobayashi, K.

    2000-10-01

    Aluminium (Al) is toxic to the growth of fetuses and sucklings. However, the incorporation of Al into fetuses and sucklings in the periods of gestation and lactation has not been well clarified because Al lacks a suitable isotope for a tracer experiment. In this study, we used 26Al (a radioisotope of Al with half-life of 716,000 yr) as a tracer, and measured 26Al incorporation into fetuses and sucklings by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To investigate Al incorporation into fetuses through transplacental passage, 26Al ( 26AlCl 3) was subcutaneously injected into pregnant rats on day 15 of gestation. 26Al was also subcutaneoulsy injected into lactating rats from day 1 to day 20 postpartum. By day 20 of gestation, 0.2% of the 26Al injected into a pregnant rat had been transferred to the fetuses, and 26Al was detected in the brain and liver of the fetuses. On day 9 postpartum, high levels of 26Al were demonstrated in the brain, liver, kidneys and blood of suckling rats. It is concluded that 26Al subcutaneously injected into pregnant rats and/or lactating rats is incorporated into their offspring through transplacental passage and/or maternal milk.

  11. Angiotensin II is required to induce exaggerated salt sensitivity in Dahl rats exposed to maternal separation

    PubMed Central

    Loria, Analia S; Pollock, David M; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that maternal separation, rat model of early life stress, enhances pressor responses to acute and chronic stressors. The aims of this study were to determine whether Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats subjected to maternal separation (MatSep-DS) as compared to normally reared DS (Ctl-DS) rats show exaggerated blood pressure responses to acute behavioral stressors, such as restraint stress or air jet stress (AJS), or, hypertensive stimuli including chronic high-salt diet (4% NaCl) and angiotensin II (AngII) infusion (200 ng/Kg/min) during 1 week. MatSep was performed in male DS rats for 3 h/day from postnatal days 2–14. At 8 weeks of age, rats were implanted with telemetry transmitters and allowed to recover. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was not different between MatSep-DS and Ctl-DS rats at baseline (120 ± 2 mmHg vs. 118 ± 1 mmHg, n = 4–8). Blood pressure responses during AJS and restraint stress were not different between MatSep-DS and Ctl-DS at 3 min. However, blood pressure recovery from AJS was significantly impaired in MatSep-DS rats compared to Ctl-DS rats (P < 0.05). 3-h stress-induced similar responses in MatSep and Ctl-DS rats. Chronic blood pressure responses to AngII infusion in rats fed a high-salt diet displayed enhanced MAP in MatSep-DS when compared with Ctl-DS rats (167 ± 5 mmHg vs. 152 ± 2 mmHg, pinteraction <0.05). However, MAP increased similarly in both groups in response to AngII infusion or high-salt diet separately. Renal parameters such as proteinuria, urine flow rate, and urine electrolytes were not different between groups in response to each treatment. In summary, salt sensitivity induces exaggerated blood pressor responses only in presence of AngII due to early life stress. PMID:25999404

  12. Effects of Love Canal soil extracts on maternal health and fetal development in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Silkworth, J.B.; Tumasonis, C.; Briggs, R.G.; Narang, A.S.; Narang, R.S.; Rej, R.; Stein, V.; McMartin, D.N.; Kaminsky, L.S.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of a solvent extract of the surface soil of the Love Canal chemical dump site, Niagara Falls, New York, and of a natural extract, or leachate, which is drained from the canal for treatment, on the maternal health and fetal development were determined in rats. The solvent extract, which was contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2, 3,7,8-TCDD) at 170 ppb and numerous other chlorinated organic compounds with the primary identified components being the isomers of benzenehexachloride (BHC), was dissolved in corn oil and administered by gavage to pregnant rats at 0,25,75, or 150 mg crude extract/kg/day on Days 6-15 of gestation. A 67% mortality was observed at the highest dose. The rats were sacrificed on Day 20. Dose-related increases in relative liver weight accompanied by hepatocyte hypertrophy were observed at all dose levels. Fetal birthweight was decreased at 75 and 150 mg extract/kg/day. No major treatment-related soft tissue or skeletal malformations, except for delayed ossification, were observed. Based on literature values for BHC, all of the observed toxicity could be accounted for by the BHC contaminants of the extract. The crude organic phase of the leachate was administered to pregnant rats at 0,10,100, or 250 mg/kg/day as described above. Maternal weight gain decreased at 100 and 250 mg/kg/day, accompanied by 5 and 14% maternal mortality, and 1 and 3 dead fetuses, respectively. Early resorptions and the percentage of dead implants increased whereas fetal birthweights were decreased at 250 mg/kg/day. No major treatment-related soft tissue or skeletal malformations, except for delayed ossification, were observed. The primary components of the complex leachate by mass were tetrachloroethanes; however, 2,3,7,8-TCDD, which was present at 3 ppm, probably accounted for all the observed toxicity.

  13. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol into the lateral hypothalamus improves reduced sleep in adult rats subjected to maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Marcel; Fajardo-Valdez, Alfonso; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2014-12-17

    We have previously reported that maternal separation (MS) for 3 h daily during the first two postnatal weeks increases wakefulness, whereas it reduces sleep in rats. Oleamide, an agonist of the cannabinoid receptor type 1, increases sleep in MS rats to such a level that we cannot differentiate their sleep patterns from those of their non-MS (NMS) siblings. However, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), an endocannabinoid, infused into the lateral hypothalamus of NMS rats at the beginning of the dark phase of the cycle increases rapid eye movement sleep and the expression of c-Fos on the rapid eye movement sleep promoting melanin-concentrating hormone neurons. We recorded the sleep-wake cycle of adult rats subjected to MS for 3 h daily from postnatal days 2 to 16, as well as in their NMS siblings. Besides the electrodes for recording the sleep-wake cycle, a couple of cannulae aimed bilaterally to the lateral hypothalamus were implanted to infuse 2-AG. We found that administration of 2-AG into the lateral hypothalamus of MS rats at the beginning of the light phase of the cycle restores sleep, whereas sleep and wakefulness of NMS rats under 2-AG infusion do not show any significant change. PMID:25356522

  14. Vasopressin deficiency diminishes acute and long-term consequences of maternal deprivation in male rat pups.

    PubMed

    Zelena, Dóra; Stocker, Berhard; Barna, István; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Makara, Gábor B

    2015-01-01

    Early life events have special importance in the development as postnatal environmental alterations may permanently affect the lifetime vulnerability to diseases. For the interpretation of the long-term consequences it is important to understand the immediate effects. As the role of vasopressin in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation as well as in affective disorders seem to be important we addressed the question whether the congenital lack of vasopressin will modify the stress reactivity of the pups and will influence the later consequences of single 24h maternal deprivation (MD) on both stress-reactivity and stress-related behavioral changes. Vasopressin-producing (di/+) and deficient (di/di) Brattleboro rat were used. In 10-day-old pups MD induced a remarkable corticosterone rise in both genotypes without adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) increase in di/di rats. Studying the later consequences at around weaning (25-35-day-old rats) we found somatic and hormonal alterations (body weight reduction, dysregulation of the stress axis) which were not that obvious in di/di rats. The more anxious state of MD rats was not detectable in di/di rats both at weaning and in adulthood (7-12-week-old). The lack of vasopressin abolished all chronic stress and anxiety-like tendencies both at weaning and in adulthood probably as a consequence of reduced ACTH rise immediately after MD in pups. This finding suggests that postnatal stress-induced ACTH rise may have long-term developmental consequences. PMID:25462910

  15. A Transcriptomic Study of Maternal Thyroid Adaptation to Pregnancy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ji-Long; Wang, Tong-Song; Zhao, Miao; Peng, Ying; Fu, Yong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disorders are relatively frequently observed in pregnant women. However, the impact of pregnancy on maternal thyroid has not been systematically evaluated. In the present study, using the rat as an animal model, we observed that the weight of maternal thyroid increased by about 18% in late pregnancy. To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms, we took advantage of RNA-seq approaches to investigate global gene expression changes in the maternal thyroid. We identified a total of 615 differentially expressed genes, most of which (558 genes or 90.7%) were up-regulated in late pregnancy compared to the non-pregnant control. Gene ontology analysis showed that genes involved in cell cycle and metabolism were significantly enriched among up-regulated genes. Unexpectedly, pathway analysis revealed that expression levels for key components of the thyroid hormone synthesis pathway were not significantly altered. In addition, by examining of the promoter regions of up-regulated genes, we identified MAZ (MYC-associated zinc finger protein) and TFCP2 (transcription factor CP2) as two causal transcription factors. Our study contributes to an increase in the knowledge on the maternal thyroid adaptation to pregnancy. PMID:26580608

  16. Maternal reproductive experience enhances early postnatal outcome following gestation and birth of rats in hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Daunton, N. G.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A major goal of space life sciences research is to broaden scientific knowledge of the influence of gravity on living systems. Recent spaceflight and centrifugation studies demonstrate that reproduction and ontogenesis in mammals are amenable to study under gravitational conditions that deviate considerably from those typically experienced on Earth (1 x g). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that maternal reproductive experience determines neonatal outcome following gestation and birth under increased (hyper) gravity. Primigravid and bigravid female rats and their offspring were exposed to 1.5 x g centrifugation from Gestational Day 11 either through birth or through the first postnatal week. On the day of birth, litter sizes were identical across gravity and parity conditions, although significantly fewer live neonates were observed among hypergravity-reared litters born to primigravid dams than among those born to bigravid dams (82% and 94%, respectively; 1.0 x g controls, 99%). Within the hypergravity groups, neonatal mortality was comparable across parity conditions from Postnatal Day 1 through Day 7, at which time litter sizes stabilized. Maternal reproductive experience ameliorated neonatal losses during the first 24 h after birth but not on subsequent days, and neonatal mortality was associated with changes in maternal care patterns. These results indicate that repeated maternal reproductive experience affords protection against neonatal losses during exposure to increased gravity. Differential mortality of neonates born to primigravid versus bigravid dams denotes gravitational load as one environmental mechanism enabling the expression of parity-related variations in birth outcome.

  17. Maternal consumption of Lake Ontario salmon in rats produces behavioral changes in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Daly, H B; Stewart, P W; Lunkenheimer, L; Sargent, D

    1998-01-01

    The current study assessed the effects of maternal, paternal, or combined parental consumption of Lake Ontario salmon in rats on the behavior of their offspring. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were put on a 30 day diet of either ground rat chow containing 30% Lake Ontario salmon (LAKE) or 30% Pacific Ocean salmon (OCEAN). These females were then mated with adult male rats similarly exposed (LAKE or OCEAN). An additional control group of males and females who were fed ground rat chow (MASH) only were also mated. These pairing combinations resulted in five offspring groups: LAKE-LAKE, LAKE-OCEAN, OCEAN-LAKE, OCEAN-OCEAN, MASH-MASH. When the offspring reached 80 days of age, they were tested for reactivity to frustrative nonreward using runway successive negative contrast, which has been repeatedly shown to be increased in adult rats fed Ontario salmon. Consistent with previous work, results showed that the behavior of the OCEAN-OCEAN rats did not differ from the MASH-MASH group, indicating that a salmon diet per se does not cause behavioral change. However, the offspring of dams who consumed Lake Ontario salmon (LAKE-LAKE and OCEAN-LAKE) showed an increased depression effect relative to controls. There was little evidence of a paternal effect. A follow-up experiment employed cross-fostering to determine the relative contribution of pre- and/or postnatal exposure to Lake Ontario salmon consumption on offspring behavior. Rat pups were cross-fostered to or from dams who consumed Lake Ontario salmon during gestation and parturition. Results from two separate replications indicated that prenatal (LAKE to OCEAN) exposure alone or postnatal (OCEAN to LAKE) exposure alone produced a large increase in successive negative contrast relative to controls (OCEAN to OCEAN). These data are strong evidence of behavioral changes produced by maternal consumption of Lake Ontario salmon in the offspring rat. Further, they indicate that either prenatal or postnatal exposure alone is sufficient to produce behavioral changes in the offspring. PMID:9460168

  18. Metyrapone blocks maternal food restriction-induced changes in female rat offspring lung development.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Virender K; Li, Yishi; Corral, Julia; Saraswat, Aditi; Husain, Sumair; Dhar, Ankita; Sakurai, Reiko; Khorram, Omid; Torday, John S

    2014-04-01

    Maternal food restriction (MFR) during pregnancy affects pulmonary surfactant production in the intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) offspring through unknown mechanisms. Since pulmonary surfactant production is regulated by maternal and fetal corticosteroid levels, both known to be increased in IUGR pregnancies, we hypothesized that metyrapone (MTP), a glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor, would block the effects of MFR on surfactant production in the offspring. Three groups of pregnant rat dams were used (1) control dams fed ad libitum; (2) MFR (50% reduction in calories) from days 10 to 22 of gestation; and (3) MFR + MTP in drinking water (0.5 mg/mL), days 11 to 22 of gestation. At 5 months, the MFR offspring weighed significantly more, had reduced alveolar number, increased septal thickness, and decreased surfactant protein and phospholipid synthesis. These MFR-induced effects were normalized by the antiglucocorticoid MTP, suggesting that the stress of MFR causes hypercorticoidism, altering lung structure and function in adulthood. PMID:24023031

  19. Maternal Deprivation of Lewis Rat Pups Increases the Severity of Experi-mental Periodontitis in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Breivik, Torbjørn; Gundersen, Yngvar; Murison, Robert; Turner, Jonathan D; Muller, Claude P; Gjermo, Per; Opstad, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Early life adverse events may influence susceptibility/resistance to chronic inflammatory diseases later in life by permanently dysregulating brain-controlled immune-regulatory systems. We have investigated the impact of infant-mother separation during early postnatal life on the severity of experimental periodontitis, as well as systemic stress and immune responses, in adulthood. Material and Methods: Pups of periodontitis resistant Lewis rats were separated from their mothers for 3 h daily during postnatal days 2-14 (termed maternal deprivation; MD), separated for 15 min daily during the same time period (termed handling; HD), or left undisturbed. As adults, their behaviour was tested in a novel stressful situation, and ligature-induced periodontitis applied for 21 days. Two h before sacrifice all rats were exposed to a gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge to induce a robust immune and stress response. Results: Compared to undisturbed controls, MD rats developed significantly more periodontal bone loss as adults, whereas HD rats showed a tendency to less disease. MD and HD rats exhibited depression-like behaviour in a novel open field test, while MD rats showed higher glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) expression in the hippocampus, and HD rats had altered methylation of genes involved in the expression of hippocampal Gr. LPS provoked a significantly lower increase in circulating levels of the cytokine TGF-1? in MD and HD rats, but there were no significant differences in levels of the stress hormone corticosterone. Conclusion: Stressful environmental exposures in very early life may alter immune responses in a manner that influences susceptibility/resistance to periodontitis. PMID:25713634

  20. Effects of maternal ethanol ingestion on uptake of glucose alanine analogs in fetal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, A.K.; Singh, S.P.; Pullen, G.L.

    1986-05-01

    The distribution of maternally-derived glucose and alanine has been studied in selected tissues of fetuses from ethanol-fed (EF) rats (30% of caloric intake throughout gestation). Controls received diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation, 2 ..mu..Ci /sup 3/H 2-deoxyglucose (DG) and 1 ..mu..Ci /sup 14/C ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) were administered i.v. to each rat. One hour later, maternal blood, placenta, and fetal blood, liver, lung and brain were sampled for /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C activities. When compared to either control group, the mean /sup 14/C AIB activities of tissues from EF animals were reduced from 19 to 46%, with the greatest effect seen in the brain (3.7 +/- 0.1, 7.2 +/- 0.3 and 6.9 +/- 1.3 dpm/mg in EF, PF and AF fetuses respectively). In addition, the ratios of tissue:plasma /sup 14/C were reduced (p < 0.01 or lower) in the EF fetal tissues and placenta. Maternal ethanol ingestion reduced the /sup 3/H 2-DG content of placenta (p < 0.05) and of brain (38.6 + 1.2, 48.1 +/- 1.2 and 47.2 +/- 1.2 in EF, PF and AF, p < 0.001). Brain weight showed significant positive correlations with AIB content (r = 0.466, p < 0.001) and with 2-DG content (r = 0.267, p < 0.01). Impaired uptake of maternally-derived nutrients may play a significant role in the effects of ethanol in utero.

  1. Maternal molecular hydrogen treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced rat fetal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Y; Kotani, T; Tsuda, H; Mano, Y; Tu, L; Li, H; Hirako, S; Ushida, T; Imai, K; Nakano, T; Sato, Y; Miki, R; Sumigama, S; Iwase, A; Toyokuni, S; Kikkawa, F

    2015-08-01

    Maternal inflammation is associated with spontaneous preterm birth and respiratory impairment among premature infants. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been reported to have a suppressive effect on oxidative stress and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of H2 on fetal lung injury caused by maternal inflammation. Cell viability and the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contained in ordinal or H2-rich medium (HM) using a human lung epithelial cell line, A549. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control, LPS, and HW + LPS groups. Rats were injected with phosphate-buffered saline (Control) or LPS intraperitoneally (LPS) on gestational day 19 and provided H2 water (HW) ad libitum for 24 h before LPS injection (HW + LPS). Fetal lung samples were collected on day 20, and the levels of apoptosis, oxidative damage, IL-6, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The number of apoptotic cells, and levels of ROS and IL-6 were significantly increased by LPS treatment, and repressed following cultured with HM in A549 cells. In the rat models, the population positive for cleaved caspase-3, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, IL-6, and VEGF was significantly increased in the LPS group compared with that observed in the Control group and significantly decreased in the HW + LPS group. In this study, LPS administration induced apoptosis and oxidative damage in fetal lung cells that was ameliorated by maternal H2 intake. Antenatal H2 administration may decrease the pulmonary mobility associated with inflammation in premature infants. PMID:25947958

  2. Effects of maternal deprivation on adrenal and behavioural responses in rats with anterodorsal thalami nuclei lesions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Molina, S; Rivarola, M A; Perassi, N I

    2002-07-26

    There is evidence that repeated maternal isolation of neonatal rats may influence both emotional behavior and Hypothalamic-Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) activity. On the other hand the Anterodorsal Thalami Nuclei (ADTN) exerts an inhibitory influence on the hypophyso-adrenal system under basal and stressful conditions. In the present work we investigated whether neonatal maternal deprivation produces long term effects on the ADTN regulation of behavioral patterns (open field test) and on HPA axis activity. Specifically, we sought to determine whether adult female rats with ADTN lesions, previously isolated for 4.5 hours daily during the first 3 weeks of life, react in endocrinologically and behaviourally distinct manner as compared to controls. The examined groups were: non maternally deprived (NMD)/sham lesioned, NMD/lesioned, maternally deprived (MD)/sham lesioned, MD/lesioned with and without the open field test. At 3 months MD/sham lesioned animals showed a marked decrease in ambulation (P < 0.01), and with ADTN lesion, the rearing values were lower (P < 0.01) and grooming higher (P < 0.05) than NMD. This last data would indicate a high emotional index. Regarding the activity of the HPA axis, maternal deprivation induced a significant decrease in plasma ACTH concentration both in sham and lesioned animals (P < 0.001), and plasma Corticosterone (C) increased in sham animals (P < 0.001). This data would indicate a higher sensitivity of the adrenal glands. After the open field test ACTH and C were different between deprived and non-deprived animals depending on the ADTN lesion. Taking into consideration the increase of ACTH levels in sham lesioned MD animals exposed to the test, we could conclude that this new situation was a stressful situation. Finally in the present work, it was very difficult to relate the behavioral parameters with the endocrine data. It is known that depending on the context, corticosteroids may produce opposite effects on emotional behavior via different receptors in the brain.In summary, neonatal maternal deprivation induced alterations of behavioral patterns and affected the ADTN inhibitory influence on ACTH and C secretion. PMID:12095534

  3. Increased affective ultrasonic communication during fear learning in adult male rats exposed to maternal immune activation.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nicole; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Fuchs, Eberhard; Wöhr, Markus

    2012-09-01

    Maternal exposure to infection during pregnancy greatly increases the risk of psychopathology in the offspring. In support of clinical findings, rodent models of maternal immune activation (MIA) show that prenatal exposure to pathogens can induce phenotypic changes in the offspring associated with schizophrenia, autism, depression and anxiety. In the current study, we investigated the effects of MIA via polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) on emotional behavior and communication in rats. Pregnant rats were administered poly I:C or saline on gestation day 15 and male offspring were tested in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm in early adulthood. We found that prenatal poly I:C exposure significantly altered affective signaling, namely, the production of aversive 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), in terms of call number, structure and temporal patterning. MIA led to an increase in aversive 22-kHz USVs to 300% of saline controls. Offspring exposed to MIA not only emitted more 22-kHz USVs, but also emitted calls that were shorter in duration and occurred in bouts containing more calls. The production of appetitive 50-kHz USVs and audible calls was not affected. Intriguingly, alterations in aversive 22-kHz USV emission were observed despite no obvious changes in overt defensive behavior, which highlights the importance of assessing USVs as an additional measure of fear. Aversive 22-kHz USVs are a prominent part of the rat's defensive behavioral repertoire and serve important communicative functions, most notably as alarm calls. The observed changes in aversive 22-kHz USVs show that MIA has long-term effects on emotional behavior and communication in exposed rat offspring. PMID:22687817

  4. Impairment of Central Chemoreception in Neonatal Rats Induced by Maternal Cigarette Smoke Exposure during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Fang; Yan, Xiang; Zhao, Fusheng; Zhang, Senfeng; Zhang, Qilan; Zhou, Hua; Zheng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    It has been postulated that prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) increases the risk for sudden infant death syndrome. The victims of infant death syndrome suffer from respiratory abnormalities, such as central apnea, diminished chemoreflex and alteration in respiratory pattern during sleep. However, no experimental evidence on CSE model exists to confirm whether prenatal CSE gives rise to reduction of neonatal central chemoreception in in vitro preparations in absence of peripheral sensory feedback. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that maternal CSE during pregnancy depresses central chemoreception of the neonatal rats. The pregnant rats were divided into two groups, control (n = 8) and CSE (n = 8). Experiments were performed on neonatal (0–3days) rat pups. Fictive respiratory activity was monitored by recording the rhythmic discharge from the hypoglossal rootlets of the medullary slices obtained from the neonatal rats. The burst frequency (BF) and integrated amplitude (IA) of the discharge were analyzed. Their responses to acidified artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) were tested to indicate the change of the central chemosensitivity. Under condition of perfusing with standard aCSF (pH 7.4), no significant difference was detected between the two groups in either BF or IA (P>0.05). Under condition of perfusing with acidified aCSF (pH 7.0), BF was increased and IA was decreased in both groups (P<0.01). However, their change rates in the CSE group were obviously smaller than that in the control group, 66.98 ± 10.11% vs. 143.75 ± 15.41% for BF and ?22.38 ± 2.51% vs. ?44.90 ± 3.92% for IA (P<0.01). In conclusion, these observations, in a prenatal CSE model, provide important evidence that maternal smoking during pregnancy exerts adverse effects on central chemoreception of neonates. PMID:26333001

  5. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Aires, M.B.; Santos, J.R.A.; Souza, K.S.; Farias, P.S.; Santos, A.C.V.; Fioretto, E.T.; Maria, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g) with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg) on the 8th gestational day (gd 8). At gd 15, rats from control (n=5) and diabetic (n=5) groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05), CCR2 (P<0.001), and OCT3/4 (P<0.01), and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05), CD117 (P<0.01), and CD14 (P<0.05) were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers. PMID:26176314

  6. The stress of maternal separation causes misprogramming in the postnatal maturation of rat resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Reho, John J; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    We examined the effect of stress in the first 2 wk of life induced by brief periods of daily maternal separation on developmental programming of rat small resistance mesenteric arteries (MAs). In MAs of littermate controls, mRNAs encoding mediators of vasoconstriction, including the ?1a-adrenergic receptor, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and CPI-17, the inhibitory subunit of myosin phosphatase, increased from after birth through sexual [postnatal day (PND) 35] and full maturity, up to ?80-fold, as measured by quantitative PCR. This was commensurate with two- to fivefold increases in maximum force production to KCl depolarization, calcium, and the ?-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, and increasing systolic blood pressure. Rats exposed to maternal separation stress as neonates had markedly accelerated trajectories of maturation of arterial contractile gene expression and function measured at PND14 or PND21 (weaning), 1 wk after the end of the stress protocol. This was suppressed by the ?-adrenergic receptor blocker terazosin (0.5 mg·kg ip(-1)·day(-1)), indicating dependence on stress activation of sympathetic signaling. Due to the continued maturation of MAs in control rats, by sexual maturity (PND35) and into adulthood, no differences were observed in arterial function or response to a second stressor in rats stressed as neonates. Thus early life stress misprograms resistance artery smooth muscle, increasing vasoconstrictor function and blood pressure. This effect wanes in later stages, suggesting plasticity during arterial maturation. Further studies are indicated to determine whether stress in different periods of arterial maturation may cause misprogramming persisting through maturity and the potential salutary effect of ?-adrenergic blockade in suppression of this response. PMID:26371173

  7. Maternal hyperglycemia at different stages of gestation and its effects on male reproductive functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Akindele, O O; Kunle-Alabi, O T; Udofia, U A; Ahmed, T T; Raji, Y

    2015-12-01

    The critical period during which maternal hyperglycemia predisposes offspring to develop reproductive disorders in adult life is not known. The relationship between maternal hyperglycemia at different stages and reproductive functions of male offspring was investigated. A single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (90 mg/kg body weight) was administered at gestation days (GD) 1, 8 and 15. Animals were subsequently given 10% glucose solution daily as drinking water until parturition. All male pups were sacrificed on the 63rd day of postnatal life. Birth weight, anogenital distance index (AGDi), testes descent day, preputial separation day, sperm profile, serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels and the histology of the testis were assessed. Data significance test was based on 95% confidence interval. GD1 pups showed a significant increase in mean birth weight, whereas GD8 pups and GD15 pups had significantly reduced birth weight as compared with control. AGDi was significantly increased in GD8 and GD15 pups. Testes descent and preputial separation in all the experimental groups were significantly earlier. There was a significant reduction in sperm count and viability in GD8 offspring. Sperm motility was reduced in all test groups. Testosterone level was reduced in all test groups. Histology of the testis showed varying degrees of pathologies. It was deduced from this study that maternal hyperglycemia caused alterations in reproductive functions in male offspring of Wistar rats irrespective of the period of gestation involved, although GD8 pups were most severely affected. PMID:26496962

  8. Functional mapping of the neural circuitry of rat maternal motivation: effects of site-specific transient neural inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Mariana; Morrell, Joan I.

    2011-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent studies from our laboratory examining the neural circuitry subserving rat maternal motivation across postpartum. We employed a site-specific neural inactivation method by infusion of bupivacaine to map the maternal motivation circuitry using two complementary behavioral approaches: unconditioned maternal responsiveness and choice of pup- over cocaine-conditioned incentives in a concurrent pup/cocaine choice conditioned place preference task. Our findings revealed that during the early postpartum period, distinct brain structures, including the medial preoptic area, ventral tegmental area and medial prefrontal cortex infralimbic and anterior cingulate subregions, contribute a pup-specific bias to the motivational circuitry. As the postpartum period progresses and the pups grow older, our findings further revealed that maternal responsiveness becomes progressively less dependent on medial preoptic area and medial prefrontal cortex infralimbic activity, and more distributed in the maternal circuitry, such that additional network components, including the medial prefrontal cortex prelimbic subregion, are recruited with maternal experience, and contribute to the expression of late postpartum maternal behavior. Collectively, our findings provide strong evidence that the remarkable ability of postpartum females to successfully care for their developing infants is subserved by a distributed neural network that carries out efficient and dynamic processing of complex, constantly changing incoming environmental and pup-related stimuli, ultimately allowing the progression of appropriate expression and waning of maternal responsiveness across the postpartum period. PMID:21815954

  9. Effect of maternal exercise on biochemical parameters in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, Thiago Beltram; de Lemos Rodrigues, Patrícia Idalina; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Pereira Silva, Lenir Orlandi; Matté, Cristiane

    2015-10-01

    Pregnancy is a critical period for brain metabolic programming, being affected by individual environment, such as nutrition, stress, and physical exercise. In this context, we previously reported a cerebral antioxidant upregulation and mitochondrial biogenesis in the offspring delivered from exercised mothers, which could provide neuroprotection against neonatal insults. Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) encephalopathy is one of the most studied models of neonatal brain injury; disrupting motor, cognitive, and learning abilities. Physiopathology includes oxidative stress, allied to mitochondria energy production failure, glutamatergic excitotoxicity, and cell death. In this study we evaluated the effect of maternal swimming during pregnancy on offspring?s brain oxidative status evaluated fourteen days after HI stablishment. Swimming exercise was performed by female adult rats one week before and during pregnancy, in controlled environment. Their offspring was submitted to HI on postnatal day 7, and the brain samples for biochemical assays were obtained in the weaning. Contrary to our expectations, maternal exercise did not prevent the oxidative alterations observed in brain from HI-rats. In a general way, we found a positive modulation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, measured two weeks after HI, in hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum of pups delivered from exercised mothers. Reactive species levels were modulated differently in each structure evaluated. Considering the scenery presented, we concluded that HI elicited a neurometabolic adaptation in both brain hemispheres, particularly in hippocampus, parietal cortex, and cerebellum; while striatum appears to be most damaged. The protocol of aerobic maternal exercise was not enough to fully prevent HI-induced brain damages. PMID:26119914

  10. Effect of maternal separation on mitochondrial function and role of exercise in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Sharief; Ojuka, Edward; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Mabandla, Musa V; Russell, Vivienne A

    2012-09-01

    Early life stress, such as maternal separation, causes adaptive changes in neural mechanisms that have adverse effects on the neuroplasticity of the brain in adulthood. As a consequence, children who are exposed to stress during development may be predisposed to neurodegenerative disorders in adulthood. A possible mechanism for increased vulnerability to neurodegeneration may be dysfunctional mitochondria. Protection from neurotoxins, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), has been observed following voluntary exercise. The mechanism of this neuroprotection is not understood and mitochondria may play a role. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of maternal separation and exercise on mitochondrial function in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Maternally separated (pups separated from the dam for 3 h per day from postnatal day (P) 2-14) and non-separated rats were placed in individual cages with or without attached running wheels for 1 week prior to unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA (5 ?g/4 ?l, 0.5 ?l/min) into the left medial forebrain bundle at P60. After 2 h recovery, rats were returned to their cages and wheel revolutions recorded for a further 2 weeks. On P72, the rats' motor function was assessed using the forelimb akinesia test. On P74, rats were sacrificed for measurement of mitochondrial function. Exercise increased the respiratory control index (RCI) in the non-lesioned hemisphere of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. This effect was evident in the striatum of non-separated rats and the prefrontal cortex of maternally separated rats. These results suggest that early life stress may reduce the adaptive response to exercise in the striatum, a major target of dopamine neurons, but not the prefrontal cortex in this model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22527997

  11. Maternal separation enhances neuronal activation and cardiovascular responses to acute stress in borderline hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Brian J; Anticevic, Alan

    2007-10-01

    There is much evidence suggesting early life events, such has handling or repeated separations from the nest, can have a long-term effect on the biological and behavioral development of rats. The current study examined the effect of repeated maternal separation (MS) on the behavioral, cardiovascular, and neurobiological responses to stress in subjects vulnerable to environmental stressors as adults. Borderline hypertensive rats (BHR), which are the first generation offspring of spontaneously hyperternsive and Wistar-Kyoto rats, were separated from the dams for 3h per day from postnatal day 1 through 14. Non-separated controls remained in the home cage. When allowed to explore the open field chamber for 60 min as adults, MS subjects had significantly greater locomotor activity compared to controls. All subjects were exposed to 30 min of restraint stress during which time mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured. Although both groups had comparable increases in MAP, MS animals displayed significantly higher HR throughout the stress period. Finally, MS subjects had significantly more stress-induced Fos positive cells, an estimate of neuronal activation, in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), each of which plays an important role in organizing the biobehavioral response to stress. These results suggest that maternal separation can further enhance stress reactivity in this model and may represent a useful approach for studying the relationship between early life events and future vulnerability to stressful situations. PMID:17604851

  12. Maternal obesity characterized by gestational diabetes increases the susceptibility of rat offspring to hepatic steatosis via a disrupted liver metabolome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Fonseca, Mario A; Campbell, Kristyn E; Moyce, Brittany L; Cole, Laura K; Hatch, Grant M; Doucette, Christine A; Klein, Julianne; Aliani, Michel; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-07-15

    Maternal obesity is associated with a high risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is a common complication of pregnancy. The influence of maternal obesity and GDM on the metabolic health of the offspring is poorly understood. We hypothesize that GDM associated with maternal obesity will cause obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in the offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat (45%) and sucrose (HFS) diet to cause maternal obesity and GDM. Lean control pregnant rats received low-fat (LF; 10%) diets. To investigate the interaction between the prenatal environment and postnatal diets, rat offspring were assigned to LF or HFS diets for 12 weeks, and insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis were evaluated. Pregnant GDM dams exhibited excessive gestational weight gain, hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia. Offspring of GDM dams gained more weight than the offspring of lean dams due to excess adiposity. The offspring of GDM dams also developed hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. The postnatal consumption of a LF diet did not protect offspring of GDM dams against these metabolic disorders. Analysis of the hepatic metabolome revealed increased diacylglycerol and reduced phosphatidylethanolamine in the offspring of GDM dams compared to offspring of lean dams. Consistent with altered lipid metabolism, the expression of CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase, and peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor-? mRNA was reduced in the livers of GDM offspring. GDM exposure programs gene expression and hepatic metabolite levels and drives the development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in young adult rat offspring. PMID:25922055

  13. Maternal obesity during gestation impairs fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial SIRT3 expression in rat offspring at weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In utero exposure to maternal obesity increases the offspring’s risk of obesity in later life. We have also previously reported that offspring of obese rat dams develop hepatic steatosis, mild hyperinsulinemia, and a lipogenic gene signature in the liver at postnatal day (PND) 21. In the current s...

  14. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2?, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2?, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  15. Maternal Antioxidant Supplementation Prevents Adiposity in the Offspring of Western Diet–Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sarbattama; Simmons, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that maternal obesity increases oxidative stress during fetal development, and to determine whether administration of an antioxidant supplement to pregnant Western diet-fed rats would prevent the development of adiposity in the offspring. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Female Sprague Dawley rats were started on the designated diet at 4 weeks of age. Four groups of animals were studied: control chow (control); control + antioxidants (control+Aox); Western diet (Western); and Western diet + antioxidants (Western+Aox). The rats were mated at 12 to 14 weeks of age, and all pups were weaned onto control diet. RESULTS Offspring from dams fed the Western diet had significantly increased adiposity as early as 2 weeks of age as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared with offspring of dams fed a control diet. Inflammation and oxidative stress were increased in preimplantation embryos, fetuses, and newborns of Western diet-fed rats. Gene expression of proadipogenic and lipogenic genes was altered in fat tissue of rats at 2 weeks and 2 months of age. The addition of an antioxidant supplement decreased adiposity and normalized glucose tolerance. CONCLUSIONS Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play a key role in the development of increased adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed pregnant dams. Restoration of the antioxidant balance during pregnancy in the Western diet-fed dam is associated with decreased adiposity in offspring. PMID:20823102

  16. Maternal creatine supplementation affects the morpho-functional development of hippocampal neurons in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Sartini, S; Lattanzi, D; Ambrogini, P; Di Palma, M; Galati, C; Savelli, D; Polidori, E; Calcabrini, C; Rocchi, M B L; Sestili, P; Cuppini, R

    2016-01-15

    Creatine supplementation has been shown to protect neurons from oxidative damage due to its antioxidant and ergogenic functions. These features have led to the hypothesis of creatine supplementation use during pregnancy as prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS damage, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Unfortunately, very little is known on the effects of creatine supplementation during neuron differentiation, while in vitro studies revealed an influence on neuron excitability, leaving the possibility of creatine supplementation during the CNS development an open question. Using a multiple approach, we studied the hippocampal neuron morphological and functional development in neonatal rats born by dams supplemented with 1% creatine in drinking water during pregnancy. CA1 pyramidal neurons of supplemented newborn rats showed enhanced dendritic tree development, increased LTP maintenance, larger evoked-synaptic responses, and higher intrinsic excitability in comparison to controls. Moreover, a faster repolarizing phase of action potential with the appearance of a hyperpolarization were recorded in neurons of the creatine-treated group. Consistently, CA1 neurons of creatine exposed pups exhibited a higher maximum firing frequency than controls. In summary, we found that creatine supplementation during pregnancy positively affects morphological and electrophysiological development of CA1 neurons in offspring rats, increasing neuronal excitability. Altogether, these findings emphasize the need to evaluate the benefits and the safety of maternal intake of creatine in humans. PMID:26592720

  17. Maternal-pup interaction disturbances induce long-lasting changes in the newborn rat pulmonary vasculature.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Yulia; Sadeghi, Sina; Pan, Jingyi; Jain, Amish; Fajardo, Andres F; McNamara, Patrick J; Belik, Jaques

    2015-11-15

    The factors accounting for the pathological maintenance of a high pulmonary vascular (PV) resistance postnatally remain elusive, but neonatal stressors may play a role in this process. Cross-fostering in the immediate neonatal period is associated with adult-onset vascular and behavioral changes, likely triggered by early-in-life stressors. In hypothesizing that fostering newborn rats induces long-lasting PV changes, we evaluated them at 14 days of age during adulthood and compared the findings with animals raised by their biological mothers. Fostering resulted in reduced maternal-pup contact time when compared with control newborns. At 2 wk of age, fostered rats exhibited reduced pulmonary arterial endothelium-dependent relaxation secondary to downregulation of tissue endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency-induced uncoupling. These changes were associated with neonatal onset-increased ANG II receptor type 1 expression, PV remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy that persisted into adulthood. The pulmonary arteries of adult-fostered rats exhibited a higher contraction dose response to ANG II and thromboxane A2, the latter of which was abrogated by the oxidant scavenger Tempol. In conclusion, fostering-induced neonatal stress induces long-standing PV changes modulated via the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:26342088

  18. Effects of maternal stress on development and behaviour in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, M

    2001-09-01

    Retrospective studies suggest that gestational stress in humans can delay the attainment of developmental milestones, increase the incidence of allergic reactions and respiratory infections and cause behavioural abnormalities in the children. Our studies and others have shown that prenatal stress in rats can mimic several of these developmental and behavioural alterations. These include a suppression of immune function, but also enhanced sensitivity to allergens. Prenatally-stressed rats, like children, show a reduced propensity for social interaction and increased anxiety in intimidating or novel situations. They have physiological and behavioural alterations consistent with depressive symptoms, including a phase-shift in their circadian rhythm for corticosterone, sleep abnormalities, and greater acquisition of learned helplessness under appropriate conditions. Prenatally-stressed male rats also show demasculinisation and feminisation of their sexual behaviour. The developmental and behavioural abnormalities in prenatally-stressed offspring may be mediated by alterations in the activity of endogenous opioids or neurosteroids, since several of them can be corrected by maternal administration of an opioid antagonist or by drugs like diazepam and allopregnanolone that modulate GABA transmission. PMID:22432137

  19. Functional correlates for 5-HT(1A) receptors in maternally deprived rats displaying anxiety and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lambás-Señas, Laura; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Certin, Véronique; Faure, Céline; Lemoine, Laetitia; Zimmer, Luc; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2009-03-17

    Maternal separation is known to induce long-term changes in neuroendocrine and emotional responsiveness to stress in a large variety of models. We examined an animal model of early deprivation in Sprague-Dawley rats consisting of separating litters from their mothers and littermates 3 h daily during postnatal days 2 to 15. In adulthood, maternally deprived rats in comparison with non-deprived controls exhibited an increase in anxiety and depression-related behaviors in the open-field and forced swim tests. Because serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT(1A) receptors seem to play an important role in the pathophysiology of major depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressants, we investigated if 5-HT(1A) receptor function is altered in deprived rats. Although the hypothermic response to the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT was increased in adult deprived rats compared to non-deprived control group, no differences between groups were found in the effect of the systemic 8-OH-DPAT administration on serotoninergic cell firing in dorsal raphe nucleus and in the 5-HT release at the ventral hippocampus levels. These results suggest that 5-HT(1A) receptors are not substantially affected in adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were subjected to a maternal deprivation 3 h daily during the neonatal period. PMID:19111592

  20. Behavioral and pharmacological investigation of anxiety and maternal responsiveness of postpartum female rats in a pup elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Qin, Jingxue; Chen, Weihai; Sui, Nan; Chen, Hong; Li, Ming

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the validity of a novel pup-based repeated elevated plus maze task to detect reduced anxiety and increased maternal responsiveness in postpartum female rats and explored the roles of dopamine D2, serotonin transporter and GABA/benzodiazepine receptors in the mediation of these processes. Sprague-Dawley postpartum or nulliparous female rats were tested 4 times every other day on postpartum days 4, 6 and 8 in an elevated plus maze with 4 pups or 4 pup-size erasers placed on each end of the two open arms. When tested with erasers, untreated postpartum mother rats entered the open arms proportionally more than nulliparous rats. They also tended to spend more time in the open arms, indicating reduced anxiety. When tested with pups, postpartum rats retrieved pups into the closed arms, entered the open arms and closed arms more and had a higher moving speed than nulliparous rats, indicating increased maternal responsiveness. Both haloperidol (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg, sc) and fluoxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg, ip) dose- and time-dependently decreased the percentage of time spent in the open arms and speed, but did not affect the percentage of open arm entries. Diazepam (1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg, ip) did not affect pup retrieval, open arm time/entry in lactating rats. Thus, the percentage of open arm entries appears to be the most sensitive measure of anxiety in postpartum female rats, while speed could be used to index maternal responsiveness to pups, which are likely mediated by the dopamine D2 and serotonin transporter systems. PMID:26159828

  1. Maternal allergen exposure reprograms the developmental lung transcriptome in atopic and normoresponsive rat pups.

    PubMed

    Carpe, Nicole; Mandeville, Isabel; Kho, Alvin T; Qiu, Weiliang; Martin, James G; Tantisira, Kelan G; Raby, Benjamin A; Weiss, Scott T; Kaplan, Feige

    2012-11-15

    The "fetal origins hypothesis" argued that physiological changes consequent to in utero exposures ultimately contribute to disease susceptibility in later life. The dramatic increase in asthma prevalence is attributed to early exposures acting on preexisting asthma-susceptible genotypes. We showed previously that distinct transcriptome signatures distinguish the developmental respiratory phenotype of atopic (Brown Norway, BN) and normoresponsive (Lewis) rats. We aimed to determine whether maternal allergen exposure would influence asthma pathogenesis by reprogramming primary patterns of developmental lung gene expression. Postnatal offspring of dams sensitized to ovalbumin before mating and challenged during pregnancy were assessed for lung function, inflammatory biomarkers, and respiratory gene expression. Although maternal ovalbumin exposure resulted in characteristic features of an allergic response (bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, IgE, methacholine-induced lung resistance) in offspring of both strains, substantial strain-specific differences were observed in respiratory gene expression. Of 799 probes representing the top 5% of transcriptomic variation, only 112 (14%) were affected in both strains. Strain-specific gene signatures also exhibited marked differences in enrichment for gene ontologies, with immune regulation and cell proliferation being prominent in the BN strain, cell cycle and microtubule assembly gene sets in the Lewis strain. Multiple ovalbumin-specific probes in both strains were also differentially expressed in lymphoblastoid cell lines from human asthmatic vs. nonasthmatic sibling pairs. Our data point to the existence of distinct, genetically programmed responses to maternal exposures in developing lung. These different response patterns, if recapitulated in human fetal development, can contribute to long-term pulmonary health including interindividual susceptibility to asthma. PMID:22983352

  2. Maternal Hyperglycemia Directly and Rapidly Induces Cardiac Septal Overgrowth in Fetal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Erin E.; Reinking, Benjamin E.; Hu, Shanming; Yao, Jianrong; Kua, Kok L.; Younes, Areej K.; Wang, Chunlin; Segar, Jeffrey L.; Norris, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac septal overgrowth complicates 10–40% of births from diabetic mothers, but perplexingly hyperglycemia markers during pregnancy are not reliably predictive. We thus tested whether fetal exposure to hyperglycemia is sufficient to induce fetal cardiac septal overgrowth even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes. To isolate the effects of hyperglycemia, we infused glucose into the blood supply of the left but not right uterine horn in nondiabetic pregnant rats starting on gestational day 19. After 24?h infusion, right-sided fetuses and dams remained euglycemic while left-sided fetuses were moderately hyperglycemic. Echocardiograms in utero demonstrated a thickened cardiac septum among left-sided (glucose-exposed, 0.592 ± 0.016?mm) compared to right-sided (control, 0.482 ± 0.016?mm) fetuses. Myocardial proliferation was increased 1.5 ± 0.2-fold among left-sided compared to right-sided fetuses. Transcriptional markers of glucose-derived anabolism were not different between sides. However, left-sided fetuses exhibited higher serum insulin and greater JNK phosphorylation compared to controls. These results show that hyperglycemic exposure is sufficient to rapidly induce septal overgrowth even in the absence of the myriad other factors of maternal diabetes. This suggests that even transient spikes in glucose may incite cardiac overgrowth, perhaps explaining the poor clinical correlation of septal hypertrophy with chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:26064981

  3. Maternal sleep deprivation inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis associated with inflammatory response in young offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuying; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Xiaohui; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Cheng; You, Zili

    2014-08-01

    Although sleep complaints are very common among pregnant women, the potential adverse effects of sleep disturbance on the offspring are not well studied. Growing evidence suggests that maternal stress can induce an inflammatory environment on the fetal development. But people are not sure about the consequences of prenatal stress such as the inflammatory responses induced by maternal sleep deprivation (MSD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of MSD on long-term behavioral and cognitive consequences in offspring and its underlying inflammatory response pathway. The pregnant Wistar rats received prolonged sleep deprivation (72h) on gestational day (GD) 4, 9, and 18, respectively. The post-natal day (PND) 21 offspring showed impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the Morris Water Maze task and anhedonia in sucrose preference experiment. Quantification of BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells revealed a significant decrease in hippocampus neurogenesis in prepuberty offspring, especially for the late MSD (GD 18) group. Real-time RT-PCR showed that after MSD, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF?) increased in the hippocampus of offspring on PND 1, 7, 14 and 21, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 reduced at the same time. Immunofluorescence found that the cells of activated microglia were higher in the brains of MSD offspring. Taken together, these results suggested that the MSD-induced inflammatory response is an important factor for neurogenesis impairment and neurobehavioral outcomes in prepuberty offspring. PMID:24769004

  4. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25982389

  5. Size dependent translocation and fetal accumulation of gold nanoparticles from maternal blood in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence that nanoparticles (NP) cross epithelial and endothelial body barriers. We hypothesized that gold (Au) NP, once in the blood circulation of pregnant rats, will cross the placental barrier during pregnancy size-dependently and accumulate in the fetal organism by 1. transcellular transport across the hemochorial placenta, 2. transcellular transport across amniotic membranes 3. transport through ~20 nm wide transtrophoblastic channels in a size dependent manner. The three AuNP sizes used to test this hypothesis are either well below, or of similar size or well above the diameters of the transtrophoblastic channels. Methods We intravenously injected monodisperse, negatively charged, radio-labelled 1.4 nm, 18 nm and 80 nm 198AuNP at a mass dose of 5, 3 and 27 ?g/rat, respectively, into pregnant rats on day 18 of gestation and in non-pregnant control rats and studied the biodistribution in a quantitative manner based on the radio-analysis of the stably labelled 198AuNP after 24 hours. Results We observed significant biokinetic differences between pregnant and non-pregnant rats. AuNP fractions in the uterus of pregnant rats were at least one order of magnitude higher for each particle size roughly proportional to the enlarged size and weight of the pregnant uterus. All three sizes of 198AuNP were found in the placentas and amniotic fluids with 1.4 nm AuNP fractions being two orders of magnitude higher than those of the larger AuNP on a mass base. In the fetuses, only fractions of 0.0006 (30 ng) and 0.00004 (0.1 ng) of 1.4 nm and 18 nm AuNP, respectively, were detected, but no 80 nm AuNP (<0.000004 (<0.1 ng)). These data show that no AuNP entered the fetuses from amniotic fluids within 24 hours but indicate that AuNP translocation occurs across the placental tissues either through transtrophoblastic channels and/or via transcellular processes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the translocation of AuNP from maternal blood into the fetus is NP-size dependent which is due to mechanisms involving (1) transport through transtrophoblastic channels ¿ also present in the human placenta ¿ and/or (2) endocytotic and diffusive processes across the placental barrier. PMID:25928666

  6. Effect of essential oil from Citrus aurantium in maternal reproductive outcome and fetal anomaly frequency in rats.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Gustavo T; Francia-Farje, Luis A D; Damasceno, Débora C; Oliveira, Renata V; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia A; Kempinas, Wilma G

    2015-03-01

    Citrus aurantium L., commonly known as bitter orange, is widely used in folk medicine, but there is little data in the literature about the effects on pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of essential oil obtained from fruits of Citrus aurantium on the maternal reproductive outcome and fetal anomaly incidence in rats. Pregnant Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n minimum = 12 animals/group): G1 = control, G2 to G4 = treated with essential oil from C. aurantium at dose 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Rats were orally treated, by gavage, with plant essential oil or vehicle during pre-implantation and organogenic period (gestational day 0-14). On gestational day 20 the rats were anaesthetized and the gravid uterus was weighed with its contents and the fetuses were analyzed. Results showed that the treated group with 500 mg/kg presented decreased placental weights and placental index, although the treatment with bitter orange essential oil did not show any alteration in maternal reproductive performance, toxicological effect, changes in ossification sites, and malformation index. In conclusion, the treatment of Citrus aurantium essential oil was not teratogenic and did not alter the maternal reproductive outcome. PMID:25806990

  7. Effects of Maternal Dietary Restriction of Vitamin B-6 on Neocortex Development in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groziak, Susan Marie

    The aim of this investigation was to quantitate the effects of a dietary restriction in Vitamin B-6 during gestation or gestation and lactation on neurogenesis, neuron longevity and neuron differentiation in the neocortex of rats. Sprague Dawley female rats were fed, ad libitum, a Vitamin B-6 free diet (AIN 76) supplemented with 0.0 or 0.6 mg pyridoxine (PN)/kg diet during gestation followed by a control level of 7.0 mg PN/kg diet during lactation, or were fed the Vitamin B-6 free diet supplemented with 0.6 or 7.0 mg PN/kg diet throughout gestation and lactation. The neocortex of progeny of these animals were examined at 30 days of age employing light and electron microscopy. Analyses of neurogenesis, neuron longevity and differentiation of neurons (size of somata, dendritic arborization and spine density in Golgi Cox preparations, and synaptic density in E.M. preparations) were conducted. Each of the Vitamin B-6 restricted treatments adversely affected neurogenesis, neuron longevity and neuron differentiation. The degree of adverse effects paralleled the severity (dose or duration) of the restriction imposed. Expressed as percentage reduction from control values, the findings indicated that neuron longevity and differentiation of neurons in the neocortex were more severely affected than neurogenesis by a maternal dietary restriction in Vitamin B-6.

  8. Maternal separation increases methamphetamine-induced damage in the striatum in male, but not female rats.

    PubMed

    Hensleigh, Emily; Pritchard, Laurel M

    2015-12-15

    Methamphetamine abuse impacts the global economy through costs associated with drug enforcement, emergency room visits, and treatment. Previous research has demonstrated early life stress, such as childhood abuse, increases the likelihood of developing a substance abuse disorder. However, the effects of early life stress on neuronal damage induced by binge methamphetamine administration are unknown. We aimed to elucidate the effects of early life stress on methamphetamine induced dopamine damage in the striatum. Pups were separated from dams for 3h per day during the first two weeks of development or 15min for control. In adulthood, rats received either subcutaneous 0.9% saline or 5.0mg/kg METH injections every 2h for a total of four injections. Rectal temperatures were taken before the first injection and 1h after each subsequent injection. Seven days after treatment, rats were euthanized and striatum was collected for quantification of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporters (DAT) content by Western blot. Methamphetamine significantly elevated core body temperature in males and decreased striatal DAT and TH content, and this effect was potentiated by early life stress. Females did not exhibit elevated core body temperatures or changes in DAT or TH in either condition. Results indicate maternal separation increases methamphetamine induced damage, and females are less susceptible to methamphetamine induced damage. PMID:25535855

  9. The phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, tadalafil, improves depressive symptoms, ameliorates memory impairment, as well as suppresses apoptosis and enhances cell proliferation in the hippocampus of maternal-separated rat pups.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sang-Bin; Bahn, Geonho; Moon, Su-Jin; Lee, Jiah; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Sung, Yun-Hee; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Soo; Kim, Chang-Ju; Shin, Mal-Soon

    2011-01-13

    Early adverse experiences resulting from maternal separation may lead to neuronal cell death and eventually cause memory impairment. Maternal separation has been used to create a valid animal model of early life stress and a depression-like syndrome. The phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor, tadalafil (Cialis), is a widely prescribed agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the effects of tadalafil on apoptosis and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat pups following maternal separation. Specifically, the immobility time in the forced swim test was increased in the maternal-separated rat pups, and tadalafil treatment decreased the immobility time. The rat pups in the maternal separation group had deceased memory function compared to the rat pups in the maternal care group, and tadalafil treatment increased memory function of the rat pups in the maternal separation group. Apoptotic cell death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly increased in the maternal-separated rat pups, and tadalafil treatment suppressed maternal separation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus was significantly decreased in the maternal-separated rat pups, and taldalafil treatment increased cell proliferation. The present results suggest that tadalafil improves depressive symptoms and alleviates memory impairment by suppressing apoptotic neuronal cell death and enhancing cell proliferation in maternal-separated rat pups. PMID:21056623

  10. The Effect of Maternal Thyroid Disorders (Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism) During Pregnancy and Lactation on Skin Development in Wistar Rat Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Amerion, Maryam; Tahajjodi, Somayye; Hushmand, Zahra; Mahdavi Shahri, Nasser; Nikravesh, Mohammad Reza; Jalali, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Previous studies have shown that thyroid hormones are necessary for normal development of many organs and because of the importance of skin as the largest and the most important organ in human body protection in spite of external environment, the study of thyroid hormones effects on skin development is considerable. In this survey we have tried to study the effects of maternal hypothyroidism on skin development in fetus during pregnancy and lactation by immunohistochemistry technique. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into 4 groups, hypothyroids, hyperthyroids, hypothyroids are treated with levothyroxin and a control group. The rat mothers were exposed to PTU with 50 mg/lit dosage and levothyroxin with 1 mg/lit dosage and PTU and levothyroxin simultaneously and with the same dosage respectively in hypothyroid, hyperthyroid and treated hypothyroids with levothyroxin groups. After 14 days, blood sample was taken from mothers, and if thyroid hormones level had change well, mating was allowed. After pregnancy and delivery, 1th day dorsal skin (as the sample for pregnancy assay) and 10th day skin (as for lactation assay) was used for immunohystochemical and morphometric studies. Results: In this study it was observed that maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy and lactation causes significant increase in laminin expression, in most areas of skin, and maternal hyperthyroidism during pregnancy and lactation causes significant decrease in laminin expression. Also significant decrease was observed in hair follicles number and epidermis thickness in hypothyroidism groups. Conclusion: This study showed maternal hypothyroidism causes significant decrease in epidermis thickness and hair follicles number and it causes less hair in fetus. Also maternal hypothyroidism causes large changes in laminin expression in different parts of skin. At the same time,maternal hyperthyroidism causes opposite results. In fact, thyroid hormones regulate laminin expression negatively which means increase in thyroid hormone level, decreases laminin expression. So changes in thyroid hormones level can influence skin development significantly. PMID:23826487

  11. Diabetic rats exercised prior to and during pregnancy: maternal reproductive outcome, biochemical profile, and frequency of fetal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Silva, Hellen Pontes; Vaz, Geizi Fátima; Vasques-Silva, Francine Aparecida; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Campos, Kleber Eduardo; Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exercise prior to or during pregnancy on maternal reproductive outcome, biochemical profile, and on fetal anomaly frequency in a rat pregnancy model utilizing chemically induced diabetes. Wistar rats (minimum n = 11 animals/group) were randomly assigned the following groups: group 1 (G1), sedentary, nondiabetic; G2, nondiabetic, exercised during pregnancy; G3, nondiabetic, exercised prior to and during pregnancy; G4, sedentary, diabetic; G5, diabetic, exercised during pregnancy; and G6, diabetic, exercised prior to and during pregnancy. A swimming program was utilized for moderate exercise. On day 21 of pregnancy, all rats were anesthetized to obtain blood for biochemical measurements. The gravid uterus was weighed with its contents, and the fetuses were analyzed. The nondiabetic rats exercised prior to pregnancy presented a reduced maternal weight gain. Besides, G2 and G3 groups showed decreased fetal weights at term pregnancy, indicating slight intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). In the diabetic dams, the swimming program did not have antihyperglycemic effects. The exercise applied only during pregnancy caused severe IUGR, as confirmed by reduced fetal weight mean, fetal weight classification, and ossification sites. Nevertheless, exercise was not a teratogenic factor and improved the rats' lipid profiles, demonstrating that the exercise presented possible benefits, but there are also risks prior and during pregnancy, especially in diabetic pregnant women. PMID:23171681

  12. Functional connectivity in prenatally stressed rats with and without maternal treatment with ladostigil, a brain-selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Goelman, G; Ilinca, R; Zohar, I; Weinstock, M

    2014-09-01

    Stress during pregnancy in humans is known to be a risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Prenatal stress in rats caused depressive-like behavior that was restored to that of controls by maternal treatment with ladostigil (8.5 mg/kg per day), a brain-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor that prevented increased anxiety-like behavior in stressed mothers. Ladostigil inhibited maternal striatal MAO-A and -B by 45-50% at the time the pups were weaned. Using resting state-functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging on rat male offspring of control mothers, and mothers stressed during gestation with and without ladostigil treatment, we identified neuronal connections that differed between these groups. The percentage of significant connections within a predefined predominantly limbic network in control rats was 23.3 within the right and 22.0 within the left hemisphere. Prenatal stress disturbed hemispheric symmetry, resulting in 30.2 and 21.6%, significant connections in the right and left hemispheres, respectively, but this was fully restored in the maternal ladostigil group to 24.6% in both hemispheres. All connections that were modified in prenatally stressed rats and restored by maternal drug treatment were associated with the dopaminergic system. Specifically, we observed that restoration of the connections of the right nucleus accumbens shell with frontal areas, the cingulate, septum and motor and sensory cortices, and those of the right globus pallidus with the infra-limbic and the dentate gyrus, were most important for prevention of depressive-like behavior. PMID:24862938

  13. Environmental prenatal stress eliminates brain and maternal behavioral sex differences and alters hormone levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, M C R; Ortega, E; Gómez, F; Segovia, S; Pérez-Laso, C

    2015-07-01

    Environmental prenatal stress (EPS) has effects on fetuses that are long-lasting, altering their hormone levels, brain morphology and behavior when they reach maturity. In previous research, we demonstrated that EPS affects the expression of induced maternal behavior (MB), the neuroendocrine system, and morphology of the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) involved in reproductive behavior patterns. The bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) is another vomeronasal (VN) structure that plays an inhibitory role in rats in the expression of induced maternal behavior in female and male virgins. In the present study, we have ascertained whether the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuromorphological alterations of the AOB found after EPS also appear in the BAOT. After applying EPS to pregnant rats during the late gestational period, in their female offspring at maturity we tested induced maternal behavior, BAOT morphology and plasma levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS: a) affected the induction of MB, showed a male-like pattern of care for pups, b) elevated plasma levels of Cpd B and reduced E2 in comparison with the controls, and c) significantly increased the number of BAOT neurons compared to the control females and comparable to the control male group. These findings provide further evidence that stress applied to pregnant rats produces long-lasting behavioral, endocrine and neuroanatomical alterations in the female offspring that are evident when they become mature. PMID:26163152

  14. Effects of maternal diet and exercise during pregnancy on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and fat of weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Raipuria, Mukesh; Bahari, Hasnah; Morris, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in offspring. Maternal exercise may limit gestational weight gain and ameliorate these programming effects. We previously showed benefits of post-weaning voluntary exercise in offspring from obese dams. Here we examined whether voluntary exercise during pregnancy influences lipid and glucose homeostasis in muscle and fat in offspring of both lean and obese dams. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed chow (C) or high fat (F) diet for 6 weeks before mating. Half underwent voluntary exercise (CE/FE) with a running wheel introduced 10 days prior to mating and available until the dams delivered; others remained sedentary (CS/FS). Male and female pups were killed at postnatal day (PND)19 and retroperitoneal fat and gastrocnemius muscle were collected for gene expression. Lean and obese dams achieved similar modest levels of exercise. At PND1, both male and female pups from exercised lean dams were significantly lighter (CE versus CS), with no effect in those from obese dams. At PND19, maternal obesity significantly increased offspring body weight and adiposity, with no effect of maternal exercise. Exercise significantly reduced insulin concentrations in males (CE/FE versus CS/FS), with reduced glucose in male FE pups. In males, maternal obesity significantly decreased muscle myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) mRNA expressions (FS vs CS); these were normalized by exercise. Maternal exercise upregulated adipose GLUT4, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1?) mRNA expression in offspring of dams consuming chow. Modest voluntary exercise during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight in pups from lean dams. Maternal exercise appeared to decrease the metabolic risk induced by maternal obesity, improving insulin/glucose metabolism, with greater effects in male than female offspring. PMID:25853572

  15. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaojing; Kohtz, Amy; Pollonini, Gabriella; Riccio, Andrea; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2) is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain. PMID:26495851

  16. A methyl-seq analyses of rat offspring liver reveals maternal obesity-induced alterations in dna methylation status at weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to maternal obesity (MO) increases the risk of obesity in adult-life. MO was induced in rats by overfeeding via total enteral nutrition. Male offspring from obese rats gain greater body weight, fat mass and develop insulin resistance when fed high fat diets. However the mechanisms underlyin...

  17. EFFECTS ON THE FETAL RAT INTESTINE OF MATERNAL MALNUTRITION AND EXPOSURE TO NITROFEN (2,4-DICHLOROPHENYL-P-NITROPHENYL ETHER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of maternal protein-energy malnutrition and exposure to nitrofen on selected aspects of intestinal morphology and function were studied in the fetal rat. Pregnant rats were fed, throughout gestation, diets containing 24% or 6% casein as the sole source of protein. Red...

  18. Maternal flaxseed diet during lactation changes adrenal function in adult male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Mariana Sarto; da Conceição, Ellen Paula Santos; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia Cristina; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar

    2015-10-14

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) has been a focus of interest in the field of functional foods because of its potential health benefits. However, we hypothesised that maternal flaxseed intake during lactation could induce several metabolic dysfunctions in adult offspring. In the present study, we aimed to characterise the adrenal function of adult offspring whose dams were supplemented with whole flaxseed during lactation. At birth, lactating Wistar rats were divided into two groups: rats from dams fed the flaxseed diet (FLAX) with 25% of flaxseed and controls dams. Pups received standard diet after weaning and male offspring were killed at age 180 days old to collect blood and tissues. We evaluated body weight and food intake during development, corticosteronaemia, adrenal catecholamine content, hepatic cholesterol, TAG and glycogen contents, and the protein expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), 11-?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11?-HSD1) and adrenaline ?2 receptor at postnatal day 180 (PN180). After weaning, pups from the FLAX group had a higher body weight (+10 %) and food intake (+10%). At PN180, the FLAX offspring exhibited higher serum corticosterone (+48%) and lower adrenal catecholamine ( - 23%) contents, lower glycogen ( - 30%), higher cholesterol (4-fold increase) and TAG (3-fold-increase) contents in the liver, and higher 11?-HSD1 (+62%) protein expression. Although the protein expression of hypothalamic CRH was unaffected, the FLAX offspring had lower protein expression of pituitary ACTH ( - 34%). Therefore, induction of hypercorticosteronaemia by dietary flaxseed during lactation may be due to an increased hepatic activation of 11?-HSD1 and suppression of ACTH. The changes in the liver fat content of the FLAX group are suggestive of steatosis, in which hypercorticosteronaemia may play an important role. Thus, it is recommended that lactating women restrict the intake of flaxseed during lactation. PMID:26337632

  19. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate affects lipid profiling in fetal rat brain upon maternal exposure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Agrawal, Shruti; Cook, Thomas J; Knipp, Gregory T

    2007-01-01

    Lipids, especially essential fatty acids (EFAs), play critical roles in guiding proper fetal development. Exposure to xenobiotics that may alter the fetal supply of EFAs/lipids could potentially lead to fetotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of the peroxisome proliferator chemical, di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP), on the lipid metabolomic profile of the rat fetal brain upon maternal exposure during gestation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were orally gavaged with a control vehicle or DEHP (1,500 mg/kg) from gestational day (GD) 0 to GD 19 and fetal brain tissue was isolated at GD 20. The concentrations of 11 lipid classes [free fatty acid, free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), diacylglycerol (DAG), triacylglyceride, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine (PS), lysophosphatidylcholine (LYPC), cardiolipin, and sphingomyelin (SM)] were determined, as well as the differences in the composition of individual fatty acids. The total lipid concentration decreased with DEHP exposure, particularly for FC and SM, by 33 and 54%, respectively. The same trend was observed in the fatty acid compositions, particularly the unsaturated fatty acids, where a greater decrease was observed with longer fatty acid chain length. The compositions of docosahexaenoic acid decreased significantly in five lipid classes (P < 0.05), including CE (43%), DAG (60%), PS (33%), LYPC (35%), and SM (40%). In contrast, the most remarkable reduction of arachidonic acid presented in two lipid classes, CE and LYPC, with a decrease of up to 33%. These results suggest that in utero exposure to DEHP alters the lipid metabolome in the fetal brain, which may lead to aberrant neurodevelopment. PMID:16951938

  20. Maternal Deprivation Enhances Behavioral Vulnerability to Stress Associated with miR-504 Expression in Nucleus Accumbens of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Bai, Mei; Zhang, Li; Xue, Liang; Yi, Jinyao

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this study, the effect of maternal deprivation (MD) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) in inducing depressive behaviors and associated molecular mechanism were investigated in rats. Methods Maternal deprivation was established by separating pups from their mothers for 6 hours daily from postnatal day 1 to day 14. Chronic unpredictable stress was established by water deprivation, elevated open platform, food deprivation, restraint stress and electric foot shock. The depressive behaviors were determined by use of sucrose preference test and forced swim test. Results Rats in MD/CUS group exhibited lower sucrose preference rate, longer immobility time, and lighter body weights than rats in other groups (MD/control, non-MD/CUS and non-MD/control group). Meanwhile, higher miR-504 expression and lower dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) and D2 (DRD2) expression were observed in the nucleus accumbens of rats in the MD/CUS group than in the other three groups. MiR-504 expression correlated negatively with DRD1 gene expression and sucrose preference rate in the sucrose preference test, but correlated positively with immobility time in forced swim test. Both DRD2 mRNA and protein expression correlated negatively with immobility time in forced swim test. Conclusion These results suggest that MD enhances behavioral vulnerability to stress during adulthood, which is associated with the upregulation of miR-504 and downregulation of DRD2 expression in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:23922862

  1. Influence of the destabilisation of the maternal digestive microflora on that of the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Brunel, A; Gouet, P

    1993-01-01

    By destabilising the digestive flora of pregnant rats by antibiotic treatment, it was shown that part of the digestive microflora of the neonate originated from the maternal faeces. A mixture of ampicillin, bacitracin neomycin and streptomycin associated with nystatin were administered ad libitum at three different times, 1-3, 3-5, and more than 5 days before the estimated date of littering. For each treatment, samples were taken from the faeces, teats, and vagina of dams and from the digestive tracts of neonates aged between 6 and 120 h, and analysed for the presence of staphylococci, enterococci, lactobacilli and coliform bacteria. Antibiotic treatment reduced digestive flora populations to levels lower than 10(2) g-1 but had less effect on the vaginal and cutaneous mammary flora. In the digestive microflora of the neonate, the enterococci were unevenly affected, whereas the staphylococci were considerably decreased and the lactobacilli almost completely eliminated; coliform bacteria were found sporadically and in small numbers. The traces of antibiotics found in milk are not sufficient to explain these modifications. Counts made in control animals on media fed the same antibiotic concentrations were not modified. This work underlined the awful consequences for the newborn of a serious perturbation of the mother flora and the necessity of its presence for a normal installation of the digestive microflora of the newborn. PMID:8513029

  2. Maternal Nicotine Exposure Leads to Impaired Disulfide Bond Formation and Augmented Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Rat Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K.; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Holloway, Alison C.; Hardy, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal nicotine exposure has been associated with many adverse fetal and placental outcomes. Although underlying mechanisms remain elusive, recent studies have identified that augmented endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is linked to placental insufficiency. Moreover, ER function depends on proper disulfide bond formation—a partially oxygen-dependent process mediated by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and ER oxidoreductases. Given that nicotine compromised placental development in the rat, and placental insufficiency has been associated with poor disulfide bond formation and ER stress, we hypothesized that maternal nicotine exposure leads to both placental ER stress and impaired disulfide bond formation. To test this hypothesis, female Wistar rats received daily subcutaneous injections of either saline (vehicle) or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg) for 14 days prior to mating and during pregnancy. Placentas were harvested on embryonic day 15 for analysis. Protein and mRNA expression of markers involved in ER stress (e.g., phosphorylated eIF2?, Grp78, Atf4, and CHOP), disulfide bond formation (e.g., PDI, QSOX1, VKORC1), hypoxia (Hif1?), and amino acid deprivation (GCN2) were quantified via Western blot and/or Real-time PCR. Maternal nicotine exposure led to increased expression of Grp78, phosphorylated eIF2?, Atf4, and CHOP (p<0.05) in the rat placenta, demonstrating the presence of augmented ER stress. Decreased expression of PDI and QSOX1 (p<0.05) reveal an impaired disulfide bond formation pathway, which may underlie nicotine-induced ER stress. Finally, elevated expression of Hif1? and GCN2 (p<0.05) indicate hypoxia and amino acid deprivation in nicotine-exposed placentas, respectively, which may also cause impaired disulfide bond formation and augmented ER stress. This study is the first to link maternal nicotine exposure with both placental ER stress and disulfide bond impairment in vivo, providing novel insight into the mechanisms underlying nicotine exposure during pregnancy on placental health. PMID:25811377

  3. Histamine acting on the basolateral amygdala reverts the impairment of aversive memory of rats submitted to neonatal maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; da Silveira, Clarice Kras Borges; Rosa, Jessica; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    Recent findings suggest a role of brain histamine in the regulation of memory consolidation, particularly in one-trial inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning and that disruption in the mother infant relationship i.e. maternal deprivation induces cognitive deficits. We investigate whether histamine itself, and histaminergic compounds given into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) immediately post-training can affect retention (24 h after training) of one-trial (IA) in rats submitted to early postnatal maternal deprivation. In all cases, deprived (Dep) animals had lower retention scores than non-deprived controls (N-dep). Histamine induced memory enhancement on its own in N-dep animals and was able to overcome the deleterious effect of Dep. The effects by SKF-91488 is similar to histamine. The H3 agonist, imetit mimetized the enhancing effects of histamine; neither agonist H1 pyridylethylamine nor the H2 dimaprit had any effect. Ranitidine and thioperamide (50 nmol) co-infused with histamine (10 nmol) fully blocked the restorative effect of histamine on retention in Dep animals. Thioperamide, in addition, blocked the enhancing effect of histamine on memory of the N-dep animals as well. None of the drugs used given into BLA had any effect on open-field or elevated plus-maze behavior in N-dep or Dep rats. Our results are limited to experimental design in rats. Extrapolation i.e. in humans requires further experimentations. The present results suggest that the memory deficit induced by early postnatal maternal deprivation in rats may at least in part be due to an impairment of histamine H3 receptor-mediated mediated mechanisms in the BLA. PMID:25257105

  4. Methyl donor supplementation in rats reverses the deleterious effect of maternal separation on depression-like behaviour.

    PubMed

    Paternain, Laura; Martisova, Eva; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Ramírez, Maria J; Milagro, Fermin I

    2016-02-15

    Adverse early life events are associated with altered stress responsiveness and metabolic disturbances in the adult life. Dietary methyl donor supplementation could be able to reverse the negative effects of maternal separation by affecting DNA methylation in the brain. In this study, maternal separation during lactation reduced body weight gain in the female adult offspring without affecting food intake, and altered total and HDL-cholesterol levels. Also, maternal separation induced a cognitive deficit as measured by NORT and an increase in the immobility time in the Porsolt forced swimming test, consistent with increased depression-like behaviour. An 18-week dietary supplementation with methyl donors (choline, betaine, folate and vitamin B12) from postnatal day 60 also reduced body weight without affecting food intake. Some of the deleterious effects induced by maternal separation, such as the abnormal levels of total and HDL-cholesterol, but especially the depression-like behaviour as measured by the Porsolt test, were reversed by methyl donor supplementation. Also, the administration of methyl donors increased total DNA methylation (measured by immunohistochemistry) and affected the expression of insulin receptor in the hippocampus of the adult offspring. However, no changes were observed in the DNA methylation status of insulin receptor and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter regions in the hypothalamus. In summary, methyl donor supplementation reversed some of the deleterious effects of an early life-induced model of depression in rats and altered the DNA methylation profile in the brain. PMID:26628207

  5. Importance of Maternal Diabetes on the Chronological Deregulation of the Intrauterine Development: An Experimental Study in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Salazar García, Marcela; Reyes Maldonado, Elba; Revilla Monsalve, María Cristina; Villavicencio Guzmán, Laura; Reyes López, Alfonso; Sánchez-Gómez, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether maternal diabetes induced in rats using streptozotocin (STZ) on Day 5 of pregnancy affects the intrauterine developmental timeline. A total of 30 pregnant Sprague-Dawley diabetic rats (DRs) and 20 control rats (CRs) were used to obtain 21-day fetuses (F21) and newborn (NB) pups. Gestational age, weight, and body size were recorded as were the maxillofacial morphometry and morphohistological characteristics of the limbs. In DRs, pregnancy continued for ?1.7 days, and delivery occurred 23 days postcoitus (DPC). In this group, the number of pups was lower, and 13% had maxillofacial defects. F21 in the DR group had lower weights and were smaller; moreover, the morphological characteristics of the maxillofacial structures, derived from the neural crest, were discordant with their chronological gestational age, resembling 18- to 19-day-old fetuses. These deficiencies were counterbalanced in NB pups. We conclude that hyperglycemia, which results from maternal diabetes and precedes embryo implantation, deregulates the intrauterine developmental timeline, restricts embryo-fetal growth, and primarily delays the remodeling and maturation of the structures derived from neural crest cells. PMID:25756053

  6. Maternal Melatonin Therapy Rescues Prenatal Dexamethasone and Postnatal High-Fat Diet Induced Programmed Hypertension in Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lin, Yu-Ju; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Huang, Li-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure and high-fat (HF) intake are linked to hypertension. We examined whether maternal melatonin therapy prevents programmed hypertension synergistically induced by prenatal DEX plus postnatal HF in adult offspring. We also examined whether DEX and melatonin causes renal programming using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle from gestational day 16 to 22. In the melatonin-treatment groups (M), rats received 0.01% melatonin in drinking water during their entire pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to five groups: control, DEX, HF, DEX+HF, and DEX+HF+M. Male offspring in the HF group were fed a HF diet from weaning to 4 months of age. Prenatal DEX and postnatal HF diet synergistically induced programmed hypertension in adult offspring, which melatonin prevented. Maternal melatonin treatment modified over 3000 renal transcripts in the developing offspring kidney. Our NGS data indicate that PPAR signaling and fatty acid metabolism are two significantly regulated pathways. In addition, maternal melatonin therapy elicits longstanding alterations on renal programming, including regulation of the melatonin signaling pathway and upregulation of Agtr1b and Mas1 expression in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), to protect male offspring against programmed hypertension. Postnatal HF aggravates prenatal DEX induced programmed hypertension in adult offspring, which melatonin prevented. The protective effects of melatonin on programmed hypertension is associated with regulation of the RAS and melatonin receptors. The long-term effects of maternal melatonin therapy on renal transcriptome require further clarification. PMID:26696906

  7. Toxic Effects of Maternal Zearalenone Exposure on Intestinal Oxidative Stress, Barrier Function, Immunological and Morphological Changes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Gao, Rui; Meng, Qingwei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Bi, Chongpeng; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of maternal zearalenone (ZEN) exposure on the intestine of pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and its offspring. Ninety-six pregnant SD rats were randomly divided into four groups and were fed with diets containing ZEN at concentrations of 0.3 mg/kg, 48.5 mg/kg, 97.6 mg/kg or 146.0 mg/kg from gestation days (GD) 1 to 7. All rats were fed with mycotoxin-free diet until their offspring were weaned at three weeks of age. The small intestinal fragments from pregnant rats at GD8, weaned dams and pups were collected and studied for toxic effects of ZEN on antioxidant status, immune response, expression of junction proteins, and morphology. The results showed that ZEN induced oxidative stress, affected the villous structure and reduced the expression of junction proteins claudin-4, occludin and connexin43 (Cx43) in a dose-dependent manner in pregnant rats. Different effects on the expression of cytokines were also observed both in mRNA and protein levels in these pregnant groups. Ingestion of high levels of ZEN caused irreversible damage in weaned dams, such as oxidative stress, decreased villi hight and low expression of junction proteins and cytokines. Decreased expression of jejunal interleukin-8 (IL-8) and increased expression of gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GPx2) mRNA were detected in weaned offspring, indicating long-term damage caused by maternal ZEN. We also found that the Nrf2 expression both in mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the ZEN-treated groups of pregnant dams and the high-dose of ZEN group of weaned dams. The data indicate that modulation of Nrf2-mediated pathway is one of mechanism via which ZEN affects gut wall antioxidant and inflammatory responses. PMID:25180673

  8. Increased white matter neuron density in a rat model of maternal immune activation - Implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Duchatel, Ryan J; Jobling, Phillip; Graham, Brett A; Harms, Lauren R; Michie, Patricia T; Hodgson, Deborah M; Tooney, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    Interstitial neurons are located among white matter tracts of the human and rodent brain. Post-mortem studies have identified increased interstitial white matter neuron (IWMN) density in the fibre tracts below the cortex in people with schizophrenia. The current study assesses IWMN pathology in a model of maternal immune activation (MIA); a risk factor for schizophrenia. Experimental MIA was produced by an injection of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) into pregnant rats on gestational day (GD) 10 or GD19. A separate control group received saline injections. The density of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN(+)) and somatostatin (SST(+)) IWMNs was determined in the white matter of the corpus callosum in two rostrocaudally adjacent areas in the 12week old offspring of GD10 (n=10) or GD19 polyI:C dams (n=18) compared to controls (n=20). NeuN(+) IWMN density trended to be higher in offspring from dams exposed to polyI:C at GD19, but not GD10. A subpopulation of these NeuN(+) IWMNs was shown to express SST. PolyI:C treatment of dams induced a significant increase in the density of SST(+) IWMNs in the offspring when delivered at both gestational stages with more regionally widespread effects observed at GD19. A positive correlation was observed between NeuN(+) and SST(+) IWMN density in animals exposed to polyI:C at GD19, but not controls. This is the first study to show that MIA increases IWMN density in adult offspring in a similar manner to that seen in the brain in schizophrenia. This suggests the MIA model will be useful in future studies aimed at probing the relationship between IWMNs and schizophrenia. PMID:26385575

  9. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Ronco, Ana Maria; Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel; Saez, Daniel; Hirsch, Sandra; Zepeda, Ramiro; Llanos, Miguel N.

    2011-03-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  10. Maternal high fat and/or salt consumption induces sex-specific inflammatory and nutrient transport in the rat placenta

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Clare M; Vickers, Mark H; Harrison, Claudia J; Segovia, Stephanie A; Gray, Clint

    2015-01-01

    Maternal high fat and salt consumption are associated with developmental programming of disease in adult offspring. Inadequacies in placental nutrient transport may explain these ‘programmed effects’. Diet-induced inflammation may have detrimental effects on placental function leading to alteration of key nutrient transporters. We examined the effects of maternal high fat and/or salt diets on markers of placental nutrient transport and inflammation. Sprague–Dawley rats were assigned to (1) control (CD; 1% Salt 10% kcal from fat); (2) high salt (SD; 4% salt, 10% kcal from fat); (3) high fat (HF; 1% Salt 45% kcal from fat) or (4) high fat high salt (HFSD; 4% salt, 45% kcal from fat) 21 days prior to and throughout gestation. At embryonic day 18, dams were killed by isoflurane anesthesia followed by decapitation; placenta/fetuses were weighed, sexed, and collected for molecular analysis. Maternal SD, HF, and HFSD consumption decreased weight of placenta derived from male offspring; however, weight of placenta derived from female offspring was only reduced with maternal HF diet. This was associated with increased expression of LPL, SNAT2, GLUT1, and GLUT4 in placenta derived from male offspring suggesting increased fetal exposure to free fatty acids and glucose. Maternal SD, HF, and HFSD diet consumption increased expression of proinflammatory mediators IL-1?, TNF?, and CD68 in male placenta. Our results suggest that a proinflammatory placental profile results in detrimental alterations in nutrient transport which may contribute to the developmental origins of cardio-metabolic disturbances in offspring throughout life. PMID:25991721

  11. COCAINE-ASSOCIATED ODOR CUE RE-EXPOSURE INCREASES BLOOD OXYGENATION LEVEL DEPENDENT SIGNAL IN MEMORY AND REWARD REGIONS OF THE MATERNAL RAT BRAIN*

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martha K.; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cue triggered relapse during the postpartum period can negatively impact maternal care. Given the high reward value of pups in maternal rats, we designed an fMRI experiment to test whether offspring presence reduces the neural response to a cocaine associated olfactory cue. METHODS Cocaine conditioned place preference was carried out before pregnancy in the presence of two distinct odors that were paired with cocaine or saline (+Cue and ?Cue). The BOLD response to +Cue and ?Cue was measured in dams on postpartum days 2–4. Odor cues were delivered to dams in the absence and then the presence of pups. RESULTS Our data indicate that several limbic and cognitive regions of the maternal rat brain show a greater BOLD signal response to a +Cue versus ?Cue. These include dorsal striatum, prelimbic cortex, parietal cortex, habenula, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, lateral septum and the mediodorsal and the anterior thalamic nucleus. Of the aforementioned brain regions, only the parietal cortex of cocaine treated dams showed a significant modulatory effect of pup presence. In this area of the cortex, cocaine exposed maternal rats showed a greater BOLD activation in response to the +Cue in the presence than in the absence of pups. CONCLUSIONS Specific regions of the cocaine exposed maternal rat brain are strongly reactive to drug associated cues. The regions implicated in cue reactivity have been previously reported in clinical imaging work, and previous work supports their role in various motivational and cognitive functions. PMID:24183499

  12. Generational reproductive outcomes in Wistar rats maternally exposed to Ricinus communis oil at different stages of gestation.

    PubMed

    Salami, S A; Raji, Y

    2015-10-01

    Fetal programming hypothesis presupposes that stimulus or insult acting during critical periods of uterine growth and development may permanently alter tissue structure and function. Ricinus communis oil (RCO) has been reported to possess/used as laxative, labor-inducing and estrogenic properties. Generational reproductive effects of maternal exposure to RCO was investigated in rats. A total of 25 pregnant rats randomly assigned to five equal groups were treated with distilled water (control, group 1), RCO (950 mg/kg p.o.) during gestation days (GD) 1-7, 7-14, 14-21 and 1-21, respectively. Birth weight, morphometric data, anogenital distance (AGD), pubertal age, sperm parameters, hormonal profile, organ weight and histopathology were determined in the first (F1) and second (F2) filial generations. Results showed a significant decrease (P<0.05) in birth weight/morphometric data in male pups from the GD 1-7 and 7-14 groups. AGD decreased significantly in RCO-treated F1 males. Pubertal age of F1 females decreased significantly (P<0.05) compared with controls. At postnatal day 90, F1 males from the RCO-treated group showed significant decrease in testis weight, body weight, sperm count, motility and normal morphology. Testosterone levels were significantly decreased in RCO-treated F1 males, which also showed testicular interstitial edema and epididymal hypospermia. Only pubertal indexes were altered in F2 rats. Maternal exposure to RCO at early gestation periods impaired androgen-mediated reproductive end points in the first generation of rats. RCO exhibits endocrine disrupting capabilities. PMID:26118402

  13. Intrauterine Growth Restricted Rats Exercised at Pregnancy: Maternal-Fetal Repercussions.

    PubMed

    Corvino, S B; Netto, A O; Sinzato, Y K; Campos, K E; Calderon, I M P; Rudge, M V C; Volpato, G T; Zambrano, E; Damasceno, D C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of swimming in pregnant rats born with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and their offspring, IUGR rats were obtained using the streptozotocin-induced severe diabetic (SD) rats. In this study, the nondiabetic parental generation presented 10 rats and diabetic parental generation presented 116 rats. Of these, the mated nondiabetic female rats were 10 and the number of diabetic rats was 45. In relation to term pregnancy, there were 10 animals in the nondiabetic group and 15 rats in the diabetic group. In the offspring of SD rats (IUGR group), 43 females were classified as small for pregnancy age, 19 rats were classified as appropriate for pregnancy age, and 0 female was classified as large for pregnancy age. The nondiabetic and SD pregnant rats generated offspring with appropriate (control [C]) and small (IUGR) weight for pregnancy age, respectively. At adult life, the C group was maintained as nonexercised C group and IUGR rats were distributed into 2 subgroups, namely, nonexercised (IUGR) and exercised (IUGRex). The rate of mated rats in the IUGR group was reduced compared to the C group. During pregnancy, the IUGR rats presented hyperinsulinemia, impaired reproductive outcomes, decreased body weight, hypertriglyceridemia, and hyperlactacidemia. The IUGRex presented reduced insulin and triglyceride levels. Thus, swimming improved lipid metabolism and increased insulin sensitivity. However, the offspring showed retarded growth, reinforcing the need to stimulate the exercise practice in women under supervision with different professional expertise to promote appropriate gestational conditions and improve perinatal outcomes. PMID:25761405

  14. Predation threat exerts specific effects on rat maternal behaviour and anxiety-related behaviour of male and female offspring.

    PubMed

    Mashoodh, Rahia; Sinal, Christopher J; Perrot-Sinal, Tara S

    2009-03-23

    Differences in the rate of maternal behaviours received by rodent offspring are associated with differential programming of molecular and behavioural components of anxiety and stress-related functions. To determine the degree to which maternal behaviours are sensitive to environmental conditions, Long-Evans rat dams were exposed to the odour of a predator (cat) at two different time points during the first week postpartum. Exposure on the day of birth (DOB), but not the third day following birth, increased levels of maternal care in predator-exposed dams relative to dams exposed to a control condition across the first 5 days post-partum. As adults, female offspring of dams exposed on DOB exhibited a less-anxious phenotype in a novel open-field, spending more time in the center and less time displaying thigmotaxis. In contrast, under the same conditions, male offspring showed the opposite behavioural response, consistent with an increasingly anxious phenotype. Results from a subsequent stressor test (response to a predator odour) were consistent with the notion that the rearing effects were specific to anxiety-related behaviours in offspring. Accordingly, we showed that rearing conditions did not affect GR mRNA or NGFI-A expression in the hippocampus of offspring or cross-fostered offspring. The dissociation between stress and anxiety, as well as the sex-specific alterations in behaviour, may reflect the specificity inherent to neural programming in the face of naturalistic early life conditions. PMID:19171159

  15. Effects of environmental stress during pregnancy on maternal and fetal plasma corticosterone and progesterone in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D.E.; Rhees, R.W.; Williams, S.R.; Kurth, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Prenatal stress applied during a presumed critical period (third trimester) for sexual differentiation of the brain has been shown to alter development and influence sexual behavior. This experiment was designed to study the effects of environmental stress (restraint/illumination/heat) on maternal and fetal plasma corticosterone and progesterone titers. These hormones were studied since corticosterone has been shown to alter brain differentiation and progesterone has anti-androgen properties and since the secretion of both from the adrenal cortex is stimulated by ACTH. Plasma corticosterone and progesterone titers of both stressed and control gravid rats and their fetuses were measured on gestational days 18 and 20 by radioimmunoassay. Prenatal stress significantly reduced fetal body weight and fetal adrenal weight. Maternal pituitary weight was significantly increased. Prenatal stress caused a significant elevation in maternal corticosterone and progesterone titers and in fetal corticosterone titers. There was no difference between prenatal stressed and control fetal plasma progesterone levels. These data demonstrate that environmental stress significantly increases adrenal activity beyond that brought about naturally by pregnancy, and therefore may modify sequential hormonal events during fetal development.

  16. Effect of maternal alcohol and nicotine intake, individually and in combination, on fetal growth in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Leichter, J. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of maternal ethanol and nicotine administration, separately and in combination, on fetal growth of rats was studied. Nicotine was administered by gavage for the entire gestational period. Alcohol was given in drinking water for 4 weeks prior to mating and 30% throughout gestation. Appropriate pair-fed and ad libitum control animals were included to separate the effect of ethanol and nicotine on the outcome of pregnancy from those produced by the confounding variables of malnutrition. Body weights of fetuses exposed to alcohol alone or in combination with nicotine were significantly lower than those of the pair-fed and ad libitum controls. However, the difference in fetal body weight between the alcohol plus nicotine and the alcohol alone group was not significant. Similarly, in the rats administered nicotine only, fetal weight was not significantly different compared to control animals. The results of this study indicate that maternal alcohol intake impairs fetal growth and nicotine does not, regardless whether it is administered separately or in combination with alcohol for the entire gestational period.

  17. Structural equation modeling and nested ANOVA: Effects of lead exposure on maternal and fetal growth in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.D. ); O'Flaherty, E.J.; Shukla, R.; Gartside, P.S. ); Ross, R. )

    1994-01-01

    This study provided an assessment of the effects of lead on early growth in rats based on structural equation modeling and nested analysis of variance (ANOVA). Structural equation modeling showed that lead in drinking water (250, 500, or 1000 ppm) had a direct negative effect on body weight and tail length (i.e., growth) in female rats during the first week of exposure. During the following 2 weeks of exposure, high correlation between growth measurements taken over time resulted in reduced early postnatal growth. By the fourth week of exposure, reduced growth was not evident. Mating began after 8 weeks of exposure, and exposure continued during gestation. Decreased fetal body weight was detected when the effects of litter size, intrauterine position, and sex were controlled in a nested ANOVA. Lead exposure did not appear to affect fetal skeletal development, possibly because lead did not alter maternal serum calcium and phosphorus levels. The effect of lead on individual fetal body weight suggests that additional studies are needed to examine the effect of maternal lead exposure on fetal development and early postnatal growth. 24 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. 1,25(OH) sub 2 D sub 3 and Ca-binding protein in fetal rats: Relationship to the maternal vitamin D status

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaeghe, J.; Thomasset, M.; Brehier, A.; Van Assche, F.A.; Bouillon, R. Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medical )

    1988-04-01

    The autonomy and functional role of fetal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) were investigated in nondiabetic and diabetic BB rats fed diets containing 0.85% calcium-0.7% phosphorus or 0.2% calcium and phosphorus and in semistarved rats on the low calcium-phosphorus diet. The changes in maternal and fetal plasma 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} were similar: the levels were increased by calcium-phosphorus restriction and decreased by diabetes and semistarvation. Maternal and fetal 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} levels were correlated. The vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding proteins (CaBP{sub 9K} and CaBP{sub 28K}) were measured in multiple maternal and fetal tissues and in the placenta of nondiabetic, diabetic, and calcium-phosphorus-restricted rats. The distributions of CaBP{sub 9K} and CaBP{sub 28K} in the pregnant rat were similar to that of the growing rat. The increased maternal plasma 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} levels in calcium-phosphorus-restricted rats were associated with higher duodenal CaBP{sub 9K} and renal CaBPs, but placental CaBP{sub 9K} was not different. In diabetic pregnant rats, duodenal CaBP{sub 9K} was not different. In diabetic pregnant rats, duodenal CaBP{sub 9K} tended to be lower, while renal CaBPs were normal; placental CaBP{sub 9K} was decreased. The results indicate that in the rat fetal 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} depends on maternal 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} or on factors regulating maternal 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. The lack of changes in fetal CaBP in the presence of altered fetal plasma 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} levels confirms earlier data showing that 1,25(H){sub 2}D{sub 3} has a limited hormonal function during perinatal development in the rat.

  19. Dimethadione embryotoxicity in the rat is neither correlated with maternal systemic drug concentrations nor embryonic tissue levels.

    PubMed

    Ozolinš, Terence R S; Weston, Andrea D; Perretta, Anthony; Thomson, Jason J; Brown, Nigel A

    2015-11-15

    Pregnant rats treated with dimethadione (DMO), the N-demethylated metabolite of the anticonvulsant trimethadione, produce offspring having a 74% incidence of congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the incidence of CHD has high inter-litter variability (40-100%) that presents a challenge when studying the initiating events prior to the presentation of an abnormal phenotype. We hypothesized that the variability in CHD incidence was the result of differences in maternal systemic concentrations or embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO. To test this hypothesis, dams were administered 300mg/kg DMO every 12h from the evening of gestational day (GD) 8 until the morning of GD 11 (six total doses). Maternal serum levels of DMO were assessed on GD 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18 and 21. Embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO were assessed on GD 11, 12, 13 and 14. In a separate cohort of GD 12 embryos, DMO concentrations and parameters of growth and development were assessed to determine if tissue levels of DMO were correlated with these endpoints. Embryos were exposed directly to different concentrations of DMO with whole embryo culture (WEC) and their growth and development assessed. Key findings were that neither maternal systemic concentrations nor tissue concentrations of DMO identified embryos that were sensitive or resistant to DMO in vivo. Direct exposure of embryos to DMO via WEC also failed to show correlations between embryonic concentrations of DMO with developmental outcomes in vitro. We conclude that neither maternal serum nor embryonic tissue concentrations of DMO predict embryonic outcome. PMID:26375719

  20. Continuous central infusion of cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 decreases maternal care in lactating rats: consequences for fear conditioning in adulthood males.

    PubMed

    Costa, Heloísa Helena Vilela; Vilela, Fabiana Cardoso; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2013-11-15

    In lactating rats, maternal behavior consists of several integrated elements designed to promote care and nutrition of the offspring to ensure their survival. Given previous studies showing the role of the brain endocannabinoid system in maternal behavior, the objective of this work was to determine which changes in maternal care occur during continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of a cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2). Maternal behavior was scored daily in 4 sessions of 72 min each (3 during the light phase and 1 during the dark phase). During drug infusion, the results indicated decreased time spent by the mother licking pups and an increase in feeding time. To determine the extent to which variations in maternal care during the neonatal period affect offspring later in life, we evaluated possible changes in the fear response of offspring once they reached adulthood. Offspring of mothers treated with a cannabinoid agonist presented a lower latency for freezing behavior and increased time spent freezing in a fear test. These results show that treatment with a cannabinoid agonist decreases maternal care, mainly licking, in lactating rats and is associated with increased fear responses in offspring later in life. PMID:24060654

  1. High fat diet and in utero exposure to maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythm and leads to metabolic programming of liver in rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in adulthood is subject to programming beginning at conception. In animal models, exposure to maternal obesity and high fat diets influences the risk of obesity in the offspring. Among other long-term changes, offspring from obese rats develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosi...

  2. Effects of prolactin deficiency during the early postnatal period on the development of maternal behavior in female rats: Mother's milk makes the difference

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    behavior in female rats: Mother's milk makes the difference Angel I. Melo a, , Mirsha Pérez June 2009 Available online 16 June 2009 Keywords: Prolactin Milk Maternal behavior Sensitization through the milk participates in the development of neuroendocrine, immunological and reproductive systems

  3. Long Term Hippocampal and Cortical Changes Induced by Maternal Deprivation and Neonatal Leptin Treatment in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mela, Virginia; Díaz, Francisca; Borcel, Erika; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2015-01-01

    Maternal deprivation (MD) during neonatal life has diverse long-term behavioral effects and alters the development of the hippocampus and frontal cortex, with several of these effects being sexually dimorphic. MD animals show a marked reduction in their circulating leptin levels, not only during the MD period, but also several days later (PND 13). A neonatal leptin surge occurs in rodents (beginning around PND 5 and peaking between PND 9 and 10) that has an important neurotrophic role. We hypothesized that the deficient neonatal leptin signaling of MD rats could be involved in the altered development of their hippocampus and frontal cortex. Accordingly, a neonatal leptin treatment in MD rats would at least in part counteract their neurobehavioural alterations. MD was carried out in Wistar rats for 24 h on PND 9. Male and female MD and control rats were treated from PND 9 to 13 with rat leptin (3 mg/kg/day sc) or vehicle. In adulthood, the animals were submitted to the open field, novel object memory test and the elevated plus maze test of anxiety. Neuronal and glial population markers, components of the glutamatergic and cannabinoid systems and diverse synaptic plasticity markers were evaluated by PCR and/or western blotting. Main results include: 1) In some of the parameters analyzed, neonatal leptin treatment reversed the effects of MD (eg., mRNA expression of hippocampal IGF1 and protein expression of GFAP and vimentin) partially confirming our hypothesis; 2) The neonatal leptin treatment, per se, exerted a number of behavioral (increased anxiety) and neural effects (eg., expression of the following proteins: NG2, NeuN, PSD95, NCAM, synaptophysin). Most of these effects were sex dependent. An adequate neonatal leptin level (avoiding excess and deficiency) appears to be necessary for its correct neuro-programing effect. PMID:26382238

  4. CRF-R1 activation in the anterior-dorsal BNST induces maternal neglect in lactating rats via an HPA axis-independent central mechanism.

    PubMed

    Klampfl, Stefanie M; Brunton, Paula J; Bayerl, Doris S; Bosch, Oliver J

    2016-02-01

    Adequate maternal behavior in rats requires minimal corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRF-R) activation in the medial-posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (mpBNST). Based on the architectural heterogeneity of the BNST and its distinct inter-neural connectivity, we tested whether CRF-R manipulation in another functional part, the anterior-dorsal BNST (adBNST), differentially modulates maternal behavior. We demonstrate that in the adBNST, activation of CRF-R1 reduced arched back nursing (ABN) and nursing, whereas activation of CRF-R2 resulted in an initial reduction in nursing but significantly increased the incidence of ABN 5h after the treatment. Following stressor exposure, which is detrimental to maternal care, ABN tended to be protected by CRF-R1 blockade. Maternal motivation, maternal aggression, and anxiety were unaffected by any manipulation. Furthermore, under basal and stress conditions, activation of adBNST CRF-R1 increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations, whereas stimulation of adBNST CRF-R2 increased basal plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations, but blocked the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone secretion. Moreover, both the CRF-R1 and -R2 antagonists prevented the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone secretion. Importantly, elevated levels of circulating corticosterone induced by intra-adBNST administration of CRF-R1 or -R2 agonist did not impact maternal care. Finally, Crf mRNA expression in the adBNST was increased during lactation; however, Crfr1 mRNA expression was similar between lactating and virgin rats. In conclusion, maternal care is impaired by adBNST CRF-R1 activation, and this appears to be the result of a central action, rather than an effect of elevated circulating levels of CORT. These data provide new insights into potential causes of disturbed maternal behavior postpartum. PMID:26630389

  5. A single dose of S-ketamine induces long-term antidepressant effects and decreases oxidative stress in adulthood rats following maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Carlessi, Anelise S; Titus, Stephanie E; Abelaira, Helena M; Ignácio, Zuleide M; da Luz, Jaine R; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Florentino, Drielly; Vieira, Andriele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Quevedo, João

    2015-11-01

    Ketamine, an antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, has produced rapid antidepressant effects in patients with depression, as well as in animal models. However, the extent and duration of the antidepressant effect over longer periods of time has not been considered. This study evaluated the effects of single dose of ketamine on behavior and oxidative stress, which is related to depression, in the brains of adult rats subjected to maternal deprivation. Deprived and nondeprived Wistar rats were divided into four groups nondeprived?+?saline; nondeprived?+?S-ketamine (15 mg/kg); deprived?+?saline; deprived?+?S-ketamine (15 mg/kg). A single dose of ketamine or saline was administrated during the adult phase, and 14 days later depressive-like behavior was assessed. In addition, lipid damage, protein damage, and antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated in the rat brain. Maternal deprivation induces a depressive-like behavior, as verified by an increase in immobility and anhedonic behavior. However, a single dose of ketamine was able to reverse these alterations, showing long-term antidepressant effects. The brains of maternally deprived rats had an increase in protein oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation, but administration of a single dose of ketamine reversed this damage. The activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in the deprived rat brains. However, ketamine was also able to reverse these changes. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a single dose of ketamine is able to induce long-term antidepressant effects and protect against neural damage caused by oxidative stress in adulthood rats following maternal deprivation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1268-1281, 2015. PMID:25728399

  6. Gestational ethanol and nicotine exposure: effects on maternal behavior, oxytocin, and offspring ethanol intake in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMurray, M S; Williams, S K; Jarrett, T M; Cox, E T; Fay, E E; Overstreet, D H; Walker, C H; Johns, J M

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy is common, despite the known adverse effects of these drugs on fetal development. Though studies on the effects of each drug separately are published, little is known about the effect of concurrent use of alcohol and nicotine in humans or in preclinical models. In this report, we examined the impact of continuous gestational exposure to both ethanol via liquid diet and nicotine via an osmotic minipump on maternal behavior, offspring ethanol intake, and oxytocin levels in a rat model. Dams were tested for the onset of maternal behavior with litters of unexposed surrogate pups and then killed to examine oxytocin levels within specific brain regions. Drug-exposed offspring reared by surrogate dams were tested for ethanol intake at either adolescence or adulthood, and oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions after behavioral tests. Dams exhibited minor deficits in maternal care, which were associated with lower oxytocin levels in both the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic areas compared to control dams. Prenatal exposure altered sex-specific ethanol intake, with differential effects at adolescence and adulthood. Oxytocin system changes were also apparent in the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic regions of drug-exposed adolescent and adult offspring. These results suggest that dam treatment with ethanol and nicotine can somewhat negatively affect the early rearing environment, and that prenatal exposure to both of these drugs results in drinking behavior differing from what would be expected from either drug alone. Oxytocin's possible involvement in the mediation of these effects is highlighted. PMID:18664381

  7. Gestational Ethanol and Nicotine Exposure: Effects on Maternal Behavior, Oxytocin, and Offspring Ethanol Intake in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, M.S.; Williams, S.K.; Jarrett, T.M.; Cox, E.T.; Fay, E.E.; Overstreet, D.H.; Walker, C.H.; Johns, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy is common, despite the known adverse effects of these drugs on fetal development. Though studies on the effects of each drug separately are published, little is known about the effect of concurrent use of alcohol and nicotine in humans or in preclinical models. In this report, we examined the impact of continuous gestational exposure to both ethanol via liquid diet and nicotine via an osmotic minipump on maternal behavior, offspring ethanol intake, and oxytocin levels in a rat model. Dams were tested for the onset of maternal behavior with litters of unexposed surrogate pups and then killed to examine oxytocin levels within specific brain regions. Drug-exposed offspring reared by surrogate dams were tested for ethanol intake at either adolescence or adulthood, and oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions after behavioral tests. Dams exhibited minor deficits in maternal care, which were associated with lower oxytocin levels in both the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic areas compared to control dams. Prenatal exposure altered sex-specific ethanol intake, with differential effects at adolescence and adulthood. Oxytocin system changes were also apparent in the ventral tegmental and medial preoptic regions of drug-exposed adolescent and adult offspring. These results suggest that dam treatment with ethanol and nicotine can somewhat negatively affect the early rearing environment, and that prenatal exposure to both of these drugs results in drinking behavior differing from what would be expected from either drug alone. Oxytocin’s possible involvement in the mediation of these effects is highlighted. PMID:18664381

  8. Sex-dependent effects of an early life treatment in rats that increases maternal care: vulnerability or resilience?

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Sílvia; Daviu, Núria; Gagliano, Humberto; Garrido, Pedro; Zelena, Dóra; Monasterio, Nela; Armario, Antonio; Nadal, Roser

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) in rodents has profound long-term effects that are partially mediated by changes in maternal care. ELS not only induces “detrimental” effects in adulthood, increasing psychopathology, but also promotes resilience to further stressors. In Long-Evans rats, we evaluated a combination of two procedures as a model of ELS: restriction of bedding during the first post-natal days and exposure to a “substitute” mother. The maternal care of biological and “substitute” mothers was measured. The male and female offspring were evaluated during adulthood in several contexts. Anxiety was measured by the elevated plus-maze (EPM), acoustic startle response (ASR) and forced swim test (FST). In other group of animals, novelty-seeking was measured (activity in an inescapable novel environment, preference for novel environments and exploration of novel objects). Plasmatic ACTH and corticosterone in basal conditions and in response to stress were also measured. Cognitive impulsivity was assessed by a delay-discounting paradigm, and impulsive action, attention and compulsive-like behavior by a five choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT). ELS decreased pup body weight and increased the care of the biological mother; however, the “substitute” mother did not exhibit overt maltreatment. A mixture of “detrimental” and “beneficial” effects was shown. In the 5CSRTT, attention was impaired in both genders, and in females, ELS increased compulsive-like behavior. Novel object exploration was only increased by ELS in males, but the preference for novel spaces decreased in both genders. Baseline anxiety (EPM and ASR) and recognition memory were not affected. Unexpectedly, ELS decreased the ACTH response to novelty and swim stress and increased active coping in the FST in both genders. Cognitive impulsivity was decreased only in females, but impulsive action was not affected. The enhancement in maternal care may “buffer” the effects of ELS in a context-dependent manner. PMID:24616673

  9. Maternal immune activation produces neonatal excitability defects in offspring hippocampal neurons from pregnant rats treated with poly I:C.

    PubMed

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) resulting from prenatal exposure to infectious pathogens or inflammatory stimuli is increasingly recognized to play an important etiological role in neuropsychiatric disorders with neurodevelopmental features. MIA in pregnant rodents induced by injection of the synthetic double-stranded RNA, Poly I:C, a mimic of viral infection, leads to a wide spectrum of behavioral abnormalities as well as structural and functional defects in the brain. Previous MIA studies using poly I:C prenatal treatment suggested that neurophysiological alterations occur in the hippocampus. However, these investigations used only juvenile or adult animals. We postulated that MIA-induced alterations could occur earlier at neonatal/early postnatal stages. Here we examined the neurophysiological properties of cultured pyramidal-like hippocampal neurons prepared from neonatal (P0-P2) offspring of pregnant rats injected with poly I:C. Offspring neurons from poly I:C-treated mothers exhibited significantly lower intrinsic excitability and stronger spike frequency adaptation, compared to saline. A similar lower intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons from hippocampal slices of two weeks-old poly I:C offspring. Cultured hippocampal neurons also displayed lower frequency of spontaneous firing, higher charge transfer of IPSCs and larger amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Thus, maternal immune activation leads to strikingly early neurophysiological abnormalities in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26742695

  10. Ethanol exposure during late gestation and nursing in the rat: effects upon maternal care, ethanol metabolism and infantile milk intake.

    PubMed

    Pueta, Mariana; Abate, Paula; Haymal, Olga B; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan C

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol experiences, during late gestation as well as during nursing, modify the behavioral dynamics of the dam/pup dyad, and leads to heightened ethanol intake in the offspring. This study focuses on: a) behavioral and metabolic changes in intoxicated dams with previous exposure to ethanol during pregnancy and b) infantile consumption of milk when the dam is either under the effects of ethanol or sober. Pregnant rats received water, 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg ethanol, and were administered with water or ethanol during the postpartum period. Intoxication during nursing disrupted the capability of the dam to retrieve the pups and to adopt a crouching posture. These disruptions were attenuated when dams had exposure to ethanol during pregnancy. Ethanol experiences during gestation did not affect pharmacokinetic processes during nursing, whereas progressive postpartum ethanol experience resulted in metabolic tolerance. Pups suckling from intoxicated dams, with previous ethanol experiences, ingested more milk than did infants suckling from ethanol-intoxicated dams without such experience. Ethanol gestational experience results in subsequent resistance to the drug's disruptions in maternal care. Consequently, better maternal care by an intoxicated dam with ethanol experience during gestation facilitates access of pups to milk which could be contaminated with ethanol. PMID:18602418

  11. FETAL AND MATERNAL EFFECTS OF CONTINUAL EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 970-MHZ CIRCULARLY-POLARIZED MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtually continual exposure to 970-MHz microwaves in circularly-polarized waveguides was used to elicit fetal responses in Sprague-Dawley rats during gestation. wo hundred fifty rats were exposed to microwave radiation at whole-body averaged specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0....

  12. SENSITIVITY OF FETAL RAT TESTICULAR STEROIDOGENESIS TO MATERNAL PROCHLORAZ EXPOSURE AND THE UNDERLYING MECHANISM OF INHIBITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with 0, 31.3, ...

  13. Effects of early maternal separation on biobehavioral and neuropathological markers of Alzheimer's disease in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Martisova, Eva; Aisa, Bárbara; Guereñu, Gorka; Ramírez, María Javier

    2013-05-01

    Stress has been described as a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In the present work we aim to study the validity of an experimental model of neonatal chronic stress in order to recapitulate the main hallmarks of AD. Male Wistar rats that were separated daily from the dam during the first 3 weeks of life (maternal separation, MS) showed in adulthood cognitive deficits novel object recognition test. In the hippocampus of MS rats, increases in both A?40 and A?42 levels, the principal constituent of amyloid plaques observed in AD, were accompanied by increased expression of the cleaving enzyme BACE1. Hyperphosphorylation of Tau associated to increased activation of the tau kinase JNK1 was also found. Decreased cell number in the hippocampus was observed in stressed rats, as a consequence of both decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptotic death. Decreases in BDNF and in the synaptic markers synaptophysin and PSD-95 were also found in MS rats. All these effects could be related to an HPA axis hyperactivity, as reflected in significant increases in corticosterone levels and decreases in glucocorticoid receptor expression. Further, SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells treated with corticosterone showed increased BACE1, pTau and pJNK1 expression. In addition, venlafaxine, an antidepressant able to modulate HPA axis activity, reversed all the above cited deleterious effects of chronic stress, both in vivo and in vitro. It is proposed that the MS model can be considered as an appropriate experimental model for the study of sporadic AD. PMID:23305081

  14. Effect of maternal obesity on fetal bone development in the rat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological studies show that quality of nutrition during intrauterine and postnatal early life impact the risk of low bone mass and fracture later in life. Maternal consumption of high-fat diets has been demonstrated to affect health outcomes, such as: brain development; obesity; insulin resist...

  15. FETAL ANEMIA FOLLOWING MATERNAL EXPOSURE TO 5-FLUOROURACIL IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined dose-dependent changes in fetal hematology after maternal 5-FU exposure (0, 20, 30, 40 mg/kg on GD14) to assess 1) hematopoiesis as a potential target for its developmental toxicity, and 2) the significance of the resultant fetal anemia to developmental outcom...

  16. Maternal obesity promotes a proinflammatory signature in rat uterus and blastocyst

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal obesity at conception increases the risk of offspring obesity, thus propagating an intergenerational vicious cycle. Male offspring born to obese dams are hyper-responsive to high fat diets, gaining greater body weight, fat mass and additional metabolic sequelae compared to lean controls. ...

  17. Changes in Astroglial Markers in a Maternal Immune Activation Model of Schizophrenia in Wistar Rats are Dependent on Sex

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Daniela F.; Wartchow, Krista M.; Lunardi, Paula S.; Brolese, Giovana; Tortorelli, Lucas S.; Batassini, Cristiane; Biasibetti, Regina; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Data from epidemiological studies suggest that prenatal exposure to bacterial and viral infection is an important environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. The maternal immune activation (MIA) animal model is used to study how an insult directed at the maternal host can have adverse effects on the fetus, leading to behavioral and neurochemical changes later in life. We evaluated whether the administration of LPS to rat dams during late pregnancy affects astroglial markers (S100B and GFAP) of the offspring in later life. The frontal cortex and hippocampus were compared in male and female offspring on postnatal days (PND) 30 and 60. The S100B protein exhibited an age-dependent pattern of expression, being increased in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the MIA group at PND 60, while at PND 30, male rats presented increased S100B levels only in the frontal cortex. Considering that S100B secretion is reduced by elevation of glutamate levels, we may hypothesize that this early increment in frontal cortex tissue of males is associated with elevated extracellular levels of glutamate and glutamatergic hypofunction, an alteration commonly associated with SCZ pathology. Moreover, we also found augmented GFAP in the frontal cortex of the LPS group at PND 30, but not in the hippocampus. Taken together data indicate that astroglial changes induced by MIA are dependent on sex and brain region and that these changes could reflect astroglial dysfunction. Such alterations may contribute to our understanding of the abnormal neuronal connectivity and developmental aspects of SCZ and other psychiatric disorders.

  18. Brief maternal deprivation of rats reduces hepatic mixed function oxidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Vesell, E.S. ); Heubel, F.; Netter, K.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Deprivation of pups from mother and sibs for 3 min daily from day 5 today 41 of life reduced activities of 4 hepatic mixed function oxidases (MFO) expressed per mg protein in male rats compared to unhandled control rats. These decreases, though generally small, 22.4% and under, reached statistical significance for the substrates aminopyrine, benzphetamine and ethoxycoumarin. This handling procedure did not consistently affect the inductive response to phenobarbital. Previously ignored as a source of variability in response to xenobiotics, handling appears from these results to merit further investigation as such a factor in uninduced rats. Differences among rats in handling could contribute to large day-to-day variations in their metabolism of xenobiotics.

  19. EFFECTS ON THE FETUS OF MATERNAL BENOMYL EXPOSURE IN THE PROTEIN-DEPRIVED RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The separate and combined effects of protein deprivation and benomyl ((methyl 1-butylcarbomoyl)2-benzimidazole carbamate) exposure were studied in the pregnant rat fed a diet containing 24% (control) or 8% (deficient) casein throughout gestation. Within each diet group, subgroups...

  20. Effect of maternal intake of organically or conventionally produced feed on oral tolerance development in offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maja Melballe; Halekoh, Ulrich; Stokes, Christopher R; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2013-05-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maternal consumption of organically or conventionally produced feed on immunological biomarkers and their offsprings' response to a novel dietary antigen. First-generation rats were fed plant-based diets from two different cultivation systems (organic or conventional) or a chow. Second-generation rats were exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) via their mother's milk and subsequently challenged with OVA after weaning onto the chow diet. In the chow diet group feeding the dams OVA resulted in suppression of the pups' anti-OVA antibody response to the OVA challenge (total OVA-specific IgG was 197 for the OVA-treated chow diet group and 823 for the control chow diet group (arbitrary ELISA units)). In contrast, OVA exposure of the dams from the plant-based dietary groups did not result in a similar suppression. Cultivation system had no effect on the immunological biomarkers, except for a higher spleen prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in pups originating from dams fed the conventional plant-based diet (223 ng/L) than from those fed the organic plant-based diet (189 ng/L). PMID:23581797

  1. Phenotypic dysregulation of microglial activation in young offspring rats with maternal sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuying; Xie, Xiaofang; Fan, Yonghua; Zhang, Jinqiang; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Xiaohui; Yan, Shuo; Chen, Yubo; Peng, Cheng; You, Zili

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential adverse effects of maternal sleep deprivation (MSD) on physiological and behavioral aspects of offspring, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study was intended to investigate the roles of microglia on neurodevelopment and cognition in young offspring rats with prenatal sleep deprivation. Pregnant Wistar rats received 72?h sleep deprivation in the last trimester of gestation, and their prepuberty male offspring were given the intraperitoneal injection with or without minocycline. The results showed the number of Iba1(+) microglia increased, that of hippocampal neurogenesis decreased, and the hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory were impaired in MSD offspring. The classical microglial activation markers (M1 phenotype) IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-?, CD68 and iNOS were increased, while the alternative microglial activation markers (M2 phenotype) Arg1, Ym1, IL-4, IL-10 and CD206 were reduced in hippocampus of MSD offspring. After minocycline administration, the MSD offspring showed improvement in MWM behaviors and increase in BrdU(+)/DCX(+) cells. Minocycline reduced Iba1(+) cells, suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory molecules, and reversed the reduction of M2 microglial markers in the MSD prepuberty offspring. These results indicate that dysregulation in microglial pro- and anti-inflammatory activation is involved in MSD-induced inhibition of neurogenesis and impairment of spatial learning and memory. PMID:25830666

  2. Paralemniscal TIP39 is induced in rat dams and may participate in maternal functions

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Tamás; Mogyoródi, Bence; Bagó, Attila G.; Cservenák, Melinda; Domokos, Dominika; Renner, Éva; Gallatz, Katalin; Usdin, Ted B.; Palkovits, Miklós

    2011-01-01

    The paralemniscal area, situated between the pontine reticular formation and the lateral lemniscus in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum contains some tuberoin-fundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39)-expressing neurons. In the present study, we measured a 4 times increase in the level of TIP39 mRNA in the paralemniscal area of lactating mothers as opposed to nulliparous females and mothers deprived of pups using real-time RT-PCR. In situ hybridization histochemistry and immunolabeling demonstrated that the induction of TIP39 in mothers takes place within the medial paralemniscal nucleus, a cytoarchitectonically distinct part of the paralemniscal area, and that the increase in TIP39 mRNA levels translates into elevated peptide levels in dams. The paralemniscal area has been implicated in maternal control as well as in pain perception. To establish the function of induced TIP39, we investigated the activation of TIP39 neurons in response to pup exposure as maternal, and formalin injection as noxious stimulus. Both stimuli elicited c-fos expression in the paralemniscal area. Subsequent double labeling demonstrated that 95% of neurons expressing Fos in response to pup exposure also contained TIP39 immunoreactivity and 91% of TIP39 neurons showed c-fos activation by pup exposure. In contrast, formalin-induced Fos does not co-localize with TIP39. Instead, most formalin-activated neurons are situated medial to the TIP39 cell group. Our data indicate that paralemniscal neurons may be involved in the processing of maternal and nociceptive information. However, two different groups of paralemniscal neurons participate in the two functions. In particular, TIP39 neurons may participate in the control of maternal functions. PMID:22081168

  3. Melatonin prevents oxidative damage induced by maternal ethanol administration and reduces homocysteine in the cerebellum of rat pups.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Farzaneh; Goudarzi, Iran; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism leads to elevated plasma and brain homocysteine (Hcy) levels, as demonstrated by animal experiments. This study was designed to evaluate the alterations in offspring rat cerebellum following increase of plasma Hcy level induced by maternal exposure to ethanol and to investigate the possible protective role of melatonin administration upon cerebellar ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. The adult female rats were divided randomly into 4 groups, including one control and three experimental groups, after vaginal plagues. Group I received normal saline, group II received ethanol (4 g/kg), group III received ethanol+melatonin (10mg/kg) and group IV received melatonin on day 6 of gestation until weaning. 21 days after birth, plasma Hcy level, level of lipid peroxidation, the activities of several antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and levels of bcl-2 and bax mRNA expression in cerebellum were determined. Our results demonstrated that ethanol could induce lipid peroxidation, and decrease antioxidants activities and increase plasma total Hcy level. We also observed that ethanol impaired performance on the rotarod and locomotor activities of rats. However, treatment with melatonin significantly attenuated motoric impairment, the lipid peroxidation process and restored the levels of antioxidant activities and significantly reduced plasma total Hcy levels. Moreover, melatonin reduced bax/bcl-2 ratio in the presence of ethanol. We conclude that these results provide evidence that ethanol neurotoxicity in part is related to increase of plasma Hcy levels and melatonin with reducing of plasma Hcy level has neuroprotective effects against ethanol toxicity in cerebellum. PMID:25797213

  4. Changes in intestinal glucocorticoid sensitivity in early life shape the risk of epithelial barrier defect in maternal-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Braniste, Viorica; Ait-Belgnaoui, Afifa; Gabanou, Mélissa; Sekkal, Soraya; Olier, Maiwenn; Théodorou, Vassilia; Martin, Pascal G P; Houdeau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) contribute to human intestine ontogeny and accelerate gut barrier development in preparation to birth. Rat gut is immature at birth, and high intestinal GC sensitivity during the first two weeks of life resembles that of premature infants. This makes suckling rats a model to investigate postpartum impact of maternal separation (MS)-associated GC release in preterm babies, and whether GC sensitivity may shape MS effects in immature gut. A 4 hours-MS applied once at postnatal day (PND)10 enhanced plasma corticosterone in male and female pups, increased by two times the total in vivo intestinal permeability (IP) to oral FITC-Dextran 4 kDa (FD4) immediately after the end of MS, and induced bacterial translocation (BT) to liver and spleen. Ussing chamber experiments demonstrated a 2-fold increase of permeability to FD4 in the colon immediately after the end of MS, but not in the ileum. Colonic permeability was not only increased for FD4 but also to intact horseradish peroxidase 44 kDa in MS pups. In vivo, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU486 or ML7 blockade of myosin light chain kinase controlling epithelial cytoskeleton contraction prevented MS-induced IP increase to oral FD4 and BT. In addition, the GR agonist dexamethasone dose-dependently mimicked MS-increase of IP to oral FD4. In contrast, MS effects on IP to oral FD4 and BT were absent at PND20, a model for full-term infant, characterized by a marked drop of IP to FD4 in response to dexamethasone, and decreased GR expression in the colon only compared to PND10 pups. These results show that high intestinal GC responsiveness in a rat model of prematurity defines a vulnerable window for a post-delivery MS, evoking immediate disruption of epithelial integrity in the large intestine, and increasing susceptibility to macromolecule passage and bacteremia. PMID:24586321

  5. Highly Palatable Food during Adolescence Improves Anxiety-Like Behaviors and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Dysfunction in Rats that Experienced Neonatal Maternal Separation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Jin Young

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to examine the effects of ad libitum consumption of highly palatable food (HPF) during adolescence on the adverse behavioral outcome of neonatal maternal separation. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from dam for 3 hours daily during the first 2 weeks of birth (maternal separation, MS) or left undisturbed (nonhandled, NH). Half of MS pups received free access to chocolate cookies in addition to ad libitum chow from postnatal day 28 (MS+HPF). Pups were subjected to behavioral tests during young adulthood. The plasma corticosterone response to stress challenge was analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Results Daily caloric intake and body weight gain did not differ among the experimental groups. Ambulatory activities were decreased defecation activity and rostral grooming were increased in MS controls (fed with chow only) compared with NH rats. MS controls spent less time in open arms, and more time in closed arms during the elevated plus maze test, than NH rats. Immobility duration during the forced swim test was increased in MS controls compared with NH rats. Cookie access normalized the behavioral scores of ambulatory and defecation activities and grooming, but not the scores during the elevated plus maze and swim tests in MS rats. Stress-induced corticosterone increase was blunted in MS rats fed with chow only, and cookie access normalized it. Conclusion Prolonged access to HPF during adolescence and youth partly improves anxiety-related, but not depressive, symptoms in rats that experienced neonatal maternal separation, possibly in relation with improved function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. PMID:25031890

  6. Gestational Protein Restriction Impairs Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transport Mechanisms in Gastrocnemius Muscles of Adult Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Blesson, Chellakkan S.; Sathishkumar, Kunju; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Type II diabetes originates from various genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies showed that an adverse uterine environment such as that caused by a gestational low-protein (LP) diet can cause insulin resistance in adult offspring. The mechanism of insulin resistance induced by gestational protein restriction is not clearly understood. Our aim was to investigate the role of insulin signaling molecules in gastrocnemius muscles of gestational LP diet–exposed male offspring to understand their role in LP-induced insulin resistance. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed a control (20% protein) or isocaloric LP (6%) diet from gestational day 4 until delivery and a normal diet after weaning. Only male offspring were used in this study. Glucose and insulin responses were assessed after a glucose tolerance test. mRNA and protein levels of molecules involved in insulin signaling were assessed at 4 months in gastrocnemius muscles. Muscles were incubated ex vivo with insulin to evaluate insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), Insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt, and AS160. LP diet-fed rats gained less weight than controls during pregnancy. Male pups from LP diet–fed mothers were smaller but exhibited catch-up growth. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were elevated in LP offspring when subjected to a glucose tolerance test; however, fasting levels were comparable. LP offspring showed increased expression of IR and AS160 in gastrocnemius muscles. Ex vivo treatment of muscles with insulin showed increased phosphorylation of IR (Tyr972) in controls, but LP rats showed higher basal phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Insulin receptor substrate-1 (Tyr608, Tyr895, Ser307, and Ser318) and AS160 (Thr642) were defective in LP offspring. Further, glucose transporter type 4 translocation in LP offspring was also impaired. A gestational LP diet leads to insulin resistance in adult offspring by a mechanism involving inefficient insulin-induced IR, Insulin receptor substrate-1, and AS160 phosphorylation and impaired glucose transporter type 4 translocation. PMID:24797633

  7. Effects of maternal vitamin B6 deficiency and over-supplementation on DNA damage and oxidative stress in rat dams and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Mara Ribeiro; Venâncio, Vinícius Paula; Aissa, Alexandre Ferro; Darin, Joana Darc Castania; Pires Bianchi, Maria Lourdes; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin B6 is a cofactor for more than 140 essential enzymes and plays an important role in maternal health and fetal development. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal vitamin B6 on DNA damage and oxidative stress status in rat dams and their offspring. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three dietary groups fed a standard diet (control diet), a diet supplemented with 30?mg/kg of vitamin B6, or a deficient diet (0?mg/kg of vitamin B6) for 10 weeks before and during mating, pregnancy and lactation. The dams were euthanized at weaning, and their male pups were euthanized either 10 days or 100 days after birth. We found that maternal vitamin B6 deficiency increased the micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells and also increased the concentration of hepatic TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) in newborn pups (10 days old). In conclusion, maternal 5- to 6-fold over-supplementation of vitamin B6 had no adverse effects, however its deficiency may induce chromosomal damage and hepatic lipid peroxidation in the offspring. PMID:25818462

  8. Maternal saturated-fat-rich diet promotes leptin resistance in fetal liver lipid catabolism and programs lipid homeostasis impairments in the liver of rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, María Belén; Fornes, Daiana; Capobianco, Evangelina; Higa, Romina; Jawerbaum, Alicia; White, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to analyze if an overload of saturated fat in maternal diet induced lipid metabolic impairments in livers from rat fetuses that persist in the offspring and to identify potential mechanisms involving fetal leptin resistance. Female rats were fed either a diet enriched in 25% of saturated fat (SFD rats) or a regular diet (controls). Fetuses of 21days of gestation and offspring of 21 and 140days of age were obtained and plasma and liver were kept for further analysis. Livers from a group of control and SFD fetuses were cultured in the presence or absence of leptin. Leptin or vehicle was administered to control fetuses during the last days of gestation and, on day 21, fetal livers and plasma were obtained. Lipid levels were assessed by thin-layer chromatography and mRNA gene expression of CPT1, ACO and PPAR? by RT-PCR. Liver lipid levels were increased and CPT1 and ACO were down-regulated in fetuses and offspring from SFD rats compared to controls. After the culture with leptin, control fetal livers showed increased ACO and CPT1 expression and decreased lipid levels, while fetal livers from SFD rats showed no changes. Fetal administration of leptin induced a decrease in ACO and no changes in CPT1 expression. In summary, our results suggest that a saturated fat overload in maternal diet induces fetal leptin resistance in liver lipid catabolism, which might be contributing to liver lipid alterations that are sustained in the offspring. PMID:26383539

  9. Adolescent Opiate Exposure in the Female Rat Induces Subtle Alterations in Maternal Care and Transgenerational Effects on Play Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole L.; Carini, Lindsay; Schenk, Marian E.; Stewart, Michelle; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription opiates, such as Vicodin® and MSContin®, has increased dramatically over the past decade. Of particular concern is the rising popularity of these drugs in adolescent female populations. Use during this critical developmental period could have significant long-term consequences for both the female user as well as potential effects on her future offspring. To address this issue, we have begun modeling adolescent opiate exposure in female rats and have observed significant transgenerational effects despite the fact that all drugs are withdrawn several weeks prior to pregnancy. The purpose of the current set of studies was to determine whether adolescent morphine exposure modifies postpartum care. In addition, we also examined juvenile play behavior in both male and female offspring. The choice of the social play paradigm was based on previous findings demonstrating effects of both postpartum care and opioid activity on play behavior. The findings revealed subtle modifications in the maternal behavior of adolescent morphine-exposed females, primarily related to the amount of time females’ spend nursing and in non-nursing contact with their young. In addition, male offspring of adolescent morphine-exposed mothers (MOR-F1) demonstrate decreased rough and tumble play behaviors, with no significant differences in general social behaviors (i.e., social grooming and social exploration). Moreover, there was a tendency toward increased rough and tumble play in MOR-F1 females, demonstrating the sex-specific nature of these effects. Given the importance of the postpartum environment on neurodevelopment, it is possible that modifications in maternal–offspring interactions, related to a history of adolescent opiate exposure, plays a role in the observed transgenerational effects. Overall, these studies indicate that the long-term consequences of adolescent opiate exposure can impact both the female and her future offspring. PMID:21713113

  10. Adolescent opiate exposure in the female rat induces subtle alterations in maternal care and transgenerational effects on play behavior.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicole L; Carini, Lindsay; Schenk, Marian E; Stewart, Michelle; Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription opiates, such as Vicodin(®) and MSContin(®), has increased dramatically over the past decade. Of particular concern is the rising popularity of these drugs in adolescent female populations. Use during this critical developmental period could have significant long-term consequences for both the female user as well as potential effects on her future offspring. To address this issue, we have begun modeling adolescent opiate exposure in female rats and have observed significant transgenerational effects despite the fact that all drugs are withdrawn several weeks prior to pregnancy. The purpose of the current set of studies was to determine whether adolescent morphine exposure modifies postpartum care. In addition, we also examined juvenile play behavior in both male and female offspring. The choice of the social play paradigm was based on previous findings demonstrating effects of both postpartum care and opioid activity on play behavior. The findings revealed subtle modifications in the maternal behavior of adolescent morphine-exposed females, primarily related to the amount of time females' spend nursing and in non-nursing contact with their young. In addition, male offspring of adolescent morphine-exposed mothers (MOR-F1) demonstrate decreased rough and tumble play behaviors, with no significant differences in general social behaviors (i.e., social grooming and social exploration). Moreover, there was a tendency toward increased rough and tumble play in MOR-F1 females, demonstrating the sex-specific nature of these effects. Given the importance of the postpartum environment on neurodevelopment, it is possible that modifications in maternal-offspring interactions, related to a history of adolescent opiate exposure, plays a role in the observed transgenerational effects. Overall, these studies indicate that the long-term consequences of adolescent opiate exposure can impact both the female and her future offspring. PMID:21713113

  11. EFFECTS ON THE FETUS OF MATERNAL NITROFEN EXPOSURE IN THE PROTEIN-DEPRIVED RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The separate and combined effects of protein deprivation and nitrofen exposure were studied in the pregnant rat. Animals were fed diets containing 24, 8, 6 or 4% casein throughout gestation. Within each diet group, sub-groups were gavage-fed with 12.5 (lower dose) and 25 (higher ...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF MATERNAL TOXICITY, EMBRYOTOXICITY AND TERATOGENIC POTENTIAL OF SODIUM CHLORITE IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of up to 13 pregnant rats were individually caged. Body weight, food and water consumption were recorded at days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of gestation and the dams were treated on days 8-15 with sodium chlorite, 0.1%, 0.5% or 2% in drinking water or by injection of 10, 20, or 50 mg...

  13. Assessment of the perinatal effects of maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is believed that I. carnea toxicosis induces abnormal embryogenesis in livestock. Studies with rats treated with I. carnea aqueous fraction (AF) during gestation, revealed litters with decreased body weight, but the characteristic vacuolar lesions promoted by swainsonine, its main toxic principle...

  14. OFFSPRING MORTALITY AND MATERNAL LUNG PATHOLOGY IN FEMALE RATS FED HEXACHLOROBENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Female Sprague-Dawley CD rats were fed 0, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 ppm hexachlorobenzene (HCB) continuously in the diet and 2 successive litters raised. These doses were selected to range from approximately the no observable effect level to lethality in suckling offspring of trea...

  15. Maternal hyperthyroidism increases the susceptibility of rat adult offspring to cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Lino, Caroline A; da Silva, Ivson Bezerra; Shibata, Caroline E R; Monteiro, Priscilla de S; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M

    2015-11-15

    Suboptimal intrauterine conditions as changed hormone levels during critical periods of the development are considered an insult and implicate in physiological adaptations which may result in pathological outcomes in later life. This study evaluated the effect of maternal hyperthyroidism (hyper) on cardiac function in adult offspring and the possible involvement of cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) in this process. Wistar dams received orally thyroxin (12 mg/L) from gestational day 9 (GD9) until GD18. Adult offspring at postnatal day 90 (PND90) from hyper dams presented increased SBP evaluated by plethysmography and worse recovery after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), as evidenced by decreased LVDP, +dP/dT and -dP/dT at 25 min of reperfusion and by increased infarct size. Increased cardiac Angiotensin I/II levels and AT1R in hyper offspring were verified. Herein, we provide evidences that maternal hyperthyroidism leads to altered expression of RAS components in adult offspring, which may be correlated with worse recovery of the cardiac performance after ischemic insults and hypertension. PMID:26277399

  16. Effects of prolactin deficiency during the early postnatal period on the development of maternal behavior in female rats: mother's milk makes the difference.

    PubMed

    Melo, Angel I; Pérez-Ledezma, Mirsha; Clapp, Carmen; Arnold, Edith; Rivera, José Carlos; Fleming, Alison S

    2009-09-01

    During early life, prolactin (PRL) ingested by the pups through the milk participates in the development of neuroendocrine, immunological and reproductive systems. The present study tested whether a deficiency in PRL in the dam's milk during early lactation affected the offspring in terms of the maternal responsiveness in the sensitization paradigm and behavioral response to a novel environment in the offspring. Thus, lactating rats were injected (sc) on postnatal days (PND) 2-5 with bromocriptine (125 microg/day), bromocriptine+ovine PRL (125 microg+300 microg/day), or vehicle. As juveniles (at PND 24) or adults (PND 90-100), one female from each litter was exposed to 5 foster pups continuously for 8 days and their maternal responsiveness was recorded. Female offspring were also tested in an open field arena. Adult, but not juvenile, female offspring of bromocriptine-treated mothers showed an increased latency to become maternal, in comparison to latencies displayed by the offspring of control mothers. Furthermore, the proportion of adult, but not juvenile, offspring of bromocriptine-treated mothers that became maternal was lower than that showed by the offspring of vehicle-treated mothers. In comparison to female offspring of vehicle-treated mothers, female offspring of bromocriptine-treated mothers spent less time hovering over the pups (as juvenile females), body licking (as both juvenile and adult females), and in close proximity to pups (as adult females) during the maternal behavior test. Simultaneous administration of ovine PRL and bromocriptine reversed almost all the negative effects of bromocriptine. These data suggest that maternally-derived PRL participates during the early postnatal period in the development of neural systems that underlie the control of maternal behavior. PMID:19538963

  17. Early Life Exposure to Fructose Alters Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Hepatic Gene Expression and Leads to Sex-Dependent Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Zoe E.; Vickers, Mark H.; Bernal, Angelica; Yap, Cassandra; Sloboda, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Fructose consumption is associated with altered hepatic function and metabolic compromise and not surprisingly has become a focus for perinatal studies. We have previously shown that maternal fructose intake results in sex specific changes in fetal, placental and neonatal outcomes. In this follow-up study we investigated effects on maternal, fetal and neonatal hepatic fatty acid metabolism and immune modulation. Methods Pregnant rats were randomised to either control (CON) or high-fructose (FR) diets. Fructose was given in solution and comprised 20% of total caloric intake. Blood and liver samples were collected at embryonic day 21 (E21) and postnatal day (P)10. Maternal liver samples were also collected at E21 and P10. Liver triglyceride and glycogen content was measured with standard assays. Hepatic gene expression was measured with qPCR. Results Maternal fructose intake during pregnancy resulted in maternal hepatic ER stress, hepatocellular injury and increased levels of genes that favour lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a reduction in the NLRP3 inflammasome. Fetuses of mothers fed a high fructose diet displayed increased hepatic fructose transporter and reduced fructokinase mRNA levels and by 10 days of postnatal age, also have hepatic ER stress, and elevated IL1? mRNA levels. At P10, FR neonates demonstrated increased hepatic triglyceride content and particularly in males, associated changes in the expression of genes regulating beta oxidation and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Further, prenatal fructose results in sex-dependant changes in levels of key clock genes. Conclusions Maternal fructose intake results in age and sex-specific alterations in maternal fetal and neonatal free fatty acid metabolism, which may be associated in disruptions in core clock gene machinery. How these changes are associated with hepatic inflammatory processes is still unclear, although suppression of the hepatic inflammasome, as least in mothers and male neonates may point to impaired immune sensing. PMID:26562417

  18. Developmental Timing of the Effects of Maternal Care on Gene Expression and Epigenetic Regulation of Hormone Receptor Levels in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Catherine Jensen; Neugut, Y. Dana

    2013-01-01

    Maternal care experienced during postnatal development has enduring effects on neuroendocrine function and behavior. Previous studies in rats have illustrated the effect of maternal licking/grooming (LG) on hormone receptors and maternal behavior of adult female offspring associated with altered DNA methylation. However, the developmental timing of these effects, which provide insight into the cellular and molecular pathways through which early experience alters later behavior, had not been explored. Here, we demonstrate the developmental emergence of these outcomes and use cross-fostering to identify sensitive periods for these effects. Estrogen receptor (ER)? and ER? mRNA levels within the medial preoptic area (MPOA) of the hypothalamus were increased by postnatal day (PN)21 in female offspring of high LG dams; LG-associated increases in oxytocin receptor mRNA levels were observed beyond the weaning period. Quantification of ER?-immunoreactivity indicated a high degree of neuroanatomical specificity of LG effects within the MPOA that were observed by PN6. Reduced DNA methylation and histone 3 lysine 9 tri-methylation and increased histone 3 lysine 4 tri-methylation at the ER? gene promoter (Esr1) were detected at PN21 in high LG female offspring. Latency to engage in maternal behavior toward donor pups was significantly shorter among high LG females. Cross-fostering revealed that maternal sensitization and MPOA ER? levels are sensitive to maternal care experienced before but not after PN10. Differential windows of plasticity were identified for ER? and oxytocin receptor mRNA levels. These studies contribute significantly to our understanding of the molecular, neurobiological, and behavioral pathways through which variation in maternal behavior is transmitted from one generation to the next. PMID:24002038

  19. Selective carbohydrate or protein restriction: effects on subsequent food intake and cravings.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Jennifer S; Polivy, Janet; Herman, C Peter

    2006-11-01

    In order to determine the effects of selective food restriction on subsequent food intake and cravings, participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: carbohydrate-restriction, protein-restriction, or control (no restriction). Participants in the restriction conditions were asked to restrict their intake of either complex carbohydrates or animal proteins for 3 days, before coming to the laboratory for an experimental session. During the experimental session, participants' food intake, cravings, and affect were measured. The results indicated that selective food restriction resulted in selective behavioural consequences. Specifically, carbohydrate-restricted participants consumed more of a high-carbohydrate food than did controls or protein-restrictors, in addition to reporting more cravings for high-carbohydrate foods over the restriction period. Protein-restricted participants reported more cravings for high-protein foods over the restriction period, in comparison to controls and carbohydrate-restrictors; however, protein-restricted participants did not consume more of the particular high-protein food presented to them in the laboratory. The roles of dietary restraint and negative affect in influencing cravings and food intake are discussed. Overall, selective food restriction is demonstrated to have negative psychological and behavioural consequences. PMID:16844265

  20. Oxytocin receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell are involved in the consolidation of maternal memory in postpartum rats

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    to respond maternally until the pups are weaned at about 3­4 weeks postpartum (Numan, 1994; Rosenblatt, 1987). Maternal memory likely occurs in a number of species. This has been demonstrated in rabbits

  1. Protective effect of maternal prenatal melatonin administration on rat pups born to mothers submitted to constant light during gestation.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, C D; Compagnucci, M V; Conti, N R; Ponce, R H; Vermouth, N T

    2010-09-01

    We studied the effects of adverse conditions such as constant light (LL) on the circadian rhythm of malate (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37) and lactate (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) dehydrogenase activities of the testes of male Wistar rats on postnatal day 28 (PN28), anxiety-like behavior (elevated plus-maze test) at PN60 and sexual behavior at PN120. The rats were assigned to mother groups on day 10 of pregnancy: control (12-h light/dark), LL (light from day 10 to 21 of pregnancy), and LL+Mel (LL and sc injection to the mothers of a daily dose of melatonin, 1 mg/kg body weight at circadian time 12, from day 17 to 21 of pregnancy). LL offspring did not show circadian rhythms of MDH (N = 62) and LDH (N = 63) activities (cosinor and ANOVA-LSD Fisher). They presented a 44.7% decrease in open-arm entries and a 67.9% decrease in time (plus-maze test, N = 15, P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test), an increase in mounting (94.4%), intromission (94.5%) and ejaculation (56.6%) latencies (N = 12, P < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test) and lower numbers of these events (61, 59 and 73%, respectively; P < 0.01, N = 12) compared to controls. The offspring of the LL+Mel group presented MDH and LDH circadian rhythms (P < 0.05, N = 50, cosinor and ANOVA-LSD Fisher), anxiety-like and sexual behaviors similar to control. These findings supported the importance of the melatonin signal and provide evidence for the protective effects of hormones on maternal programming during gestation. This protective action of melatonin is probably related to its entrainment capacity, favoring internal coupling of the fetal multioscillatory system. PMID:20802971

  2. Variations in postnatal maternal care and the epigenetic regulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 expression and hippocampal function in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bagot, Rosemary C.; Zhang, Tie-Yuan; Wen, Xianglan; Nguyen, Thi Thu Thao; Nguyen, Huy-Binh; Diorio, Josie; Wong, Tak Pan; Meaney, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Variations in maternal care in the rat affect hippocampal morphology and function as well as performance on hippocampal-dependent tests of learning and memory in the offspring. Preliminary genome-wide analyses of gene transcription and DNA methylation of the molecular basis for such maternal effects suggested differences in the epigenetic state and transcriptional activity of the Grm1 gene in the rat as a function of maternal care. Grm1 encodes the type I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1), and we found increased mGluR1 mRNA and protein in hippocampus from the adult offspring of mothers showing an increased frequency of pup licking/grooming (i.e., high-LG mothers) that was associated with a decrease in the methylation of Grm1. ChIP assays showed increased levels of histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation of Grm1 in hippocampus from the adult offspring of high-LG compared with low-LG mothers. These histone posttranslational modifications were highly correlated, and both associate inversely with DNA methylation and positively with transcription. Studies of mGluR1 function showed increased hippocampal mGluR1-induced long-term depression in the adult offspring of high-LG compared with low-LG mothers, as well as increased paired-pulse depression (PPD). PPD is an inhibitory feedback mechanism that prevents excessive glutamate release during high-frequency stimulation. The maternal effects on both long-term depression and PPD were eliminated by treatment with an mGluR1-selective antagonist. These findings suggest that variations in maternal care can influence hippocampal function and cognitive performance through the epigenetic regulation of genes implicated in glutamatergic synaptic signaling. PMID:23045678

  3. The influence of handling and isolation postweaning on open field, exploratory and maternal behavior of female rats.

    PubMed

    Genaro, Gelson; Schmidek, Werner Robert

    2002-04-15

    Fifty-three black-hooded female rats, raised from the 28th to the 128th day of life under four types of environmental conditions differing in social and handling factors, had their behavioral performance evaluated in eight tests involving exploration of a complex environment (EX) in two open field (OF) tests and in three pup-retrieving tests. These tests were held before, during and after the period of lactation of their first brood. Females differed from (previously studied) males in that environmental raising conditions had a much smaller influence, especially during the lactation period. Nevertheless, females raised in isolation tended to remain for longer times inside a protected den in the exploration tests and to have greater locomotion in the open field. Previous handling allowed a greater exploration during the first contact with the novel complex environment as well as greater activity in the open field. The presence of small pups drastically reduced the exploratory motivation, but the presence of pups more than 20 days old tended to increase it. Maternal behavior evaluated in the pup retrieval test and in the test of time for the female to leave the nest side of the double box system was markedly refractory to previous environmental influences. PMID:12020733

  4. Maternal nutrient restriction reduces carotid artery constriction without increasing nitric oxide synthesis in the late gestation rat fetus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Morag E; Williams, Sarah J; Veerareddy, Sukrutha; Davidge, Sandra T

    2005-11-01

    Chronic reduction in substrate delivery to the fetus may induce redistribution of fetal cardiac output to maintain nutrient delivery to vital organs, including the brain. Reduced vasoconstriction, in conjunction with increased local synthesis of nitric oxide may contribute to "brain sparing." The authors hypothesized that maternal undernutrition would reduce vasoconstrictor responses in fetal carotid arteries due to increased nitric oxide. Timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized on day 0 of pregnancy to control (C) or nutrient restricted (NR) diet. Dams were killed on day 20 of pregnancy. Fetal carotid artery responses were assessed using a pressurized myograph system. Fetal body weight was reduced by NR diet. In NR fetuses, liver, lung, kidney, and heart weights were lower, whereas proportional brain weight was greater. Carotid artery constriction to endothelin-1 was similar in both groups; however, phenylephrine-induced constriction was decreased in NR arteries. Arteries from control fetuses constricted in response to increasing concentrations of L-NAME, whereas arteries from NR did not. There was also no effect of L-NAME on constriction to phenylephrine in arteries from NR fetuses. Our study indicates that the reduced carotid artery vasoconstriction to phenylephrine in NR fetuses, which is consistent with the maintenance of fetal brain blood flow, was not mediated by enhanced nitric oxide. Reduced phenylephrine but not endothelin-1-induced constriction suggests specific effects on adrenergic carotid artery function, which may implicate this pathway in the vascular adaptation to fetal undernutrition. PMID:16183825

  5. Early postnatal maternal separation causes alterations in the expression of ?3-adrenergic receptor in rat adipose tissue suggesting long-term influence on obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Takanori; Liu, Jun-Qian; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Shingo; Kusaka, Takashi; Warita, Katsuhiko; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Jamal, Mostofa; Ueki, Masaaki; Yakura, Tomiko; Tamai, Motoki; Sumitani, Kazunori; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •High-fat diet intake following maternal separation did not cause body weight gain. •However, levels of metabolism-related molecules in adipose tissue were altered. •Increased levels of prohibitin mRNA in white fat were observed. •Attenuated levels of ?3-adrenergic receptor mRNA were observed in brown fat. •Such alterations in adipose tissue may contribute to obesity later in life. -- Abstract: The effects of early postnatal maternal deprivation on the biological characteristics of the adipose tissue later in life were investigated in the present study. Sprague–Dawley rats were classified as either maternal deprivation (MD) or mother-reared control (MRC) groups. MD was achieved by separating the rat pups from their mothers for 3 h each day during the 10–15 postnatal days. mRNA levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1), ?3-adrenergic receptor (?3-AR), and prohibitin (PHB) in the brown and white adipose tissue were determined using real-time RT-PCR analysis. UCP-1, which is mediated through ?3-AR, is closely involved in the energy metabolism and expenditure. PHB is highly expressed in the proliferating tissues/cells. At 10 weeks of age, the body weight of the MRC and MD rats was similar. However, the levels of the key molecules in the adipose tissue were substantially altered. There was a significant increase in the expression of PHB mRNA in the white adipose tissue, while the ?3-AR mRNA expression decreased significantly, and the UCP-1 mRNA expression remained unchanged in the brown adipose tissue. Given that these molecules influence the mitochondrial metabolism, our study indicates that early postnatal maternal deprivation can influence the fate of adipose tissue proliferation, presumably leading to obesity later in life.

  6. Short- and long-term effects of a maternal low-protein diet on ventilation, O?/CO? chemoreception and arterial blood pressure in male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    de Brito Alves, José Luiz; Nogueira, Viviane Oliveira; de Oliveira, Gerliny Bezerra; da Silva, Glauber Santos Ferreira; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves; Leandro, Carol Góis; Costa-Silva, João Henrique

    2014-02-01

    Maternal undernutrition increases the risk of adult arterial hypertension. The present study investigated the short- and long-term effects of a maternal low-protein diet on respiratory rhythm, O?/CO? chemosensitivity and arterial blood pressure (ABP) of the offspring. Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to their mothers' diets during gestation and lactation: control (NP, 17% of casein) and low-protein (LP, 8% of casein) groups. Direct measurements of ABP, respiratory frequency (RF), tidal volume (V T) and ventilation (VE), as well as hypercapnia (7% CO?) and hypoxia (7% O?) evoked respiratory responses were recorded from the awake male offspring at the 30th and 90th days of life. Blood samples were collected for the analyses of protein, creatinine and urea concentrations. The LP offspring had impaired body weight and length throughout the experiment. At 30 d of age, the LP rats showed a reduction in the concentrations of total serum protein (approximately 24%). ABP in the LP rats was similar to that in the NP rats at 30 d of age, but it was 20% higher at 90 d of age. With respect to ventilatory parameters, the LP rats showed enhanced RF (approximately 34%) and VE (approximately 34%) at 30 d of age, which was associated with increased ventilatory responses to hypercapnia (approximately 21% in VE) and hypoxia (approximately 82% in VE). At 90 d of age, the VE values and CO?/O? chemosensitivity of the LP rats were restored to the control range, but the RF values remained elevated. The present data show that a perinatal LP diet alters respiratory rhythm and O?/CO? chemosensitivity at early ages, which may be a predisposing factor for increased ABP at adulthood. PMID:24059468

  7. Effect of voluntary alcohol consumption on Maoa expression in the mesocorticolimbic brain of adult male rats previously exposed to prolonged maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Bendre, M; Comasco, E; Nylander, I; Nilsson, K W

    2015-01-01

    Discordant associations between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype and high alcohol drinking have been reported in human and non-human primates. Environmental influences likely moderate genetic susceptibility. The biological basis for this interplay remains elusive, and inconsistencies call for translational studies in which conditions can be controlled and brain tissue is accessible. The present study investigated whether early life stress and subsequent adult episodic alcohol consumption affect Maoa expression in stress- and reward-related brain regions in the rat. Outbred Wistar rats were exposed to rearing conditions associated with stress (prolonged maternal separation) or no stress during early life, and given free choice between alcohol and/or water in adulthood. Transcript levels of Maoa were assessed in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens (NAc), medial prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, amygdala and dorsal striatum (DS). Blood was collected to assess corticosterone levels. After alcohol consumption, lower blood corticosterone and Maoa expression in the NAc and DS were found in rats exposed to early life stress compared with control rats. An interaction between early life stress and voluntary alcohol intake was found in the NAc. Alcohol intake before death correlated negatively with Maoa expression in DS in high alcohol-drinking rats exposed to early life stress. Maoa expression is sensitive to adulthood voluntary alcohol consumption in the presence of early life stress in outbred rats. These findings add knowledge of the molecular basis of the previously reported associations between early life stress, MAOA and susceptibility to alcohol misuse. PMID:26645625

  8. Nephron number and blood pressure in rat offspring with maternal high-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Zimanyi, Monika A; Bertram, John F; Black, M Jane

    2002-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of a high-protein diet during pregnancy on nephron endowment and subsequent levels of blood pressure in the offspring. Female WKY rats were fed either a normal (20%, NPD) or a high (54%, HPD) protein diet during pregnancy. Male offspring were paired at birth. At 4 weeks of age, 1 of the pair was randomly chosen for perfusion fixation, and total glomerular number, and thereby nephron number, was estimated using an unbiased stereological technique. The other rat of the pair was allowed to grow to 30 weeks of age, during which time tail cuff systolic blood pressure was monitored twice weekly. There was no effect of the HPD on birth weight (NPD 4.23+/-0.53 g, HPD 4.26+/-0.45 g, mean+/-SD), kidney weight (NPD 0.372+/-0.049 g, HPD 0.337+/-0.090 g), or total nephron number (NPD 27,191+/-3,512, HPD 26,738+/-4,735). Systolic blood pressure at 30 weeks was 170+/-14 mmHg in NPD and 169+/-14 in HPD offspring. These findings show that a HPD during pregnancy did not lead to an increase in birth weight, kidney weight, or nephron endowment, nor did the HPD affect adult blood pressure. PMID:12478348

  9. Effects of altered maternal folic acid, vitamin B12 and docosahexaenoic acid on placental global DNA methylation patterns in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Asmita; Dangat, Kamini; Kale, Anvita; Sable, Pratiksha; Chavan-Gautam, Preeti; Joshi, Sadhana

    2011-01-01

    Potential adverse effects of excess maternal folic acid supplementation on a vegetarian population deficient in vitamin B(12) are poorly understood. We have previously shown in a rat model that maternal folic acid supplementation at marginal protein levels reduces brain omega-3 fatty acid levels in the adult offspring. We have also reported that reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels may result in diversion of methyl groups towards DNA in the one carbon metabolic pathway ultimately resulting in DNA methylation. This study was designed to examine the effect of normal and excess folic acid in the absence and presence of vitamin B(12) deficiency on global methylation patterns in the placenta. Further, the effect of maternal omega 3 fatty acid supplementation on the above vitamin B(12) deficient diets was also examined. Our results suggest maternal folic acid supplementation in the absence of vitamin B(12) lowers plasma and placental DHA levels (p<0.05) and reduces global DNA methylation levels (p<0.05). When this group was supplemented with omega 3 fatty acids there was an increase in placental DHA levels and subsequently DNA methylation levels revert back to the levels of the control group. Our results suggest for the first time that DHA plays an important role in one carbon metabolism thereby influencing global DNA methylation in the placenta. PMID:21423696

  10. Effects of maternally exposed colouring food additives on cognitive performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Ceyhan, Betul Mermi; Ozturk, Mustafa; Gultekin, Fatih

    2013-08-01

    Artificial food colourings and additives (AFCAs) have long been suggested to adversely affect the learning and behaviour in children. In this study, we aimed to provide additional data to clarify the possible side effects of colouring additives on behaviour and memory. We administered acceptable daily intake values of AFCAs as a mixture (Eritrosin, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red AC, Sunset Yellow FCF, Tartrazin, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Azorubin and Indigotin) to female rats before and during gestation and then tested their effects on behaviour and on spatial working memory in their offspring. Effects on spatial learning and memory were evaluated by Morris water maze, behavioural effects were evaluated by open-field test and forced swim test. Our results showed that commonly used artificial food colourings have no adverse effects on spatial working memory and did not create a depressive behaviour in offspring. But they showed a few significant effects on locomotor activity as AFCAs increased some parameters of locomotor activity. PMID:22323474

  11. Effect of Caffeine Chronically Consumed During Pregnancy on Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors Signaling in Both Maternal and Fetal Heart from Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Inmaculada; Albasanz, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, even during pregnancy. Its stimulatory effects are mainly due to antagonism of adenosine actions by blocking adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Previous studies have shown that caffeine can cross the placenta and therefore modulate these receptors not only in the fetal brain but also in the heart. Methods: In the present work, the effect of caffeine chronically consumed during pregnancy on A1 and A2A receptors in Wistar rat heart, from both mothers and their fetuses, were studied using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, and adenylyl cyclase activity assays, as well as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: Caffeine did not significantly alter A1R neither at protein nor at gene expression level in both the maternal and fetal heart. On the contrary, A2AR significantly decreased in the maternal heart, although mRNA was not affected. Gi and Gs proteins were also preserved. Finally, A1R-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity did not change in the maternal heart, but A2AR mediated stimulation of this enzymatic activity significantly decreased according to the detected loss of this receptor. Conclusions: Opposite to the downregulation and desensitization of the A1R/AC pathway previously reported in the brain, these results show that this pathway is not affected in rat heart after caffeine exposure during pregnancy. In addition, A2AR is downregulated and desensitized in the maternal heart, suggesting a differential modulation of these receptor-mediated pathways by caffeine. PMID:25538864

  12. Maternal deprivation disrupts mitochondrial energy homeostasis in the brain of rats subjected to ketamine-induced schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zugno, Alexandra Ioppi; Pacheco, Felipe Damázio; Budni, Josiane; de Oliveira, Mariana Bittencourt; Canever, Lara; Heylmann, Alexandra Stephanie; Wessler, Patrícia Gomes; da Rosa Silveira, Flávia; Mastella, Gustavo Antunes; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludwig; Freitas, Karoline V; de Castro, Adalberto Alves; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-08-01

    Maternal deprivation (MD) appears to be one of the environmental factors involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. A widely used animal model of the schizophrenia involves the administration of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, NMDA receptors noncompetitive antagonist, that induce symptoms such as schizophrenia. To clarify the molecular mechanism of schizophrenia induced by MD, we investigated alterations in energetic metabolism, oxidative stress and neurotrophic factor levels in the brain of rats following MD and/or a single administration of ketamine during adulthood. Male Wistar rats were subjected to MD for 10 days. Additionally, these animals received acute ketamine (5, 15 or 25 mg/kg by intraperitoneal route, i.p.) during adulthood, and 30 min later, they were killed and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the hippocampus and the striatum were removed for molecular analyses. Ketamine 25 mg/kg and/or MD and Ketamine 15 and 5 mg/kg with MD decreased the creatine kinase (CK) activity in the hippocampus. The enzyme activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in the Krebs cycle had increased in the striatum following the administration of ketamine 25 mg/kg, MD per se or MD plus ketamine 5 and 15 mg/kg. MD per se or MD combined with ketamine in different doses increased the activity of mitochondrial complexes. The PFC of animals subjected to MD and administered with ketamine 5 mg/kg exhibited increased protein carbonyl content. In the hippocampus, ketamine 15 mg/kg, ketamine 25 mg/kg and MD each increased the carbonyl content. In the striatum, the TBARS levels were increased by the administration of ketamine 25 mg/kg. Finally, in the hippocampus, MD alone or in combination with ketamine reduced the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) levels; however, the Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels were unaltered. In the present study, we suggest that MD increased the risk of psychotic symptoms in adulthood, altering different parameters of energy and oxidative stress. Our results suggest that adverse experiences occurring early in life may sensitize specific neurocircuits to subsequent stressors, inducing vulnerability, and may help us understand the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in this disorder. PMID:25920483

  13. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Diabetes on Blood Pressure and Renal Function in Rat Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jie; Li, Xin; Su, Rina; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Huixia

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing rapidly worldwide. Previous animal models were established to study consequences of offspring after exposure to severe intrauterine hyperglycemia. In this study we are aiming to characterize the blood pressure levels and renal function of male offspring obtained from diabetic mothers with moderate hyperglycemia. Methods We established a rat model with moderate hyperglycemia after pregnancy by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The male offspring were studied and fed with either normal diet or high salt diet after weaning. Arterial pressure and renal function were measured. Results Arterial pressure of male offspring increased from 12 weeks by exposure to intrauterine moderate hyperglycemia. At 20 weeks, high salt diet accelerated the blood pressure on diabetic offspring compared to diabetic offspring fed with normal diet. We found offspring exposed to intrauterine moderate hyperglycemia had a trend to have a higher creatinine clearance rate and significant increase of urinary N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) excretion indicating an early stage of nephropathy progression. Conclusions/Interpretation We observed the high blood pressure level and early renal dysfunction of male offspring obtained from diabetic mothers with moderate hyperglycemia. Furthermore, we investigated high salt diet after weaning on offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia could exacerbate the blood pressure and renal function. Renin angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in hypertension pathogenesis and altered gene expression of RAS components in offspring with in utero hyperglycemia exposure may account for the programmed hypertension. Therefore, our study provides evidence “fetal programming” of maternal diabetes is critical for metabolic disease development. PMID:24505458

  14. Programmed regulation of rat offspring adipogenic transcription factor (PPAR?) by maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Jellyman, J K; Han, G; Lane, R H; Ross, M G

    2015-12-01

    We determined the protein expression of adipogenic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) and its co-repressor and co-activator complexes in adipose tissue from the obese offspring of under- and over-nourished dams. Female rats were fed either a high-fat (60% kcal) or control (10% kcal) diet before mating, and throughout pregnancy and lactation (Mat-OB). Additional dams were 50% food-restricted from pregnancy day 10 to term [intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR)]. Adipose tissue protein expression was analyzed in newborn and adult male offspring. Normal birth weight Mat-OB and low birth weight IUGR newborns had upregulated PPAR? with variable changes in co-repressors and co-activators. As obese adults, Mat-OB and IUGR offspring had increased PPAR? with decreased co-repressor and increased co-activator expression. Nutritionally programmed increased PPAR? expression is associated with altered expression of its co-regulators in the newborn and adult offspring. Functional studies of PPAR? co-regulators are necessary to establish their role in PPAR?-mediated programmed obesity. PMID:26286138

  15. Early administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, prevents the development of hypertension programmed by intrauterine exposure to a maternal low-protein diet in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R C; Langley-Evans, S C

    1998-04-01

    1. Associations of intrauterine exposure to maternal undernutrition with later hypertension and coronary heart disease in the human population have been duplicated in the rat. Fetal exposure to low protein diets produces offspring that develop raised systolic blood pressure by the age of weaning. This animal model of 'programmed' hypertension was used to investigate the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the initiation and maintenance of high blood pressure. 2. Pregnant rats were fed diets containing 18 or 9% casein from conception until littering. The offspring from these pregnancies were administered captopril either between 2 and 4 weeks of age, or from 10 to 12 weeks of age. 3. The feeding of low protein diets in pregnancy had no effect upon the reproductive ability of female rats and the offspring generated were of normal birthweight. By 4 weeks of age the male and female offspring of low-protein-fed dams had systolic blood pressures that were 24-25 mmHg higher than those of rats exposed to a control diet in utero. 4. Treatment of 10-week-old female offspring with captopril for 2 weeks indicated that angiotensin II formation may play a role in the maintenance of high blood pressure in low-protein-exposed rats. While captopril had no significant effect upon systolic pressures of rats exposed to the control diet in intrauterine life, the systolic blood pressures of low-protein animals rapidly declined by 31 mmHg. 5. Administration of captopril to male and female offspring between 2 and 4 weeks of age exerted long-term effects upon systolic blood pressure. Eight weeks after cessation of treatment, at an age where maximal blood pressures are achieved, captopril-treated, low-protein-exposed rats had similar blood pressures to normotensive rats exposed to the protein-replete diet in utero. 6. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the elevation of adult blood pressure associated with fetal exposure to a maternal low-protein diet, is prevented by early administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. The actions of angiotensin II in the late suckling period may be a critical determinant of long-term cardiovascular functions in these animals. PMID:9640343

  16. Maternal obesity enhances white adipose tissue differentiation and alters genome-scale DNA methylation in male rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in adulthood is strongly influenced by maternal body composition. Here we examined the hypothesis that maternal obesity influences white adipose tissue (WAT) transcriptome and increases propensity for adipogenesis in the offspring, prior to the development of obesity, using an es...

  17. In utero glucocorticoid (GLC) exposure and maternal undernutrition reduce fetal skeletal muscle mass by different mechanisms in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both maternal undernutrition and exposure of the fetus to above normal levels of GLC impair skeletal muscle growth. The degree to which the effects of maternal undernutrition on fetal skeletal muscle growth are a direct result of nutrient deficit or secondary to the presence of above normal GLC leve...

  18. Maternal low protein diet causes body weight loss in male, neonate Sprague-Dawley rats involving UCP-1 mediated thermogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in regulating body weight (BW) by modifying thermogenesis. Maternal low protein (LP) diets reduce offspring birth weight. Increased BAT thermogenesis in utero may be one mechanism for the lower BW. However, whether maternal LP nutrition alters BAT...

  19. Congenital hypothyroidism, as studied in rats. Crucial role of maternal thyroxine but not of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine in the protection of the fetal brain.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, R; Obregón, M J; Ruiz de Oña, C; Escobar del Rey, F; Morreale de Escobar, G

    1990-01-01

    To study the protective effects of maternal thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) in congenital hypothyroidism, we gave pregnant rats methimazole (MMI), an antithyroid drug that crosses the placenta, and infused them with three different doses of T4 or T3. The concentrations of both T4 and T3 were determined in maternal and fetal plasma and tissues (obtained near term) by specific RIAs. Several thyroid hormone-dependent biological end-points were also measured. MMI treatment resulted in marked fetal T4 and T3 deficiency. Infusion of T4 into the mothers increased both these pools in a dose-dependent fashion. There was a preferential increase of T3 in the fetal brain. Thus, with a T4 dose maintaining maternal euthyroidism, fetal brain T3 reached normal values, although fetal plasma T4 was 40% of normal and plasma TSH was high. The infusion of T3 pool into the mothers increased the total fetal extrathyroidal T3 pool in a dose-dependent fashion. The fetal T4 pools were not increased, however, and this deprived the fetal brain (and possibly the pituitary) of local generation of T3 from T4. As a consequence, fetal brain T3 deficiency was not mitigated even when dams were infused with a toxic dose of T3. The results show that (a) there is a preferential protection of the brain of the hypothyroid fetus from T3 deficiency; (b) maternal T4, but not T3, plays a crucial role in this protection, and (c) any condition which lowers maternal T4 (including treatment with T3) is potentially harmful for the brain of a hypothyroid fetus. Recent confirmation of transplacental passage of T4 in women at term suggests that present results are relevant for human fetuses with impairment of thyroid function. Finding signs of hypothyroidism at birth does not necessarily mean that the brain was unprotected in utero, provided maternal T4 is normal. It is crucial to realize that maintainance of maternal "euthyroidism" is not sufficient, as despite hypothyroxinemia, the mothers may be clinically euthyroid if their T3 levels are normal. Images PMID:2394838

  20. Experimental evaluation of the impact of maternal consumption of aqueous leaf extract of Hybanthus enneaspermus on pregnancy in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Olubajo, Awobajo Funmileyi; Adefunke, Adegoke Olufeyisipe; Olubusola, Iranloye Bolanle; Ibilola, Olatunji-Bello Ibiyemi

    2013-01-01

    The impact of aqueous leaf extract of Hybanthus enneaspermus (HEaq) on pregnancy factors and litter survival was investigated in Sprague Dawley (SD) rat. Control group received distilled water while the test group received 2g/kg body weight of HEaq orally. Blood samples were collected on days one and twenty of pregnancy for total blood count, serum thyroid hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) assay. Half the number of rats in each group was sacrificed on day nineteen of pregnancy and the placenta and foetus were removed and weighed. The second half carried their pregnancy to term. Number and weights of litter were recorded at birth and the litter were also subjected to righting reflex test. Post-natal survival rate was determined for each group while effect of HEaq was also examined in-vivo on the activities of pregnant myometrial muscle. HEaq significantly decreased (p<0.05) foetal weight, placenta weight, foetal growth and survival, number and weights of litter at birth, maternal serum triiodotyroxine T3 and TSH level. Mean corpuscular haemoglobin, white blood cell count, platelet count and lipid profile were significantly increased (P<0.05). HEaq increased the frequency and percentage contraction of gravid myometrial muscle in a dose dependent manner. Maternal consumption of aqueous leaf extract of Hybanthus enneaspermus adversely affected pregnancy and development of the foetus, as it precipitated resorption of developing foetus and reduced size and weight of litter at term. PMID:24146452

  1. Chronic Maternal Vitamin B12 Restriction Induced Changes in Body Composition & Glucose Metabolism in the Wistar Rat Offspring Are Partly Correctable by Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kalle Anand; Lalitha, Anumula; Reddy, Umakar; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Sengupta, Shantanu; Raghunath, Manchala

    2014-01-01

    Maternal under-nutrition increases the risk of developing metabolic diseases. We studied the effects of chronic maternal dietary vitamin B12 restriction on lean body mass (LBM), fat free mass (FFM), muscle function, glucose tolerance and metabolism in Wistar rat offspring. Prevention/reversibility of changes by rehabilitating restricted mothers from conception or parturition and their offspring from weaning was assessed. Female weaning Wistar rats (n?=?30) were fed ad libitum for 12 weeks, a control diet (n?=?6) or the same with 40% restriction of vitamin B12 (B12R) (n?=?24); after confirming deficiency, were mated with control males. Six each of pregnant B12R dams were rehabilitated from conception and parturition and their offspring weaned to control diet. While offspring of six B12R dams were weaned to control diet, those of the remaining six B12R dams continued on B12R diet. Biochemical parameters and body composition were determined in dams before mating and in male offspring at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of their age. Dietary vitamin B12 restriction increased body weight but decreased LBM% and FFM% but not the percent of tissue associated fat (TAF%) in dams. Maternal B12R decreased LBM% and FFM% in the male offspring, but their TAF%, basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake by diaphragm were unaltered. At 12 months age, B12R offspring had higher (than controls) fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and impaired glucose tolerance. Their hepatic gluconeogenic enzyme activities were increased. B12R offspring had increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant status. Changes in body composition, glucose metabolism and stress were reversed by rehabilitating B12R dams from conception, whereas rehabilitation from parturition and weaning corrected them partially, highlighting the importance of vitamin B12 during pregnancy and lactation on growth, muscle development, glucose tolerance and metabolism in the offspring. PMID:25398136

  2. Maternal high-fat diet-induced programing of gut taste receptor and inflammatory gene expression in rat offspring is ameliorated by CLA supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Clare M; Segovia, Stephanie A; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy and lactation influences later life predisposition to obesity and cardiometabolic disease in offspring. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly defined, but one potential target that has received scant attention and is likely pivotal to disease progression is that of the gut. The present study examined the effects of maternal supplementation with the anti-inflammatory lipid, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), on offspring metabolic profile and gut expression of taste receptors and inflammatory markers. We speculate that preventing high-fat diet-induced metainflammation improved maternal metabolic parameters conferring beneficial effects on adult offspring. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat), CD with CLA (CLA; 10% kcal from fat, 1% CLA), HF (45% kcal from fat) or HF with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal from fat, 1% CLA) throughout gestation and lactation. Plasma/tissues were taken at day 24 and RT-PCR was carried out on gut sections. Offspring from HF mothers were significantly heavier at weaning with impaired insulin sensitivity compared to controls. This was associated with increased plasma IL-1? and TNF? concentrations. Gut Tas1R1, IL-1?, TNF?, and NLRP3 expression was increased and Tas1R3 expression was decreased in male offspring from HF mothers and was normalized by maternal CLA supplementation. Tas1R1 expression was increased while PYY and IL-10 decreased in female offspring of HF mothers. These results suggest that maternal consumption of a HF diet during critical developmental windows influences offspring predisposition to obesity and metabolic dysregulation. This may be associated with dysregulation of taste receptor, incretin, and inflammatory gene expression in the gut. PMID:26493953

  3. Maternal high-fat diet-induced programing of gut taste receptor and inflammatory gene expression in rat offspring is ameliorated by CLA supplementation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Clare M; Segovia, Stephanie A; Zhang, Xiaoyuan D; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet during pregnancy and lactation influences later life predisposition to obesity and cardiometabolic disease in offspring. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly defined, but one potential target that has received scant attention and is likely pivotal to disease progression is that of the gut. The present study examined the effects of maternal supplementation with the anti-inflammatory lipid, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), on offspring metabolic profile and gut expression of taste receptors and inflammatory markers. We speculate that preventing high-fat diet-induced metainflammation improved maternal metabolic parameters conferring beneficial effects on adult offspring. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a purified control diet (CD; 10% kcal from fat), CD with CLA (CLA; 10% kcal from fat, 1% CLA), HF (45% kcal from fat) or HF with CLA (HFCLA; 45% kcal from fat, 1% CLA) throughout gestation and lactation. Plasma/tissues were taken at day 24 and RT-PCR was carried out on gut sections. Offspring from HF mothers were significantly heavier at weaning with impaired insulin sensitivity compared to controls. This was associated with increased plasma IL-1? and TNF? concentrations. Gut Tas1R1, IL-1?, TNF?, and NLRP3 expression was increased and Tas1R3 expression was decreased in male offspring from HF mothers and was normalized by maternal CLA supplementation. Tas1R1 expression was increased while PYY and IL-10 decreased in female offspring of HF mothers. These results suggest that maternal consumption of a HF diet during critical developmental windows influences offspring predisposition to obesity and metabolic dysregulation. This may be associated with dysregulation of taste receptor, incretin, and inflammatory gene expression in the gut. PMID:26493953

  4. Taurine supplementation preserves hypothalamic leptin action in normal and protein-restricted mice fed on a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Rafael L; Batista, Thiago M; Ribeiro, Rosane A; Branco, Renato C S; Da Silva, Priscilla M R; Izumi, Clarice; Araujo, Thiago R; Greene, Lewis J; Boschero, Antonio C; Carneiro, Everardo M

    2015-11-01

    Malnutrition programs the neuroendocrine axis by disruption of food-intake control, leading to obesity. Taurine (Tau) is neuroprotective and improves anorexigenic actions in the hypothalamus. We evaluated the hypothalamic gene-expression profile and food-intake control in protein-restricted mice submitted to a high-fat diet (HFD) and Tau supplementation. Mice were fed on a control (14 % protein-C) or a protein-restricted diet (6 % protein-R) for 6 weeks. Thereafter, mice received, or not, HFD for 8 weeks (CH and RH) with or without 5 % Tau supplementation (CHT and RHT). Protein restriction led to higher food intake, but calories were matched to controls. Excessive calorie intake occurred in HFD mice and this was prevented by Tau supplementation only in the CH group. Additionally, RH and CH mice developed hypothalamic leptin resistance, which was prevented by Tau. Global alterations in the expressions of genes involved in hypothalamic metabolism, cellular defense, apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways were induced by dietary manipulations and Tau treatment. The orexigenic peptides NPY and AgRP were increased by protein restriction and lowered by the HFD. The anorexigenic peptide Pomc was increased by HFD, and this was prevented by Tau only in CH mice. Thus, food intake was disrupted by dietary protein restriction and obesity. HFD-induced alterations were not enhanced by previous protein deficiency, but the some beneficial effects of Tau supplementation upon food intake were blunted by protein restriction. Tau effects upon feeding behavior control are complex and involve interactions with a vast gene network, preventing hypothalamic leptin resistance. PMID:26133737

  5. : IFITM Proteins Restrict Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Ying Kai Chan, I-Chueh Huang, Michael Farzan

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    : IFITM Proteins Restrict Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection Ying Kai Chan) (dengue virus, DENV)(West Nile virus) (DENV1,2,3,4)(1)(2) (antibody dependent enhancement, ADE) IFITM, Viral Infection, Innate Immunity (dengue fever, DF)/(dengue hemorrhagic fever, DHF)/ (dengue shock

  6. Levels of Pesticides and Their Metabolites in Wistar Rat Amniotic Fluids and Maternal Urine upon Gestational Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bossi, Rossana; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Taxvig, Camilla; Boberg, Julie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of pesticides and selected metabolites in rat urine and amniotic fluid were determined as biomarker upon oral administration of Wistar rats to two pesticide mixtures consisting of three to five pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion, and terbuthylazine). The pesticides and their metabolites were found in rat amniotic fluid and urine, generally in dose-response concentrations in relation to dosage. The measurement of the substances in the amniotic fluid indicated that the fetus was exposed to the pesticides as well as their metabolites. Moreover, the pesticides detected in urine demonstrated the exposure as well as the ability of the rat to excrete these compounds. PMID:23736656

  7. Effect of intrauterine growth restriction on the number of cardiomyocytes in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Corstius, Hugo Brandt; Zimanyi, Monika A; Maka, Noori; Herath, Thiloshini; Thomas, Walter; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Wreford, Nigel G; Black, M Jane

    2005-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease later in life; reduced cardiomyocyte number in IUGR hearts may underlie such prenatal programming. Our aim was to examine the effect of IUGR, as a result of maternal protein restriction, on the number of cardiomyocytes in the rat heart at birth. Rats were fed either a low-protein diet (LPD) or a normal-protein diet (NPD) during pregnancy. At birth, the offspring were killed and the hearts were immersion-fixed. The number of cardiomyocyte nuclei in the hearts were stereologically determined using an optical disector-fractionator approach. In some litters, cardiomyocytes were enzymatically isolated from freshly excised hearts and the proportion of binucleated cells was determined. Taking into account the number of binucleated cells, the nuclear counts were adjusted to estimate total cardiomyocyte number. Birth weight and heart weight were significantly reduced in the LPD offspring. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of cardiomyocytes per heart in the LPD offspring compared with the NPD offspring (1.18 +/- 0.05 x 10(7) and 1.41 +/- 0.06 x 10(7), respectively; p = 0.001). The number of binucleated cardiomyocytes was low (approximately 3%) and equal in both groups. In conclusion, IUGR as a result of maternal protein restriction leads to a reduction in the number of cardiomyocytes per heart. As cardiomyocyte proliferation is rare after birth, it is plausible that this reduction in cardiomyocytes may lead to compromised cardiac function later in life. PMID:15774830

  8. Maternal Nutrient Restriction Alters Ca2+ Handling Properties and Contractile Function of Isolated Left Ventricle Bundles in Male But Not Female Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robyn M.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), defined as a birth weight below the 10th centile, may be caused by maternal undernutrition, with evidence that IUGR offspring have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. Calcium ions (Ca2+) are an integral messenger for several steps associated with excitation-contraction coupling (ECC); the cascade of events from the initiation of an action potential at the surface membrane, to contraction of the cardiomyocyte. Any changes in Ca2+ storage and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), or sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ may underlie the mechanism linking IUGR to an increased risk of CVD. This study aimed to explore the effects of maternal nutrient restriction on cardiac function, including Ca2+ handling by the SR and force development by the contractile apparatus. Juvenile Long Evans hooded rats born to Control (C) and nutrient restricted (NR) dams were anaesthetized for collection of the heart at 10–12 weeks of age. Left ventricular bundles from male NR offspring displayed increased maximum Ca2+-activated force, and decreased protein content of troponin I (cTnI) compared to C males. Furthermore, male NR offspring showed a reduction in rate of rise of the caffeine-induced Ca2+ force response and a decrease in the protein content of ryanodine receptor (RYR2). These physiological and biochemical findings observed in males were not evident in female offspring. These findings illustrate a sex-specific effect of maternal NR on cardiac development, and also highlight a possible mechanism for the development of hypertension and hypertrophy in male NR offspring. PMID:26406887

  9. A Combination Supplement of Fructo- and Xylo-Oligosaccharides Significantly Abrogates Oxidative Impairments and Neurotoxicity in Maternal/Fetal Milieu Following Gestational Exposure to Acrylamide in Rat.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Gokul; Divyashri, Gangaraju; Prapulla, S G; Muralidhara

    2015-09-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides are demonstrated to confer a wide spectrum of physiological benefits during pregnancy. In view of this, focused attempts are being directed towards understanding their role as modulators of brain chemistry and behavior. Epidemiological studies have identified that exposure to neurotoxins during prenatal/early life can profoundly impact neurodevelopment/function. In this context, we have tested the hypothesis that a combination of prebiotic supplements during gestation has the propensity to attenuate acrylamide (ACR) induced oxidative impairments, mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity in maternal and fetal brain of rats. To achieve this, pregnant dams given oral supplements of a combination of fructo- and xylooligosaccharides (FOS + XOS, 3 g/kg/day) during gestation days (GD 0-19) were exposed to ACR (200 ppm in drinking water, GD 6-19). The behavioral analysis revealed that ACR dams fed prebiotics displayed higher exploratory behavior in the open field test. The prenatal evaluation showed that ACR-induced decrements of placental/fetal weights were markedly restored with prebiotic feeding. Prebiotics significantly offset markers of oxidative stress, restored enzymic antioxidants, cholinergic and mitochondrial function in the maternal and fetal brain. Concomitantly, prebiotics restored ACR-induced depletion in the levels of dopamine and ?-aminobutyric acid in the maternal cortex that positively correlated with cecal bacterial numbers. Collectively, these data suggest that prenatal prebiotic oligosaccharide supplements protect developing brain against oxidative stress-mediated neurotoxicity. While the underlying mechanism/s by which prebiotics abrogate the impact of neurotoxicants in the developing brain merits further studies, we speculate that it may be mediated predominantly through attenuation of oxidative stress and proliferation of enteric microbiota. PMID:26248513

  10. Maternal Nutrient Restriction Alters Ca2+ Handling Properties and Contractile Function of Isolated Left Ventricle Bundles in Male But Not Female Juvenile Rats.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Thomas J; Murphy, Robyn M; Morrison, Janna L; Posterino, Giuseppe S

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), defined as a birth weight below the 10th centile, may be caused by maternal undernutrition, with evidence that IUGR offspring have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. Calcium ions (Ca2+) are an integral messenger for several steps associated with excitation-contraction coupling (ECC); the cascade of events from the initiation of an action potential at the surface membrane, to contraction of the cardiomyocyte. Any changes in Ca2+ storage and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), or sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ may underlie the mechanism linking IUGR to an increased risk of CVD. This study aimed to explore the effects of maternal nutrient restriction on cardiac function, including Ca2+ handling by the SR and force development by the contractile apparatus. Juvenile Long Evans hooded rats born to Control (C) and nutrient restricted (NR) dams were anaesthetized for collection of the heart at 10-12 weeks of age. Left ventricular bundles from male NR offspring displayed increased maximum Ca2+-activated force, and decreased protein content of troponin I (cTnI) compared to C males. Furthermore, male NR offspring showed a reduction in rate of rise of the caffeine-induced Ca2+ force response and a decrease in the protein content of ryanodine receptor (RYR2). These physiological and biochemical findings observed in males were not evident in female offspring. These findings illustrate a sex-specific effect of maternal NR on cardiac development, and also highlight a possible mechanism for the development of hypertension and hypertrophy in male NR offspring. PMID:26406887

  11. Variable Maternal Stress in Rats Alters Locomotor Activity, Social Behavior, and Recognition Memory in the Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christina A.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2013-01-01

    Rats repeatedly exposed to variable prenatal stress (PNS) exhibit behavioral signs that are similar to those manifested in several neuropsychiatric disorders such as deficits in attention and inhibitory control, and impairments in memory-related task performance. The purpose of the study described here was to conduct a comprehensive battery of tests to further characterize the behavioral phenotype of PNS rats as well as to evaluate the sensitivity of the model to therapeutic interventions (i.e., to compounds previously shown to have therapeutic potential in neuropsychiatric disorders). The results of this study indicated that PNS in rats is associated with: 1) increased locomotor activity and stereotypic behaviors, 2) elevated sensitivity to the psychostimulant amphetamine, 3) increased aggressive behaviors toward both adult and juvenile rats and 4) delay-dependent deficits in recognition memory. There was no evidence that PNS rats exhibited deficits in other areas of motor function/learning, sensorimotor gating, spatial learning and memory, social withdrawal, or anhedonia. In addition, the results revealed that the second generation antipsychotic risperidone attenuated amphetamine-related increases in locomotor activity in PNS rats; however, the effect was not sustained over time. Furthermore, deficits in recognition memory in PNS rats were attenuated by the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine, but not by the ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, GTS-21. This study supports the supposition that important phenomenological similarities exist between rats exposed to PNS and patients afflicted with neuropsychiatric disorders thus further establishing the face validity of the model for evaluating potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:23287801

  12. Influence of maternal ingestion of Aroclor 1254[reg sign] (PCB) or FireMaster BP-6[reg sign] (PBB) on unstimulated and stimulated corticosterone levels in young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Meserve, L.A.; Murray, B.A.; Landis, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    The organohalides polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) remain troublesome environmental pollutants. For example, the percentage of the population in which PCB is detectable in adipose tissue remains high. These compounds are of particular interest to residents of the North Central United States, especially in regions surrounding the Great Lakes where contaminated fish may be a regular component of the diet. Additionally, PBB was mistakenly fed to cattle and chickens in Michigan during the early 1970s, products of which were ingested by humans. Among the physiological effects of ingestion of PCB or PBB is the depression of thyroid status, which has been reported in adult humans, in adult experimental animals, and in the offspring of these animals. In adult rats, circulating levels of thyroid hormones are inversely proportional to dose of PCB or PBB in the diet. On the other hand, reports of effects of these organohalides on adrenocortical function remain equivocal, describing both PCB- and PBB-induced depression, and absence of effect in rats and monkeys. Despite the possible consequences of maternal ingestion of PCB or PBB on future generations, little work has been done previously to determine whether consumption of these materials by pregnant and lactating animals confers hypothyroidism on their offspring, and/or influences other mechanisms of endocrine control in the young. Since early studies showed that hypothyroidism induced by feeding pregnant rats the goitrogen thiouracil altered the functional capabilities in their young of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, as revealed by circulating corticosterone levels, the present study was done to determine whether ingestion of either PCB (Aroclor 1254[reg sign]) or PBB (FireMaster BP-6[reg sign]) by pregnant and lactating rats resulted in depressed thyroid status and/or modified HPA axis function in their 15 day old young. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Early weaning by maternal prolactin inhibition leads to higher neuropeptide Y and astrogliosis in the hypothalamus of the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; Moura, Egberto G; Manhães, Alex C; Peixoto-Silva, Nayara; de Oliveira, Elaine; Lisboa, Patricia C

    2015-02-14

    The suppression of prolactin production with bromocriptine (BRO) in the last 3 d of lactation reduces milk yield (early weaning) and increases the transfer of leptin through the milk, causing hyperleptinaemia in pups. In adulthood, several changes occur in the offspring as a result of metabolic programming, including overweight, higher visceral fat mass, hypothyroidism, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperleptinaemia and central leptin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether overweight rats programmed by early weaning with maternal BRO treatment have hypothalamic alterations in adulthood. We analysed the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?-MSH) by immunohistochemistry in the following hypothalamic nuclei: medial and lateral arcuate nucleus (ARC); paraventricular nucleus (PVN); lateral hypothalamus (LH). Additionally, we sought to determine whether these programmed rats exhibited hypothalamic inflammation as indicated by astrogliosis. NPY immunostaining showed a denser NPY-positive fibre network in the ARC and PVN (+82% in both nuclei) of BRO offspring. Regarding the anorexigenic neuropeptides, no difference was found for CART, POMC and ?-MSH. The number of astrocytes was higher in all the nuclei of BRO rats. The fibre density of glial fibrillary acidic protein was also increased in both medial and lateral ARC (6·06-fold increase and 9·13-fold increase, respectively), PVN (5·75-fold increase) and LH (2·68-fold increase) of BRO rats. We suggest that early weaning has a long-term effect on the expression of NPY as a consequence of developmental plasticity, and the presence of astrogliosis indicates hypothalamic inflammation that is closely related to overweight and hyperleptinaemia observed in our model. PMID:25609154

  14. EFFECT OF VARYING MATERNAL FOLATE STATUS AND DIETARY FOLATE INTAKE ON RESPONSE TO DIVERSE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periconceptional and early pregnancy folate supplements are associated with reduced recurrence and occurrence of birth defects in humans. This study was undertaken to assess the influence of maternal folate status and dietary folate intake on outcome of exposures to diverse terat...

  15. Acute Changes in Maternal Thyroid Hormone Induce Rapid and Transient Changes in Gene Expression in Fetal Rat Brain

    E-print Network

    Zoeller, R. Thomas

    Acute Changes in Maternal Thyroid Hormone Induce Rapid and Transient Changes in Gene Expression, Massachusetts 01655 Despite clinical evidence that thyroid hormone is essential for brain development before birth, effects of thyroid hormone on the fetal brain have been largely unexplored. One mechanism

  16. Variations in maternal care in the rat as a mediating influence for the effects of environment on development

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    behavior, particularly in licking/grooming, regulate the development of endocrine, emotional and cognitive responses to stress. These studies form the basis of a potentially useful model for the study of maternal actively contributes to the development of specific neural systems, or simply that the absence

  17. The programming of individual differences in defensive responses and reproductive strategies in the rat through variations in maternal care

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    behaviors; Stress; Environmental programming; Epigenetics Contents 1. Phenotypic plasticity. Fish, Kumi Ozaki-Kuroda, Michael J. Meaney* McGill Program for the Study of Behavior, Genes comparable forms of maternal effects on both defensive responses to threat and reproductive behavior

  18. Maternal fat intake in rats alters 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3 status and the epigenetic regulation of Fads2 in offspring liver.

    PubMed

    Hoile, Samuel P; Irvine, Nicola A; Kelsall, Christopher J; Sibbons, Charlene; Feunteun, Aurélie; Collister, Alex; Torrens, Christopher; Calder, Philip C; Hanson, Mark A; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C

    2013-07-01

    Poor prenatal nutrition, acting through epigenetic processes, induces persistent changes in offspring phenotype. We investigated the effect of maternal fat intake on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status and on the epigenetic regulation of Fads2, encoding ?6 desaturase (rate limiting in PUFA synthesis), in the adult offspring. Rats (n=6 per dietary group) were fed either 3.5% (w/w), 7% (w/w) or 21% (w/w) butter or fish oil (FO) from 14 days preconception until weaning. Offspring (n=6 males and females per dietary group) were fed 4% (w/w) soybean oil until postnatal day 77. 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3 levels were lower in liver phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine and plasma PC (all P<.0001) in offspring of dams fed 21% than 3.5% or 7% fat regardless of type. Hepatic Fads2 expression related inversely to maternal dietary fat. Fads2 messenger RNA expression correlated negatively with methylation of CpGs at -623, -394, -84 and -76 bases relative to the transcription start site (all P<.005). Methylation of these CpGs was higher in offspring of dams fed 21% than 3.5% or 7% fat; FO higher than butter. Feeding adult female rats 7% fat reduced 20:4n-6 status in liver PC and Fads2 expression and increased methylation of CpGs -623, -394, -84 and -76 that reversed in animals switched from 7% to 4% fat diets. These findings suggest that fat exposure during development induces persistent changes, while adults exhibit a transient response, in hepatic PUFA status in offspring through epigenetic regulation of Fads2. Thus, epigenetic regulation of Fads2 may contribute to short- and long-term regulation of PUFA synthesis. PMID:23107313

  19. Gestational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin alters retinoid homeostasis in maternal and perinatal tissues of the Holtzman rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kransler, Kevin M. Tonucci, David A. McGarrigle, Barbara P. Napoli, Joseph L. Olson, James R.

    2007-10-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), one of the most widely studied environmental contaminants, causes a variety of adverse health effects including teratogenesis and altered development which may be related to disruptions in retinoid homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that gestational administration of TCDD has on retinoid homeostasis in both pregnant Holtzman rats and developing fetuses and neonates. A single oral dose of TCDD (0, 1.5, 3, or 6 {mu}g/kg) was administered to pregnant rats on gestation day 10, with fetuses analyzed on gestation days 17 and 20, and neonates analyzed on post natal day 7. Exposure to TCDD generally produced decreases in the concentrations of retinyl esters, such as retinyl palmitate, and retinol in maternal and perinatal liver and lung, while increasing levels in the maternal kidney. Additionally, perinatal hepatic retinol binding protein 1-dependent retinyl ester hydrolysis was also decrease by TCDD. Sensitivity of the developing perinates to TCDD appeared to have an age-related component demonstrated by an increased rate of mortality and significant alterations to body weight and length on post natal day 7 relative to that observed at gestation day 20. A unique observation made in this study was a significant decrease in lung weight observed in the perinates exposed to TCDD. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TCDD significantly alters retinoid homeostasis in tissues of the developing fetus and neonate, suggesting that their unique sensitivity to TCDD may at least be in part the result of altered retinoid homeostasis.

  20. Thrifty metabolic programming in rats is induced by both maternal undernutrition and postnatal leptin treatment, but masked in the presence of both: implications for models of developmental programming

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal undernutrition leads to an increased risk of metabolic disorders in offspring including obesity and insulin resistance, thought to be due to a programmed thrifty phenotype which is inappropriate for a subsequent richer nutritional environment. In a rat model, both male and female offspring of undernourished mothers are programmed to become obese, however postnatal leptin treatment gives discordant results between males and females. Leptin treatment is able to rescue the adverse programming effects in the female offspring of undernourished mothers, but not in their male offspring. Additionally, in these rats, postnatal leptin treatment of offspring from normally-nourished mothers programmes their male offspring to develop obesity in later life, while there is no comparable effect in their female offspring. Results We show by microarray analysis of the female liver transcriptome that both maternal undernutrition and postnatal leptin treatment independently induce a similar thrifty transcriptional programme affecting carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress genes. Paradoxically, however, the combination of both stimuli restores a more normal transcriptional environment. This demonstrates that “leptin reversal” is a global phenomenon affecting all genes involved in fetal programming by maternal undernourishment and leptin treatment. The thrifty transcriptional programme was associated with pro-inflammatory markers and downregulation of adaptive immune mediators, particularly MHC class I genes, suggesting a deficit in antigen presentation in these offspring. Conclusions We propose a revised model of developmental programming reconciling the male and female observations, in which there are two competing programmes which collectively drive liver transcription. The first element is a thrifty metabolic phenotype induced by early life growth restriction independently of leptin levels. The second is a homeostatic set point calibrated in response to postnatal leptin surge, which is able to over-ride the metabolic programme. This “calibration model” for the postnatal leptin surge, if applicable in humans, may have implications for understanding responses to catch-up growth in infants. Additionally, the identification of an antigen presentation deficit associated with metabolic thriftiness may relate to a previously observed correlation between birth season (a proxy for gestational undernutrition) and infectious disease mortality in rural African communities. PMID:24447410

  1. Can low-level ethanol exposure during pregnancy influence maternal care? An investigation using two strains of rat across two generations.

    PubMed

    Popoola, Daniel O; Borrow, Amanda P; Sanders, Julia E; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Cameron, Nicole M

    2015-09-01

    Gestational alcohol use is well documented as detrimental to both maternal and fetal health, producing an increase in offspring's tendency for alcoholism, as well as in behavioral and neuropsychological disorders. In both rodents and in humans, parental care can influence the development of offspring physiology and behavior. Animal studies that have investigated gestational alcohol use on parental care and/or their interaction mostly employ heavy alcohol use and single strains. This study aimed at investigating the effects of low gestational ethanol dose on parental behavior and its transgenerational transmission, with comparison between two rat strains. Pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD) and Long Evans (LE) progenitor dams (F0) received 1g/kg ethanol or water through gestational days 17-20 via gavage, or remained untreated in their home cages. At maturity, F1 female offspring were mated with males of the same strain and treatment and were left undisturbed through gestation. Maternal behavior was scored in both generations during the first six postnatal days. Arch-back nursing (ABN) was categorized as: 1, when the dam demonstrated minimal kyphosis; 2, when the dam demonstrated moderate kyphosis; and 3, when the dam displayed maximal kyphosis. Overall, SD showed greater amounts of ABN than LE dams and spent more time in contact with their pups. In the F0 generation, water and ethanol gavage increased ABN1 and contact with pups in SD, behaviors which decreased in treated LE. For ABN2, ethanol-treated SD dams showed more ABN2 than water-treated dams, with no effect of treatment on LE animals. In the F1 generation, prenatal exposure affected retrieval. Transgenerational transmission of LG was observed only in the untreated LE group. Strain-specific differences in maternal behavior were also observed. This study provides evidence that gestational gavage can influence maternal behavior in a strain-specific manner. Our results also suggest that the experimental procedure during gestation and genetic variations between strains may play an important role in the behavioral effects of prenatal manipulations. PMID:25575692

  2. Maternal Separation Enhances Conditioned Fear and Decreases the mRNA Levels of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Gene with Hypermethylation of This Gene in the Rat Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Boku, Shuken; Nakagawa, Shin; Inoue, Takeshi; Kato, Akiko; Takamura, Naoki; Song, Ning; Nibuya, Masashi; Koyama, Tsukasa; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Stress during postnatal development is associated with an increased risk for depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse later in life, almost as if mental illness is able to be programed by early life stressors. Recent studies suggest that such “programmed” effects can be caused by epigenetic regulation. With respect to conditioned fear, previous studies have indicated that early life stress influences its development in adulthood, whereas no potential role of epigenetic regulation has been reported. Neurotensin (NTS) is an endogenous neuropeptide that has receptors densely located in the amygdala and hippocampus. Recently, NTS systems have constituted an emerging target for the treatment of anxiety. The aim of the present work is to clarify whether the NTS system is involved in the disturbance of conditioned fear in rats stressed by maternal separation (MS). The results showed that MS enhanced freezing behaviors in fear-conditioned stress and reduced the gene expression of NTS receptor (NTSR) 1 but not of NTS or NTSR2 in the amygdalas of adult rats. The microinjection of a NTSR1 antagonist into the amygdala increased the percentage of freezing in conditioned fear, whereas the microinjection of NTSR1 agonist decreased freezing. These results suggest that NTSR1 in the amygdala may play a role in the effects of MS on conditioned fear stress in adult rats. Moreover, MS increased DNA methylation in the promoter region of NTSR1 in the amygdala. Taken together, MS may leave epigenetic marks in the NTSR1 gene in the amygdala, which may enhance conditioned fear in adulthood. The MS-induced alternations of DNA methylation in the promoter region of NTSR1 in the amygdala may be associated with vulnerability to the development of anxiety disorders and depression in adulthood. PMID:24831231

  3. Prenatal nicotine and maternal deprivation stress de-regulate the development of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus neurons in hippocampus of infant rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2013-01-01

    Adverse experiences by the developing fetus and in early childhood are associated with profound effects on learning, emotional behavior, and cognition as a whole. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure (NIC), postnatal maternal deprivation (MD) or the combination of the two (NIC+MD) to determine if hippocampal neuron development is modulated by exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stress. Growth of rat offspring exposed to MD alone or NIC+MD was repressed until after weaning. In CA1 but not CA3 of postnatal day 14 (P14) pups, MD increased pyramidal neurons, however, in dentate gyrus (DG), decreased granule neurons. NIC had no effect on neuron number in CA1, CA3 or DG. Unexpectedly, NIC plus MD combined caused a synergistic increase in the number of CA1 or CA3 neurons. Neuron density in CA regions was unaffected by treatment, but in the DG, granule neurons had a looser packing density after NIC, MD or NIC+MD exposure. When septotemporal axes were analyzed, the synergism of stress and drug exposure in CA1 and CA3 was associated with rostral, whereas MD effects were predominantly associated with caudal neurons. TUNEL labeling suggests no active apoptosis at P14, and doublecortin positive neurons and mossy fibers were diminished in NIC+MD relative to controls. The laterality of the effect of nicotine and/or maternal deprivation in right versus left hippocampus was also analyzed and found to be insiginificant. We report for the first time that early life stressors such as postnatal MD and prenatal NIC exposure, when combined, may exhibit synergistic consequences for CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neuron development, and a potential antagonistic influence on developing DG neurons. These results suggest that early stressors may modulate neurogenesis, apoptosis, or maturation of glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus in a region-specific manner during critical periods of neurodevelopment. PMID:23785432

  4. Effects of Post-coital Administration of Alkaloids from Senna alata (Linn. Roxb) Leaves on some Fetal and Maternal Outcomes of Pregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yakubu, Musa Toyin; Musa, Isa Fakai

    2012-01-01

    Background The abortifacient claim of Senna alata (S. alata) was scientifically validated recently with alkaloids speculated to be the bioactive agent. This speculation is yet to be substantiated or refuted by scientific evidence. The present study was aimed to investigate the pregnancy terminating effects of the alkaloids from S. alata leaves. Methods Twenty four Pregnant rats (143.99±1.21 g) allocated randomly to four groups: A, B, C and D respectively received, 0.5 ml of distilled water, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg body weight of the S. alata extracted alkaloids orally, once daily from day 10 until day 18 post-coitum. The indices of abortifacient were evaluated at the end of the exposure period. The results were analyzed by both the analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results Thin-layer chromatographic separation produced five spots with Rf values of 0.28, 0.33, 0.39, 0.47 and 0.55 which gave positive reaction with Meyer's and Wagner's reagents, respectively. The number of implantation sites and corpora lutea, as well as the concentrations of FSH, LH, progesterone, weight of uterus, uterine/ body weight ratio, glucose and cholesterol decreased significantly (p < 0.05) whereas the resorption index, pre- and post-implantation losses, uterine protein content and alkaline phosphatase activity increased significantly. None of the alkaloid treated animals presented with provoked vaginal opening or bleeding except fetal deaths. The alkaloid decreased the maternal weight gain, as well as feed and water intake. Conclusion Overall, the alkaloids from S. alata leaves exhibited anti-implantation, anti-gonadotropic, anti-progesteronic, embryonic resorptive, feto-maternal toxic activities but not complete abortifacient. The alkaloids alone may not be the sole abortifacient bioactive agent in the leaf extract. PMID:23926548

  5. Long-term postpartum anxiety and depression-like behavior in mother rats subjected to maternal separation are ameliorated by palatable high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Morris, Margaret J

    2010-03-17

    While the effects of maternal separation on pups are well studied, the impact on dams has attracted little attention. The consumption of palatable food is known to dampen stress responses in animals, and emotions influence food choice in humans. Here we examined the early- and long-term impacts of maternal separation on behavioral profile of the dams, and the effects of palatable cafeteria high-fat diet (HFD). After littering, Sprague-Dawley female rats were subjected to prolonged separation, S180 (180 min) or brief separation, S15 (15 min/day) from postnatal days (PND) 2-14. At 4 weeks postpartum, half the dams were assigned to HFD. Anxiety and depression-like behaviors were assessed pre- and post-diet. Compared to S15 dams, S180 dams consuming chow demonstrated increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim (FST) tests, respectively. These behavioral deficits were observed at 4 weeks, and persisted until 17 weeks postpartum. The S180 dams also had increased plasma corticosterone concentration compared to S15 dams, which coincided with increased hypothalamic CRH mRNA and reduced hippocampal GR mRNA expression, suggesting possible dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Interestingly, continuous provision of HFD improved the behavioral deficits observed in S180 dams with significant reduction of hypothalamic CRH mRNA expression. These data are the first to describe long-term detrimental behavioral impacts of separation in dams, suggesting this may provide a model of postpartum depression. Moreover, they support the notion of long-term beneficial effects of 'comfort food' on stress responses. PMID:19896506

  6. Alterations in hepatic gene expression and genome-wide DNA methylation in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult offspring from obese (OB) rat dams gain greater body weight and fat mass than controls when fed HFD. At PND21, we examined energy expenditure (EE) (indirect calorimetry), hepatic gene expression (microarrays), and changes in genome-wide and global DNA methylation (enrichment-coupled DNA seque...

  7. The effects of maternal exposure to food additive E341 (tricalcium phosphate) on foetal development of rats.

    PubMed

    Güngörmü?, Cans?n; K?l?ç, Aysun; Akay, M Turan; Kolankaya, Dürdane

    2010-03-01

    E341 (tricalcium phosphate) (TCP) is commonly used as a food additive and also as a nutritional supplement. To evaluate the possible developmental effects, female Wistar rats were treated with E341 (TCP) by oral gavage during pregnancy. There were three groups of each containing five rats. Rats in Groups I-III were fed with standard diet, oil and E341 (TCP) 175mg/kg body weight during gestation days (GD 0-20) respectively. We assessed foetal body lengths and weights and also made morphometric examination of placenta and umbilical cord. The placental weights of E341 (TCP) group (Group III) were found to be decreased statistically. According to skeletal stainings of foetuses, lengths of left ulna (28.3%), right femur (29.8%), left femur (34.9%) and diameter of the skull of y-axis were significantly decreased (12.3%) in E341 (TCP) treatment groups. There was an increase in trans-umbilical diameter in treatment group (14%). This is the first study in which developmental effects of E341 (TCP) have ever evaluated. The results suggest that prenatal development of rats during gestation is sensitive to E341 (TCP) exposure. PMID:21787591

  8. Reversible aberration of neurogenesis affecting late-stage differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring after maternal exposure to manganese chloride.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Takumi; Wang, Liyun; Akane, Hirotoshi; Shiraki, Ayako; Goto, Ken; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-11-01

    To examine the effects of developmental manganese (Mn)-exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis, pregnant rats were treated with MnCl(2)·4H(2)O in the diet at 32, 160 or 800 ppm from gestation day 10 to day 21 after delivery. Serum concentrations of thyroid-related hormones were examined in offspring exposed to MnCl(2)·4H(2)O at 800 or 1600 ppm. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased doublecortin-positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus on postnatal day (PND) 21 following exposure to MnCl(2)·4H(2)O at 800 ppm, indicating an increase of type-3 progenitor or immature granule cells. Reelin-positive cells, suggestive of ?-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons in the dentate hilus, also increased at 800 ppm on PND 21. Brain Mn concentrations increased in offspring on PND 21 at 160 and 800 ppm, whereas brain concentrations in the dams were unchanged. Serum concentrations of triiodothyronine and thyroxine decreased at 800 and 1600 ppm, whereas thyroid-stimulating hormone increased only after exposure at 800 ppm. All changes disappeared on PND 77. Thus, maternal exposure to MnCl(2)·4H(2)O at 800 ppm mildly and reversibly affects neurogenesis targeting late-stage differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. Direct effects of accumulated Mn in the developing brain might be implicated in the mechanism of the development of aberrations in neurogenesis; however, indirect effects through thyroid hormone fluctuations might be rather minor. PMID:22561194

  9. RNA-seq analysis of the rat placentation site reveals maternal obesity-associated changes in placental and offspring thyroid hormone signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction In animal models, maternal obesity (OB) leads to augmented risk of offspring OB. While placental function is influenced by maternal habitus, the effect of maternal obesity on the interacting zones of the placenta [the labyrinth (LZ), junctional (JZ) and metrial gland (MG)] remains unkno...

  10. [The behavioral effects of a single adverse exposure in a number of rat generations: the role of maternal glucocorticoids].

    PubMed

    Dygalo, N N; Sakharov, D G; Kalinina, T S; Shishkina, G T

    1999-01-01

    The ionizing irradiation of rat fetuses during the last third of intrauterine development increased blood corticosterone level adulthood and decreased the open field locomotion of their adult offsprings of the next first nonirradiated generation. Treatment of the pregnant rats with glucocorticoids also decreased the offspring locomotion. Irradiation of fetuses in the middle of embryogenesis decreased blood corticosterone level in adulthood and shortened the open-field freezing reaction of their adult offsprings of the next first nonirradiated generation. Adrenalectomy of females before mating decreasing the blood corticosterone level had a similar effect on freezing duration of their adult offsprings. Irradiation of the ancestors within the last third of their intrauterine development had no effect on blood corticosterone level of their adult offsprings of the first generation and produced no behavioral alterations in their descendants of the next second nonirradiated generation. Irradiation of the ancestors in the middle of their embryogenesis decreased the stress-induced corticosterone response in their adult offsprings of the first generation and increased rearings and locomotion in their descendants of the next second nonirradiated generation. The data suggest that a single noxious treatment may have behavioral effects throughout two consequent generations of rats. Mother's glucocorticoid hormones may be one of the factors which transmit the effect. PMID:10420560

  11. Effects of maternally exposed coloring food additives on receptor expressions related to learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Betul Mermi; Gultekin, Fatih; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Kulac, Esin

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to artificial food colors and additives (AFCAs) has been implicated in the induction and severity of some childhood behavioral and learning disabilities. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACHRs) are thought to be effective in the learning and memory-generating process. In this study, we investigated the effects of intrauterine exposure to AFCAs on subunit concentrations of NMDARs and nAChRs isoforms in rats. We administered a mixture of AFCAs (Eritrosin, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red AC, Sunset Yellow FCF, Tartrazin, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Azorubin and Indigotin) to female rats before and during gestation. The concentration of NR2A and NR2B subunits and nAChR ?7, ?4?2 isoforms in their offspring's hippocampi were measured by Western Blotting. Expressions of NR2B and nAChR ?2 were significantly increased (17% and 6.70%, respectively), whereas expression of nAChR ?4 was significantly decreased (5.67%) in male experimental group compared to the male control group (p<0.05). In the female experimental group, AFCAs caused a 14% decrease in NR2B expression when compared to the female control group (p<0.05). Our results indicate that exposure to AFCAs during the fetal period may lead to alterations in expressions of NMDARs and nAChRs in adulthood. These alterations were different between male and female genders. PMID:23429044

  12. Changes in Maternal liver Cyp2c and Cyp2d Expression and Activity During Rat Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, Leslie J.; Tay, Suzanne; Senn, Tauri D.; Zhang, Huixia; Visone, Anthony; Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Hebert, Mary F.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    During human pregnancy, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6 activities are altered. The aim of the current study was to determine if this phenomenon can be replicated in the rat, and to evaluate the mechanisms that contribute to the changes in Cyp2c and Cyp2d activity during pregnancy. The intrinsic clearance of dextromethorphan O-demethylation, a measure of Cyp2d2 activity, was decreased 80% at both days 9 and 19 of gestation when compared to nonpregnant controls. The decreased intrinsic clearance was a result of both decreased Vmax and increased Km -values at both days of gestation. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that transcripts of Cyp2d2 and Cyp2d4 were significantly decreased at day 19 of pregnancy (p<0.05) when compared to day 9 and nonpregnant controls. The decrease in Cyp2d mRNA levels correlated with a decrease in several nuclear receptor mRNA levels (RAR?, RXR?, HNF1 and HNF3?) but not with the mRNA levels of nuclear receptors usually associated with regulation of P450 enzymes (PXR, CAR and HNF4?). In contrast, Cyp2c12 and Cyp2c6 transcription and protein expression were not significantly altered during rat pregnancy although the intrinsic clearance of Cyp2c6-mediated diclofenac 4?-hydroxylation was increased 2-fold on day 19 of gestation when compared to nonpregnant controls. The increase in intrinsic clearance was due to a decrease in the Km-value for 4?-hydroxydiclofenac formation. These data show that pregnancy significantly alters the expression and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in an enzyme and gestational stage specific manner. These changes are likely to have toxicological and therapeutic implications. PMID:18342837

  13. Maternal nicotine exposure during lactation alters food preference, anxiety-like behavior and the brain dopaminergic reward system in the adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, C R; Moura, E G; Manhães, A C; Fraga, M C; Claudio-Neto, S; Younes-Rapozo, V; Santos-Silva, A P; Lotufo, B M; Oliveira, E; Lisboa, P C

    2015-10-01

    The mesolimbic reward pathway is activated by drugs of abuse and palatable food, causing a sense of pleasure, which promotes further consumption of these substances. Children whose parents smoke are more vulnerable to present addictive-like behavior to drugs and food.We evaluated the association between maternal nicotine exposure during lactation with changes in feeding, behavior and in the dopaminergic reward system. On postnatal day (PN) 2,Wistar rat dams were implanted with minipumps releasing nicotine (N; 6 mg/kg/day, s.c.) or saline (C) for 14 days. On PN150 and PN160, offspring were divided into 4 groups for a food challenge: N and C that received standard chow(SC); and N and C that could freely self-select (SSD) between high-fat and high-sugar diets (HFD and HSD, respectively). Offspring were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field (OF) arena on PN152–153. On PN170, offspring were euthanized for central dopaminergic analysis. SSD animals showed an increased food intake compared to SC ones and a preference for HFD. However, N-SSD animals consumed relatively more HSD than C-SSD ones. Regarding behavior, N animals showed an increase in the time spent in the EPM center and a reduction in relative activity in the OF center. N offspring presented lower dopamine receptor (D2R) and transporter (DAT) contents in the nucleus accumbens, and lower D2R in the arcuate nucleus. Postnatal exposure to nicotine increases preference for sugar and anxiety levels in the adult progeny possibly due to a decrease in dopaminergic action in the nucleus accumbens and arcuate nucleus. PMID:26048299

  14. Canalization and developmental instability of the fetal skull in a mouse model of maternal nutritional stress

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Paula N.; Lotto, Federico P.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional imbalance is one of the main sources of stress in both extant and extinct human populations. Restricted availability of nutrients is thought to disrupt the buffering mechanisms that contribute to developmental stability and canalization, resulting in increased levels of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and phenotypic variance among individuals. However, the literature is contradictory in this regard. This study assesses the effect of prenatal nutritional stress on FA and among-individual variance in cranial shape and size using a mouse model of maternal protein restriction. Two sets of landmark coordinates were digitized in three dimensions from skulls of control and protein restricted specimens at E17.5 and E18.5. We found that, by the end of gestation, maternal protein restriction resulted in a significant reduction of skull size. Fluctuating asymmetry in size and shape exceeded the amount of measurement error in all groups, but no significant differences in the magnitude of FA were found between treatments. Convsersely, the pattern of shape asymmetry was affected by the environmental perturbation since the angles between the first eigenvectors extracted from the covariance matrix of shape asymmetric component of protein restricted and control groups were not significantly different from the expected for random vectors. In addition, among-individual variance in cranial shape was significanlty higher in the protein restricted than the control group at E18.5. Overall, the results obtained from a controlled experiment do not support the view of fluctuating asymmetry of cranial structures as a reliable index for inferring nutritional stress in human populations. PMID:24888714

  15. Impairment of Rat Fetal Beta-Cell Development by Maternal Exposure to Dexamethasone during Different Time-Windows

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Olivier; Theys, Nicolas; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Remacle, Claude; Reusens, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Aim Glucocorticoids (GCs) take part in the direct control of cell lineage during the late phase of pancreas development when endocrine and exocrine cell differentiation occurs. However, other tissues such as the vasculature exert a critical role before that phase. This study aims to investigate the consequences of overexposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during different time-windows of gestation for the development of the fetal endocrine pancreas. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats received dexamethasone acetate in their drinking water (1 µg/ml) during the last week or throughout gestation. Fetuses and their pancreases were analyzed at day 15 and 21 of gestation. Morphometrical analysis was performed on pancreatic sections after immunohistochemistry techniques and insulin secretion was evaluated on fetal islets collected in vitro. Results Dexamethasone given the last week or throughout gestation reduced the beta-cell mass in 21-day-old fetuses by respectively 18% or 62%. This was accompanied by a defect in insulin secretion. The alpha-cell mass was reduced similarly. Neither islet vascularization nor beta-cell proliferation was affected when dexamethasone was administered during the last week, which was however the case when given throughout gestation. When given from the beginning of gestation, dexamethasone reduced the number of cells expressing the early marker of endocrine lineage neurogenin-3 when analyzed at 15 days of fetal age. Conclusions GCs reduce the beta- and alpha-cell mass by different mechanisms according to the stage of development during which the treatment was applied. In fetuses exposed to glucocorticoids the last week of gestation only, beta-cell mass is reduced due to impairment of beta-cell commitment, whereas in fetuses exposed throughout gestation, islet vascularization and lower beta-cell proliferation are involved as well, amplifying the reduction of the endocrine mass. PMID:21991320

  16. Maternal low protein diet reduces birth weight and increases brown adipose tissue UCP-1 and FNDC5 gene expression in male neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in regulating body weight (BW) by modifying thermogenesis. Maternal low protein (LP) diets reduce offspring birth weight. Increased BAT thermogenesis in utero may be one mechanism for the lower BW. However, whether maternal LP nutrition alters BAT...

  17. Maternal low protein diet-induced low birth weight in male, neonate Sprague-Dawley rats is mediated by altered brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in regulating body weight (BW) by modifying thermogenesis. Maternal low protein (LP) diets reduce offspring birth weight. Increased BAT thermogenesis in utero may be one mechanism for the lower BW. However, whether maternal LP nutrition alters BAT...

  18. SISTER-CHROMATID EXCHANGE INDUCTION IN RAT MATERNAL, EMBRYONIC AND EXTRA-EMBRYONIC CELLS AFTER IN VIVO EXPOSURE TO 4-NITROQUINOLINE 1-OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic damage is associated with various embryo pathologies; and many teratogens and transplacental carcinogens are known to be genotoxic. The present study was aimed at charaterizing SCE induction levels in rodent maternal, embryonic and extra-embryonic cells after maternal exp...

  19. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proportion of obese women who become pregnant continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are matern...

  20. Maternal guilt.

    PubMed

    Rotkirch, Anna; Janhunen, Kristiina

    2010-01-01

    The recent emphasis on humans as cooperative breeders invites new research on human family dynamics. In this paper we look at maternal guilt as a consequence of conditional maternal investment. Solicited texts written by Finnish mothers with under school-aged children in 2007 (n = 63) described maternal emotions perceived as difficult and forbidden. Content analysis of guilt-inducing situations showed that guilt arose from diverging interest and negotiations between the mother and child (i.e., classic parent- offspring conflict). Also cultural expectations of extensive and perpetual high-quality maternal investment or the "motherhood myth" induced guilt in mothers. We argue that guilt plays an important role in maternal-investment regulation. Maternal guilt is predicted to vary with social and cultural context but also to show universal characteristics due to parent-offspring conflict and allomaternal manipulation. Results are preliminary and intended to stimulate research into the mechanisms, gender differences and cultural variations of guilt and other social emotions in human parenting. PMID:22947781

  1. Prenatal immune challenge in rats: Altered responses to dopaminergic and glutamatergic agents, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, and reduced route-based learning as a function of maternal body weight gain after prenatal exposure to Poly IC

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Graham, Devon L.; Braun, Amanda A.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Richtand, Neil M.; Williams, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation has been used to test the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. Most of the data are in mouse models; far less is available for rats. We previously showed that maternal weight change in response to the immune activator polyinosinic-polycytidylic (Poly IC) in rats differentially affects offspring. Therefore, we treated gravid Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats i.p. on embryonic day 14 with 8 mg/kg of Poly IC or Saline. The Poly IC group was divided into those that lost or gained the least weight, Poly IC (L), versus those that gained the most weight, Poly IC (H), following treatment. The study design controlled for litter size, litter sampling, sex distribution, and test experience. We found no effects of Poly IC on elevated zero-maze, open-field activity, object burying, light-dark test, straight channel swimming, Morris water maze spatial acquisition, reversal, or shift navigation or spatial working or reference memory, or conditioned contextual or cued fear or latent inhibition. The Poly IC (H) group showed a significant decrease in the rate of route-based learning when visible cues unavailable in the Cincinnati water maze and reduced prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in females, but not males. The Poly IC (L) group exhibited altered responses to acute pharmacological challenges: exaggerated hyperactivity in response to (+)-amphetamine and an attenuated hyperactivity in response to MK-801. This model did not exhibit the cognitive, acoustic startle, or latent inhibition deficits reported in Poly IC-treated rats, but showed changes in response to drugs acting on neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (dopaminergic hyperfunction and glutamatergic hypofunction). PMID:22473973

  2. Protein Nutrition of Southern Plains Small Mammals: Immune Response to Variation in Maternal and Offspring Dietary Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and postnatal offspring nutrition may influence offspring traits. We investigated the effects of maternal and postweaning offspring dietary nitrogen on immune function and hematology in two species of rodent: the hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon his...

  3. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Orally Administered Botanical Composition, UP446-Part II: Effects on Prenatal and Postnatal Development, Including Maternal Function in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Jia, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Almost all herbal remedies could be therapeutic at one dose and toxic at another. These facts become more troubling and a double threat when uncharacterized medicinal herbs are blended together and used by expectant mothers as a supplement to conventional pregnancy management with an inherent belief of considering herbal remedies as harmless. Here we describe the potential adverse effects of UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, on the maternal and their first filial generation (F1) developmental and functional toxicity following exposure at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg/day. Maternal gestation, viability index, sex ratio, body weight, and food consumption were evaluated. F1 growth and development, sexual function including mating index, fertility, implantation, and embryo mortality were also assessed. Test substance impacts on the maternal (F0) or F1 reproductive parameters were very minimal. There were no statistically significant differences in implantation, parturition, viability, and neonates' sex ratios. There were no significant changes in maturation, behavioral, or functional developments between groups. No treatment-related prenatal or postnatal in-life or necropsy abnormalities were observed. Therefore, the no observed adverse effect level in the prenatal and postnatal developments, including maternal function study was considered to be greater than 1000 mg/kg. PMID:26033919

  4. Effects of maternal and pre-weaning undernutrition in rat offspring: Age at reproductive senescence and intergenerational pup growth and viability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal and/or postnatal undernutrition are widespread in human populations and are components of many experimental developmental and reproductive toxicology bio-assays. This study investigated in utero and/or pre-weaning undernutrition effects on reproductive maturation and se...

  5. Effects of Early Deprivation and Maternal Separation on

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    Effects of Early Deprivation and Maternal Separation on Pup-Directed Behavior and HPA Axis Measures of the following experiment was to investigate whether the HPA axis, through the use of early separation rats were early deprived or maternally separated for 5 hours daily from PND 2 to 14 and compared

  6. Maternal Obesity at Conception Programs Obesity in the Offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in adult-life is subject to programming during gestation. To examine whether in utero exposure to maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in the offspring, we have developed an overfeeding-based model of maternal obesity in rats utilizing intragastric feeding of diets via ...

  7. Brief Neonatal Maternal Separation Alters Extinction of Conditioned Fear and Corticolimbic Glucocorticoid

    E-print Network

    Wellman, Cara

    Brief Neonatal Maternal Separation Alters Extinction of Conditioned Fear and Corticolimbic and extinction of conditioned fear in adult rats that underwent neonatal maternal separation. Corticolimbic control rearing or maternal separation for 15 min per day. Fear condition- ing and extinction in adulthood

  8. Modelling maternal obesity: the effects of a chronic high-fat, high-cholesterol diet on uterine expression of contractile-associated proteins and ex vivo contractile activity during labour in the rat.

    PubMed

    Muir, Ronan; Ballan, Jean; Clifford, Bethan; McMullen, Sarah; Khan, Raheela; Shmygol, Anatoly; Quenby, Siobhan; Elmes, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labour and emergency caesarean section, but the mechanisms are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of an adiposity-inducing high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet on uterine contractile-associated protein (CAP) expression and ex vivo uterine contractility in term non-labouring (TNL) and term labouring (TL) rats. Female rats were fed either control chow (CON n=20) or HFHC (n=20) diet 6 weeks before conception and during pregnancy. On gestational day 21 (TNL) or day 22 (TL) CON and HFHC (n=10) rats were killed to determine plasma cholesterol, triacylglycerol and progesterone concentrations and collection of myometrium for contractility studies and expression of CAPs caveolin-1 (Cav-1), connexin-43 (CX-43) and it's phosphorylated form (pCX-43), oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). HFHC feeding increased visceral fat (P?0.001), plasma cholesterol (P?0.001) and triacylglycerol (P=0.039) concentrations. Stage of labour effected uterine expression of CAV-1 (P<0.02), pCX43 and COX-2 (both P<0.03). CAV-1 and pCX43 decreased but COX-2 increased with parturition. Significant diet- and labour-stage interactions were evident for CX-43 and pCX43 (P<0.03 and P<0.004 respectively). CX-43 decreased with TL in HFHC animals but was unaltered in CON. pCX-43 fell with labour in CON but remained high in HFHC. OXTR expression was significantly higher in HFHC compared with CON animals (P<0.03). Progesterone was higher in HFHC rats at term (P<0.014) but fell significantly with labour to similar concentrations as CON. Contractility studies identified synchronous contractions of stable amplitude in lean animals, but unstable asynchronous contractions with obesity. Uterine dose response to oxytocin was blunted during labour in HFHC rats with a log EC50 of -8.84 compared with -10.25 M in CON for integral activity (P<0.05). In conclusion, our adiposity model exhibits adverse effects on contractile activity during labour that can be investigated further to unravel the mechanisms causing uterine dystocia in obese women. PMID:26543049

  9. Modelling maternal obesity: the effects of a chronic high-fat, high-cholesterol diet on uterine expression of contractile-associated proteins and ex vivo contractile activity during labour in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ronan; Ballan, Jean; Clifford, Bethan; McMullen, Sarah; Khan, Raheela; Shmygol, Anatoly; Quenby, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labour and emergency caesarean section, but the mechanisms are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of an adiposity-inducing high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet on uterine contractile-associated protein (CAP) expression and ex vivo uterine contractility in term non-labouring (TNL) and term labouring (TL) rats. Female rats were fed either control chow (CON n=20) or HFHC (n=20) diet 6 weeks before conception and during pregnancy. On gestational day 21 (TNL) or day 22 (TL) CON and HFHC (n=10) rats were killed to determine plasma cholesterol, triacylglycerol and progesterone concentrations and collection of myometrium for contractility studies and expression of CAPs caveolin-1 (Cav-1), connexin-43 (CX-43) and it's phosphorylated form (pCX-43), oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). HFHC feeding increased visceral fat (P?0.001), plasma cholesterol (P?0.001) and triacylglycerol (P=0.039) concentrations. Stage of labour effected uterine expression of CAV-1 (P<0.02), pCX43 and COX-2 (both P<0.03). CAV-1 and pCX43 decreased but COX-2 increased with parturition. Significant diet- and labour-stage interactions were evident for CX-43 and pCX43 (P<0.03 and P<0.004 respectively). CX-43 decreased with TL in HFHC animals but was unaltered in CON. pCX-43 fell with labour in CON but remained high in HFHC. OXTR expression was significantly higher in HFHC compared with CON animals (P<0.03). Progesterone was higher in HFHC rats at term (P<0.014) but fell significantly with labour to similar concentrations as CON. Contractility studies identified synchronous contractions of stable amplitude in lean animals, but unstable asynchronous contractions with obesity. Uterine dose response to oxytocin was blunted during labour in HFHC rats with a log EC50 of ?8.84 compared with ?10.25 M in CON for integral activity (P<0.05). In conclusion, our adiposity model exhibits adverse effects on contractile activity during labour that can be investigated further to unravel the mechanisms causing uterine dystocia in obese women. PMID:26543049

  10. Distribution and biomarker of carbon-14 labeled fullerene C60 ([(14) C(U)]C60 ) in pregnant and lactating rats and their offspring after maternal intravenous exposure.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Rodney W; Fennell, Timothy R; Wingard, Christopher J; Mortensen, Ninell P; Holland, Nathan A; Shannahan, Jonathan H; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Lewin, Anita H; Sumner, Susan C J

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive distribution study was conducted in pregnant and lactating rats exposed to a suspension of uniformly carbon-14 labeled C60 ([(14) C(U)]C60 ). Rats were administered [(14) C(U)]C60 (~0.2?mg [(14) C(U)]C60 kg(-1) body weight) or 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-saline vehicle via a single tail vein injection. Pregnant rats were injected on gestation day (GD) 11 (terminated with fetuses after either 24?h or 8?days), GD15 (terminated after 24?h or 4?days), or GD18 (terminated after 24?h). Lactating rats were injected on postnatal day 8 and terminated after 24?h, 3 or 11?days. The distribution of radioactivity in pregnant dams was influenced by both the state of pregnancy and time of termination after exposure. The percentage of recovered radioactivity in pregnant and lactating rats was highest in the liver and lungs. Radioactivity was quantitated in over 20 tissues. Radioactivity was found in the placenta and in fetuses of pregnant dams, and in the milk of lactating rats and in pups. Elimination of radioactivity was < 2% in urine and feces at each time point. Radioactivity remained in blood circulation up to 11?days after [(14) C(U)]C60 exposure. Biomarkers of inflammation, cardiovascular injury and oxidative stress were measured to study the biological impacts of [(14) C(U)]C60 exposure. Oxidative stress was elevated in female pups of exposed dams. Metabolomics analysis of urine showed that [(14) C(U)]C60 exposure to pregnant rats impacted the pathways of vitamin B, regulation of lipid and sugar metabolism and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis. This study demonstrated that [(14) C(U)]C60 crosses the placenta at all stages of pregnancy examined, and is transferred to pups via milk. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26081520

  11. Understanding the Role of Maternal Diet on Kidney Development; an Opportunity to Improve Cardiovascular and Renal Health for Future Generations

    PubMed Central

    Wood-Bradley, Ryan James; Barrand, Sanna; Giot, Anais; Armitage, James Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide are cardiovascular disease (high blood pressure, high cholesterol and renal disease), cancer and diabetes. It is increasingly obvious that the development of these diseases encompasses complex interactions between adult lifestyle and genetic predisposition. Maternal malnutrition can influence the fetal and early life environment and pose a risk factor for the future development of adult diseases, most likely due to impaired organogenesis in the developing offspring. This then predisposes these offspring to cardiovascular disease and renal dysfunction in adulthood. Studies in experimental animals have further illustrated the significant impact maternal diet has on offspring health. Many studies report changes in kidney structure (a reduction in the number of nephrons in the kidney) in offspring of protein-deprived dams. Although the early studies suggested that increased blood pressure was also present in offspring of protein-restricted dams, this is not a universal finding and requires clarification. Importantly, to date, the literature offers little to no understanding of when in development these changes in kidney development occur, nor are the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive these changes well characterised. Moreover, the mechanisms linking maternal nutrition and a suboptimal renal phenotype in offspring are yet to be discerned—one potential mechanism involves epigenetics. This review will focus on recent information on potential mechanisms by which maternal nutrition (focusing on malnutrition due to protein restriction, micronutrient restriction and excessive fat intake) influences kidney development and thereby function in later life. PMID:25774605

  12. Effects of maternal ingestion of aroclor 1254 (PCB) on the development pattern of oxygen consumption and body temperature in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B.W.; Meserve, L.A.

    1995-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) is an environmental pollutant that has been implicated in depression of reproductive success in Great Lakes gulls, production of congenital deformities in humans, and increased incidence of carcinogenesis in laboratory mice. PCB has also been shown to be a thyrotoxin in both adult and developing animals. Most recently, the hypothyroid effects of PCB exposure have been reported to elicit effects similar to those of hypothyroidism caused by other methods. This study was done to determine the effects of PCB ingestion in pregnant and lactating rats on the development of thermoregulation in neonatal animals. Body temperature and rate of oxygen consumption was evaluated in rat puts on days 4 through 14 after birth. Because the major thermomregulatory hormones are thyroid hormones, thyroid hormone status and thyroid weights were evaluated at the end of the study on postnatal day 15. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Differential effect of maternal diet supplementation with ?-Linolenic adcid or n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on glial cell phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine fatty acid profile in neonate rat brains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) are of crucial importance for the development of neural tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dietary supplementation in n-3 fatty acids in female rats during gestation and lactation on fatty acid pattern in brain glial cells phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the neonates. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed during the whole gestation and lactation period with a diet containing either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.55%) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 0.75% of total fatty acids) or ?-linolenic acid (ALA, 2.90%). At two weeks of age, gastric content and brain glial cell PE and PS of rat neonates were analyzed for their fatty acid and dimethylacetal (DMA) profile. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results In the neonates from the group fed with n-3 LC-PUFA, the DHA level in gastric content (+65%, P < 0.0001) and brain glial cell PE (+18%, P = 0.0001) and PS (+15%, P = 0.0009) were significantly increased compared to the ALA group. The filtered correlation analysis (P < 0.05) underlined that levels of dihomo-?-linolenic acid (DGLA), DHA and n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were negatively correlated with arachidonic acid (ARA) and n-6 DPA in PE of brain glial cells. No significant correlation between n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFA were found in the PS dataset. DMA level in PE was negatively correlated with n-6 DPA. DMA were found to occur in brain glial cell PS fraction; in this class DMA level was correlated negatively with DHA and positively with ARA. Conclusion The present study confirms that early supplementation of maternal diet with n-3 fatty acids supplied as LC-PUFA is more efficient in increasing n-3 in brain glial cell PE and PS in the neonate than ALA. Negative correlation between n-6 DPA, a conventional marker of DHA deficiency, and DMA in PE suggests n-6 DPA that potentially be considered as a marker of tissue ethanolamine plasmalogen status. The combination of multivariate and bivariate statistics allowed to underline that the accretion pattern of n-3 LC-PUFA in PE and PS differ. PMID:20148111

  14. Maternal stress predicts altered biogenesis and the profile of mitochondrial proteins in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of adult offspring rats.

    PubMed

    G?ombik, Katarzyna; Stachowicz, Aneta; ?lusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Budziszewska, Bogus?awa; Suski, Maciej; Kubera, Marta; Laso?, W?adys?aw; W?dzony, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafa?; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2015-10-01

    Currently, much attention is focused on the influence of mitochondrial disturbances at the onset of depression. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of prenatal stress (an animal model of depression) on the mitochondrial biogenesis proteins and mitoproteome profile in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of adult 3-month-old male rats following a prenatal stress procedure. Our results show that rats that were exposed to prenatal stress stimuli displayed depression-like behaviors based on the sucrose preference and elevated plus maze tests. It has been found that the level of the PGC-1? protein was reduced in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the adult offspring after the prenatal stress procedure. Moreover, in the frontal cortex, the level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was up-regulated. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry showed the statistically significant down-regulation of the mitochondrial ribosomal protein L12 (Mrpl12) and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2) as well as the up-regulation of the Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Proteins (Tppp/p25) in the frontal cortex. In contrast, in the hippocampus, the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component subunit beta, the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2 (VDAC2), and the GTP-binding nuclear protein RAN (RAN) were down-regulated and the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP-1) was enhanced. These findings provide new evidence that stress during pregnancy may lead not only to behavioral deficits, but also to disturbances in the brain mitoproteome profile in adult rat offspring. PMID:26143539

  15. Nicotine-induced over-exposure to maternal glucocorticoid and activated glucocorticoid metabolism causes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic alterations in fetal rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, D; Liang, G; Yan, Y E; He, W W; Liu, Y S; Chen, L B; Magdalou, J; Wang, H

    2012-03-25

    Fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) induced by prenatal nicotine exposure are susceptible to adult metabolic syndrome. Our goals for this study were to investigate the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and glucose and lipid metabolism and to explain the susceptibility to adult metabolic syndrome for fetuses with nicotine induced-IUGR. Pregnant Wistar rats were administered 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg nicotine subcutaneously twice a day from gestational day 11 to 20. Nicotine exposure significantly increased the levels of fetal blood corticosterone and decreased the expression of placental 11?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11?-HSD-2). Moreover, nicotine exposure significantly increased the expressions of fetal hippocampal 11?-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and decreased the expressions of fetal hypothalamus corticotropin-releasing hormone, adrenal steroid acute regulatory protein, and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme. Additionally, increased expressions of 11?-HSD-1 and GR were observed in fetal liver and gastrocnemius muscle, and these tissues also expressed lower levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor, and insulin receptor, while expressing increased levels of adiponectin receptor, leptin receptors, and AMP-activated protein kinase ?2. Prenatal nicotine exposure causes HPA axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic alterations in fetal rats. The underlying mechanism may involve activated glucocorticoid metabolism in various fetal tissues. PMID:22265867

  16. Maternal exposure to anti-androgenic compounds, vinclozolin, flutamide and procymidone, has no effects on spermatogenesis and DNA methylation in male rats of subsequent generations

    SciTech Connect

    Inawaka, Kunifumi Kawabe, Mayumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Doi, Yuko; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Tarui, Hirokazu; Abe, Jun; Kawamura, Satoshi; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-06-01

    To verify whether anti-androgens cause transgenerational effects on spermatogenesis and DNA methylation in rats, gravid Crl:CD(SD) female rats (4 or 5/group, gestational day (GD) 0 = day sperm detected) were intraperitoneally treated with anti-androgenic compounds, such as vinclozolin (100 mg/kg/day), procymidone (100 mg/kg/day), or flutamide (10 mg/kg/day), from GD 8 to GD 15. Testes were collected from F1 male pups at postnatal day (PND) 6 for DNA methylation analysis of the region (210 bp including 7 CpG sites) within the lysophospholipase gene by bisulfite DNA sequencing method. F0 and F1 males underwent the sperm analysis (count, motility and morphology), followed by DNA methylation analysis of the sperm. Remaining F1 males were cohabited with untreated-females to obtain F2 male pups for subsequent DNA methylation analysis of the testes at PND 6. These analyses showed no effects on spermatogenesis and fertility in F1 males of any treatment group. DNA methylation status in testes (F1 and F2 pups at PND 6) or sperms (F1 males at 13 weeks old) of the treatment groups were comparable to the control at all observation points, although DNA methylation rates in testes were slightly lower than those in sperm. In F0 males, no abnormalities in the spermatogenesis, fertility and DNA methylation status of sperm were observed. No transgenerational abnormalities of spermatogenesis and DNA methylation status caused by anti-androgenic compounds were observed.

  17. Maternal treatment with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone attenuates secondary mitochondrial dysfunction after transient intrauterine asphyxia in the fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Yoshinari; Nakai, Akihito; Koshino, Tatsuo; Araki, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    Recirculation following 30 min of ischemia due to transient uterine artery occlusion in pregnant rats at 20 days gestation has previously been found to cause partial recovery and secondary deterioration of the cellular bioenergetic state in the fetal brain, the subsequent damage being ameliorated by a free radical spin trap agent, alpha-phenyl-N-TERT-butylnitrone (PBN). Our objective was to assess whether the secondary deterioration of the cellular bioenergetic state is due to mitochondrial dysfunction and to study whether PBN acts to prevent secondary damage to mitochondria in the fetal rat brain. Fetal neocortical tissues were sampled after 30 min of intrauterine ischemia and after 1, 2 or 4 h of recirculation. PBN or vehicle was given 1 h after recirculation. Homogenates were prepared, and ADP-stimulated, nonstimulated and uncoupled respiratory rates were measured polarographically. Ischemia was associated with a decrease in ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiratory rates, with a marked fall in the respiratory control ratio, defined as ADP-stimulated divided by nonstimulated respiration (p < 0.01). Recirculation (1 h) brought about partial recovery, but continued reflow (2 and 4 h) was associated with a secondary deterioration of respiratory functions (p < 0.01). The secondary deterioration was prevented by PBN (p < 0.05). The results demonstrate that the secondary deterioration of the cellular bioenergetic state in ischemia-reperfusion is due to secondary mitochondrial dysfunction and that this deterioration may be induced by oxygen-derived free radicals in the immature fetal brain. PMID:12865593

  18. Branched-chain Amino Acids are Beneficial to Maintain Growth Performance and Intestinal Immune-related Function in Weaned Piglets Fed Protein Restricted Diet.

    PubMed

    Ren, M; Zhang, S H; Zeng, X F; Liu, H; Qiao, S Y

    2015-12-01

    As a novel approach for disease control and prevention, nutritional modulation of the intestinal health has been proved. However, It is still unknown whether branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) is needed to maintain intestinal immune-related function. The objective of this study was to determine whether BCAA supplementation in protein restricted diet affects growth performance, intestinal barrier function and modulates post-weaning gut disorders. One hundred and eight weaned piglets (7.96±0.26 kg) were randomly fed one of the three diets including a control diet (21% crude protein [CP], CON), a protein restricted diet (17% CP, PR) and a BCAA diet (BCAA supplementation in the PR diet) for 14 d. The growth performance, plasma amino acid concentrations, small intestinal morphology and intestinal immunoglobulins were tested. First, average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.05) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (p<0.05) of weaned pigs in PR group were lower, while gain:feed ratio was lower than the CON group (p<0.05). Compared with PR group, BCAA group improved ADG (p<0.05), ADFI (p<0.05) and feed:gain ratio (p<0.05) of piglets. The growth performance data between CON and BCAA groups was not different (p>0.05). The PR and BCAA treatments had a higher (p<0.05) plasma concentration of methionine and threonine than the CON treatment. The level of some essential and functional amino acids (such as arginine, phenylalanine, histidine, glutamine etc.) in plasma of the PR group was lower (p<0.05) than that of the CON group. Compared with CON group, BCAA supplementation significantly increased BCAA concentrations (p<0.01) and decreased urea concentration (p<0.01) in pig plasma indicating that the efficiency of dietary nitrogen utilization was increased. Compared with CON group, the small intestine of piglets fed PR diet showed villous atrophy, increasing of intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs) number (p<0.05) and declining of the immunoglobulin concentration, including jejunal immunoglobulin A (IgA) (p = 0.04), secreted IgA (sIgA) (p = 0.03) and immunoglobulin M (p = 0.08), and ileal IgA (p = 0.01) and immunoglobulin G (p = 0.08). The BCAA supplementation increased villous height in the duodenum (p<0.01), reversed the trend of an increasing IELs number. Notably, BCAA supplementation increased levels of jejunal and ileal immunoglobulin mentioned above. In conclusion, BCAA supplementation to protein restricted diet improved intestinal immune defense function by protecting villous morphology and by increasing levels of intestinal immunoglobulins in weaned piglets. Our finding has the important implication that BCAA may be used to reduce the negative effects of a protein restricted diet on growth performance and intestinal immunity in weaned piglets. PMID:26580442

  19. Branched-chain Amino Acids are Beneficial to Maintain Growth Performance and Intestinal Immune-related Function in Weaned Piglets Fed Protein Restricted Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ren, M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zeng, X. F.; Liu, H.; Qiao, S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    As a novel approach for disease control and prevention, nutritional modulation of the intestinal health has been proved. However, It is still unknown whether branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) is needed to maintain intestinal immune-related function. The objective of this study was to determine whether BCAA supplementation in protein restricted diet affects growth performance, intestinal barrier function and modulates post-weaning gut disorders. One hundred and eight weaned piglets (7.96±0.26 kg) were randomly fed one of the three diets including a control diet (21% crude protein [CP], CON), a protein restricted diet (17% CP, PR) and a BCAA diet (BCAA supplementation in the PR diet) for 14 d. The growth performance, plasma amino acid concentrations, small intestinal morphology and intestinal immunoglobulins were tested. First, average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.05) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (p<0.05) of weaned pigs in PR group were lower, while gain:feed ratio was lower than the CON group (p<0.05). Compared with PR group, BCAA group improved ADG (p<0.05), ADFI (p<0.05) and feed:gain ratio (p<0.05) of piglets. The growth performance data between CON and BCAA groups was not different (p>0.05). The PR and BCAA treatments had a higher (p<0.05) plasma concentration of methionine and threonine than the CON treatment. The level of some essential and functional amino acids (such as arginine, phenylalanine, histidine, glutamine etc.) in plasma of the PR group was lower (p<0.05) than that of the CON group. Compared with CON group, BCAA supplementation significantly increased BCAA concentrations (p<0.01) and decreased urea concentration (p<0.01) in pig plasma indicating that the efficiency of dietary nitrogen utilization was increased. Compared with CON group, the small intestine of piglets fed PR diet showed villous atrophy, increasing of intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs) number (p<0.05) and declining of the immunoglobulin concentration, including jejunal immunoglobulin A (IgA) (p = 0.04), secreted IgA (sIgA) (p = 0.03) and immunoglobulin M (p = 0.08), and ileal IgA (p = 0.01) and immunoglobulin G (p = 0.08). The BCAA supplementation increased villous height in the duodenum (p<0.01), reversed the trend of an increasing IELs number. Notably, BCAA supplementation increased levels of jejunal and ileal immunoglobulin mentioned above. In conclusion, BCAA supplementation to protein restricted diet improved intestinal immune defense function by protecting villous morphology and by increasing levels of intestinal immunoglobulins in weaned piglets. Our finding has the important implication that BCAA may be used to reduce the negative effects of a protein restricted diet on growth performance and intestinal immunity in weaned piglets. PMID:26580442

  20. Central effects of ethanol interact with endogenous mu opioid activity to control isolation-induced analgesia in maternally separated infant rats

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Kozlov, Andrey P.; Kramskaya, Tatiana. A.; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous opioid activity plays an important role in ethanol consumption and reinforcement in infant rats. Opioid systems are also involved in mediation and regulation of stress responses. Social isolation is a stressful experience for preweanling rats and changes the effects of ethanol through opioid-dependent mechanisms. The present study assessed effects of intracisternal (i.c.) administration of a selective mu-opioid antagonist (CTOP) and i.p. administration of a nonspecific opioid antagonist (naloxone) on voluntary intake and behavior in socially isolated 12–day-old (P12) pups treated with 0.5 g/kg ethanol. Voluntary intake of 0.1% saccharin or water, locomotion, rearing activity, paw licking and grooming were assessed during short-term isolation from littermates (STSI; 8-min duration). Thermal nociceptive reactivity was measured before and after this intake test, with normalized differences between pre- and post-test latencies of paw withdrawal from a hot plate (49°C) used as an index of isolation-induced analgesia (IIA). Results indicated several effects of social isolation and ethanol mediated through the mu-opioid system. Effects of low dose ethanol (0.5 g/kg) and voluntary consumption of saccharin interacted with endogenous mu-opioid activity associated with STSI. Blockade of mu-opioid receptors on saccharin consumption and paw licking-grooming affected intoxicated animals. Low dose ethanol and ingestion of saccharin blunted effects of CTOP on rearing behavior and nociceptive reactivity. Central injections of CTOP stimulated paw licking and grooming dependent on ethanol dose and type of fluid ingested. Ethanol selectively increased saccharin intake during STSI in females, naloxone and CTOP blocked ethanol–mediated enhancement of saccharin intake. We suggest that enhancement of saccharin intake by ethanol during STSI is the product of synergism between isolation-induced mu- opioid activity that increases the pup’s sensitivity to appetitive taste stimulation and the anxiolytic effects of 0.5 g/kg ethanol that decreases behaviors otherwise competing with independent ingestive activity. PMID:24315831

  1. Central effects of ethanol interact with endogenous mu-opioid activity to control isolation-induced analgesia in maternally separated infant rats.

    PubMed

    Nizhnikov, Michael E; Kozlov, Andrey P; Kramskaya, Tatiana A; Varlinskaya, Elena I; Spear, Norman E

    2014-03-01

    Endogenous opioid activity plays an important role in ethanol consumption and reinforcement in infant rats. Opioid systems are also involved in mediation and regulation of stress responses. Social isolation is a stressful experience for preweanling rats and changes the effects of ethanol through opioid-dependent mechanisms. The present study assessed effects of intracisternal (i.c.) administration of a selective mu-opioid antagonist (CTOP) and i.p. administration of a nonspecific opioid antagonist (naloxone) on voluntary intake and behavior in socially isolated 12-day-old (P12) pups treated with 0.5 g/kg ethanol. Voluntary intake of 0.1% saccharin or water, locomotion, rearing activity, paw licking and grooming were assessed during short-term isolation from littermates (STSI; 8-min duration). Thermal nociceptive reactivity was measured before and after this intake test, with normalized differences between pre- and post-test latencies of paw withdrawal from a hot plate (49°C) used as an index of isolation-induced analgesia (IIA). Results indicated several effects of social isolation and ethanol mediated through the mu-opioid system. Effects of low dose ethanol (0.5 g/kg) and voluntary consumption of saccharin interacted with endogenous mu-opioid activity associated with STSI. Blockade of mu-opioid receptors on saccharin consumption and paw licking-grooming affected intoxicated animals. Low dose ethanol and ingestion of saccharin blunted effects of CTOP on rearing behavior and nociceptive reactivity. Central injections of CTOP stimulated paw licking and grooming dependent on ethanol dose and type of fluid ingested. Ethanol selectively increased saccharin intake during STSI in females, naloxone and CTOP blocked ethanol-mediated enhancement of saccharin intake. We suggest that enhancement of saccharin intake by ethanol during STSI is the product of synergism between isolation-induced mu-opioid activity that increases the pup's sensitivity to appetitive taste stimulation and the anxiolytic effects of 0.5 g/kg ethanol that decreases behaviors otherwise competing with independent ingestive activity. PMID:24315831

  2. Sensory, hormonal, and neural basis of maternal aggression in rodents.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rosa Maria Martins; Ferreira, Annabel; Agrati, Daniella

    2014-01-01

    We review existing knowledge of the neural, hormonal, and sensory basis of maternal aggression in the female rat. Although females may express different kinds of aggression, such as defense or dominance, the most frequent and conspicuous form of aggressive behavior among females is the one associated with motherhood. Maternal aggression occurs in various vertebrate and invertebrate species; however, our emphasis will be on maternal aggression in rats because most of the physiological investigations have been performed in this species. Firstly, we address those factors that predispose the female to attack, such as the endocrine profile, the maternal state, and the stimulation provided by the pups, as well as those that trigger the aggressive response, as the intruder's characteristics and the context. As the postpartum aggression is a fundamental component of the maternal repertoire, we emphasize its association with maternal motivation and the reduction of fear and anxiety in dams. Finally, we outline the neurocircuitry involved in the control of maternal aggression, stressing the role of the ventro-orbital region of prefrontal cortex and the serotoninergic system. PMID:24841427

  3. Development/Plasticity/Repair Reversal of Maternal Programming of Stress Responses in

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    . Key words: maternal behavior; rat; hippocampus; glucocorticoid receptor; epigenetics; L Offspring through Methyl Supplementation: Altering Epigenetic Marking Later in Life Ian C. G. Weaver,1 Stressresponsesintheadultratareprogrammedearlyinlifebymaternalcareandassociatedwithepigenomicmarkingofthehippocam- pal exon 17 glucocorticoid receptor (GR) promoter. To examine whether such epigenetic programming

  4. Overexpression of dopamine receptor genes and their products in the postnatal rat brain following maternal n-3 fatty acid dietary deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kuperstein, F; Yakubov, E; Dinerman, P; Gil, S; Eylam, R; Salem, N; Yavin, E

    2005-12-01

    A combination of PCR-Select cDNA subtraction and gene array hybridization was used to identify differentially expressed genomic markers in brains of rats fed for 3 weeks in utero and 2 weeks after birth on an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-deficient diet supplied to dams. Total RNA was isolated, switch mechanism at 5'-end of the RNA transcripts (SMART) applied and used for PCR-Select subtraction of PUFA-deficient and adequately-fed control preparations. Subtracted and amplified ds-cDNA end-products were fragmented, terminally labeled with biotin-ddUTP and hybridized with a RN-U34A gene array. A 10-fold increase in potential genes with log2(Tester/Driver) = 1.4 was found compared with traditional gene array technology when the same chip was tested using non-subtracted targets. Reverse transcription-real-time relative PCR confirmed 30% of the transcripts. Among the validated transcripts, D1 and D2 receptors for dopamine (DA), were most prominent among a number of over-expressed neurotransmitter receptors and retinoic acid receptor (RXR alpha-2 and alpha-1). Immunohistochemical staining of brain sections from 2-week-old pups revealed a substantial enrichment of the D2 receptor in discrete regions of the mesolimbic and mesocortical pathways as well as in a large number of brain areas from the n-3 PUFA-deficient pups. Punches of the same areas run on western blots showed similar results. The overwhelming expression of D1 and D2 receptors may be attributed to a behavioral hypersensitivity caused by the possible impairment of DA production during brain development, which may have implications in certain disorders of the nervous system. PMID:16305626

  5. Poor maternal nutrition followed by accelerated postnatal growth leads to alterations in DNA damage and repair, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and oxidative defense capacity in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain; Alfaradhi, Maria Z; Land, John M; Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    Low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth lead to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We reported previously that rats exposed to a low-protein diet in utero and postnatal catch-up growth (recuperated) develop metabolic dysfunction and have reduced life span. Here we explored the hypothesis that cardiac oxidative and nitrosative stress leading to DNA damage and accelerated cellular aging could contribute to these phenotypes. Recuperated animals had a low birth weight (P<0.001) but caught up in weight to controls during lactation. At weaning, recuperated cardiac tissue had increased (P<0.05) protein nitrotyrosination and DNA single-stranded breaks. This condition was preceded by increased expression of DNA damage repair molecules 8-oxoguanine-DNA-glycosylase-1, nei-endonuclease-VIII-like, X-ray-repair-complementing-defective-repair-1, and Nthl endonuclease III-like-1 on d 3. These differences were maintained on d 22 and became more pronounced in the case of 8-oxoguanine-DNA-glycosylase-1 and nei-endonuclease-VIII-like. This was accompanied by increases in xanthine oxidase (P<0.001) and NADPH oxidase (P<0.05), major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The detrimental effects of increased ROS in recuperated offspring may be exaggerated at 22 d by reductions (P<0.001) in the antioxidant enzymes peroxiredoxin-3 and CuZn-superoxide-dismutase. We conclude that poor fetal nutrition followed by accelerated postnatal growth results in increased cardiac nitrosative and oxidative-stress and DNA damage, which could contribute to age-associated disease risk. PMID:23024373

  6. Maternal low protein diet and postnatal high fat diet increases adipose imprinted gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal and postnatal diet can alter Igf2 gene expression and DNA methylation. To test whether maternal low protein and postnatal high fat (HF) diet result in alteration in Igf2 expression and obesity, we fed obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats 8% (LP) or 20% (NP) protein for 3 wk prior to breeding and...

  7. Maternal obesity during conception programs offspring's body composition: Modulation of fatty acid synthase expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in later life is subject to programming during gestation. To examine whether in utero exposure to maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in the offspring, we have developed an overfeeding-based model of maternal obesity in rats by intragastric feeding of diets using total...

  8. Maternal Hypothyroidism Selectively Affects the Expression of Neuroendocrine-Specific Protein A

    E-print Network

    Zoeller, R. Thomas

    is whether thy- roid hormone of maternal origin is essential in guiding fetal brain development. In both hormone of maternal origin exerts specific receptor-mediated effects on fetal brain development A Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in the Proliferative Zone of the Fetal Rat Brain Cortex* AMY L. S. DOWLING, ERIC

  9. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: I. impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on body composition in the C57BL/6 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon E.; Tang, Zhanhui; Kerbois, Celine; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Bruel, Aurélie; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara; Aspden, Richard M.; Goodyear, Simon R.; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jackie J.D.; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E.L.; Lusseau, David; Douglas, Alex; Speakman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Faced with reduced levels of food, animals must adjust to the consequences of the shortfall in energy. We explored how C57BL/6 mice withdrew energy from different body tissues during three months of food restriction at graded levels up to 40% (calorie restriction: CR). We compared this to the response to equivalent levels of protein restriction (PR) without a shortfall in calories. Under CR there was a dynamic change in body mass over 30 days and thereafter it stabilized. The time to reach stability was independent of the level of restriction. At the end of three months whole body dissections revealed differential utilization of the different tissues. Adipose tissue depots were the most significantly utilized tissue, and provided 55.8 to 60.9% of the total released energy. In comparison, reductions in the sizes of structural tissues contributed between 29.8 and 38.7% of the energy. The balance was made up by relatively small changes in the vital organs. The components of the alimentary tract grew slightly under restriction, particularly the stomach, and this was associated with a parallel increase in assimilation efficiency of the food (averaging 1.73%). None of the changes under CR were recapitulated by equivalent levels of PR. PMID:26079539

  10. Maternal overweight programs offspring insulin and adiponectin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal overweight (OW) was induced in rats by overfeeding via total enteral nutrition. Male offspring from OW dams gained greater (p < 0.005) body weight and %fat mass assessed by NMR, X-ray CT and adipose tissue weights when fed high fat diet (45% fat). Hepatic microarray analyses at postnatal da...

  11. Weaning in Rats: I. Maternal Behavior

    E-print Network

    of mammalian devel- opment. For example, in Trivers' (1972, 1974)parental investment theory, conflicts of predictable conflict, during which it is in the parents to cease investing their resources in the young resources. Galef (1981)constructed a somewhat different characterization of weaning. He casts the infant

  12. Offspring insulin and adiponectin signaling are targets of in utero programming following exposure to maternal overweight during gestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity in adult-life is subject to programming during gestation. To examine whether in utero exposure to maternal overweight (OW) increases the risk of obesity in the offspring, we developed an overfeeding-based model of maternal OW in rats utilizing intragastric feeding of diets via to...

  13. Ventral premammillary nucleus as a critical sensory relay to the maternal aggression network

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Simone C.; Guimarães, Cibele Carla; Furigo, Isadora Clivatti; Sukikara, Marcia Harumi; Baldo, Marcus V. C.; Lonstein, Joseph S.; Canteras, Newton S.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal aggression is under the control of a wide variety of factors that prime the females for aggression or trigger the aggressive event. Maternal attacks are triggered by the perception of sensory cues from the intruder, and here we have identified a site in the hypothalamus of lactating rats that is highly responsive to the male intruder—the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMv). The PMv is heavily targeted by the medial amygdalar nucleus, and we used lesion and immediate-early gene studies to test our working hypothesis that the PMv signals the presence of a male intruder and transfers this information to the network organizing maternal aggression. PMv-lesioned dams exhibit significantly reduced maternal aggression, without affecting maternal care. The Fos analysis revealed that PMv influences the activation of hypothalamic and septal sites shown to be mobilized during maternal aggression, including the medial preoptic nucleus (likely to represent an important locus to integrate priming stimuli critical for maternal aggression), the caudal two-thirds of the hypothalamic attack area (comprising the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and the adjacent tuberal region of the lateral hypothalamic area, critical for the expression of maternal aggression), and the ventral part of the anterior bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (presently discussed as being involved in controlling neuroendocrine and autonomic responses accompanying maternal aggression). These findings reveal an important role for the PMv in detecting the male intruder and how this nucleus modulates the network controlling maternal aggression. PMID:23918394

  14. Maternal taurine supplementation attenuates maternal fructose-induced metabolic and inflammatory dysregulation and partially reverses adverse metabolic programming in offspring.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Reynolds, C M; Sloboda, D M; Gray, C; Vickers, M H

    2015-03-01

    Excessive fructose consumption is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and high fructose intake during pregnancy can lead to compromised fetal development in the rat. Evidence suggests that the amino acid taurine can ameliorate fructose-induced IR and NAFLD in nonpregnant animals. This study investigated the efficacy of taurine supplementation on maternal fructose-induced metabolic dysfunction and neonatal health. Time-mated Wistar rats were randomized to four groups during pregnancy and lactation: (a) control diet (CON), (b) CON supplemented with 1.5% taurine in drinking water (CT), (c) CON supplemented with fructose solution (F) and (d) F supplemented with taurine (FT). Maternal and neonatal weights, plasma cytokines and hepatic gene expression were analyzed. Maternal hyperinsulinemia, increased homeostasis model assessment of IR indices and elevated proinflammatory cytokines were observed in F group and normalized in FT group. Maternal fructose-induced hepatic steatosis accompanied with increased liver weight was ameliorated with taurine supplementation. Maternal hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and fatty acid synthase expression was significantly increased in the F group compared to the CON, CT and FT groups. Neonatal hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression was increased in male F neonates compared to the CON, CT and FT groups and was increased in female F and FT neonates compared to CON and CT. Interleukin-1? expression was decreased in male CT and FT neonates compared to other male groups. Hepatic tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 was lower in the male FT group than the F group. These results demonstrate that maternal taurine supplementation can partially reverse fructose-induced maternal metabolic dysfunction and may ameliorate adverse developmental programming effects in offspring in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25576095

  15. Media representation of maternal neonaticide 

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Jocelyn Renee

    2008-10-10

    of mothers who commit neonaticide. Both fictional and non-fictional media sources exhibited aspects of the monstrous maternal theme and the strain defense theme. The monstrous maternal theme consists of words and statements that indicate the descriptions...

  16. Neuroendocrine control of maternal behaviour 

    E-print Network

    Caughey, Sarah Dawn

    2011-11-25

    Maternal behaviour during the peri-partum period, albeit in differing forms, can be observed in all mammals, thus it must serve an important evolutionary purpose in enabling the successful raising of offspring. Maternal ...

  17. New Insights on the Maternal Diet Induced-Hypertension: Potential Role of the Phenotypic Plasticity and Sympathetic-Respiratory Overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Silva, João H.; de Brito-Alves, José L.; Barros, Monique Assis de V.; Nogueira, Viviane Oliveira; Paulino-Silva, Kássya M.; de Oliveira-Lira, Allan; Nobre, Isabele G.; Fragoso, Jéssica; Leandro, Carol G.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and affects worldwide population. Current environment including life style coupled with genetic programming have been attributed to the rising incidence of hypertension. Besides, environmental conditions during perinatal development such as maternal malnutrition can program changes in the integration among renal, neural, and endocrine system leading to hypertension. This phenomenon is termed phenotypic plasticity and refers to the adjustment of a phenotype in response to environmental stimuli without genetic change, following a novel or unusual input during development. Human and animal studies indicate that fetal exposure to an adverse maternal environment may alter the renal morphology and physiology that contribute to the development of hypertension. Recently, it has been shown that the maternal protein restriction alter the central control of SAH by a mechanism that include respiratory dysfunction and enhanced sympathetic-respiratory coupling at early life, which may contribute to adult hypertension. This review will address the new insights on the maternal diet induced-hypertension that include the potential role of the phenotypic plasticity, specifically the perinatal protein malnutrition, and sympathetic-respiratory overactivity. PMID:26635631

  18. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2010-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk…

  19. Maternal Sexuality and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the…

  20. Maternal obesity influences hepatic gene expression and genome-wide DNA methylation in offspring liver at weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring from obese rat dams gain greater body weight and fat mass when fed HFD. Here we examine hepatic gene expression related to systemic energy expenditure and alterations in genome-wide DNA methylation. Maternal obesity was produced in rats prior to conception via overfeeding of diets. At PND2...

  1. Phenylketonuria and maternal phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Purnell, H

    2001-07-01

    Phenylketonuria is a genetic disease affecting 1:10,000 to 14,000 live births. In NSW there is an average of nine cases diagnosed each year (Dietitians Working Party 1996). This paper discusses the management of phenylketonuria, and in particular the value of breastfeeding, complemented with a low phenylalanine infant formula, in facilitating easier maintenance of satisfactory phenylalanine blood levels. The 'diet for life' approach to managing phenylketonuria is to avoid long-term neurological deficits and, in particular, the risk that maternal PKU, which is not under strict dietary control, will have adverse effects on infants born of mothers with the disease. There have been 31 successful pregnancies to 1997 managed by the Nutrition and Dietetics Department of The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney. The Maternal PKU diet is presented with the case of a client with phenylketonuria who has achieved two normal pregnancies and breastfed her second child for six months. PMID:11550601

  2. Maternal serum screening.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Maternal serum screening (MSS) measures three serum markers: alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and unconjugated estriol, from which the risk of fetal Down syndrome or open neural tube defect is calculated. Initially, 8% of women will have positive results. I present a protocol for investigating these women. Family physicians should be informed about MSS so they can give their patients information and guidance. PMID:7524838

  3. Long-Lasting Effect of Perinatal Exposure to L-tryptophan on Circadian Clock of Primary Cell Lines Established from Male Offspring Born from Mothers Fed on Dietary Protein Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Elizabeth; Guzman-Quevedo, Omar; Delacourt, Nellie; da Silva Aragão, Raquel; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; de Souza, Sandra Lopes; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Maternal undernutrition programs metabolic adaptations which are ultimately detrimental to adult. L-tryptophan supplementation was given to manipulate the long-term sequelae of early-life programming by undernutrition and explore whether cultured cells retain circadian clock dysregulation. Methods Male rat pups from mothers fed on low protein (8%, LP) or control (18%, CP) diet were given, one hour before light off, an oral bolus of L-tryptophan (125 mg/kg) between Day-12 and Day-21 of age. Body weight, food intake, blood glucose along with the capacity of colonization of primary cells from biopsies were measured during the young (45–55 days) and adult (110–130 days) phases. Circadian clock oscillations were re-induced by a serum shock over 30 hours on near-confluent cell monolayers to follow PERIOD1 and CLOCK proteins by Fluorescent Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (FLISA) and period1 and bmal1 mRNA by RT-PCR. Cell survival in amino acid-free conditions were used to measure circadian expression of MAP-LC3B, MAP-LC3B-FP and Survivin. Results Tryptophan supplementation did not alter body weight gain nor feeding pattern. By three-way ANOVA of blood glucose, sampling time was found significant during all phases. A significant interaction between daily bolus (Tryptophan, saline) and diets (LP, CP) were found during young (p?=?0.0291) and adult (p?=?0.0285) phases. In adult phase, the capacity of colonization at seeding of primary cells was twice lower for LP rats. By three-way ANOVA of PERIOD1 perinuclear/nuclear immunoreactivity during young phase, we found a significant effect of diets (p?=?0.049), daily bolus (p<0.0001) and synchronizer hours (p?=?0.0002). All factors were significantly interacting (p?=?0.0148). MAP-LC3B, MAP-LC3B-FP and Survivin were altered according to diets in young phase. Conclusions Sequelae of early-life undernutrition and the effects of L-tryptophan supplementation can be monitored non-invasively by circadian sampling of blood D-glucose and on the expression of PERIOD1 protein in established primary cell lines. PMID:23460795

  4. Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbarski, Dana; Witt, Whitney P.

    2013-01-01

    Although maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children's future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse…

  5. Maternal Depression, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Youth Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompson, Martha C.; Pierre, Claudette B.; Boger, Kathryn Dingman; McKowen, James W.; Chan, Priscilla T.; Freed, Rachel D.

    2010-01-01

    Across development, maternal depression has been found to be a risk factor for youth psychopathology generally and youth depression specifically. Maternal Expressed Emotion (EE) has been examined as a predictor of outcome among youth with depression. The present study explored the associations between youth psychopathology and two…

  6. Effects of maternal diabetes on trophoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Marlúcia Bastos; dos Santos, Anne Carolline Veríssimo

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a health condition characterized by hyperglycemia over a prolonged period. There are three main types of DM: DM type 1 (DM1), DM2 and gestational DM (GDM). Maternal diabetes, which includes the occurrence of DM1 and DM2 during pregnancy or GDM, increases the occurrence of gesttional complications and adverse fetal outcomes. The hyperglycemic intrauterine environment affects not only the fetus but also the placental development and function in humans and experimental rodents. The underlying mechanisms are still unclear, but some evidence indicates alterations in trophoblast proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle control in diabetes. A proper coordination of trophoblast proliferation, differentiation and invasion is required for placental development. Initially, increased expression of proliferative markers in junctional and labyrinth zones of rat placentas and villous cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, stromal cells and fetal endothelial cells in human placentas is reported among diabetics. Moreover, reduced apoptotic index and expression of some apoptotic genes are described in placentas of GDM women. In addition, cell cycle regulators including cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors seem to be affected by the hyperglycemic environment. More studies are necessary to check the balance between proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation in trophoblast cells during maternal diabetes. PMID:25789116

  7. Child Characteristics and Maternal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolak, Linda

    1987-01-01

    An eight-month longitudinal study measuring infants' (N=8) temperament characteristics of activity level, task persistence, and affect and discourse and pragmatic features of their mothers' speech revealed complex interactions between maternal speech and infant temperament. It is argued that nonlinguistic child behaviors may influence maternal

  8. Maternal care differentially affects neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy-Binh; Bagot, Rosemary C; Diorio, Josie; Wong, Tak Pan; Meaney, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Variations in early life maternal care modulate hippocampal development to program distinct emotional-cognitive phenotypes that persist into adulthood. Adult rat offspring that received low compared with high levels of maternal licking and grooming (low LG offspring) in early postnatal life show reduced long term potentiation (LTP) and impaired hippocampal-dependent memory, suggesting a 'detrimental' maternal effect on neural development. However, these studies focused uniquely on the dorsal hippocampus. Emerging evidence suggests a distinct role of the ventral hippocampus in mediating aggression, anxiety, and fear-memory formation, which are enhanced in low LG offspring. We report that variations in maternal care in the rat associate with opposing effects on hippocampal function in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Reduced pup licking associated with suppressed LTP formation in the dorsal hippocampus, but enhanced ventral hippocampal LTP. Ventral hippocampal neurons in low LG offspring fired action potentials at lower threshold voltages that were of larger amplitude and faster rise rate in comparison with those in high LG offspring. Furthermore, recordings of excitatory postsynaptic potential-to-spike coupling (E-S coupling) revealed an increase in excitability of ventral hippocampal CA1 neurons in low LG offspring. These effects do not associate with changes in miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents or paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a specific effect of maternal care on intrinsic excitability. These findings suggest region-specific influences of maternal care in shaping neural development and synaptic plasticity. PMID:25598429

  9. Fetal programming by maternal obesity increases offspring’s susceptibility to obesity in later-life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine whether exposure of the developing fetus to an obese mother during pregnancy increases the risk of obesity in the children in later-life, we have developed an overfeeding-based model of maternal obesity in rats by tube feeding of liquid diets directly into the stomach using total enteral ...

  10. Maternal overweight induces integrative changes in gene expression in the offspring in metabolically active tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational exposure to maternal overweight (OW) influences the risk of obesity in adult-life. Male offspring from OW rat dams (Sprague Dawley) gain greater body weight (p less than 0.005), fat mass and develop insulin resistance when fed high-fat diets (45 percent fat). Hepatic microarray analyses ...

  11. MATERNAL HYPOTHYROXENEMIA LEADS TO PERSISTENT DEFICITS IN HIPPOCAMPAL SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION AND LEARNING IN OFFSPRING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATERNAL HYPOTHYROXINEMIA LEADS TO PERSISTENT DEFICITS IN HIPPOCAMPAL SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION AND LEARNING IN RAT OFFSPRING. M.E. Gilbert1 and Li Sui2, Neurotoxicology Division, 1US EPA and 2National Research Council, Research Triangle Pk, NC 27711.
    While severe hypothyroidis...

  12. Offspring's hydromineral adaptive responses to maternal undernutrition during lactation.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, P; Arguelles, J; Perillan, C

    2015-12-01

    Early development, throughout gestation and lactation, represents a period of extreme vulnerability during which susceptibility to later metabolic and cardiovascular injuries increases. Maternal diet is a major determinant of the foetal and newborn developmental environment; maternal undernutrition may result in adaptive responses leading to structural and molecular alterations in various organs and tissues, such as the brain and kidney. New nephron anlages appear in the renal cortex up to postnatal day 4 and the last anlages to be formed develop into functional nephrons by postnatal day 10 in rodents. We used a model of undernutrition in rat dams that were food-restricted during the first half of the lactation period in order to study the long-term effects of maternal diet on renal development, behaviour and neural hydromineral control mechanisms. The study showed that after 40% food restriction in maternal dietary intake, the dipsogenic responses for both water and salt intake were not altered; Fos expression in brain areas investigated involved in hydromineral homeostasis control was always higher in the offspring in response to isoproterenol. This was accompanied by normal plasma osmolality changes and typical renal histology. These results suggest that the mechanisms for the control of hydromineral balance were unaffected in the offspring of these 40% food-restricted mothers. Undernutrition of the pups may not be as drastic as suggested by dams' restriction. PMID:26234469

  13. Maternal Phenylketonuria (MPKU)

    PubMed Central

    Schoonheyt, W.E.; Hanley, W.B.; Clarke, J.T.R.; Austin, V.; Howe, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Untreated maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) is a major cause of microcephaly, congenital heart disease, intrauterine growth retardation and mental retardation in the offspring of mothers who have the disease. There is evidence, however, that dietary restriction of phenylalanine in the mother before conception and throughout the pregnancy will reduce the risk of these congenital anomalies in the fetus. It is important to be alert to this preventable cause of developmental retardation and congenital abnormalities in all pregnancies until the stage is reached where every woman of child-bearing age has been through the neonatal PKU-screening program. Family physicians are advised to consider prenatal or premarital screening for PKU of all female patients of child-bearing age for the next generation. PMID:21267327

  14. Relative IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression in maternal and fetal tissues from diabetic swine

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.K.; Leaman, D.W.; White, M.E.; Ramsay, T.G. )

    1990-02-26

    Fourteen pregnant, crossbred gilts were utilized in this study. Seven gilts were injected with alloxan (50 mg/kg) at day 75 of gestation to induce diabetes. Gilts underwent caesarean section on day 105 of gestation. Samples were collected from maternal skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, uterus and endometrium; and from fetal skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, placenta, liver, lung, kidney, heart, brain and spleen. Tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen for later analysis of IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression. Samples were pooled and total RNA was isolated using the guanidine isothiocynate method. Total mRNA was analyzed by dot blot hybridization. Blots were probed with {sup 32}P-cDNA for porcine IGF-1 and rat IGF-2. IGF-1 gene expression in maternal tissues was unaffected by diabetes. Maternal diabetes increased IGF-2 mRNA in maternal adipose tissue but exhibited no effect in muscle or uterus. Expression of IGF-2 by maternal endometrium was decreased by diabetes. Maternal diabetes induced an increase in IGF-1 gene expression in muscle and placenta while causing an increase in IGF-2 expression in fetal liver and placenta. IGF-2 mRNA was lower in lung from fetuses of diabetic mothers than in controls. These results suggest that maternal diabetes alters IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression in specific tissues and differential regulation of these genes appears to exist in the mother and developing fetus.

  15. [Maternal death: an avoidable tragedy].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C E

    1992-01-01

    Although statistics show that maternal mortality has declined during this century, high levels persist in the developing world. There are 100 to 1000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in developing countries, compared to 7 to 15 deaths per 100,000 live births in developed countries. Most of these deaths in developing countries are avoidable by effective maternal care interventions. A book edited by Unicamp on maternal mortality has made an important contribution to the debate that has been going on in scientific circles and among planners and health professionals. The quality of data for analysis of maternal mortality is implicated also because of erroneous classification of maternal deaths as nonmaternal, imprecision in the death certification, and omission of the status of pregnancy associated with illegal abortion. The identification of these errors means that medical files, hospital registers, family interviews, and autopsies have to be consulted. Research carried out in Sao Paulo demonstrated that at the end of the 1980s the maternal mortality rate was in fact 99.5/100,000 live births, whereas original records showed only 44.5/100,000 live births. Even in the United States during 1980-85, 33% of maternal deaths were underreported. In England the level of underreporting amounted to 41% during 1970-72. The World Health Organization has encouraged the formation of committees to study the prevention of maternal mortality. Two such committees were started in the state of Sao Paulo with the objectives of making professionals aware of the importance of accurate death records; immediate notification of maternal deaths to the regional committee; means from the proper authorities for the correction of deficiencies detected; and continuous evaluation of maternal mortality rates. The committee of Marilia, in the interior of the state of Sao Paulo, demonstrated that 72% of maternal deaths during 1986-88 were avoidable by medical-obstetrical means, prenatal care, or social assistance. 61% of deaths were attributed to cesarean section, which indicates the major risk of surgical complications. PMID:12286240

  16. Maternal collapse: Training in resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Mergan

    2015-11-01

    The National Committee for the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths (NCCEMD) of South Africa has recommended in the Sixth Saving Mothers Report that health-care professionals (HCPs) training in managing obstetric emergencies be improved. One such measure is to ensure that the Essential Steps in Managing Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE) with its Emergency Obstetric Simulation Training (EOST) be rolled out to every HCP working in the obstetric environment. The programme has been strengthened and rolled out in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. This review focuses on the various teaching methods used to improve maternal resuscitation training in a South African context. Evidence-based interventions in maternal resuscitation will be highlighted, and recommendations for clinical practice will be suggested. Common causes of maternal collapse will be explored, and measures to improve training in these areas will be outlined. In order to ensure sustainability, quality improvement measures need to be introduced and evaluated. PMID:26277335

  17. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment by enhancing cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hoon; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Bo-Kyun

    2014-08-01

    During pregnancy, diabetes mellitus exerts detrimental effects on the development of the fetus, especially the central nervous system. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of postnatal treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic maternal rats. Adult female rats were mated with male rats for 24 h. Two weeks after mating, the pregnant female rats were divided into two groups: control group and STZ injection group. The pregnant rats in the STZ injection group were administered 40 mg/kg of STZ intraperitoneally. After birth, the rat pups were divided into the following four groups: control group, control with postnatal exercise group, maternal STZ-injection group, and maternal STZ-injection with postnatal exercise group. The rat pups in the postnatal exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times per week for 2 weeks beginning 4 weeks after birth. The rat pups born to diabetic rats were shown to have short-term memory impairment with suppressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviated short-term memory impairment by increased cell proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in the rat pups born to diabetic rats. These findings indicate that postnatal treadmill exercise may be used as a valuable strategy to ameliorate neurodevelopmental problems in children born to diabetics. PMID:25210695

  18. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment by enhancing cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hoon; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Bo-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    During pregnancy, diabetes mellitus exerts detrimental effects on the development of the fetus, especially the central nervous system. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of postnatal treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic maternal rats. Adult female rats were mated with male rats for 24 h. Two weeks after mating, the pregnant female rats were divided into two groups: control group and STZ injection group. The pregnant rats in the STZ injection group were administered 40 mg/kg of STZ intraperitoneally. After birth, the rat pups were divided into the following four groups: control group, control with postnatal exercise group, maternal STZ-injection group, and maternal STZ-injection with postnatal exercise group. The rat pups in the postnatal exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times per week for 2 weeks beginning 4 weeks after birth. The rat pups born to diabetic rats were shown to have short-term memory impairment with suppressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviated short-term memory impairment by increased cell proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in the rat pups born to diabetic rats. These findings indicate that postnatal treadmill exercise may be used as a valuable strategy to ameliorate neurodevelopmental problems in children born to diabetics. PMID:25210695

  19. Denial or receipt of expected reward through maternal contact during the neonatal period differentially affect the development of the rat amygdala and program its function in adulthood in a sex-dimorphic way.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulou, Anastasia; Raftogianni, Androniki; Stamatakis, Antonios; Tzanoulinou, Stamatina; Oitzl, Melly S; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2013-09-01

    Early experiences affect brain development and thus adult brain function and behavior. We employed a novel early experience model involving denial (DER) or receipt of expected reward (RER) through maternal contact in a T-maze. Exposure to the DER experience for the first time, on postnatal day 10 (PND10), was stressful for the pups, as assessed by increased corticosterone levels, and was accompanied by enhanced activation of the amygdala, as assessed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Re-exposure to the same experience on days 11-13 led to adaptation. Corticosterone levels of the RER pups did not differ on the first and last days of training (PND10 and 13 respectively), while on PND11 and 12 they were lower than those of the CTR. The RER experience did not lead to activation of the amygdala. Males and females exposed as neonates to the DER or RER experience, and controls were tested as adults in the open field task (OF), the elevated plus maze (EPM), and cued and contextual fear conditioning (FC). No group differences were found in the EPM, while in the OF, both male and female DER animals, showed increased rearings, compared to the controls. In the FC, the RER males had increased memory for both context and cued conditioned fear, than either the DER or CTR. On the other hand, the DER males, but not females showed an increased activation, as assessed by c-Fos expression, of the amygdala following fear conditioning. Our results show that the DER early experience programmed the function of the adult amygdala as to render it more sensitive to fearful stimuli. This programming by the DER early experience could be mediated through epigenetic modifications of histones leading to chromatin opening, as indicated by our results showing increased levels of phospho-acetyl-histone-3 in the amygdala of the DER males. PMID:23490071

  20. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    , & Carmichael Olson, 1999). However, effects of maternally mediated prenatal and postnatal exposure to alcohol effects of drinking while pregnant on subsequent alcohol use by children of drinking mothers. Legal examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary

  1. Extracellular HSP70 levels in diabetic environment in rats.

    PubMed

    Santos, T M M; Sinzato, Y K; Gallego, F Q; Iessi, I L; Volpato, G T; Dallaqua, B; Damasceno, D C

    2015-07-01

    The expression of HSP70 in embryonic cells of mammals and its role for their normal development and protection is an important aspect to be investigated in pregnancy and/or mild diabetes. In this sense, the present study evaluated the effects of mild diabetes on maternal reproductive parameters and HSP70 levels in Wistar rats at different stages of life and in their offspring. Mild diabetes was induced by a beta-cytotoxic drug (streptozotocin) at birth. Four experimental groups were evaluated: at 90 days of age: nonpregnant nondiabetic (ND90) and nonpregnant mild diabetic (D90) female rats, and at term pregnancy: pregnant female rats of both glycemic status were examined (NDP and DP, respectively). The rats were submitted to oral glucose tolerance test, and blood samples were collected for determination of HSP70 levels. In addition, the reproductive performance of pregnant rats was assessed and HSP70 levels determined in their offspring blood samples. The HSP70 levels and maternal reproductive performance presented no difference between ND and D rats, regardless of the life stage. The HSP70 levels were increased in D90 rats and lower in offspring from D rats. Maternal HSP70 levels were positively correlated to the number of dead embryos. In conclusion, mild diabetes did not affect maternal reproductive performance, but high maternal HSP70 levels compromised embryo development. In addition, offspring from D rats exhibited lower HSP70 levels, showing that this protein can be used as an indicator of metabolic consequences of diabetes and predictor of related disorders in adulthood. PMID:25813004

  2. KIDNEY MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION IN THE YOUNG OF RATS MALNOURISHED AND EXPOSED TO NITROFEN DURING PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The separate and combined effects of prenatal protein deficiency (65 casein) and prenatal nitrofen exposure (12.5 mg/kg on gestational days 7-21) on renal morphology in the 21-day fetal and postnatal rat were examined. Maternal protein deprivation reduced maternal feed intake, fe...

  3. German Maternal Phenylketonuria Study.

    PubMed

    Cipcic-Schmidt, S; Trefz, F K; Fünders, B; Seidlitz, G; Ullrich, K

    1996-07-01

    The German maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) Study began in 1989 and since 1992 works together with the American-Canadian MPKU Study. Main goals of the study are: (1) to find women with phenylketonuria (PKU) and mild untreated hyperphenylalaninaemia (HPA); (2) to inform them about the risks of an untreated pregnancy with PKU and HPA; (3) to evaluate the efficacy of the phenylalanine (Phe) restricted dietary treatment prior to and during pregnancy by following the physical and cognitive development of offspring from treated pregnancies. An interim report of the study is presented. Until now, 43 pregnancies have been followed. They resulted in 34 live births, 24 from women with PKU and 10 form women with HPA. There are significant negative correlations between the gestational age in which the dietary control (blood Phe level < 360 mumol/l) was reached and pregnancy outcome as measured by growth parameters and early cognitive and motor developmental quotients at the age of 2 years. For minimizing risks of MPKU, preconceptional dietary control is strongly recommended. Tracking and timely information of young women about risks of MPKU is of outmost importance. PMID:8828639

  4. Maternal perinatal undernutrition modifies lactose and serotranferrin in milk: relevance to the programming of metabolic diseases?

    PubMed

    Wattez, J S; Delmont, A; Bouvet, M; Beseme, O; Goers, S; Delahaye, F; Laborie, C; Lesage, J; Foligné, B; Breton, C; Metges, C C; Vieau, D; Pinet, F

    2015-03-01

    A close link between intrauterine growth restriction and development of chronic adult diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension has been established both in humans and animals. Modification of growth velocity during the early postnatal period (i.e., lactation) may also sensitize to the development of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. This suggests that milk composition may have long-lasting programming/deprogramming metabolic effects in the offspring. We therefore assess the effects of maternal perinatal denutrition on breast milk composition in a food-restricted 50% (FR50) rat model. Monosaccharides and fatty acids were characterized by gas chromatography, and proteins were profiled by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis in milk samples from FR50 and control rat dams. Milk analysis of FR50 rats demonstrated that maternal undernutrition decreases lactose concentration and modulates lipid profile at postnatal day 10 by increasing the unsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids and diminishes serotransferrin levels at postnatal day 21. Our data indicate that maternal perinatal undernutrition modifies milk composition both quantitatively and qualitatively. These modifications by maternal nutrition open new perspectives to identify molecules that could be used in artificial milk to protect from the subsequent development of metabolic diseases. PMID:25550282

  5. Maternal mortality in a maternity hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, R A; Erkaya, S; Sipahi, T; Kutlar, I

    1995-09-01

    During 1983-1992 in Turkey, 17 maternal deaths occurred out of 100,531 live births at the Zubeyde Hanim Maternity Hospital in Ankara for a maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 16.9/100,000 live births. Hemorrhage (41.2%) and pulmonary embolism (35.3%) were the leading causes of maternal death. Cases referred to the hospital after home deliveries accounted for 57% of the hemorrhage-related deaths. Other causes of maternal death were eclampsia (11.7%), puerperal infection (5.9%), and heart failure attributed to rheumatic heart disease (5.9%). The MMR fell over time from 22.6 (1983-1984) to 12.8 (1991-1992). Women younger than 20 and those 35 and older suffered from the highest MMRs. MMR increased with parity (8 for primigravida, 10 for parity 1-2, 27.3 for parity 3-4, and 62.1 for parity =or 5). Cesarean delivery was associated with a higher MMR than vaginal delivery (44.7 vs. 14.1). This association was likely a result of pregnancy complications that led to a cesarean section rather than the cesarean section itself. PMID:7660764

  6. Maternal high fat diet programs stress-induced behavioral disorder in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Lin, ChengCheng; Shao, Bei; Huang, HuanJie; Zhou, YuLei; Lin, YuanShao

    2015-12-01

    Early life exposure to specific environmental factors can contribute to development of behavioral disorders in adulthood. Although maternal high fat diet (HFD) consumption during the perinatal period has been reported to program offspring behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of maternal HFD on offspring behavior under nonstressed and stressful conditions, using male Sprague-Dawley offspring, which mothers were fed with HFD or normal diet (ND), receiving chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in the adulthood. We found that although the detrimental effects of maternal HFD consumption on offspring depressive behavior did not persist into adulthood, it markedly aggravated the behavioral disorder response to stressful challenge in adult offspring. Moreover, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentration in CSF and hippocampus were increased in the HFD+CUMS rats, compared to the ND+CUMS subjects. Another separate groups were fitted with intracerebroventricular (icv) cannulae. Central infusion of ?CGRP8-37, a CGRP antagonist, produced antidepressant effects in HFD+CUMS rats, implying that the programming of maternal HFD on offspring behavior responses to stress may be mediated partially by endogenous central CGRP signaling. Moreover, we found that maternal HFD significantly exacerbated HPA profile response to acute restraint stress and attenuated the habituation of HPA responses to repeated restraint stress, suggesting that maternal HFD may program the changes of HPA-regulatory mechanisms. Overall, our findings suggest that maternal HFD influence adult depressive disorder response to stressful challenge, through the modulation of endogenous central CGRP signaling and HPA-regulatory components. PMID:26423785

  7. [Epigenetic mechanisms of the influence of maternal care on off spring development].

    PubMed

    Dang, Yong-Hui; Yan, Chun-Xia; Chen, Teng

    2011-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that the social environment early in life has a long lasting effect on the physical and psychological health of the human body. However, understanding of the relationship between early life experiences, such as maternal care behavior, and life-long cognitive and emotional health can only rely on the studies on animal models. In this paper, we summarized the maternal care effects on both defensive responses to stress and reproductive behavior in rat, and explored the possible underlying epigenetic mechanisms for these effects. Based on this model, we further investigated the significance of such epigenetic effects on human mental health. PMID:21951791

  8. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: III. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on mean daily body temperature and torpor use in the C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon E; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara L; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jing-Dong J; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E L; Douglas, Alex; Lusseau, David; Speakman, John R

    2015-07-30

    A commonly observed response in mammals to calorie restriction (CR) is reduced body temperature (Tb). We explored how the Tb of male C57BL/6 mice responded to graded CR (10 to 40%), compared to the response to equivalent levels of protein restriction (PR) over 3 months. Under CR there was a dynamic change in daily Tb over the first 30-35 days, which stabilized thereafter until day 70 after which a further decline was noted. The time to reach stability was dependent on restriction level. Body mass negatively correlated with Tb under ad libitum feeding and positively correlated under CR. The average Tb over the last 20 days was significantly related to the levels of body fat, structural tissue, leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1. Some mice, particularly those under higher levels of CR, showed periods of daily torpor later in the restriction period. None of the changes in Tb under CR were recapitulated by equivalent levels of PR. We conclude that changes in Tb under CR are a response only to the shortfall in calorie intake. The linear relationship between average Tb and the level of restriction supports the idea that Tb changes are an integral aspect of the lifespan effect. PMID:26286956

  9. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: II. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on circulating hormone levels, glucose homeostasis and oxidative stress in male C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon E; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Hurst, Jane; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jackie J D; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E L; Lusseau, David; Douglas, Alex; Speakman, John R

    2015-09-15

    Limiting food intake attenuates many of the deleterious effects of aging, impacting upon healthspan and leading to an increased lifespan. Whether it is the overall restriction of calories (calorie restriction: CR) or the incidental reduction in macronutrients such as protein (protein restriction: PR) that mediate these effects is unclear. The impact of 3 month CR or PR, (10 to 40%), on C57BL/6 mice was compared to controls fed ad libitum. Reductions in circulating leptin, tumor necrosis factor-? and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were relative to the level of CR and individually associated with morphological changes but remained unchanged following PR. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were improved following CR but not affected by PR. There was no indication that CR had an effect on oxidative damage, however CR lowered antioxidant activity. No biomarkers of oxidative stress were altered by PR. CR significantly reduced levels of major urinary proteins suggesting lowered investment in reproduction. Results here support the idea that reduced adipokine levels, improved insulin/IGF-1 signaling and reduced reproductive investment play important roles in the beneficial effects of CR while, in the short-term, attenuation of oxidative damage is not applicable. None of the positive effects were replicated with PR. PMID:26061745

  10. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: III. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on mean daily body temperature and torpor use in the C57BL/6 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon E.; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara L.; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jing-Dong J.; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E.L.; Douglas, Alex; Lusseau, David; Speakman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A commonly observed response in mammals to calorie restriction (CR) is reduced body temperature (Tb). We explored how the Tb of male C57BL/6 mice responded to graded CR (10 to 40%), compared to the response to equivalent levels of protein restriction (PR) over 3 months. Under CR there was a dynamic change in daily Tb over the first 30–35 days, which stabilized thereafter until day 70 after which a further decline was noted. The time to reach stability was dependent on restriction level. Body mass negatively correlated with Tb under ad libitum feeding and positively correlated under CR. The average Tb over the last 20 days was significantly related to the levels of body fat, structural tissue, leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1. Some mice, particularly those under higher levels of CR, showed periods of daily torpor later in the restriction period. None of the changes in Tb under CR were recapitulated by equivalent levels of PR. We conclude that changes in Tb under CR are a response only to the shortfall in calorie intake. The linear relationship between average Tb and the level of restriction supports the idea that Tb changes are an integral aspect of the lifespan effect. PMID:26286956

  11. Learning lessons from maternal death.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Margaret

    2011-04-01

    Maternity Services and the whole team delivering care to women and their families have had the benefit of the review and recommendations from the confidential enquiries into maternal deaths since their beginnings in 1952. The maternal death enquiry continued to develop and became UK wide in the 1990s. The title of the report published in December 2007 changed to the more positive 'Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer--2003-2005'. Midwives must be aware of the report, the findings reached and recommendations made. They must ensure that their own knowledge and clinical practice are up to date. The most recent report has just been published in March 2011. It is an ideal opportunity for midwives to be involved and work with the whole team to review the report and its recommendations. They can contribute towards ensuring that the local service and care delivered meet the standards expected, reflect the recommendations and make the service provided for local mothers and babies as safe as possible. In this article, a supervisor of midwives and regional midwifery assessor reflects on these role in relation to maternal death and the lessons that can be learnt from the actions taken and recorded in each case when this devastating event occurs. PMID:21560944

  12. The impact of early postnatal environmental enrichment on maternal care and offspring behaviour following weaning.

    PubMed

    Li, Ki Angel; Lund, Emilie Torp; Voigt, Jörg-Peter W

    2016-01-01

    The early postnatal period is a sensitive period in rodents as behavioural systems are developing and maturing during this time. However, relatively little information is available about the impact of environmental enrichment on offspring behaviour if enrichment is implemented only during this period. Here, environmental enrichment was provided from postnatal day 1 until weaning. On post-natal day 9, maternal behaviour and nonmaternal behaviour of the dam was observed. Nursing time in the enriched group was reduced but dams showed more non-maternal appetitive behaviours. Offspring were exposed to either the open field or the elevated plus maze (EPM) after weaning. In the open field, rats from the enriched group approached the more aversive inner zone of the open field later than control rats. Offspring from the enriched group made fewer entries into the inner zone and spent less time in this part of the arena. Enrichment had no impact on behaviour in the EPM. The present study provides evidence that postnatal enrichment can interfere with maternal behaviour in rats and can possibly lead to increased anxiety in the offspring. The findings suggest that enrichment procedures can have potentially unintended effects, interfering with the development of emotional behaviours in rats. PMID:26562657

  13. Early life stress induces renal dysfunction in adult male rats but not female rats

    PubMed Central

    Loria, Analia S.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Pollock, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal separation (MatSep) is a model of behavioral stress during early life. We reported that MatSep exacerbates ANG II-induced hypertension in adult male rats. The aims of this study were to determine whether exposure to MatSep in female rats sensitizes blood pressure to ANG II infusion similar to male MatSep rats and to elucidate renal mechanisms involved in the response in MatSep rats. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) pups were exposed to MatSep 3 h/day from days 2 to 14, while control rats remained with their mothers. ANG II-induced mean arterial pressure (MAP; telemetry) was enhanced in female MatSep rats compared with control female rats but delayed compared with male MatSep rats. Creatinine clearance (Ccr) was reduced in male MatSep rats compared with control rats at baseline and after ANG II infusion. ANG II infusion significantly increased T cells in the renal cortex and greater histological damage in the interstitial arteries of male MatSep rats compared with control male rats. Plasma testosterone was greater and estradiol was lower in male MatSep rats compared with control rats with ANG II infusion. ANG II infusion failed to increase blood pressure in orchidectomized male MatSep and control rats. Female MatSep and control rats had similar Ccr, histological renal analysis, and sex hormones at baseline and after ANG II infusion. These data indicate that during ANG II-induced hypertension, MatSep sensitizes the renal phenotype in male but not female rats. PMID:23174859

  14. Relationships between Maternal Adult Attachment Security, Child Perceptions of Maternal Support, and Maternal Perceptions of Child Responses to Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leifer, Myra; Kilbane, Teresa; Skolnick, Linda I.

    2002-01-01

    Study assessed the relationships between maternal adult attachment style, children's perceptions of maternal support following disclosure of sexual abuse, and maternal perceptions of children's behavioral and emotional responses to sexual abuse. Findings indicate that fostering parent-child attachment is important in order to decrease the risk for…

  15. Maternal and Child Health MPH Degree Program

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Maternal and Child Health MPH Degree Program Division of Epidemiology and Community Health 2015, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status.......................................................................................................................................................... 3 1. Maternal and Child Health MPH Degree Program

  16. Improving maternal care reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Reduction of maternal mortality in developing countries by community-based action is complex but possible. Deaths related to pregnancy are primarily due to bleeding, infection, toxemia and illegal abortion. The excess maternal deaths in developing countries are also related to high numbers of high-risk pregnancies, total lack of prenatal and obstetric care in some areas, poor nutrition and overwork. The basic interventions available to communities include prenatal care, improved alarm and transport systems, referral centers and improved community-based care. Prenatal care can include nutritional supplements and exams and referrals by traditional birth attendants, targeting women suffering from toxemia, bleeding and infections. Local ambulances with life-support equipment, and maternity waiting houses are examples of ways of dealing with transport problems. Referral centers should be capable of providing sterile conditions and blood transfusions. Nurses can be trained to do caesarean sections. Birth attendants can use checklists to administer antibiotics and oxytocic drugs, for example. PMID:12281272

  17. Subchronic, reproductive, and maternal toxicity studies with tertiary butyl acetate (TBAC).

    PubMed

    Faber, Willem; Kirkpatrick, Daniel; Coder, Pragati; Li, Abby; Borghoff, Susan; Banton, Marcy

    2014-04-01

    Tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC) was tested for subchronic toxicity in rats and mice and reproductive toxicity in rats at inhalation concentrations of 0, 100, 400 or 1600ppm. An oral maternal toxicity study was conducted in rats at dose levels of 0, 400, 800, 1000 and 1600mgkg(-1)d(-1). In the inhalation studies, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, gross pathology and the majority of body weight and feed consumption values were unaffected. Exposure to TBAC at concentrations of 400ppm and higher caused transient hyperactivity in mice and some evidence of increased motor activity counts in male rats at the 1600ppm exposure level. TBAC caused ?2u-globulin accumulation in male rat kidneys from all exposure groups and increased liver weights in 1600ppm rats and mice. Levels of thyroxin were decreased in male mice exposed to 1600ppm TBAC for 4weeks but otherwise thyroid endpoints were unaffected in rats and mice at either the 4 or 13weeks time points. There was no evidence or immunotoxicity or reproductive toxicity in rats. Pregnant rats receiving 1000mgkg(-1)d(-1) TBAC exhibited severe signs of acute neurotoxicity and decreased feed consumption and body weight gain. Fetal viability and growth were unaffected. PMID:24486531

  18. Maternity telehealth: ringing the changes.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Dorothy; Brown, Sheona

    2013-12-01

    This article describes NHS Scotland's Maternity telehealth options project and the implementation of the recommendations made. This 17-month project resulted in the development of national documentation for recording telehealth calls; the development of a self-directed eLearning tool on maternity telehealth call structure which was made available to all health boards in Scotland; a comprehensive programme of training on telehealth for student midwives; a programme of 'Train-the-trainer' events for qualified midwives to enable the cascade of learning throughout the service. The project also involved collaboration with Health Scotland, signposting for women to contact the appropriate caregiver at the appropriate time. PMID:24386706

  19. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  20. Enhanced Adipogenic and Lipogenic Signatures in White Adipose Tissue of Offspring Exposed to Maternal Obesity In Utero

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The risk of obesity throughout life is subject to programming beginning early in development. Exposure to maternal obesity (MO) at conception and during gestation increases the risk of obesity in adult-life. MO was induced in female Sprague Dawley rats via overfeeding of liquid diets (30% excess cal...

  1. Gestational exposure to maternal obesity decreases mitochondrial SIRT3 and components of oxidative phosphorylation in offspring liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to maternal overweight (OW) during development influences the risk of obesity in adult-life. We reported that by postnatal day (PND) 120 male offspring from OW rat dams have greater body weight and fat mass (p<0.005), and develop insulin resistance when fed high-fat diets (HFD, 45% fat). OW...

  2. The Effect of Maternal Nutrition on the Development of the Offspring: An International Symposium. Nutrition Reports International, Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeder, Lois M., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Contents of this symposium include the following papers: "Effect of Maternal Protein Malnutrition on Neonatal Lung Development and Mitochondrial Function," E. J. Hawrylewicz, J. Q. Kissane, W. H. Blair and C. A. Heppner; "Effect of the Level of Nutrition on Rates of Cell Proliferation and of RNA and Protein Syntheses in the Rat," L. M. Roeder;…

  3. IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion

    E-print Network

    2013-01-01

    an intermediate of fusion, referred to as a cold arrestedcold arrested state (CAS), PLOS Pathogens | www.plospathogens.org January 2013 | Volume 9 | Issue 1 | e1003124 Restriction of Viral Membrane Fusion

  4. University of Sussex Maternity Guide

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    is designed to help you if you are considering starting or adding to your family, or if you are already expecting a baby. It gives advice on the steps you should take before you start your maternity leave, what in which your baby is expected to be born, beginning on a Sunday. This is important as it is used

  5. Plotting Maternity in Three Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Amber E.

    2012-01-01

    This performance text examines complexities of personal and maternal identity in family life. Speaking in first, second, and third person voices, the author offers autoethnographic accounts of the tensions between separateness and connectedness, normative and subjective motherhood, and novice and seasoned perspectives. The piece functions as a…

  6. CELL NUMBER AND SIZE IN SELECTED ORGANS OF FETUSES OF RATS MALNOURISHED AND EXPOSED TO NITROFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of maternal exposure to nitrofen or protein-energy malnutrition on the number and sizes of cells in selected organs of the fetal rat have been studied. Pregnant rats were fed either an adequate (CON) or protein-energy deficient diet (PEM) throughout gestation. Materna...

  7. Early maternal separation affects ethanol-induced conditioning in a nor-BNI insensitive manner, but does not alter ethanol-induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Fabio, Ma Carolina; Spear, Norman E

    2012-01-01

    Early environmental stress significantly affects the development of offspring. This stress has been modeled in rats through the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, which alters the functioning of the HPA axis and can enhance ethanol intake at adulthood. Infant rats are sensitive to ethanol's reinforcing effects, which modulate ethanol seeking and intake. Little is known about the impact of MS on sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive and aversive effects during infancy. The present study assessed ethanol-induced conditioned place preference established through second-order conditioning (SOC), spontaneous or ethanol-induced locomotor activity and ethanol intake in preweanling rats that experienced normal animal facility rearing (AFR) or daily episodes of maternal separation (MS) during postnatal days 1-13 (PDs 1-13). Low-ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) induced appetitive conditioned place preference (via SOC) in control rats given conventional rearing but not in rats given maternal separation in early infancy, whereas 2.0 g/kg ethanol induced aversive conditioned place preference in the former but not the latter. The administration of a kappa antagonist at PD 1 or immediately before testing did not alter ethanol-induced reinforcement. High (i.e., 2.5 and 2.0 g/kg) but not low (i.e., 0.5 g/kg) ethanol dose induced reliable motor stimulation, which was independent of early maternal separation. Ethanol intake and blood alcohol levels during conditioning were unaffected by rearing conditions. Pups given early maternal separation had lower body weights than controls and showed an altered pattern of exploration when placed in an open field. These results indicate that, when assessed in infant rats, earlier maternal separation alters the balance between the appetitive and aversive motivational effects of ethanol but has no effect on the motor activating effects of the drug. PMID:22108648

  8. Elevated maternal cortisol leads to relative maternal hyperglycemia and increased stillbirth in ovine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E.; Richards, Elaine; Anthony, Russell V.; Dahl, Geoffrey E.; Tao, Sha

    2014-01-01

    In normal pregnancy, cortisol increases; however, further pathological increases in cortisol are associated with maternal and fetal morbidities. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that increased maternal cortisol would increase maternal glucose concentrations, suppress fetal growth, and impair neonatal glucose homeostasis. Ewes were infused with cortisol (1 mg·kg?1·day?1) from day 115 of gestation to term; maternal glucose, insulin, ovine placental lactogen, estrone, progesterone, nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA), ?-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and electrolytes were measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal glucose concentration and slowed the glucose disappearance after injection of glucose; maternal infusion of cortisol also increased the incidence of fetal death at or near parturition. The design of the study was altered to terminate the study prior to delivery, and post hoc analysis of the data was performed to test the hypothesis that maternal metabolic factors predict the fetal outcome. In cortisol-infused ewes that had stillborn lambs, plasma insulin was increased relative to control ewes or cortisol-infused ewes with live lambs. Maternal cortisol infusion did not alter maternal food intake or plasma NEFA, BHB, estrone, progesterone or placental lactogen concentrations, and it did not alter fetal body weight, ponderal index, or fetal organ weights. Our study suggests that the adverse effect of elevated maternal cortisol on pregnancy outcome may be related to the effects of cortisol on maternal glucose homeostasis, and that chronic maternal stress or adrenal hypersecretion of cortisol may create fetal pathophysiology paralleling some aspects of maternal gestational diabetes. PMID:24920731

  9. Oxidative stress status and placental implications in diabetic rats undergoing swimming exercise after embryonic implantation.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-05-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control-nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised-nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic-diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised-diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. PMID:25361551

  10. Food allergens are transferred intact across the rat blood-placental barrier in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Yoshiko; Baba, Ryoko; Arita, Kumi; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Mamoru

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the mechanism of transplacental macromolecular transport in rats on the nineteenth day of pregnancy using tracers, transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The blood-placental barrier of full-term rat placentas was composed of a trilaminar layer of trophoblast cells that separates the fetal capillaries from the maternal blood spaces: a layer of cytotrophoblasts lining the maternal blood space and a bilayer of syncytiotrophoblast surrounding the fetal capillaries. Horseradish peroxidase, intravenously injected into the maternal circulation, was found in the maternal blood spaces, the interspaces between the cytotrophoblasts and the syncytiotrophoblast I, many pits and small vesicles in the syncytiotrophoblast I, vesicles of the syncytiotrophoblast II, fetal connective tissue and fetal capillaries. Intravenously injected ovalbumin was detected in the maternal blood spaces, a trilaminar layer and the fetal capillaries. Neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a receptor for IgG, was localized at the maternal side of the blood-placental barrier. These results show that the structure of the rat blood-placental barrier is quite similar to the human blood-placental barrier, and non-specific macromolecules and food allergens may penetrate through the blood-placental barrier of the full-term placenta from the maternal to fetal circulation mediated by FcRn. PMID:23475277

  11. Maternal hyperventilation and foetal hypocapnia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Baillie, P; Dawes, G S; Merlet, C L; Richards, R

    1971-11-01

    1. In anaesthetized foetal lambs near term, hypocapnia induced by maternal hyperventilation abolished the rise of arterial pressure and femoral vasoconstriction caused by hypoxaemia. This is consistent with interaction of P(CO2) and P(O2) on the foetal aortic bodies.2. In immature lambs (0.6-0.77 of term) maternal hyperventilation caused a fall in foetal carotid P(CO2) commensurate with that in the maternal blood. In mature lambs (at 0.9 or more of term) the fall in foetal carotid P(CO2) was less than that in maternal blood, whether the foetus was exteriorized or in utero.3. The mean transplacental gradient for P(CO2) (maternal arterial-umbilical vascular), when the foetus was replaced with a mechanical pump recirculating foetal blood, was 6.3 mm Hg. This is attributed to placental CO(2) production, and is nearly half the mean P(CO2) gradient (maternal artery-foetal carotid) of about 14 mm Hg during normal maternal ventilation.4. The mean maternal-umbilical transcotyledonary venous gradients (avoiding vascular shunts through the myometrium and intercotyledonary chorion) were for P(CO2) 1.7 mm Hg and for P(O2) 13.4 mm Hg.5. Maternal hyperventilation (P(a, CO2) approximately 20 mm Hg) caused a small fall in mean foetal carotid P(O2) (5 mm Hg), which was readily reversible with no evidence of progressive acidaemia. PMID:5133951

  12. Evidence from Maternity Leave Expansions of the Impact of Maternal Care on Early Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Milligan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We study the impact of maternal care on early child development using an expansion in Canadian maternity leave entitlements. Following the leave expansion, mothers who took leave spent 48-58 percent more time not working in their children's first year of life. This extra maternal care primarily crowded out home-based care by unlicensed…

  13. Maternal and Child Anxiety: Do Attachment Beliefs or Children's Perceptions of Maternal Control Mediate Their Association?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Natalie M.; Weems, Carl F.

    2005-01-01

    This study tested a model of the association between maternal and child anxiety that views mother and child attachment beliefs and children's perceptions of maternal control as mediators of the association. The study was conducted with mothers and their children aged 6 to 17 (N = 88). Maternal anxiety was significantly associated with child…

  14. Maternal Psychiatric Disorders, Parenting, and Maternal Behavior in the Home during the Child Rearing Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie; Brook, Judith S.

    2006-01-01

    Data from the Children in the Community Study, a community-based longitudinal study, were used to investigate associations between maternal psychiatric disorders and child-rearing behaviors. Maternal psychiatric symptoms and behavior in the home were assessed in 782 families during the childhood and adolescence of the offspring. Maternal anxiety,…

  15. [The prenatal toxicity of butenylisothiocyanate in rats].

    PubMed

    Bleyl, D W; Lewerenz, H J

    1992-01-01

    Butenyl isothiocyanate (BylITC), the hydrolysis product of the glucosinolate gluconapin, present in various cruciferous vegetables and in rapeseed, was administered in oral doses of 0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg to pregnant rats on day 12 to 19 of gestation. Maternal toxicity was indicated by reduced body weight gain and increases in the weights of liver and kidneys. BylITC doses of 100 and 150 mg/kg caused retardation of fetal growth and ossification. PMID:1480217

  16. Predicting Maternal Rat and Pup Exposures: How Different Are They?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk and safety assessments for early life exposures to environmental chemicals or pharmaceuticals based on cross-species extrapolation would greatly benefit from information on chemical dosimetry in the young. Although relevant toxicity studies involve exposures during multiple ...

  17. Perinatal maternal feeding with an energy dense diet and/or micronutrient mixture drives offspring fat distribution depending on the sex and growth stage.

    PubMed

    Cordero, P; Gonzalez-Muniesa, P; Milagro, F I; Campion, J; Martinez, J A

    2015-10-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation influences offspring development and health. Novel studies have described the effects on next generation obesity-related features depending on maternal macro- and micro-nutrient perinatal feeding. We hypothesized that the maternal obesogenic diet during pregnancy and lactation programs an obese phenotype, while maternal micronutrient supplementation at these stages could partially prevent these features. Thus, the aim was to assess the influence of a perinatal maternal feeding with an obesogenic diet enriched in fat and sucrose and a micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy and lactation on offspring growth and obese phenotypical features during life course. Female Wistar rats were assigned to four dietary groups during pregnancy and lactation: control, control supplemented with micronutrients (choline, betaine, folic acid and vitamin B12 ), high-fat sucrose (HFS) and HFS supplemented. At weaning, the offspring were transferred to a chow diet, and weight and fat mass were measured at weeks 3, 12 and 20. At birth, both male and female offspring from mothers fed the obesogenic diet showed lower body weight (-5 and -6%, respectively), while only female offspring weight decreased by maternal micronutrient supplementation (-5%). During lactation, maternal HFS diet was associated with increased body weight, while micronutrient supplementation protected against body weight gain. Whole body fat mass content increased at weeks 3, 12 and 20 (from 16 to 65%) due to maternal HFS diet. Maternal micronutrient supplementation decreased offspring fat mass content at week 3 (-8%). Male offspring showed higher adiposity than females at weeks 12 and 20. In conclusion, maternal HFS feeding during pregnancy and lactation was associated with a low offspring weight at birth and obese phenotypical features during adult life in a sex- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, maternal methyl donor supplementation protected against body weight gain in male offspring during lactation and in female offspring also during juvenile period. PMID:25521806

  18. BIOLOGICALLY-BASED DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING IN DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY: BIOCHEMICAL AND CELLULAR SEQUELAE OF 5-FLUOROURACIL EXPOSURE IN THE DEVELOPING RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistically-based dose-response models for developmental toxicity require elucidation of biological events that intervene between maternal exposure and adverse developmental outcome. We examined some of the major events in the rat embryo following subcutaneous injection of 5-...

  19. Early maternal separation: a rodent model of depression and a prevailing human condition.

    PubMed

    Vetulani, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The early life of most mammals is spent in close contact with the mother, and for the neonate, early maternal separation is a traumatic event that, depending on various conditions, may shape its behavioral and neurochemical phenotype in adulthood. Studies on rodents demonstrated that a very brief separation followed by increased maternal care may positively affect the development of the offspring but that prolonged separation causes significant amounts of stress. The consequences of this stress (particularly the hyperreactivity of the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis are expressed in adulthood and persist for life. Maternal separation in rodents, particularly rats, was used as a model for various psychotic conditions, especially depression. The most popular separation procedure of a 3-h daily separation from the second to the 12th postpartum day yields a depression model of high construct and predictive validity. The results of studies on maternal separation in rats and monkeys prompt a discussion of the consequences of traditional procedures in the maternity wards of developed countries where attention is focused on the hygiene of the neonates and not on their psychological needs. This alternate focus results in a drastic limitation of mother-infant contact and prolonged periods of separation. It is tempting to speculate that differences in the course and severity of various mental disorders, which are usually less prevalent in underdeveloped countries than in developed countries (as noted by Kraepelin), may be related to different modes of infant care. Only recently has so-called kangaroo mother care (establishing mother-infant skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth) become popular in developed countries. In addition to its instant benefits for the neonates, this procedure may also be beneficial for the mental health of the offspring in adulthood. PMID:24552992

  20. Framing maternal morbidity: WHO scoping exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal morbidity estimations are not based on well-documented methodologies and thus have limited validity for informing efforts to address the issue and improve maternal health. To fill this gap, maternal morbidity needs to be clearly defined, driving the development of tools and indicators to measure and monitor maternal health. This article describes the scoping exercise conducted by the World Health Organization’s Department of Reproductive of Health and Research (WHO/RHR), as an essential first step in this process. Methods A literature review was conducted to identify the range of definitions and conditions included in various studies of maternal morbidity with a special focus on the similarities and discrepancies of the definitions used across the studies. Furthermore a questionnaire was developed which included sections on key areas identified during the review and was sent out electronically to 130 international experts in the field of maternal health. Results Maternal morbidities have been categorized in a variety of ways based on the causes, types of complications, and/or timeline. Issues regarding the time frame, severity, identification and classification and demographics were identified as key areas in the literature that require further investigation to achieve consensus on a maternal morbidity definition. Fifty-five (N?=?55) individuals responded with completed questionnaires. Respondents’ views on the time frame for the postpartum period varied from 6 weeks to beyond one year postpartum, it was noted that time frame depended on the type of complication. The majority of respondents said maternal morbidity should comprise a continuum of severity, whereas the identification of the cases should use a mixed criteria employing multiple methods. Conclusions Significant discrepancy in literature and expert opinion exists concerning elements of a maternal morbidity definition. There is a clear need for a concrete definition that would allow for consistent measurement and monitoring of maternal morbidity across settings and time. PMID:24252359

  1. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P. L.; Rommereim, R. L.; Burton, F. G.; Buschbom, R. L.; Sasser, L . B.

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with 0. 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development. These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats and rabbits since fetal effects were observed only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for "no observable effects levels" in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  2. Effects of early maternal employment on maternal health and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study on Early Child Care to examine the effects of maternal employment on maternal mental and overall health, self-reported parenting stress, and parenting quality. These outcomes are measured when children are 6 months old. Among mothers of 6-month-old infants, maternal work hours are positively associated with depressive symptoms and parenting stress and negatively associated with self-rated overall health. However, maternal employment is not associated with quality of parenting at 6 months, based on trained assessors’ observations of maternal sensitivity. PMID:23645972

  3. Marathon Maternity Oral History Project

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing maternity services in rural Canada. PMID:24452565

  4. Maternal Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chebbo, Ahmad; Tan, Susanna; Kassis, Christelle; Tamura, Leslie; Carlson, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician who identified unhygienic practices of physicians as a major cause of childbed fever or puerperal sepsis. Although such practices have largely disappeared as a factor in the development of chorioamnionitis and postpartum or puerperal endometritis, it is appropriate that this article on sepsis in pregnancy acknowledges his contributions to maternal health. This review describes the incidence and mortality of sepsis in pregnancy, methods to identify and define sepsis in this population, including scoring systems, causes, and sites of infection during pregnancy and parturition and management guidelines. PMID:26600449

  5. Putting the "M" back in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: reducing maternal mortality and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Michael C; Highsmith, Keisher; de la Cruz, David; Atrash, Hani K

    2015-07-01

    Maternal mortality and severe morbidity are on the rise in the United States. A significant proportion of these events are preventable. The Maternal Health Initiative (MHI), coordinated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau at the Health Resources and Services Administration, is intensifying efforts to reduce maternal mortality and severe morbidity in the U.S. Through a public-private partnership, MHI is taking a comprehensive approach to improving maternal health focusing on five priority areas: improving women's health before, during and beyond pregnancy; improving the quality and safety of maternity care; improving systems of maternity care including both clinical and public health systems; improving public awareness and education; and improving surveillance and research. PMID:25626713

  6. NATIONAL MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH SURVEY (NMIHS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS) provides data on maternal and infant health, including prenatal care, birth weight, fetal loss, and infant mortality. The objective of the NMIHS is to collect data needed by Federal, State, and private researchers to study fa...

  7. Significance of maternal periodontal health in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Khushboo; Desai, Parth; Duseja, Shilpa; Kumar, Santosh; Mahendra, Jaideep; Duseja, Sareen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present case–control study was to evaluate the association between maternal periodontitis and preeclampsia. Association studies between maternal periodontitis and elevated risk for preeclampsia have shown conflicting results. Periodontal maintenance is necessary to reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes like preeclampsia. Materials and Methods: Periodontal parameters [bleeding on probing, probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL)] of 1320 women were assessed, followed by retrieval of their demographic and medical data from the medical records. Based on the medical records, 80 women were excluded from the study, leaving 1240 females as the eligible sample for the study. The women were divided into control group (1120 non-preeclamptic women who gave birth to infants with adequate gestational age) and case group (120 preeclamptic women). Logistic regression analysis revealed that primiparity and maternal periodontitis were the two significant variables causing preeclampsia. Further analysis was carried out by matching the two groups for primiparity to find the significance of maternal periodontitis. Maternal periodontitis was defined as PD ?4 mm and CAL ?3 mm at the same site in at least four teeth. Results: The results showed that maternal periodontitis (odds ratio 19.8) was associated with preeclampsia. Maternal periodontitis also remained associated with preeclampsia after matching for primiparity, which was another significant confounding factor in the study (odds ratio 9.33). Conclusion: Maternal periodontitis is a risk factor associated with preeclampsia, emphasizing the importance of periodontal care in prenatal programs. PMID:25992334

  8. Maternal Depression and Childhood Health Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of literature documents considerable inequalities in the health of young children in the United States, though maternal depression is one important, yet often overlooked, determinant of children's health. In this article, the author uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 4,048) and finds that maternal

  9. Infant Communicative Behaviors and Maternal Responsiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Onwujuba, Chinwe; Baumgartner, Jennifer I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study applies attachment and transactional theories in evaluating the dyadic interactions observed between a mother and her infant. Infant communication and maternal responsivity are highlighted as the medium for positive interaction. Objective: The impact of individualized maternal training on mother infant communicative…

  10. Listeria monocytogenes Traffics from Maternal Organs

    E-print Network

    Bakardjiev, Anna

    Listeria monocytogenes Traffics from Maternal Organs to the Placenta and Back Anna I. Bakardjiev1 the role of trafficking between maternal organs and placenta in a pregnant guinea pig model of listeriosis to placenta was 103 ­104 :1. Rapid increase of bacteria in the placenta changed the ratio to 1:1 after 24 h

  11. Infant and Maternal Sensitivity to Interpersonal Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Anne; Striano, Tricia

    2011-01-01

    A perturbation paradigm was employed to assess 3- and 6-month-old infants' and their mothers' sensitivity to a 3-s temporal delay implemented in an ongoing televised interaction. At both ages, the temporal delay affected infant but not maternal behavior and only when implementing the temporal delay in maternal (Experiment 1, N = 64) but not infant…

  12. Autism Symptom Topography and Maternal Socioemotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekas, Naomi; Whitman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers examining the relationship of autism "symptomatology" and maternal stress have defined symptomatology in terms of level of severity, frequency of occurrence, or symptom type. In the present study, the relationship of maternal perceptions of these dimensions, along with a fourth, symptom diversity, and negative and positive indices of…

  13. Maternal occupation and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Savitz, D A; Olshan, A F; Gallagher, K

    1996-05-01

    Few studies have addressed the effect of maternal employment on late pregnancy outcomes. The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey, a probability sample of U.S. livebirths, stillbirths, and infant deaths in 1988, provided an opportunity to evaluate mothers' jobs in relation to preterm delivery, very low birthweight ( < 1,500 gm), moderately low birthweight (1,500-2,499 gm), small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth, stillbirth, and infant death. We aggregated mothers' jobs, which were ascertained by mailed questionnaire or telephone interview, into categories for analysis. We considered jobs held at any time during pregnancy and jobs held during the fifth month of pregnancy. Relative to the referent group of clerks, textile workers had adjusted odds ratios of 1.5 or greater for all outcomes, with elevated risks also found sporadically for food service workers (preterm delivery, SGA birth, stillbirth) and electrical equipment operators (all outcomes except for still-birth and infant death). Janitors had elevated adjusted odds ratios of 2.0 or greater for preterm delivery and stillbirth. Relative to clerks, teachers and librarians tended to have reduced risks for adverse outcomes. PMID:8728440

  14. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Ana CI; Lima, Paula HO; Sinzato, Yuri K; Takaku, Mariana; Takeno, Marisa A; Rudge, Marilza VC; Damasceno, Débora C

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl) and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl) on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. Methods On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16), severe (n = 50) and mild diabetes (n = 30). At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Results Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Conclusion Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy reproduced maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women presenting uncontrolled clinical diabetes. On the other hand, the mild diabetes model caused mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy, although it was not enough to reproduce the increased rate of macrosomic fetuses seen in women with gestational diabetes. PMID:19840387

  15. C57BL/6J male offspring exposed "in utero" and during weaning to a maternal low protein diet have reduced muscle weight by 12 months of age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: C57BL/6J mice are predisposed to obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and may be a sensitive model for fetal programming of T2DM. The "maternal low protein diet" (MLP) rat model is well established to study fetal growth restriction effects on programming of T2DM. How data from C57BL/6J mice...

  16. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-01-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. PMID:24661622

  17. How do maternal PTSD and alexithymia interact to impact maternal behavior?

    PubMed

    Schechter, Daniel S; Suardi, Francesca; Manini, Aurelia; Cordero, Maria Isabel; Rossignol, Ana Sancho; Merminod, Gaëlle; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Moser, Dominik A; Serpa, Sandra Rusconi

    2015-06-01

    Maternal interpersonal violence-related post-traumatic stress disorder (IPV-PTSD) is known to be associated with impairment of a mother's capacity to participate in mutual emotion regulation during her child's first years of life. This study tested the hypothesis that maternal difficulty in identifying feelings in self and other, as an important dimension of the construct of alexithymia, together with maternal IPV-PTSD, would be negatively associated with maternal sensitivity. Maternal sensitivity to child emotional communication is a marker of maternal capacity to engage in mutual regulation of emotion and arousal. Following diagnostic interviews and administration of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, 56 mothers and their toddlers (ages 12-42 months) were filmed during free-play and separation/novelty-exposure. Observed maternal sensitivity was coded via the CARE-Index. Maternal IPV-PTSD severity, difficulty in identifying emotions, and lower socio-economic status were all associated with less maternal sensitivity, and also with more maternal controlling and unresponsive behavior on the CARE-Index. PMID:25008189

  18. The maternal health outcomes of paid maternity leave: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Zoe; Garrett, Cameryn C; Hewitt, Belinda; Keogh, Louise; Hocking, Jane S; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2015-04-01

    Paid maternity leave has become a standard benefit in many countries throughout the world. Although maternal health has been central to the rationale for paid maternity leave, no review has specifically examined the effect of paid maternity leave on maternal health. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of studies that examine the association between paid maternity leave and maternal health. We conducted a comprehensive search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Sociological Abstracts) and Google Scholar. We searched websites of relevant organisations, reference lists of key papers and journals, and citation indices for additional studies including those not in refereed journals. There were no language restrictions. Studies were included if they compared paid maternity leave versus no paid maternity leave, or different lengths of paid leave. Data were extracted and an assessment of bias was performed independently by authors. Seven studies were identified, with participants from Australia, Sweden, Norway, USA, Canada, and Lebanon. All studies used quantitative methodologies, including cohort, cross-sectional, and repeated cross-sectional designs. Outcomes included mental health and wellbeing, general health, physical wellbeing, and intimate partner violence. The four studies that examined leave at an individual level showed evidence of maternal health benefits, whereas the three studies conducting policy-level comparisons reported either no association or evidence of a negative association. The synthesis of the results suggested that paid maternity leave provided maternal health benefits, although this varied depending on the length of leave. This has important implications for public health and social policy. However, all studies were subject to confounding bias and many to reverse causation. Given the small number of studies and the methodological limitations of the evidence, longitudinal studies are needed to further clarify the effects of paid maternity leave on the health of mothers in paid employment. PMID:25680101

  19. Selection Against Maternal microRNA Target Sites in Maternal Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In animals, before the zygotic genome is expressed, the egg already contains gene products deposited by the mother. These maternal products are crucial during the initial steps of development. In Drosophila melanogaster, a large number of maternal products are found in the oocyte, some of which are indispensable. Many of these products are RNA molecules, such as gene transcripts and ribosomal RNAs. Recently, microRNAs (small RNA gene regulators) have been detected early during development and are important in these initial steps. The presence of some microRNAs in unfertilized eggs has been reported, but whether they have a functional impact in the egg or early embryo has not being explored. I have extracted and sequenced small RNAs from Drosophila unfertilized eggs. The unfertilized egg is rich in small RNAs and contains multiple microRNA products. Maternal microRNAs often are encoded within the intron of maternal genes, suggesting that many maternal microRNAs are the product of transcriptional hitchhiking. Comparative genomics analyses suggest that maternal transcripts tend to avoid target sites for maternal microRNAs. I also developed a microRNA target mutation model to study the functional impact of polymorphisms at microRNA target sites. The analysis of Drosophila populations suggests that there is selection against maternal microRNA target sites in maternal transcripts. A potential role of the maternal microRNA mir-9c in maternal-to-zygotic transition is also discussed. In conclusion, maternal microRNAs in Drosophila have a functional impact in maternal protein?coding transcripts. PMID:26306531

  20. Interaction does Count: A Cross-Fostering Study on Transgenerational Effects of Pre-reproductive Maternal Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Paola; Cutuli, Debora; Gelfo, Francesca; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Petrosini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pre-reproductive environmental enrichment of female rats influences sensorimotor development and spatial behavior of the offspring, possibly through the changed maternal nurturing. Nevertheless, maternal care could be not the solely responsible for changing offspring developmental trajectories. To disentangle the specific contribution to the transgenerational inheritance of pre- and post-natal factors, a cross-fostering study was performed. Female rats were reared in an enriched environment from weaning to sexual maturity, while control female rats were reared under standard conditions. Following mating with standard-reared males, all females were housed individually. Immediately after delivery, in- or cross-fostering manipulations were performed so that any foster dams received pups born to another dam of the same (in-fostering) or the opposite (cross-fostering) pre-reproductive rearing condition. In lactating dams maternal care and nesting activities were assessed, while in their male pups spatial abilities were assessed through Morris Water Maze (MWM) test at post-natal day 45. Moreover, the expression of Brain-Derived-Neurotrophic-Factor (BDNF) was evaluated in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of dams and pups at weaning. Pre-reproductive maternal environmental enrichment, followed by adoption procedures, loosened its potential in modifying maternal care and offspring developmental trajectories, as indicated by the lack of differences between in-fostered groups of dams and pups. In addition, enriched dams rearing standard pups showed the least complex maternal repertoire (the highest sniffing duration and the lowest nest quality), and their pups showed a reduced spatial learning in the MWM. Nevertheless, pre-reproductive maternal enrichment kept influencing neurotrophic pattern, with enriched dams expressing increased frontal BDNF levels (regardless of the kind of fostered pups), and their offspring expressing increased hippocampal BDNF levels. The present findings enlighten the crucial importance of the early mother-pups interactions in influencing maternal care and offspring phenotype, with the enriched dam-standard pups couple resulting in the most maladaptive encounter. Our study thus sustains that the bidirectional interactions between mother and pups are able to deeply shape offspring phenotype. PMID:26648854

  1. Interaction does Count: A Cross-Fostering Study on Transgenerational Effects of Pre-reproductive Maternal Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Caporali, Paola; Cutuli, Debora; Gelfo, Francesca; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Petrosini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pre-reproductive environmental enrichment of female rats influences sensorimotor development and spatial behavior of the offspring, possibly through the changed maternal nurturing. Nevertheless, maternal care could be not the solely responsible for changing offspring developmental trajectories. To disentangle the specific contribution to the transgenerational inheritance of pre- and post-natal factors, a cross-fostering study was performed. Female rats were reared in an enriched environment from weaning to sexual maturity, while control female rats were reared under standard conditions. Following mating with standard-reared males, all females were housed individually. Immediately after delivery, in- or cross-fostering manipulations were performed so that any foster dams received pups born to another dam of the same (in-fostering) or the opposite (cross-fostering) pre-reproductive rearing condition. In lactating dams maternal care and nesting activities were assessed, while in their male pups spatial abilities were assessed through Morris Water Maze (MWM) test at post-natal day 45. Moreover, the expression of Brain-Derived-Neurotrophic-Factor (BDNF) was evaluated in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of dams and pups at weaning. Pre-reproductive maternal environmental enrichment, followed by adoption procedures, loosened its potential in modifying maternal care and offspring developmental trajectories, as indicated by the lack of differences between in-fostered groups of dams and pups. In addition, enriched dams rearing standard pups showed the least complex maternal repertoire (the highest sniffing duration and the lowest nest quality), and their pups showed a reduced spatial learning in the MWM. Nevertheless, pre-reproductive maternal enrichment kept influencing neurotrophic pattern, with enriched dams expressing increased frontal BDNF levels (regardless of the kind of fostered pups), and their offspring expressing increased hippocampal BDNF levels. The present findings enlighten the crucial importance of the early mother-pups interactions in influencing maternal care and offspring phenotype, with the enriched dam-standard pups couple resulting in the most maladaptive encounter. Our study thus sustains that the bidirectional interactions between mother and pups are able to deeply shape offspring phenotype. PMID:26648854

  2. Ontogenetic aspects of hypertension development: analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zicha, J; Kunes, J

    1999-10-01

    In this review, we attempt to outline the age-dependent interactions of principal systems controlling the structure and function of the cardiovascular system in immature rats developing hypertension. We focus our attention on the cardiovascular effects of various pharmacological, nutritional, and behavioral interventions applied at different stages of ontogeny. Several distinct critical periods (developmental windows), in which particular stimuli affect the further development of the cardiovascular phenotype, are specified in the rat. It is evident that short-term transient treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with certain antihypertensive drugs in prepuberty and puberty (at the age of 4-10 wk) has long-term beneficial effects on further development of their cardiovascular apparatus. This juvenile critical period coincides with the period of high susceptibility to the hypertensive effects of increased salt intake. If the hypertensive process develops after this critical period (due to early antihypertensive treatment or late administration of certain hypertensive stimuli, e.g., high salt intake), blood pressure elevation, cardiovascular hypertrophy, connective tissue accumulation, and end-organ damage are considerably attenuated compared with rats developing hypertension during the juvenile critical period. As far as the role of various electrolytes in blood pressure modulation is concerned, prohypertensive effects of dietary Na+ and antihypertensive effects of dietary Ca2+ are enhanced in immature animals, whereas vascular protective and antihypertensive effects of dietary K+ are almost independent of age. At a given level of dietary electrolyte intake, the balance between dietary carbohydrate and fat intake can modify blood pressure even in rats with established hypertension, but dietary protein intake affects the blood pressure development in immature animals only. Dietary protein restriction during gestation, as well as altered mother-offspring interactions in the suckling period, might have important long-term hypertensive consequences. The critical periods (developmental windows) should be respected in the future pharmacological or gene therapy of human hypertension. PMID:10508234

  3. Measuring quality of maternity care.

    PubMed

    Collins, Katherine J; Draycott, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Health-care organisations are required to monitor and measure the quality of their maternity services, but measuring quality is complex, and no universal consensus exists on how best to measure it. Clinical outcomes and process measures that are important to stakeholders should be measured, ideally in standardised sets for benchmarking. Furthermore, a holistic interpretation of quality should also reflect patient experience, ideally integrated with outcome and process measures, into a balanced suite of quality indicators. Dashboards enable reporting of trends in adverse outcomes to stakeholders, staff and patients, and they facilitate targeted quality improvement initiatives. The value of such dashboards is dependent upon high-quality, routinely collected data, subject to robust statistical analysis. Moving forward, we could and should collect a standard, relevant set of quality indicators, from routinely collected data, and present these in a manner that facilitates ongoing quality improvement, both locally and at regional/national levels. PMID:25913563

  4. A Model for Maternal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Cynthia D.; Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Hazen, Andrea L.; Landsverk, John

    2010-01-01

    Abstract With the awareness of maternal depression as a prevalent public health issue and its important link to child physical and mental health, attention has turned to how healthcare providers can respond effectively. Intimate partner violence (IPV) and the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are strongly related to depression, particularly for low-income women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends psychosocial screening of pregnant women at least once per trimester, yet screening is uncommonly done. Research suggests that a collaborative care approach improves identification, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of care. This article presents The Perinatal Mental Health Model, a community-based model that developed screening and referral partnerships for use in community obstetric settings in order to specifically address the psychosocial needs of culturally diverse, low-income mothers. PMID:20718624

  5. Maternal effects and maternal selection arising from variation in allocation of free amino acid to eggs

    PubMed Central

    Newcombe, Devi; Hunt, John; Mitchell, Christopher; Moore, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Maternal provisioning can have profound effects on offspring phenotypes, or maternal effects, especially early in life. One ubiquitous form of provisioning is in the makeup of egg. However, only a few studies examine the role of specific egg constituents in maternal effects, especially as they relate to maternal selection (a standardized selection gradient reflecting the covariance between maternal traits and offspring fitness). Here, we report on the evolutionary consequences of differences in maternal acquisition and allocation of amino acids to eggs. We manipulated acquisition by varying maternal diet (milkweed or sunflower) in the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus. Variation in allocation was detected by examining two source populations with different evolutionary histories and life-history response to sunflower as food. We measured amino acids composition in eggs in this 2 × 2 design and found significant effects of source population and maternal diet on egg and nymph mass and of source population, maternal diet, and their interaction on amino acid composition of eggs. We measured significant linear and quadratic maternal selection on offspring mass associated with variation in amino acid allocation. Visualizing the performance surface along the major axes of nonlinear selection and plotting the mean amino acid profile of eggs from each treatment onto the surface revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface. While maternal selection appears to have influenced how females allocate amino acids, this maternal effect did not evolve equally in the two populations. Furthermore, none of the population means coincided with peak performance. Thus, we found that the composition of free amino acids in eggs was due to variation in both acquisition and allocation, which had significant fitness effects and created selection. However, although there can be an evolutionary response to novel food resources, females may be constrained from reaching phenotypic optima with regard to allocation of free amino acids. PMID:26120429

  6. Maternal effects and maternal selection arising from variation in allocation of free amino acid to eggs.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Devi; Hunt, John; Mitchell, Christopher; Moore, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    Maternal provisioning can have profound effects on offspring phenotypes, or maternal effects, especially early in life. One ubiquitous form of provisioning is in the makeup of egg. However, only a few studies examine the role of specific egg constituents in maternal effects, especially as they relate to maternal selection (a standardized selection gradient reflecting the covariance between maternal traits and offspring fitness). Here, we report on the evolutionary consequences of differences in maternal acquisition and allocation of amino acids to eggs. We manipulated acquisition by varying maternal diet (milkweed or sunflower) in the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus. Variation in allocation was detected by examining two source populations with different evolutionary histories and life-history response to sunflower as food. We measured amino acids composition in eggs in this 2 × 2 design and found significant effects of source population and maternal diet on egg and nymph mass and of source population, maternal diet, and their interaction on amino acid composition of eggs. We measured significant linear and quadratic maternal selection on offspring mass associated with variation in amino acid allocation. Visualizing the performance surface along the major axes of nonlinear selection and plotting the mean amino acid profile of eggs from each treatment onto the surface revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface. While maternal selection appears to have influenced how females allocate amino acids, this maternal effect did not evolve equally in the two populations. Furthermore, none of the population means coincided with peak performance. Thus, we found that the composition of free amino acids in eggs was due to variation in both acquisition and allocation, which had significant fitness effects and created selection. However, although there can be an evolutionary response to novel food resources, females may be constrained from reaching phenotypic optima with regard to allocation of free amino acids. PMID:26120429

  7. Maternal Immunization: Opportunities for Scientific Advancement

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Richard H.; Fortner, Kimberly B.; Munoz, Flor M.; Roberts, Jeff; Gordon, Jennifer L.; Han, Htay Htay; Glenn, Greg; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Gu, Xing Xing; Read, Jennifer S.; Edwards, Kathryn; Patel, Shital M.; Swamy, Geeta K.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization is an effective strategy to prevent and/or minimize the severity of infectious diseases in pregnant women and their infants. Based on the success of vaccination programs to prevent maternal and neonatal tetanus, maternal immunization has been well received in the United States and globally as a promising strategy for the prevention of other vaccine-preventable diseases that threaten pregnant women and infants, such as influenza and pertussis. Given the promise for reducing the burden of infectious conditions of perinatal significance through the development of vaccines against relevant pathogens, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored a series of meetings to foster progress toward clinical development of vaccines for use in pregnancy. A multidisciplinary group of stakeholders convened at the NIH in December 2013 to identify potential barriers and opportunities for scientific advancement in maternal immunization. PMID:25425719

  8. The empirical themes of five maternal emotions 

    E-print Network

    Krause, Matthew David

    1998-01-01

    This research examined the patterns of cognition associated with five qualitatively different maternal emotions related to parenting. A set of twenty-four cognitive dimensions suggested by Reisenzein and Spielhofer (1994) were used to test...

  9. Transformations in maternity services in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Sargent, C; Rawlins, J

    1992-11-01

    Analysis of the current organization and delivery of maternity care in Jamaica profits not only from an assessment of recent health issues but from consideration of the development of maternity services over the past century. Historical analysis indicates that a critical element in public health policy has been the effort to encourage use of biomedical obstetrical care and to eliminate the lay midwife. However, while women increasingly patronize hospitals, the delivery of services has deteriorated, resulting in widespread client dissatisfaction. Economic contingencies have contributed to the decline in maternity services, but health personnel manifest the ideology prevalent throughout the colonial era equating social irresponsibility with health complications. The cultural construction of illegitimacy and maternity is shown to be a dimension of class relations having an impact on health policy throughout Jamaica's history. PMID:1439906

  10. The National Partnership for Maternal Safety.

    PubMed

    D?Alton, Mary E; Main, Elliott K; Menard, M Kathryn; Levy, Barbara S

    2014-05-01

    Recognition of the need to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States has led to the creation of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety. This collaborative, broad-based initiative will begin with three priority bundles for the most common preventable causes of maternal death and severe morbidity: obstetric hemorrhage, severe hypertension in pregnancy, and peripartum venous thromboembolism. In addition, three unit-improvement bundles for obstetric services were identified: a structured approach for the recognition of early warning signs and symptoms, structured internal case reviews to identify systems improvement opportunities, and support tools for patients, families, and staff that experience an adverse outcome. This article details the formation of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety and introduces the initial priorities. PMID:24785848

  11. Maternity leaves and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

    PubMed

    Brucker, M C; Reedy, N J

    1983-01-01

    More than 50% of mothers in the United States work. An important issue facing working women is maternity leave and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA). The nurse should recognize the childbearing-related problems the working woman may encounter and initiate appropriate referrals. Understanding both maternity leaves and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act will enhance the nurse's ability to provide appropriate counseling and referral. PMID:6556373

  12. Anesthetic management of maternal Mirror syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tayler, E; DeSimone, C

    2014-11-01

    Mirror syndrome (Ballantyne syndrome, triple edema, maternal hydrops, pseudotoxemia) is a rarely diagnosed condition associated with pregnancy that can be life-threatening for both the mother and fetus. There is limited literature on its pathogenesis and anesthetic management, making prevention and treatment complex. The duration of pregnancy and severity of maternal or fetal presentation often determines outcome. We describe the anesthetic considerations of a morbidly obese parturient with Mirror syndrome. PMID:25066819

  13. Estimates of maternal mortality for 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K.; AbouZhar, C.; Wardlaw, T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present estimates of maternal mortality in 188 countries, areas, and territories for 1995 using methodologies that attempt to improve comparability. METHODS: For countries having data directly relevant to the measurement of maternal mortality, a variety of adjustment procedures can be applied depending on the nature of the data used. Estimates for countries lacking relevant data may be made using a statistical model fitted to the information from countries that have data judged to be of good quality. Rather than estimate the Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMRatio) directly, this model estimates the proportion of deaths of women of reproductive age that are due to maternal causes. Estimates of the number of maternal deaths are then obtained by applying this proportion to the best available figure of the total number of deaths among women of reproductive age. FINDINGS: On the basis of this exercise, we have obtained a global estimate of 515,000 maternal deaths in 1995, with a worldwide MMRatio of 397 per 100,000 live births. The differences, by region, were very great, with over half (273,000 maternal deaths) occurring in Africa (MMRatio: > 1000 per 100,000), compared with a total of only 2000 maternal deaths in Europe (MMRatio: 28 per 100,000). Lower and upper uncertainty bounds were also estimated, on the basis of which the global MMRatio was unlikely to be less than 234 or more than 635 per 100,000 live births. These uncertainty bounds and those of national estimates are so wide that comparisons between countries must be made with caution, and no valid conclusions can be drawn about trends over a period of time. CONCLUSION: The MMRatio is thus an imperfect indicator of reproductive health because it is hard to measure precisely. It is preferable to use process indicators for comparing reproductive health between countries or across time periods, and for monitoring and evaluation purposes. PMID:11285661

  14. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P L; Rommereim, R L; Burton, F G; Buschbom, R L; Sasser, L B

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with o. 0.5, 1 .0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats • and rabbits since fetal effects were obs~rved only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for •no observable effects levers· in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  15. Reproduction at an advanced maternal age and maternal health.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Mark V

    2015-05-01

    Advanced age is a risk factor for female infertility, pregnancy loss, fetal anomalies, stillbirth, and obstetric complications. These concerns are based on centuries-old observations, yet women are delaying childbearing to pursue educational and career goals in greater numbers than ever before. As a result, reproductive medicine specialists are treating more patients with age-related infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss, while obstetricians are faced with managing pregnancies often complicated by both age and comorbidities. The media portrayal of a youthful but older woman, able to schedule her reproductive needs and balance family and job, has fueled the myth that "you can have it all," rarely characterizing the perils inherent to advanced-age reproduction. Reproductive medicine specialists and obstetrician/gynecologists should promote more realistic views of the evidence-based realities of advanced maternal age pregnancy, including its high-risk nature and often compromised outcomes. Doctors should also actively educate both patients and the public that there is a real danger of childlessness if individuals choose to delay reproduction. PMID:25934599

  16. Effect of exercise on learning and memory in a rat model of developmental stress.

    PubMed

    Grace, Laurian; Hescham, Sarah; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2009-12-01

    Adverse life events occurring in early development can result in long-term effects on behavioural, physiological and cognitive processes. In particular, perinatal stressors impair neurogenesis in the hippocampus which consequently impairs memory formation. Exercise has previously been shown to have antidepressant effects and to increase cognitive functioning by increasing neurogenesis and neurotrophins in the hippocampus. The current study examined the effects of maternal separation, which has been shown to model anxiety in animals, and the effects of exercise on learning and memory. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups, maternally separated / non-runners, maternally separated / runners, non-separated / runners and non-separated / non-runners. Maternal separation occurred from postnatal day 2 (P2) to 14 (P14) for 3 h per day. Exercised rats were given voluntary access to individual running wheels attached to their cages from P29 to P49. Behavioural testing (Morris water maze (MWM) and object recognition tests) took place from P49 to P63. Maternally separated rats showed no significant difference in anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze and the open field compared to the normally reared controls. However, rats that were allowed voluntary access to running wheels showed increased levels of anxiety in the elevated plus maze and in the open field. Maternal separation did not have any effect on memory performance in the MWM or the object recognition tasks. Exercise increased spatial learning and memory in the MWM with the exercised rats displaying a decreased latency in locating the hidden platform than the non-exercised rats. The exercised rats spent significantly less time exploring the most recently encountered object in the temporal order task in comparison to the non-exercised controls, therefore showing improved temporal recognition memory. All groups performed the same on the other recognition tasks, with all rats showing intact memory performance. Results indicate that maternal separation had little effect on the rats whereas exercise enhanced both spatial and recognition memory. PMID:19821018

  17. Fetal programming of colon cancer in adult rats: correlations with altered neonatal trajectory, circulating IGF-I and IGFPBs, and testosterone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifelong consumption of soy protein isolate (SPI) reduces the incidence of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We determined if a maternal SPI diet during pregnancy could protect against colon cancer in progeny. Four groups of male rats were used: a lifetime ...

  18. Perfluorooctanoate: Placental and lactational transport pharmacokinetics in rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Mylchreest, E.; Gannon, S. A.; Butenhoff, J. L.; Kennedy, G.L., Jr.

    2005-07-01

    This study was conducted to develop a quantitative understanding of the potential for gestational and lactational transfer of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in the rat. Time-mated female rats were dosed by oral gavage once daily at concentrations of 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg/day of the ammonium salt of PFOA (APFO) starting on gestation (G) day 4 and continuing until sacrifice. On days 10, 15, and 21G, five rats per dose level were sacrificed and blood samples were collected 2h post-dose. Embryos were collected on day 10G, amniotic fluid, placentas, and embryos/fetuses were collected on days 15 and 21G, and fetal blood samples were collected on day 21G. Five rats per dose level were allowed to deliver and nurse their litters, and on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 post-partum (PP) milk and blood samples of maternal and pup were collected 2h post-dose. All samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) for PFOA concentration. Concentrations of PFOA in maternal plasma and milk attained steady state during the sampling interval. The steady-state concentrations in maternal plasma were 10-15, 25-30, and 60-75 microg/mL in rats receiving 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, respectively. Steady-state concentrations in milk were approximately 10 times less than those in maternal plasma. The concentration of PFOA in fetal plasma on day 21G was approximately half the steady-state concentration in maternal plasma. The milk concentrations appeared to be generally comparable to the concentrations in pup plasma. Pup plasma concentrations decreased from day 3PP to day 7PP, and were similar on days 7, 14, and 21PP at all dose levels. PFOA was detected in placenta (days 15 and 21G), amniotic fluid (days 15 and 21G), embryo (days 10 and 15G), and fetus (day 21G). These pharmacokinetics allow estimation of the dose to developing and nursing rat offspring following maternal exposure.

  19. Maternal autoantibodies and fetal disease.

    PubMed

    Gross, K R; Petty, R E; Lum, V L; Allen, R C

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the relationships between maternal connective tissue disease (CTD), fetal and neonatal health, and the presence of specific autoantibodies: antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-Ro, antiLa, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-DNA, and anticardiolipin (ACL) in 27 mothers with CTD (Group A), and 10 asymptomatic mothers of babies with complete congenital heart block (CCHB), or cardiac arrhythmias (Group B). Compared to 100 normal pregnant controls, autoantibodies were significantly more common in both Group A (96.3%, p less than 0.0005) and Group B (70%, p less than 0.0005), although the prevalence of autoantibodies in the Group A mothers having abnormal babies compared with those who had normal babies did not differ. Anti-La was present only in mothers with abnormal babies (7 of 17 compared to 0 of 10, p less than 0.025). Anti-La did not occur without anti-Ro, but anti-Ro occurred in 9 mothers without anti-La. Anti-Ro was present in the serum of all mothers of infants with CCHB and occurred alone in 3 of 4 instances. Titers of anti-Ro did not differ between abnormal and normal infants or their mothers. ACL occurred alone in the serum of 10 of 38 mothers, and was present in 7 mothers who had infants with cardiac abnormalities other than CCHB. PMID:2612085

  20. Emotion Regulation in Preschoolers: The Roles of Behavioral Inhibition, Maternal Affective Behavior, and Maternal Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Xin; Shaw, Daniel S.; Kovacs, Maria; Lane, Tonya; O'Rourke, Flannery E.; Alarcon, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examined preschoolers' emotion regulation (ER) strategies and the association with temperament, maternal interactive style, and maternal history of childhood-onset depression (COD). Methods: Participants were 62 children and their mothers, 37 of whom had mothers with COD. Children's ER was assessed using a disappointment…

  1. Poverty and Maternal Responsiveness: The Role of Maternal Stress and Social Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary W.; Boxhill, Louise; Pinkava, Michael

    2008-01-01

    One of the main reasons poverty is bad for children's development is because it reduces maternal responsiveness. This study addresses a heretofore unanswered question: why do low-income children experience diminished maternal responsiveness compared with their more affluent counterparts? In addition, we examine this question among a largely…

  2. Trajectories of Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Sensitivity, and Children's Functioning at School Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Susan B.; Matestic, Patricia; von Stauffenberg, Camilla; Mohan, Roli; Kirchner, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the authors modeled trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from infant age 1 month to 7 years. The authors identified 6 trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms: high-chronic, moderate-increasing, high-decreasing,…

  3. Exploring the effects of maternal eating patterns on maternal feeding and child eating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has demonstrated the importance of maternal feeding practices and children’s eating behavior in the development of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between maternal and child eating patterns, and to examine the degree to which these relationsh...

  4. The Relations among Maternal Depressive Disorder, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Toddler Behavior Problems and Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravener, Julie A.; Rogosch, Fred A.; Oshri, Assaf; Narayan, Angela J.; Cicchetti, Dante; Toth, Sheree L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct and indirect relations among maternal depression, maternal Expressed Emotion (EE: Self- and Child-Criticism), child internalizing and externalizing symptoms, and child attachment were examined. Participants were mothers with depression (n = 130) and comparison mothers (n = 68) and their toddlers (M age = 20 mo.; 53% male). Assessments…

  5. Maternal Psychopathology and Infant Development at 18 Months: The Impact of Maternal Personality Disorder and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Susan; Pariante, Carmine M.; Marks, Maureen N.; Davies, Helen A.; Farrelly, Simone; Schacht, Robin; Moran, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: No previous longitudinal study has examined the impact of comorbid maternal personality disorder (PD) and depression on child development. We set out to examine whether maternal PD and depression assessed at 2 months post partum would be independently associated with adverse developmental outcomes at 18 months of age. Method: Women were…

  6. Associations between Parents' Marital Functioning, Maternal Parenting Quality, Maternal Emotion and Child Cortisol Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendry, Patricia; Adam, Emma K.

    2007-01-01

    Associations between family functioning and children's stress hormone levels are explored, by examining how aspects of the interparental relationship (parents' marital satisfaction and parent conflict styles), the mother-child relationship (maternal involvement and warmth) and maternal emotional functioning (depression, anxiety and self-esteem)…

  7. Relations among Intimate Partner Violence, Maternal Depressive Symptoms, and Maternal Parenting Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Cox, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the relations among intimate partner violence (IPV), maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal harsh intrusive parenting. Using a cross-lagged, autoregressive path model, they sought to clarify the directionality of the relations among these 3 variables over the first 2 years of the child's life. The results indicated that,…

  8. The Longitudinal Interplay of Maternal Warmth and Adolescents' Self-Disclosure in Predicting Maternal Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blodgett Salafia, Elizabeth H.; Gondoli, Dawn M.; Grundy, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal associations among maternal warmth, adolescents' self-disclosure, and maternal knowledge during the transition to adolescence. Three years of self-report data were collected from 131 married mothers and their adolescents. Results from longitudinal analysis using adolescent reports indicated that greater…

  9. Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Dysfunctional Cognitions, and Infant Night Waking: The Role of Maternal Nighttime Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teti, Douglas M.; Crosby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms were examined to clarify relations between maternal depressive symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, and infant night waking among 45 infants (1-24 months) and their mothers. A mother-driven mediational model was tested in which maternal depressive symptoms and dysfunctional cognitions about infant sleep predicted infant night waking via…

  10. The Maternal Description of Child (MDoC): A New Audiotaped Measure of Maternal Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Anne; Razza, Rachel A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    We report on a new measure of maternal affect from an ongoing multi-site birth cohort study with primarily low-income families, the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. At child age of 5?years, mothers were asked to describe their child in a short, semi-structured home interview. One innovation of this measure--called the Maternal

  11. Improving maternity care in Ethiopia through facility based review of maternal deaths and near misses.

    PubMed

    Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Tewolde, Birukkidus T

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to initiate facility based review of maternal deaths and near misses as part of the Ethiopian effort to reduce maternal mortality and achieve United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. An in-depth review of all maternal deaths and near misses among women who visited 10 hospitals in four regions of Ethiopia was conducted between May 2011 and October 2012 as part of the FIGO LOGIC initiative. During the study period, a total of 2774 cases (206 deaths and 2568 near misses) were reviewed. The ratio of maternal deaths to near misses was 1:12 and the overall maternal death rate was 728 per 100 000 live births. Socioeconomic factors associated with maternal mortality included illiteracy 1672 (60.3%) and lack of employment outside the home 2098 (75.6%). In all, 1946 (70.2%) women arrived at hospital after they had developed serious complications owing to issues such as lack of transportation. Only 1223 (44.1%) women received prenatal follow-up and 157 (76.2%) deaths were attributed to direct obstetric causes. Based on the findings, facilities adopted a number of quality improvement measures such as providing 24-hour services, and making ambulances available. Integrating review of maternal deaths and near misses into regular practice provides accurate information on causes of maternal deaths and near misses and also improves quality of care in facilities. PMID:25261109

  12. Maternal mental health: The missing "m" in the global maternal and child health agenda.

    PubMed

    Atif, Najia; Lovell, Karina; Rahman, Atif

    2015-08-01

    While the physical health of women and children is emphasized, the mental aspects of their health are often ignored by maternal and child health programs, especially in low- and middle-income countries. We review the evidence of the magnitude, impact, and interventions for common maternal mental health problems with a focus on depression, the condition with the greatest public health impact. The mean prevalence of maternal depression ranges between 15.6% in the prenatal and 19.8% in the postnatal period. It is associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and poor infant growth and cognitive development. There is emerging evidence for the effectiveness of interventions, especially those that can be delivered by non-specialists, including community health workers, in low-income settings. Strategies for integrating maternal mental health in the maternal and child health agenda are suggested. PMID:26164538

  13. Disposition of cefixime in the material-fetal unit after an i. v. dose to pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin-Walega, E.; Barr, A.; Tonelli, A.P.; Shin, K.; Batra, V.K.

    1986-03-01

    Cefixime, a potent, broad spectrum oral cephalosporin, is currently undergoing clinical trials. To determine the extent of transfer of cefixime across the placenta to the fetus, a single dose of 17.8 mg/kg /sup 14/C-cefixime was administered to rats on day 18 of gestation via the caudal vein. Maternal serum and urine, fetal plasma and tissues, and placentae were sampled at appropriate times after dosing. Separate rats were subjected to whole body autoradiography. The half-life for elimination of radioactivity from both maternal serum and placentae was 6.9 hours. Elimination from fetal plasma and tissues was somewhat longer, 12.5 and 13.7 hours, respectively. However, based on a comparison of area under the curve, relative to maternal dose, exposure of the fetuses to cefixime was far less than that of placentae. Peak radioactivity in fetal plasma occurred at 2 hours and was less than 2% of the maternal peak at 0.5 hours after dosing. Whole body autoradiography showed the greatest radioactivity in maternal liver, kidney and intestines. Somewhat less radioactivity appeared in placentae and virtually none could be visualized within the amniotic sac. Overall, the data indicate that exposure of the rat fetus to cefixime after a single maternal dose is limited by the placenta.

  14. Women Workers and Maternity: Some Examples from Western Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paoli, Chantal

    1982-01-01

    The author studies measures adopted in some European market economy countries with a view to improving maternity protection and enabling women workers to reconcile the dual function of maternity and economic activity without undermining equality. (Editor)

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms and the transgenerational effects of maternal care

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    Review Epigenetic mechanisms and the transgenerational effects of maternal care Frances A generations. However, recent evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are capable of mediating this type 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Maternal; Epigenetic; DNA methylation; Estrogen

  16. Diminished maternal responsiveness during pregnancy in multiparous female common marmosets

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    pregnancy. Within reproductive conditions, however, maternal behaviors were not correlated with hormone Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Marmoset; Maternal behavior; Pregnancy; Infanticide; Estrogen monkeys that usually exhibit a singular cooperative breeding system: only a single, dominant female breeds

  17. Early zebrafish development: It’s in the maternal genes

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Elliott W.; Mullins, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The earliest stages of embryonic development in all animals examined rely on maternal gene products that are generated during oogenesis and supplied to the egg. The period of maternal control of embryonic development varies among animals according to the onset of zygotic transcription and the persistence of maternal gene products. This maternal regulation has been little studied in vertebrates, due to the difficulty in manipulating maternal gene function and lack of basic molecular information. However, recent maternal-effect screens in the zebrafish have generated more than 40 unique mutants that are providing new molecular entry points to the maternal control of early vertebrate development. Here we discuss recent studies of 12 zebrafish mutant genes that illuminate the maternal molecular controls on embryonic development, including advances in the regulation of animal-vegetal polarity, egg activation, cleavage development, body plan formation, tissue morphogenesis, microRNA function and germ cell development. PMID:19608405

  18. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral health care for pregnant women Oral Health Resource Bulletin Oral Health Resource Bulletin: Volume 34 (November 2015) Pocket Guide Bright ... from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration National Maternal and Child Oral ...

  19. Maternal Responsiveness Increases during Pregnancy and after Estrogen

    E-print Network

    Maestripieri, Dario

    Maternal Responsiveness Increases during Pregnancy and after Estrogen Treatment in Macaques Dario- creased their rate of interaction with infants in the last weeks of pregnancy in correspondence mammals, where maternal responsiveness is affected by the endocrine changes underlying pregnancy

  20. Postpartum Transitions in Adolescent Mothers' Romantic and Maternal Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Christina B.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    1999-01-01

    Interviewed adolescent mothers at prepartum or early postpartum and 1 year later regarding maternal and romantic relationships, depression, and negative life events. Responses indicated that over time male partner support became more important than maternal support. (LBT)

  1. 75 FR 1792 - Maternal and Child Health Bureau

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ...University, Maternal and Child Health Library can continue to provide...Funding The Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Library at Georgetown University...education resource library to help meet the changing...professionals, families with children, and the...

  2. The role of insurers in maternity safety.

    PubMed

    Draycott, Tim; Sagar, Rachel; Hogg, Susannah

    2015-11-01

    Adverse events in maternity care are frequently avoidable and litigation costs for maternity care are rising for many health services across the world. Whilst families for whom this injury was preventable suffer from this tragedy, there is an enormous loss of resource to healthcare in general. It is axiomatic that preventing avoidable harm is better for women, their families and society in general, and downstream this improvement should also reduce both litigation and costs. However, there are few initiatives that have reduced adverse clinical events in maternity services and fewer still that have demonstrated decreases in litigation costs. Where these data do exist, the involvement and engagement of insurers seem to have been crucial, but often unrecognized. Insurers could play a much broader role in preventing harm, and this article explores this potential. PMID:26323546

  3. Emotional context, maternal behavior and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Roque, Lisa; Veríssimo, Manuela

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the importance of emotion-eliciting context (positive and negative) and mother's behaviors (constrained and involved) on toddlers' emotion regulation behavioral strategies, emotional expressiveness and intensity, during three episodes eliciting fear, frustration/anger and positive affect. Fifty-five children between 18 and 26 months of age and their mothers participated in the study. Toddlers' regulatory strategies varied as function of emotion-eliciting context (children exhibited behavioral strategies more frequently during positive affect and frustration/anger episodes and less frequently during fear episodes) and maternal involvement. Toddlers' expression of emotion varied as function of emotion-eliciting context (children exhibited more emotional expressions, both negative and positive during fear and frustration/anger episodes compared to positive affect episodes). Toddlers' expression of emotion was not strongly related to maternal involvement, however, the intensity of emotional expression was related to the interaction of context and maternal involvement. PMID:21764459

  4. Maternal transmission, sex ratio distortion, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Steve J; Hodson, Christina N; Hamilton, Phineas T; Opit, George P; Gowen, Brent E

    2015-08-18

    In virtually all multicellular eukaryotes, mitochondria are transmitted exclusively through one parent, usually the mother. In this short review, we discuss some of the major consequences of uniparental transmission of mitochondria, including deleterious effects in males and selection for increased transmission through females. Many of these consequences, particularly sex ratio distortion, have well-studied parallels in other maternally transmitted genetic elements, such as bacterial endosymbionts of arthropods. We also discuss the consequences of linkage between mitochondria and other maternally transmitted genetic elements, including the role of cytonuclear incompatibilities in maintaining polymorphism. Finally, as a case study, we discuss a recently discovered maternally transmitted sex ratio distortion in an insect that is associated with extraordinarily divergent mitochondria. PMID:25870270

  5. Maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Tang, Alvin; Levy, Denis; Grossfeld, Paul; Kashani, Iraj; Shaughnessy, Robin; Rothman, Abraham

    2002-02-01

    The maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography may be deleterious in the face of newly diagnosed congenital heart disease. This questionnaire-based study prospectively examined the psychological impact of both normal and abnormal fetal echocardiography. Normal fetal echocardiography decreased maternal anxiety, increased happiness, and increased the closeness women felt toward their unborn children. In contrast, when fetal echocardiography detected congenital heart disease, maternal anxiety typically increased, and mothers commonly felt less happy about being pregnant. However, among women who had recently delivered infants with congenital heart disease, those who had had fetal echocardiography during the pregnancy felt less responsible for their infants' defects and tended to have improved their relationships with the infants' fathers after the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Further study of the psychological and medical impact of fetal echocardiography will be necessary to define and optimize the clinical value of this powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:11836491

  6. Vascular effects of maternal alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Magness, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy is a significant field of scientific exploration primarily because of its negative effects on the developing fetus, which is specifically defined as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Though the effects on the mother are less explored compared with those on the fetus, alcohol produces multiple effects on the maternal vascular system. Alcohol has major effects on systemic hemodynamic variables, endocrine axes, and paracrine factors regulating vascular resistance, as well as vascular reactivity. Alcohol is also reported to have significant effects on the reproductive vasculature including alterations in blood flow, vessel remodeling, and angiogenesis. Data presented in this review will illustrate the importance of the maternal vasculature in the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and that more studies are warranted in this field. PMID:22730388

  7. Maternal transmission, sex ratio distortion, and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Steve J.; Hodson, Christina N.; Hamilton, Phineas T.; Opit, George P.; Gowen, Brent E.

    2015-01-01

    In virtually all multicellular eukaryotes, mitochondria are transmitted exclusively through one parent, usually the mother. In this short review, we discuss some of the major consequences of uniparental transmission of mitochondria, including deleterious effects in males and selection for increased transmission through females. Many of these consequences, particularly sex ratio distortion, have well-studied parallels in other maternally transmitted genetic elements, such as bacterial endosymbionts of arthropods. We also discuss the consequences of linkage between mitochondria and other maternally transmitted genetic elements, including the role of cytonuclear incompatibilities in maintaining polymorphism. Finally, as a case study, we discuss a recently discovered maternally transmitted sex ratio distortion in an insect that is associated with extraordinarily divergent mitochondria. PMID:25870270

  8. Maternal benefits of immunization during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Geeta K; Beigi, Richard H

    2015-11-25

    The US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention currently recommend routine immunization to prevent 17 vaccine-preventable diseases that occur in infants, children, adolescents, or adults. Pregnant women are at particularly high risk for morbidity and mortality related to several vaccine-preventable diseases. Furthermore, such illnesses are also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion, congenital anomalies, preterm birth, and low birthweight. In addition to directly preventing maternal infection, vaccination during pregnancy may offer fetal and infant benefit through passive immunization. Several vaccines aimed at providing passive immunity to neonates are either currently recommended or in development. This article specifically addresses maternal benefits of maternal immunization following (1) vaccines recommended for all pregnant women; (2) vaccines recommended for pregnant women with particular risk factors; and (3) novel vaccines currently under development that primarily aim to at reduce infant morbidity and mortality. PMID:26384445

  9. Maternal lupus and congenital cortical impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Y.; Huerta, Patricio T.; Zhang, Jie; Kowal, Czeslawa; Bertini, Eva; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease mediated by autoantibodies (AAbs) and preferentially affecting women of childbearing age. Since the offspring of mothers with SLE exhibit a high frequency of learning disorders1-5, we hypothesized that maternally transferred AAbs that bind DNA and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)6-12 could play a pathogenic role during fetal brain development. Here we describe a maternal SLE murine model wherein pregnant dams harbored DNA-specific, NMDAR-specific AAbs throughout gestation. High titers of these AAbs in maternal circulation led to histological abnormalities in fetal brain and subsequent cognitive impairments in adult offspring. These data support a paradigm in which in utero exposure to neurotoxic AAbs causes abnormal brain development with long-term consequences. This paradigm may apply to multiple congenital neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19079257

  10. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Phyllis E.

    2014-01-01

    The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases “expectant brain” and “maternal brain”. Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array) was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1) whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR ?2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated. PMID:24961703

  11. Dopamine receptor D2 deficiency reduces mouse pup ultrasonic vocalizations and maternal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Curry, T; Egeto, P; Wang, H; Podnos, A; Wasserman, D; Yeomans, J

    2013-06-01

    Dopamine signalling facilitates motivated behaviours, and the D2 dopamine receptor (D2R) is important in mother-infant interactions. D2R antagonists disrupt maternal behaviour and, in isolated rat pups, reduce ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that promote maternal interaction. Here, we examined the effects of genetic D2R signalling deficiency on pup-dam interaction with Drd2 knockout (D2R KO) mice. Using heterozygous (HET) cross littermates, the effect of pup genotype on isolation-induced USVs was quantified. Independent of parental genotype, D2R-deficient pups emitted fewer USVs than wild type (WT) littermates in a gene dose-dependent manner. Using reciprocal D2R KO-WT crosses, we examined how parental genotype affects pup USVs. Heterozygous pups from D2R KO dams produced fewer USVs than HET pups from WT dams. Also, exposure to USV-emitting pups increased plasma prolactin levels in WT dams but not in D2R KO dams, and KO dams showed delayed pup retrieval and nest building. These findings indicate the importance of the interaction between pup and dam genotypes on behaviour and further support the role of D2R signalling in maternal care. PMID:23521753

  12. Renal Transcriptome Analysis of Programmed Hypertension Induced by Maternal Nutritional Insults.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Chan, Julie Y H; Huang, Li-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Maternal nutrition can affect development, leading to long-term effects on the health of offspring. The most common outcome is programmed hypertension. We examined whether alterations in renal transcriptome are responsible for generating programmed hypertension among four different models using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received 50% caloric restriction (CR), intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg streptozotocin, 60% high-fructose (HF) diet, or 1% NaCl in drinking water to conduct CR, diabetes, HF, or high-salt models, respectively. All four models induced programmed hypertension in adult male offspring. We observed 16 shared genes in a two-week-old kidney among four different models. The identified differential expressed genes (DEGs) that are related to the regulation of blood pressure included Adrb3, Alb, Apoe, Calca, Kng1, Adm2, Guca2b, Hba2, Hba-a2, and Ppara. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway and glutathione metabolism pathway were shared by the CR, diabetes, and HF models. Conclusively, a variety of maternal nutritional insults induced the same phenotype-programmed hypertension with differential alterations of renal transcriptome in adult male offspring. The roles of DEGs identified by the NGS in this study deserve further clarification to develop ideal maternal dietary interventions and thus spare the next generations from the burden of hypertension. PMID:26247937

  13. Maternal high-fat diet alters anxiety behavior and glucocorticoid signaling in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, A; de Vega, W; Sivanathan, S; St-Cyr, S; McGowan, P O

    2014-07-11

    Maternal obesity and overconsumption of saturated fats during pregnancy have profound effects on offspring health, ranging from metabolic to behavioral disorders in later life. The influence of high-fat diet (HFD) exposure on the development of brain regions implicated in anxiety behavior is not well understood. We previously found that maternal HFD exposure is associated with an increase in anxiety behavior and alterations in the expression of several genes involved in inflammation via the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in adult rat offspring. During adolescence, the maturation of feedback systems mediating corticosteroid sensitivity is incomplete, and therefore distinct from adulthood. In this study, we examined the influence of maternal HFD on several measures of anxiety behavior and gene expression in adolescent offspring. We examined the expression of corticosteroid receptors and related inflammatory processes, as corticosteroid receptors are known to regulate circulating corticosterone levels during basal and stress conditions in addition to influencing inflammatory processes in the hippocampus and amygdala. We found that adolescent animals perinatally exposed to HFD generally showed decreased anxiety behavior accompanied by a selective alteration in the expression of the glucocorticoid receptor and several downstream inflammatory genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. These data suggest that adolescence constitutes an additional period when the effects of developmental programming may modify mental health trajectories. PMID:24791714

  14. Cues of maternal condition influence offspring selfishness.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janine W Y; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of parent-offspring communication was mostly studied from the perspective of parents responding to begging signals conveying information about offspring condition. Parents should respond to begging because of the differential fitness returns obtained from their investment in offspring that differ in condition. For analogous reasons, offspring should adjust their behavior to cues/signals of parental condition: parents that differ in condition pay differential costs of care and, hence, should provide different amounts of food. In this study, we experimentally tested in the European earwig (Forficula auricularia) if cues of maternal condition affect offspring behavior in terms of sibling cannibalism. We experimentally manipulated female condition by providing them with different amounts of food, kept nymph condition constant, allowed for nymph exposure to chemical maternal cues over extended time, quantified nymph survival (deaths being due to cannibalism) and extracted and analyzed the females' cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC). Nymph survival was significantly affected by chemical cues of maternal condition, and this effect depended on the timing of breeding. Cues of poor maternal condition enhanced nymph survival in early broods, but reduced nymph survival in late broods, and vice versa for cues of good condition. Furthermore, female condition affected the quantitative composition of their CHC profile which in turn predicted nymph survival patterns. Thus, earwig offspring are sensitive to chemical cues of maternal condition and nymphs from early and late broods show opposite reactions to the same chemical cues. Together with former evidence on maternal sensitivities to condition-dependent nymph chemical cues, our study shows context-dependent reciprocal information exchange about condition between earwig mothers and their offspring, potentially mediated by cuticular hydrocarbons. PMID:24498046

  15. Cues of Maternal Condition Influence Offspring Selfishness

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Janine W. Y.; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of parent-offspring communication was mostly studied from the perspective of parents responding to begging signals conveying information about offspring condition. Parents should respond to begging because of the differential fitness returns obtained from their investment in offspring that differ in condition. For analogous reasons, offspring should adjust their behavior to cues/signals of parental condition: parents that differ in condition pay differential costs of care and, hence, should provide different amounts of food. In this study, we experimentally tested in the European earwig (Forficula auricularia) if cues of maternal condition affect offspring behavior in terms of sibling cannibalism. We experimentally manipulated female condition by providing them with different amounts of food, kept nymph condition constant, allowed for nymph exposure to chemical maternal cues over extended time, quantified nymph survival (deaths being due to cannibalism) and extracted and analyzed the females’ cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC). Nymph survival was significantly affected by chemical cues of maternal condition, and this effect depended on the timing of breeding. Cues of poor maternal condition enhanced nymph survival in early broods, but reduced nymph survival in late broods, and vice versa for cues of good condition. Furthermore, female condition affected the quantitative composition of their CHC profile which in turn predicted nymph survival patterns. Thus, earwig offspring are sensitive to chemical cues of maternal condition and nymphs from early and late broods show opposite reactions to the same chemical cues. Together with former evidence on maternal sensitivities to condition-dependent nymph chemical cues, our study shows context-dependent reciprocal information exchange about condition between earwig mothers and their offspring, potentially mediated by cuticular hydrocarbons. PMID:24498046

  16. Paid maternity and paternity leave: rights and choices.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Claire

    2007-01-01

    From April 2007 onwards, maternity leave will be raised to nine months Paid maternity leave is associated with significant health benefits for babies, including reduced infant mortality The Government proposes to increase paid maternity leave to one year and introduce additional paternity leave by around 2009 The U.K's provision for maternity leave and child care is more generous than the U.S.A. or Australia but less than in the Scandinavian countries PMID:17385479

  17. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  18. Maternal exposure to the mixture of organophosphorus pesticides induces reproductive dysfunction in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Yang, Aimin; Zhang, Jinghua; Hu, Senke

    2013-09-01

    Organophosphorus pesticide residues are found in many food samples due to increasing use of multiple organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) in agriculture. Toxicity of individual organophosphorus has been well-studied in previous epidemiological and laboratory investigations. This study focused on reproductive toxicity of perinatal exposure to the mixture of organophosphorus pesticides (MOPs). The MOPs consists of three most commonly used pesticides, i.e., Dichlorovos, Dimethoate, and Malathion which individually does not cause significant effects on the reproductive system at the similar concentration levels based on previous studies. Using the Sprague-Dawley rats, we established a perinatal exposure model by oral gavage and observed significant endometrial hyperplasia and thickened uterine walls in the F0 rats after administration of high doses of the MOPs. We further monitored several key developmental and behavioral indices in the F1 generation after maternal exposure to the MOPs, and observed significantly delayed physical development and weakened mental development. Moreover, we found increased weights of the reproductive organs (the uterus and the testis) and abnormal levels of key sex hormones (progestin and testosterone) in the MOPs groups. It is more important that we observed a significantly lower pregnancy rate and live birth rate in the high-dose MOPs group. These results indicate that the MOPs may be more detrimental to the maternal endometria and the reproductive functions in the offspring than individual organophosphorus. PMID:21793158

  19. Effects of Maternal Employment on Adolescent Substance Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Stephen B.; And Others

    As levels of maternal employment increase (71% for mothers with school-age children), there is concern for both the short- and long-term consequences of maternal employment on children and families. This study examined the influence of maternal employment in two-parent families on the substance use of adolescents. Subjects were male and female…

  20. The Development of Maternal Attachment: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tannis MacBeth; And Others

    Summaries of papers presented in a symposium deal with a related series of four issues concerning the development of maternal attachment: Is maternal attachment best conceptualized and measured as an emotional tie or as observable behavior? Is there continuity in the development of maternal attachment from the prenatal to postpartum period? Can…

  1. Projecting Health: Community-Led Video Education for Maternal Health

    E-print Network

    Hochberg, Michael

    in Education General Terms Human Factors Keywords Maternal and child health; behavior change; community; videoProjecting Health: Community-Led Video Education for Maternal Health Neha Kumar1 , Trevor Perrier1 maternal and infant mortality rates. This project is based on our model of Community- led Video Education

  2. RHOA SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION: EFFECTS OF MATERNAL COPPER DEFICIENCY ON PROGENY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Maternal copper deficiency during pregnancy and lactation impairs development of the cardiovascular system.Maternal copper deficiency induces reduction in CCO activity in neonatal cardiac mitochondria, pointing to developmental alterations. Effects of maternal copper deficiency on RhoA s...

  3. Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy, Child Behavior Problems, and Adolescent Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesler, Pamela C.; Kandel, Denise B.; Davies, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Used longitudinal sample of 187 mother-child dyads to examine the role of child behavior problems in explaining the effect of maternal prenatal smoking on adolescent daughters' smoking. Found that maternal prenatal smoking retained a unique effect on girls' current smoking with controls for current maternal smoking, child behavior problems, and…

  4. Mediating Links between Maternal Childhood Trauma and Preadolescent Behavioral Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Meeyoung O.; Singer, Lynn T.; Minnes, Sonia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Short, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to simultaneously examine maternal psychological distress and social support as mediators linking maternal childhood trauma (MCT) to both maternal and child-reported behavior at 9 years of age in 231 birth mother-child dyads, who were primarily poor, urban, and African American. One half of the mothers…

  5. Newly Deposited Maternal Hormones can be Detected in the

    E-print Network

    Wade, Juli

    Newly Deposited Maternal Hormones can be Detected in the Yolks of Oviductal Eggs in the Green Anole was to investigate whether maternal steroids can enter oviductal eggs. In Experiment 1, gravid female green anole of oviductal eggs in the green anole lizard. J. Exp. Zool. 313A:352­358. Maternal hormones have been detected

  6. Physiological Reactivity to Infant Crying and Observed Maternal Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosen, Katharina J.; Mesman, Judi; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Pieper, Suzanne; Zeskind, Philip S.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2013-01-01

    Relations between maternal sensitivity and physiological reactivity to infant crying were examined using measures of heart rate (HR) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in 49 mothers of second-born infants. Using the Ainsworth Sensitivity Scale, an independent assessment of maternal sensitivity was made during maternal free play and bathing of…

  7. Maternal oxytocin response predicts mother-to-infant gaze

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuropeptide oxytocin is importantly implicated in the emergence and maintenance of maternal behavior that forms the basis of the mother–infant bond. However, no research has yet examined the specific association between maternal oxytocin and maternal gaze, a key modality through which the mothe...

  8. BENOMYL-INDUCED CRANIOCEREBRAL ANOMALIES IN FETUSES OF ADEQUATELY NOURISHED AND PROTEIN-DEPRIVED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benomyl, a benzimidazole fungicide, produced craniocerebral and systemic malformations in fetal rats when administered by gavage in doses of 31.2, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg of maternal body weight on days 7-21 of gestation. Malformations increased in incidence and severity with increas...

  9. PLASMA PROTEINS AND COLLOID OSMOTIC PRESSURE OF BLOOD OF RAT FETUSES PRENATALLY EXPOSED TO MIREX

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant effect of prenatal exposure to the pesticide Mirex is a fetal edema, which is responsible for many of the toxic effects of this agent. Pregnant rats were given 6 mg/kg mirex on d 8 and a half-15 and a half, a moderate dose that does not cause maternal mortality. The...

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM INDUCES A NEURONAL HETEROTOPIA IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM OF THE RAT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well established that severe hypothyroidism leads to profound alterations in brain development and mental retardation. In this study we examined the effect of subtle decreases in maternal thyroid hormones (TH) on brain development in the rat. To induce TH insufficiency pr...

  11. Social Competitiveness and Plasticity of Neuroendocrine Function in Old Age: Influence of Neonatal Novelty Exposure and Maternal Care Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Katherine G.; Yang, Zhen; DelVecchio, Dominic P.; Reeb, Bethany C.; Romeo, Russell D.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Tang, Akaysha C.

    2008-01-01

    Early experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care. PMID:18641792

  12. Development Of Cocaine Sensitization Before Pregnancy Affects Subsequent Maternal Retrieval Of Pups And Prefrontal Cortical Activity During Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Febo, Marcelo; Ferris, Craig F.

    2007-01-01

    Pups are a highly rewarding stimulus for early postpartum rats. Our previous work supports this notion by showing that suckling activates the mesocorticolimbic system in mothers. In the present study, we tested whether development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine before pregnancy affects the neural response to pups during the early postpartum days (PD). Virgin rats were repeatedly administered cocaine for 14 days (15 mg kg-1) and withdrawn from treatment during breeding and pregnancy. The neural response to suckling was measured at PD 4 to 8 using blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI or microdialysis. Our results show that BOLD activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), septum and auditory cortex was curtailed in cocaine-sensitized dams. No differences between cocaine sensitized and saline control dams were observed in the nucleus accumbens, olfactory structures, or in 48 additional major brain regions that were analyzed. Baseline, but not pup-stimulated, dopamine (DA) levels in the medial PFC was lower in cocaine-sensitized dams than in controls. When tested for maternal behaviors, cocaine sensitized dams showed significantly faster retrieval of pups without changes in other maternal behaviors such as grouping, crouching and defending the nest. Taken together, the present findings suggest that maternal motivation to retrieve pups was enhanced by repeated cocaine exposure and withdrawal, a result reminiscent of ‘cross sensitization’ between the drug and a natural reward. Changes in retrieval behavior in cocaine-sensitized mothers might be associated with a hypo-responsive medial PFC. PMID:17651902

  13. Maternal self-confidence postpartum and at pre-school age: the role of depression, anxiety disorders, maternal attachment insecurity.

    PubMed

    Zietlow, Anna-Lena; Schlüter, Myriam Kim; Nonnenmacher, Nora; Müller, Mitho; Reck, Corinna

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of maternal postpartum depression and/or anxiety disorders according to DMS-IV on maternal self-confidence throughout infancy and early childhood. Exploratively, associations between maternal attachment insecurity and maternal self-confidence at pre-school age were examined. The sample (N = 54) of this prospective longitudinal study was comprised of n = 27 women with postpartum depression and/or anxiety disorders according to DSM-IV criteria and n = 27 healthy women without present or history of mental health disorders or psychotherapy. Data was collected in the postpartum period (M = 60.08 days) and at pre-school age (M = 4.7 years). Subjects were recruited between 2004 and 2011 in South Germany. Data revealed a significant difference in maternal self-confidence between clinical and control group at child's pre-school age: Women with postpartum depression and/or anxiety disorder scored lower on maternal self-confidence than healthy controls, but only if they had current SCID-diagnoses or partly remitted symptoms. According to explorative analyses maternal attachment insecurity turned out to be the strongest predictor of maternal self-confidence at pre-school age besides maternal mental health status. The results emphasize the impact of attachment insecurity and maternal mental health regarding maternal self-confidence leading to potential adverse long-term consequences for the mother-child relationship. Attachment based interventions taking maternal self-confidence into account are needed. PMID:24474591

  14. Social Support and Maternal Depression from Pregnancy to Postpartum: The Association with Positive Maternal Behaviours among Brazilian Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diniz, Eva; Koller, Sílvia H.; Volling, Brenda L.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent motherhood is a risky situation related to poorer quality of infant caregiving. The lack of social support and increased odds for maternal depression are the main concerns. This study aimed to investigate whether maternal-foetal attachment, social support and maternal depression measured during pregnancy and after birth were associated…

  15. Maternal Eating Disorders and Infant Feeding Difficulties: Maternal and Child Mediators in a Longitudinal General Population Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micali, Nadia; Simonoff, Emily; Stahl, Daniel; Treasure, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Background: Maternal eating disorders (ED) have been shown to increase the risk of feeding difficulties in the offspring. Very few studies, however, have investigated whether the effect of a maternal ED on childhood feeding is a direct effect or whether it can be ascribed to other child or maternal factors. We aimed to determine the role of…

  16. Proteomic Analysis of One-carbon Metabolism-related Marker in Liver of Rat Offspring*

    PubMed Central

    You, Young-Ah; Lee, Ji Hye; Kwon, Eun Jin; Yoo, Jae Young; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol; Kim, Young Ju

    2015-01-01

    Maternal food intake has a significant effect on the fetal environment, and an inadequate maternal diet may result in intrauterine growth restriction. Intrauterine growth restriction newborn rat pups nursed by normal diet-fed dams exhibited rapid catch-up growth, which plays a critical role in the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. Specifically, one-carbon metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in placental and fetal growth. Impaired functioning of one-carbon metabolism is associated with increased homocysteine levels. In this study, we applied a comprehensive proteomic approach to identify differential expression of proteins related to one-carbon metabolism in the livers of rat offspring as an effect of maternal food restriction during gestation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002578. We determined that betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial (ATP5B) expression levels were significantly reduced in the livers of rat offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation compared with in the offspring of rats fed a normal diet (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial were negatively correlated with serum homocysteine concentration in male offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation and normal diet during lactation. However, in female offspring only expression levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 were negatively correlated with homocysteine concentration. This study shows that maternal food restriction during late gestation and normal diet during lactation lead to increased homocysteine concentration through disturbance of one-carbon metabolism in the livers of male offspring. This suggests that male offspring have an increased gender-specific susceptibility to disease in later life through fetal programming. PMID:26342040

  17. Choline is required in the diet of lactating dams to maintain maternal immune function.

    PubMed

    Dellschaft, Neele S; Ruth, Megan R; Goruk, Susan; Lewis, Erin D; Richard, Caroline; Jacobs, René L; Curtis, Jonathan M; Field, Catherine J

    2015-06-14

    Choline demands during lactation are high; however, detailed knowledge is lacking regarding the optimal dietary intake during this critical period. The present study was designed to determine the effects of varying intakes of choline on maternal immune function during lactation. Primiparous Sprague-Dawley rats (n 42) were randomised 24-48 h before birth and fed the following diets for 21 d: choline-devoid (0 g choline/kg diet; D, n 10); 1·0 g choline/kg diet (C1, n 11); 2·5 g choline/kg diet (C2·5, n 10); 6·2 g choline/kg diet (C6, n 11). Splenocytes were isolated and stimulated ex vivo with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CD3/CD28. D and C6 dams had lower final body weight, spleen weight and average pup weight than C1 dams (P< 0·05). There was a linear relationship between free choline concentration in pup stomach contents with maternal dietary choline content (P< 0·001, r² 0·415). Compared with C1 and C2·5, D spleens had a lower proportion of mature T cells and activated suppressor cells, and this resulted in reduced cytokine production after stimulation (P< 0·05). Feeding 6·2 g choline/kg diet resulted in a higher cytokine production after stimulation with CD3/CD28 (P< 0·05). Except for a higher IL-6 production after LPS stimulation with cells from the C2·5 dams (P< 0·05), there were no differences between the C1 and C2·5 dams. For the first time, we show that feeding lactating mothers a diet free of choline has substantial effects on their immune function and on offspring growth. Additionally, excess dietary choline had adverse effects on maternal and offspring body weight but only minimal effects on maternal immune function. PMID:25902853

  18. Facility-based maternal death reviews: effects on maternal mortality in a district hospital in Senegal.

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Alexandre; Gaye, Alioune; de Bernis, Luc; Chaillet, Nils; Landry, Anne; Delage, Joanne; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The improvement of obstetric services is one of the key components of the Safe Motherhood Programme. Reviewing maternal deaths and complications is one method that may make pregnancy safer, but there is no evidence about the effectiveness of this strategy. The objective of our before and after study is to assess the effect of facility-based maternal deaths reviews (MDR) on maternal mortality rates in a district hospital in Senegal that provides primary and referral maternity services. METHODS: We included all women who were admitted to the maternity unit for childbirth, or within 24 hours of delivery. We recorded maternal mortality during a 1-year baseline period from January to December 1997, and during a 3-year period from January 1998 to December 2000 after MDR had been implemented. Effects of MDR on organization of care were qualitatively evaluated. FINDINGS: The MDR strategy led to changes in organizational structure that improved life-saving interventions with a relatively large financial contribution from the community. Overall mortality significantly decreased from 0.83 (95% CI (confidence interval) = 0.60 -1.06) in baseline period to 0.41 (95% CI = 0.25 -0.56) per 100 women 3 years later. CONCLUSION: MDR had a marked effect on resources, management and maternal outcomes in this facility. However, given the design of our study and the local specific context, further research is needed to confirm the feasibility of MDR in other settings and to confirm the benefits of this approach for maternal health in developing countries. PMID:16583081

  19. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  20. The Corporate Perspective on Maternal & Child Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Carol; Hartman, Rebecca

    This report considers the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality's recommendations for ways for the private sector to become more involved in promoting maternal and child health. The first chapter presents demographic data on changes affecting the workforce, including statistics on women in the workforce, changing family lifestyles,…

  1. Maternal Effects as Generators of Evolutionary Change

    E-print Network

    Badyaev, Alex

    Maternal Effects as Generators of Evolutionary Change A Reassessment Alexander V. Badyaev Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA Despite being a center of debate in biology for centuries, the connection between the generation of novel adaptive

  2. Contextual Variation in Maternal Conversational Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haden, Catherine A.; Fivush, Robyn

    1996-01-01

    Observed mothers playing with their 40-month-old children and eliciting their children's memories of shared experiences. Cluster analysis found two distinct maternal interaction styles in each of these contexts. Individual mothers' styles varied across the contexts, suggesting that infant-mother dyads must be observed in multiple contexts to…

  3. Maternal Care Patterns and Behavioral Development of

    E-print Network

    Maestripieri, Dario

    Emory University Atlanta, GA M.M. Sanchez Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences EmoryMaternal Care Patterns and Behavioral Development of Rhesus Macaque Abused Infants in the First 6@spelman.edu Yerkes National Primate Research Center Emory University, Atlanta, GA Center for Behavioral Neuroscience

  4. Effects of Maternal Depression on Youth Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jennifer

    Depressive disorders are chronic illnesses affecting women and their families for extended periods of time. This paper summarizes research related to the effects of maternal depression on children's short and long term adjustment. Children of depressed mothers are at risk for internalizing and externalizing disorders. Genetics account for a small…

  5. Update in Maternal and Infant Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Elizabeth M.

    1989-01-01

    This review emphasizes research that confirms or questions established practices regarding maternal and infant nutrition. Controversial issues include weight gain and use of vitamins and mineral supplements during pregnancy and the effects of second-hand smoke. Infant nutrition topics include use of unmodified cow's milk, level of fat, and…

  6. Selenium and maternal blood pressure during childbirth.

    PubMed

    Wells, Ellen M; Goldman, Lynn R; Jarrett, Jeffery M; Apelberg, Benjamin J; Herbstman, Julie B; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Halden, Rolf U; Witter, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests selenium concentrations outside the nutritional range may worsen cardiovascular health. This paper examines the relationship between selenium and maternal blood pressure (BP) among 270 deliveries using umbilical cord serum as a proxy for maternal exposure levels. Multivariable models used linear splines for selenium and controlled for gestational age, maternal age, race, median household income, parity, smoking, and prepregnancy body mass index. Non-parametric analysis of this dataset was used to select spline knots for selenium at 70 and 90??g/l. When selenium was <70??g/l, increasing selenium levels were related to a non-statistically significant decrease in BP. For selenium 70-90??g/l, a 1??g/l increase was related to a 0.37?mm?Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.005, 0.73) change in systolic and a 0.35?mm?Hg (0.07, 0.64) change in diastolic BP. There were very few selenium values >90??g/l. Other studies indicate that the maternal/cord selenium ratio is 1.46 (95% CI: 1.28, 1.65). This u-shaped relationship between selenium and BP is consistent with a dual role of selenium as an essential micronutrient that is nonetheless a toxicant at higher concentrations; however, this needs to be studied further. PMID:22108761

  7. Maternal Work Conditions and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felfe, Christina; Hsin, Amy

    2012-01-01

    How do maternal work conditions, such as psychological stress and physical hazards, affect children's development? Combining data from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the Occupational Information Network allows us to shed some light on this question. We employ various techniques including OLS with…

  8. Smallpox during Pregnancy and Maternal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    A historical study evaluated maternal outcomes in pregnancy complicated by smallpox. The overall case fatality was estimated to be 34.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 31.4–37.1), and the proportion of miscarriage or premature birth was estimated to be 39.9% (95% CI 36.5–43.2). Vaccination before pregnancy reduced the risk for death. PMID:16836830

  9. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls' Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls' disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent- and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years.…

  10. Maternal Care Effects on the Development of a Sexually Dimorphic Motor System: The Role of Spinal Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kathryn M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.

    2010-01-01

    Maternal licking in rats affects the development of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB), a sexually dimorphic motor nucleus that controls penile reflexes involved with copulation. Reduced maternal licking results in decreased motoneuron number, size, and dendritic length in the adult SNB, as well as deficits in adult male copulatory behavior. Our previous findings that licking-like tactile stimulation influences SNB dendritic development and upregulates Fos expression in the lumbosacral spinal cord suggest that afferent signaling is changed by differences in maternal stimulation. Oxytocin afferents from the hypothalamus are a possible candidate, given previous research that has shown oxytocin is released following sensory stimulation, oxytocin modulates excitability in the spinal cord, and is a pro-erectile modulator of male sex behavior. In this experiment, we used immunofluorescence and immediate early gene analysis to assess whether licking-like tactile stimulation of the perineum activated parvocellular oxytocinergic neurons in the hypothalamus in neonates. We also used enzyme immunoassay to determine whether this same stroking stimulation produced an increase in spinal oxytocin levels. We found that stroking increased Fos immunolabeling in small oxytocin-positive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, in comparison to unstroked or handled control pups. In addition, sixty seconds of licking-like perineal stimulation produced a transient 89% increase in oxytocin levels in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Together, these results suggest that oxytocin afferent activity may contribute to the effects of early maternal care on the masculinization of the SNB and resultant male copulatory behavior. PMID:20688065

  11. Maternal outcomes of cesarean sections

    PubMed Central

    Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Newbery, Sarah; Kelly, Len; Weaver, Bruce; Wilson, Scott

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare maternal outcomes of cesarean sections performed by GPs with the outcomes of those performed by specialists. DESIGN Retrospective, comorbidity-adjusted study. SETTING Mostly small isolated rural hospitals in Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan compared with all levels of specialist obstetric programs offered in Canada. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen GPs with less than 1 year of surgical training who performed cesarean sections. METHOD Using data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Discharge Abstracts Database for the years 1990 to 2001, we matched each of 1448 cesarean section cases managed by these GPs to 3 cases managed by specialists and looked for comorbidity. In total, we analyzed the outcomes of 5792 cesarean sections. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Composites of major morbidity possibly attributable to surgery:death, sepsis, cardiac arrest, shock, hypotension, ileus or bowel obstruction,major puerperal infection, septic or fat embolism, postpartum hemorrhage requiring hysterectomy, need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or another operation; and all major morbidity: major surgical morbidity, acute coronary syndrome, endocarditis, pulmonary edema, cerebrovascular disorder, pneumothorax, respiratory failure, amniotic fluid embolism, complications of anesthesia, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, acute renal failure, and need for mechanical ventilation. RESULTS The rate of all major morbidity was higher among GPs’ patients than among specialists’ patients (3.1% vs 1.9%, odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to2.3, P = .009) as was the rate of major surgical morbidity (2.5% vs 1.6%, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4, P = .024). Differences in major morbidity variables were not significant if major postpartum infection was excluded (all major morbidity 1.5% vs 1.1%, major surgical morbidity 1.0% vs 0.8%). Secondary outcomes included rate of transfer to acute care institutions (6.0% vs 1.5%, OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.6 to 6.5, P < .001), mean length of hospital stay (5.2 vs 4.9 days, P= .006), need for blood transfusion (5.9% vs 7.0%, OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.1, P = .11) and frequency of surgical error (0.8% vs 0.7%, OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.3, P = .72). CONCLUSION Although major morbidity was higher among GPs’ patients, differences were entirely attributable to the rate of postpartum infection. Infection rates in both groups were far below expected rates. The observation that blood transfusion and surgical error rates were similar suggests that surgical technique was not the cause of differences between groups. We conclude that these GPs with a mean of 4 months’ training subsequently performed cesarean sections with an acceptable degree of safety compared with specialists. PMID:18077752

  12. A relationship between proteinuria and acute tubulointerstitial disease in rats with experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, A. A.; McCulloch, L.; Liu, E.; Adams, J.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between tubulointerstitial nephritis and proteinuria was characterized in experimental nephrosis in rats. In one group, proteinuria induced by aminonucleoside of puromycin (PAN) was reduced by using an 8% protein diet and adding the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril to the drinking water. Two control groups were injected with saline and PAN, respectively, and fed a 27% protein diet. The first group had significantly reduced albuminuria and a definite attenuation of tubular cell injury. There was a strong positive correlation between the number of interstitial macrophages and albuminuria. The beneficial effect was reproduced by dietary-protein restriction alone, whereas ACE inhibition alone had an insignificant effect on the degree of proteinuria. Depletion of circulating T lymphocytes in one group of nephrotic rats eliminated interstitial lymphocytes but did not affect interstitial macrophage influx. Inhibition of the in situ proliferation of resident interstitial macrophages by unilateral kidney irradiation failed to change the intensity of the macrophage infiltration. Treatment of rats with sodium maleate produced proximal tubular cell toxicity but interstitial inflammation did not develop, suggesting that the latter is not a nonspecific response to tubular injury. These studies demonstrate a strong relationship between tubulointerstitial nephritis and the severity of proteinuria in experimental nephrosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:2024704

  13. Maternal smoking and behavior problems of children.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, M; Gortmaker, S; Sobol, A

    1992-09-01

    Numerous health consequences of children's exposure to maternal smoking have been demonstrated, including increased rates of low birth weight, infant mortality, respiratory infections, asthma, and modest impairments of cognitive development. There is little evidence, however, linking maternal smoking and increased rates of children's behavior problems. Data from the population-based National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were used to investigate the possible association of maternal smoking and behavior problems among 2256 children aged 4 through 11 years. In multiple regression analyses the authors controlled for child's race, age, sex, birth weight, and chronic asthma; family structure, income, and divorce or separation in the prior 2 years; mother's education, intelligence, self-esteem, employment status, chronic disabling health conditions, and use of alcohol during pregnancy; and the quality of the home environment as assessed by the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment-Short Form to investigate the relationship between maternal smoking and children's behavior problems. The measure of maternal smoking status reflected two levels of smoking intensity (less than a pack per day and a pack or more per day) for each of three different categories of children's exposure: prenatal only (mother smoked only during pregnancy), passive only (mother smoked only after pregnancy), and prenatal plus passive exposure (mother smoked both during and after pregnancy). Measures of children's behavior problems included the overall score on a 32-item parent-reported child Behavior Problem Index (PBI), scores on the BPI's subscales, and rates of extreme scores on the BPI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1518686

  14. Sex-specific maternal effects in a viviparous fish

    PubMed Central

    Kruuk, Loeske E. B.; Livingston, Julianne; Kahn, Andrew; Jennions, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Mothers vary in their effects on their offspring, but studies of variation in maternal effects rarely ask whether differences between mothers are consistent for sons and daughters. Here, we analysed maternal effects in the mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki for development time and adult size of sons and daughters, and a primary male sexual character (gonopodium length). We found substantial maternal effects on all traits, most notably for gonopodium length. There were significant correlations within each sex for maternal effects on different traits, indicative of trade-offs between development rate and adult size. By contrast, there was no evidence of any consistency in maternal effects on sons and daughters. This suggests that the evolution of maternal effects will follow independent trajectories dependent on sex-specific selection on offspring. Importantly, failure to recognize the sex-specific nature of maternal effects in this population would have substantially underestimated the extent of their variation between mothers. PMID:26289441

  15. Maternal hormones during early pregnancy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianhui; Lundin, Eva; Grankvist, Kjell; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Wulff, Marianne; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Schock, Helena; Johansson, Robert; Lenner, Per; Hallmans, Goran; Wadell, Goran; Toniolo, Paolo; Lukanova, Annekatrin

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about correlates of first trimester pregnancy hormones as in most studies maternal hormones have been measured later in gestation. We examined the associations of maternal characteristics and child sex with first trimester maternal concentrations of 4 hormones implicated in breast cancer: human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), ?-fetoprotein (AFP), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II. Methods 338 serum samples donated to the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort (NSMC), 1975–2001, during the first trimester of uncomplicated pregnancies were analyzed for the hormones of interest as a part of a case-control study. The associations between maternal characteristics and child sex with hormone concentrations were investigated by correlation, general linear regression, and multivariate regression models. Results In the first trimester, greater maternal age was inversely correlated with IGF-I and IGF-II. In comparison with women carrying their first child, already parous women had higher IGF-I but lower hCG. Greater maternal weight and smoking were inversely correlated with hCG. No differences in hormone levels by child sex were observed. Conclusions Our analyses indicated that potentially modifiable maternal characteristics (maternal weight and smoking) influence first trimester pregnancy maternal hormone concentrations. PMID:20084544

  16. MATERNAL SELF-ESTEEM, EXPOSURE TO LEAD, AND CHILD NEURODEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Surkan, Pamela J.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Wright, Rosalind J.; Téllez-Rojo, Martha M.; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hu, Howard; Hernández-Avila, E. Mauricio; Bellinger, David C.; Schwartz, Joel; Perroni, Estela; Wright, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    The notion that maternal personality characteristics influence cognitive development in their children has been grounded in stress moderation theory. Maternal personality traits, such as self-esteem, may buffer maternal stressors or lead to improved maternal-child interactions that directly impact neurodevelopment. This can be extended to suggest that maternal personality may serve to attenuate or exacerbate the effects of other neurotoxicants, although this has not been studied directly. We examined whether mothers’ self-esteem had a direct or main effect on their children's cognitive outcomes. We also explored the modifying effects of maternal self-esteem on the association between exposure to lead and neurodevelopment in these children. Study participants included 379 mother-child pairs from Mexico City. Data included the Coopersmith self-esteem scale in mothers, children's Bayley's Scale of Infant Development (BSID) scores, and sociodemographic information. Linear regression was used to model the relationship between maternal self-esteem and the Bayley's Mental Development Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) scores at age 24 months using regression models stratified by levels of maternal self-esteem. In adjusted models, each point increase in maternal self-esteem was associated with children having 0.2 higher score on the Bayley's MDI (p=0.04). Similar results were observed using the PDI outcome. Moreover, there was evidence that maternal self-esteem attenuated the negative effects of lead exposure, although the interaction fell short of conventional levels of statistical significance. PMID:18261800

  17. Effects of Cocaine on Maternal Behavior and Neurochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Febo, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the mother-child bond. While it has been argued the developmental effects of maternal cocaine use on children were initially overstated, it is clear that disruptions of typical maternal behavior (i.e. postpartum depression, anxiety disorders) are detrimental to the physical and emotional health of offspring. Cocaine use in mothers is commonly associated with psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, and it is postulated that many of the negative effects of maternal cocaine use on offspring are mediated through changes in maternal behavior. This review will summarize research on cocaine and maternal behavior in animal and human studies, discuss potential mechanisms, and suggest therapeutic strategies for treating cocaine-affected maternal behavior which may improve the physical and behavioral health of both mother and child. The primary objective is to stimulate future communication, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers who use animals and humans to study cocaine and maternal behavior. PMID:22942878

  18. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  19. Maternal and Fetal Well-being

    PubMed Central

    Shy, Kirk K.; Brown, Zane A.

    1984-01-01

    Pregnancy outcomes can be improved by following modern recommendations for personal health maintenance. Adequate caloric intake, reflected by a weight gain of about 10 to 12.3 kg (22 to 27 lb) for women of average build, is associated with the lowest rate of perinatal mortality. Maternal dietary protein supplementation should generally be avoided because it may be associated with low-birth-weight pregnancies. Abstinence from social drugs offers the greatest positive opportunity to modify the health of a fetus. Serious perinatal infection can be prevented by preconception immunization (rubella), food hygiene (toxoplasmosis) and attention to the expression of virus in the mother (herpes simplex). Available data do not correlate exercise programs begun before pregnancy and continued during pregnancy with adverse fetal effects. Athletic capacity need not diminish postpartum. Most employment may safely continue until delivery. Routine recommendations for prolonged maternal disability leaves are not medically warranted. PMID:6395495

  20. Maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics of methanol. (Includes the commentary of the Institute`s Health Review Committee). Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, G.M.; Brouwer, K.L.R.

    1996-06-01

    This study defines the physiological factors that govern methanol delivery to the developing fetus after maternal methanol exposure. The disposition of methanol after oral or intravenous administration was similar in pregnant and nonpregnant rats, regardless of the gestational stage (day 7, 14, or 20 after conception) at which the toxicokinetics of methanol were observed. Parallel experiments in female mice indicated that methanol elimination was approximately twice as rapid in mice due to a significantly higher maximal velocity of methanol metabolism in this smaller rodent species. During inhalation exposure in the rat, methanol absorption was mediated entirely by the nose, and absorption decreased with increasing exposure concentration. Methanol absorption from the airstream was significantly higher in the mouse than in the rat. Apparently due to these species differences in absorption during inhalation, blood methanol concentrations were two- to threefold higher in the mouse than in the rat despite the approximately twofold more rapid elimination of methanol in the mouse. Methanol elimination from the systemic circulation was nonlinear due to saturation of the metabolic pathways for the breakdown of methanol. In addition, a significant parallel linear route of methanol elimination was observed, which accounted for an increasingly significant fraction of methanol elimination as exposure or systemic concentrations increased. Using the results of this study, a toxicokinetic model based on physiologic measurements was constructed that describes methanol disposition in rats and mice during pregnancy.

  1. Maternal mortality in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.

    PubMed Central

    Gurina, Natalia A.; Vangen, Siri; Forsén, Lisa; Sundby, Johanne

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the levels and causes of maternal mortality in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. METHODS: We collected data about all pregnancy-related deaths in St. Petersburg over the period 1992-2003 using several sources of information. An independent research group reviewed and classified all cases according to ICD-10 and the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. We tested trends of overall and cause specific ratios (deaths per 100,000 births) for four 3-year intervals using the chi2 test. FINDINGS: The maternal mortality ratio for the study period was 43 per 100,000 live births. A sharp decline of direct obstetric deaths was observed from the first to fourth 3-year interval (49.8 for 1992-94 versus 18.5 for 2001-03). Sepsis and haemorrhage were the main causes of direct obstetric deaths. Among the total deaths from sepsis, 63.8% were due to abortion. Death ratios from sepsis declined significantly from the first to second study interval. In the last study interval (2001-03), 50% of deaths due to haemorrhage were secondary to ectopic pregnancies. The death ratio from thromboembolism remained low (2.9%) and stable throughout the study period. Among indirect obstetric deaths a non-significant decrease was observed for deaths from cardiac disease. Death ratios from infectious causes and suicides increased over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal mortality levels in St. Petersburg still exceed European levels by a factor of five. Improved management of abortion, emergency care for sepsis and haemorrhage, and better identification and control of infectious diseases in pregnancy, are needed. PMID:16628301

  2. The Relation between Maternal Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Mother-Infant Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Deborah L.; Mash, Eric J.; Ninowski, Jerilyn E.; Benzies, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between maternal symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and specific maternal behaviors was examined in a community sample of 40 mothers of infants aged 3-8 months. It was hypothesized that maternal ADHD symptoms would be related to lower levels of maternal sensitivity, and higher levels of maternal

  3. Preweaning GH Treatment Normalizes Body Growth Trajectory and Reverses Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Offspring After Maternal Undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Li, Minglan; Reynolds, Clare M; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-09-01

    Maternal undernutrition (UN) results in growth disorders and metabolic dysfunction in offspring. Although dysregulation of the GH-IGF axis in offspring is a known consequence of maternal UN, little is known about the efficacy of GH treatment during the period of developmental plasticity on later growth and metabolic outcomes. The present study investigated the effect of preweaning GH treatment on growth, glucose metabolism, and the GH-IGF axis in adult male and female offspring after maternal UN. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a chow diet ad libitum (control [CON]) or 50% of ad libitum (UN) throughout pregnancy. From postnatal day 3, CON and UN pups received either saline (CON-S and UN-S) or GH (2.5 ?g/g·d CON-GH and UN-GH) daily throughout lactation. At weaning, male and female offspring were randomly selected from each litter and fed a standard chow diet for the remainder of the study. Preweaning GH treatment normalized maternal UN-induced alterations in postweaning growth trajectory and concomitant adiposity in offspring. Plasma leptin concentrations were increased in UN-S offspring and normalized in the UN-GH group. Hepatic GH receptor expression was significantly elevated in UN-S offspring and normalized with GH treatment. Hepatic IGF binding protein-2 gene expression and plasma IGF-1 to IGF binding protein-3 ratio was reduced in UN-S offspring and elevated with GH treatment. GH treatment during a critical developmental window prevented maternal UN-induced changes in postnatal growth patterns and related adiposity, suggesting that manipulation of the GH-IGF-1 axis in early development may represent a promising avenue to prevent adverse developmental programming effects in adulthood. PMID:25993526

  4. Maternal diabetes modulates renal morphogenesis in offspring.

    PubMed

    Tran, Stella; Chen, Yun-Wen; Chenier, Isabelle; Chan, John S D; Quaggin, Susan; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2008-05-01

    Maternal diabetes leads to an adverse in utero environment, but whether maternal diabetes impairs nephrogenesis is unknown. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin in pregnant Hoxb7-green fluorescence protein mice at embryonic day 13, and the offspring were examined at several time points after birth. Compared with offspring of nondiabetic controls, offspring of diabetic mice had lower body weight, body size, kidney weight, and nephron number. The observed renal dysmorphogenesis may be the result of increased apoptosis, because immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly more apoptotic podocytes as well as increased active caspase-3 immunostaining in the renal tubules compared with control mice. Regarding potential mediators of these differences, offspring of diabetic mice had increased expression of intrarenal angiotensinogen and renin mRNA, upregulation of NF-kappaB isoforms p50 and p65, and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In conclusion, maternal diabetes impairs nephrogenesis, possibly via enhanced intrarenal activation of the renin-angiotensin system and NF-kappaB signaling. PMID:18305124

  5. Maternal – Child Health Needs Assessment in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Cianelli, Rosina; Mitchell, Emma; Albuja, Laura; Wilkinson, Carole; Anglade, Debbie; Chery, Marie; Peragallo, Nilda

    2015-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Haiti are among the highest in the world. This study investigated maternal-child health needs in Haiti, using a mixed method approach including qualitative and quantitative data collection. Participants (n=119) comprised of 39 healthcare workers and 80 Haitian women. The focus group centered around three major themes: difficult access to healthcare; health issues affecting mothers-child; and healthcare workers training. The interviews revealed that 60% of the deliveries happened at home, 52.5% of them were assisted by a lay birth attendant, 42% of the women gave their newborn a drink other than breast milk within the first week of birth, 70% of the women had not been, or did not know, if they had been tested for HIV, 92% did not use condoms during sexual encounters, and 47.5% justified violence against themselves from their partner. Considering the dearth of research concerning maternal-child health in Haiti that incorporates the opinions of healthcare workers and Haitian women, identifying their needs is essential to developing programs, such as the following that contribute to improving their health: nurse-midwife programs, training for lay birth attendants, obstetric-pediatric training, breastfeeding training, and programs to prevent intimate partner violence and HIV. PMID:26097809

  6. Australian maternity reform through clinical redesign.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Donna L; White, Jan; Lainchbury, Kathleen A; Gunn, Helen; Jarman, Helen; Welsh, Alec W; Challis, Daniel; Tracy, Sally K

    2012-05-01

    The current Australian national maternity reform agenda focuses on improving access to maternity care for women and their families while preserving safety and quality. The caseload midwifery model of care offers the level of access to continuity of care proposed in the reforms however the introduction of these models in Australia continues to meet with strong resistance. In many places access to caseload midwifery care is offered as a token, usually restricted to well women, within limited metropolitan and regional facilities and where available, places for women are very small as a proportion of the total service provided. This case study outlines a major clinical redesign of midwifery care at a metropolitan tertiary referral maternity hospital in Sydney. Caseload midwifery care was introduced under randomised trial conditions to provide midwifery care to 1500 women of all risk resulting in half of the publicly insured women receiving midwifery group practice care. The paper describes the organisational quality and safety tools that were utilised to facilitate the process while discussing the factors that facilitated the process and the barriers that were encountered within the workforce, operational and political context. PMID:22624638

  7. Why are most organelle genomes transmitted maternally?

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Stephan; Sobanski, Johanna; Bock, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Why the DNA-containing organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria, are inherited maternally is a long standing and unsolved question. However, recent years have seen a paradigm shift, in that the absoluteness of uniparental inheritance is increasingly questioned. Here, we review the field and propose a unifying model for organelle inheritance. We argue that the predominance of the maternal mode is a result of higher mutational load in the paternal gamete. Uniparental inheritance evolved from relaxed organelle inheritance patterns because it avoids the spread of selfish cytoplasmic elements. However, on evolutionary timescales, uniparentally inherited organelles are susceptible to mutational meltdown (Muller's ratchet). To prevent this, fall-back to relaxed inheritance patterns occurs, allowing low levels of sexual organelle recombination. Since sexual organelle recombination is insufficient to mitigate the effects of selfish cytoplasmic elements, various mechanisms for uniparental inheritance then evolve again independently. Organelle inheritance must therefore be seen as an evolutionary unstable trait, with a strong general bias to the uniparental, maternal, mode. PMID:25302405

  8. Effects of dietary fish oil and corn oil on rat mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Delpal, Serge; Pauloin, Alain; Hue-Beauvais, Catherine; Berthelot, Valérie; Schmidely, Philippe; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2013-03-01

    The effects, on the maternal mammary gland, of diets containing similar lipid percentages but differing in composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been assessed in rats during pregnancy and lactation. For this purpose, tuna fish oil (an n-3-PUFA-enriched oil) and corn oil (an n-6-PUFA-enriched oil) were included in diets at ratios such that the caloric inputs were the same as that of the control diet. As expected, the maternal diet affected the tissue composition of dams. Unexpectedly, only the tuna fish oil diet had an effect on pup growth, being associated with the pups being underweight between the ages of 11 and 21 days. The maternal mammary gland of rats fed the tuna fish oil diet displayed two main modifications: the size of cytoplasmic lipid droplets was increased when compared with those in control rats and the mammary epithelium showed an unusual formation of multilayers of cells. These results show that the tuna fish oil diet, during pregnancy and lactation, exerts specific effects on mammary cells and on the formation of lipid droplets. They suggest that this maternal diet affects the functioning of the mammary tissue. PMID:23180320

  9. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Alba G; Briz, Oscar; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Perez, Maria J; Ghanem, Carolina I; Marin, Jose J G

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. PMID:24631341

  10. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M.; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest. PMID:23956861

  11. Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries

    PubMed Central

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23076927

  12. Effects of estrogen coadministration on epoxiconazole toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Stefan; Schneider, Steffen; Fegert, Ivana; Rey Moreno, Maria Cecilia; Strauss, Volker; Gröters, Sibylle; Fabian, Eric; Fussell, Karma C; Pigott, Geoffrey H; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-06-01

    Epoxiconazole (EPX; CAS-No. 133855-98-8) is a triazole class-active substance of plant protection products. At a dose level of 50 mg/kg bw/day, it causes a significantly increased incidence of late fetal mortality when administered to pregnant rats throughout gestation (gestation day [GD] 7-18 or 21), as reported previously (Taxvig et al., 2007, 2008) and confirmed in these studies. Late fetal resorptions occurred in the presence of significant maternal toxicity such as clear reduction of corrected body weight gain, signs of anemia, and, critically, a marked reduction of maternal estradiol plasma levels. Furthermore, estradiol supplementation at dose levels of 0.5 or 1.0 ?g/animal/day of estradiol cyclopentylpropionate abolished the EPX-mediated late fetal resorptions. No increased incidences of external malformations were found in rats cotreated with 50 mg/kg bw/day EPX and estradiol cyclopentylpropionate, indicating that the occurrence of malformations was not masked by fetal mortality under the study conditions. Overall, the study data indicate that fetal mortality observed in rat studies with EPX is not the result of direct fetal toxicity but occurs indirectly via depletion of maternal estradiol levels. The clarification of the human relevance of the estrogen-related mechanism behind EPX-mediated late fetal resorptions in rats warrants further studies. In particular, this should involve investigation of the placenta (Rey Moreno et al., 2013), since it is the materno-fetal interface and crucial for fetal maintenance. The human relevance is best addressed in a species which is closer to humans with reference to placentation and hormonal regulation of pregnancy, such as the guinea pig (Schneider et al., 2013). PMID:23720304

  13. Maternal Health Situation in India: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mavalankar, Dileep V.; Ramani, K.V.; Upadhyaya, Mudita; Sharma, Bharati; Iyengar, Sharad; Gupta, Vikram; Iyengar, Kirti

    2009-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Safe Motherhood Initiative, India has accounted for at least a quarter of maternal deaths reported globally. India's goal is to lower maternal mortality to less than 100 per 100,000 livebirths but that is still far away despite its programmatic efforts and rapid economic progress over the past two decades. Geographical vastness and sociocultural diversity mean that maternal mortality varies across the states, and uniform implementation of health-sector reforms is not possible. The case study analyzes the trends in maternal mortality nationally, the maternal healthcare-delivery system at different levels, and the implementation of national maternal health programmes, including recent innovative strategies. It identifies the causes for limited success in improving maternal health and suggests measures to rectify them. It recommends better reporting of maternal deaths and implementation of evidence-based, focused strategies along with effective monitoring for rapid progress. It also stresses the need for regulation of the private sector and encourages further public-private partnerships and policies, along with a strong political will and improved management capacity for improving maternal health. PMID:19489415

  14. Australian primary maternity units: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Monk, Amy R; Tracy, Sally; Foureur, Maralyn; Barclay, Lesley

    2013-09-01

    Primary maternity units are commonly those run by midwives who provide care to women with low-risk pregnancies with no obstetric, anaesthetic, laboratory or paediatric support available on-site. In some other countries, primary level maternity units play an important role in offering equitable and accessible maternity care to women with low-risk pregnancies, particularly in rural and remote areas. However there are very few primary maternity units in Australia, largely due to the fact that over the past 200 years, the concept of safety has become inherently linked with the immediate on-site availability of specialist medical support. The purpose if this paper is to explore the various drivers and barriers to the sustainability of primary maternity units in Australia. It firstly looks at the historical antecedents that shaped primary level maternity services in Australia, from the time of colonisation to now. During this period the space and management of childbirth moved from home and midwifery-led settings to obstetric-led hospitals. Following on from this an analysis of recent political events shows how Australian government policy both supports and undermines the potential of primary maternity units. It is important that researchers, clinicians and policy makers understand the past in order to manage the challenges facing the development and maintenance of midwifery-led maternity services, in particular primary maternity units, in Australia today. PMID:23830063

  15. Maternal inheritance of severe hypertriglyceridemia impairs glucose metabolism in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ya-Hong; Yu, Caiguo; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Guo, Xin; Ji, Zhili; Liu, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Maternally inherited familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) impairs glucose metabolism and increases cardiovascular risks in the offspring to a greater degree than paternal inherited FH. However, it remains unknown whether hypertriglyceridemia affects glucose metabolism via inheritance. In this study, we sought to compare the impact of maternally and paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia on glucose and lipid metabolism in mice. ApoCIII transgenic mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia were mated with non-transgenic control mice to obtain 4 types of offspring: maternal non-transgenic control and maternal transgenic offspring, and paternal control and paternal transgenic offspring. Plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FINS) were measured. ApoCIII overexpression caused severe hypertriglyceridemia, but the transgenic female mice had unaltered fertility with normal pregnancy and birth of pups. The 4 groups of offspring had similar birth weight and growth rate. The plasma TG of maternal and paternal transgenic offspring were nearly 40-fold higher than maternal and paternal control mice, but there was no difference in plasma TG between maternal and paternal transgenic offspring. Although the FPG of the 4 groups of animals had no difference, the maternal transgenic mice showed impaired glucose tolerance, increased FINS levels and higher homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) than the other 3 groups. In conclusion, maternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia in ApoCIII transgenic mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and increased HOMA-R, while paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia did not have such impacts. PMID:25859267

  16. Maternal Hypoxia Decreases Capillary Supply and Increases Metabolic Inefficiency Leading to Divergence in Myocardial Oxygen Supply and Demand

    PubMed Central

    Hauton, David; Al-Shammari, Abdullah; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Egginton, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Maternal hypoxia is associated with a decrease in left ventricular capillary density while cardiac performance is preserved, implying a mismatch between metabolism and diffusive exchange. We hypothesised this requires a switch in substrate metabolism to maximise efficiency of ATP production from limited oxygen availability. Rat pups from pregnant females exposed to hypoxia (FIO2=0.12) at days 10-20 of pregnancy were grown to adulthood and working hearts perfused ex vivo. 14C-labelled glucose and 3H-palmitate were provided as substrates and metabolism quantified from recovery of 14CO2 and 3H2O, respectively. Hearts of male offspring subjected to Maternal Hypoxia showed a 20% decrease in cardiac output (P<0.05), despite recording a 2-fold increase in glucose oxidation (P<0.01) and 2.5-fold increase (P<0.01) in palmitate oxidation. Addition of insulin to Maternal Hypoxic hearts, further increased glucose oxidation (P<0.01) and suppressed palmitate oxidation (P<0.05), suggesting preservation in insulin signalling in the heart. In vitro enzyme activity measurements showed that Maternal Hypoxia increased both total and the active component of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase (both P<0.01), although pyruvate dehydrogenase sensitivity to insulin was lost (NS), while citrate synthase activity declined by 30% (P<0.001) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity was unchanged by Maternal Hypoxia, indicating realignment of the metabolic machinery to optimise oxygen utilisation. Capillary density was quantified and oxygen diffusion characteristics examined, with calculated capillary domain area increased by 30% (P<0.001). Calculated metabolic efficiency decreased 4-fold (P<0.01) for Maternal Hypoxia hearts. Paradoxically, the decline in citrate synthase activity and increased metabolism suggest that the scope of individual mitochondria had declined, rendering the myocardium potentially more sensitive to metabolic stress. However, decreasing citrate synthase may be essential to preserve local PO2, minimising regions of hypoxia and hence maximising the area of myocardium able to preserve cardiac output following maternal hypoxia. PMID:26030353

  17. Wired for motherhood: induction of maternal care but not maternal aggression in virgin female CD1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Sánchez, Ana; Valera-Marín, Guillermo; Hernández-Martínez, Adoración; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Virgin adult female mice display nearly spontaneous maternal care towards foster pups after a short period of sensitization. This indicates that maternal care is triggered by sensory stimulation provided by the pups and that its onset is largely independent on the physiological events related to gestation, parturition and lactation. Conversely, the factors influencing maternal aggression are poorly understood. In this study, we sought to characterize two models of maternal sensitization in the outbred CD1 strain. To do so, a group of virgin females (godmothers) were exposed to continuous cohabitation with a lactating dam and their pups from the moment of parturition, whereas a second group (pup-sensitized females), were exposed 2 h daily to foster pups. Both groups were tested for maternal behavior on postnatal days 2–4. Godmothers expressed full maternal care from the first test. Also, they expressed higher levels of crouching than dams. Pup-sensitized females differed from dams in all measures of pup-directed behavior in the first test, and expressed full maternal care after two sessions of contact with pups. However, both protocols failed to induce maternal aggression toward a male intruder after full onset of pup-directed maternal behavior, even in the presence of pups. Our study confirms that adult female mice need a short sensitization period before the onset of maternal care. Further, it shows that pup-oriented and non-pup-oriented components of maternal behavior are under different physiological control. We conclude that the godmother model might be useful to study the physiological and neural bases of the maternal behavior repertoire. PMID:26257621

  18. Community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) to measure and prevent maternal mortality: a pilot study in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Olivia; Chapota, Hilda; Kainja, Esther; Phiri, Tambosi; Gondwe, Chelmsford; King, Carina; Nambiar, Bejoy; Mwansambo, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Costello, Anthony; Rosato, Mikey

    2015-01-01

    Background In Malawi, maternal mortality remains high. Existing maternal death reviews fail to adequately review most deaths, or capture those that occur outside the health system. We assessed the value of community involvement to improve capture and response to community maternal deaths. Methods We designed and piloted a community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) process in Mchinji District, Malawi, which partnered community and health facility stakeholders to identify and review maternal deaths and generate actions to prevent future deaths. The CLMDR process involved five stages: community verbal autopsy, community and facility review meetings, a public meeting and bimonthly reviews involving both community and facility representatives. Results The CLMDR process was found to be comparable to a previous research-driven surveillance system at identifying deaths in Mchinji District (population 456?500 in 2008). 52 maternal deaths were identified between July 2011 and June 2012, 27 (52%) of which would not have been identified without community involvement. Based on district estimates of population (500?000) and crude birth rate (35 births per 1000 population), the maternal mortality ratio was around 300 maternal deaths per 100?000 live births. Of the 41 cases that started the CLMDR process, 28 (68%) completed all five stages. We found the CLMDR process to increase the quantity of information available and to involve a wider range of stakeholders in maternal death review (MDR). The process resulted in high rates of completion of community-planned actions (82%), and district hospital (67%) and health centre (65%) actions to prevent maternal deaths. Conclusions CLMDR is an important addition to the established forms of MDR. It shows potential as a maternal death surveillance system, and may be applicable to similar contexts with high maternal mortality. PMID:25897028

  19. 78 FR 37553 - Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ...Administration Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice...Meeting Name: Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session. Date...Maternal Health Initiative. The Town Hall Listening Session will...Special Initiatives and Program Planning and Evaluation, Health...

  20. RATS VERSUS PEOPLE Rats equal twice

    E-print Network

    , and tapeworm infections are spread by rats. The germs are transmitted to man by polluted_food and water. Rat, ----= -, - paper car ton s, and wooden containers are easily damaged. #12;By Starting Fires Rats start fires by damaging the insu- lation of electric wiring. A survey of 39 cities showed that 530 fires were started

  1. Prenatal epoxiconazole exposure effects on rat postnatal development.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Vera L S S; Maia, Aline H

    2012-04-01

    Although some studies have pointed out to embryo/fetal toxicity, knowledge about the potential toxicity of the fungicide epoxiconazole is still limited. Once the results of these previous studies have raised some concern, this study studied the effects of epoxiconazole maternal exposure on the physical endpoints in the development of rat pups. To accomplish that, the effects of epoxiconazole (50.0, 100.0, and 150.0? mg/kg) were examined when rats were exposed at two different developmental stages: during the first 6 days of pregnancy or in the organogenesis period (6-15 days). After parturition, pups were tested for growth and maturational milestones. Maternal exposure to the fungicide, independently of phase, resulted in significantly early mean time to vaginal opening and delayed time to testes descent in pups. Weight gain rate in pups and their mothers was not affected for the tested exposure period. The findings of this study emphasize that epoxiconazole maternal exposure may lead to alterations in developmental patterns in nursing pups, consistent with the known influence of epoxiconazole on steroid hormone synthesis. PMID:22140080

  2. RATS EXPOSED TO ISOFLURANE IN UTERO DURING EARLY GESTATION ARE BEHAVIORALLY ABNORMAL AS ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Arvind; Baxter, Mark G.; Keel, Pamela K.; Xie, Zhongcong; Crosby, Gregory; Culley, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preclinical evidence suggests that commonly used anesthetic agents induce long-lasting neurobehavioral changes when administered early in life but there has been virtually no attention to the neurodevelopmental consequences for the fetus of maternal anesthesia. This study tested the hypothesis that fetal rats exposed to isoflurane during maternal anesthesia on gestational day 14, which corresponds to the second trimester in humans, would be behaviorally abnormal as adults. Methods Timed, pregnant rats were randomly assigned on gestational day 14 to receive 1.4% isoflurane in 100% oxygen (N = 3) or 100 % oxygen (N = 2) for 4 h. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, male offspring were evaluated for spontaneous locomotor activity, hippocampal dependent learning and memory (spontaneous alternations, novel object recognition, and radial arm maze), and anxiety (elevated plus maze). Results Isoflurane anesthesia was physiologically well tolerated by the dams. Adult rats exposed prenatally to isoflurane were not different than controls on spontaneous locomotor activity, spontaneous alternations, or object recognition memory but made more open arm entries on the elevated plus maze and took longer and made more errors of omission on the radial arm maze. Conclusions Rats exposed to isoflurane in utero at a time that corresponds to the second trimester in humans have impaired spatial memory acquisition and, reduced anxiety compared to controls. This suggests the fetal brain may be adversely affected by maternal anesthesia and raises the possibility that vulnerability to deleterious neurodevelopmental effects of isoflurane begins much earlier in life than previously recognized. PMID:21307768

  3. Maternal fructose-intake-induced renal programming in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Wu, Kay L H; Lee, Wei-Chia; Leu, Steve; Chan, Julie Y H

    2015-06-01

    Nutrition in pregnancy can elicit long-term effects on the health of offspring. Although fructose consumption has increased globally and is linked to metabolic syndrome, little is known about the long-term effects of maternal high-fructose (HF) exposure during gestation and lactation, especially on renal programming. We examined potential key genes and pathways that are associated with HF-induced renal programming using whole-genome RNA next-generation sequencing (NGS) to quantify the abundance of RNA transcripts in kidneys from 1-day-, 3-week-, and 3-month-old male offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received regular chow or chow supplemented with HF (60% diet by weight) during the entire period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring exhibited programmed hypertension at 3 months of age. Maternal HF intake modified over 200 renal transcripts from nephrogenesis stage to adulthood. We observed that 20 differentially expressed genes identified in 1-day-old kidney are related to regulation of blood pressure. Among them, Hmox1, Bdkrb2, Adra2b, Ptgs2, Col1a2 and Tbxa2r are associated with endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). NGS also identified genes in arachidonic acid metabolism (Cyp2c23, Hpgds, Ptgds and Ptges) that may be potential key genes/pathways contributing to renal programming and hypertension. Collectively, our NGS data suggest that maternal HF intake elicits a defective adaptation of interrelated EDHFs during nephrogenesis which may lead to renal programming and hypertension in later life. Moreover, our results highlight genes and pathways involved in renal programming as potential targets for therapeutic approaches to prevent metabolic-syndrome-related comorbidities in children with HF exposure in early life. PMID:25765514

  4. Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Yan, Jian; Green, Ralph; Nijland, Mark; Miller, Joshua W; Wu, Guoyao; McDonald, Thomas J; Caudill, Marie A

    2015-01-01

    Maternal intake of dietary methyl-micronutrients (e.g. folate, choline, betaine and vitamin B-12) during pregnancy is essential for normal maternal and fetal methionine metabolism, and is critical for important metabolic processes including those involved in developmental programming. Maternal obesity and nutrient excess during pregnancy influence developmental programming potentially predisposing adult offspring to a variety of chronic health problems. In the present study, we hypothesized that maternal obesity would dysregulate the maternal and fetal methionine cycle. To test this hypothesis, we developed a nulliparous baboon obesity model fed a high fat, high energy diet (HF-HED) prior to and during gestation, and examined methionine cycle biomarkers (e.g., circulating concentrations of homocysteine, methionine, choline, betaine, key amino acids, folate, and vitamin B-12). Animals were group housed allowing full physical activity and social interaction. Maternal prepregnancy percent body fat was 5% in controls and 19% in HF-HED mothers, while fetal weight was 16% lower in offspring of HF-HED mothers at term. Maternal and fetal homocysteine were higher, while maternal and fetal vitamin B-12 and betaine were lower in the HF-HED group. Elevations in circulating maternal folate were evident in the HF-HED group indicating impaired folate metabolism (methyl-trap) as a consequence of maternal vitamin B-12 depletion. Finally, fetal methionine, glycine, serine, and taurine were lower in the HF-HED fetuses. These data show that maternal obesity disturbs the methionine cycle in primate pregnancy, providing a mechanism for the epigenetic changes observed among obese pregnant women and suggesting diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities in human pregnancies complicated by obesity. PMID:26537341

  5. Maternal obesity disrupts the methionine cycle in baboon pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Yan, Jian; Green, Ralph; Nijland, Mark; Miller, Joshua W; Wu, Guoyao; McDonald, Thomas J; Caudill, Marie A

    2015-11-01

    Maternal intake of dietary methyl-micronutrients (e.g. folate, choline, betaine and vitamin B-12) during pregnancy is essential for normal maternal and fetal methionine metabolism, and is critical for important metabolic processes including those involved in developmental programming. Maternal obesity and nutrient excess during pregnancy influence developmental programming potentially predisposing adult offspring to a variety of chronic health problems. In the present study, we hypothesized that maternal obesity would dysregulate the maternal and fetal methionine cycle. To test this hypothesis, we developed a nulliparous baboon obesity model fed a high fat, high energy diet (HF-HED) prior to and during gestation, and examined methionine cycle biomarkers (e.g., circulating concentrations of homocysteine, methionine, choline, betaine, key amino acids, folate, and vitamin B-12). Animals were group housed allowing full physical activity and social interaction. Maternal prepregnancy percent body fat was 5% in controls and 19% in HF-HED mothers, while fetal weight was 16% lower in offspring of HF-HED mothers at term. Maternal and fetal homocysteine were higher, while maternal and fetal vitamin B-12 and betaine were lower in the HF-HED group. Elevations in circulating maternal folate were evident in the HF-HED group indicating impaired folate metabolism (methyl-trap) as a consequence of maternal vitamin B-12 depletion. Finally, fetal methionine, glycine, serine, and taurine were lower in the HF-HED fetuses. These data show that maternal obesity disturbs the methionine cycle in primate pregnancy, providing a mechanism for the epigenetic changes observed among obese pregnant women and suggesting diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities in human pregnancies complicated by obesity. PMID:26537341

  6. The Determinants of Negative Maternal Parenting Behaviours: Maternal, Child, and Paternal Characteristics and Their Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C.; Zuroff, David C.; Koestner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study tested Belsky's determinants of parenting, namely maternal characteristics, child characteristics, and contextual issues, namely the mother's perception of the husband as a father, husband, and person. Three hundred and seventy-nine mothers first investigated by Sears, Maccoby, and Levin completed a standardised interview to assess…

  7. Maternal Dispositional Empathy and Electrodermal Reactivity: Interactive Contributions to Maternal Sensitivity with Toddler-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother-toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry-laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater dispositional empathy exhibited more sensitive behavior at low, but not high, levels of SCL reactivity to infant cues. Analyses examining self-reported emotional reactivity to the cry-laugh audio paradigm yielded a similar finding: dispositional empathy was related to greater sensitivity when mothers reported low, but not high, negative emotional reactivity. Results provide support for Dix’s (1991) affective model of parenting that underscores the combined contribution of the parent’s empathic tendencies and his/her own emotional experience in response to child emotions. Specificity of the Empathy × Reactivity interaction is discussed with respect to the context in which reactivity was assessed (infant cry versus laugh) and the type of sensitivity examined (sensitivity to the child’s distress versus non-distress). PMID:24955589

  8. Maternal Attachment Style and Responses to Adolescents’ Negative Emotions: The Mediating Role of Maternal Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jason D.; Brett, Bonnie E.; Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Lejuez, Carl W.; Cassidy, Jude

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objective Previous research has examined the developmental consequences, particularly in early childhood, of parents’ supportive and unsupportive responses to children’s negative emotions. Much less is known about factors that explain why parents respond in ways that may support or undermine their children’s emotions, and even less is known about how these parenting processes unfold with adolescents. We examined the associations between mothers’ attachment styles and their distress, harsh, and supportive responses to their adolescents’ negative emotions two years later and whether these links were mediated by maternal emotion regulation difficulties. Design Mothers in a longitudinal study (n = 230) reported on their attachment style, difficulties regulating their emotions, and their hypothetical responses to their adolescents’ negative emotions, respectively, at consecutive laboratory visits one year apart. Results Mothers who reported greater attachment-related avoidance and anxiety reported having greater difficulties with emotion regulation one year later. Emotion dysregulation, in turn, predicted more distressed, harsher, and less supportive maternal responses to adolescents’ negative emotions the following year. In addition, greater avoidance directly predicted harsher maternal responses two years later. Conclusions These findings extend previous research by identifying maternal attachment style as a predictor of responses to adolescent distress and by documenting the underlying role of emotion dysregulation in the link between adult attachment style and parenting. PMID:25568638

  9. Maternal Control Strategies, Maternal Language Usage and Children's Language Usage at Two Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Nicole; Donovan, Wilberta; Miles, Sally; Leavitt, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined whether parenting style, defined by control strategies varying in power-assertion mediated the established relation between maternal language usage (grammar and semantics) and child language (grammar, semantics and pragmatics) during toddlerhood (n = 60). Based upon their use of control strategies mothers were…

  10. Parenting Stress Mediates between Maternal Maltreatment History and Maternal Sensitivity in a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Jessica; Vickers, Kristin; Atkinson, Leslie; Gonzalez, Andrea; Wekerle, Christine; Levitan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Maternal maltreatment history and current parenting stress are associated with parenting difficulties. However, researchers have not investigated the mechanism by which these variables are interlinked. We hypothesized that parenting stress mediates the relation between history of maltreatment and parenting behavior. Methods: We assessed…

  11. Maternal dispositional empathy and electrodermal reactivity: Interactive contributions to maternal sensitivity with toddler-aged children.

    PubMed

    Emery, Helen T; McElwain, Nancy L; Groh, Ashley M; Haydon, Katherine C; Roisman, Glenn I

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother-toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry-laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater dispositional empathy exhibited more sensitive behavior at low, but not high, levels of SCL reactivity to infant cues. Analyses examining self-reported emotional reactivity to the cry-laugh audio paradigm yielded a similar finding: Dispositional empathy was related to greater sensitivity when mothers reported low, but not high, negative emotional reactivity. Results provide support for Dix's (1991) affective model of parenting that underscores the combined contribution of the parent's empathic tendencies and his or her own emotional experience in response to child emotions. Specificity of the Empathy × Reactivity interaction is discussed with respect to the context in which reactivity was assessed (infant cry vs. laugh) and the type of sensitivity examined (sensitivity to the child's distress vs. nondistress). PMID:24955589

  12. Maternal brain death and somatic support.

    PubMed

    Farragher, Rachel A; Laffey, John G

    2005-01-01

    Brain death is a concept used in situations in which life-support equipment obscures the conventional cardiopulmonary criteria of death, and it is legally recognized in most countries worldwide. Brain death during pregnancy is an occasional and tragic occurrence. The mother and fetus are two distinct organisms, and the death of the mother mandates consideration of the well-being of the fetus. Where maternal brain death occurs after the onset of fetal viability, the benefits of prolonging the pregnancy to allow further fetal maturation must be weighed against the risks of continued time in utero, and preparations must be made to facilitate urgent cesarean section and fetal resuscitation at short notice. Where the fetus is nonviable, one must consider whether continuation of maternal organ supportive measures in an attempt to attain fetal viability is appropriate, or whether it constitutes futile care. Although the gestational age of the fetus is central to resolving this issue, there is no clear upper physiological limit to the prolongation of somatic function after brain death. Furthermore, medical experience regarding prolonged somatic support is limited and can be considered experimental therapy. This article explores these issues by considering the concept of brain death and how it relates to somatic death. The current limits of fetal viability are then discussed. The complex ethical issues and the important variations in the legal context worldwide are considered. Finally, the likelihood of successfully sustaining maternal somatic function for prolonged periods and the medical and obstetric issues that are likely to arise are examined. PMID:16174876

  13. Maternal Phenylketonuria: Long-term Outcomes in Offspring and Post-pregnancy Maternal Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, S E; Rohr, F; Anastasoaie, V; Brown, M; Harris, D; Ozonoff, A; Petrides, S; Wessel, A; Levy, H L

    2015-01-01

    Maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) is a well-recognized complication of PKU and one of the most potent teratogenic syndromes of pregnancy. Virtually all offspring from untreated pregnancies in women with classic PKU have intellectual disabilities and microcephaly. Congenital heart disease and intrauterine growth retardation occur many times more often than expected in the general population. Control of