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Sample records for matricaria recutita plantago

  1. Study of antiseizure effects of Matricaria recutita extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Heidari, M R; Dadollahi, Z; Mehrabani, M; Mehrabi, H; Pourzadeh-Hosseini, M; Behravan, E; Etemad, L

    2009-08-01

    Matricaria recutita L. is a well-known medicinal plant that is suggested as being carminative, analgesic, and anticonvulsant in traditional medicine. In the present investigation the effect of hydro-methanolic percolated extract of this plant on seizure induced by picrotoxin was studied in male mice. This study was performed on animals pretreated with doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg of extract or 40 mg/kg phenobarbital as the reference drug via intraperitoneal injection. After 20 min each animal received 12 mg/kg picrotoxin for induction of seizure. Latency of onset time of seizure, duration of seizure, death latency, and death rate were determined in experimental and control groups. The results showed that latency of the beginning time of seizure was increased in groups that were pretreated with different doses of extract. The most effective dose was 200 mg/kg (P < 0.05). In addition, this dose delayed the time of death in mice (P < 0.01). The extract had no effect on the death rate. The results indicate that the extract of M. recutita possesses suitable effects on seizure induced by picrotoxin, and more experiments are needed in this field. PMID:19723069

  2. Mechanism of nanocapsules of Matricaria recutita L. extract formation by the emulsion-diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Saremnia, Betsabe; Koohian, Ata; Rezazadeh, Shamsali

    2011-10-01

    Nanocapsules coated by medicinal plants have many applications in drug manufacturing. Medicinal plants can be loaded on nanocapsules with polyesteric triblock copolymer poly ethylene glycol-poly butylene adipate-poly ethylene glycol (PEG-PBA-PEG) as shell and olive oil can be introduced as a core of nanocapsules by a method known as polymer deposition solvent evaporation method. In this research, first, certain amount of polymer, Matricaria recutita extract and olive oil were mixed with acetone and then, water was added to the solution using magnetic stirrer. After which the acetone was removed by vacuuming and finally nanocapsules were found by freezing-drier. The study showed the size of nanocapsules depends on variety of factors such as the ratio of polymer to oil and concentration of polymers and plant extract. The nanocapsules were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zeta potential sizer (ZPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

  3. Psychopharmacological profile of Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) essential oil in mice.

    PubMed

    Can, Ozgür Devrim; Demir Özkay, Umide; Kıyan, Hülya Tuba; Demirci, Betül

    2012-02-15

    In this study, the effect of Matricaria recutita L. essential oil (MEO) on the central nervous system (CNS) of mice was investigated using some behavioral methods. Chemical profiling both by GC and GC-MS analyses of the hydrodistilled essential oil of M. recutita revealed α-bisabolol oxide A (28%), α-bisabolol oxide B (17.1%), (Z)-β-Farnesene (15.9%) and α-bisabolol (6.8%) as the main components. Changes induced by MEO (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg) and reference drug caffeine (25 mg/kg) in spontaneous locomotor activities and motor coordinations of mice were investigated by activity cage measurements and Rota-Rod tests, respectively. Open field, social interaction and elevated plus-maze tests were applied to assess the emotional state of the animals. Further, tail-suspension test was performed for evaluating the effect of MEO on depression levels of mice. As a result, at 50 and 100 mg/kg, MEO significantly increased the numbers of spontaneous locomotor activities, exhibited anxiogenic effect in the open field, elevated plus-maze and social interaction tests and decreased the immobility times of animals in tail suspension tests. The falling latencies in Rota-Rod tests did not change. This activity profile of MEO was similar to the typical psychostimulant caffeine. The exact mechanism of action underlying this stimulant-like effect should be clarified with further detailed studies. PMID:22070986

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of the full-length Hsp90 gene from Matricaria recutita.

    PubMed

    Ling, S P; Su, S S; Zhang, H M; Zhang, X S; Liu, X Y; Pan, G F; Yuan, Y

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is one of the most abundant and conserved chaperone proteins and plays important roles in plant growth and responses to environmental stimuli. However, little is known regarding the sequence and function of Hsp90s in Matricaria recutita. In the present study, we cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of the hsp90 gene from this species. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends technologies with 2 degenerate primers that were designed based on the hsp90 gene sequence from other members of Asteraceae, we isolated and characterized an Hsp90 homolog gene from M. recutita (Mr-Hsp90). The full-length Mr-hsp90 cDNA sequence, containing 2097 base pairs, encodes a protein of 698 amino acids. Based on amino acid sequence identity, Mr-Hsp90 showed high similarity to other cloned Hsp90 proteins. The Mr-Hsp90 protein was closely clustered with the Lactuca sativa in a phylogenetic tree. These results indicate that the cloned sequence of Mr-Hsp90 is a member of the Hsp90 family, which is reported for the first time in M. recutita. Next, we conducted a salt stress experiment to determine the protein's function under salt stress conditions. Survival of chamomile seedlings subjected to heat-shock pretreatment was significantly increased compared with groups that had not undergone heat-shock pretreatment in a salt stress environment. This indicates that Mr-Hsp90 plays an important role in the salt resistance of chamomile seedlings. PMID:25526220

  5. Comparative evaluation on fatty acid and Matricaria recutita essential oil incorporated into casein-based film.

    PubMed

    Aliheidari, Nahal; Fazaeli, Mahboubeh; Ahmadi, Reza; Ghasemlou, Mehran; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra

    2013-05-01

    Sodium caseinate composite films containing lipids-oleic acid (OA), stearic acid (SA), or Matricaria recutita essential oil (MEO) - were prepared through emulsification and their physical, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties were evaluated and compared. Furthermore, their antimicrobial effectiveness against Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli was studied. Emulsified films were softer, less rigid, and more stretchable than pure films. The films' water vapor barrier properties were found to decrease upon the addition of lipid content; this effect was greatly reduced when MEO was added. The presence of OA/SA and MEO decreased tensile strength and elastic modulus but increased the elongation at break. Thermal analysis of all emulsified films showed two endothermic peaks; these results confirmed those obtained by SEM studies, where a partial separation of the two phases occurred. The films' antimicrobial activities were increased by incorporating lipids, particularly those containing MEO, which were more effective against the studied bacteria. This work showed that when taking all the studied variables into account, films formulated with MEO were found most suitable for various food applications. PMID:23415659

  6. Physiological and phytochemical response to drought stress of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.).

    PubMed

    Baghalian, K; Abdoshah, Sh; Khalighi-Sigaroodi, F; Paknejad, F

    2011-02-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions where water availability is a major limitation, using plants with low water consumption is one way to manage available water efficiently. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) may be considered as an economical crop for fields with water scarcity due to its considerable adaptability to a wide range of climates and soils. A field experiment was conducted during 2007-2008 using complete randomized block design with four replications in order to evaluate the effect of drought stress on agro-morphological characters (fresh flower weight, dried flower yield, shoot weight and root weight), oil content, oil composition and apigenin content of chamomile. Drought stress had four different levels of soil moisture depletion (30%, 50%, 70% and 90%). Analysis of variance showed that drought stress decreased plant height, flower yield, shoot weight and apigenin content but it had no significant effect on oil content or oil composition. Impacts of drought stress on growth indices were evaluated as well and the results indicated that plant managed to maintain potential for biomass production under the drought stress. Growth analysis results as well as phytochemical properties of this plant showed that despite decrease in agronomical traits, chamomile could be proposed as a moderate drought resistant medicinal plant with a reasonable performance. PMID:21186125

  7. Antioxidant effects of different extracts from Melissa officinalis, Matricaria recutita and Cymbopogon citratus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Romaiana Picada; Fachinetto, Roselei; de Souza Prestes, Alessandro; Puntel, Robson Luiz; Santos da Silva, Gloria Narjara; Heinzmann, Berta Maria; Boschetti, Ticiane Krapf; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Bürger, Marilise Escobar; Morel, Ademir Farias; Morsch, Vera Maria; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2009-05-01

    Considering the important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases, and the growing evidence of the presence of compounds with antioxidant properties in the plant extracts, the aim of the present study was to investigate the antioxidant capacity of three plants used in Brazil to treat neurological disorders: Melissa officinalis, Matricaria recutita and Cymbopogon citratus. The antioxidant effect of phenolic compounds commonly found in plant extracts, namely, quercetin, gallic acid, quercitrin and rutin was also examined for comparative purposes. Cerebral lipid peroxidation (assessed by TBARS) was induced by iron sulfate (10 microM), sodium nitroprusside (5 microM) or 3-nitropropionic acid (2 mM). Free radical scavenger properties and the chemical composition of plant extracts were assessed by 1'-1' Diphenyl-2' picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method and by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), respectively. M. officinalis aqueous extract caused the highest decrease in TBARS production induced by all tested pro-oxidants. In the DPPH assay, M. officinalis presented also the best antioxidant effect, but, in this case, the antioxidant potencies were similar for the aqueous, methanolic and ethanolic extracts. Among the purified compounds, quercetin had the highest antioxidant activity followed by gallic acid, quercitrin and rutin. In this work, we have demonstrated that the plant extracts could protect against oxidative damage induced by various pro-oxidant agents that induce lipid peroxidation by different process. Thus, plant extracts could inhibit the generation of early chemical reactive species that subsequently initiate lipid peroxidation or, alternatively, they could block a common final pathway in the process of polyunsaturated fatty acids peroxidation. Our study indicates that M. officinalis could be considered an effective agent in the prevention of various neurological diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:18853256

  8. Cloning and characterization of a farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase from Matricaria recutita L. and its upregulation by methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Su, S S; Zhang, H M; Liu, X Y; Pan, G F; Ling, S P; Zhang, X S; Yang, X M; Tai, Y L; Yuan, Y

    2015-01-01

    Matricaria recutita (L.), commonly known as chamomile, is one of the most valuable medicinal plants because it synthesizes a large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as α-bisabolol and chamazulene. Although the plant has been well characterized in terms of chemical constituents of essential oil as well as pharmacological properties, little is known about the genes responsible for biosynthesis of these compounds. In this study, we report a new full-length cDNA encoding farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS), a key enzyme in the pathway of biosynthesis of isoprenoids, from M. recutita. The cDNA of MrFPS comprises 1032 bp and encodes 343 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 39.4 kDa. The amino acid sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis indicated that MrFPS belongs to the plant FPS super-family and is closely related to FPS from the Asteraceae family. Expression of the MrFPS gene in Escherichia coli yielded FPS activity. Using real-time quantitative PCR, the expression pattern of the MrFPS gene was analyzed in different tissues of M. recutita as well as in response to methyl jasmonate. The expression analysis demonstrated that MrFPS expression varies in different tissues (with maximal expression in flowers and stems) and was significantly elevated in response to methyl jasmonate. This study will certainly enhance our understanding of the role of MrFPS in the biosynthesis and regulation of valuable secondary metabolites in M. recutita at a molecular level. PMID:25729967

  9. Enantioselective microbial synthesis of the indigenous natural product (-)-α-bisabolol by a sesquiterpene synthase from chamomile (Matricaria recutita).

    PubMed

    Son, Young-Jin; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Kim, Soo-Un

    2014-10-15

    (-)-α-Bisabolol, a sesquiterpene alcohol, is a major ingredient in the essential oil of chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and is used in many health products. The current supply of (-)-α-bisabolol is mainly dependent on the Brazilian candeia tree (Eremanthus erythropappus) by distillation or by chemical synthesis. However, the distillation method using the candeia tree is not sustainable, and chemical synthesis suffers from impurities arising from undesirable α-bisabolol isomers. Therefore enzymatic synthesis of (-)-α-bisabolol is a viable alternative. In the present study, a cDNA encoding (-)-α-bisabolol synthase (MrBBS) was identified from chamomile and used for enantioselective (-)-α-bisabolol synthesis in yeast. Chamomile MrBBS was identified by Illumina and 454 sequencing, followed by activity screening in yeast. When MrBBS was expressed in yeast, 8 mg of α-bisabolol was synthesized de novo per litre of culture. The structure of purified α-bisabolol was elucidated as (S,S)-α-bisabolol [or (-)-α-bisabolol]. Although MrBBS possesses a putative chloroplast-targeting peptide, it was localized in the cytosol, and a deletion of its N-terminal 23 amino acids significantly reduced its stability and activity. Recombinant MrBBS showed kinetic properties comparable with those of other sesquiterpene synthases. These data provide compelling evidence that chamomile MrBBS synthesizes enantiopure (-)-α-bisabolol as a single sesquiterpene product, opening a biotechnological opportunity to produce (-)-α-bisabolol. PMID:25048207

  10. Variability of the essential oil content and composition of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) affected by weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Gosztola, Beáta; Sárosi, Szilvia; Németh, Eva

    2010-03-01

    In our study we examined the variability of the essential oil content and composition of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) during three years (2005-2007). Twenty-eight populations of wild origin and 4 registered cultivars ('Soroksári 40', 'Lutea', 'Goral' and 'Bona') were evaluated in open field experiments. It could be established that the experimental populations represented different genetic potential for essential oil accumulation and composition. The best populations of wild growing origin from the Somogy-region and four cultivars produced the highest essential oil contents (above 0.6 g/100g) in each year. Additionally, the quality of the characteristic main compound of the oil determining the "chemotype", according to Schilcher, was found to be stable during the three years period. However, the actual chemosyndroms are significantly influenced by the weather conditions. In the three years' experiment, the moderately warm and relatively wet year of 2006 produced the highest contents of essential oil and also that of its alpha-bisabolol component. Although bisabolol oxide A also showed a high variability through the years, its direct connection with weather conditions could not be proved. A moderate variability was established for the proportions of chamazulene, and the lowest one for bisabolol-oxide B. Considerable genotype-weather interaction was supposed, especially for the essential oil content and for the ratio of bisabolol-oxide A. PMID:20420329

  11. In vitro characterization of a (E)-β-farnesene synthase from Matricaria recutita L. and its up-regulation by methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Su, Shanshan; Liu, Xueyan; Pan, Guifang; Hou, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Huimin; Yuan, Yi

    2015-10-15

    (E)-β-farnesene is a sesquiterpene semiochemical that is used extensively by both plants and animals for communication. This acyclic olefin is found in the essential oil of chamomile (Matricaria recutita) and was demonstrated that it could attract natural enemies to reduce cabbage aphids in the Chinese cabbage fields. However, little is known regarding the sequence and function of (E)-β-farnesene synthase in M. recutita. In this study, we reported a new full-length cDNA encoding (E)-β-farnesene synthase from M. recutita (Mr-βFS). The cDNA of Mr-βFS consisted of 2010bp including 1725bp of coding sequence encoding a protein of 574 amino acids with a molecular weight of 67kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibits a considerably higher homology to βFS from Artemisia annua (about 92% identity) than to βFSs from other plants (about 20-40% identity). The recombinant enzyme, produced in Escherichia coli, catalyzed the formation of a single product, (E)-β-farnesene, from farnesyl diphosphate. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that Mr-βFS expression was highest in leaves and lowest in disk florets. The treatment of M. recutita with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) significantly enhanced the transcriptional level of βFS gene and the content of (E)-β-farnesene in M. recutita. The transcriptional level of βFS gene was approximately 11.5-fold higher than the control sample and the (E)-β-farnesene emission level ranged from approximately from 0.082 to 0.695μg/g after 24h induction. Our results laid a solid foundation for later improving crop aphid resistance by transgenic technology and provided an important basic data for the regulation of valuable products from M. recutita. PMID:26095800

  12. Benefit of Aloe vera and Matricaria recutita mixture in rat irritable bowel syndrome: Combination of antioxidant and spasmolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Shahmirzadi, Azar; Mozaffari, Shilan; Sanei, Yara; Baeeri, Maryam; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-12-21

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the beneficial effects of a mixture of Aloe vera (AV) and Matricaria recutita (German chamomile, GC) in an experimental model of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: IBS was induced by a 5-day restraint stress in rats including the groups of control (water), GC (300 mg/kg), loperamide (10 mg/kg), mixed AV and GC (50: 50 at doses of 150, 300 or 450 mg/kg assigned as Mix-150, Mix-300 and Mix-450, respectively) and the sham group which did not receive any restraint stress and was fed with saline. All medications were administered intragastrically by gavage for 7 days, 2 days as pre-treatment followed by 5 days during induction of IBS every day before restraining. RESULTS: The increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in colonic cells in the control group were significantly decreased in the treatment groups. GC inhibited only small bowel transit while the AV/GC mixture delayed gastric emptying at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg. The AV/GC mixture also reduced colonic transit and small bowel transit at the dose of 150 mg/kg. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of stress-induced IBS was diminished by the AV/GC mixture at all doses used but not dose-dependently, via inhibiting colonic MPO activity and improving oxidative stress status. The effect of the mixture was more effective than GC alone. The present results support effectiveness of the AV and GC combination in IBS. PMID:23263994

  13. Improvement of Asthma and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease With Oral Pulvis stomachicus cum Belladonna, a Combination of Matricaria recutita, Atropa belladonna, Bismuth, and Antimonite: A Pediatric Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Madeleyn, René; Kiene, Helmut; Kienle, Gunver S.; Vagedes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and asthma, although well established in adults, is less strong in the pediatric age group. Benefits of proton pump therapy are limited across age ranges. While there is a growing body of literature on the use of complementary treatments for both asthma and GERD, few studies have focused on treatment benefits for the GERD-asthma association. We present the case of a 2-year-old boy with asthma and GERD who was not responding to inhaled, low-dose corticosteroids, beta-mimetic therapy, and a 6-week course of proton pump inhibitor treatment. We noted a gradual disappearance of symptoms when he was given an oral preparation of Pulvis stomachicus cum Belladonna, an anthroposophic medication containing Matricaria recutita, Atropa belladonna, bismuth, and antimonite. Matricaria recutita and bismuth have known gastric protective properties, and Atropa belladonna contains anticholinergic agents that have a bronchodilatory effect. These complementary medications appear promising in terms of relieving the symptoms of GERD-associated asthma. PMID:26937321

  14. Improvement of Asthma and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease With Oral Pulvis stomachicus cum Belladonna, a Combination of Matricaria recutita, Atropa belladonna, Bismuth, and Antimonite: A Pediatric Case Report.

    PubMed

    von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Madeleyn, René; Kiene, Helmut; Kienle, Gunver S; Vagedes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and asthma, although well established in adults, is less strong in the pediatric age group. Benefits of proton pump therapy are limited across age ranges. While there is a growing body of literature on the use of complementary treatments for both asthma and GERD, few studies have focused on treatment benefits for the GERD-asthma association. We present the case of a 2-year-old boy with asthma and GERD who was not responding to inhaled, low-dose corticosteroids, beta-mimetic therapy, and a 6-week course of proton pump inhibitor treatment. We noted a gradual disappearance of symptoms when he was given an oral preparation of Pulvis stomachicus cum Belladonna, an anthroposophic medication containing Matricaria recutita, Atropa belladonna, bismuth, and antimonite. Matricaria recutita and bismuth have known gastric protective properties, and Atropa belladonna contains anticholinergic agents that have a bronchodilatory effect. These complementary medications appear promising in terms of relieving the symptoms of GERD-associated asthma. PMID:26937321

  15. Evaluation of thin-layer chromatography methods for quality control of commercial products containing Aesculus hippocastanum, Turnera diffusa, Matricaria recutita, Passiflora incarnata, and Tilia occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Durón, Rosalba; Ceniceros-Almaguer, Lucía; Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Salazar-Cavazos, Ma de la Luz; Waksman de Torres, Noemi

    2007-01-01

    In Mexico, plant-derived products with health claims are sold as herbal dietary supplements, and there are no rules for their legal quality control. Aesculus hippocastanum, Turnera diffusa, Matricaria recutita, Passiflora incarnata, and Tilia occidentalis are some of the major commercial products obtained from plants used in this region. In this paper, we describe the effectiveness of thin-layer chromatography methods to provide for the quality control of several commercial products containing these plants. Standardized extracts were used. Of the 49 commercial products analyzed, only 32.65% matched the chromatographic characteristic of standardized extracts. A significant number of commercial products did not match their label, indicating a problem resulting from the lack of regulation for these products. The proposed methods are simple, sensitive, and specific and can be used for routine quality control of raw herbals and formulations of the tested plants. The results obtained show the need to develop simple and reliable analytical methods that can be performed in any laboratory for the purpose of quality control of dietary supplements or commercial herbal products sold in Mexico. PMID:17760328

  16. Chemical composition, antioxidant properties and hepatoprotective effects of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) decoction extract against alcohol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Hichem; Jabri, Mohamed-Amine; Souli, Abdelaziz; Hosni, Karim; Rtibi, Kais; Tebourbi, Olfa; El-Benna, Jamel; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    The present study assessed the chemical composition, antioxidant properties, and hepatoprotective effects of subacute pre-treatment with chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) decoction extract (CDE) against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rats. The colorimetric analysis demonstrated that the CDE is rich in total polyphenols, total flavonoids and condensed tannins, and exhibited an important in vitro antioxidant activity. The use of LC/MS technique allowed us to identify 10 phenolic compounds in CDE. We found that CDE pretreatment, in vivo, protected against EtOH-induced liver injury evident by plasma transaminases activity and preservation of the hepatic tissue structure. The CDE counteracted EtOH-induced liver lipoperoxidation, preserved thiol -SH groups and prevented the depletion of antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). We also showed that acute alcohol administration increased tissue and plasma hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), calcium and free iron levels. More importantly, CDE pre-treatment reversed all EtOH-induced disturbances in intracellular mediators. In conclusion, our data suggest that CDE exerted a potential hepatoprotective effect against EtOH-induced oxidative stress in rat, at least in part, by negatively regulating Fenton reaction components such as H(2)O(2) and free iron, which are known to lead to cytotoxicity mediated by intracellular calcium deregulation. PMID:25816359

  17. [Comparative cytogenetic study of the tetraploid Matricaria chamomilla L. and Matricaria inodora L].

    PubMed

    Samatadze, T E; Amosova, A V; Mel'nikova, N V; Suslina, S N; Zagumennikova, T N; Zelenin, A V; Bykov, V A; Muravenko, O N

    2014-01-01

    A comparative cytogenetic study of the autotetraploid breed of Matricaria chamomilla L. (M. recutita L.) and Matricaria inodora L. was carried out by DAPI-banding, fluorescent hybridization in situ (FISH) with 26S and 5S rDNA probes, and analysis of meiosis. All chromosomes were identified in both karyotypeson the basis of DAPI-banding images and 26S and 5S rDNA distribution, and species-specific idiograms were composed for both M. chamomilla and M. indora taking into account the polymorphous variants of DAPI-banding images, showing the location of the 26S and 5S rDNA sites. PMID:25735163

  18. Hydroxylated bisabolol oxides: evidence for secondary oxidative metabolism in Matricaria chamomilla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) is one of the most popular medicinal plants used in Western medicine. Among the various phytochemicals present in essential oils of German chamomile, bisabolol and its oxidative metabolites are considered as marker compounds for distinguishing different chem...

  19. [Plantago ovata].

    PubMed

    Ceranić, M; Kecmanović, D; Pavlov, M; Sepetkovski, A; Kovacević, P; Stamenković, A; Masirević, V; Ranković, V

    2006-01-01

    Plantago ovata is a high fibre bulk forming laxative. It absorbs water and expands to provide increased bulk and moisture content to the stool. The increased bulk encourages normal peristalsis and bowel motility. Clinical Indications: Constipation, Fecal Incontinence, Hemorrhoids, Ulcerative Colitis, Appetite, Hyperlipidemia, Diabetes mellitus. PMID:16989139

  20. Antihyperalgesic and antiedematous activities of bisabolol-oxides-rich matricaria oil in a rat model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Maja; Popović, Višnja; Petrović, Silvana; Stepanović-Petrović, Radica; Micov, Ana; Pavlović-Drobac, Milica; Couladis, Maria

    2014-05-01

    From the dried flower heads of Matricaria recutita L., essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation, and in the obtained blue oil, α-bisabolol oxide A (21.5%), α-bisabolol oxide B (25.5%) and (Z)-spiroether (cis-en-yn-spiroether) (10.3%) were identified as the main compounds, by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry analyses. The antihyperalgesic effects of this oil were examined in a rat model of inflammation induced by carrageenan, through a modified 'paw-pressure' test. Antiedematous effects were examined in a rat model of inflammation induced by carrageenan, dextran and histamine, through plethysmometry. Matricaria oil (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) exhibited a significant dose-dependent reduction of hyperalgesia and edema induced by carrageenan in both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment schemes. It was more efficacious in the prophylactic treatment scheme, and the corresponding median effective dose (ED50 ) ± standard error of the mean (SEM) values were 49.8 ± 6.0 and 42.4 ± 0.2 mg/kg for antihyperalgesic and antiedematous effects, respectively. Prophylactic treatments with matricaria oil (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) caused a significant dose-dependent antiedematous effect in dextran-induced edema with lower efficacy than in the carrageenan model. In a dose of 100 mg/kg, p.o., matricaria oil caused a slight reduction of histamine-induced edema. These results suggest that bisabolol-oxide-rich matricaria oil may be effective against pain and edema present in various inflammatory conditions, which supports matricaria traditional uses. PMID:23983133

  1. [Plantago ovata (Laxomucil) after hemorrhoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Kecmanović, D; Pavlov, M; Ceranić, M; Sepetkovski, A; Kovacević, P; Stamenković, A; Masirević, V; Ranković, V

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized study is to describe the effects of laxative plantago ovata after open hemorrhoidectomy (Milligan-Morgan). Sixty patients divided into 2 equal groups were included in this study. The first group was treated postoperatively with 2 sachets of bulk agent Laxomucil (3.26 g plantago ovata), twice daily, for a period of twenty days, while the control group was treated with glycerin oil. The p.ovata group patients had a statistically significant shorter postoperative length of hospital stay (2.9 v.s. 4.1 days). Pain after stool was statistically significant more tolerable in the p.ovata group. In conclusion, the application of bulk agent plantago ovata after hemorrhoidectomy shortens the mean postoperative hospital stay, expedites digestive function recovery and lessens the pain after stool. PMID:16018379

  2. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase and metalloprotease-9 of human adenocarcinoma gastric cells by chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) infusion.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Michela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Colombo, Elisa; Maschi, Omar; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether the antiinflammatory effect of chamomile infusion at gastric level could be ascribed to the inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 and elastase. The infusions from capitula and sifted flowers (250-1500 µg/mL) and individual flavonoids (10 µM) were tested on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated AGS cells and human neutrophil elastase. The results indicate that the antiinflammatory activity associated with chamomile infusions from both the capitula and sifted flowers is most likely due to the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and gastric metalloproteinase-9 activity and secretion; the inhibition occurring in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activity was inhibited as well and the decrease of metalloproteinase-9 expression was found to be associated with the inhibition of NF-kB driven transcription. The results further indicate that the flavonoid-7-glycosides, major constituents of chamomile flowers, may be responsible for the antiinflammatory action of the chamomile infusion observed here. PMID:22407864

  3. Inhibition of human cAMP-phosphodiesterase as a mechanism of the spasmolytic effect of Matricaria recutita L.

    PubMed

    Maschi, Omar; Cero, Esther Dal; Galli, Germana V; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2008-07-01

    Mechanisms underlying the spasmolytic activity of chamomile still remain unclear. Inhibition of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterases (PDE) is one of the mechanisms operated by spasmolytic drugs. In this study, the effect of chamomile on PDE was investigated. Human platelet cAMP-PDE and recombinant PDE5A1 were assayed in the presence of infusions prepared from sifted flowers and capitula. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed different compositions in infusions made with sifted flowers and capitula. Chamomile inhibited cAMP-PDE activity (IC50 = 17.9-40.5 microg/mL), while cGMP-PDE5 was less affected (-15% at 50 microg/mL). Among the individual compounds tested, only flavonoids showed an inhibitory effect (IC50 = 1.3-14.9 microM), contributing to around 39% of the infusion inhibition; other compounds responsible for cAMP-PDE inhibition still remain unknown. Although experimental evidence supporting the use of chamomile for gastrointestinal minor spasms dates back to the fifties, cAMP-PDE inhibition as a likely mechanism underlying the spasmolytic activity is reported for the first time. PMID:18553893

  4. Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.): An overview

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ompal; Khanam, Zakia; Misra, Neelam; Srivastava, Manoj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is a well-known medicinal plant species from the Asteraceae family often referred to as the “star among medicinal species.” Nowadays it is a highly favored and much used medicinal plant in folk and traditional medicine. Its multitherapeutic, cosmetic, and nutritional values have been established through years of traditional and scientific use and research. Chamomile has an established domestic (Indian) and international market, which is increasing day by day. The plant available in the market many a times is adulterated and substituted by close relatives of chamomile. This article briefly reviews the medicinal uses along with botany and cultivation techniques. Since chamomile is a rich source of natural products, details on chemical constituents of essential oil and plant parts as well as their pharmacological properties are included. Furthermore, particular emphasis is given to the biochemistry, biotechnology, market demand, and trade of the plant. This is an attempt to compile and document information on different aspects of chamomile and highlight the need for research and development. PMID:22096322

  5. Plantago ovata: Clinical study of overuse.

    PubMed

    Agha, Rukh-e-Nasreen; Saeed, Aftab; Nazar, Halima

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the study was to undertake evidence-base study to evaluate clinical manifestation of the over-estimated use of herbal drug Plantago ovata and to compare it with placebo for the efficacy and adverse effects. The patients of both genders were included. Blood urea, creatinine, ALT, Serum B12, CP, ESR and liver function tests were performed. The data was statistically analyzed in both groups for differential symptomatology. In anorexia test verses control results showed that Plantago ovata husk and placebo showed the affected ratio as 81 percent and 50 percent, correspondingly. Whereas in clinical performance of heart burning, pain in epigastrium, low libido, body pain, dyspepsia, fever, burning sensation in palm and sole in test drug showed affected response as adverse effect 90%, 88% and as control drug, 36%, 29%, 22%, 25%, 38%, 30%, 33%, 57%, respectively. The results were highly marked in test drug i.e. in comparison with placebo. This is clearly evident from data analysis that effect observed in test arm is far more superior hence null hypothesis was rejected clearly. Similarly serological and biochemical reports study i.e. (ALT, Vit. B1 and Vit A) revealed that there is no hepatotoxic and neurotoxic effect found in both the drugs. PMID:27087080

  6. TNF-alpha expression, evaluation of collagen, and TUNEL of Matricaria recutita L. extract and triamcinolone on oral ulcer in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    OLIVEIRA, Bruna Vasconcelos; BARROS SILVA, Paulo Goberlânio; NOJOSA, Jacqueline de Santiago; BRIZENO, Luiz André Cavalcante; FERREIRA, Jamile Magalhães; SOUSA, Fabrício Bitú; MOTA, Mário Rogério Lima; ALVES, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease associated with delayed wound healing of oral ulcers by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular apoptosis. Objective to evaluate the influence of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and apoptosis in rats with DM treated with chamomile extract or triamcinolone. Material and Methods Wistar male rats (210.0±4.2 g) were divided into five groups: negative control group (NCG) without diabetes; positive control group (PCG) with DM (alloxan, 45 mg/kg); and groups treated with chamomile extract (normoglycemic= NCG group and diabetic= DCG group) and with triamcinolone (TG). Traumatic ulcers were performed on all animals that received topical triamcinolone, chamomile extract or saline 12/12 hours for ten days. Results On days five and ten the animals were euthanized and the ulcers were analyzed by light microscopy, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemically (TNF-α). The NCG (p=0.0062), PCG (p=0.0285), NCG (p=0.0041), and DCG (p<0.0001) groups were completely healed on the 10th day, however, there was no healing on the TG (p=0.5127) group. The TNF-α expression showed a significant reduction from the 5th to the 10th day in NCG (p=0.0266) and DCG (p=0.0062). In connective tissue, the TUNEL assay showed a significant reduction in the number of positive cells in NCG (p=0.0273) and CNG (p=0.0469) and in the epithelium only in CDG (p=0.0320). Conclusions Chamomile extract can optimize the healing of traumatic oral ulcers in diabetic rats through the reduction of apoptosis in the epithelium and TNF-α expression. PMID:27383710

  7. Validation of a RP-HPLC-DAD Method for Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) Preparations and Assessment of the Marker, Apigenin-7-glucoside, Safety and Anti-Inflammatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Felipe Galeti; Cavalheiro, Amanda Henriques; Spinola, Nathália Favaretto; Ribeiro, Diego Luis; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Hori, Juliana Issa; Marquele-Oliveira, Franciane; Rocha, Bruno Alves; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Chamomile is a medicinal plant, which presents several biological effects, especially the anti-inflammatory effect. One of the compounds related to this effect is apigenin, a flavonoid that is mostly found in its glycosylated form, apigenin-7-glucoside (APG), in natural sources. However, the affectivity and safety of this glycoside have not been well explored for topical application. In this context, the aim of this work was to develop and validate a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC-DAD) method to quantify APG in chamomile preparations. Additionally, the safety and the anti-inflammatory potential of this flavonoid were verified. The RP-HPLC-DAD method was developed and validated with linearity at 24.0–36.0 μg/mL range (r = 0.9994). Intra- and interday precision (RSD) were 0.27–2.66% and accuracy was 98.27–101.21%. The validated method was applied in the analysis of chamomile flower heads, glycolic extract, and Kamillen cream, supporting the method application in the quality control of chamomile preparations. Furthermore, the APG safety was assessed by MTT cytotoxicity assay and mutagenic protocols and the anti-inflammatory activity was confirmed by a diminished TNF-α production showed by mice macrophages treated with APG following LPS treatment. PMID:26421053

  8. Validation of a RP-HPLC-DAD Method for Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) Preparations and Assessment of the Marker, Apigenin-7-glucoside, Safety and Anti-Inflammatory Effect.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Felipe Galeti; Cavalheiro, Amanda Henriques; Spinola, Nathália Favaretto; Ribeiro, Diego Luis; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Hori, Juliana Issa; Marquele-Oliveira, Franciane; Rocha, Bruno Alves; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Chamomile is a medicinal plant, which presents several biological effects, especially the anti-inflammatory effect. One of the compounds related to this effect is apigenin, a flavonoid that is mostly found in its glycosylated form, apigenin-7-glucoside (APG), in natural sources. However, the affectivity and safety of this glycoside have not been well explored for topical application. In this context, the aim of this work was to develop and validate a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC-DAD) method to quantify APG in chamomile preparations. Additionally, the safety and the anti-inflammatory potential of this flavonoid were verified. The RP-HPLC-DAD method was developed and validated with linearity at 24.0-36.0 μg/mL range (r = 0.9994). Intra- and interday precision (RSD) were 0.27-2.66% and accuracy was 98.27-101.21%. The validated method was applied in the analysis of chamomile flower heads, glycolic extract, and Kamillen cream, supporting the method application in the quality control of chamomile preparations. Furthermore, the APG safety was assessed by MTT cytotoxicity assay and mutagenic protocols and the anti-inflammatory activity was confirmed by a diminished TNF-α production showed by mice macrophages treated with APG following LPS treatment. PMID:26421053

  9. In Vitro Effects of Plantago Major Extract on Urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Sharifa Abdul; See, Tan Lee; Khuay, Lim Yew; Osman, Khairul; Abu Bakar, Mohd. Azman

    2005-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the in vitro effect of Plantago major extract on calcium oxalate crystals and to compare the effects of Plantago major extract with clinically used drugs like allopurinol and potassium citrate (positive controls). Modified Schneider slide gel method was used for the in vitro study and the crystals formed were measured by Image Analyser system KS 300, 3.0 Carl Zeiss. The concentrations of Plantago major extract used were from 100ppm to 350ppm. Plantago major extract at concentrations in the range of (100ppm–350ppm) significantly inhibited the size of calcium oxate crystals (dihydrate variety) against negative control (p<0.05) and against positive controls (p<0.05). However the inhibition concentration 50 (IC50) values on the size of calcium oxalate crystal for the extract, potassium citrate and allopurinol were 300ppm, 350ppm and 450ppm respectively. Extract of Plantago major also has inhibition effect on the number of crystals but it was not significant. In conclusion extract of Plantago major was better than allopurinol and potassium citrate in inhibiting the size of the calcium oxalate crystal in-vitro. PMID:22605954

  10. Microbiologic Evaluation of Matricaria and Chlorhexidine against E. faecalis and C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Hena; Chandra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Matricaria chamomilla and Chlorhexidine gel against Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods: The agar diffusion test was used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 15%, 25% Matricaria chamomilla in aq. base and 2% chlorhexidine gel against C. albicans (ATCC 24433) and E. faecalis (ATCC 24212) strains. Vancomycin was used as the positive control for E. faecalis and fluconazole for C. albicans . The agar plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h after which the zone of inhibition were measured separately for each material. Data thus obtained were statistically analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank–order test. Results: 2% chlorhexidine showed maximum inhibitory zone for C. albicans (33.26 mm) and E. faecalis (24.54 mm). 25% Matricaria showed zones of 24.16 mm and 20.62 mm for C. albicans and E. faecalis, respectively. 15% Matricaria did not show any antimicrobial activity (0 mm). Conclusion: The results of the current in vitro study suggest that 25% Matricaria can be used as an antimicrobial agent, but it is less effective than 2% chlorhexidine gluconate gel against C. albicans and E. faecalis. Matricaria at a lesser concentration of 15% aq. base is ineffective against both the microorganisms. PMID:26097333

  11. Clinical application of Chamomilla recutita in phlebitis: dose response curve study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2011-01-01

    This experimental and dose-response curve study aimed to carry out the quality control of the Chamomilla recutita sample, as well as to estimate the ideal dose, for anti-inflammatory effect, of the extract of its capitula, in patients with phlebitis due to peripheral intravenous infusion of antineoplastic chemotherapy and to evaluate the toxicity of this extract in human beings. The therapeutic efficacy, concerning the anti-inflammatory potential, of different doses of Chamomilla recutita extract were analyzed and compared in 25 patients. The time of regression of phlebitis was shorter for groups with 2.5% concentration (mean=29.2h, standard deviation = 8.98) and 5% concentration (mean = 38.8h, standard deviation = 17.47). Local toxicity was almost not observed. This research contributes to the innovation of the nursing clinical practice, since it suggests an alternative for the treatment of phlebitis through the clinical use of phytotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21412623

  12. Phytoremediation of cyanophos insecticide by Plantago major L. in water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cyanophos is commonly used in Egypt to control various agricultural and horticultural pests. It is not easily hydrolyzed and thus they are highly persistent and accumulate in various aquatic compartments such as rivers and lakes. Such issues may be solved by phytoremediation, which is the use of plants for the cleanup of pollutants. Here, we tested Plantago major L. to clean water polluted with cyanophos insecticide under laboratory conditions.The biosorption capacity (KF) of cyanophos were 76.91, 26.18 and 21.09 μg/g for dry roots, fruit (seeds with shells) and leaves of the Plantago major L., respectively. Viable Plantago major L. in water significantly reduced cyanophos by 11.0% & 94.7% during 2 hours & 9 days of exposure as compared with 0.8% & 36.9% in water without the plantain. In water with plantain, cyanophos significantly accumulated in plantain roots and leaves to reach maximum levels after two and four hours of treatment, respectively. After 1 day, the concentration of cyanophos decreased in roots and shoots until the end of testing. Three major degradation products were detected at roots and leaf samples. Here we demonstrate that plantago major L. removes efficiently cyanophos residue in water and has a potential activity for pesticide phytoremediation. PMID:24447385

  13. Phytoremediation of cyanophos insecticide by Plantago major L. in water.

    PubMed

    Romeh, Ahmed Ali

    2014-01-01

    Cyanophos is commonly used in Egypt to control various agricultural and horticultural pests. It is not easily hydrolyzed and thus they are highly persistent and accumulate in various aquatic compartments such as rivers and lakes. Such issues may be solved by phytoremediation, which is the use of plants for the cleanup of pollutants. Here, we tested Plantago major L. to clean water polluted with cyanophos insecticide under laboratory conditions.The biosorption capacity (KF) of cyanophos were 76.91, 26.18 and 21.09 μg/g for dry roots, fruit (seeds with shells) and leaves of the Plantago major L., respectively. Viable Plantago major L. in water significantly reduced cyanophos by 11.0% & 94.7% during 2 hours & 9 days of exposure as compared with 0.8% & 36.9% in water without the plantain. In water with plantain, cyanophos significantly accumulated in plantain roots and leaves to reach maximum levels after two and four hours of treatment, respectively. After 1 day, the concentration of cyanophos decreased in roots and shoots until the end of testing. Three major degradation products were detected at roots and leaf samples. Here we demonstrate that plantago major L. removes efficiently cyanophos residue in water and has a potential activity for pesticide phytoremediation. PMID:24447385

  14. Electron beam irradiation of Matricaria chamomilla L. for microbial decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemţanu, Monica R.; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha; Mazilu, Elena; Setnic, Silvia; Bucur, Marcela; Duliu, Octavian G.; Meltzer, Viorica; Pincu, Elena

    2008-05-01

    Wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is one of the most popular herbal materials with both internal and external use to cure different health disturbances. As a consequence of its origin, chamomile could carry various microbial contaminants which offer different hazards to the final consumer. Reduction of the microbial load to the in force regulation limits represents an important phase in the technological process of vegetal materials, and the electron beam treatment might be an efficient alternative to the classical methods of hygienic quality assurance. The purpose of the study was to analyze the potential application of the electron beam treatment in order to assure the microbial safety of the wild chamomile. Samples of chamomile dry inflorescences were treated in electron beam (e-beam) of 6 MeV mean energy, at room temperature and ambient pressure. Some loss of the chemical compounds with bioactive role could be noticed, but the number of microorganisms decreased as a function on the absorbed dose. Consequently, the microbial quality of studied vegetal material inflorescences was improved by e-beam irradiation.

  15. Phytochemical analysis of Plantago sempervirens from Majella National Park.

    PubMed

    Venditti, A; Serrilli, A M; Di Cecco, M; Ciaschetti, G; Andrisano, T; Bianco, A

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we report the isolation and identification of several compounds from Plantago sempervirens Crantz, collected in the protected area of Majella National Park. We examined the polar fraction, in particular the iridoidic one. Aucubin, caryoptoside, plantarenaloside and gardoside were isolated and identified. For the first time, in this species, 8-epiloganic acid was recognised. Also, verbascoside, a phenylethanoid glycoside, was recognised in this plant. PMID:22081901

  16. Changes on organic acid secretion and accumulation in Plantago almogravensis Franco and Plantago algarbiensis Samp. under aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Martins, Neusa; Gonçalves, Sandra; Andrade, Paula B; Valentão, Patrícia; Romano, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Al (400μM) on organic acids secretion, accumulation and metabolism in Plantago almogravensis Franco and Plantago algarbiensis Samp. Al induced a significant reduction on root elongation only in P. algarbiensis. Both species accumulated considerable amounts of Al (>120μgg(-1)) in their tissues, roots exhibiting the highest contents (>900μgg(-1)). Al stimulated malonic acid secretion in P. algarbiensis, while citric, succinic and malic acids were secreted by P. almogravensis. Moreover, Al uptake was accompanied by substantial increases of citric, oxalic, malonic and fumaric acids contents in the plantlets of either species. Overall, the acid metabolizing enzymes were not directly involved in the Al induced organic acid secretion and accumulation. Our data suggest that Al detoxification in P. almogravensis implies both secretion of organic acids from roots and tolerance to high Al tissue concentrations, while in P. algarbiensis only the tolerance mechanism seems to be involved. PMID:23199681

  17. Molecular instability induced by aluminum stress in Plantago species.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sofia; Matos, Manuela; Ferreira, Vanessa; Martins, Neusa; Gonçalves, Sandra; Romano, Anabela; Pinto-Carnide, Olinda

    2014-08-01

    Aluminum (Al) is one of the most abundant metals on earth's crust and Al toxicity represents one of the major factors that limit plant growth and productivity in acid soils (with a pH≤5.0). In this study the mutagenic/genotoxic effects of Al were evaluated in roots and leaves of two Plantago, species, Plantago almogravensis and Plantago lagopus, using ISSRs markers. Both species were exposed to 400 μM Al during 7 and 21 days. Ten ISSR primers produced polymorphic bands. In P. almogravensis, a total of 257 and 258 bands in roots and 255 and 265 bands in leaves were produced in the presence and absence of Al, respectively. In P. lagopus were produced 279 and 278 a total bands in roots and 275 and 274 bands in leaves, under the same conditions. The changes in ISSR profiles after Al treatment were considered as gain and/or loss of bands compared with the controls. The results suggest that changes in genomic template stability (GTS) could be detected with ISSR profiles. This molecular marker proved to be a good tool to detect the effects of Al on DNA profiles. It seems that Al did not interfere significantly with DNA integrity in both species but generated less ISSR stability in P. almogravensis than in P. lagopus. The results confirm the tolerance of P. almogravensis and suggest the same behavior of P. lagopus. Although further studies are required for confirmation the Al tolerance behavior of P. lagopus, a potential application for phytoremediation can be also considered due its wide distribution. PMID:25344171

  18. Biology of Anguina plantaginis parasitic on Plantago aristata.

    PubMed

    Vargas, O F; Sasser, J N

    1976-01-01

    Among 17 species and cultivars of plants exposed to Anguina plantaginis, only Plantago aristata (bracted plantain) was a host. Larvae penetrated the emerging apical meristem; reproduces and migrated progressively; caused twisting and galling of leaves, looping andspiraling of peduncles, and transformation of floral structures into galls. Extreme infections caused stunting and death of entire plants. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of leaf mesophyll, cell separation and disintegration, and xylem wall thickening in older galls occurred. Only third-stage larvae were infective, and they exhibited cryptobiosis under adverse conditions. PMID:19308199

  19. Potent protein glycation inhibition of plantagoside in Plantago major seeds.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Aradate, Tadashi; Kurosaka, Chihiro; Ubukata, Makoto; Kittaka, Shiho; Nakaminami, Yuri; Gamo, Kanae; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Plantagoside (5,7,4',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-3'-O-glucoside) and its aglycone (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavanone), isolated from a 50% ethanol extract of Plantago major seeds (Plantaginaceae), were established to be potent inhibitors of the Maillard reaction. These compounds also inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products in proteins in physiological conditions and inhibited protein cross-linking glycation. These results indicate that P. major seeds have potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of diabetic complications. PMID:24895551

  20. Plantago ovata Mucilage in the Design of Fast Disintegrating Tablets.

    PubMed

    Shirsand, S B; Suresh, Sarasija; Para, M S; Swamy, P V; Kumar, D Nagendra

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, fast disintegrating tablets of prochlorperazine maleate were designed with a view to enhance patient compliance by direct compression method. In this method mucilage of Plantago ovata and crospovidone were used as superdisintegrants (2-8% w/w) along with microcrystalline cellulose (20-60% w/w) and directly compressible mannitol (Pearlitol SD 200) to enhance mouth feel. The prepared batches of tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, drug content uniformity, wetting time, water absorption ratio and in vitro dispersion time. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 8 s), the two formulations were tested for the in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer), short-term stability (at 40 degrees /75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction (IR spectroscopy). Among the two promising formulations, the formulation prepared by using 8% w/w of Plantago ovata mucilage and 60% w/w of microcrystalline cellulose emerged as the overall best formulation (t(50%) 3.3 min) based on the in vitro drug release characteristics compared to conventional commercial tablets formulation (t(50%) 17.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulations indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (p<0.05). PMID:20177454

  1. Distribution of eu- and heterochromatin in Plantago ovata.

    PubMed

    Dhar, M K; Fuchs, J; Houben, A

    2009-01-01

    Plantago ovata (2n = 8) is the only cultivated species in the monotypic genus Plantago. The seed husk of the plant constitutes the psyllium (Isabgol) which has many medicinal properties. The 1C DNA content was determined to be 0.635 pg (621 Mb) with an AT content of 59.7%. Applying Giemsa C-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Cot-1 fraction of DNA on prometaphase and metaphase chromosomes we investigated the chromosomal distribution of eu- and heterochromatin. All applied techniques revealed that the euchromatin is located at the distal ends of all chromosome arms, besides the NOR-bearing ones. Interestingly, in addition one arm of chromosome 1 seems to be entirely euchromatic. Furthermore, we have analysed the correlation between the global distribution of histone H3 mono-, di- or trimethylated at either lysine 4, 9 or 27 and the microscopically detectable eu- and heterochromatin. Methylated H3K4 was found to be enriched exclusively within euchromatin. From the other tested methylation marks only H3K9me1, H3K9me2 and H3K27me1 showed, in addition to a more or less disperse labelling, an enrichment within the heterochromatic chromocentres. The cell cycle dependent phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 and threonine 11 was enriched in all pericentromeric regions. PMID:19738383

  2. Plantago ovata Mucilage in the Design of Fast Disintegrating Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Shirsand, S. B.; Suresh, Sarasija; Para, M. S.; Swamy, P. V.; Kumar, D. Nagendra

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, fast disintegrating tablets of prochlorperazine maleate were designed with a view to enhance patient compliance by direct compression method. In this method mucilage of Plantago ovata and crospovidone were used as superdisintegrants (2-8% w/w) along with microcrystalline cellulose (20-60% w/w) and directly compressible mannitol (Pearlitol SD 200) to enhance mouth feel. The prepared batches of tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, drug content uniformity, wetting time, water absorption ratio and in vitro dispersion time. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 8 s), the two formulations were tested for the in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer), short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction (IR spectroscopy). Among the two promising formulations, the formulation prepared by using 8% w/w of Plantago ovata mucilage and 60% w/w of microcrystalline cellulose emerged as the overall best formulation (t50% 3.3 min) based on the in vitro drug release characteristics compared to conventional commercial tablets formulation (t50% 17.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulations indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (p<0.05). PMID:20177454

  3. Enzymatic activities and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in a soil root zone under heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Gucwa-Przepióra, Ewa; Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Fojcik, Barbara; Chmura, Damian

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the present field study were to examine the soil enzyme activities in the soil root zones of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in different heavy metal contaminated stands. Moreover, the investigations concerned the intensity of root endophytic colonization and metal bioaccumulation in roots and shoots. The investigated Plantago species exhibited an excluder strategy, accumulating higher metal content in the roots than in the shoots. The heavy metal accumulation levels found in the two plantain species in this study were comparable to other plants suggested as phytostabilizers; therefore, the selected Plantago species may be applied in the phytostabilization of heavy metal contaminated areas. The lower level of soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) as well as the higher bioavailability of metals in the root zone soil of the two plantain species were found in an area affected by smelting activity, where organic matter content in the soil was also the smallest. Mycorrhizal colonization on both species in the contaminated area was similar to colonization in non-contaminated stands. However, the lowest arbuscule occurrence and an absence of dark septate endophytes were found in the area affected by the smelting activity. It corresponded with the lowest plant cover observed in this stand. The assessment of enzyme activity, mycorrhizal colonization, and the chemical and physical properties of soils proved to be sensitive to differences between sites and between Plantago species. PMID:26531716

  4. An immunoblotting analysis of cross-reactivity between melon, and plantago and grass pollens.

    PubMed

    García Ortiz, J C; Ventas, P; Cosmes, P; López-Asunsolo, A

    1996-01-01

    It is known that most patients with type I allergy to pollens also suffer intolerance to fruits. Recently, an epidemiological and CAP-inhibition study has shown a new clustering of allergy between melon and Plantago and grass pollens. The aim of the present study was to confirm these results by immunoblotting analysis and inhibition of immunoblotting. Sera from 3 patients with confirmed allergy to melon, and Dactylis glomerata and Plantago lanceolata pollens were used for the in vitro studies. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis with a pool of sera revealed that several distinct protein bands were shared by the three extracts at 14, 31, and a spectrum between 40 and 70 kDa, approximately. Immunoblotting inhibition experiments, performed with extracts of melon, Plantago and Dactylis, showed that all allergens of melon blotting were almost completely inhibited by grass and Plantago pollen extracts. Inversely, the melon extract was capable of inhibiting IgE-binding to various allergens of Dactylis at high mol mass and partially to the band at 14 kDa. Moreover, the melon almost totally inhibited the IgE-binding capacity to the proteins of Plantago extract. Taken together, the results support the presence of structurally similar allergens in melon, Plantago and grass pollens, and that all allergenic epitopes of the melon are present in these pollens. PMID:9015782

  5. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species

    PubMed Central

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P.; Donat-Torres, María P.; Llinares, Josep V.; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus–both halophytes–and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600–800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants. PMID:27490924

  6. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species.

    PubMed

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P; Donat-Torres, María P; Llinares, Josep V; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus-both halophytes-and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600-800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants. PMID:27490924

  7. Efficiency of Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and number of doses of rabies vaccine on the humoral immune response in cattle.

    PubMed

    de Souza Reis, Luis Souza; Frazatti-Gallina, Neuza Maria; de Lima Paoli, Rosana; Giuffrida, Rogerio; Albas, Avelino; Oba, Eunice; Pardo, Paulo Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Matricaria chamomilla and vaccination frequency on cattle immunization against rabies. Four groups (n = 15 /group) were treated with or without Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and vaccinated with one or two doses of rabies vaccine (30 day interval). No effect of chamomile was found on cattle immunization against rabies; however, antibody titers were protective in cattle vaccinated twice, while 93.3% of cattle vaccinated only once had titers under 0.5 UI/ml after 60 days. In conclusion, the use of chamomile did not alter the humoral immune response in cattle, and two vaccine doses are suggested for achieving protective antibody titers. PMID:19043320

  8. Efficiency of Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and number of doses of rabies vaccine on the humoral immune response in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Frazatti-Gallina, Neuza Maria; de Lima Paoli, Rosana; Giuffrida, Rogerio; Albas, Avelino; Oba, Eunice; Pardo, Paulo Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Matricaria chamomilla and vaccination frequency on cattle immunization against rabies. Four groups (n = 15 /group) were treated with or without Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and vaccinated with one or two doses of rabies vaccine (30 day interval). No effect of chamomile was found on cattle immunization against rabies; however, antibody titers were protective in cattle vaccinated twice, while 93.3% of cattle vaccinated only once had titers under 0.5 UI/ml after 60 days. In conclusion, the use of chamomile did not alter the humoral immune response in cattle, and two vaccine doses are suggested for achieving protective antibody titers. PMID:19043320

  9. Quality control of herbs: determination of amino acids in Althaea officinalis, Matricaria chamomilla and Taraxacum officinale.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Muhammad Nasimullah; Stecher, Guenther; Bonn, Guenther Karl

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of raw materials and final products need reliable methods for the standardization of natural product drugs. Legal guideline also emphasizes on the qualitative and quantitative analyses of the plant constituents in an herbal product. In this study, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and amino acid analyzer was used for the determination of amino acids in plant extracts. Samples for this study were standards and aqueous extracts from Althaea officinalis, Matricaria chamomilla and Taraxacum officinale. Different amino acids in the extracts were detected through TLC. An automatic amino acid analyzer was used for the quantification of amino acids in the plant extracts under study. PMID:24811801

  10. 78 FR 68027 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Revlon Consumer Products Corporation, Subzone 93G...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... production equipment. The components and materials sourced from abroad include: Chamomilla recutita (matricaria) flower/leaf extract, squalane, lanolin, shea butter, propylene glycol dicaprylate, kaolin,...

  11. Content and composition of the essential oil of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert from some European countries.

    PubMed

    Orav, Anne; Raal, Ain; Arak, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    Variations in the essential oil composition of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert from different European countries were determined. A total of 39 components were identified, representing over 92% of the total oil yield. The principal biologically active compounds in chamomile oils were bisabolol oxide A (3.1-56.0%), alpha-bisabolol (0.1-44.2%), bisabolol oxide B (3.9-27.2%), cis-enyne-bicycloether (8.8-26.1%), bisabolon oxide A (0.5-24.8%), chamazulene (0.7-15.3%), spathulenol (1.7-4.8%) and (E)-beta-farnesene (2.3-6.6%). In 8 chamomile samples from 13, bisabolol oxide A (27.5-56.0%) was predominant (among them in three Estonian samples). alpha-Bisabolol (23.9-44.2%) was predominant in the samples from Moldova, Russia and the Czech Republic. The sample from Armenia was rich in bisabolol oxide B (27.2%) and chamazulene (15.3%). The oils were obtained in yields of 0.7-6.7 mL kg(-1) and the minimum limit of 4 mL kg(-1) stated by the European Pharmacopoeia was exceeded only in 13 samples from 13 analysed drugs. PMID:20013472

  12. In vitro and in vivo studies of an aqueous extract of Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) on the radiolabeling of blood constituents, on the morphology of red blood cells and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Pinto, Angélica B.; Santos-Filho, Sebastião D.; Carvalho, Jorge J.; Pereira, Mário J. S.; Fonseca, Adenilson S.; Bernardo-Filho, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Background: Natural products might alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m (99mTc) and these results may be correlated with modifications of the shape of the red blood cells (RBC). The biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals can be also altered. Objective: This investigation aimed to determine biological effects of an aqueous extract of chamomile (CE). Materials and Methods: To study the effect of the CE on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc, in vitro and in vivo assays were performed. The effect of the CE on the morphology of RBC was observed under light microscope. The images were acquired, processed, and the perimeter/area ratio of the RBC determined. To analyze the effect of the CE on biodistribution of the sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) in Wistar rats, these animals were treated or not with a CE. Na99mTcO4 was injected, the rats were sacrificed, the organs were removed, weighted and percentage of radioactivity/gram calculated. Result: In the in vitro experiment, the radioactivity on blood cells compartment and on insoluble fractions of plasma was diminished. The shape and the perimeter/area ratio of the RBC were altered in in vitro assays. An increase of the percentage of radioactivity of Na99mTcO4 was observed in stomach after in vivo treatment. Conclusion: These results could be due to substances of the CE or by the products of the metabolism of this extract in the animal organism. These findings are examples of drug interaction with a radiopharmaceutical, which could lead to misdiagnosis in clinical practice with unexpected consequences. PMID:24143045

  13. Bulk agent Plantago ovata after Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy with Ligasure.

    PubMed

    Kecmanovic, Dragutin M; Pavlov, Maja J; Ceranic, Miljan S; Kerkez, Mirko D; Rankovic, Vitomir I; Masirevic, Vesna P

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine usefulness of the bulk agent Plantago ovata in reducing postoperative pain and tenesmus after open hemorrhoidectomy (Milligan-Morgan with Ligasure). Ninety-eight patients were randomized into two groups of 49 patients each. In both groups Milligan-Morgan open hemorrhoidectomy with Ligasure was performed. The first group received postoperatively two sachets daily of 3.26 g of the bulk agent, Plantago ovata, for 20 days. The control group was treated postoperatively with glycerin oil. There was no statistically significant difference in age, gender distribution and hemorrhoid grading, between the two groups. The pain score after first defecation (p < 0.001) and after 10 days (p < 0.01) and the global pain score (p < 0.001) was statistically significantly lower in the group treated with Plantago ovata, while there was no statistically significant difference in the pain level after 20 days (p > 0.05). The hospital stay was statistically significantly shorter in the group receiving Plantago ovata (2.6 +/- 0.6 vs 3.9 +/- 0.7 days, p < 0.001). The incidence of tenesmus was higher in the control group (40.8% vs 10.2%, p < 0.01). Treating patients with Plantago ovata after open hemorrhoidectomy, reduces pain, tenesmus rate and shortens postoperative hospital stay. PMID:16708408

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa Strain Mc5Re-14, an Antagonistic Root Endophyte of Matricaria chamomilla

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14 was isolated from the inner root tissue of Matricaria chamomilla (German chamomile). Mc5Re-14 revealed promising in vitro antagonistic activity against plant and opportunistic human pathogens. The 6.0-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively involved in pathogen suppression and direct and indirect plant growth promotion. PMID:26251493

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa Strain Mc5Re-14, an Antagonistic Root Endophyte of Matricaria chamomilla.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14 was isolated from the inner root tissue of Matricaria chamomilla (German chamomile). Mc5Re-14 revealed promising in vitro antagonistic activity against plant and opportunistic human pathogens. The 6.0-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively involved in pathogen suppression and direct and indirect plant growth promotion. PMID:26251493

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa Strain Mc5Re-14, an Antagonistic Root Endophyte of Matricaria chamomilla

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Paenibacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14 was isolated from the inner root tissue of Matricaria chamomilla (German chamomile). Mc5Re-14 revealed promising in vitro antagonistic activity against plant and opportunistic human pathogens. The 6.0-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively involved in pathogen suppression and direct and indirect plant growth promotion.

  17. Draft genome sequence of Paenbacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14, an antagonistic root endophyte of Matricaria chamomilla

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Paenbacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14 was isolated from the inner root tissue of Matricaria chamomilla (e.g German chamomile). The draft genome of Paenbacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14 revealed promising antagonistic in vitro activity against plant and opportunistic human pathogens. Putative genes involved in plant pathogen suppression and plant growth-promotion were identified.

  18. Aluminium stress disrupts metabolic performance of Plantago almogravensis plantlets transiently.

    PubMed

    Grevenstuk, Tomás; Moing, Annick; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Romano, Anabela

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about how tolerant plants cope with internalized aluminium (Al). Tolerant plants are known to deploy efficient detoxification mechanisms, however it is not known to what extent the primary and secondary metabolism is affected by Al. The aim of this work was to study the metabolic repercussions of Al stress in the tolerant plant Plantago almogravensis. P. almogravensis is well adapted to acid soils where high concentrations of free Al are found and has been classified as a hyperaccumulator. In vitro reared plantlets were used for this purpose in order to control Al exposure rigorously. The metabolome of P. almogravensis plantlets as well as its metabolic response to the supply of sucrose was characterized. The supply of sucrose leads to an accumulation of amino acids and secondary metabolites and consumption of carbohydrates that result from increased metabolic activity. In Al-treated plantlets the synthesis of amino acids and secondary metabolites is transiently impaired, suggesting that P. almogravensis is able to recover from the Al treatment within the duration of the trials. In the presence of Al the consumption of carbohydrate resources is accelerated. The content of some metabolic stress markers also demonstrates that P. almogravensis is highly adapted to Al stress. PMID:26433896

  19. Evaluation of the Association Metformin: Plantago ovata Husk in Diabetic Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Díez-Láiz, Raquel; García-Vieitez, Juan J; Diez-Liébana, M José; Sierra-Vega, Matilde; Sahagún-Prieto, Ana M; Calle-Pardo, Ángela P; Fernández-Martínez, Nélida

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study we have investigated whether the inclusion of the dietary fiber Plantago ovata husk could be recommended as coadjuvant in treatments with oral hypoglycemic drugs. We evaluated the use of Plantago ovata husk-metformin association in diabetic rabbits by determining its effects on glucose and insulin concentrations. Six groups of 6 rabbits were used. Groups 1 to 3 were fed with standard chow and groups 4 to 6 with chow supplemented with Plantago ovata husk (3.5 mg/kg/day). Two groups (numbers 1 and 4) were used as controls (receiving standard or supplemented chow), two groups (numbers 2 and 5) received metformin orally, and the other two (numbers 3 and 6) were treated orally with metformin and psyllium. Plasma glucose concentrations were lower in groups fed with fiber-supplemented chow whereas insulin levels showed important interindividual variations. Glucose pharmacokinetics parameters showed significant differences in Cmax and t(max) in relation to fiber intake. Insulin pharmacokinetics parameters after treatment with oral metformin showed an important increase in Cmax, AUC, and t(max) in animals fed with fiber. We conclude that Plantago ovata husk intake can contribute to the oral antihyperglycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26576433

  20. Determination of phenylethanoid glycosides and iridoid glycosides from therapeutically used Plantago species by CE-MEKC.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Sándor; Nguyen, Nhat Minh; Batta, Gyula; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Máthé, Csaba; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-09-01

    CE methods are valuable tools for medicinal plant quality management, screening, and analysis. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to optimize and validate a CE-MEKC method for simultaneous quantification of four chief bioactive metabolites from Plantago species. The two most important secondary metabolite groups were aimed to be separated. Different electrolyte and surfactant types were tested. Surfactant concentration, BGE pH, electrolyte concentration, and buffering capacity were optimized. The final BGE consisted of 15 mM sodium tetraborate, 20 mM TAPS, and 250 mM DOC at pH 8.50. Acceptable precision, good stability, and accuracy were achieved, with high resolution for phenylethanoid glycosides. Analytes were separated within 20 min. The method was shown to be suitable for the quantification of the iridoid glycosides aucubin and catalpol, and the phenylethanoid glycosides acteoside (verbascoside) and plantamajoside from water extracts of different samples. The method was shown to be applicable to leaf extracts of Plantago lanceolata, Plantago major, and Plantago asiatica, the main species with therapeutic applications, and a biotechnological product, plant tissue cultures (calli) of P. lanceolata. Baseline separation of the main constituents from minor peaks was achieved, regardless of the matrix type. PMID:23784714

  1. Dry deposition of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in three Plantago species

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, M.I.; Vorenhout, M.; Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Kolloeffel, C.

    1999-10-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the leaf wax of three Plantago species were determined weekly for 3 weeks. The almost glabrous, free-standing leaves of Plantago major and the sparsely hairy Plantago lanceolata leaves were more heavily contaminated with low molecular weight (MW) PAHs (MW {lt} 228) than the densely hairy, partly overlapping Plantago media leaves. This may be caused by the lower canopy roughness (higher aerodynamic resistance), the higher amount of leaf hairs, and/or the higher leaf overlap of P. media. On the other hand, PAHs with MW {ge} 252 tended to show higher concentrations in P. media than in the other two species. This is likely caused by the dense layer of hairs on P. media leaves, which can efficiently intercept the largely particle-bound high MW PAHs. When the PAH concentrations were normalized to projected leaf surface area, the differences between P. media and the other two species became significant for the high MW PAHs, while the differences for the low MW PAHs decreased. Although the differences in PAH concentrations between species are relatively small, this study clearly shows that plant architecture and leaf hairs influence the dry deposition of PAHs.

  2. Narrow-Leaf Plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) selection to increase freezing tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in the northeastern USA have shown that the improved New Zealand cultivars of narrow leaf plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.), Tonic and Lancelot, do not have sufficient winter hardiness to persist under wintertime conditions typical of this region. However, an experimental line, PG700, develo...

  3. Evaluation of the Association Metformin: Plantago ovata Husk in Diabetic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Láiz, Raquel; García-Vieitez, Juan J.; Diez-Liébana, M. José; Sierra-Vega, Matilde; Sahagún-Prieto, Ana M.; Calle-Pardo, Ángela P.; Fernández-Martínez, Nélida

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study we have investigated whether the inclusion of the dietary fiber Plantago ovata husk could be recommended as coadjuvant in treatments with oral hypoglycemic drugs. We evaluated the use of Plantago ovata husk-metformin association in diabetic rabbits by determining its effects on glucose and insulin concentrations. Six groups of 6 rabbits were used. Groups 1 to 3 were fed with standard chow and groups 4 to 6 with chow supplemented with Plantago ovata husk (3.5 mg/kg/day). Two groups (numbers 1 and 4) were used as controls (receiving standard or supplemented chow), two groups (numbers 2 and 5) received metformin orally, and the other two (numbers 3 and 6) were treated orally with metformin and psyllium. Plasma glucose concentrations were lower in groups fed with fiber-supplemented chow whereas insulin levels showed important interindividual variations. Glucose pharmacokinetics parameters showed significant differences in Cmax and tmax in relation to fiber intake. Insulin pharmacokinetics parameters after treatment with oral metformin showed an important increase in Cmax, AUC, and tmax in animals fed with fiber. We conclude that Plantago ovata husk intake can contribute to the oral antihyperglycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26576433

  4. Allelopathic Potential of Invasive Plantago virginica on Four Lawn Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huatian; Zhou, Yumei; Chen, Yang; Wang, Quanxi; Jiang, Lifen; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-01-01

    Plantago virginica L. has invaded many lawn ecosystems in the Eastern part of China. The invasion has incurred an economic cost to remove them. In order to prevent the invasion, it is critical to understand the invasive mechanisms of this species. However, few studies have been conducted on the allelopathic mechanisms of its invasion. In this study, we examined allelopathic effects of P. virginica on germination of seeds and growth of seedlings of four widely used lawn species. We found extensive allelopathic potential of P. virginica on other lawn species, which varied with species and developmental stage. While most effects of the extracts of P. virginica were inhibitory, some variables in some species were promoted by the addition of the extracts. The extracts of P. virginica significantly inhibited seed germination of Agrostis matsumurae. While the overall differences in seed germination rate of Poa annua were significant among treatments, difference between control and any of the treatments was not significant. The height of seedlings of A. matsumurae and Cynodon dactylon was significantly lower under the treatments of adding extracts of P. virginica. In contrast, growth of seedlings of Festuca elata and P. annua did not show significant differences among treatments. The root length of A. matsumurae, C. dactylon and P. annua was suppressed by the extracts of P. virginica whereas root length of F. elata was not affected. Aboveground biomass of A. matsumurae and F. elata was significantly higher than control, except for F. elata at the concentration of 50mg/mL, whereas aboveground biomass of C. dactylon and P. annua was reduced at higher concentrations of the extracts. Except for A. matsumurae, root biomass of the other three lawn species declined under the treatments with the extracts of P. virginica. Our results revealed that P. virginica had allelopathic potential on four lawn species and supported the theory of "novel weapons hypothesis". Invasion by P

  5. Allelopathic Potential of Invasive Plantago virginica on Four Lawn Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huatian; Zhou, Yumei; Chen, Yang; Wang, Quanxi; Jiang, Lifen; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-01-01

    Plantago virginica L. has invaded many lawn ecosystems in the Eastern part of China. The invasion has incurred an economic cost to remove them. In order to prevent the invasion, it is critical to understand the invasive mechanisms of this species. However, few studies have been conducted on the allelopathic mechanisms of its invasion. In this study, we examined allelopathic effects of P. virginica on germination of seeds and growth of seedlings of four widely used lawn species. We found extensive allelopathic potential of P. virginica on other lawn species, which varied with species and developmental stage. While most effects of the extracts of P. virginica were inhibitory, some variables in some species were promoted by the addition of the extracts. The extracts of P. virginica significantly inhibited seed germination of Agrostis matsumurae. While the overall differences in seed germination rate of Poa annua were significant among treatments, difference between control and any of the treatments was not significant. The height of seedlings of A. matsumurae and Cynodon dactylon was significantly lower under the treatments of adding extracts of P. virginica. In contrast, growth of seedlings of Festuca elata and P. annua did not show significant differences among treatments. The root length of A. matsumurae, C. dactylon and P. annua was suppressed by the extracts of P. virginica whereas root length of F. elata was not affected. Aboveground biomass of A. matsumurae and F. elata was significantly higher than control, except for F. elata at the concentration of 50mg/mL, whereas aboveground biomass of C. dactylon and P. annua was reduced at higher concentrations of the extracts. Except for A. matsumurae, root biomass of the other three lawn species declined under the treatments with the extracts of P. virginica. Our results revealed that P. virginica had allelopathic potential on four lawn species and supported the theory of “novel weapons hypothesis”. Invasion by P

  6. Role of plant β-glucosidases in the dual defense system of iridoid glycosides and their hydrolyzing enzymes in Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major.

    PubMed

    Pankoke, Helga; Buschmann, Torsten; Müller, Caroline

    2013-10-01

    The typical defense compounds of Plantaginaceae are the iridoid glycosides, which retard growth and/or enhance mortality of non-adapted herbivores. In plants, glycosidic defense compounds and hydrolytic enzymes often form a dual defense system, in which the glycosides are activated by the enzymes to exert biological effects. Yet, little is known about the activating enzymes in iridoid glycoside-containing plants. To examine the role of plant-derived β-glucosidases in the dual defense system of two common plantain species, Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major, we determined the concentration of iridoid glycosides as well as the β-glucosidase activity in leaves of different age. To investigate the presence of other leaf metabolites potentially involved in plant defense, we used a metabolic fingerprinting approach with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. According to the optimal defense hypothesis, more valuable parts such as young leaves should be better protected than less valuable parts. Therefore, we expected that both, the concentrations of defense compounds as well as the β-glucosidase activity, should be highest in younger leaves and decrease with increasing leaf age. Both species possessed β-glucosidase activity, which hydrolyzed aucubin, one of the two most abundant iridoid glycosides in both plant species, with high activity. In line with the optimal defense hypothesis, the β-glucosidase activity in both Plantago species as well as the concentration of defense-related metabolites such as iridoid glycosides correlated negatively to leaf age. When leaf extracts were incubated with bovine serum albumin and aucubin, SDS-PAGE revealed a protein-denaturing effect of the leaf extracts of both plantain species, suggesting that iridoid glycosides and plant β-glucosidase interact in a dual defense system. PMID:23773298

  7. Phenotypic and RAPD diversity among 80 germplasm accessions of the medicinal plant isabgol (Plantago ovata, Plantaginaceae).

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Lal, R K; Shasany, A K

    2009-01-01

    Plantago ovata, popularly known as isabgol, has great commercial and medicinal importance due to thin rosy white membranous seed husk. Isabgol seeds and husks have emollient, demulcent and laxative properties. We used both biometric and molecular techniques to assess the genetic variability and relatedness of 80 germplasm accessions of Plantago spp (P. ovata, P. lanceolata, and P. major) collected both from India and abroad. The range of D2 values (2.01-4890.73) indicated a very high degree of divergence among the accessions. Based on the degree of divergence, 80 accessions/genotypes were grouped into seven clusters. Thirty-six accessions were analyzed through RAPD profiling for similarity and genetic distances, using 20 random primers. Intraspecific differences in all three species were smaller [range for P. ovata (2-17%), P. lanceolata (3-15%), P. major (2-11%)] than interspecific diversity. These highly divergent lines could be used to produce superior hybrids. PMID:19876869

  8. Radical scavenging and antioxidant effects of Matricaria chamomilla polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal B; Zbikowska, Halina M; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Maniecka, Marta; Pawlaczyk, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Matricaria chamomilla L. (MC), a member of the Asteraceae family, is one of the oldest medicinal plants, widely used worldwide for a variety of healing applications. Its recommendations, derived from both traditional and modern medicine, include numerous disorders such as inflammation, ulcers, wounds, gastrointestinal disorders, stomach ache, pharyngitis, rheumatic pain, as well as the other ailments. This work is focused on another aspect of the biological activity of chamomile polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates--their antioxidant properties in the protection of blood plasma components against in vitro oxidative stress. Measurements of DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging indicated considerable anti-free radical action of MC. Pre-incubation of blood plasma with MC considerably diminished the extent of ONOO(-)-induced oxidative modifications such as protein carbonyl groups, SH groups, 3-nitrotyrosine, as well as the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The analysis of the FRAP assay result shows a considerable increase of ferric reducing ability of blood plasma in the presence of MC. The results obtained in this study indicate that polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates isolated from M. chamomilla substances possess antioxidant properties. The M. chamomilla macromolecular glycoconjugates may be useful in the creation of new natural-based medications or dietary supplements, helpful in the prevention and treatment of oxidative stress-mediated disorders. PMID:25285848

  9. Ameliorative effect of Matricaria chamomilla .L on paraquat: Induced oxidative damage in lung rats

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Akram; Mohsenzadeh, Fariba; Chehregani, Abdolkarim; Khajavi, Farzad; Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa Hossini; Ghasemi, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Herbal medicines have been long used for antioxidant properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroalcholic extract Matricaria chamomilla. L (M. chamomilla) against Paraquat (PQ) induced pulmonary injury in association with its antioxidant activity. Materials and Methods: Effective doses of PQ (5 mg/kg/day) and M. chamomilla (50 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination for 7 days. At the end of the experiment, lung tissue of the animals was separated. The activity of enzymatic scavengers such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total antioxidant power (TAP) were measured. Results: In these samples, the LPO, SOD, and GPx were higher in the PQ group as compared with controls. M. chamomilla extract ameliorated LPO, SOD, GPx and increased TAP in plasma and lung tissue of PQ induced changes. Co administration of PQ with M. chamomilla improved LPO and SOD, and GPx. Conclusion: M. chamomilla as natural antioxidant may be considered beneficial for the protection oxidative lung injury in PQ poisoning. PMID:25002799

  10. Short-term UV-B dose stimulates production of protective metabolites in Matricaria chamomilla leaves.

    PubMed

    Petruľová, Veronika; Dučaiová, Zuzana; Repčák, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Physiological response of two cultivars of Matricaria chamomilla plants on UV irradiation was studied. The impact of used short-time UV dose was evaluated in three time points; 2, 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Used UV irradiation immediately resulted in changes in plant oxidative status monitored as increased concentration of H2 O2 . Decrease in chlorophyll a and b indicated the impact on photosynthetic apparatus. For phenolic secondary metabolites, an increase in total soluble phenols and AlCl3 -reactive flavonols was observed. The activity of main phenolic enzyme, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, increased with time after irradiation. Significant changes, mainly decreasing trends, in the content of free coumarins and their glycosidic precursors were observed. Enhanced accumulation in chlorogenic and 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and in (Z)-isoform of dicycloethers was detected. From these results, the redirecting precursors of coumarin biosynthesis to biosynthesis of substances with higher antioxidative potential can be assumed. Different reactions in diploid and tetraploid plants were recorded, too. PMID:24913599

  11. Analysis of phenolic compounds in Matricaria chamomilla and its extracts by UPLC-UV

    PubMed Central

    Haghi, G.; Hatami, A.; Safaei, A.; Mehran, M.

    2014-01-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is a widely used medicinal plant possessing several pharmacological effects due to presence of active compounds. This study describes a method of using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with photodiode array (PDA) detector for the separation of phenolic compounds in M. chamomilla and its crude extracts. Separation was conducted on C18 column (150 mm × 2 mm, 1.8 μm) using a gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 4% aqueous acetic acid at 25°C. The method proposed was validated for determination of free and total apigenin and apigenin 7-glucoside contents as bioactive compounds in the extracts by testing sensitivity, linearity, precision and recovery. In general, UPLC produced significant improvements in method sensitivity, speed and resolution. Extraction was performed with methanol, 70% aqueous ethanol and water solvents. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents ranged from 1.77 to 50.75 gram (g) of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g and 0.82 to 36.75 g quercetin equivalent (QE)/100 g in dry material, respectively. There was a considerable difference from 40 to 740 mg/100 g for apigenin and 210 to 1110 mg/100 g for apigenin 7-glucoside in dry material. PMID:25598797

  12. PIXE analysis of trace elements in relation to chlorophyll concentration in Plantago ovata Forsk.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal

    2010-03-01

    Plantago ovata Forsk - an economically important medicinal plant - was analyzed for trace elements and chlorophyll in a study of the effects of gamma radiation on physiological responses of the seedlings. Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was used to quantify trace elements in unirradiated and gamma-irradiated plants at the seedling stage. The experiments revealed radiation-induced changes in the trace element and chlorophyll concentrations. PMID:20047839

  13. Characterization and Physical Mapping of Ribosomal RNA Gene Families in Plantago

    PubMed Central

    DHAR, MANOJ K.; FRIEBE, BERND; KAUL, SANJANA; GILL, BIKRAM S.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The organization of rRNA genes in cultivated Plantago ovata Forsk. and several of its wild allies was analysed to gain insight into the phylogenetic relationships of these species in the genus which includes some 200 species. • Methods Specific primers were designed to amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions from seven Plantago species and the resulting fragments were cloned and sequenced. Similarly, using specific primers, the 5S rRNA genes from these species were amplified and subsequently cloned. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal RNA genes. • Results The ITS1 region is 19–29 bp longer than the ITS2 in different Plantago species. The 5S rRNA gene-repeating unit varies in length from 289 to 581 bp. Coding regions are highly conserved across species, but the non-transcribed spacers (NTS) do not match any database sequences. The clone from the cultivated species P. ovata was used for physical mapping of these genes by FISH. Four species have one FISH site while three have two FISH sites. In P. lanceolata and P. rhodosperma, the 5S and 45S (18S-5·8S-25S) sites are coupled. • Conclusions Characterization of 5S and 45S rRNA genes has indicated a possible origin of P. ovata, the only cultivated species of the genus and also the only species with x = 4, from a species belonging to subgenus Psyllium. Based on the studies reported here, P. ovata is closest to P. arenaria, although on the basis of other data the two species have been placed in different subgenera. FISH mapping can be used as an efficient tool to help determine phylogenetic relationships in the genus Plantago and show the interrelationship between P. lanceolata and P. lagopus. PMID:16481363

  14. Pharmacological aspects of selected herbs employed in Hispanic folk medicine in the San Luis Valley of Colorado, USA: I. Ligusticum porteri (osha) and Matricaria chamomilla (manzanilla).

    PubMed

    Appelt, G D

    1985-03-01

    Interviews with Hispanic families in the San Luis Valley of Colorado delineated several medicinal herbs that are popular in Hispanic folk medicine, including Ligusticum porteri (osha) and Matricaria chamomilla (manzanilla). A search of the scientific literature reveals that related species of Ligusticum and Matricaria chamomilla contain compounds that possess significant pharmacologic activity. This combined information is now being used as a basis for further investigation at the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy in an effort to detect pharmacologic activity in osha and manzanilla preparations. PMID:3990316

  15. The weak effects of climatic change on Plantago pollen concentration: 17 years of monitoring in Northwestern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Parrado, Zulima; Valencia-Barrera, Rosa Ma.; Vega-Maray, Ana Ma.; Fuertes-Rodríguez, Carmen Reyes; Fernández-González, Delia

    2014-09-01

    Plantago L. species are very common in nitrified areas such as roadsides and their pollen is a major cause of pollinosis in temperate regions. In this study, we sampled airborne pollen grains in the city of León (NW, Spain) from January 1995 to December 2011, by using a Burkard® 7-day-recording trap. The percentage of Plantago pollen compared to the total pollen count ranged from 11 % (1997) to 3 % (2006) in the period under study. Peak pollen concentrations were recorded in May and June. Our 17-year analysis failed to disclose significant changes in the seasonal trend of plantain pollen concentration. In addition, there were no important changes in the start dates of pollen release and the meteorological parameters analyzed did not show significant variations in their usual trends. We analyzed the influence of several meteorological parameters on Plantago pollen concentration to explain the differences in pollen concentration trends during the study. Our results show that temperature, sun hours, evaporation, and relative humidity are the meteorological parameters best correlated to the behavior of Plantago pollen grains. In general, the years with low pollen concentrations correspond to the years with less precipitation or higher temperatures. We calculated the approximate Plantago flowering dates using the cumulative sum of daily maximum temperatures and compared them with the real bloom dates. The differences obtained were 4 days in 2009, 3 days in 2010, and 1 day in 2011 considering the complete period of pollination.

  16. The weak effects of climatic change on Plantago pollen concentration: 17 years of monitoring in Northwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    González-Parrado, Zulima; Valencia-Barrera, Rosa Ma; Vega-Maray, Ana Ma; Fuertes-Rodríguez, Carmen Reyes; Fernández-González, Delia

    2014-09-01

    Plantago L. species are very common in nitrified areas such as roadsides and their pollen is a major cause of pollinosis in temperate regions. In this study, we sampled airborne pollen grains in the city of León (NW, Spain) from January 1995 to December 2011, by using a Burkard® 7-day-recording trap. The percentage of Plantago pollen compared to the total pollen count ranged from 11% (1997) to 3% (2006) in the period under study. Peak pollen concentrations were recorded in May and June. Our 17-year analysis failed to disclose significant changes in the seasonal trend of plantain pollen concentration. In addition, there were no important changes in the start dates of pollen release and the meteorological parameters analyzed did not show significant variations in their usual trends. We analyzed the influence of several meteorological parameters on Plantago pollen concentration to explain the differences in pollen concentration trends during the study. Our results show that temperature, sun hours, evaporation, and relative humidity are the meteorological parameters best correlated to the behavior of Plantago pollen grains. In general, the years with low pollen concentrations correspond to the years with less precipitation or higher temperatures. We calculated the approximate Plantago flowering dates using the cumulative sum of daily maximum temperatures and compared them with the real bloom dates. The differences obtained were 4 days in 2009, 3 days in 2010, and 1 day in 2011 considering the complete period of pollination. PMID:24337493

  17. Comparative analysis between Chamomilla recutita and corticosteroids on wound healing. An in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Manoela Domingues; Marques, Márcia Martins; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Pavesi, Vanessa Christina Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos

    2009-02-01

    The comparison of chamomile and corticosteroids for treating ulcers was done in vitro and in vivo. The experimental groups were: control; chamomile recutita; triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate. For the in vitro study the cell viability of fibroblasts cultured for 24 h in media conditioned by the substances was obtained by the MTT reduction analysis. For the in vivo study, 125 male rats were submitted to experimental ulcers treated or not (control) by the substances tested. At 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days later 5 animals of each group were sacrificed. The lesions were analyzed by means of clinical observation and histological wound-healing grading. Data were compared by ANOVA (p

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa Strain Mc5Re-14, an Antagonistic Root Endophyte of Matricaria chamomilla

    SciTech Connect

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Paenibacillus polymyxa strain Mc5Re-14 was isolated from the inner root tissue of Matricaria chamomilla (German chamomile). Mc5Re-14 revealed promising in vitro antagonistic activity against plant and opportunistic human pathogens. The 6.0-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively involved in pathogen suppression and direct and indirect plant growth promotion.

  19. Medicinal plants used in Kirklareli Province (Turkey).

    PubMed

    Kültür, Sükran

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, 126 traditional medicinal plants from Kirklareli Province in Turkey have been reported. One hundred and twenty six plant species belonging to 54 families and among them 100 species were wild and 26 species were cultivated plants. Most used families were Rosaceae, Labiatae, Compositae and the most used plants were Cotinus coggyria, Sambucus ebulus, Achillea millefolium subsp. pannonica, Hypericum perforatum, Matricaria chamomilla var. recutita, Melissa officinalis subsp. officinalis, Juglans regia, Thymus longicaulis subsp. longicaulis var. subisophyllus, Malva sylvestris, Urtica dioica, Plantago lanceolata, Rosa canina, Ecballium elaterium, Artemisia absinthium, Viscum album subsp. album, Papaver rhoeas, Helleborus orientalis, Cydonia oblonga, Prunus spinosa subsp. dasyphylla, Rubus discolor, Sorbus domestica. A total of 143 medicinal uses were obtained. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of wounds (25.3%), cold and influenza (24.6%), stomach (20%), cough (19%), kidney ailments (18.2%), diabetes (13.4%). PMID:17257791

  20. Formulation of nutrient medium for in vitro somatic embryo induction in Plantago ovata forsk.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Bandyopadhyay, Subhendu; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2011-05-01

    A nutrient medium has been formulated by altering the macro- and micro-elemental concentration in the culture medium for in vitro somatic embryo induction of economically important medicinal plant Plantago ovata Forsk .A comparison was made between induced embryos with normal embryos (produced in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium) to observe frequency of embryo induction and also to determine regeneration efficiency. In the present investigation, three different media have been formulated. Among them, FM3 (formulated media, treatment 3) was the most suitable for increasing the frequency of somatic embryo production and regeneration of P. ovata Forsk. Better result was obtained using formulated medium than with MS medium. PMID:20405339

  1. Inhibitory activity of Plantago major L. on angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Tai, Bui Huu; Van Kiem, Phan; Van Minh, Chau; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Tung, Nguyen Huu; Thu, Vu Kim; Trung, Trinh Nam; Anh, Hoang Le Tuan; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Jang, Hae-Dong; Kwon, Young-In; Kim, Young Ho

    2011-03-01

    Eight compounds were isolated from methanol extract of Plantago major L. leaves and investigated for their ability to inhibit angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity. Among them, compound 1 showed the most potent inhibition with rate of 28.06 ± 0.21% at a concentration of 100 μM. Compounds 2 and 8 exhibited weak activities. These results suggest that compound 1 might contribute to the ability of P. major to inhibit the activity of angiotensin I- converting enzyme. PMID:21547673

  2. [Study of a new group of bioregulators isolated from the greater plantain (Plantago major L.)].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S; Iamskova, V P; Margasiuk, D V; Kulikova, O G; Il'ina, A P; Rybakova, E Iu; Iamslov, I A

    2011-01-01

    Proteins with physicochemical properties and biological activity similar to those of membrano-tropic homeostatic tissue-specific bioregulators that had been found earlier in various animal tissues were discovered in leaves of the common plantain (Plantago major L.). To study the specific activity of these plant proteins, we developed an experimental model for organotypic roller cultivation of newt (Pleurodeles waltl) skin tissue in vitro. We showed that the plant proteins of interest exert the wound-healing effect, which is characteristic of this plant, on the skin of vertebrates both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22808737

  3. Fitness of resprouters versus seeders in relation to nutrient availability in two Plantago species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latzel, Vít; Klimešová, Jitka

    2009-07-01

    Two contrasting strategies of plants from disturbed areas are reported to depend on nutrient availability. Resprouters, investing into storage and capable of vegetative regeneration after disturbance, are predicted to be enhanced in nutrient poor environments. This contrasts to seeders, which invest preferentially into seed production and regenerating only from seeds, and are thought to prevail in nutrient rich environments. To test such predicted dichotomy, we set up an experiment with two facultative resprouters with contrasting nutrient demands and assessed the fitness of individuals regenerated from seeds and root fragments in differently productive environments. We hypothesized that 1) plants with higher nutrient demands have a higher fitness as seeders irrespectable of nutrient availability and/or 2) both species will have a higher fitness as resprouters under lower nutrient availability and as seeders when nutrient availability is higher. Nutrient availability was also manipulated prior to and after disturbance to evaluate the impact of changing nutrient availability on the strategy of resprouting. The results of our pot experiment with Plantago lanceolata and Plantago media supported the first but not the second hypothesis. Moreover, high nutrient availability prior to disturbance negatively affected resprouting success, but the growth and fitness of successfully regenerated individuals were enhanced under higher nutrient availability. We concluded that resprouting from roots after disturbance is affected by nutrient availability, but this effect considerably differs between individual life-history stages.

  4. Isolation, characterization and investigation of Plantago ovata husk polysaccharide as superdisintegrant.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harshal; Varkhade, Chhaya

    2014-08-01

    Psyllium husk (Plantago ovata, Family: Plantaginaceae) contains a high proportion of hemicellulose, composed of a xylan backbone linked with arabinose, rhamnose, and galacturonic acid units (arabinoxylans). Polysaccharide was isolated from Psyllium husk using solvent precipitation method. The isolated polysaccharide was evaluated for various physicochemical parameters. The rheological behavior of polysaccharide (1% w/v in water) was studied using Brookfield viscometer. Polysaccharide derived from the husk of P. ovata was investigated as superdisintegrant in the fast dissolving tablets. Valsartan, an antihypertensive drug, was selected as a model drug. The tablets of Valsartan were prepared separately using different concentrations (1, 2.5, 5, 7.5% w/w) of isolated Plantago ovata (P. ovata) husk polysaccharide (Natural) and crospovidone as a synthetic superdisintegrant by direct compression method. The prepared tablets were evaluated for various pre-compression and post-compression parameters. The drug excipient interactions were characterized by FTIR studies. The formulation F4 containing7.5% polysaccharide showed rapid wetting time and disintegration time as compared to formulation prepared using synthetic superdisintegrant at the same concentration level. Hence batch F4 was considered as optimized formulation. The stability studies were performed on formulation F4. The disintegration time and in vitro drug release of the optimized formulation was compared with the marketed formulation (Conventional tablets). PMID:24854213

  5. Comparative Analysis of the Trace Element Content of the Leaves and Roots of Three Plantago Species.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Nemereshina, Olga N; Suliburska, Joanna; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Regula, Julita; Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Skalny, Anatoly V

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this study is to perform a comparative analysis of the trace element content of the leaves and roots of three Plantago species (P. maxima Juss. ex Jacq., P. major L., and P. lanceolata L.). Trace element levels were assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The data indicate that the leaves of P. lanceolata are characterized by the highest Co, Cr, and Se content, whereas P. maxima leaves contained the greatest levels of Si and Zn. In contrast, the highest concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, I, Mn, Si, and V were detected in the roots of P. major. Zn content was also higher in P. maxima roots than in the other species analyzed. The toxic trace elements were differentially distributed across the studied species. In particular, P. lanceolata leaves contained significantly higher Al, As, Li, Ni, Pb, and Sr levels, whereas the B and Cd content was elevated in P. major as compared to the other species. Surprisingly, the leaf Hg level was the lowest in P. major, whose levels of Al, As, B, Cd, Ni, Li, and Sr were significantly higher than the other two species. The data indicate that the concentration of most of the essential trace elements was higher in the leaves and roots of P. major and P. lanceolata than in P. maxima, while P. maxima had less toxic metals. The obtained data on trace elements content in Plantago tissues may be taken into account while using plant preparations in practical medicine. PMID:26811105

  6. Protective Effect of Plantago major Extract against t-BOOH-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Damage and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mello, Joyce C; Gonzalez, Mariano V D; Moraes, Vivian W R; Prieto, Tatiana; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Rodrigues, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    Plantago major L. produces several chemical substances with anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and its use in the treatment of oral and throat inflammation in popular medicine is well described. In this study, the antioxidant potential of the Plantago major hydroethanolic extract was screened and its protective action was evaluated against t-BOOH-induced oxidative stress. The extract was obtained by fractionated percolation using 50% ethanolic solution and, after drying, suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide. The chromatographic profile of crude extract was obtained with the identification of some phytochemical markers and the total phenols and flavonoids were quantified. The scavenger activity against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radicals was determined and the antioxidant activity in biological systems was evaluated in isolated rat liver mitochondria and HepG2 cells. The extract exhibited a significant free radical scavenger activity at 0.1 mg/mL, and decreased the ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation in succinate-energized mitochondria. Such an effect was associated with the preservation of the intrinsic antioxidant defenses (reduced glutathione and NAD(P)H) against the oxidation by t-BOOH, and also to the protection of membranes from lipid oxidation. The cytoprotective effect of PmHE against t-BOOH induced cell death was also shown. These findings contribute to the understanding of the health benefits attributed to P. major. PMID:26404215

  7. Quantification of spiroether isomers and herniarin of different parts of Matricaria matricarioides and flowers of Chamaemelum nobile.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao-Mei; Winsor, Linda; Daneshtalab, Mohsen

    2007-01-01

    A simple HPLC-PAD-MS method was established to quantitatively analyse two spiroether isomers (cis-en-yn-dicycloether and trans-en-yn-dicycloether) and the main coumarin, herniarin, in chamomile herbs, simultaneously. By using this method, the contents of these three compounds in the flowers of two chamomile species, Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) and pineapple weed (Matricaria matricarioides), as well as in different parts of pineapple weed, were investigated. It was found that the flowers of both herbs contained large amounts of cis-en-yn-dicycloether and trans-en-yn-dicycloether, with the trans-form being more abundant than the cis-form. The leaves of pineapple weed were found to have the highest concentration of cis-en-yn-dicycloether and herniarin than the other parts. HPLC-PAD-MS-guided isolation and identification of other constituents are also discussed. PMID:17260697

  8. Composition and Bioactivities of an (E)-β-Farnesene Chemotype of Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) Essential Oil from Nepal.

    PubMed

    Satyal, Prabodh; Shrestha, Samon; Setzer, William N

    2015-08-01

    The essential oil of Matricaria chamomilla, collected from Nepal, was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major components in Nepalese chamomile oil were (E)-β-famesene (42.2%), α-bisabolol oxide A (22.3%), (E,E)-α-famesene (8.3%), cis-bicycloether (5.0%), α-bisabolol oxide B (4.5%), and α-bisabolone oxide A (4.0%). A cluster analysis based on the chemical compositions of 48 samples of chamomile oil reported in the literature has revealed seven chemotypes, and the oil from Nepal represents the (E)-β-farnesene chemotype. The chamomile oil was screened for antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger, and toxicity toward MCF-7 breast tumor cells, Artemia salina, Chaoborus plumicornis, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26434140

  9. In vitro radiation induced alterations in heavy metals and metallothionein content in Plantago ovata Forsk.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Mishra, Debadutta; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2008-09-01

    Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) have been used to study the effects of gamma irradiation on heavy metal accumulation in callus tissue of Plantago ovata-an important cash crop of India. PIXE analysis revealed radiation-induced alteration in trace element profile during developmental stages of the callus of P. ovata. Subsequent experiments showed antagonism between Fe and Cu and also Cu and Zn and synergistic effect between Fe and Zn. FACS analysis showed significant induction of the metallothionein (MT) protein following gamma-irradiation, and maximum induction was noted at the 50-Gy absorbed dose. This indicated a progressive increment of MTs as a measure for protection against gamma-rays, to combat alteration in the homeostasis of heavy metals like Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn. PMID:18493724

  10. Anguina plantaginis n. sp. Parasitic on Plantago aristata with a Description of Its Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hirschmann, Hedwig

    1977-01-01

    Anguina plantaginis n. sp., parasitic on Plantago aristata, is described and illustrated. This new species is most closely related to A. klebahni, A. millefolii, A. mobilis, and A. moxae and is characterized as follows: moderate body size for the genus; absence of esophageal "storage organ"; postvulval uterine sac extending about 45% of vulva-anus distance; crustaformeria of young females longer than spermatotheca or uterus proper; spicules with 2 sclerotized thickenings; long, conical tail in both sexes, narrowing at about 1/6 of its length to peg-like tip; parasitic only on P. aristata. Two nematode generations that are morphologically similar but differ in body size develop in one plant gall. The postembryogenesis, studied with respect to morphological development of the larval stages, is similar to that of Ditylenchus. The sexes can be differentiated from the second molt on. The infective larva is the third stage, which is morphologically distinct from the regularly developing third-stage larva. PMID:19305601

  11. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress induced by lead in the leaves of Plantago major L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakhnina, Tamara I.; Borkowska, Aneta; Nosalewicz, Magdalena; Nosalewicz, Artur; Włodarczyk, Teresa M.; Kosobryukhov, Anatoly A.; Fomina, Irina R.

    2016-07-01

    Fluctuation of the summer day-time temperatures in the mid-latitudes in a range from 16 to 30°C should not have irreversible negative effects on plants, but may influence metabolic processes including the oxidative stress. To test the effect of moderately high temperature on oxidative stress induced by lead in the leaves of Plantago major L.; the plants were incubated in a water solution of 0, 150, 450, and 900 μM Pb (NO3)2 at 20 and 28°C. Plant reactions were evaluated by the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in leaves after 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. The Pb concentration in the leaves rose with the increase in the Pb content and was higher at 20°C. The increase in stomatal resistance caused by Pb was higher at 28°C. The contents of TBARS increased after 2 h of plant exposure to Pb and the increase was the highest at 900 μM Pb, 28°C. The AsP activity increased up to 50% after 24 h of Pb-treatment at 28°C; the highest increase in glutathione reductase activity was observed after 72 h at 20°C. Thus, the moderately high temperature 28°C compared with optimal 20°C caused a decrease in Pb accumulation in Plantago leaves but amplified the negative effects of lead, especially in the beginning of stress development.

  12. Quantitative determination of seven chemical constituents and chemo-type differentiation of chamomiles using high-performance thin-layer chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matricaria recutita L. (German Chamomile), Anthemis nobilis L. (Roman Chamomile) and Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat are commonly used chamomiles. High performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed for estimation of six flavonoids (rutin, luteolin-7-O-ß-glucoside, chamaemeloside...

  13. Chamomile

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Chamomile ( Matricaria recutita, Chamaemelum nobile ). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on May ... 2000:57–61. German chamomile. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on May ...

  14. An experimental study of the effects of Matricaria chamomilla extract on cutaneous burn wound healing in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Jarrahi, Morteza

    2008-03-20

    Previous studies conducted on the anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects of Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile) extract led us to study the effect of topical chamomile extract on burn wound healing in albino rats. Thirty male albino rats (250-300 g) were randomly divided into three groups, as control, vehicle, and treatment. Second-degree burning was induced in 20% of whole surface area of animal body by placing the back of animal into boiling water for 8s. Animals of control group received no treatment. Animals of vehicle and treatment groups were treated topically by olive oil and extract dissolved in olive oil twice a day respectively from the first day of burn induction to complete wound healing. The percentage of wound healing was calculated weekly. The results showed that there was significant difference (p < 0.05) between vehicle and treatment groups. So we concluded that the chamomile extract in the form of rubbing oil had a good potential for acceleration of burn wound healing in rats. PMID:18404562

  15. Fast quality assessment of German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) by headspace solid-phase microextraction: influence of flower development stage.

    PubMed

    Rafieiolhossaini, Mohammad; Adams, An; Sodaeizadeh, Hamid; Van Damme, Patrick; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    For an adequate quality evaluation of aromatic plants grown under different conditions, a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the analysis of volatile constituents is indispensable. The main objective of the present study was to compare fast screening of German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with conventional isolation of the essential oil (steam distillation-solvent extraction (SDSE)) for the differentiation of chamomile essential oil constituents. Flowers were harvested at two distinct development stages: stage I, when ligulate flowers start to develop and tubular flowers are still closed, and stage II, when tubular flowers are partially to completely opened. Dried chamomile flowers at two development stages were extracted by means of both SDSE and HS-SPME, followed by GC-MS analysis. Among 30 compounds detected, (E)-beta-farnesene (49%), artemisia ketone (10%) and germacrene D (9%) were the predominant volatile components in the HS-SPME-extract, while alpha-bisabolol oxide A (42%), chamazulene (21%) and (Z)-spiroether (8%) were the main essential oil constituents among the 13 compounds obtained by SDSE. After statistical analysis of the data, both techniques enabled the same conclusion: (E)-beta-farnesene was the only compound which showed significant differences between the two flower development stages. These results suggest that HS-SPME-GC-MS can be used as a sensitive technique for the rapid screening and quality assessment of M. chamomilla. PMID:22428258

  16. The effect of Plantago ovata on humoral immune responses in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Rezaeipoor, R; Saeidnia, S; Kamalinejad, M

    2000-09-01

    The effect of the aqueous extract of Plantago ovata (PO) (Plantaginaceae) consisting of a mixture of polysaccharides and glycoside on humoral immune responses was studied. In rabbits, after oral administration of PO (0.5 g/kg) a significant decrease in anti-HD antibody titre was observed in primary response. Intraperitoneal injection of 0.25 g/kg of PO in mice prior to immunisation with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) resulted in a significant decrease in hemagglutinating antibody (HD) titre. Oral administration and intraperitoneal injection of 0.25 and 0.5 g/kg of PO resulted in a significant increase in white blood cells (WBC) and spleen leukocytes counts. The spleen weight also increased with intraperitoneal injection (0.25 and 0.5 g/kg) and oral administration of 0.5 g/kg of PO. Present results indicate that PO can suppress the humoral immune responses, especially in primary immune response. PMID:10967483

  17. The hydrosoluble fiber Plantago ovata husk improves levodopa (with carbidopa) bioavailability after repeated administration.

    PubMed

    Diez, M Jose; Garcia, Juan J; Prieto, Carlos; Fernandez, Nelida; Sahagun, Ana; Sierra, Matilde

    2008-08-15

    The influence of treatment duration (7 or 14 days) with Plantago ovata husk/levodopa/carbidopa in the bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of levodopa were evaluated in rabbits. Fiber was administered at two different doses, 100 and 400 mg/kg, and the dosage of levodopa/carbidopa was 20:5 mg/kg. These doses were administered once a day. When 100 mg/kg of fiber was administered, the mean AUC value obtained for levodopa increased 20.2% from day 1 to day 7, and 27.2% from day 1 to day 14; C(max) was 8.6% higher on day 7 and 11.7% higher on day 14. When administering 400 mg/kg of fiber, the increase in AUC values was 17.6% on day 7 and 24.9% on day 14, and that of C(max) 11.1% on day 7 and 11.3% on day 14. The concentration determined immediately before drug administration (C(min)) increased progressively with the duration of treatment, and the highest increase (53.2%) was observed on day 14 with 100 mg/kg of fiber. There was also a delay in levodopa elimination (higher MRT and lower Cl) in a fiber-dose dependent manner. In summary, we found that there was an improvement in the extent of levodopa absorbed with higher final concentrations and that levodopa elimination was slower with the administration of P. ovata husk. PMID:18474374

  18. Genetics of Male Sterility in Gynodioecious Plantago Coronopus. II. Nuclear Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Koelewijn, H. P.; Van-Damme, JMM.

    1995-01-01

    Inheritance of male sterility was studied in the gynodioecious species Plantago coronopus using five plants and their descendants from an area of ~50 m(2) from each of four locations. In each location, crosses between these five plants yielded the entire array of possible sex phenotypes. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic genes were involved. Emphasis is placed on the nuclear (restorer) genetics of two cytoplasmic types. For both types, multiple interacting nuclear genes were demonstrated. These genes carried either dominant or recessive restorer alleles. The exact number of genes involved could not be determined, because different genetic models could be proposed for each location and no common genetic solution could be given. At least five genes, three with dominant and two with recessive restorer allele action, were involved with both cytoplasmic types. Segregation patterns of partially male sterile plants suggested that they are due to incomplete dominance at restorer loci. Restorer genes interact in different ways. In most instances models with independent restorer gene action were sufficient to explain the crossing results. However, for one case we propose a model with epistatic restorer gene action. There was a consistent difference in the segregation of male sterility between plants from the two cytoplasmic types. Hermaphrodites of cytoplasmic type 2 hardly segregated male steriles, in contrast to plants with cytoplasmic type 1. PMID:7789776

  19. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Medicinally Important Plantago ovata Using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Shivanjali; Kaul, Sanjana; Sharma, Pooja; Gupta, Mehak; Shankar, Rama; Jain, Mukesh; Dhar, Manoj K.

    2016-01-01

    Plantago ovata is an economically and medicinally important plant of the family Plantaginaceae. It is used extensively for the production of seed husk for its application in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. In the present study, the transcriptome of P. ovata ovary was sequenced using Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to characterize the mucilage biosynthesis pathway in the plant. De novo assembly was carried out using Oases followed by velvet. A total of 46,955 non-redundant transcripts (≥100 bp) using ~29 million high-quality paired end reads were generated. Functional categorization of these transcripts revealed the presence of several genes involved in various biological processes like metabolic pathways, mucilage biosynthesis, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and antioxidants. In addition, simple sequence-repeat motifs, non-coding RNAs and transcription factors were also identified. Expression profiling of some genes involved in mucilage biosynthetic pathway was performed in different tissues of P. ovata using Real time PCR analysis. The study has resulted in a valuable resource for further studies on gene expression, genomics and functional genomics in P. ovata. PMID:26943165

  20. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Medicinally Important Plantago ovata Using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Shivanjali; Kaul, Sanjana; Sharma, Pooja; Gupta, Mehak; Shankar, Rama; Jain, Mukesh; Dhar, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    Plantago ovata is an economically and medicinally important plant of the family Plantaginaceae. It is used extensively for the production of seed husk for its application in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. In the present study, the transcriptome of P. ovata ovary was sequenced using Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to characterize the mucilage biosynthesis pathway in the plant. De novo assembly was carried out using Oases followed by velvet. A total of 46,955 non-redundant transcripts (≥100 bp) using ~29 million high-quality paired end reads were generated. Functional categorization of these transcripts revealed the presence of several genes involved in various biological processes like metabolic pathways, mucilage biosynthesis, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and antioxidants. In addition, simple sequence-repeat motifs, non-coding RNAs and transcription factors were also identified. Expression profiling of some genes involved in mucilage biosynthetic pathway was performed in different tissues of P. ovata using Real time PCR analysis. The study has resulted in a valuable resource for further studies on gene expression, genomics and functional genomics in P. ovata. PMID:26943165

  1. Artificial simulated saliva, gastric and intestinal digestion of polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Min, Fang-Fang; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2013-02-15

    The saliva, gastric and intestinal digestion of polysaccharide from Plantago asiatica L. seeds was investigated in vitro. It was found that salivary amylase had no effect on the polysaccharide; however, the polysaccharide was influenced in later gastrointestinal digestion. A steady decrease in molecular weight (M(w)) of the polysaccharide from 1903.1±93.0 to 4.7±0.2 kDa was observed as digestion time increased. Meanwhile, the reducing ends were increased from 0.157±0.009 to 0.622±0.026 mM, indicating the decrease of M(w) may due to the breakdown of glycosidic bonds. In addition, there was no monosaccharide released throughout the whole digestion period, suggesting that the gastrointestinal digestion did not result in a production of free monosaccharide. These results may provide some information on the digestion of polysaccharide from P. asiatica L. in vitro, and may contribute to the methods of studying the digestion of other carbohydrates. PMID:23399139

  2. The gel-forming polysaccharide of psyllium husk (Plantago ovata Forsk).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Milton H; Yu, Nanxiong; Gray, Gary R; Ralph, John; Anderson, Laurens; Marlett, Judith A

    2004-08-01

    The physiologically active, gel-forming fraction of the alkali-extractable polysaccharides of Plantago ovata Forsk seed husk (psyllium seed) and some derived partial hydrolysis products were studied by compositional and methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy. Resolving the conflicting claims of previous investigators, the material was found to be a neutral arabinoxylan (arabinose 22.6%, xylose 74.6%, molar basis; only traces of other sugars). With about 35% of nonreducing terminal residues, the polysaccharide is highly branched. The data are compatible with a structure consisting of a densely substituted main chain of beta-(1-->4)-linked D-xylopyranosyl residues, some carrying single xylopyranosyl side chains at position 2, others bearing, at position 3, trisaccharide branches having the sequence L-Araf-alpha-(1-->3)-D-Xylp-beta-(1-->3)-l-Araf. The presence of this sequence is supported by methylation and NMR data, and by the isolation of the disaccharide 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-L-arabinose as a product of partial acid hydrolysis of the polysaccharide. PMID:15261594

  3. Plant Community Diversity Influences Allocation to Direct Chemical Defence in Plantago lanceolata

    PubMed Central

    Mraja, Anne; Unsicker, Sybille B.; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Roscher, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Background Forecasting the consequences of accelerating rates of changes in biodiversity for ecosystem functioning requires a mechanistic understanding of the relationships between the structure of biological communities and variation in plant functional characteristics. So far, experimental data of how plant species diversity influences the investment of individual plants in direct chemical defences against herbivores and pathogens is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Plantago lanceolata as a model species in experimental grasslands differing in species richness and composition (Jena Experiment) to investigate foliar concentrations of the iridoid glycosides (IG), catalpol and its biosynthetic precursor aucubin. Total IG and aucubin concentrations decreased, while catalpol concentrations increased with increasing plant diversity in terms of species or functional group richness. Negative plant diversity effects on total IG and aucubin concentrations correlated with increasing specific leaf area of P. lanceolata, suggesting that greater allocation to light acquisition reduced the investment into these carbon-based defence components. In contrast, increasing leaf nitrogen concentrations best explained increasing concentrations of the biosynthetically more advanced IG, catalpol. Observed levels of leaf damage explained a significant proportion of variation in total IG and aucubin concentrations, but did not account for variance in catalpol concentrations. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly show that plants growing in communities of varying species richness and composition differ in their defensive chemistry, which may modulate plant susceptibility to enemy attack and consequently their interactions with higher trophic level organisms. PMID:22174766

  4. Early Root Herbivory Impairs Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Colonization and Shifts Defence Allocation in Establishing Plantago lanceolata

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alison E.; Macrae, Anna M.; Moore, Ben D.; Caul, Sandra; Johnson, Scott N.

    2013-01-01

    Research into plant-mediated indirect interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and insect herbivores has focussed on those between plant shoots and above-ground herbivores, despite the fact that only below-ground herbivores share the same part of the host plant as AM fungi. Using Plantago lanceolata L., we aimed to characterise how early root herbivory by the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus F.) affected subsequent colonization by AM fungi (Glomus spp.) and determine how the two affected plant growth and defensive chemistry. We exposed four week old P. lanceolata to root herbivory and AM fungi using a 2×2 factorial design (and quantified subsequent effects on plant biomass and iridoid glycosides (IGs) concentrations. Otiorhynchus sulcatus reduced root growth by c. 64%, whereas plant growth was unaffected by AM fungi. Root herbivory reduced extent of AM fungal colonization (by c. 61%). O. sulcatus did not influence overall IG concentrations, but caused qualitative shifts in root and shoot IGs, specifically increasing the proportion of the more toxic catalpol. These changes may reflect defensive allocation in the plant against further attack. This study demonstrates that very early root herbivory during plant development can shape future patterns of AM fungal colonization and influence defensive allocation in the plant. PMID:23840398

  5. Application of Isfarzeh seed (Plantago ovate L.) mucilage as a fat mimetic in mayonnaise.

    PubMed

    Amiri Aghdaei, S S; Aalami, M; Babaei Geefan, Saeed; Ranjbar, A

    2014-10-01

    In present study, application of Isfarzeh seed (Plantago ovate L.) mucilage as fat replacer was studied in mayonnaise formulation. Fat was partially substituted by mucilage gels (2 and 3 % suspensions) at levels of 30, 40 and 50 % which were referred to as FM2-30 % (2 % gel and 30 % substitution level), FM2-40 %, FM2-50 %, FM3-30 %, FM3-40 %, and FM3-50 % formulations, respectively and the full fat (Ff) mayonnaise with 78 % oil was used as control. Physicochemical, texture and sensory analysis of Ff and Low fat (Lf) treatments were evaluated. Results indicated that Lf samples had considerably lower energy content compared with control, but higher water content than their Ff counterpart. In view of texture, FM3-30 % showed similar textural characteristics as those of control. Both Ff and Lf samples exhibited thixotropic and shear thinning behavior through rheological studies and all samples followed the power law model except FM3-40 % and FM3-50 %. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that all of mayonnaise samples, containing 3 % mucilage, were more acceptable. It was concluded that Isfarzeh seed mucilage can be used as a suitable fat replacer in mayonnaise formulation. PMID:25328221

  6. Anticoccidial effects of the Plantago asiatica extract on experimental Eimeria tenella infection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sunhwa; Oh, Gi-Wook; Kang, Won-Guk

    2016-01-01

    Anticoccidial effects of the Plantago asiatica extract (PAE) were evaluated in chickens following oral infection with Eimeria (E.) tenella. This study was conducted on the 3-day-old chickens (n=30). Those animals were divided with 3 groups; PAE 0.1% treated/infected (n=10), PAE untreated/infected (n=10) and non-infected control (n=10). Chickens were fed a standard diet supplemented with or without PAE for 1 week prior to infection with E. tenella (10,000 sporulated oocysts per chicken). The effects of PAE on E. tenella infection were assessed by two parameters; fecal oocysts shedding and body weights gain. The PAE-fed chickens produced significantly reduced fecal oocysts (P<0.05) when compared to the E. tenella-infected group fed standard diet. Also, PAE-based diet, improved body weight loss caused by E. tenella infection. Our data demonstrated that PAE had remarkable anticoccidial activities against E. tenella. This finding might have implications for the development of anticoccidial drug. This study is the first to demonstrate anticoccidial effect of PAE on Eimeria parasites. PMID:27051444

  7. Frequent, geographically structured heteroplasmy in the mitochondria of a flowering plant, ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata)

    PubMed Central

    Levsen, N; Bergero, R; Charlesworth, D; Wolff, K

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has convincingly documented cases of mitochondrial heteroplasmy in a small set of wild and cultivated plant species. Heteroplasmy is suspected to be common in flowering plants and investigations of additional taxa may help understand the mechanisms generating heteroplasmy as well as its effects on plant phenotypes. The role of mitochondrial heteroplasmy is of particular interest in plants as cytoplasmic male sterility is controlled by mitochondrial genotypes, sometimes leading to co-occurring female and hermaphroditic individuals (gynodioecy). Paternal leakage may be important in the evolution of mating systems in such populations. We conducted a genetic survey of the gynodioecious plant Plantago lanceolata, in which heteroplasmy has not previously been reported, and estimated the frequencies of mitochondrial genotypes and heteroplasmy. Sanger sequence genotyping of 179 individuals from 15 European populations for two polymorphic mitochondrial loci, atp6 and rps12, identified 15 heteroplasmic individuals. These were distributed among 6 of the 10 populations that had polymorphisms in the target loci and represented 8% of all sampled individuals and 15% of the individuals in those 6 populations. The incidence was highest in Northern England and Scotland. Our results are consistent with geographic differences in the incidence of paternal leakage and/or the rates of nuclear restoration of male fertility. PMID:26956565

  8. Frequent, geographically structured heteroplasmy in the mitochondria of a flowering plant, ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata).

    PubMed

    Levsen, N; Bergero, R; Charlesworth, D; Wolff, K

    2016-07-01

    Recent research has convincingly documented cases of mitochondrial heteroplasmy in a small set of wild and cultivated plant species. Heteroplasmy is suspected to be common in flowering plants and investigations of additional taxa may help understand the mechanisms generating heteroplasmy as well as its effects on plant phenotypes. The role of mitochondrial heteroplasmy is of particular interest in plants as cytoplasmic male sterility is controlled by mitochondrial genotypes, sometimes leading to co-occurring female and hermaphroditic individuals (gynodioecy). Paternal leakage may be important in the evolution of mating systems in such populations. We conducted a genetic survey of the gynodioecious plant Plantago lanceolata, in which heteroplasmy has not previously been reported, and estimated the frequencies of mitochondrial genotypes and heteroplasmy. Sanger sequence genotyping of 179 individuals from 15 European populations for two polymorphic mitochondrial loci, atp6 and rps12, identified 15 heteroplasmic individuals. These were distributed among 6 of the 10 populations that had polymorphisms in the target loci and represented 8% of all sampled individuals and 15% of the individuals in those 6 populations. The incidence was highest in Northern England and Scotland. Our results are consistent with geographic differences in the incidence of paternal leakage and/or the rates of nuclear restoration of male fertility. PMID:26956565

  9. Turbulence-induced resonance vibrations cause pollen release in wind-pollinated Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Timerman, David; Greene, David F.; Urzay, Javier; Ackerman, Josef D.

    2014-01-01

    In wind pollination, the release of pollen from anthers into airflows determines the quantity and timing of pollen available for pollination. Despite the ecological and evolutionary importance of pollen release, wind–stamen interactions are poorly understood, as are the specific forces that deliver pollen grains into airflows. We present empirical evidence that atmospheric turbulence acts directly on stamens in the cosmopolitan, wind-pollinated weed, Plantago lanceolata, causing resonant vibrations that release episodic bursts of pollen grains. In laboratory experiments, we show that stamens have mechanical properties corresponding to theoretically predicted ranges for turbulence-driven resonant vibrations. The mechanical excitation of stamens at their characteristic resonance frequency caused them to resonate, shedding pollen vigorously. The characteristic natural frequency of the stamens increased over time with each shedding episode due to the reduction in anther mass, which increased the mechanical energy required to trigger subsequent episodes. Field observations of a natural population under turbulent wind conditions were consistent with these laboratory results and demonstrated that pollen is released from resonating stamens excited by small eddies whose turnover periods are similar to the characteristic resonance frequency measured in the laboratory. Turbulence-driven vibration of stamens at resonance may be a primary mechanism for pollen shedding in wind-pollinated angiosperms. The capacity to release pollen in wind can be viewed as a primary factor distinguishing animal- from wind-pollinated plants, and selection on traits such as the damping ratio and flexural rigidity may be of consequence in evolutionary transitions between pollination systems. PMID:25297315

  10. Anticoccidial effects of the Plantago asiatica extract on experimental Eimeria tenella infection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sunhwa; Oh, Gi-Wook; Kang, Won-Guk; Kim, Okjin

    2016-03-01

    Anticoccidial effects of the Plantago asiatica extract (PAE) were evaluated in chickens following oral infection with Eimeria (E.) tenella. This study was conducted on the 3-day-old chickens (n=30). Those animals were divided with 3 groups; PAE 0.1% treated/infected (n=10), PAE untreated/infected (n=10) and non-infected control (n=10). Chickens were fed a standard diet supplemented with or without PAE for 1 week prior to infection with E. tenella (10,000 sporulated oocysts per chicken). The effects of PAE on E. tenella infection were assessed by two parameters; fecal oocysts shedding and body weights gain. The PAE-fed chickens produced significantly reduced fecal oocysts (P<0.05) when compared to the E. tenella-infected group fed standard diet. Also, PAE-based diet, improved body weight loss caused by E. tenella infection. Our data demonstrated that PAE had remarkable anticoccidial activities against E. tenella. This finding might have implications for the development of anticoccidial drug. This study is the first to demonstrate anticoccidial effect of PAE on Eimeria parasites. PMID:27051444

  11. Chemical composition of essential oils from plantago lanceolata L. leaves extracted by hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Bajer, Tomáš; Janda, Václav; Bajerová, Petra; Kremr, Daniel; Eisner, Aleš; Ventura, Karel

    2016-03-01

    Extensive traditional use of medical plants leads to research dealing with chemical composition of essential oils. The aim of this work was evaluation of quality of the essential oil and extending of the knowledge about chemical composition of essential oil from ribwort (Plantago lanceolata L.) and proportional representation of compounds. Extractions of essential oils from samples of ribwort were performed by hydrodistillation. GC-MS and GC-FID techniques were used for investigation of the qualitative and semi-quantitative content of aromatic compounds in the essential oils, respectively. Major aroma constituents of ribwort leaves were groups of fatty acids 28.0-52.1 % (the most abundant palmitic acid 15.3-32.0 %), oxidated monoterpenes 4.3-13.2 % (linalool 2.7-3.5 %), aldehydes and ketones 6.9-10.0 % (pentyl vinyl ketone 2.0-3.4 %) and alcohols 3.8-9.2 % (1-octen-3-ol 2.4-8.2 %). In relative high amount were identified apocarotenoids (1.5-2.3 %) which are important constituents because of their intense fragrant. The importance is in potential manufacture control of feedstocks before producing of food supplements. PMID:27570283

  12. Phytoremediation of water and soil contaminated with imidacloprid pesticide by Plantago major, L.

    PubMed

    Romeh, A A

    2010-02-01

    Broadleaf plantain plant (Plantago major L.) was used in phytoremediation of imidacloprid insecticide in water and soils. For the Freundlich model the constant related to the biosorption capacity (Kf) of imidaclaprid were respectively, 7.94, 6.31, and 2.51 ug/g for dry roots, fruits (seeds with shells) and leaves of broadleaf plantain plant. Viable whole broadleaf plantain plant in water solution reduced imidacloprid residues by 55.81-95.17%, during 1-10 days of exposure periods compared with 13.71-61.95% in water solution without the plantain. In water solution, imidacloprid significantly accumulated in plantain roots, leaves and fruits to reach the maximum levels after 6, 1 and 3 days of treatment, respectively. The maximum levels were 15.74, 37.21, and 5.74 ug/gm, respectively. These values were decreased to 6.95, 1.46, and 0.12 ug/ gm after 10 days of treatment. The growing cells of short-rod gram-negative bacteria that isolated from the water solution containing broadleaf plantain plants was able to induce 93.34% loss of imidacloprid as a source of both carbon and nitrogen within a short period (48 hr) compared with 31.90% in un inoculated medium. Half-life (t 1/2) in soil planted with broadleaf plantain plants and in unplanted soil were found to be 4.8 and 8.4 days, respectively. PMID:20734615

  13. Characterization of the complete genome of ribgrass mosaic virus isolated from Plantago major L. from New Zealand and Actinidia spp. from China.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Ramesh R; Cohen, Daniel; Blouin, Arnaud G; Pearson, Michael N

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomes of tobamovirus isolates from Plantago major L. from New Zealand (NZ-439), Plantago sp. from Germany (Kons 1105), Actinidia chinensis (Actinidia-AC) and A. deliciosa (Actinidia-AD) from China were sequenced and compared to previously published tobamovirus genomes. Their genome organization and phylogenetic analysis of the putative replicase component, replicase readthrough component, movement protein, coat protein and complete genome placed all four isolates in subgroup 3 of the tobamoviruses. The complete genomes differed from each other by <8.5% and from published sequences of turnip vein clearing virus and youcai mosaic virus by about 12-13% and 19-20%, respectively. The aa sequences of the individual ORFs of the Plantago and Actinidia isolates differed from each other by <4% and were most similar to published (partial) sequences of ribgrass mosaic virus (RMV). We propose that these sequences constitute the first complete published sequences for RMV. PMID:22456910

  14. Yet another new species from one of the best-studied neotropical areas: Plantago humboldtiana (Plantaginaceae), an extremely narrow endemic new species from a waterfall in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rønsted, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents and describes Plantago humboldtiana, an extremely narrow endemic rheophytic new species from a waterfall in Corupá, Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. The new species is unique in presenting a combination of type-G antrorse trichomes on scapes, pendulous inflorescences and 1-seeded pyxidia. Only one population is known to exist, despite intensive search efforts in nearby, similar environments. Its conservation status is assessed as critically endangered (CR) as the only known population is restricted to a dramatically small area, and is subject to extreme fluctuation due to occasional floods, and also to intense visitation by tourists, which can disturb its fragile habitat. We also present an updated identification key to the species of Plantago that occur in Santa Catarina. The recent description of three narrow endemic, threatened new species of Plantago in Santa Catarina, which is the Brazilian state with its flora best studied, highlights the need for more taxonomic research, especially in the neotropics. PMID:27231665

  15. Yet another new species from one of the best-studied neotropical areas: Plantago humboldtiana (Plantaginaceae), an extremely narrow endemic new species from a waterfall in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Rønsted, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents and describes Plantago humboldtiana, an extremely narrow endemic rheophytic new species from a waterfall in Corupá, Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. The new species is unique in presenting a combination of type-G antrorse trichomes on scapes, pendulous inflorescences and 1-seeded pyxidia. Only one population is known to exist, despite intensive search efforts in nearby, similar environments. Its conservation status is assessed as critically endangered (CR) as the only known population is restricted to a dramatically small area, and is subject to extreme fluctuation due to occasional floods, and also to intense visitation by tourists, which can disturb its fragile habitat. We also present an updated identification key to the species of Plantago that occur in Santa Catarina. The recent description of three narrow endemic, threatened new species of Plantago in Santa Catarina, which is the Brazilian state with its flora best studied, highlights the need for more taxonomic research, especially in the neotropics. PMID:27231665

  16. Promotion of wound healing by Plantago major L. leaf extracts--ex-vivo experiments confirm experiences from traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Muhammad; Nybom, Hilde; Lindholm, Christina; Brandner, Johanna M; Rumpunen, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    The wound-healing properties of Plantago major L. (plantain) were evaluated using an ex-vivo porcine wound-healing model. Ethanol- and water-based extracts were prepared from greenhouse-grown and freeze-dried leaves of P. major. Both types of extracts stimulated wound healing in porcine skin, but the ethanol-based extracts had a somewhat stronger effect. A concentration of 1.0 mg/mL (on dry weight basis) produced the best results for both types of extracts. PMID:25898918

  17. Effects of Plantago ovata husk on levodopa (with Carbidopa) bioavailability in rabbits with autonomic gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    García, Juan J; Fernández, Nélida; Calle, Angela P; Diez, M José; Sahagún, Ana; Sierra, Matilde

    2009-07-01

    Gastrointestinal dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease. Fiber therapy could be used to reduce the symptoms of gastrointestinal motility disorders. In a previous study, we showed that slowed gastrointestinal motility modified levodopa pharmacokinetics: area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) decreased and the elimination was delayed. In this study, we evaluated whether or not the hydrosoluble fiber Plantago ovata husk is useful in improving levodopa pharmacokinetics in rabbits with autonomic gastrointestinal disorders induced by the administration of the anticholinergic biperiden. Levodopa + carbidopa (20:5 mg/kg), biperiden (100 microg/kg), and P. ovata husk (at two different doses: 100 and 400 mg/kg) were administered orally to rabbits for two periods of time (7 or 14 days). In all groups of animals, the AUC values were approximately 50% higher on the final day of treatment than on day 1. C(max) was also higher, with the greater increase at the 400 mg/kg dose of fiber, which resulted in a boost of approximately 35%. On day 1 of treatment and with both doses of fiber, AUC values were very similar to those obtained in previous work in rabbits with normal gastrointestinal motility, but the C(max) was lower. However, after 7 or 14 days, the AUC values were higher, but C(max) remained lower. The greatest differences were observed in plasma concentration before drug administration (C(min)), for which the highest increase was obtained with the dose of 400 mg/kg fiber on day 14 of treatment (349.8%). P. ovata husk could be beneficial in patients with Parkinson's disease because it regulates stool transit in the intestine and because it improves levodopa pharmacokinetics when gastrointestinal peristalsis is slowed. These changes could lead to a possible delay in the onset of dyskinesias and to changes in prognosis. PMID:19389862

  18. Physicochemical characterization and evaluation of suspending properties of arabinoxylan from Ispaghula (Plantago ovata) husk.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Sajid; Erum, Alia; Saghir, Shazia; Tulain, Umme Ruqia; Rashid, Ayesha

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of arabinoxylan as potential suspending agent, an effective alternative to commercially used excipients for the preparation of pharmaceutical suspensions. Alkali extraction was done to separate arabinoxylan from ispaghula (Plantago ovata) seed husk by alkali extraction its physicochemical characterization was done and the suspending properties of arabinoxylan isolated were evaluated comparatively with those of bentonite at different concentration ranges of 0.125,0.25,0.5 and 1% in Zinc oxide suspension. The parameters employed for evaluation were sedimentation volume, degree of flocculation, flow rate, density, pH, redispersibility, microbiological evaluation and particle size analysis. Physicochemical characterization of arabinoxylan indicates its suitability as excipient as it has fair flow properties, low moisture content and almost neutral pH. Arabinoxylan at low conc. 0.125% showed sedimentation volume comparable to commercially used suspending agents such as bentonite 1% while suspensions containing higher concentrations such as 0.25% (sedimentation volume 92%), 0.5% (sedimentation volume 94%) and 1% conc. (sedimentation volume 98%) of arabinoxylan remained almost completely suspended during study period of 7 days. Formulations containing 0.125% and 0.25% arabinoxylan as suspending agents are easily redispersible as compared to bentonite containing formulation while formulation containing 0.5% arabinoxylan are moderately redispersible while formulation containing 1% suspending agent gel upon storage and was not redispersible. Furthermore arabinoxylan produces stable, highly flocculated suspension, which fulfilled microbiological, and particle size specifications, however the formulations containing higher arabinoxylan 1% concentration gel upon storage. So it is concluded that arabinoxylan could be used as effective suspending agent at low concentrations in Zinc oxide suspension. PMID:25362588

  19. Ball milling improves extractability and affects molecular properties of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk) seed husk arabinoxylan.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyveld, Valerie; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2008-12-10

    Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk) seed husk (PSH) is very rich in arabinoxylan (AX). However, its high gelling capacity and the complex nature of the AX make it difficult to process. In this study, ball milling was investigated as a tool for enhancing PSH AX water extractability and molecular mass (MM). A 48 h laboratory-scale ball mill treatment under standardized optimal conditions reduced the PSH average particle size from 161 microm for the untreated sample to 6 microm. Concurrently, it increased the water-extractable AX (WE-AX) level from 13 (untreated PSH) to 90% of the total PSH AX. While the WE-AX of the untreated PSH had a peak MM of 216 kDa and an arabinose to xylose (A/X) ratio of 0.20, WE-AX fragments from ball mill-pretreated PSH had a peak MM of 22 kDa and an A/X ratio of 0.31. Ball milling further drastically reduced the intrinsic viscosity of PSH extracts and their water-holding capacity. Prolonged treatment brought almost all AX (98%) in solution and yielded WE-AX fragments with an even higher A/X ratio (0.42) and a lower peak MM (11 kDa). While impact and jet milling of PSH equally led to significant reductions in particle size, these technologies only marginally affected the water extractability of PSH AX. This implies that ball milling affects PSH particles and their constituent molecules differently than impact and jet milling. PMID:19007123

  20. Chemical defense, mycorrhizal colonization and growth responses in Plantago lanceolata L.

    PubMed

    De Deyn, Gerlinde Barbra; Biere, A; van der Putten, W H; Wagenaar, R; Klironomos, J N

    2009-06-01

    Allelochemicals defend plants against herbivore and pathogen attack aboveground and belowground. Whether such plant defenses incur ecological costs by reducing benefits from plant mutualistic symbionts is largely unknown. We explored a potential trade-off between inherent plant chemical defense and belowground mutualism with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in Plantago lanceolata L., using plant genotypes from lines selected for low and high constitutive levels of the iridoid glycosides (IG) aucubin and catalpol. As selection was based on IG concentrations in leaves, we first examined whether IG concentrations covaried in roots. Root and leaf IG concentrations were strongly positively correlated among genotypes, indicating genetic interdependence of leaf and root defense. We then found that root AMF arbuscule colonization was negatively correlated with root aucubin concentration. This negative correlation was observed both in plants grown with monocultures of Glomus intraradices and in plants colonized from whole-field soil inoculum. Overall, AMF did not affect total biomass of plants; an enhancement of initial shoot biomass was offset by a lower root biomass and reduced regrowth after defoliation. Although the precise effects of AMF on plant biomass varied among genotypes, plants with high IG levels and low AMF arbuscule colonization in roots did not produce less biomass than plants with low IG and high AMF arbuscule colonization. Therefore, although an apparent trade-off was observed between high root chemical defense and AMF arbuscule colonization, this did not negatively affect the growth responses of the plants to AMF. Interestingly, AMF induced an increase in root aucubin concentration in the high root IG genotype of P. lanceolata. We conclude that AMF does not necessarily stimulate plant growth, that direct plant defense by secondary metabolites does not necessarily reduce potential benefits from AMF, and that AMF can enhance concentrations of root

  1. Evaluation of healing wound and genotoxicity potentials from extracts hydroalcoholic of Plantago major and Siparuna guianensis.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Ralph Gruppi; dos Santos, Hélio Batista; dos Santos, Fábio Vieira; da Silva Oliveira, Renato José; de Camargos, Luis Fernando; Pereira, Mariana Nunes; Longatti, Tamara Ribeiro; Souto, Cássio Martins; Franco, Carlaile Soares; de Oliveira Aquino Schüffner, Raissa; Ribeiro, Rosy Iara Maciel Azambuja

    2012-12-01

    Despite the large use of the Plantago major and Siparuna guianensis in traditional medicine, there are no studies demonstrating the effectiveness from extracts of these plants in the healing process by the present methodology. This study reported the effects and toxicity of the P. major and S. guianensis extracts in the wound healing compared with a commercial product used in Brazil by macroscopic and microscopic analysis. Following injury in cervical dorsal area of the mice, the extract from P. major and S. guianensis and ointment was applied after an injury in cervical dorsal area of the mice. Wound healing rates were calculated at 4, 9, 15 and 21 d after the wounding, and tissues were obtained on the ninth day for histological analysis. Moreover, mutagenic assay of extracts was performed. Mutagenicity studies carried out with plant extracts showed not mutagenic with or without metabolic activations. Reduction of the wound area occurred earlier in mice treated with P. major and control treatment. On the 15th day, the complete wound closure occurred in P. major-treated wounds. Throughout ointment and S. guianensis treatment it was not observed the wound closured. Microscopic analyses of the wound, on the ninth day, showed the more efficient formation of the neoepithelium and skin appendages in animals treated with S. guianensis and P. major, while ointment treatment presented no re-epithelialization and absent skin appendages in wound. Thus, P. major extract showed good effects on wound healing processes rendering it a promising candidate for the treatment of wounds what also justified its traditional usage in wound treatment. PMID:23354396

  2. Variations of the composition of the leaf cuticular wax among Chinese populations of Plantago major.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanjun; He, Yuji; Guo, Na; Gao, Jianhua; Ni, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Plantago major L. grows in a very wide range of regions in China and exhibits great variations among populations. The analysis of the cuticular-wax composition provides a potential approach to classify populations of P. major confronting different environmental conditions. Twelve populations of P. major and five populations of P. depressa Willd., distributed over regions with average annual temperatures ranging from -2.0 to 18.4°, were sampled, the variation of the composition of their cuticular waxes was analyzed, and their values of average chain length (ACL) and carbon preference index (CPI) were calculated. Great intra- and interspecies variations were observed for the total wax contents. The average annual temperature of the habitats was significantly correlated with the relative contents of the dominant n-alkanes with an odd number of C-atoms, but not with the wax contents. With an increasing average annual temperature, the relative contents of n-alkanes C29 and C31 decreased, whereas those of C33 and C35 as well as the values of ACLtotal and ACL27-33 increased. Cluster analysis based on the pattern of the n-alkane distribution allowed to clearly separate the populations of P. major according to the average annual temperature of their habitats, but not to separate the populations of the two species. Hence, the pattern of the n-alkane distribution might be a good taxonomic marker for P. major at the intraspecies level, but not at the interspecies level. Nevertheless, a small difference between the populations of the two species was observed concerning the values of ACLtotal and CPItotal , implying the potential use of these indices for the classification of the populations of the two species at the interspecies level. PMID:25879506

  3. Hydrosoluble fiber (Plantago ovata husk) and levodopa I: experimental study of the pharmacokinetic interaction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Juan J; Fernandez, Nelida; Carriedo, Demetrio; Diez, M Jose; Sahagun, Ana; Gonzalez, Aranzazu; Calle, Angela; Sierra, Matilde

    2005-10-01

    Fiber therapy could be used in patients with Parkinson disease to reduce the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders; however, it could interact with levodopa reducing its effectiveness. In this experimental study we have investigated whether the presence of Plantago ovata husk (water-soluble fiber) modifies in rabbits the bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of levodopa (20 mg/kg) when administered by the oral route at the same time. We have also studied whether pharmacokinetic modifications are fiber-dose dependent (100 and 400 mg/kg). The extent of levodopa absorbed when administering 100 mg/kg of fiber (AUC=43.4 mug min ml(-1)) is approximately the same as when levodopa is administered alone (AUC=47.1 microg min ml(-1)); however, Cmax is lower (1.04 versus 1.43 microg ml(-1)). Results obtained indicate that fiber at the higher dose increases the extent of levodopa absorbed (AUC=62.2 microg min ml(-1)), being the value of Cmax similar (1.46 microg ml(-1)). The value of tmax increases from 10 min when levodopa is administered alone to 20 min when the animals receive fiber. On the other hand, since certain time on, levodopa concentrations are always higher in the groups that receive fiber: 60 min with 100 mg/kg fiber and 20 min with 400 mg/kg fiber. Fiber also increases the mean residence time (MRT). P. ovata husk administration with levodopa could be beneficial, not only in patients with constipation, due to: lower adverse reactions (lower values of Cmax) and longer and more stable effects (higher final concentrations and more time in the body). PMID:16139166

  4. Antigenotoxic effect of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert essential oil in mouse spermatogonial cells, and determination of its antioxidant capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ceruelos, Alejandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Morales-González, José Antonio; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Cassani-Galindo, Martha; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert (Asteraceae), popularly known as chamomile, is a plant used in traditional medicine for various therapeutic purposes. Chamomile essential oil (CEO) is particularly known to inhibit the genotoxic damage produced by mutagens in mice somatic cells. The aim of this research was to determine the inhibitory potential of CEO on the genotoxic damage produced by daunorubicin (DAU) in mice germ cells. We evaluated the effect of 5, 50, and 500 mg/kg of essential oil on the rate of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced in spermatogonia by 10 mg/kg of the mutagen. We found no genotoxicity of CEO, but detected an inhibition of SCE after the damage induced by DAU; from the lowest to the highest dose of CEO we found an inhibition of 47.5%, 61.9%, and 93.5%, respectively. As a possible mechanism of action, the antioxidant capacity of CEO was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging method and ferric thiocyanate assays. In the first test we observed a moderate scavenging potential of the oil; nevertheless, the second assay showed an antioxidant capacity similar to that observed with vitamin E. In conclusion, we found that CEO is an efficient chemoprotective agent against the damage induced by DAU in the precursor cells of the germinal line of mice, and that its antioxidant capacity may induce this effect. PMID:21152302

  5. Antigenotoxic Effect of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert Essential Oil in Mouse Spermatogonial Cells, and Determination of Its Antioxidant Capacity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ceruelos, Alejandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Morales-González, José Antonio; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Cassani-Galindo, Martha; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert (Asteraceae), popularly known as chamomile, is a plant used in traditional medicine for various therapeutic purposes. Chamomile essential oil (CEO) is particularly known to inhibit the genotoxic damage produced by mutagens in mice somatic cells. The aim of this research was to determine the inhibitory potential of CEO on the genotoxic damage produced by daunorubicin (DAU) in mice germ cells. We evaluated the effect of 5, 50, and 500 mg/kg of essential oil on the rate of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced in spermatogonia by 10 mg/kg of the mutagen. We found no genotoxicity of CEO, but detected an inhibition of SCE after the damage induced by DAU; from the lowest to the highest dose of CEO we found an inhibition of 47.5%, 61.9%, and 93.5%, respectively. As a possible mechanism of action, the antioxidant capacity of CEO was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging method and ferric thiocyanate assays. In the first test we observed a moderate scavenging potential of the oil; nevertheless, the second assay showed an antioxidant capacity similar to that observed with vitamin E. In conclusion, we found that CEO is an efficient chemoprotective agent against the damage induced by DAU in the precursor cells of the germinal line of mice, and that its antioxidant capacity may induce this effect. PMID:21152302

  6. Phloem-specific expression of Yang cycle genes and identification of novel Yang cycle enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  7. Stool-fermented Plantago ovata husk induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells independently of molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vanessa R; Giros, Anna; Xicola, Rosa M; Fluvià, Lourdes; Grzybowski, Mike; Anguera, Anna; Llor, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have suggested that the partially fermentable fibre Plantago ovata husk (PO) may have a protective effect on colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the potentially pro-apoptotic effect of PO and the implicated mechanisms in CRC cells with different molecular phenotypes (Caco-2, HCT116, LoVo, HT-29, SW480) after PO anaerobic fermentation with colonic bacteria as it occurs in the human colon. The fermentation products of PO induced apoptosis in all primary tumour and metastatic cell lines, independent of p53, adenomatous polyposis coli, β-catenin or cyclo-oxygenase-2 status. Apoptosis was caspase-dependent and both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were implicated. The intrinsic pathway was activated through a shift in the balance towards a pro-apoptotic environment with an up-regulation of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 homologous antagonist killer (BAK) and a down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) seen in HCT116 and LoVo cells. This resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, increased expression of caspase activators second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac)/Diablo, death effector apoptosis-inducing factor, apoptosome member apoptotic protease activating factor 1 and down-regulation of inhibitors of apoptosis Survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in most cells. The extrinsic pathway was activated presumably through the up-regulation of death receptor (DR5). Some important differences were seen between primary tumour and metastatic CRC cells. Thus, metastatic PO-treated LoVo cells had a remarkable up-regulation of TNF-α ligand along with death-inducing signalling complex components receptor interacting protein and TNF-α receptor 1-associated death domain protein. The extrinsic pathway modulator FCICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), an inhibitor of both spontaneous death ligand-independent and death receptor-mediated apoptosis, was significantly down-regulated after PO treatment in all primary tumour cells, but not

  8. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  9. Physiological and morphological variation in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide in two populations of Plantago lanceolata

    SciTech Connect

    Klus, D.J.; Kalisz, S.; Tonsor, S.J. )

    1993-06-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Duke University Phytotron to determine the nature and extent of genetic variation in response to elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide in 44 families from two populations of Plantago lanceolata. 10 seedlings from each maternal family were divided equally between ambient and elevated greenhouses and were grown for 60 days. At the end of that period measurements of assimilation and transpiration were made, the plants were harvested and seven morphological traits were measured. Analysis of the data reveals that genetic variation in response to elevated carbon dioxide exists at the family level for assimilation, and at the population level for three of the morphological traits: number of vegetative shoots per plant, diameter of the vegetative shoots, and number of leaves per shoot. Thus, the potential for elevated carbon dioxide to act as an agent of natural selection exists within this plant species.

  10. Structural Features of Alkaline Extracted Polysaccharide from the Seeds of Plantago asiatica L. and Its Rheological Properties.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun-Yi; Chen, Hai-Hong; Lin, Hui-Xia; Xie, Ming-Yong; Nie, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. has many bioactivities, but few papers report on the structural and rheological characteristics of the alkaline extract. The alkaline extracted polysaccharide was prepared from seeds of P. asiatica L. and named herein as alkaline extracted polysaccharide from seeds of P. asiatica L. (PLAP). Its structural and rheological properties were characterized by monosaccharide composition, methylation, GC-MS and rheometry. PLAP, as an acidic arabinoxylan, was mainly composed of 1,2,4-linked Xylp and 1,3,4-linked Xylp residues. PLAP solution showed pseudoplastic behavior, and weak gelling properties at high concentration. Sodium and especially calcium ions played a significant role in increasing the apparent viscosity and gel strength. PMID:27608001

  11. The complex technology on products of German chamomile.

    PubMed

    Barene, Ilze; Daberte, Irena; Zvirgzdina, Lija; Iriste, Vilhelmine

    2003-01-01

    The German chamomile is an old herbal medicine, which is widely used in medical practice. The water and ethanol extracts of matricaria flowers are mainly used for their anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and spasmolytic properties. It is possible to prepare tea of pulverized matricaria flowers with 0.2 mm sized particles packed in tea bags. The investigation of anatomical diagnostical identification, qualitative and quantitative indices showed that matricaria top got after gathering flowers can be recommend as a herb for medical use. The thin-layer chromatographic research showed that matricaria top contains 9 flavonoids (2 more than flowers) and it's essential oil--10 components (one more than flowers). The technological study of practical use of matricaria top approved the possibility to prepare the fluid extract of matricaria top for external use. The results of investigations showed the possibility of complex use of Matricaria recutita cultivated in Latvia. PMID:14617873

  12. Seasonal dynamic of morpho-physiological properties and the lipid composition of Plantago media (Plantaginaceae) in the Middle Volga region.

    PubMed

    Rozentsvet, Olga; Grebenkina, Tatyana; Nesterov, Viktor; Bogdanova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The changes in morpho-physiological properties and lipid composition have been studied in the leaves of the plant Plantago media collected from two different places in the Middle Volga region during the summer of 2010. The plants gathered from the first plot (P1 plants) grew on plain ground in the midst of typical meadow-steppe perennial plants. The plants of the second group (P2 plants) grew on a flat slope of the South-West exposition, in the grass community. The leaves of the plants Р1 had lower specific area densities but larger areas and masses; they accumulated more levels lipid peroxide products. The changes in lipid compositions depended on the growth phase and habitats. Correlations between morpho-physiological parameters and certain lipids have been established. The amounts of galactolipids (GL) have been shown to correlate with the leaf areas. When the leaf areas were reduced, a ratio between phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) decreased. The result of our study showed that gradual changes of morphometrical parameters were accompanied by the alterations in biomass structure and modifications in lipids and fatty acids (FA). PMID:27017435

  13. A novel method for extraction of a proteinous coagulant from Plantago ovata seeds for water treatment purposes.

    PubMed

    Ramavandi, Bahman; Hashemi, Seyedenayat; Kafaei, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Several chemicals have been applied in the process of coagulant extraction from herbal seeds, and the best extraction has been obtained in the presence of KCl or NaNO3[1-3], and NaCl [4]. However, the main challenge posed to these methods of coagulant extraction is their relatively low efficiency for water treatment purposes and the formation of dissolved organic matter during the treatment process. In these methods the salts, which have a one-valance metal (Na(+) and K(+)), are deposited in the internal structure and the pore of the coagulant, and may be useful for the coagulation/flocculation process. In this research, we found that modified methods produced more dense protein. Therefore, the modified procedure was better than the older one for removal of turbidity and harness from the contaminated water. Here we describe a method where: •According to the Hardy-Schulze rule, we applied the Fe(3+) ions instead of Na(+) and K(+) for the extraction of protein from Plantago ovata seeds.•The method was narrowed to extract protein by ethanol (defatting) and ammonium acetate and CM-Sepharose (protein extraction).•Two consecutive elutriations of crude extract was directly performed using 0.025-M FeCl3 and 0.05-M FeCl3 according to the basis of the ion-exchange processes. PMID:26150999

  14. Effect of Plantago ovata (psyllium) husk and seeds on sterol metabolism: studies in normal and ileostomy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, I C; Brodie, B; Eastwood, M A

    1994-02-01

    The diet of six normal and five ileostomy subjects was supplemented with 10 g/d Plantago ovata psyllium husk for 3 wk while six normal and four ileostomy subjects received 10 g/d psyllium seed. Fecal and ileostomy output, sterol excretion, serum cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured before and after supplementation. The husk had no effect on cholesterol or triglyceride concentrations in either normal or ileostomy subjects. Total and high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were reduced on average by 6.4% and 9.3%, respectively, in the normal group after seed supplementation. No effect on fecal bile acid excretion in the normal subjects was found after both regimes. Ileostomy bile acids were increased (on average 25%) after seed supplementation, whereas no effect on cholesterol concentrations was found. These results suggest that psyllium seed might be more effective than the husk in reducing serum cholesterol, that this cholesterol-lowering effect is not mediated by increased fecal bile acid losses, and increased ileal losses of bile acids might be compensated for by enhanced reabsorption in the colon. PMID:8310991

  15. A novel polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. induces dendritic cells maturation through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danfei; Nie, Shaoping; Jiang, Leming; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a polysaccharide purified from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. (PLP-2) on the phenotypic and functional maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and relevant mechanisms. The results showed that PLP-2 increased the expression of maturation markers major histocompatibility complex II, CD86, CD80, and CD40 on DCs. Consistent with the changes in the phenotypic markers, functional assay for DCs maturation showed that PLP-2 decreased DCs endocytosis and increased intracellular interleukin (IL)-12 levels and allostimulatory activity. Furthermore, using a syngeneic T cell activation model, we found that PLP-2 treated DCs presented ovalbumin antigen to T cells more efficiently as demonstrated by increased T cell proliferation. In addition, the effects of PLP-2 on DCs were significantly impaired by treating the cells with anti-TLR4 antibody prior to PLP-2 treatment, implying direct interaction between PLP-2 and TLR4 on cell surface. These results suggested that PLP-2 may induce DCs maturation through TLR4. Our results may have important implications for our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of immunopotentiating action of the polysaccharides from plants. PMID:24316254

  16. Evaluation of Plantago major L. seed mucilage as a rate controlling matrix for sustained release of propranolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Majid; Morteza-Semnani, Katayoun; Sagheb-Doust, Mehdi

    2013-03-01

    Polysaccharide mucilage derived from the seeds of Plantago major L. (family Plantaginaceae) was investigated for use in matrix formulations containing propranolol hydrochloride. HPMC K4M and tragacanth were used as standards for comparison. The hardness, tensile strength, and friability of tablets increased as the concentration of mucilage increased, indicating good compactibility of mucilage powders. The rate of release of propranolol hydrochloride from P. major mucilage matrices was mainly controlled by the drug/mucilage ratio. Formulations containing P. major mucilage were found to exhibit a release rate comparable to HPMC containing matrices at a lower drug/polymer ratio (drug/HPMC 2:1). These results demonstrated that P. major mucilage is a better release retardant compared to tragacanth at an equivalent content. The results of kinetic analysis showed that in F3 (containing 1:2 drug/mucilage) the highest correlation coefficient was achieved with the zero order model. The swelling and erosion studies revealed that as the proportion of mucilage in tablets was increased, there was a corresponding increase in percent swelling and a decrease in percent erosion of tablets. The DSC and FT-IR studies showed that no formation of complex between the drug and mucilage or changes in crystallinity of the drug had occurred. PMID:23482316

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Property of Plantago major Leaf Extract Reduces the Inflammatory Reaction in Experimental Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hussan, Farida; Mansor, Adila Sofea; Hassan, Siti Nazihahasma; Tengku Nor Effendy Kamaruddin, Tg Nurul Tasnim; Budin, Siti Balkis; Othman, Faizah

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic injury induces inflammatory process and cell necrosis. Plantago major is traditionally used for various diseases. This study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory property of P. major leaf extracts on inflammatory reaction following acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups, namely, normal control (C), APAP, aqueous (APAP + AQ), methanol (APAP + MT), and ethanol (APAP + ET) extract treated groups. All APAP groups received oral APAP (2 g/kg) at day 0. Then, 1000 mg/kg dose of P. major extracts was given for six days. The levels of liver transaminases were measured at day 1 and day 7 after APAP induction. At day 7, the blood and liver tissue were collected to determine plasma cytokines and tissue 11β-HSD type 1 enzyme. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of methanol, ethanol, and aqueous extracts were 26.74 ± 1.6%, 21.69 ± 2.81%, and 12.23 ± 3.15%, respectively. The ALT and AST levels were significantly higher in the APAP groups at day 1 whereas the enzyme levels of all groups showed no significant difference at day 7. The extracts treatment significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokine levels and significantly increased the 11β-HSD type 1 enzyme activity (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the P. major extracts attenuate the inflammatory reaction following APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26300946

  18. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  19. A novel method for extraction of a proteinous coagulant from Plantago ovata seeds for water treatment purposes

    PubMed Central

    Ramavandi, Bahman; Hashemi, Seyedenayat; Kafaei, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Several chemicals have been applied in the process of coagulant extraction from herbal seeds, and the best extraction has been obtained in the presence of KCl or NaNO3[1], [2], [3], and NaCl [4]. However, the main challenge posed to these methods of coagulant extraction is their relatively low efficiency for water treatment purposes and the formation of dissolved organic matter during the treatment process. In these methods the salts, which have a one-valance metal (Na+ and K+), are deposited in the internal structure and the pore of the coagulant, and may be useful for the coagulation/flocculation process. In this research, we found that modified methods produced more dense protein. Therefore, the modified procedure was better than the older one for removal of turbidity and harness from the contaminated water. Here we describe a method where: • According to the Hardy–Schulze rule, we applied the Fe3+ ions instead of Na+ and K+ for the extraction of protein from Plantago ovata seeds. • The method was narrowed to extract protein by ethanol (defatting) and ammonium acetate and CM-Sepharose (protein extraction). • Two consecutive elutriations of crude extract was directly performed using 0.025-M FeCl3 and 0.05-M FeCl3 according to the basis of the ion-exchange processes. PMID:26150999

  20. Polymorphisms in LEP and NPY genes modify the response to soluble fibre Plantago ovata husk intake on cardiovascular risk biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Anna; Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa M; Anguera, Anna; Arola, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    The satiating effect of fibre consumption has been related to gut hormones, such as peptide YY and leptin. These peptides may also influence cardiovascular (CVD) risk biomarkers. Nevertheless, there is wide interindividual variation in metabolic responses to fibre consumption. The objective was to investigate differences in the effects of soluble fibre, in the form of Plantago ovata husk (Po-husk) treatment, on CVD risk biomarkers according to selected polymorphisms in genes related to satiety. The study was a multi-centred, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel and randomised trial in mild-moderate hypercholesterolaemic patients (age range: 43-67 years). Eight polymorphisms in three genes related to satiety (LEP, NPY and PYY) were identified in 178 participants; 88 patients in the placebo (microcrystalline cellulose 14 g/day) group and 90 in the Po-husk (14 g/day) group, which had added to a low-saturated-fat diet for 8 weeks. The CVD biomarkers measured included the following: lipid profile, blood pressure (BP), glucose, insulin, hs-CRP, oxidised LDL and IL-6. Relative to the placebo, Po-husk consumption lowered the plasma total cholesterol concentration by 3.3 % according to rs7799039 polymorphism in the LEP gene (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the Po-husk reduced systolic BP (mean [95 % CI]) by -8 mmHg (-14.16; -1.90) and hs-CRP by 24.9 % in subjects with the AA genotype of the rs16147 polymorphism in the NPY gene (32 % of our total population; p < 0.05), which remained significant after Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, polymorphisms in the LEP and NPY genes potentiate the response to Po-husk, particularly the effects on systolic BP and the hs-CRP plasma concentration. PMID:22669627

  1. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk).

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish K; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid CPS (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid CPS (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  2. Water availability and population origin affect the expression of the tradeoff between reproduction and growth in Plantago coronopus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C F; García, M B; Ehlers, B K

    2013-05-01

    Investment in reproduction and growth represent a classic tradeoff with implication for life history evolution. The local environment can play a major role in the magnitude and evolutionary consequences of such a tradeoff. Here, we examined the investment in reproductive and vegetative tissue in 40 maternal half-sib families from four different populations of the herb Plantago coronopus growing in either a dry or wet greenhouse environment. Plants originated from populations with an annual or a perennial life form, with annuals prevailing in drier habitats with greater seasonal variation in both temperature and precipitation. We found that water availability affected the expression of the tradeoff (both phenotypic and genetic) between reproduction and growth, being most accentuated under dry condition. However, populations responded very differently to water treatments. Plants from annual populations showed a similar response to drought condition with little variation among maternal families, suggesting a history of selection favouring genotypes with high allocation to reproduction when water availability is low. Plants from annual populations also expressed the highest level of plasticity. For the perennial populations, one showed a large variation among maternal families in resource allocation and expressed significant negative genetic correlations between reproductive and vegetative biomass under drought. The other perennial population showed less variation in response to treatment and had trait values similar to those of the annuals, although it was significantly less plastic. We stress the importance of considering intraspecific variation in response to environmental change such as drought, as conspecific plants exhibited very different abilities and strategies to respond to high versus low water availability even among geographically close populations. PMID:23621367

  3. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manish K.; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food. PMID:27092153

  4. The seeds from Plantago ovata lower plasma lipids by altering hepatic and bile acid metabolism in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ana Lourdes; West, Kristy L; Zern, Tosca; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2002-06-01

    Psyllium, the husks from Plantago ovata (PO), is recognized as a potent agent in lowering plasma cholesterol. In this study, we tested the potential hypolipidemic effects of the seeds from PO and the mechanisms associated with the lowering of plasma lipids. Male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 30; 10 per group) were fed either a control diet or diets containing 7.5 or 10 g/100 g PO for 4 wk. Diets were identical in composition except for the fiber source. The control diet contained 10 g/100 g cellulose and 2.5 g/100 g guar gum, whereas the PO diets were adjusted to a total of 12.5 g/100 g fiber with cellulose. Although a dose response was not observed, plasma triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were 34 and 23% lower in the PO groups compared with the control (P < 0.01). Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activities were significantly affected by the PO diets. The control group had 100 and 36% higher LCAT and CETP (P < 0.01) activities, respectively, compared with the PO groups. Hepatic total and free cholesterol concentrations were not affected by PO, but cholesteryl ester concentrations were 50% (P < 0.01) lower in the PO groups compared with the control. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis was up-regulated in the PO groups by 37%. Similarly, the activity of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, the regulatory enzyme of cholesterol catabolism to bile acids was 33% higher in the PO groups (P < 0.02). Fecal bile acids were 3 times higher in the PO groups than in the control group. These results suggest that PO exerts its hypolipidemic effect by affecting bile acid absorption and altering hepatic cholesterol metabolism. PMID:12042433

  5. Effects of extreme weather events and legume presence on mycorrhization of Plantago lanceolata and Holcus lanatus in the field.

    PubMed

    Walter, J; Kreyling, J; Singh, B K; Jentsch, A

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about direct and indirect effects of extreme weather events on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) under field conditions. In a field experiment, we investigated the response of mycorrhization to drought and heavy rain in grassland communities. We quantified AMF biomass in soil, mycorrhization of roots of the grass Holcus lanatus and the forb Plantago lanceolata, as well as plant performance. Plants were grown in four-species communities with or without a legume. We hypothesised that drought increases and heavy rain decreases mycorrhization, and that higher mycorrhization will be linked to improved stress resistance and higher biomass production. Soil AMF biomass increased under both weather extremes. Heavy rain generally benefitted plants and increased arbuscules in P. lanceolata. Drought neither reduced plant performance nor root mycorrhization. Arbuscules increased in H. lanatus several weeks after drought, and in P. lanceolata several weeks after heavy rain spells. These long-lasting effects of weather events on mycorrhization highlight the indirect influence of climate on AMF via their host plant. Legume presence increased plant community biomass, but had only minor effects on mycorrhization. Arbuscule colonisation was negatively correlated with senescence during the dry summer. Mycorrhization and biomass production in P. lanceolata were positively related. However, increased mycorrhization was related to less biomass in the grass. AMF mycelium in soil might generally increase under extreme events, root colonisation, however, is host species specific. This might amplify community shifts in grassland under climate change by further increasing stress resistance of species that already benefit from changed precipitation. PMID:26284575

  6. Hydrosoluble fiber (Plantago ovata husk) and levodopa II: experimental study of the pharmacokinetic interaction in the presence of carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Nelida; Carriedo, Demetrio; Sierra, Matilde; Diez, M Jose; Sahagun, Ana; Calle, Angela; Gonzalez, Aranzazu; Garcia, Juan J

    2005-10-01

    Levodopa combined with carbidopa constitutes one of the most frequent medication in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Plantago ovata husk (water-soluble fiber) improves levodopa absorption conditions, but when this drug is administered with carbidopa, fiber could reduce its effectiveness. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the presence of P. ovata husk modifies in rabbits the bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of levodopa (20 mg/kg) when administered by the oral route with carbidopa (5 mg/kg). We have also studied whether pharmacokinetic modifications are fiber-dose dependent (100 and 400 mg/kg). When levodopa and carbidopa were administered with 100 mg/kg P. ovata husk, the value of AUC for levodopa diminishes 29.7% (sign, n=6, P<0.05) and Cmax 28.1% (sign, n=6, P<0.05) in relation to the values obtained when these drugs were administered without fiber. If the dose of fiber was 400 mg/kg, the decrease was smaller: 20.4% for AUC (no significant difference) and 24.6% for Cmax (sign, n=6, P<0.05), that may indicate an inhibitory action of AADC by the fiber or any of its partial hydrolysis products. On the other hand, since certain time on, levodopa concentrations are always higher in the groups that receive fiber: 210 min with 100 mg/kg and 150 min with 400 mg/kg. The administration of P. ovata husk with levodopa/carbidopa to patients with Parkinson disease could be beneficial and in particular in those patients who also suffer constipation due to an improvement of levodopa kinetic profile with higher final concentrations, a longer plasma half-life and lower Cmax. PMID:16139167

  7. Light and Nutrient Dependent Responses in Secondary Metabolites of Plantago lanceolata Offspring Are Due to Phenotypic Plasticity in Experimental Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Miehe-Steier, Annegret; Roscher, Christiane; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B.

    2015-01-01

    A few studies in the past have shown that plant diversity in terms of species richness and functional composition can modify plant defense chemistry. However, it is not yet clear to what extent genetic differentiation of plant chemotypes or phenotypic plasticity in response to diversity-induced variation in growth conditions or a combination of both is responsible for this pattern. We collected seed families of ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) from six-year old experimental grasslands of varying plant diversity (Jena Experiment). The offspring of these seed families was grown under standardized conditions with two levels of light and nutrients. The iridoid glycosides, catalpol and aucubin, and verbascoside, a caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycoside, were measured in roots and shoots. Although offspring of different seed families differed in the tissue concentrations of defensive metabolites, plant diversity in the mothers' environment did not explain the variation in the measured defensive metabolites of P. lanceolata offspring. However secondary metabolite levels in roots and shoots were strongly affected by light and nutrient availability. Highest concentrations of iridoid glycosides and verbascoside were found under high light conditions, and nutrient availability had positive effects on iridoid glycoside concentrations in plants grown under high light conditions. However, verbascoside concentrations decreased under high levels of nutrients irrespective of light. The data from our greenhouse study show that phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental variation rather than genetic differentiation in response to plant community diversity is responsible for variation in secondary metabolite concentrations of P. lanceolata in the six-year old communities of the grassland biodiversity experiment. Due to its large phenotypic plasticity P. lanceolata has the potential for a fast and efficient adjustment to varying environmental conditions in plant communities of

  8. In Vivo Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells on Electrospun Poly-L-Lactide Acid Scaffolds Coated with Matricaria chamomilla L. Oil

    PubMed Central

    Fazili, Afsaneh; Gholami, Soghra; Minaie Zangi, Bagher; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Gholami, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the in vivo differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into insulin producing cells (IPCs) on electrospun poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) scaffolds coated with Matricaria chammomila L. (chamomile) oil. Materials and Methods In this interventional, experimental study adipose MSCs (AMSCs) were isolated from 12 adult male New Zealand white rabbits and characterized by flow cytometry. AMSCs were subsequently differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic lines. Cells were seeded onto either a PLLA scaffold (control) or PLLA scaffold coated with chamomile oil (experimental). A total of 24 scaffolds were inserted into the pancreatic area of each rabbit and placement was confirmed by ultrasound. After 21 days, immunohistochemistry analysis of insulin-producing like cells on protein levels confirmed insulin expression of insulin producing cells (IPSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) determined the expressions of genes related to pancreatic endocrine development and function. Results Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results confirmed the existence of oil on the surface of the PLLA scaffold. The results showed a new peak at 2854 cm-1 for the aliphatic CH2 bond. Pdx1 expression was 0.051 ± 0.007 in the experimental group and 0.009 ± 0.002 in the control group. There was significantly increased insulin expression in the scaffold coated with chamomile oil (0.09 ± 0.001) compared to control group (0.063 ± 0.009, P≤0.05). Both groups expressed Ngn3 and Pdx1 specific markers and pancreatic tissue was observed at 21 days post transplantation. Conclusion The pancreatic region is an optimal site for differentiation of AMSCs to IPCs. Chamomile oil (as an antioxidant agent) can affect cell adhesion to the scaffold and increase cell differentiation. In addition, the oil may lead to increased blood glucose uptake in pathways in the muscles, liver and fatty tissue of a diabetic animal model by some probable molecular mechanisms

  9. Impact of bio-fertilizers and different levels of cadmium on the growth, biochemical contents and lipid peroxidation of Plantago ovata Forsk.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Irfana; Faizan, Shahla; Perveen, Rubina; Kausar, Saima

    2014-09-01

    Plantago ovata Forsk. (isabgol) is a valuable medicinal plant; its seeds and shell have a significant role in pharmacy as a laxative compound. Increasing soil contamination with cadmium (Cd) is one of the major concerns and is responsible for toxic effects in plants. This investigation was aimed to analyze the role of biofertilizers in alleviation of cadmium stress, given at the rate of 0, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1) of soil. The plants of isabgol, were grown in pots with and without application of AM fungi and Azotobacter (alone and combination). Cadmium showed negative effect on growth and biochemical component whereas proline and MDA content increase with increasing cadmium concentration. Addition of bio-fertilizer showed better growth and higher pigment concentration under cadmium stress as compared to the control. The dual inoculation of AM fungi and Azotobacter was found to be the best in reduction of cadmium stress and promotion of growth parameters. PMID:25183940

  10. Impact of bio-fertilizers and different levels of cadmium on the growth, biochemical contents and lipid peroxidation of Plantago ovata Forsk

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Irfana; Faizan, Shahla; Perveen, Rubina; Kausar, Saima

    2014-01-01

    Plantago ovata Forsk. (isabgol) is a valuable medicinal plant; its seeds and shell have a significant role in pharmacy as a laxative compound. Increasing soil contamination with cadmium (Cd) is one of the major concerns and is responsible for toxic effects in plants. This investigation was aimed to analyze the role of biofertilizers in alleviation of cadmium stress, given at the rate of 0, 50, and 100 mg kg−1 of soil. The plants of isabgol, were grown in pots with and without application of AM fungi and Azotobacter (alone and combination). Cadmium showed negative effect on growth and biochemical component whereas proline and MDA content increase with increasing cadmium concentration. Addition of bio-fertilizer showed better growth and higher pigment concentration under cadmium stress as compared to the control. The dual inoculation of AM fungi and Azotobacter was found to be the best in reduction of cadmium stress and promotion of growth parameters. PMID:25183940

  11. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-04-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis.

  12. Plasiatine, an Unprecedented Indole–Phenylpropanoid Hybrid from Plantago asiatica as a Potent Activator of the Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Shp2

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Hua; Shi, Yi-Ming; Qiang, Zhe; Wang, Xia; Shang, Shan-Zhai; Yang, Yan; Du, Bao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Pan; Ji, Xu; Li, Honglin; Wang, Fei; Xiao, Wei-Lie

    2016-01-01

    Plasiatine (1), isolated from the seeds of Plantago asiatica, is an unprecedented indole analogue linked to a phenylpropanoid moiety via a carbon bond that builds up a novel heteromeric construction with a C19N2 scaffold. Its structure was determined by spectroscopic data and computational evidence. Notably, experimental assay demonstrated that 1 significantly enhanced the activity of the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 0.97 μM, and activated phosphorylation of ERK, a known target of Shp2. Moreover, plasiatine (1) promoted hepatocellular HepG2 cells migration. Molecular docking suggested that plasiatine (1) binds to the catalytic cleft of Shp2. These results identified plasiatine (1) as the first small molecule Shp2 activator, and it warrants further investigation as a novel pharmaceutical tool to study the function of Shp2 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27101899

  13. Effects of the Timing of Herbivory on Plant Defense Induction and Insect Performance in Ribwort Plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) Depend on Plant Mycorrhizal Status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minggang; Bezemer, T Martijn; van der Putten, Wim H; Biere, Arjen

    2015-11-01

    Plants often are exposed to antagonistic and symbiotic organisms both aboveground and belowground. Interactions between above- and belowground organisms may occur either simultaneously or sequentially, and jointly can determine plant responses to future enemies. However, little is known about time-dependency of such aboveground-belowground interactions. We examined how the timing of a 24 h period of aboveground herbivory by Spodoptera exigua (1-8 d prior to later arriving conspecifics) influenced the response of Plantago lanceolata and the performance of later arriving conspecifics. We also examined whether these induced responses were modulated by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae. The amount of leaf area consumed by later arriving herbivores decreased with time after induction by early herbivores. Mycorrhizal infection reduced the relative growth rate (RGR) of later arriving herbivores, associated with a reduction in efficiency of conversion of ingested food rather than a reduction in relative consumption rates. In non-mycorrhizal plants, leaf concentrations of the defense compound catalpol showed a linear two-fold increase during the eight days following early herbivory. By contrast, mycorrhizal plants already had elevated levels of leaf catalpol prior to their exposure to early herbivory and did not show any further increase following herbivory. These results indicate that AMF resulted in a systemic induction, rather than priming of these defenses. AMF infection significantly reduced shoot biomass of Plantago lanceolata. We conclude that plant responses to future herbivores are not only influenced by exposure to prior aboveground and belowground organisms, but also by when these prior organisms arrive and interact. PMID:26552915

  14. Isolation, identification and molecular docking as cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors of the main constituents of Matricaria chamomilla L. extract and its synergistic interaction with diclofenac on nociception and gastric damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Fernández-Martínez, Eduardo; Soria-Jasso, Luis Enrique; Lucas-Gómez, Isaac; Villagómez-Ibarra, Roberto; González-García, Martha P; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Salinas-Caballero, Mireya

    2016-03-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L., Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant widely used as remedy for pain and gastric disorders. The association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with medicinal plant extracts may increase its antinociceptive activity, permit the use of lower doses and limit side effects. The aim was to isolate and identify the main chemical constituents of Matricaria chamomilla ethanolic extract (MCE) as well as to explore their activity as cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors in silico; besides, to examine the interaction between MCE and diclofenac on nociception in the formalin test by isobolographic analysis, and to determine the level of gastric injury in rats. Three terpenoids, α-bisabolol, bisabolol oxide A, and guaiazulene, were isolated and identified by (1)H NMR. Docking simulation predicted COX inhibitory activity for those terpenoids. Diclofenac, MCE, or their combinations produced an antinociceptive effect. The sole administration of diclofenac and the highest combined dose diclofenac-MCE produced significant a gastric damage, but that effect was not seen with MCE alone. An isobologram was constructed and the derived theoretical ED35 for the antinociceptive effect was significantly different from the experimental ED35; hence, the interaction between diclofenac and MCE that mediates the antinociceptive effect is synergist. The MCE contains three major terpenoids with plausible COX inhibitory activity in silico, but α-bisabolol showed the highest affinity. Data suggest that the diclofenac-MCE combination can interact at the systemic level in a synergic manner and may have therapeutic advantages for the clinical treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:26898449

  15. Quantitative Gene Expression of ERG9 in Model Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Chamomile Extract For Human Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Maryam; Mobini-Dehkordi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over expression of squalene synthase gene causes induction of growth tumour and reduction of apoptosis. This gene which is conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and humans, is named (ERG9). Aim In this work, we studied the effect of Matricaria recutita extract on ERG9 gene (squalene synthase) expression in S.cerevisiae which was used as organism model in cancer therapy. Materials and Methods S. cerevisiae was cultured in YPD medium plus 0,250, 1000 and 3000 μg/ml of Matricaria recutita extract and we evaluated the (ERG9) gene expression by Real-time RT-PCR method after 24 hours. Statistical analysis used At least 3 independent experiments were done. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s test. A p-value of less than 0.01 was considered as significant. Results We found that 250, 1000 and 3000 μg/ml of Matricaria recutita extract could reduce expression of ERG9 gene significantly (p<0.01). Interestingly, the expression of this gene was completely inhibited in 1000 and 3000 μg/ml concentrations. Conclusion This study predicted that Matricaria recutita extract produced anti-cancer effects in humans, because it could inhibit the expression of an analogue key gene in this malignant disease. Further investigations should be made, to study its molecular mechanism of action at the mammal cell level.

  16. Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 can colonize and improve P uptake of Plantago lanceolata after exposure to ionizing gamma radiation in root organ culture.

    PubMed

    Kothamasi, David; Wannijn, Jean; van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; van Gompel, Axel; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie; Declerck, Stéphane; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2016-04-01

    Long-lived radionuclides such as (90)Sr and (137)Cs can be naturally or accidentally deposited in the upper soil layers where they emit β/γ radiation. Previous studies have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can accumulate and transfer radionuclides from soil to plant, but there have been no studies on the direct impact of ionizing radiation on AMF. In this study, root organ cultures of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 were exposed to 15.37, 30.35, and 113.03 Gy gamma radiation from a (137)Cs source. Exposed spores were subsequently inoculated to Plantago lanceolata seedlings in pots, and root colonization and P uptake evaluated. P. lanceolata seedlings inoculated with non-irradiated AMF spores or with spores irradiated with up to 30.35 Gy gamma radiation had similar levels of root colonization. Spores irradiated with 113.03 Gy gamma radiation failed to colonize P. lanceolata roots. P content of plants inoculated with non-irradiated spores or of plants inoculated with spores irradiated with up to 30.35 Gy gamma radiation was higher than in non-mycorrhizal plants or plants inoculated with spores irradiated with 113.03 Gy gamma radiation. These results demonstrate that spores of R. irregularis MUCL 41833 are tolerant to chronic ionizing radiation at high doses. PMID:26467250

  17. Determination of the In Vitro and In Vivo Antimicrobial Activity on Salivary Streptococci and Lactobacilli and Chemical Characterisation of the Phenolic Content of a Plantago lanceolata Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Lia; Ingenito, Aniello; Roscetto, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Plant extracts may be suitable alternative treatments for caries. Aims. To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial effects of Plantago lanceolata herbal tea (from flowers and leaves) on cariogenic bacteria and to identify the major constituents of P. lanceolata plant. Materials and Methods. The MIC and MBC against cariogenic bacteria were determined for P. lanceolata tea. Subsequently, a controlled random clinical study was conducted. Group A was instructed to rinse with a P. lanceolata mouth rinse, and Group B received a placebo mouth rinse for seven days. The salivary colonisation by streptococci and lactobacilli was investigated prior to treatment and on the fourth and seventh days. Finally, the P. lanceolata tea was analysed for its polyphenolic content, and major phenolics were identified. Results and Discussion. P. lanceolata teas demonstrate good in vitro antimicrobial activity. The in vivo test showed that Group A subjects presented a significant decrease in streptococci compared to Group B. The phytochemical analysis revealed that flavonoids, coumarins, lipids, cinnamic acids, lignans, and phenolic compounds are present in P. lanceolata infusions. Conclusions. P. lanceolata extract could represent a natural anticariogenic agent via an antimicrobial effect and might be useful as an ancillary measure to control the proliferation of cariogenic flora. PMID:25767805

  18. Plantago ovata F. Mucilage-Alginate Mucoadhesive Beads for Controlled Release of Glibenclamide: Development, Optimization, and In Vitro-In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2013-01-01

    The current study deals with the development and optimization of ispaghula (Plantago ovata F.) husk mucilage- (IHM-) alginate mucoadhesive beads containing glibenclamide by ionotropic gelation technique. The effects of sodium alginate (SA) to IHM and cross-linker (CaCl2) concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %), as well as cumulative drug release after 10 hours (R10 h, %), were optimized using 3(2) factorial design based on response surface methodology. The observed responses were coincided well with the predicted values by the experimental design. The optimized mucoadhesive beads exhibited 94.43 ± 4.80% w/w of DEE and good mucoadhesivity with the biological membrane in wash-off test and sustained drug release profile over 10 hours. The beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR analyses. The in vitro drug release from these beads was followed by controlled release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The optimized glibenclamide-loaded IHM-alginate mucoadhesive beads showed significant antidiabetic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration. PMID:26555967

  19. Ispaghula (Plantago ovata) seed husk polysaccharides promote proliferation of human epithelial cells (skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts) via enhanced growth factor receptors and energy production.

    PubMed

    Deters, A M; Schröder, K R; Smiatek, T; Hensel, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous carbohydrates, especially oligo- and polysaccharides, participate in the regulation of a broad range of biological activities, e. g., signal transduction, inflammation, fertilisation, cell-cell-adhesion and act as in vivo markers for the determination of cell types. In the present study, water-soluble (WS) and gel-forming polysaccharides (GF) of ispaghula seed husk (Plantago ovata Forsskal, Plantaginaceae) were characterised as neutral and acidic arabinoxylans and tested under in vitro conditions for regulating activities on cell physiology of human keratinocytes and human primary fibroblasts. Only water-soluble polysaccharides exhibited strong and significant effects on cell physiology of keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Proliferation of cells of the spontaneously immortalised keratinocyte cell line HaCaT was significantly up-regulated in a dose-independent manner. Analysis of activated signal pathways by RNA analysis proved an effect of the acidic arabinoxylan on the expression of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in HaCaT cells. Differentiation behaviour of normal human keratinocytes (NHK) determined by involucrin was slightly influenced, due to the enhanced cell proliferation, leading to a cell-cell-mediated indirect induction of early differentiation. WS did not influence late differentiation, as determined by keratin K1 and K10 titres. PMID:15678371

  20. Aqueous extracts of husks of Plantago ovata reduce hyperglycaemia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes by inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption.

    PubMed

    Hannan, J M A; Ali, L; Khaleque, J; Akhter, M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2006-07-01

    Plantago ovata has been reported to reduce postprandial glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the present study, the efficacy and possible modes of action of hot-water extracts of husk of P. ovata were evaluated. The administration of P. ovata (0.5 g/kg body weight) significantly improved glucose tolerance in normal, type 1 and type 2 diabetic rat models. When the extract was administered orally with sucrose solution, it suppressed postprandial blood glucose and retarded small intestinal absorption without inducing the influx of sucrose into the large intestine. The extract significantly reduced glucose absorption in the gut during in situ perfusion of small intestine in non-diabetic rats. In 28 d chronic feeding studies in type 2 diabetic rat models, the extract reduced serum atherogenic lipids and NEFA but had no effect on plasma insulin and total antioxidant status. No effect of the extract was evident on intestinal disaccharidase activity. Furthermore, the extract did not stimulate insulin secretion in perfused rat pancreas, isolated rat islets or clonal beta cells. Neither did the extract affect glucose transport in 3T3 adipocytes. In conclusion, aqueous extracts of P. ovata reduce hyperglycaemia in diabetes via inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption and enhancement of motility. These attributes indicate that P. ovata may be a useful source of active components to provide new opportunities for diabetes therapy. PMID:16870001

  1. Analysis of trace elements during different developmental stages of somatic embryogenesis in Plantago ovata Forssk using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Chakraborty, Anindita

    2010-06-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique has been used for the determination of trace element profile during different developmental stages of somatic embryogenic callus of an economically important medicinal plant, Plantago ovata Forssk. Somatic embryogenesis is a plant tissue culture-based technique, which is used for plant regeneration and crop improvement. In the present investigation, elemental content was analysed using ED-XRF technique during different developmental stages and also determine the effect of additives--casein hydrolysate and coconut water on the trace elemental profile of embryogenic callus tissue of P. ovata. Subsequent experiments showed significant alteration in the concentration of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Br, and Sr in both the embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus. Higher K, Ca, Fe, Cu, and Zn accumulation was in embryogenic tissue stage compared to other stages, suggesting these elements are crucial for successful embryogenesis. The results suggest that this information could be useful for formulating a media for in vitro embryo induction of P. ovata. PMID:19696971

  2. Assessment of hormone-like activities in Ginkgo biloba, Elettaria cardamomum and Plantago ovata extracts using in vitro receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jimenez, Jesús; Diéguez, Horacio R; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely used for the treatment of diseases and for the development of new drugs. This study was designed to determine the presence of hormone-like activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in methanol extracts prepared from three medicinal plants historically and currently used for therapeutic purposes: Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBL), Elettaria cardamomum seeds (ECS) and Plantago ovata seeds (POS). After a solid-liquid extraction (SLE) step, their effects on hERa function were assessed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells using the E-Screen bioassay, and their ability to induce hAR-mediated reporter gene expression was evaluated using the androgen-sensitive stable prostatic PALM cell line. Unlike POS extracts, GBL and ECS extracts showed estrogenic (0.07 and 0.20 nM E2Eq mg(-1), respectively) and anti-estrogenic (0.01 and 0.02 μM ICI182780Eq mg(-1), respectively) activities. ECS extracts evidenced androgenic activity (0.30 nM R1881Eq mg(-1)) and POS extracts anti-androgenic activity (22.30 μM ProcEq mg(-1)). According to these findings, these plant extracts may interfere with the endocrine system via one or more hormonal receptors, and further investigation is warranted into their role as endocrine disrupters in humans. PMID:26161806

  3. Investigating genetic diversity and habitat dynamics in Plantago brutia (Plantaginaceae), implications for the management of narrow endemics in Mediterranean mountain pastures.

    PubMed

    De Vita, A; Bernardo, L; Gargano, D; Palermo, A M; Peruzzi, L; Musacchio, A

    2009-11-01

    Many factors have contributed to the richness of narrow endemics in the Mediterranean, including long-lasting human impact on pristine landscapes. The abandonment of traditional land-use practices is causing forest recovery throughout the Mediterranean mountains, by increasing reduction and fragmentation of open habitats. We investigated the population genetic structure and habitat dynamics of Plantago brutia Ten., a narrow endemic in mountain pastures of S Italy. Some plants were cultivated in the botanical garden to explore the species' breeding system. Genetic diversity was evaluated based on inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) polymorphisms in 150 individuals from most of known stands. Recent dynamics in the species habitat were checked over a 14-year period. Flower phenology, stigma receptivity and experimental pollinations revealed protogyny and self-incompatibility. With the exception of very small and isolated populations, high genetic diversity was found at the species and population level. amova revealed weak differentiation among populations, and the Mantel test suggested absence of isolation-by-distance. Multivariate analysis of population and genetic data distinguished the populations based on genetic richness, size and isolation. Landscape analyses confirmed recent reduction and isolation of potentially suitable habitats. Low selfing, recent isolation and probable seed exchange may have preserved P. brutia populations from higher loss of genetic diversity. Nonetheless, data related to very small populations suggest that this species may suffer further fragmentation and isolation. To preserve most of the species' genetic richness, future management efforts should consider the large and isolated populations recognised in our analyses. PMID:19796359

  4. Plantago ovata F. Mucilage-Alginate Mucoadhesive Beads for Controlled Release of Glibenclamide: Development, Optimization, and In Vitro-In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2013-01-01

    The current study deals with the development and optimization of ispaghula (Plantago ovata F.) husk mucilage- (IHM-) alginate mucoadhesive beads containing glibenclamide by ionotropic gelation technique. The effects of sodium alginate (SA) to IHM and cross-linker (CaCl2) concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %), as well as cumulative drug release after 10 hours (R10 h, %), were optimized using 32 factorial design based on response surface methodology. The observed responses were coincided well with the predicted values by the experimental design. The optimized mucoadhesive beads exhibited 94.43 ± 4.80% w/w of DEE and good mucoadhesivity with the biological membrane in wash-off test and sustained drug release profile over 10 hours. The beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR analyses. The in vitro drug release from these beads was followed by controlled release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The optimized glibenclamide-loaded IHM-alginate mucoadhesive beads showed significant antidiabetic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration. PMID:26555967

  5. Beta-sitosterol from psyllium seed husk (Plantago ovata Forsk) restores gap junctional intercellular communication in Ha-ras transfected rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Hiroki, Ikumi; Sato, Kenji; Ohtsuki, Kozo; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Upham, Brad L; Trosko, James E

    2005-01-01

    We purified compounds from the husks of psyllium seeds (Plantago ovata Forsk; desert Indian wheat), beginning with an ethanol extraction then followed by HP-20 and silica gel chromatography, which restored gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in v-Ha-ras transfected rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cell line (WB-Ha-ras). GJIC was assessed by a scrape loading dye transfer assay. The active compound was identified as beta-sitosterol based on gas chromatography retention times and electron ionization mass spectroscopy (EI-MS) spectrum of authentic beta-sitosterol. Authentic beta-sitosterol restored GJIC in the tumorigenic WB-Ha-ras GJIC-deficient cells at a dose of 2.4 microM. In addition, a similar phytosterol, stigmasterol, also restored GJIC, albeit at a lower activity. beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol increased the level of connexin43 protein (Cx43) and restored phosphorylation of Cx43 to levels similar to the parental nontransfected cell line. We concluded that the restoration of intercellular communication in the GJIC-deficient, tumorigenic WB-Ha-ras cell line by the ethanol soluble fraction of psyllium seed husks is largely due to the presence of the phytosterol, beta-sitosterol. We discuss implications for dietary modulation of cancer by beta-sitosterol. PMID:15860444

  6. Determination of the in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity on salivary Streptococci and Lactobacilli and chemical characterisation of the phenolic content of a Plantago lanceolata infusion.

    PubMed

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio; Cantile, Tiziana; Roberto, Lia; Ingenito, Aniello; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Roscetto, Emanuela; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Zarrelli, Armando; Pollio, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Plant extracts may be suitable alternative treatments for caries. Aims. To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial effects of Plantago lanceolata herbal tea (from flowers and leaves) on cariogenic bacteria and to identify the major constituents of P. lanceolata plant. Materials and Methods. The MIC and MBC against cariogenic bacteria were determined for P. lanceolata tea. Subsequently, a controlled random clinical study was conducted. Group A was instructed to rinse with a P. lanceolata mouth rinse, and Group B received a placebo mouth rinse for seven days. The salivary colonisation by streptococci and lactobacilli was investigated prior to treatment and on the fourth and seventh days. Finally, the P. lanceolata tea was analysed for its polyphenolic content, and major phenolics were identified. Results and Discussion. P. lanceolata teas demonstrate good in vitro antimicrobial activity. The in vivo test showed that Group A subjects presented a significant decrease in streptococci compared to Group B. The phytochemical analysis revealed that flavonoids, coumarins, lipids, cinnamic acids, lignans, and phenolic compounds are present in P. lanceolata infusions. Conclusions. P. lanceolata extract could represent a natural anticariogenic agent via an antimicrobial effect and might be useful as an ancillary measure to control the proliferation of cariogenic flora. PMID:25767805

  7. A diet supplemented with husks of Plantago ovata reduces the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and obesity by affecting adiponectin and TNF-alpha in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Milagros; Sánchez, Manuel; Vera, Rocío; González, Mercedes; Anguera, Anna; Duarte, Juan; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze whether consumption of a fiber-supplemented diet containing 3.5% Plantago ovata husks prevented many of the abnormalities clustered in the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. For this purpose, obese Zucker rats, a model of type 2 diabetes, and their lean littermates were studied. Rats consumed a standard control diet or that diet supplemented with 3.5% P. ovata husks for 25 wk. Body weights were measured weekly. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured monthly. At the end of the treatment, plasma concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, FFAs, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were determined, and studies on vascular function were performed using aortic rings. Rats fed the P. ovata husk-supplemented diet had a significantly reduced body weight gain compared with those fed the standard diet. Decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh) by aortic rings from obese Zucker rats was improved in those fed the fiber-supplemented diet. The greater SBP, higher plasma concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, FFA, glucose, insulin, and TNF-alpha, and the hypoadinectinemia that occurred in obese Zucker rats that consumed the control diet were significantly improved in those fed the fiber-supplemented diet. We conclude that intake of a P. ovata husk-supplemented diet prevents endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and obesity development, and ameliorates dyslipidemia and abnormal plasma concentrations of adiponectin and TNF-alpha in obese Zucker rats. PMID:16177203

  8. Impact of the dual defence system of Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae) on performance, nutrient utilisation and feeding choice behaviour of Amata mogadorensis larvae (Lepidoptera, Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Pankoke, Helga; Gehring, René; Müller, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Iridoid glycosides are plant defence compounds with potentially detrimental effects on non-adapted herbivores. Some plant species possess β-glucosidases that hydrolyse iridoid glycosides and thereby release protein-denaturing aglycones. To test the hypothesis that iridoid glycosides and plant β-glucosidases form a dual defence system, we used Plantago lanceolata and a polyphagous caterpillar species. To analyse the impact of leaf-age dependent differences in iridoid glycoside concentrations and β-glucosidase activities on insect performance, old or young leaves were freeze-dried and incorporated into artificial diets or were provided freshly to the larvae. We determined larval consumption rates and the amounts of assimilated nitrogen. Furthermore, we quantified β-glucosidase activities in artificial diets and fresh leaves and the amount of iridoid glycosides that larvae feeding on fresh leaves ingested and excreted. Compared to fresh leaves, caterpillars grew faster on artificial diets, on which larval weight gain correlated positively to the absorbed amount of nitrogen. When feeding fresh young leaves, larvae even lost weight and excreted only minute proportions of the ingested iridoid glycosides intact with the faeces, indicating that the hydrolysis of these compounds might have interfered with nitrogen assimilation and impaired larval growth. To disentangle physiological effects from deterrent effects of iridoid glycosides, we performed dual choice feeding assays. Young leaves, their methanolic extracts and pure catalpol reduced larval feeding in comparison to the respective controls, while aucubin had no effect on larval consumption. We conclude that the dual defence system of P. lanceolata consisting of iridoid glycosides and β-glucosidases interferes with the nutrient utilisation via the hydrolysis of iridoid glycosides and also mediates larval feeding behaviour in a concentration- and substance-specific manner. PMID:26306994

  9. The effects of mineral nitrogen limitation, competition, arbuscular mycorrhiza, and their respective interactions, on morphological and chemical plant traits of Plantago lanceolata.

    PubMed

    Pankoke, Helga; Höpfner, Ingo; Matuszak, Agnieszka; Beyschlag, Wolfram; Müller, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that suffer from a multitude of challenges such as abiotic stress or the interactions with competitors, antagonists and symbionts, which influence their performance as well as their eco-physiological and biochemical responses in complex ways. In particular, the combination of different stressors and their impact on plant biomass production and the plant's ability to metabolically adjust to these challenges are less well understood. To study the effects of mineral nitrogen (N) availability, interspecific competition and the association with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on biomass production, biomass allocation patterns (root/shoot ratio, specific leaf area) and metabolic responses, we chose the model organism Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Plants were grown in a full factorial experiment. Biomass production and its allocation patterns were assessed at harvest, and the influence of the different treatments and their interactions on the plant metabolome were analysed using a metabolic fingerprinting approach with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. Limited supply of mineral N caused the most pronounced changes with respect to plant biomass and biomass allocation patterns, and altered the concentrations of more than one third of the polar plant metabolome. Competition also impaired plant biomass production, yet affected the plant metabolome to a much lesser extent than limited mineral N supply. The interaction of competition and limited mineral N supply often caused additive changes on several traits. The association with AMF did not enhance biomass production, but altered biomass allocation patterns such as the root/shoot ratio and the specific leaf area. Interestingly, we did not find significant changes in the plant metabolome caused by AMF. A targeted analysis revealed that only limited mineral N supply reduced the concentrations of one of the main target defence

  10. The effect of Plantago major Linnaeus on serum total sialic acid, lipid-bound sialic acid, some trace elements and minerals after administration of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in rats.

    PubMed

    Oto, Gokhan; Ekin, Suat; Ozdemir, Hulya; Levent, Abdulkadir; Berber, Ismet

    2012-05-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Plantago major Linnaeus (PM) extract on serum total sialic acid (TSA), lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA), some trace elements (copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and iron) and mineral levels (magnesium, calcium and sodium) in Wistar albino rat administrated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Rats were divided into three equal groups (n = 6). Group I comprised the control group, group II was treated with DMBA (100 mg/kg, single dose) and group III was treated with DMBA (100 mg/kg single dose) and aqueous extract of PM 100 mg/kg/day for 60 days. After 60 days, statistical analyses showed that TSA and LSA levels in DMBA and DMBA + PM groups were significantly higher compared to the control group (TSA: p < 0.01, p < 0.05; LSA: p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively). Serum Zn levels were decreased in subjects treated with DMBA (p < 0.01) and DMBA + PM (p < 0.05) compared to the control group values. Serum Cu levels were increased in DMBA group and PM-treated group compared to the control group values. The results of this investigation showed that the levels of TSA and LSA changed significantly, which are sensitive markers for detecting the toxic effects of DMBA. On the other hand, observed decline in Zn levels in rats from DMBA + PM group might be due to decreased generation of free radicals and oxidative stress. Results from this study suggest that PM may be partially effective in preventing carcinogenesis initiated by environmental carcinogen DMBA. PMID:21996710

  11. Method validation and simultaneous determination of retinol, retinyl palmitate, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and vitamin C in rat serum treated with 7,12 dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and Plantago major L. by high- performance liquid chromatography using diode-array detection.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadi; Oto, Gokhan; Ekin, Suat; Berber, Ismet

    2013-02-01

    A new and simple high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of retinol, retinyl palmitate, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and vitamin C in rat serum treated with Plantago Major L. and 7,12 dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was performed utilizing an Inertsil ODS3 reversed phase column with methanol-tetrahydrofuran-water as mobile phase under gradient conditions, at 1.5 mL min(-1) flow rate and 25 °C. Diode-array detection was at 325, 450, 290 and 270 nm (retinol and retinyl palmitate), β-carotene, α-tocopherol and vitamin C, respectively and runnig time 18 min. The high-performance liquid chromatography assay and extraction procedure proposed are simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate. The method was then applied for the determination of retinol, retinyl palmitate, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and vitamin C in rat serum. Results of this study demonstrated that; at 60th day DMBA-treated group, there was a significant decrease in vitamin levels compared to the levels of control group. A significant increase was observed in vitamin levels of 7,12 dimethylbenz[α]anthracene+Plantago Major L.-treated group compared to the DMBA-treated group. Additionally, the results obtained in the study are found to be in agreement with data reported in the literature. PMID:23176060

  12. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori. PMID:24031496

  13. Plant food supplements with anti-inflammatory properties: a systematic review (I).

    PubMed

    Dell'Agli, Mario; Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Badea, Mihaela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Dima, Lorena; Bosisio, Enrica; Restani, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Plant food supplements (PFS) receive great acceptance by European consumers. However, quality and efficacy of these products remain a question of concern. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence for or against the efficacy of PFS for coping inflammatory conditions by considering epidemiological and human intervention studies. The review, which consists of two parts, considers Olea europea L., Camellia sinensis L., Vitis vinifera L., and Matricaria recutita L., which are herbal material frequently used also as food. The search retrieved 1251 publications. By applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria, the final number of papers was 91. Vitis vinifera L. showed promising results, but other trials should be performed in order to assessing the efficacy. Surprisingly, it was impossible to draw conclusions for the anti-inflammatory effect of Camellia sinensis L. as green tea. No studies were found on the leaves of Olea europea L. whereas more human trials are needed to assess the anti-inflammatory effect of olive oil. Only one study for Matricaria recutita L. was selected. In conclusion, it is advisable to conduct further studies with more homogeneous population and larger number of subjects by avoiding the heterogeneity of the herbal preparations considered. PMID:23320910

  14. Bisabolol-induced gastroprotection against acute gastric lesions: role of prostaglandins, nitric oxide, and KATP+ channels.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, S B; Leal, L K A M; Nogueira, N A P; Pinto, N A N; Campos, A R

    2009-12-01

    The effects of Matricaria recutita and alpha-bisabolol, a bioactive component from Chamomile species, were investigated against gastric damage induced by absolute ethanol (96%, 1 mL per animal) in rats. The effects of M. recutita extract and alpha-bisabolol on gastric mucosal damage were assessed by determination of changes in mean gastric lesion area. Mechanistic studies were carried out at with 100 mg=kg alpha-bisabolol. We further examined the possible participation of prostaglandins, nitric oxide, and KATP+ channels in its mechanism. M. recutita reduced gastric damage in all doses tested. Alpha-bisabolol at oral doses of 50 and 100 mg=kg markedly attenuated the gastric lesions induced by ethanol to the extent of 87% and 96%, respectively. Pretreatments with the nitric oxide antagonist N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (10 mg=kg, i.p.) or with indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, failed to block effectively the gastroprotective effect of alpha-bisabolol. Furthermore, the alpha-bisabolol effect was significantly reduced in rats pretreated with glibenclamide, an inhibitor of KATP+ channel activation. Thus we provide evidence that alpha-bisabolol reduces the gastric damage induced by ethanol, at least in part, by the mechanism of activation of KATP+ channels. PMID:20041801

  15. RESISTANCE TO ALS-INHIBITING HERBICIDES IN WEED POPULATIONS FROM BELGIAN WHEAT FIELDS.

    PubMed

    S, Claerhout; B, De Cauwer

    2015-01-01

    In modern agriculture, most farmers rely on herbicides for weed control. The intensive use of herbicides in crops has led to the development of herbicide resistance in numerous weeds worldwide. In Belgium, farmers have encountered problems with controlling populations of Alopecurus myosuroides, Matricaria recutita, Stellaria media and Popover rhoeas in some wheat fields with the conventionally used acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides. Dose response assays were conducted in the greenhouse to test the sensitivity of these populations to the key ALS-inhibiting herbicides mesosulfuron-methyl + iodosulfuron-methyl for A. myosuroides and metsulfuron-methyl and florasulam for M. recutita, S. media and P. rhoeas. The ED₉₀- and ED₅₀-values (effective dose for resp. 90% and 50% biomass reduction) were compared with those of sensitive reference populations and the resistance index (RI) was calculated. High levels of resistance were detected forA. myosuroides (RI: 24.3) after treatment with mesosulfuron-methyl and for M. recutita (RI: 36.4 to 49.5), S. media (RI > 20) and P. rhoeas (RI: 23.6) after treatment with metsulfuron-methyl. However, the metsulfuron-methyl resistant populations of M. recutita and S. media were sufficiently controlled with florasulam at the maximum authorised field dose. This was not the case for P. rhoeas. The metsulfuron-methyl resistant P. rhoeas population were also high-level resistant against florasulam (RI: 29.5). Integrated weed management practices (crop rotation, herbicide mixing, ...) should be applied to reduce the selection pressure for resistant weeds. PMID:27145589

  16. Genetics of quantitative and qualitative traits of isabgol (Plantago ovata).

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Lal, R K

    2009-01-01

    Isabgol is a medicinal plant known for its high-quality dietary fiber. The genetics and inheritance of economic characters, such as number of panicles, panicle length, seed yield, and swelling factor, were measured by diallel analysis of F(1) progenies from seven parents. The additive component of genetic variance was significant for days to flowering, plant height, branches/plant, peduncle length, panicle length, days to maturity, and swelling factor, whereas the dominance component of genetic variance was significant for all the characters except panicles/plant. Additivity was not significant for all the characters, indicating absence of non-allelic interactions (epistasis) in controlling gene expression. Heritability in the narrow sense was very high for panicle length, days to flowering, and plant height, and moderate for branches/plant, panicles/plant, days to maturity, seed yield, husk yield, and swelling factor. However, the degree of genetic improvement was only high for panicle length, seed yield and husk yield. We conclude that hybridizations, isolation of superior genotypes by sib selection and recurrent selection, and exploitation of hybrid vigor in specific parental-cross combinations are good strategies for isabgol crop improvement. PMID:19731195

  17. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  18. Analytical characterisation of homoeopathic mother tinctures.

    PubMed

    Biber, A; Franck-Karl, G; Waimer, F; Riegert, U; Wiget, R

    2009-03-01

    Quality of homoeopathic mother tinctures is assured by the definition of the starting material, the manufacturing process and the analytical characteristics described in the monograph. Traditionally analytical characterisation of the mother tincture comprises appearance, odour, identity, density and dry residue. According to annex I of directive 2001/83/EC an assay is only performed in case of a health hazard due to toxic compounds. The concept of marker substances as usually used in phytotherapy cannot be transferred to mother tinctures without research effort. For example the marker substances echinacoside, apigenin-7-glucoside and rosmarinic acid found in dried underground parts of Echinacea pallida Nutt., dried flower heads of Matricaria recutita L. and dried herb of Pulmonaria officinalis L. cannot be found in homoeopathic mother tinctures prepared from fresh material thereof. PMID:19275866

  19. Content of toxic and essential metals in medicinal herbs growing in polluted and unpolluted areas of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Baceva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajce

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare Ba, Cr, Cd, Fe, Sr, Pb, and Zn content in medicinal herbs Urtica dioica L., Taraxacum officinale, and Matricaria recutita growing in polluted and unpolluted areas of the Republic of Macedonia. The metal content was determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). In the unpolluted area of Mt. Plackovica the metal content in Taraxacum officinale was in the descending order: Fe>Sr>Zn>Ba>Cr, while Pb and Cd were below the limit of detection. In the polluted area of Veles, the order was as follows: Fe>Zn>Sr>Pb>Ba>Cd>Cr. Our results suggest that quality assurance and monitoring of toxic metals is needed for plants intended for human use and consumption. Medicinal plants should be picked in areas free of any contamination sources. PMID:20860970

  20. Isolation and identification of precocenes and piperitone from essential oils as specific inhibitors of trichothecene production by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Tsuyuki, Rie; Takahashi, Haruo; Nakajima, Takashi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2009-02-11

    Inhibitors of deoxynivalenol production by Fusarium graminearum are useful for protecting crops from deoxynivalenol contamination. We isolated precocenes and piperitone from the essential oils of Matricaria recutita and Eucalyptus dives, respectively, as specific inhibitors of the production of 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, a biosynthetic precursor of deoxynivalenol. Precocenes I and II and piperitone inhibited 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol production by F. graminearum in a liquid culture with IC(50) values of 16.6, 1.2, and 306 microM, respectively, without inhibiting fungal growth. Precocene II also inhibited deoxynivalenol production by the fungus in a solid culture on rice with an IC(50) value of 2.0 ppm. Precocene II and piperitone decreased the mRNA levels of Tri4, Tri5, Tri6, and Tri10 encoding proteins required for deoxynivalenol biosynthesis. PMID:19191669

  1. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  2. Use of herbal remedies among patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Roozbeh, Jamshid; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence, types, and associated factors for the use of herbal remedies in hemodialysis patients. Two hundred participants were selected by stratified sampling and were systematically interviewed. One hundred and twenty-six patients (63%) had used herbal remedies some time since their initiation of dialysis treatment. The users of herbal remedies had a significantly older age than nonusers, but no other significant differences were observed. The most prevalent complaints that led to herbal remedies use were gastroenterological complaints, flushing, and excessive thirst. Cichorium intybus, Borage officinalis, Mentha longifolia, and Matricaria recutita were the most prevalently used herbs in our patients. More study should be done on safety and efficacy of these herbs for hemodialysis patients. PMID:24241097

  3. Cottage cheeses functionalized with fennel and chamomile extracts: Comparative performance between free and microencapsulated forms.

    PubMed

    Caleja, Cristina; Ribeiro, Andreia; Barros, Lillian; Barreira, João C M; Antonio, Amilcar L; Beatriz P P Oliveira, M; Barreiro, Maria Filomena; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-05-15

    Globally, there is a trend for healthy food products, preferably incorporating natural bioactive ingredients, replacing synthetic additives. From previous screening studies, extracts of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) and Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile) maintained nutritional properties and improved the antioxidant activity of cottage cheese. Nevertheless, this effect was limited to 7 days. Accordingly, aqueous extracts of these plants were microencapsulated in alginate and incorporated into cottage cheese to achieve an extended bioactivity. Plain cottage cheese, and cheese functionalized by direct addition of free decoctions, were prepared and compared. Independently of plant species, "functionalization type" factor did not show a significant effect on the nutritional parameters, as also confirmed in the linear discriminant analysis, where these parameters were not selected as discriminating variables. Furthermore, samples functionalized with microencapsulated extracts showed higher antioxidant activity after the 7th day, thereby demonstrating that the main purpose of this experimental work was achieved. PMID:26776029

  4. Fortification of yogurts with different antioxidant preservatives: A comparative study between natural and synthetic additives.

    PubMed

    Caleja, Cristina; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L; Carocho, Márcio; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-11-01

    Consumers demand more and more so-called "natural" products and, therefore, the aim of this work was to compare the effects of natural versus synthetic antioxidant preservatives in yogurts. Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) decoctions were tested as natural additives, while potassium sorbate (E202) was used as a synthetic additive. The fortification of yogurts with natural and synthetic antioxidants did not cause significant changes in the yoghurt pH and nutritional value, in comparison with control samples (yogurt without any additive). However, the fortified yogurts showed higher antioxidant activity, mainly the yogurts with natural additives (and among these, the ones with chamomile decoction). Overall, it can be concluded that plant decoctions can be used to develop novel yogurts, by replacing synthetic preservatives and improving the antioxidant properties of the final product, without changing the nutritional profile. PMID:27211646

  5. Preliminary studies towards utilization of various plant extracts as antisolar agents.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M F; Santos, E P; Bizarri, C H; Mattos, H A; Padilha, M R; Duarte, H M

    1996-06-01

    Synopsis The aim of this work was to evaluate several plant extracts with regard to ultraviolet absorption spectra in view of a possible application as antisolar agents. Liquid and dry extracts of Hamamelis virginiana, Matricaria recutita, Aesculus hippocastanum, Rhamnus purshiana and Cinnamomum zeylanicum were prepared by repercolation, maceration and microwave oven extraction. UVB absorption spectra (290-320nm) were obtained and the solar protection factors (SPF) of these preparations were determined by a spectrophotometric method. The results showed that after incorporation to a 2% solution of the synthetic sunscreen octylmethoxycinnamate, the extracts showed an intensification in SPF values, suggesting that this can be an interesting method to intensify SPF. In addition, these extracts can contribute their emollient and moistening properties to the product. These are important characteristics for protecting skin against exposure to the sun. PMID:19245460

  6. Application of poly(dimethylsiloxane) fiber sol-gel coated onto NiTi alloy electrodeposited with zirconium oxide for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in herbal infusions.

    PubMed

    Budziak, Dilma; Martendal, Edmar; Carasek, Eduardo

    2008-08-01

    A PDMS fiber sol-gel coated onto an NiTi alloy previously electrodeposited with zirconium oxide (named NiTi-ZrO(2)-PDMS) was applied to the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in infusions of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf), chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), and anise seeds (Pimpinella anisum L.). Salting-out effect, extraction time, and extraction temperature were optimized firstly by means of a full-factorial design and then using a Doehlert matrix. No salt addition and 50 min of extraction at 70 degrees C were the optimum conditions. Satisfactory LODs in the range of 2-17 ng/L, as well as good correlation coefficients (at least 0.9981) in the linear range studied, were obtained. Calibration was successfully applied using an infusion of M. recutita L. and recovery tests were performed to ensure the accuracy of the method, with values in the range of 77-120%. Comparison of the NiTi-ZrO(2)-PDMS with commercially available PDMS fibers showed that the proposed fiber has an extraction efficiency comparable to that of PDMS 30 microm for the compounds evaluated, demonstrating its potential applicability. PMID:18666186

  7. [Uterotonic action of extracts from a group of medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    Shipochliev, T

    1981-01-01

    Water extracts (infusions) from a group of medicinal plants were studied in terms of their activity enhancing the uterine tonus in a series of experiments with a preparation of an isolated rabbit and guinea pig uterine horn. In a final extract concentration of 1 to 2 mg crude drug per 1 cm3 the plants ranked in the following descending order with regard to their tonus-raising effect on the uterus: camomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), potmarigold calendula (Calendula officinalis L.) cockscomb (Celosia cristata L.), plantain (Plantago lanceolata L. et Plantago major L.), symphytum (Symphytum officinale L.), shepherdspurse (Capsella bursa pastoris L.), St.-John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.). No effect showed the infusions of flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and bearberry leaves (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi L.). The combined preparation 'Antiinflamin', consisting of a pooled freeze-dried extract from three plants and chemotherapeutic agents produced a good enhancing effect, in the form of 'comprets' for intrauterine application at the rate of one compret per 2500 cm3. PMID:7314446

  8. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in Republic of Macedonia using a plant assay.

    PubMed

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2011-02-01

    Different plant organs (leaves, flowers, stems, or roots) from four plant species-Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae), Robinia pseudoacacia L. (Fabaceae), Taraxacum officinale (Asteraceae), and Matricaria recutita (Asteraceae)-were evaluated as possible bioindicators of heavy-metal pollution in Republic of Macedonia. Concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cd, Mn, Ni, and Zn were determined in unwashed plant parts collected from areas with different degrees of metal pollution by ICP-AES. All these elements were found to be at high levels in samples collected from an industrial area. Maximum Pb concentration was 174.52 ± 1.04 mg kg⁻¹ in R. pseudoacacia flowers sampled from the Veles area, where lead and zinc metallurgical activities were present. In all control samples, the Cd concentrations were found to be under the limit of detection (LOD <0.1 mg kg⁻¹) except for R. pseudoacacia flowers and T. officinale roots. The maximum Cd concentration was 7.97 ± 0.15 mg kg⁻¹ in R. pseudoacacia flowers from the Veles area. Nickel concentrations were in the range from 1.90 ± 0.04 to 5.74 ± 0.03 mg kg⁻¹. For U. dioica leaves and R. pseudoacacia flowers sampled near a lead-smelting plant, concentrations of 465.0 ± 0.55 and 403.56 ± 0.34 mg kg⁻¹ Zn were detected, respectively. In all control samples, results for Zn were low, ranging from 10.2 ± 0.05 to 38.70 ± 0.18 mg kg⁻¹. In this study, it was found that the flower of R. pseudoacacia was a better bioindicator of heavy-metal pollution than other plant parts. Summarizing the results, it can be concluded that T. officinale, U. dioica, and R. pseudoacacia were better metal accumulators and M. recutita was a metal avoider. PMID:20508923

  9. Physical exercise, use of Plantago ovata and aspirin, and reduced risk of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Juarranz, M; Calle-Purón, M-E; González-Navarro, A; Regidor-Poyatos, E; Soriano, T; Martínez-Hernandez, D; Rojas, V-D; Guinee, V F

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate certain risk and protective factors for colon cancer in our population, we conducted a paired case-control study where cases were all people diagnosed with colon cancer who were registered at the Cancer Data Exchange Systems of the Community of Madrid between January 1995 and December 1996, and controls were randomly taken from electoral lists. The study population consisted of 424 persons. Using SPSS for Windows, variables were adjusted by multiple logistic regression. The results indicate that lack of physical exercise is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.21) as compared with moderate activity 1-2 days a week. The risk decreases linearly with increasing physical exercise, and this association remains after stratifying the analysis for the existence of constipation. The consumption of is associated with a reduced risk of colon cancer in constipated patients, with an OR of 0.094 (0.014-0.639), as is aspirin use, with an OR of 0.980 (0.898-0.999). These results were obtained after adjusting all the ORs for diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, family history and socio-demographic factors such as marital status and educational level. PMID:12394244

  10. Effects of Increased UVB radiation on plant-insect interactions: Plantago lanceolata and Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    McCloud, E.S.; Berenbaum, M.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Seeds of P. lanceolata were collected from a local population and 4 replicates of 42 maternal families were grown for 90 days in the greenhouse with at two levels of supplemental UVB radiation (6 and 12 kJ day[sup [minus]1] BE[sub 300]). Higher UVB radiation increased leaf hair density and decreased plant size during early growth; family identity affected these also. Leaves excised from a subset of the plants were fed to ultimate instar larvae of J. coenia and assayed for iridoids. Increased UVB radiation did not alter the iridoid content of the leaves or the growth of the larvae. In a separate experiment, P. lanceolata growing under the two levels of UVB irradiation were infested with neonate larvae and larval growth was monitored. Larval growth was not markedly altered by enhanced UVB. These findings suggest that increased UVB is unlikely to alter the suitability of P. lanceolata as a host for J. coenia.

  11. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Thymus schimperi, Matricaria chamomilla, Eucalyptus globulus, and Rosmarinus officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Awol; Yitayew, Berhanu; Tesema, Alemnesh; Taddese, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of four plant essential oils (T. schimperi, E. globulus, R. officinalis, and M. Chamomilla) were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. The studies were carried out using agar diffusion method for screening the most effective essential oils and agar dilution to determine minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oils. Results of this study revealed that essential oils of T. schimperi, E. globulus, and R. officinalis were active against bacteria and some fungi. The antimicrobial effect of M. chamomilla was found to be weaker and did not show any antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of T. schimperi were <15.75 mg/mL for most of the bacteria and fungi used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the other essential oils were in the range of 15.75–36.33 mg/mL against tested bacteria. This study highlighted the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of E. globulus, M. chamomilla, T. Schimperi, and R. officinalis. The results indicated that T. schimperi have shown strong antimicrobial activity which could be potential candidates for preparation of antimicrobial drug preparation. PMID:26880928

  12. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Thymus schimperi, Matricaria chamomilla, Eucalyptus globulus, and Rosmarinus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Awol; Yitayew, Berhanu; Tesema, Alemnesh; Taddese, Solomon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro antimicrobial activities of four plant essential oils (T. schimperi, E. globulus, R. officinalis, and M. Chamomilla) were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. The studies were carried out using agar diffusion method for screening the most effective essential oils and agar dilution to determine minimum inhibitory concentration of the essential oils. Results of this study revealed that essential oils of T. schimperi, E. globulus, and R. officinalis were active against bacteria and some fungi. The antimicrobial effect of M. chamomilla was found to be weaker and did not show any antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of T. schimperi were <15.75 mg/mL for most of the bacteria and fungi used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the other essential oils were in the range of 15.75-36.33 mg/mL against tested bacteria. This study highlighted the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of E. globulus, M. chamomilla, T. Schimperi, and R. officinalis. The results indicated that T. schimperi have shown strong antimicrobial activity which could be potential candidates for preparation of antimicrobial drug preparation. PMID:26880928

  13. Potential effect and mechanism of action of topical chamomile (Matricaria chammomila L.) oil on migraine headache: A medical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zargaran, Arman; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Faridi, Pouya; Daneshamouz, Saeid; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2014-11-01

    Migraine is a chronic recurring headache for which no complete treatment has been found yet. Therefore, finding new treatment approaches and medicines is important. In this review, we consider the probable mechanism of action of a traditional and ethnic formulary of chamomile extract in sesame oil as a new topical medication for migraine pain relief. Chamomile oil is prepared in Traditional Persian Medicine by boiling aqueous extract of chamomile in sesame oil. To optimize the procedure, we can use a Clevenger-type apparatus to extract the essential oil and add it to the end product. The preparation includes both essential oils (chamazulene and bisabolol oxide) and polyphenols (a flavonoid such as apigenin and its derivatives). It probably possesses pain relief effects for migraines because of the following properties: (1) chamazulene and apigenin, which inhibit iNOS expression in activated macrophages and can lead to the prohibition of NO release and synthesis; (2) chamomile flavonoids, which have a strong inhibitory effect on endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in RAW 264.7 macrophages and can play the role of selective COX-2 inhibitor; (3) chamomile polyphenols, which possess anti-inflammatory effects due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages and which can reduce inflammation in neurovascular units (NVU) at the site of migraine pain; (4) chamomile, which has neuroprotective effects because of reduced NO levels; (5) sesamine in sesame oil, which possesses an anti-inflammatory effect. These effects are supported by main pathophysiological theories of migraine such as neural and sensitization theories. Chamomile oil is a traditional formulation still used in Iran as an ethno-medicine. Because of the mentioned mechanisms of action, it can be hypothesized that chamomile oil is a novel medicine for the relief of migraine pain. PMID:25238714

  14. "Zahraa", a Unani multicomponent herbal tea widely consumed in Syria: components of drug mixtures and alleged medicinal properties.

    PubMed

    Carmona, M D; Llorach, R; Obon, C; Rivera, D

    2005-12-01

    In Unani system of medicine, drugs consist of complex formulae with more than three components, for which, literature analysing these mixtures as they are sold in the market is scarce. In this paper, the main botanical components of the herbal tea known as "Zahraa" in Damascus, which contains between 6 and 14 species components is elucidated: Alcea damascena (Mout.) Mout. (Malvaceae), Aloysia triphylla (L'Herit.) Britt. (Malvaceae), Astragalus cf. amalecitanus Boiss., Cercis siliquastrum L. subsp. hebecarpa (Bornm.) Yalt. and subsp. siliquastrum. (Leguminosae), Colutea cilicica Boiss. et Bal. in Boiss. (Leguminosae), Crataegus aronia (L.) Bosc. ex DC. (Rosaceae), Cytisopsis pseudocytisus (Boiss.) Fertig. (Leguminosae), Eleagnus angustifolia L. (Eleagnaceae), Equisetum telmateia Ehrh. (Equisetaceae), Helichrysum stoechas (L.) Moench. subsp. barrelieri (Ten.) Nyman. (Compositae), Matricaria recutita L. (Compositae), Mentha longifolia L. subsp. noeana (Boiss. ex. Briq.) Briq. (Labiatae), Mentha spicata L. subsp. condensata (Briq.) Greuter and Burdet (Labiatae), Micromeria myrtifolia Boiss. and Hohen. in Boiss. (Labiatae), Paronychia argentea Lam. (Caryophyllaceae), Phlomis syriaca Boiss. (Labiatae), Rosa damascena Mill. (Rosaceae), Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Labiatae), Sambucus nigra L. (Caprifoliaceae), Spartium junceum L. (Leguminosae), Zea mays L. (Gramineae). PMID:16084679

  15. Vegetative and generative maintenance of self-incompatibility in six accessions of German chamomile.

    PubMed

    Faehnrich, Bettina; Wagner, Sarah; Franz, Chlodwig

    2016-06-01

    Self-incompatible (SI) plants are able to form ideal mother lines for hybrid crossing in hermaphroditic plants, assuring fertilization from the desired father line. To find out suitable ways to maintain SI was the aim of this study. Among 220 plants of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita (L.) Rauschert) within six accessions SI-genotypes were selected. SI was determined as staying seedless in three flower heads per plant. Initial SI-plants formed the basic paternal generation (P1) of i) maintaining the same genotypes over six months and repeating seed set analysis (P2) and of ii) conducting crossings in three versions (SI × SI, SI × NSI (not SI evaluated plants) and NSI × SI), thereby producing the F1 population. F1 exhibited 78% SI and P2 62% SI, indicating a higher environmental than genetic influence on SI. But heritability, calculated from the results of SI × SI crossings, showed high values (h(2) = 0.71). Within generative propagation, the influence of generation/crossing version was highly significant (p = 0.001) and the cultivar 'Degumille' explored the highest value of SI (86%) after SI × NSI crossings. Therefore, the intra-cultivar combination of 'Degumille' SI mother plants crossed with NSI father plants can be recommended as the most promising version to maintain SI in chamomile. PMID:27436956

  16. Does host plant influence parasitism and parasitoid species composition in Lygus rugulipennis? A molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Gariepy, T D; Kuhlmann, U; Gillott, C; Erlandson, M

    2008-06-01

    Lygus Hahn plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae) are serious pests of a wide variety of economically important crops in North America. European Peristenus digoneutis Loan and P. relictus Ruthe (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are being considered for release in Canada as part of a classical biological control program for Lygus. The attractiveness of different host plants to European Peristenus has not been addressed, but may be an important consideration prior to parasitoid release. Lygus rugulipennis Poppius nymphs were collected in the Northern Temperate Atlantic (NTA) ecoregion on red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; Fabaceae) and chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.; Asteraceae), and in the Western European Broadleaf Forest (WEBF) ecoregion on red clover and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.; Fabaceae). Parasitism levels and parasitoid species were determined using a multiplex PCR assay for P. digoneutis, P. relictus, and P. pallipes Curtis. Mean parasitism levels in L. rugulipennis were 45-49% in the NTA ecoregion and 25-32% in the WEBF ecoregion. However, in neither ecoregion were parasitism levels and parasitoid species compositions significantly different in nymphs from different host plant species. Furthermore, multiparasitism was low despite the fact that P. digoneutis and P. relictus share the same host species. PMID:18439339

  17. Evaluation of genotoxic variations in plant model systems in a case of metal stressors.

    PubMed

    Ackova, Darinka Gjorgieva; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Andonovska, Katerina Bačeva; Stafilov, Trajče

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of long term, high metal exposition (cadmium, lead, copper, nickel and zinc) on DNA damage in four plant model systems [Taraxacum officinale (Asteraceae), Matricaria recutita L. (Asteraceae), Robinia pseudoacacia L. (Fabaceae), and Urtica dioica (Urticaceae)]. DNA stability was investigated by a Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Agarose-gel electrophoresis revealed total of 37 bands with different molecular weights ranging from 1250 to 5000 bp. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 72.97% (27 bands) total in four plant species investigated. The dendrogram constructed using NTSYSpc programme showed that there is grouping in separate clusters of the same plant model collected from two different areas (metal-exposed and control samples). The study concluded that the long term metal-exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of plant model systems investigated and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of plants to metal stressors. PMID:26853058

  18. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  19. TLC-Direct Bioautography and LC/MS as Complementary Methods in Identification of Antibacterial Agents in Plant Tinctures from the Asteraceae Family.

    PubMed

    Jesionek, Wioleta; Móricz, Ágnes M; Ott, Péter G; Kocsis, Béla; Horváth, Györgyi; Choma, Irena M

    2015-01-01

    Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile) and Achillea millefolium L. (yarrow) are very common herbs growing in meadows, pathways, crop fields, and home gardens. Preparations from these plants, e.g., infusions or alcohol extracts, are widely used as remedies. Both chamomile and yarrow have anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties. Most microbiological assays used today give information only on activity of whole extracts and do not provide information on the composition and activity of individual components. This problem can be solved by using TLC with direct microbiological detection, i.e., TLC-direct bioautography (TLC-DB), followed by LC/MS of active fractions. The aim of our study was chemical and microbiological screening of plant components of chamomile and yarrow tinctures using derivatization reagents and TLC-DB against eight bacterial strains: Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, Xanthomonas campestis pv. vesicatoria, Aliivibrio fischeri, and Bacillus subtilis. The identity of compounds exhibiting the widest range of activity (apigenin and α-linolenic acid) was confirmed by LC/MS. PMID:26268962

  20. Development and application of UHPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of phenolic compounds in Chamomile flowers and Chamomile tea extracts.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Vildová, Anna; Mateus, Joana Patricia; Gonçalves, Tiago; Solich, Petr

    2010-09-15

    UHPLC-MS/MS method using BEH C18 analytical column was developed for the separation and quantitation of 12 phenolic compounds of Chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.). The separation was accomplished using gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of methanol and formic acid 0.1%. ESI in both positive and negative ion mode was optimized with the aim to reach high sensitivity and selectivity for quantitation using SRM experiment. ESI in negative ion mode was found to be more convenient for quantitative analysis of all phenolics except of chlorogenic acid and kaempherol, which demonstrated better results of linearity, accuracy and precision in ESI positive ion mode. The results of method validation confirmed, that developed UHPLC-MS/MS method was convenient and reliable for the determination of phenolic compounds in Chamomile extracts with linearity >0.9982, accuracy within 76.7-126.7% and precision within 2.2-12.7% at three spiked concentration levels. Method sensitivity expressed as LOQ was typically 5-20 nmol/l. Extracts of Chamomile flowers and Chamomile tea were subjected to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. The most abundant phenolic compounds in both Chamomile flowers and Chamomile tea extracts were chlorogenic acid, umbelliferone, apigenin and apigenin-7-glucoside. In Chamomile tea extracts there was greater abundance of flavonoid glycosides such as rutin or quercitrin, while the aglycone apigenin and its glycoside were present in lower amount. PMID:20801328

  1. Investigations into the antibacterial activities of phytotherapeutics against Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Cwikla, C; Schmidt, K; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Lehmann, R; Tiralongo, E

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of gastric diseases is increasing with H. pylori, the causative agent of acute and chronic gastritis, being a major predisposing factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. C. jejuni is the most common cause of enteric infections, particularly among children, resulting in severe diarrhoea. Increasing drug resistance of these bacteria against standard antibiotics, and the more widespread use of herbal medicines, favours investigations into additional anti-Helicobacter and anti-Campylobacter effects of phytotherapeutics that are already used for their beneficial effects on bowel and digestive functions. Twenty-one hydroethanol herbal extracts and four essential oils were screened for antibacterial activity using a modification of a previously described micro-dilution assay and compared with the inhibitory effects of antibiotics. The herbal extracts showing the highest growth inhibition of C. jejuni were Calendula officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Zingiber officinale, Salvia officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare and Silybum marianum. Agrimonia eupatoria, Hydrastis canadensis, Filipendula ulmaria and Salvia officinalis were the most active herbal extracts in inhibiting the growth of H. pylori. This study provides evidence for additional beneficial effects of phytotherapeutics marketed for their gastrointestinal effects and identifies new beneficial antibacterial effects for some herbal medicines not currently recommended for gastrointestinal problems. PMID:19653313

  2. Rapid evaluation and comparison of natural products and antioxidant activity in calendula, feverfew, and German chamomile extracts.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Babazadeh Ortakand, Davoud; Morton, David W; Yusof, Ahmad P

    2015-03-13

    The present study describes a simple high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method for the simultaneous quantification of apigenin, chamazulene, bisabolol and the use of DPPH free radical as a post-chromatographic derivatization agent to compare the free radical scavenging activities of these components in leaf and flower head extracts from feverfew, German chamomile and marigold from the Asteraceae family. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) leaves have been traditionally used in the treatment of migraine with parthenolide being the main bioactive compound. However, due to similar flowers, feverfew is sometimes mistaken for the German chamomile (Matricaria recutita). Bisabolol and chamazulene are the main components in chamomile essential oil. Marigold (Calendula officinalis) was included in the study for comparison, as it belongs to the same family. Parthenolide was found to be present in all leaf extracts but was not detected in calendula flower extract. Chamazulene and bisabolol were found to be present in higher concentrations in chamomile and Calendula flowers. Apigenin was detected and quantified only in chamomile extracts (highest concentration in flower head extracts). Antioxidant activity in sample extracts was compared by superimposing the chromatograms obtained after post-chromatographic derivatization with DPPH and post-chromatographic derivatization with anisaldehyde. It was found that extracts from chamomile flower heads and leaves have the most prominent antioxidant activity, with bisabolol and chamazulene being the most effective antioxidants. PMID:25666499

  3. Guaianolides and volatile compounds in chamomile tea.

    PubMed

    Tschiggerl, Christine; Bucar, Franz

    2012-06-01

    Chamomile (German Chamomile, Matricaria recutita L., Asteraceae) is one of the most popular medicinal plants in use as an herbal tea for food purposes and in folk medicine. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of the volatile fraction of chamomile herbal tea were performed. Volatile constituents of the infusion were isolated by two different methods, namely hydrodistillation and solid phase extraction (SPE), and analysed by GC-MS. The relative proportions of particular chemical classes, present in the essential oil and volatile fractions of the infusion showed remarkable differences. The proportion of mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in the infusion, as compared to the essential oil, was significantly lower. Strikingly, the dichloromethane extract of the infusion contained a lower amount of bisabolol oxides and chamazulene, but higher amounts of spiroethers, sesquiterpene lactones and coumarins, as compared to the hydrodistillates of the herbal drug and the infusion. In addition to the previously known guaianolides matricarin and achillin, acetoxyachillin and leucodin (= desacetoxymatricarin), corresponding C-11 stereoisomers with various biological activities typically occurring in Achillea species, were identified in the dichloromethane extract of chamomile tea for the first time. PMID:22410959

  4. Medicinal plant treatments for fleas and ear problems of cats and dogs in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya

    2008-09-01

    Research conducted in 2003/2004 documented and validated (in a non-experimental way) ethnoveterinary medicines used by small-scale, organic livestock farmers in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Interviews were conducted with 60 participants who were organic farmers or holistic medicinal/veterinary practitioners. A workshop was held with selected participants to discuss the plant-based treatments. This paper reports on the medicinal plants used for fleas in cats and dogs. Fleas and flies are treated with Artemisia vulgaris L. (Asteraceae), Citrus x limon (L.), Juniperus communis L. var. depressa Pursh. (Cupressaceae), Lavandula officinalis L. (Labiatae), Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae), and Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don (Cupressaceae). All of the plants used have insecticidal activity. Ear problems are treated with Achillea millefolium L., Calendula officinalis L., and Helichrysum angustifolium (Roth.) G. Don. (Asteraceae), Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae), Berberis aquifolium Pursh./Mahonia aquifolium (Berberidaceae), Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Fabaceae), Lobelia inflata L. (Campanulaceae), Matricaria recutita L., Melaleuca alternifolia L. (Myrtaceae), Origanum vulgare L. (Labiatae), Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae), Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry (Myrtaceae), Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae), and Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae). PMID:18563443

  5. Development and validation of an HPTLC method for apigenin 7-O-glucoside in chamomile flowers and its application for fingerprint discrimination of chamomile-like materials.

    PubMed

    Guzelmeric, Etil; Vovk, Irena; Yesilada, Erdem

    2015-03-25

    Brewed tea of chamomile flowers (Matricaria recutita L.) (Asteraceae) has been extensively consumed for centuries due to either its pleasant taste or medicinal purposes. On the other hand, the major problem is difficulty in distinguishing the genuine specimen when supplying chamomile through nature-picking. Consequently flowers of other Asteraceae members resembling to chamomile in appearance may frequently be practiced by lay people or marketed in spice shops or bazaars. Evidently detection of such adulterations plays a vital role in terms of public health to avoid risk of toxicity (i.e. pyrazolidin alkaloids) and ineffective treatments (lack or insufficient concentration of the active constituents). This work presents either development and validation of a high performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method for apigenin 7-O-glucoside which is one of the active markers in chamomile flowers or its application for the fingerprint discrimination of chamomile-like materials i.e. Anthemis spp., Bellis spp., Chrysanthemum sp. and Tanacetum sp. gathered by local people assuming as chamomile. Separation was performed on the silica gel 60 NH2 F254s HPTLC plates using the developing solvent system of ethyl acetate-formic acid-acetic acid-water (30:1.5:1.5:3, v/v/v/v). The proposed HPTLC method may also be a leading guide for the quality assessment of chamomile tea products on the market. PMID:25575175

  6. Chamomile and marigold tea: chemical characterization and evaluation of anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Matić, Ivana Z; Juranić, Zorica; Savikin, Katarina; Zdunić, Gordana; Nađvinski, Neva; Gođevac, Dejan

    2013-06-01

    With the aim to evaluate the selectivity in the antitumor action, the cytotoxic activity of chamomile and marigold tea was tested against various malignant cell lines and against healthy immunocompetent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Chemical profiles of chamomile and marigold infusions and decoctions were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; their total phenolic content and radical scavenging activity were determined, too. Results from present research demonstrate that chamomile and marigold tea exert selective dose-dependent cytotoxic action against target cancer cells. It is noteworthy that cytotoxicity of tea prepared from Calendula officinalis is remarkably higher in comparison to that from Matricaria recutita tea. The cytotoxic effect of chamomile tea is very weak to healthy PBMC, while the effect of marigold tea on PBMC is more pronounced. Marigold tea exerts highly selective antitumor effect especially to melanoma Fem-x cells in comparison to the action to normal healthy PBMC. Chemical analyses show that dominant phenolic compounds in examined infusions and decoctions are flavonoid glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. There are no considerable differences in total phenolic content and antioxidant activity between examined infusions. Antitumor potential of chamomile and marigold tea should be further investigated. PMID:22899374

  7. Vegetative and generative maintenance of self-incompatibility in six accessions of German chamomile

    PubMed Central

    Faehnrich, Bettina; Wagner, Sarah; Franz, Chlodwig

    2016-01-01

    Self-incompatible (SI) plants are able to form ideal mother lines for hybrid crossing in hermaphroditic plants, assuring fertilization from the desired father line. To find out suitable ways to maintain SI was the aim of this study. Among 220 plants of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita (L.) Rauschert) within six accessions SI-genotypes were selected. SI was determined as staying seedless in three flower heads per plant. Initial SI-plants formed the basic paternal generation (P1) of i) maintaining the same genotypes over six months and repeating seed set analysis (P2) and of ii) conducting crossings in three versions (SI × SI, SI × NSI (not SI evaluated plants) and NSI × SI), thereby producing the F1 population. F1 exhibited 78% SI and P2 62% SI, indicating a higher environmental than genetic influence on SI. But heritability, calculated from the results of SI × SI crossings, showed high values (h2 = 0.71). Within generative propagation, the influence of generation/crossing version was highly significant (p = 0.001) and the cultivar ‘Degumille’ explored the highest value of SI (86%) after SI × NSI crossings. Therefore, the intra-cultivar combination of ‘Degumille’ SI mother plants crossed with NSI father plants can be recommended as the most promising version to maintain SI in chamomile. PMID:27436956

  8. Risks and benefits of commonly used herbal medicines in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott W; Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-02-15

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicines that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of the following plant species: nopal (Opuntia ficus), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chaparral (Larrea divaricata), dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), nettle or stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), linden flower (Tilia europea), and aloe (Aloe vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified. PMID:18037151

  9. Antiulcerogenic effect of some gastrointestinally acting plant extracts and their combination.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, M T; el-Ghazaly, M A; Kenawy, S A; Seif-el-Nasr, M; Mahran, L G; Kafafi, Y A; Okpanyi, S N

    2001-01-01

    Extracts from the plants Iberis amara, Melissa officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Carum carvi, Mentha x piperita, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Angelica archangelica, Silybum marianum and Chelidonium majus, singly and combined in the form of a commercial preparation, STW 5 (Iberogast) and a modified formulation, STW 5-II, lacking the last 3 constituents, were tested for their potential anti-ulcerogenic activity against indometacin induced gastric ulcers of the rat as well as for their antisecretory and cytoprotective activities. All extracts produced a dose dependent anti-ulcerogenic activity associated with a reduced acid output and an increased mucin secretion, an increase in prostaglandin E2 release and a decrease in leukotrienes. The effect on pepsin content was rather variable and did not seem to bear a relationship with the anti-ulcerogenic activity. The most beneficial effects were observed with the combined formulations STW 5 and STW 5-II in a dose of 10 ml/kg b.w., comparable with cimetidine in a dose of 100 mg/kg b.w. The anti-ulcerogenic activity of the extracts was also confirmed histologically. The cytoprotective effect of the extracts could be partly due to their flavonoid content and to their free radical scavenging properties. PMID:11505785

  10. Risks and Benefits of Commonly used Herbal Medicines in México

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott; Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-01-01

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicine that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological and toxicological properties of the following following plant species: Nopal (Opuntia ficus), Peppermint (Mentha piperita), Chaparral (Larrea divaricata), Dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), Mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), Chamomile (Matricaria recutita), Nettle or Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica), Passionflower (Passiflora incarmata), Linden Flower (Tilia europea), and Aloa (Aloa vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified. PMID:18037151

  11. Risks and benefits of commonly used herbal medicines in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Burchiel, Scott W. Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Torres, Eliseo

    2008-02-15

    In Mexico, local empirical knowledge about medicinal properties of plants is the basis for their use as home remedies. It is generally accepted by many people in Mexico and elsewhere in the world that beneficial medicinal effects can be obtained by ingesting plant products. In this review, we focus on the potential pharmacologic bases for herbal plant efficacy, but we also raise concerns about the safety of these agents, which have not been fully assessed. Although numerous randomized clinical trials of herbal medicines have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, generalizations about the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines are clearly not possible. Recent publications have also highlighted the unintended consequences of herbal product use, including morbidity and mortality. It has been found that many phytochemicals have pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to some herbal medicines that are native or cultivated in Mexico and that have significant use. We discuss the cultural uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of the following plant species: nopal (Opuntia ficus), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chaparral (Larrea divaricata), dandlion (Taraxacum officinale), mullein (Verbascum densiflorum), chamomile (Matricaria recutita), nettle or stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), linden flower (Tilia europea), and aloe (Aloe vera). We conclude that our knowledge of the therapeutic benefits and risks of some herbal medicines used in Mexico is still limited and efforts to elucidate them should be intensified.

  12. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  13. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  14. Development of a stable low-fat yogurt gel using functionality of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk) husk gum.

    PubMed

    Ladjevardi, Zhaleh Sadat; Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Mousavi, Mohammad

    2015-07-10

    Psyllium husk gum (PHG) as an ideal fat replacer was utilized to improve the production of an industrial low-fat yogurt gel. The combined effects of critical structural components (PHG concentration (0.072-0.128%) and fat content (0.29-1.71%)) on the textural (firmness and syneresis), rheological (viscosity), and chemical (pH and total titratable acidity (TTA)) attributes of developed set-yogurts were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The second-order polynomial equations with high R(2) demonstrated a good agreement between experimental and predicted data. The optimal formulation for achieving optimal pH (4.39) and TTA (81% lactic acid), maximizing firmness (0.172 N) and viscosity (6.40 Pa s) and minimizing whey separation (36.21 mL/100g) was 0.12% PHG and 0.63% fat. Sensory characterization also revealed that the yogurts manufactured at optimal point had more aroma, texture and overall acceptability than the control yogurts. PMID:25857984

  15. First report of Plantago asiatica mosaic virus in imported Asiatic and Oriental lilies (Lilium hybrids) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asiatic and Oriental hybrid lilies (Lilium hybrids, Liliaceae) are bulbous ornamentals valued for their prominent flowers. Bulbs of several varieties of each lily type, imported from the Netherlands, were purchased in spring 2013 from retail nurseries and grown in a cool greenhouse; additional bulb...

  16. Influence of molybdenum on the accumulation and composition of the water-soluble polysaccharides of Plantago psyllium

    SciTech Connect

    Lichino, I.P.; Gomanova, M.I.; Milenysheva, L.I.; Yakovlev, A.I.

    1986-07-01

    The authors have studied the dynamics of the accumulation of polysaccharides in flaxseed plantain when it is given a foliar top dressing with molybdenum, and also their monosaccaride composition and physicochemical properties. The amounts of galacturonic acid were determined by potentiometric titration. The results of the investigations permit the conclusions that molybdenum somewhat decreases the amounts of total monosaccaride complex and of galacturonic acid while considerably raising the amount of -OCH/sub 3/.

  17. Competition between tall fescue and plantago under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide: Impact of endophytic fungi and mineral N inputs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb) is one of the most important perennial grasses as forage and turfgrass. It is usually associated with a systemic endophytic fungus (Neotyphodium coenophialum Morgan-Jones and Gams). The endophytic fungus often increases the host resistance to stresses, thus e...

  18. Inhibition of non-haem iron absorption in man by polyphenolic-containing beverages.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, R F; Reddy, M; Cook, J D

    1999-04-01

    The effects of different polyphenol-containing beverages on Fe absorption from a bread meal were estimated in adult human subjects from the erythrocyte incorporation of radio-Fe. The test beverages contained different polyphenol structures and were rich in either phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid in coffee), monomeric flavonoids (herb teas, camomile (Matricaria recutita L.), vervain (Verbena officinalis L.), lime flower (Tilia cordata Mill.), pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L.) and peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), or complex polyphenol polymerization products (black tea and cocoa). All beverages were potent inhibitors of Fe absorption and reduced absorption in a dose-dependent fashion depending on the content of total polyphenols. Compared with a water control meal, beverages containing 20-50 mg total polyphenols/serving reduced Fe absorption from the bread meal by 50-70%, whereas beverages containing 100-400 mg total polyphenols/serving reduced Fe absorption by 60-90%. Inhibition by black tea was 79-94%, peppermint tea 84%, pennyroyal 73%, cocoa 71%, vervain 59%, lime flower 52% and camomile 47%. At an identical concentration of total polyphenols, black tea was more inhibitory than cocoa, and more inhibitory than herb teas camomile, vervain, lime flower and pennyroyal, but was of equal inhibition to peppermint tea. Adding milk to coffee and tea had little or no influence on their inhibitory nature. Our findings demonstrate that herb teas, as well as black tea, coffee and coca can be potent inhibitors of Fe absorption. This property should be considered when giving dietary advice in relation to Fe nutrition. PMID:10999016

  19. Plants and other natural products used in the management of oral infections and improvement of oral health.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-02-01

    Challenges of resistance to synthetic antimicrobials have opened new vistas in the search for natural products. This article rigorously reviews plants and other natural products used in oral health: Punica granatum L. (pomegranate), Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile), Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (green tea), chewing sticks made from Diospyros mespiliformis Hochst. ex A.D.C., Diospyros lycioides Desf., and Salvadora persica L. (miswak), honey and propolis from the manuka tree (Leptospermum scoparium J.R. Forst. & G. Forst.), rhein from Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb), dried fruits of Vitis vinifera L. (raisins), essential oils, probiotics and mushrooms. Further, the review highlights plants from Africa, Asia, Brazil, Mexico, Europe, and the Middle East. Some of the plants' antimicrobial properties and chemical principles have been elucidated. While the use of natural products for oral health is prominent in resource-poor settings, antimicrobial testing is mainly conducted in the following countries (in decreasing order of magnitude): India, South Africa, Brazil, Japan, France, Egypt, Iran, Mexico, Kenya, Switzerland, Nigeria, Australia, Uganda, and the United Kingdom. While the review exposes a dire gap for more studies on clinical efficacy and toxicity, the following emerging trend was noted: basic research on plants for oral health is mainly done in Brazil, Europe and Australia. Brazil, China, India and New Zealand generally conduct value addition of natural products for fortification of toothpastes. African countries focus on bioprospecting and primary production of raw plants and other natural products with antimicrobial efficacies. The Middle East and Egypt predominantly research on plants used as chewing sticks. More research and funding are needed in the field of natural products for oral health, especially in Africa where oral diseases are fuelled by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). PMID:26522671

  20. Investigations into the antiadhesive activity of herbal extracts against Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Bensch, K; Tiralongo, J; Schmidt, K; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Lehmann, R; Tiralongo, E

    2011-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes of diarrhoea in the industrialized world, being associated with the occurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and inducing diseases partially through intestinal adherence. With increasing reports of C. jejuni drug resistance against standard antibiotics, investigations into antiadhesive agents for the prevention of bacterial infection are highly significant. Given the consumer-driven development towards holistic and integrative healthcare, research into additional anti-Campylobacter effects of herbal medicines that are already used for their beneficial effects on bowel and digestive functions is important. Twenty-one herbal extracts were screened for antiadhesive activity against C. jejuni using modifications of previously published antiadhesion assays. Antiadhesion effects with IC(50) values <3 mg/mL were obtained for seven ethanol plant extracts, with Zingiber officinale (ginger), Capsicum annum (cayenne) and Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) displaying the highest antiadhesion activity against C. jejuni (IC(50) : <0.1 mg/mL, 0.29 mg/mL and 0.65 mg/mL, respectively). Differences in antiadhesion activity were found for two different Echinacea species, with E. purpurea displaying significantly higher and dose dependent antiadhesion activity than E. angustifolia. No significant antiadhesion activity (IC(50) values >35 mg/mL) was found for Agrimonia eupatoria (agrimony), Andrographis paniculata (andrographis), Matricaria recutita (chamomile), Foeniculum vulgare (fennel), Filipendula ulmaria (meadowsweet) and Artemisia absinthium (wormwood) extracts. This study provides evidence for additional beneficial effects of marketed herbal medicines in gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:21280113

  1. Cytotoxic action of bisabololoxide A of German chamomile on human leukemia K562 cells in combination with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Ogata-Ikeda, Ikuko; Seo, Hakaru; Kawanai, Takuya; Hashimoto, Erika; Oyama, Yasuo

    2011-03-15

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) is a popular ingredient in herbal teas. In previous study, micromolar bisabololoxide A, one of main constituents in German chamomile, exerted cytotoxic action on rat thymocyte, a normal non-proliferative cell. This result prompted us to study the effect of bisabololoxide A on proliferative cancer cells and to seek the possibility of its use with 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer agent. In this study, the effect of micromolar bisabololoxide A on human leukemia K562 cells was cytometrically examined. Although the incubation of K562 cells with 10 μM bisabololoxide A for 72h did not significantly increase the percentage populations of dead cells and shrunken cells, the inhibitory action on the growth was obviously observed. It was not the case for the concentrations of less than 5 μM. The threshold concentration of bisabololoxide A to exert the cytotoxic action on K562 cells was ascertained to be 5-10 μM. Bisabololoxide A at 5-10 μM did not exert cytotoxic action on normal non-proliferative cells (rat thymocytes) in our previous study. Since the antiproliferative action of micromolar bisabololoxide A on cancerous cells was expected to be beneficial to cancer treatment, the modification of antiproliferative action of 5-fluorouracil (3-30 μM) by bisabololoxide A was studied. The combination of 5-fluorouracil and bisabololoxide further inhibited the growth of K562 cells although the additive inhibition of growth by bisabololoxide A became smaller as the concentration of 5-fluorouracil increased. Therefore, it is suggested that the simultaneous application of German chamomile containing bisabololoxide A may reduce the dose of 5-fluorouracil. PMID:20863677

  2. Phenolic characterization and antimicrobial activity of folk medicinal plant extracts for their applications in olive production.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Joana; Soto Vargas, Carolina; Pizzuolo, Pablo; Lucero, Gabriela; Silva, María Fernanda

    2014-06-01

    Phytophthora spp is important in plant pathology due to the importance of the diseases it causes. In olive trees, severe damages are caused by the disease known as "dry branch" occasioned by Phytophthora nicotianae, P. citrophthora and P. palmivora. Much effort has been made to find efficient methods of control, with a low negative impact on environment. In this regard, treatment with plant extracts is a valid strategy. The aims of the present study are (i) to determine the polyphenol composition of extracts of Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Matricaria recutita, and Larrea divaricata by CZE, (ii) correlate the analytical composition of these extracts with the inhibition on the mycelial growth, and (iii) determine the individual antimicrobial activity of the most active ingredients. A simple methodology was developed for the determination of catechin, naringenin, cinnamic acid, syringic acid, chlorogenic acid, apigenin, vanillic acid, luteolin, quercetin, and caffeic acid in plant extracts by CZE. The extraction of phenolic compounds in extract was performed by a miniaturized solid phase extraction using a home-made minicolumn packed with suitable filtering material (C18 , 50 mg). The optimized analyses conditions were: 30 mM boric acid buffer, pH 9.50; capillary, 57 cm full length, 50 cm effective length, 75 μm id, hydrodynamic injection 30 mbar, 2 s; 25 kV; 25°C, detection by UV absorbance at 290 nm. Sample results suggest that phenolic composition seems to have a great influence on inhibition of pathogens. The highest inhibitions of mycelial growth were observed for cinnamic acid and naringenin. PMID:24668423

  3. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R E; Allen, S; Chang, A P Y; Henderson, H; Hobson, G C; Karania, B; Morgan, K N; Pek, A S Y; Raghvani, K; Shee, C Y; Shikotra, J; Street, E; Abbas, Z; Ellis, K; Heer, J K; Alexander, S P H

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (-)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3-30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (-)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (-)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. PMID:23845591

  4. Antidiabetic effects of chamomile flowers extract in obese mice through transcriptional stimulation of nutrient sensors of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christopher; Wowro, Sylvia J; Rousseau, Morten; Freiwald, Anja; Kodelja, Vitam; Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Kelber, Olaf; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Given the significant increases in the incidence of metabolic diseases, efficient strategies for preventing and treating of these common disorders are urgently needed. This includes the development of phytopharmaceutical products or functional foods to prevent or cure metabolic diseases. Plant extracts from edible biomaterial provide a potential resource of structurally diverse molecules that can synergistically interfere with complex disorders. In this study we describe the safe application of ethanolic chamomile (Matricaria recutita) flowers extract (CFE) for the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes and associated disorders. We show in vitro that this extract activates in particular nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and its isotypes. In a cellular context, in human primary adipocytes CFE administration (300 µg/ml) led to specific expression of target genes of PPARγ, whereas in human hepatocytes CFE-induced we detected expression changes of genes that were regulated by PPARα. In vivo treatment of insulin-resistant high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6 mice with CFE (200 mg/kg/d) for 6 weeks considerably reduced insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and LDL/VLDL cholesterol. Co-feeding of lean C57BL/6 mice a HFD with 200 mg/kg/d CFE for 20 weeks showed effective prevention of fatty liver formation and hepatic inflammation, indicating additionally hepatoprotective effects of the extract. Moreover, CFE treatment did not reveal side effects, which have otherwise been associated with strong synthetic PPAR-targeting molecules, such as weight gain, liver disorders, hemodilution or bone cell turnover. Taken together, modulation of PPARs and other factors by chamomile flowers extract has the potential to prevent or treat type 2 diabetes and related disorders. PMID:24265809

  5. Herbal medicine for depression, anxiety and insomnia: a review of psychopharmacology and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; Panossian, Alexander; Schweitzer, Isaac; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has increased markedly over the past decades. To date however, a comprehensive review of herbal antidepressant, anxiolytic and hypnotic psychopharmacology and applications in depression, anxiety and insomnia has been absent. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to February 21st 2011) on commonly used psychotropic herbal medicines. A review of the literature was conducted to ascertain mechanisms of action of these botanicals, in addition to a systematic review of controlled clinical trials for treatment of mood, anxiety and sleep disorders, which are common comorbid psychiatric disorders. Specific emphasis was given to emerging phytomedicines. Analysis of evidence levels was conducted, as were effect sizes (Cohen's d) where data were available. Results provided evidence of a range of neurochemical, endocrinological, and epigenetic effects for 21 individual phytomedicines, which are detailed in this paper. Sixty six controlled studies were located involving eleven phytomedicines. Several of these provide a high level of evidence, such as Hypericum perforatum for major depression, and Piper methysticum for anxiety disorders. Several human clinical trials provide preliminary positive evidence of antidepressant effects (Echium amoenum, Crocus sativus, and Rhodiola rosea) and anxiolytic activity (Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Passiflora incanata, E. amoenum, and Scutellaria lateriflora). Caution should however be taken when interpreting the results as many studies have not been replicated. Several herbal medicines with in vitro and in vivo evidence are currently unexplored in human studies, and along with use of emerging genetic technologies "herbomics", are areas of potential future research. PMID:21601431

  6. Bisabololoxide A, one of the main constituents in German chamomile extract, induces apoptosis in rat thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Ikuko; Kawanai, Takuya; Hashimoto, Erika; Nishimura, Yumiko; Oyama, Yasuo; Seo, Hakaru

    2010-01-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), one of the popular ingredients in herbal teas, has been traditionally used for medicinal purposes. Bisabololoxide A (BSBO) is one of the main constituents in this herb. BSBO is supposed to be principle in some bioactivities of German chamomile such as anti-inflammatory, gastrointestinal, and antipruritic actions. Although the use of German chamomile has spread, the information related to toxicity of BSBO is very limited. In present study, the cytotoxic effect of micromolar BSBO was cytometrically examined on rat thymocytes by using appropriate fluorescent dyes. When the cells were incubated with BSBO for 24 h, BSBO at concentrations of 30 microM or more significantly increased populations of dead cells, shrunken cells, and cells with phosphatidylserine exposed on membrane surface. Both cell shrinkage and externalization of membrane phosphatidylserine are general features in an early stage of apoptosis. In addition, BSBO significantly increased population of cells containing hypodiploid DNA, and the increase was completely attenuated by Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-inhibitor for caspases, indicating an involvement of caspase activation. Thus, it is likely that the type of cell death induced by BSBO is apoptosis. The significant changes in cellular parameters of rat thymocytes by BSBO were not observed when the concentration was 10 microM or less. Furthermore, the short incubation (3 h) of cells even with 30-100 microM BSBO did not significantly affect the cells. Therefore, it may be suggested that BSBO is practically safe when German chamomile is conventionally used. PMID:19834689

  7. Infusion and decoction of wild German chamomile: bioactivity and characterization of organic acids and phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Calhelha, Ricardo C; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Queiroz, Maria João R P; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-01-15

    Natural products represent a rich source of biologically active compounds and are an example of molecular diversity, with recognised potential in drug discovery. Herein, the methanol extract of Matricaria recutita L. (German chamomile) and its decoction and infusion (the most consumed preparations of this herb) were submitted to an analysis of phytochemicals and bioactivity evaluation. The antioxidant activity was determined by free radicals scavenging activity, reducing power and inhibition of lipid peroxidation; the antitumour potential was tested in human tumour cell lines (breast, lung, colon, cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas), and the hepatotoxicity was evaluated using a porcine liver primary cell culture (non-tumour cells). All the samples revealed antioxidant properties. The decoction exhibited no antitumour activity (GI(50)>400 μg/mL) which could indicate that this bioactivity might be related to compounds (including phenolic compounds) that were not extracted or that were affected by the decoction procedure. Both plant methanol extract and infusion showed inhibitory activity to the growth of HCT-15 (GI(50) 250.24 and 298.23 μg/mL, respectively) and HeLa (GI(50) 259.36 and 277.67 μg/mL, respectively) cell lines, without hepatotoxicity (GI(50)>400 μg/mL). Infusion and decoction gave higher contents of organic acids (24.42 and 23.35 g/100g dw). Otherwise, the plant methanol extract contained the highest amounts of both phenolic acids (3.99 g/100g dw) and flavonoids (2.59 g/100g dw). The major compound found in all the preparations was luteolin O-acylhexoside. Overall, German chamomile contains important phytochemicals with bioactive properties (mainly antitumour potential selective to colon and cervical carcinoma cell lines) to be explored in the pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industries. PMID:23122148

  8. Biological activities of chamomile (Matricaria chamomile) flowers’ extract against the survival and egg laying of the cattle fever tick (Acari Ixodidae)*

    PubMed Central

    Pirali-Kheirabadi, Khodadad; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the potential of acaricidal activity of chamomile flowers’ extract was studied against engorged Rhipicephalus annulatus tick under laboratory condition. For this purpose, the engorged females of Rhipicephalus annulatus were exposed to two-fold serial dilutions of chamomile flowers’ extract (0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 4.0% and 8.0%) using “dipping method” in vitro. The engorged ticks were immersed in different plant dilutions (five ticks for each dilution) for 1 min and they were immediately incubated in separate Petri dishes for each replicate at 26 °C and 80% relative humidity. Mortality rate for each treatment was recorded 5 d after incubation. The mortality rate caused by different dilutions of chamomile flowers’ extract ranged from 6.67% to 26.7%, whereas no mortality was recorded for non-treated control group. The mass of produced eggs varied from 0.23 g (in 8.0% solution) to 0.58 g (in control), with no statistical differences between the treatments and control (P>0.05). Also the chamomile flowers’ extract in highest concentration used (8.0%) caused 46.67% failure in egg laying in engorged females while no failure was observed for non-treated control group. Macroscopic observations indicated that in effective concentrations of plant (4.0% and 8.0%), patchy hemorrhagic swelling appeared on the skin of treated ticks. The results presented for the first time in this study imply that chamomile may be considered as a promising plant for biocontrol of cattle fever tick disease in the field condition. PMID:17726752

  9. Folk medicine in the northern coast of Colombia: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional remedies are an integral part of Colombian culture. Here we present the results of a three-year study of ethnopharmacology and folk-medicine use among the population of the Atlantic Coast of Colombia, specifically in department of Bolívar. We collected information related to different herbal medicinal uses of the local flora in the treatment of the most common human diseases and health disorders in the area, and determined the relative importance of the species surveyed. Methods Data on the use of medicinal plants were collected using structured interviews and through observations and conversations with local communities. A total of 1225 participants were interviewed. Results Approximately 30 uses were reported for plants in traditional medicine. The plant species with the highest fidelity level (Fl) were Crescentia cujete L. (flu), Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (flu and cough), Euphorbia tithymaloides L. (inflammation), Gliricidia_sepium_(Jacq.) Kunth (pruritic ailments), Heliotropium indicum L. (intestinal parasites) Malachra alceifolia Jacq. (inflammation), Matricaria chamomilla L. (colic) Mentha sativa L. (nervousness), Momordica charantia L. (intestinal parasites), Origanum vulgare L. (earache), Plantago major L. (inflammation) and Terminalia catappa L. (inflammation). The most frequent ailments reported were skin affections, inflammation of the respiratory tract, and gastro-intestinal disorders. The majority of the remedies were prepared from freshly collected plant material from the wild and from a single species only. The preparation of remedies included boiling infusions, extraction of fresh or dry whole plants, leaves, flowers, roots, fruits, and seeds. The parts of the plants most frequently used were the leaves. In this study were identified 39 plant species, which belong to 26 families. There was a high degree of consensus from informants on the medical indications of the different species. Conclusions This study presents new

  10. In vitro fermentation of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides and low molecular mass arabinoxylans with different structural properties from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) bran and psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk) seed husk.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Annick; Van Craeyveld, Valerie; Van de Wiele, Tom; Verstraete, Willy; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2012-02-01

    Ball milling was used for producing complex arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (AXOS) and low molecular mass arabinoxylans (AX) from wheat bran, pericarp-enriched wheat bran, and psyllium seed husk. The arabinose to xylose ratio of the samples produced varied between 0.14 and 0.92, and their average degree of polymerization (avDP) ranged between 42 and 300. Their fermentation for 48 h in an in vitro system using human colon suspensions was compared to enzymatically produced wheat bran AXOS with an arabinose to xylose ratio of 0.22 and 0.34 and an avDP of 4 and 40, respectively. Degrees of AXOS fermentation ranged from 28% to 50% and were lower for the higher arabinose to xylose ratio and/or higher avDP materials. Arabinose to xylose ratios of the unfermented fractions exceeded those of their fermented counterparts, indicating that molecules less substituted with arabinose were preferably fermented. Xylanase, arabinofuranosidase, and xylosidase activities increased with incubation time. Enzyme activities in the samples containing psyllium seed husk AX or psyllium seed husk AXOS were generally higher than those in the wheat bran AXOS preparations. Fermentation gave rise to unbranched short-chain fatty acids. Concentrations of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids increased to 1.9-2.6, 1.9-2.8, and 1.3-2.0 times their initial values, respectively, after 24 h incubation. Results show that the human intestinal microbiota can at least partially use complex AXOS and low molecular mass AX. The tested materials are thus interesting physiologically active carbohydrates. PMID:22224418

  11. Potential of Endophytic Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 Isolated from Plantago asiatica L. for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Ling, Wanting; Li, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes are ubiquitous in plants, and they may have a natural capacity to biodegrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In our study, a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 was isolated from P. asiatica L. grown in a PAH-contaminated site. The effects of environmental variables on phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 were studied, and the ability of strain PHE-3 to use high molecular weight PAH (HMW-PAH) as a sole carbon source was also evaluated. Our results indicated that pH value of 4.0-8.0, temperature of 30 °C-42 °C, initial phenanthrene concentration less than 100 mg·L(-1), and some additional nutrients are favorable for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by strain PHE-3. The maximum biodegradation efficiency of phenanthrene was achieved at 99.9% after 84 h cultivation with additional glutamate. Moreover, the phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 was positively correlated with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity (ρ = 0.981, p < 0.05), suggesting that strain PHE-3 had the capability of degrading HMW-PAHs. In the presence of other 2-, 3-ringed PAHs, strain PHE-3 effectively degraded HMW-PAHs through co-metabolism. The results of this study are beneficial in that the re-colonization potential and PAH degradation performance of endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 may be applied towards reducing PAH contamination in plants. PMID:27347988

  12. Potential of Endophytic Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 Isolated from Plantago asiatica L. for Reduction of PAH Contamination in Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Ling, Wanting; Li, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes are ubiquitous in plants, and they may have a natural capacity to biodegrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In our study, a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 was isolated from P. asiatica L. grown in a PAH-contaminated site. The effects of environmental variables on phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 were studied, and the ability of strain PHE-3 to use high molecular weight PAH (HMW-PAH) as a sole carbon source was also evaluated. Our results indicated that pH value of 4.0–8.0, temperature of 30 °C–42 °C, initial phenanthrene concentration less than 100 mg·L−1, and some additional nutrients are favorable for the biodegradation of phenanthrene by strain PHE-3. The maximum biodegradation efficiency of phenanthrene was achieved at 99.9% after 84 h cultivation with additional glutamate. Moreover, the phenanthrene biodegradation by strain PHE-3 was positively correlated with the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity (ρ = 0.981, p < 0.05), suggesting that strain PHE-3 had the capability of degrading HMW-PAHs. In the presence of other 2-, 3-ringed PAHs, strain PHE-3 effectively degraded HMW-PAHs through co-metabolism. The results of this study are beneficial in that the re-colonization potential and PAH degradation performance of endophytic Paenibacillus sp. PHE-3 may be applied towards reducing PAH contamination in plants. PMID:27347988

  13. Fecal microbiome of growing pigs fed a cereal based diet including chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) or ribwort (Plantago lanceolata L.) forage.

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved J, Johan; Jansson, Janet K.; Lindberg , Jan E.

    2015-12-18

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate how inclusion of chicory forage or ribwort forage in a cereal-based diet influenced the fecal microbial community (microbiome) in newly weaned (35 days of age) piglets. The piglets were fed a cereal-based diet without (B) and with inclusion (80 and 160 g/kg air-dry forage) of vegetative shoots of chicory (C) and leaves of ribwort (R) forage in a 35-day growth trial. Fecal samples were collected at the start (D0), 17 (D17) and 35 (D35) days after weaning and profiles of the microbial consortia were generated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). 454-FLX pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to analyze the microbial composition in a subset of the samples already analyzed with T-RFLP. RESULTS: The microbial clustering pattern was primarily dependent on age of the pigs, but diet effects could also be observed. Lactobacilli and enterobacteria were more abundant at D0, whereas the genera Streptococcus, Treponema, Clostridium, Clostridiaceae1 and Coprococcus were present in higher abundances at D35. Pigs fed ribwort had an increased abundance of sequences classified as Treponema and a reduction in lactobacilli. However, the abundance of Prevotellaceae increased with age in on both the chicory and the ribwort diet. Moreover, there were significant correlations between the abundance of Bacteroides and the digested amount of galactose, uronic acids and total non-starch polysaccharides, and between the abundance of Bacteroidales and the digested amount of xylose. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that both chicory and ribwort inclusion in the diet of newly weaned pigs influenced the composition of the fecal microbiota and that digestion of specific dietary components was correlated with species composition of the microbiota. Moreover, this study showed that the gut will be exposed to a dramatic shift in the microbial community structure several weeks after weaning.

  14. Exposure to airborne microorganisms, dust and endotoxin during processing of peppermint and chamomile herbs on farms.

    PubMed

    Skórska, Czesława; Sitkowska, Jolanta; Krysińska-Traczyk, Ewa; Cholewa, Grazyna; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the levels of microorganisms, dust and endotoxin in the air during processing of peppermint (Mentha piperita) and chamomile (Matricaria recutita) by herb farmers, and to examine the species composition of airborne microflora. Air samples were collected on glass fibre filters by use of personal samplers on 13 farms owned by herb cultivating farmers, located in Lublin province (eastern Poland). The concentrations of total viable microorganisms (bacteria + fungi) in the farm air during processing of peppermint herb were large, within a range from 895.1-6,015.8 x 10(3) cfu/m(3) (median 1,055.3 x 10(3) cfu/m(3)). During processing of chamomile herb they were much lower and varied within a range from 0.88-295.6 x 10(3) cfu/m(3) (median 27.3 x 10(3) cfu/m(3)). Gram-negative bacteria distinctly prevailed during processing of peppermint leaves, forming 46.4-88.5 % of the total airborne microflora. During processing of chamomile herb, Gram-negative bacteria were dominant at 3 out of 6 sampling sites forming 54.7-75.3 % of total microflora, whereas at the remaining 3 sites the most common were fungi forming 46.2-99.9 % of the total count. The species Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Erwinia herbicola, Enterobacter agglomerans ), having strong allergenic and endotoxic properties, distinctly prevailed among Gram-negative isolates. Among fungi, the most common species was Alternaria alternata. The concentrations of airborne dust and endotoxin determined on the examined herb farms were large. The concentrations of airborne dust during peppermint and chamomile processing ranged from 86.7-958.9 mg/m(3), and from 1.1-499.2 mg/m(3), respectively (medians 552.3 mg/m(3) and 12.3 mg/m(3)). The concentrations of airborne endotoxin determined during peppermint and chamomile processing were within a wide range 1.53-208.33 microg/m(3) and 0.005-2604.19 microg/m(3) respectively (medians 57.3 microg/m(3) and 0.96 microg/m(3)). In conclusion, farmers

  15. Evaluation of molecular chaperons Hsp72 and neuropeptide Y as characteristic markers of adaptogenic activity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Asea, Alexzander; Kaur, Punit; Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Karl Georg

    2013-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogenic substances derived from Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract stimulated the expression and release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and molecular chaperone Hsp72 from isolated human neurolgia cells. Both of these mediators of stress response are known to play an important role in regulation of neuroendocrine system and immune response. We further demonstrated that ADAPT-232 induced release of Hsp70 is mediated by NPY, suggesting an existence of NPY-mediated pathway of activation of Hsp72 release into the blood circulation system. The objective of this study was to determine whether this pathway is common for adaptogens and whether NPY and/or Hsp72 can be considered as necessary specific biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. The release of NPY and Hsp72 from neuroglia cells in response to treatment with various plant extracts (n=23) including selected validated adaptogens, partly validated adaptogens, claimed but negligibly validated adaptogens and some other plant extracts affecting neuroendocrine and immune systems but never considered as adaptogens was measured using high throughput ELISA techniques. We demonstrated that adaptogens, e.g. R. rosea, S. chinensis and E. senticosus stimulate both NPY and Hsp70 release from neuroblastoma cells, while tonics and stimulants have no significant effect on NPY in this in vitro test. In the groups of partly validated adaptogens the effect of Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera was not statistically significant both on NPY and Hsp70 release, while the activating effect of Bryonia alba and Rhaponticum cartamoides was significant only on Hsp70. In contrast, all tested non-adaptogens, such as antiinflammatoty plant extracts Matricaria recutita, Pelargonium sidoides, Hedera helix and Vitis vinifera significantly inhibit Hsp70 release and have no influence on NPY release from neuroblastoma

  16. Use of molybdate as novel complex-forming selector in the analysis of polyhydric phenols by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Polásek, Miroslav; Petriska, Ivan; Pospísilová, Marie; Jahodár, Ludek

    2006-03-15

    Molybdate was examined as a complex-forming additive to the CE background electrolytes (BGE) to affect the selectivity of separation of polyhydric phenols such as flavonoids (apigenin, hyperoside, luteolin, quercetin and rutin) and hydroxyphenylcarboxylic acids (ferulic, caffeic, p-coumaric and chlorogenic acid). Effects of the buffer concentrations and pH and the influence of molybdate concentration on the migration times of the analytes were investigated. In contrast to borate (which is a buffering and complex-forming agent generally used in CE at pH > or =9) molybdate forms more stable complexes with aromatic o-dihydroxy compounds and hence the complex-formation effect is observed at considerably lower pH. Model mixtures of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid were separated with 25 mM morpholinoethanesulfonic acid of pH 5.4 (adjusted with Tris) containing 0.15 mM sodium molybdate as the BGE (25 kV, silica capillary effective length 45 cm x 0.1mm I.D., UV-vis detection at 280 nm). With 25 mM 2-hydroxy-3-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl]propanesulphonic acid/Tris of pH* 7.4 containing 2mM sodium molybdate in aqueous 25% (v/v) methanol as the BGE mixtures of all the above mentioned flavonoids, p-coumaric acid and chlorogenic acid could be separated (the same capillary as above, UV-vis detection at 263 nm). The calibration curves (analyte peak area versus concentration) were rectilinear (r>0.998) for approximately 8-35 microg/ml of an analyte (with 1-nitroso-2-naphthol as internal standard). The limit of quantification values ranged between 1.1 mg l(-1) for p-coumaric acid and 2.8 mg l(-1) for quercetin. The CE method was employed for the assay of flavonoids in medicinal plant extracts. The R.S.D. values ranged between 0.9 and 4.7% (n=3) when determining luteolin (0.08%) and apigenin (0.92%) in dry Matricaria recutita flowers and rutin (1.03%) and hyperoside (0.82%) in dry Hypericum perforatum haulm. The recoveries were >96%. PMID

  17. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  18. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.E. Allen, S.; Chang, A.P.Y.; Henderson, H.; Hobson, G.C.; Karania, B.; Morgan, K.N.; Pek, A.S.Y.; Raghvani, K.; Shee, C.Y.; Shikotra, J.; Street, E.; Abbas, Z.; Ellis, K.; Heer, J.K.; Alexander, S.P.H.

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (−)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3–30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (−)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (−)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (−)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. - Highlights: • Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol are present in chamomile. • They produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in arteries. • These

  19. Ethnoveterinary herbal remedies used by farmers in four north-eastern Swiss cantons (St. Gallen, Thurgau, Appenzell Innerrhoden and Appenzell Ausserrhoden)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Very few ethnoveterinary surveys have been conducted in central Europe. However, traditional knowledge on the use of medicinal plants might be an option for future concepts in treatment of livestock diseases. Therefore the aim of this study was to document and analyse the traditional knowledge and use of homemade herbal remedies for livestock by farmers in four Swiss cantons. Methods Research was conducted in 2012. Fifty farmers on 38 farms were interviewed with the aid of semistructured interviews. Detailed information about the plants used and their mode of preparation were documented as well as dosage, route of administration, category of use, origin of knowledge, frequency of use, and satisfaction with the treatment. Results In total, 490 homemade remedies were collected. Out of these, 315 homemade remedies contained only one plant species (homemade single species herbal remedies, HSHR), which are presented in this paper. Seventy six species from 44 botanical families were mentioned. The most HSHR were quoted for the families of Asteraceae, Polygonaceae and Urticaceae. The plant species with the highest number of HSHRs were Matricaria recutita L., Calendula officinalis L., Rumex obtusifolius L. and Urtica dioica L. For each HSHR, one to eight different applications were enumerated. A total of 428 applications were documented, the majority of which were used to treat cattle. The main applications were in treatment of skin afflictions and sores, followed by gastrointestinal disorders and metabolic dysfunctions. Topical administration was most frequently used, followed by oral administration. In nearly half of the cases the knowledge on preparing and using herbal remedies was from forefathers and relatives. More than one third of the applications were used more than ten times during the last five years, and in about sixty percent of the cases, the last application was during the last year preceding the interviews. Conclusions Traditional knowledge of

  20. Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya; Brauer, Gerhard; Boepple, Willi

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of medicinal plants is an option for livestock farmers who are not allowed to use allopathic drugs under certified organic programs or cannot afford to use allopathic drugs for minor health problems of livestock. Methods In 2003 we conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 participants obtained using a purposive sample. Medicinal plants are used to treat a range of conditions. A draft manual prepared from the data was then evaluated by participants at a participatory workshop. Results There are 128 plants used for ruminant health and diets, representing several plant families. The following plants are used for abscesses: Berberis aquifolium/Mahonia aquifolium Echinacea purpurea, Symphytum officinale, Bovista pila, Bovista plumbea, Achillea millefolium and Usnea longissima. Curcuma longa L., Salix scouleriana and Salix lucida are used for caprine arthritis and caprine arthritis encephalitis.Euphrasia officinalis and Matricaria chamomilla are used for eye problems. Wounds and injuries are treated with Bovista spp., Usnea longissima, Calendula officinalis, Arnica sp., Malva sp., Prunella vulgaris, Echinacea purpurea, Berberis aquifolium/Mahonia aquifolium, Achillea millefolium, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Hypericum perforatum, Lavandula officinalis, Symphytum officinale and Curcuma longa. Syzygium aromaticum and Pseudotsuga menziesii are used for coccidiosis. The following plants are used for diarrhea and scours: Plantago major, Calendula officinalis, Urtica dioica, Symphytum officinale, Pinus ponderosa, Potentilla pacifica, Althaea officinalis, Anethum graveolens, Salix alba and Ulmus fulva. Mastitis is treated with Achillea millefolium, Arctium lappa, Salix alba, Teucrium scorodonia and Galium aparine. Anethum graveolens and Rubus sp., are given for increased milk production.Taraxacum officinale, Zea mays, and Symphytum officinale are used for udder edema. Ketosis is treated with Gaultheria shallon, Vaccinium sp., and Symphytum officinale. Hedera

  1. Negative feedback within a mutualism: host-specific growth of mycorrhizal fungi reduces plant benefit.

    PubMed Central

    Bever, James D

    2002-01-01

    A basic tenet of ecology is that negative feedback on abundance plays an important part in the coexistence of species within guilds. Mutualistic interactions generate positive feedbacks on abundance and therefore are not thought to contribute to the maintenance of diversity. Here, I report evidence of negative feedback on plant growth through changes in the composition of their mutualistic fungal symbionts, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Negative feedback results from asymmetries in the delivery of benefit between plant and AM fungal species in which the AM fungus that grows best with the plant Plantago lanceolata is a poor growth promoter for Plantago. Growth of Plantago is, instead, best promoted by the AM fungal species that accumulate with a second plant species, Panicum sphaerocarpon. The resulting community dynamic leads to a decline in mutualistic benefit received by Plantago, and can contribute to the coexistence of these two competing plant species. PMID:12573075

  2. Bioassay-directed isolation and identification of phytotoxic and fungitoxic acetylenes from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Sonia C N; Cantrell, Charles L; Duke, Stephen O; Wedge, David E; Nandula, Vijay K; Moraes, Rita M; Cerdeira, Antonio L

    2012-06-13

    Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronquist syn. (horseweed) is a problematic and invasive weed with reported allelopathic properties. To identify the phytotoxic constituents of the aerial parts, a systematic bioactivity-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract was performed. Three active enyne derivatives, (2Z,8Z)-matricaria acid methyl ester, (4Z,8Z)-matricaria lactone, and (4Z)-lachnophyllum lactone, were identified. The lactones inhibited growth of the monocot Agrostis stolonifera (bentgrass) and the dicot Lactuca sativa (lettuce) at 1 mg mL(-1), while the (2Z,8Z)-matricaria acid methyl ester was less active. In a dose-response screening of the lactones for growth inhibitory activity against Lemna paucicostata , (4Z)-lachnophyllum lactone was the most active with an IC50 of 104 μM, while the (4Z,8Z)-matricaria lactone was less active (IC50 of 220 μM). In a fungal direct bioautography assay, the two lactones at 10 and 100 μg/spot inhibited growth of the plant pathogenic fungi Colletotrichum acutatum , Colletotrichum fragariae , and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides . In a dose-response screening of the lactones against six different plant pathogenic fungi, (4Z,8Z)-matricaria lactone was more active than the commercial fungicide azoxystrobin on Col. acutatum , Col. fragariae , and Col. gloeosporioides at 30 μM and about as active as the commercial fungicide captan against Col. gloeosporioides , while (4Z)-lachnophyllum lactone was less active. PMID:22612410

  3. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    PubMed

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis. PMID:25780826

  4. Chemical composition of essential oils from leaves, stems, flower heads and roots of Conyza bonariensis L. from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, S; Elaissi, A; Ben Jannet, H; Harzallah-Skhiri, F

    2011-01-01

    The essential oils isolated at the flowering stage in spring, summer and autumn of the aerial and underground parts of Conyza bonariensis L. growing in Tunisia were analysed by GC and GC/MS; 143 constituents were identified, and among them 20 were major. The oils of C. bonariensis gathered in spring were rich in matricaria ester (1.2-67.3%), (Z)-nerolidol (0.3-19.9%) and caryophyllene oxide (0.8-14.3%). In the summer samples, the oils of C. bonariensis were rich in matricaria ester (1.6-76.4%), caryophyllene oxide (1.6-22.6%) and (E)-β-farnesene (1.1-22.7%). The main constituents in the autumn samples were matricaria ester (trace to 63.5%), geranyl acetone (0.0-25.3%), trans-α-bergamotene (0.0-24.3%) and limonene (2.7-15.3%). The oils showed significant variation among the seasons. Remarkable differences were found between the constituent percentages of the different studied organs. The C. bonariensis sample from Tunisia was a matricaria ester chemotype and was quite different from the samples of other countries of origin. PMID:21240765

  5. Steam distillation extraction kinetics regression models to predict essential oil yield, composition, and bioactivity of chamomile oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is one of the most widely spread and used medicinal and essential oil crop in the world. Chamomile essential oil is extracted via steam distillation of the inflorescences (flowers). In this study, distillation time (DT) was found to be a crucial determinant of yi...

  6. LC-PDA-ESI/MS Identification of the Phenolic Components of Three Compositae Spices: Chamomile, Tarragon, and Mexican Arnica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) and Mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuoides) are common compositae spices and herbs found in the US market. They contain flavonoids and hydroxycinnamates that are potentially beneficial to human health. A standardized LC-PDA-ESI...

  7. The efficiency of adjuvants combined with flupyrsulfuron-methyl plus metsulfuron-methyl (Lexus XPE) on weed control.

    PubMed

    Heremans, B; Isebaert, S; Verhoeven, R; Haesaert, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory tests on a selection of weeds (Viola arvensis, Polygonum persicaria, Chamomilla recutita, Chenopodium album, Veronica persicaria, Alopecurus myosusroides) to investigate the efficiency of flupyrsulfuron-methyl plus metsutfuronmethyl (Lexus XPE) in combination with different adjuvants. The efficiency of the herbicide improved in combination of adjuvants. The level of phytotoxicity of the adjuvants-herbicide treatments appllied varied among the different weed species. PMID:18399424

  8. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic potential of a high fiber diet in healthy versus diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Díez, Raquel; García, Juan J; Diez, M José; Sierra, Matilde; Sahagún, Ana M; Calle, Ángela P; Fernández, Nélida

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate potential hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic effects of Plantago ovata husk included in the diet, in healthy and diabetic rabbits. We also examined the effects of this fiber in other biochemical parameters. Two groups of 18 rabbits were used. The first group was fed with standard chow and the second with chow supplemented with Plantago ovata husk (3.5 mg/kg/day). On day 14 diabetes mellitus was induced by the intravenous administration of alloxan (80 mg/kg). After an oral glucose load (3 g), glucose, insulin, and other biochemical parameters were determined on day 14 (healthy rabbits) and on day 28 (diabetic rabbits). In healthy rabbits, fiber did not modify glucose or insulin levels but decreased significantly total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, atherogenic index, and glycosylated hemoglobin. In diabetic rabbits, fiber was more beneficial in mild diabetics than in severe diabetics with significant decreases in glucose levels and increases in insulin concentrations. In these animals fiber caused an important reduction in cholesterol, indicating a beneficial effect of Plantago ovata husk in diabetic rabbits. Although further studies in patients are necessary, we think that Plantago ovata husk offers interesting perspectives to be administered to patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23762869

  9. NUTRITIVE VALUE OF CHICORY AND ENGLISH PLANTAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graziers in the northeast often face forage shortages in midsummer. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and English plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) have been introduced in the USA as perennial herbs for pastures and have been touted as drought tolerant. We conducted two field-plot experiments at Rock S...

  10. Gradual disintegration of the floral symmetry gene network is implicated in the evolution of a wind-pollination syndrome.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jill C; Martinez, Ciera C; Hileman, Lena C

    2011-02-01

    Angiosperms exhibit staggering diversity in floral form, and evolution of floral morphology is often correlated with changes in pollination syndrome. The showy, bilaterally symmetrical flowers of the model species Antirrhinum majus (Plantaginaceae) are highly specialized for bee pollination. In A. majus, Cycloidea (CYC), Dichotoma (DICH), Radialis (RAD), and Divaricata (DIV) specify the development of floral bilateral symmetry. However, it is unclear to what extent evolution of these genes has resulted in flower morphological divergence among closely related members of Plantaginaceae differing in pollination syndrome. We compared floral symmetry genes from insect-pollinated Digitalis purpurea, which has bilaterally symmetrical flowers, with those from closely related Aragoa abietina and wind-pollinated Plantago major, both of which have radially symmetrical flowers. We demonstrate that Plantago, but not Aragoa, species have lost a dorsally expressed CYC-like gene and downstream targets RAD and DIV. Furthermore, the single P. major CYC-like gene is expressed across all regions of the flower, similar to expression of its ortholog in closely related Veronica serpyllifolia. We propose that changes in the expression of duplicated CYC-like genes led to the evolution of radial flower symmetry in Aragoa/Plantago, and that further disintegration of the symmetry gene pathway resulted in the wind-pollination syndrome of Plantago. This model underscores the potential importance of gene loss in the evolution of ecologically important traits. PMID:21282634

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing. PMID:27609926

  12. Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Potential of a High Fiber Diet in Healthy versus Diabetic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Raquel; García, Juan J.; Diez, M. José; Sierra, Matilde; Sahagún, Ana M.; Calle, Ángela P.; Fernández, Nélida

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate potential hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic effects of Plantago ovata husk included in the diet, in healthy and diabetic rabbits. We also examined the effects of this fiber in other biochemical parameters. Two groups of 18 rabbits were used. The first group was fed with standard chow and the second with chow supplemented with Plantago ovata husk (3.5 mg/kg/day). On day 14 diabetes mellitus was induced by the intravenous administration of alloxan (80 mg/kg). After an oral glucose load (3 g), glucose, insulin, and other biochemical parameters were determined on day 14 (healthy rabbits) and on day 28 (diabetic rabbits). In healthy rabbits, fiber did not modify glucose or insulin levels but decreased significantly total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, atherogenic index, and glycosylated hemoglobin. In diabetic rabbits, fiber was more beneficial in mild diabetics than in severe diabetics with significant decreases in glucose levels and increases in insulin concentrations. In these animals fiber caused an important reduction in cholesterol, indicating a beneficial effect of Plantago ovata husk in diabetic rabbits. Although further studies in patients are necessary, we think that Plantago ovata husk offers interesting perspectives to be administered to patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23762869

  13. 7 CFR 201.51 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... kochia that pass through a 1 mm opening, square-hole sieve, when shaken for 30 seconds. (8) The thin... devoid of the husk and pass through a 1/13th-inch, round-hole sieve. (ii) Bulblets which show evident... swollen, dimpled or have minute holes. (7) Buckhorn (Plantago lanceolata): Black seeds, with no...

  14. Template free synthesis of natural carbohydrates functionalised fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Berenjian, Aydin; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Template-assisted synthesis is one of the most recognised techniques for fabrication of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). However, this process is time consuming, toxic and expensive. In this study, the authors report a completely novel approach for the green and facile synthesis of AgNCs using Matricaria chamomilla, without any additional template. Fluorescent and colloidally stable AgNCs with average particle size of 2.4 nm were successfully produced. They found that carbohydrates from Matricaria chamomilla act as an ideal template to generate fluorescent AgNCs. Moreover, oxygen-bearing functional groups were validated to be the active groups for anchoring and reducing of Ag(+) ions. The novel carbohydrate coating method makes the prepared nanoclusters completely hydrophilic and stable in aqueous matrices. PMID:27256890

  15. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C C; Barbosa, L; Seito, L N; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus and 16 Escherichia coli strains from human specimens was carried out using the dilution method in Mueller-Hinton agar. Some phenolic compounds with antimicrobial properties were established, and all EOs had a higher antimicrobial activity than the extracts. Matricaria chamomilla extract and E. uniflora EO were efficient against S. aureus strains, while E. uniflora and V. polyanthes extracts and V. polyanthes EO showed the best antimicrobial activity against E. coli strains. Staphylococcus aureus strains were more susceptible to the tested plant products than E. coli, but all natural products promoted antimicrobial growth inhibition. PMID:22007687

  16. Element accumulation, distribution, and phytoremediation potential in selected metallophytes growing in a contaminated area.

    PubMed

    Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Kandziora-Ciupa, Marta; Ciepał, Ryszard

    2015-07-01

    The distribution of elements in three pseudometallophytes species Cardaminopsis arenosa, Plantago lanceolata, and Plantago major, naturally occurring at metalliferous and non-metalliferous sites in southern Poland, was investigated. The accumulation of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, as well as Ca, P, Na, and K in shoots and roots was measured. The level of the accumulated trace elements (ATE) was visibly higher in C. arenosa and P. lanceolata from metalliferous sites than non-contaminated ones. However, the level of the accumulated nutrient elements (ANE) was visibly higher only in C. arenosa plants. Also, higher potassium share in ANE was found in the shoots of C. arenosa and Plantago species from metalliferous sites than non-contaminated ones. The highest content of Cd, Zn, Pb, Al, Fe, and Mn was found in C. arenosa, which better reflected metal concentrations in the metalliferous and non-metalliferous soil than other plants. In the studied Plantago species, in almost all cases in all sites TF (translocation coefficient) and MR (mobility ratio) were below 1, which indicates they use the excluder strategy. The best accumulation ability was found for C. arenosa. The higher translocation coefficients (TF > 1) for Zn and Cd in C. arenosa shoots make it suitable for phytoextraction from soil, while the lower translocation ratios (TF < 1) for Zn and Cd in Plantago species and also for Pb in C. arenosa make them suitable for phytostabilization. Almost in all cases the plants had enrichment coefficient >2, which suggested that they may act as indicators of the soil metal contamination. PMID:26088758

  17. T-lymphocyte cytokine profiles in compositae airborne dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Stingeni, L; Agea, E; Lisi, P; Spinozzi, F

    1999-10-01

    Compositae airborne dermatitis is a well-recognized disorder characterized by erythematosquamous lesions and papules on light-exposed areas. The presence of positive patch test reactions and the absence of specific serum IgE suggest delayed-type hypersensitivity, the murine model of which is characterized by a Th1 cytokine production profile [high amounts of interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-2; little or no IL-4 and IL-5]. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytokine profile of T-cell lines and T-cell clones from peripheral blood in a 38-year-old non-atopic male woodcutter affected by seasonal airborne contact dermatitis. The patient showed positive patch test reactions to several Compositae extracts (Achillea millefolium, Chamomilla recutita, Tanacetum parthenium, T. vulgare) and sesquiterpene lactone mix. On prick testing with Compositae and other plants, serum-specific IgE levels and phototesting were negative or normal. Allergen-specific T-cell lines produced with Compositae extracts showed a good in vitro cell proliferation only to C. recutita extract. Serial cloning performed using the C. recutita-specific T-cell lines revealed an alphabeta+CD4+ phenotype with high amounts of IFN-gamma and IL-4 in T-cell clones. Thus, these cells expressed a preferential Th0 phenotype. These data suggest that in addition to IFN-gamma, other T-cell derived cytokines, such as IL-4, may play a part in the immunopathogenesis of contact dermatitis. PMID:10583117

  18. Comprehensive metabolite profiling of Plantaginis Semen using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry coupled with elevated energy technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiming; Tong, Renchao; Wang, Rui; Bligh, S W Annie; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-05-01

    Plantaginis Semen is commonly used in traditional medicine to treat edema, hypertension, and diabetes. The commercially available Plantaginis Semen in China mainly comes from three species. To clarify the chemical composition and distinct different species of Plantaginis Semen, we established a metabolite profiling method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry coupled with elevated energy technique. A total of 108 compounds, including phenylethanoid glycosides, flavonoids, guanidine derivatives, terpenoids, organic acids, and fatty acids, were identified from Plantago asiatica L., P. depressa Willd., and P. major L. Results showed significant differences in chemical components among the three species, particularly flavonoids. This study is the first to provide a comprehensive chemical profile of Plantaginis Semen, which could be involved into the quality control, medication guide, and developing new drug of Plantago seeds. PMID:27030316

  19. Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, H.L.; Chapin, F.S. III; Field, C.B.

    1995-06-01

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients altered interspecific competitive performance of three grassland annuals, all exhibiting the C{sub 3} metabolic pathway. Plantago erecta, an herbaceous dicot dominant in low-fertility serpentine grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at low soil nutrients. Bromus hordeaceus, an introduced grass dominant in higher fertility sandstone grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Plantago was slightly enhanced under elevated CO{sub 2}, but only at high soil nutrients, whereas interspecific competitive ability of Bromus was stimulated under elevated CO{sub 2} at both low and high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Lasthenia californica, another herbaceous dicot common in serpentine grassland, was low in all treatments, and tended to decrease with elevated CO{sub 2} at low soil nutrients. Our results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may shift plant species abundance of serpentine grassland in favor of Bromus hordeaceus.

  20. Antidepressant effect of three traditional Chinese medicines in the learned helplessness model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Luo, Lan; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2004-04-01

    Plantago asiatica, Scrophularia ningpoensis and Ilex pubescens are among the traditional Chinese medicines which are more frequently prescribed for treating depression-like ailments in the past and present traditional Chinese medical practice. The present work was therefore conducted to evaluate the presumable antidepressant effects of the extracts derived from the three remedies in mice using the learned helplessness model being used for screening for antidepressant compounds in modern medicinal researches. As a result, the petroleum extracts of Plantago asiatica and Ilex pubescens as well as the EtOAc extract of Scrophularia ningpoensis and the petroleum-soluble fraction of the acidic hydrolysate of the water extract of Ilex pubescens (after petroleum extraction) decreased significantly the number of escape failures relative to the control. The finding rationalized the clinical prescription of the herbs for the treatment of depression, and shined a clue for the characterization of the antidepressant phytochemical(s). PMID:15120459

  1. A review of the efficacy of traditional Iranian medicine for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Roja; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2010-09-28

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet known, but many factors such as defects in the immune system, oxidative stress, microbial content in the gastrointestinal tract, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), and leukotriene B4 (LB4) are thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several medicinal plants are thought to be effective for the treatment of IBD. In this study, information on all of these remedies were derived from all available old sources such as documents or notes and books and were added to the information derived from modern medical databases covering all in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials. For some of these plants, only one or two mechanisms of action have been found such as in Cassia fistula, Lepidium sativum, and Bunium persicum. However, for some plants various mechanisms of action are known. For example, Commiphora mukul is effective in IBD due to its immunomodulatory, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties and it decreases NF-κB, NO and Cox-2. Another herb, Plantago ovata, has immunomodulatory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and wound healing activities and decreases NO and LB4. Considering the mechanisms of action of these plants, the combination of some of them may be useful because of their many mechanisms of action such as Pistacia lentiscus, Bunium persicum, Solanum nigrum, Plantago ovata, Boswellia, Solanum nigrum, Plantago ovata and Commiphora mukul. For some of the herbal products used in TIM such as oleogum resin from Commiphora myrrha, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, seeds of Linum usitatissimum, gum resin of Dracaena cinnabari, seeds of Plantago major, seeds of Lallementia royleana, and seeds of Allium porrum, there is no or not enough studies to confirm their benefits in IBD. It is suggested that an evaluation of the effects of these plants on different aspects of IBD should be performed. PMID:20857519

  2. Cytotoxic effect of Argentine medicinal plant extracts on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ruffa, M J; Ferraro, G; Wagner, M L; Calcagno, M L; Campos, R H; Cavallaro, L

    2002-03-01

    Methanolic extracts from Achyrocline satureioides (Dc.) Lam, Aristolochia macroura Gomez, Lithraea molleoides (Vell.) Engl., Schinus molle L., unlike those from Celtis spinosa Spreng, Chenopodium ambrosioides L., Petiveria alliacea L., and Plantago major L. showed cytotoxic activity against a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, Hep G2. Schinus molle L. was the most active (IC50=50+/-7 microg/ml). These results call for further studies of these extracts. PMID:11849838

  3. A review of the efficacy of traditional Iranian medicine for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Roja; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet known, but many factors such as defects in the immune system, oxidative stress, microbial content in the gastrointestinal tract, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), and leukotriene B4 (LB4) are thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several medicinal plants are thought to be effective for the treatment of IBD. In this study, information on all of these remedies were derived from all available old sources such as documents or notes and books and were added to the information derived from modern medical databases covering all in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials. For some of these plants, only one or two mechanisms of action have been found such as in Cassia fistula, Lepidium sativum, and Bunium persicum. However, for some plants various mechanisms of action are known. For example, Commiphora mukul is effective in IBD due to its immunomodulatory, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties and it decreases NF-κB, NO and Cox-2. Another herb, Plantago ovata, has immunomodulatory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and wound healing activities and decreases NO and LB4. Considering the mechanisms of action of these plants, the combination of some of them may be useful because of their many mechanisms of action such as Pistacia lentiscus, Bunium persicum, Solanum nigrum, Plantago ovata, Boswellia, Solanum nigrum, Plantago ovata and Commiphora mukul. For some of the herbal products used in TIM such as oleogum resin from Commiphora myrrha, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, seeds of Linum usitatissimum, gum resin of Dracaena cinnabari, seeds of Plantago major, seeds of Lallementia royleana, and seeds of Allium porrum, there is no or not enough studies to confirm their benefits in IBD. It is suggested that an evaluation of the effects of these plants on different aspects of IBD should be performed. PMID:20857519

  4. Research of enzymatic activities of fresh juice and water infusions from dry herbs.

    PubMed

    Chudnicka, Alina; Matysik, Grazyna

    2005-06-01

    Research was done on the presence of enzymes in juice obtained from fresh plant material from Chamomilla recutita L. (Rauschel)-anthodium, Lamium album L.-flos, Calendula officinalis L.-flos, Plantaginis lanceolata L.-folium and Euphrasiae rostkoviana Hayne-herba, and in the prepared water infusion of these materials; the objective was to determine the activity of enzymes which beside biologically active substances may have an influence of the final therapeutic effect of the applied plant preparations. The research was conducted by means of the API ZYM system (bioMerieux). Higher enzymatic activities were found in fresh juices of the examined plant material than in prepared water infusions from dried plants. In both cases naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase should have highest activity. The second one in terms of activity out of 17 studied enzymes was acidic phosphatase. The highest enzymatic activity of fresh juice was found in Lamii albi flos and Calendulae officinalis flos. Water infusions showed the highest enzymatic activity in Lamii albi flos, Chamomille recutita anthodium and Plantaginis lanceolata folium. Drying the plant material resulted in decreased enzymatic activities but not in the case of naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and acidic phosphatase which showed very low activities. The complex composition of plant materials in terms of content of biologically active substances may imply that the therapeutic effect might be directly related to the quantity and activity of plant enzymes present in preparations applied in therapeutics. PMID:15894139

  5. Control of Tetranychus urticae Koch by extracts of three essential oils of chamomile, marjoram and Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Moneim, MR Afify; Fatma, S Ali; Turky, AF

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acaricidal activity of extracts of three essential oils of chamomile, marjoram and Eucalyptus against Tetranychus urticae (T. urticae) Koch. Methods Extracts of three essential oils of chamomile, marjoram and Eucalyptus with different concentrations (0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 3.0% and 4.0%) were used to control T. urticae Koch. Results The results showed that chamomile (Chamomilla recutita) represented the most potent efficient acaricidal agent against Tetranychus followed by marjoram (Marjorana hortensis) and Eucalyptus. The LC50 values of chamomile, marjoram and Eucalyptus for adults were 0.65, 1.84 and 2.18, respectively and for eggs 1.17, 6.26 and 7.33, respectively. Activities of enzymes including glutathione-S-transferase, esterase (α-esterase and β-esterase) and alkaline phosphatase in susceptible mites were determined and activities of enzymes involved in the resistance of acaricides were proved. Protease enzyme was significantly decreased at LC50 of both chamomile and marjoram compared with positive control. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) proved that the major compositions of Chamomilla recutita are α-bisabolol oxide A (35.251%), and trans-β-farersene (7.758%), while the main components of Marjorana hortensis are terpinene-4-ol (23.860%), p-cymene (23.404%) and sabinene (10.904%). Conclusions It can be concluded that extracts of three essential oils of chamomile, marjoram and Eucalyptus possess acaricidal activity against T. urticae. PMID:23569829

  6. Short-term effects of experimental fires on a Mojave Desert seed bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esque, Todd C.; Young, James A.; Tracy, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    A Mojave Desert shrub community was experimentally burned to understand changes in seed bank of desert annual plant species in response to wildfire. Seed mortality ranged from 55 to 80%, and fire caused significant losses of native and alien annual seeds. Schismus arabicus, Schismus barbatus, Bromus madritensis, Bromus tectorum, Erodium cicutarium and Plantago spp. made up >95% of the seed bank. Bromus spp. and Plantago spp. had proportionately greater mortality of seeds than did Schismus spp. and E. cicutarium. Schismus spp. can be lodged into soil cracks thus avoiding lethal temperatures. E. cicutarium has a self-drilling mechanism that places the seeds at greater depth in the soil. Greater seed mortality occurred beneath shrub canopies than interspaces for most species (Plantago, spp., Bromus spp., and E. cicutarium), but microsite had little effect on Schismus spp. Fire reduced the perennial Ambrosia dumosa densities under canopies. Fire reduced the mean number of species found in samples by about one species per plot and no species was extirpated on experimental plots. The relative abundances of common species did not change dramatically as a result of fire or microsite, however; seed densities varied by treatment and affected interpretations of species compositions.

  7. Airborne pollen of allergenic herb species in Toledo (Spain).

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Consolación; Rodríguez-Torres, Alfonso; Rojo, Jesús; Pérez-Badia, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed airborne pollen counts for allergenic herb taxa in Toledo (central Spain), a major tourist city receiving over 2 million visitors per year, located in the region of Castilla-La Mancha. The taxa selected were Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Plantago, Poaceae and Urticaceae, all of which produce allergenic pollen giving rise to serious symptoms in pollen-allergy sufferers. Aerobiological data were recorded over a 6-year period (2005 to 2010) using the sampling and analysis procedures recommended by the Spanish Aerobiology Network. The abundance and the temporal (annual, daily and intradiurnal) distribution of these pollen types were analysed, and the influence of weather-related factors on airborne pollen counts was assessed. Pollen from herbaceous species accounted for 20.9% of total airborne pollen in Toledo, the largest contributor being Poaceae, with 8.5% of the total pollen count; this family was also the leading cause of respiratory allergies. Examination of intradiurnal variation revealed three distinct distribution patterns: (1) peak daily counts for Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae and Plantago were recorded during the hottest part of the day, i.e. from 1400 to 1600 hours; (2) Urticaceae displayed two peaks (1400-1600 and 2200 hours); and (3) Poaceae counts remained fairly stable throughout the day. Two main risk periods were identified for allergies: spring, with allergies caused by Urticaceae, Plantago and Poaceae pollen, and summer, due to Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae pollen. PMID:22331454

  8. High-performance liquid chromatographic characterization of some medical plant extracts used in cosmetic formulas.

    PubMed

    Schulz, H; Albroscheit, G

    1988-06-17

    Rapid and reliable methods are presented for the characterization of biologically active and/or characteristic constituents in aqueous extracts of Hamamelis virginiana, Matricaria chamomilla, Achillea millefolium, Thymus vulgaris, Althaea officinalis and Cinchonia spp. Prior to high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation a clean-up step was performed using a solid-phase extraction system. The purified extracts were analysed by HPLC coupled with a diode-array detector and a fluorescence detector. In some instances, previously unreported components of the aqueous plant extracts were found. PMID:3417826

  9. Antiproliferative constituents of the roots of Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Csupor-Löffler, Boglárka; Hajdú, Zsuzsanna; Zupkó, István; Molnár, Judit; Forgo, Peter; Vasas, Andrea; Kele, Zoltán; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-07-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the N-hexane and CHCl₃ phases of the methanol extract of the roots of Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronquist led to the isolation of two new dihydropyranones named conyzapyranone A (1) and B (2), and the known 4 Z,8 Z-matricaria- γ-lactone (3), 4 E,8 Z-matricaria- γ-lactone (4), 9,12,13-trihydroxy-10(E)-octadecenoic acid (5), epifriedelanol (6), friedeline (7), taraxerol (8), simiarenol (9), spinasterol (10), stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, and apigenin. The structures were determined by means of ESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, including ¹H-¹H COSY, NOESY, HSQC, and HMBC experiments. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities and were demonstrated to exert considerable cell growth-inhibitory activity against human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), skin carcinoma (A431), and breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells. Some of the active components, including 2, 4, and 10, proved to be substantially more potent against these cell lines than against noncancerous human foetal fibroblasts (MRC-5) and can therefore be considered selective antiproliferative natural products. PMID:21294076

  10. Chemical composition and antimicrobial and allelopathic activity of Tunisian Conyza sumatrensis (Retz.) E.WALKER essential oils.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Samia; Salah, Karima Bel Hadj; Elaissi, Ameur; Jlaiel, Lobna; Jannet, Hichem Ben; Aouni, Mahjoub; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2013-02-01

    Conyza sumatrensis (Retz.) E.WALKER (Asteraceae) is a spontaneous annual herb, fairly widespread throughout Tunisia, which has rarely been studied or valued in any sector. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of different parts (flower heads, leaves, stems, and roots) of C. sumatrensis plants, which were collected in autumn (November 2007) at the flowering stage in the area of Monastir, Tunisia. In total, 98 compounds, representing 88.1-99.3% of the oil composition, were identified by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The root essential oil was distinguished by its high content in acetylenes (matricaria ester, 4; 74.3%), while those from flower heads and leaves were dominated by oxygenated sesquiterpenes (61.1 and 50.3%, resp.). The oils of C. sumatrensis from Tunisia belonged to a matricaria ester/caryophyllene oxide chemotype. All the oils were evaluated for antibacterial, antifungal, and allelopathic activities. The results indicate that the leaf oil exhibited significant in vitro antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Proteus mirabilis and that the C. sumatrensis oils isolated from the aerial parts presented high mycelia-growth inhibition of Candida albicans and the filamentous fungi tested. Moreover, the essential oils of the different plant parts inhibited the shoot and root growth of Raphanus sativus (radish) seedlings. Indeed, the inhibition of the hypocotyl growth varied from 28.6 to 90.1% and that of the radicle from 42.3 to 96.2%. PMID:23418168

  11. Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with bright future

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Janmejai K; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Chamomile is one of the most ancient medicinal herbs known to mankind. It is a member of Asteraceae/Compositae family and represented by two common varieties viz. German Chamomile (Chamomilla recutita) and Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). The dried flowers of chamomile contain many terpenoids and flavonoids contributing to its medicinal properties. Chamomile preparations are commonly used for many human ailments such as hay fever, inflammation, muscle spasms, menstrual disorders, insomnia, ulcers, wounds, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. Essential oils of chamomile are used extensively in cosmetics and aromatherapy. Many different preparations of chamomile have been developed, the most popular of which is in the form of herbal tea consumed more than one million cups per day. In this review we describe the use of chamomile in traditional medicine with regard to evaluating its curative and preventive properties, highlight recent findings for its development as a therapeutic agent promoting human health. PMID:21132119

  12. Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) in chromatographic analysis of essential oils in herbs.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina

    2010-05-01

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) is a simple and cheap sample preparation procedure allowing for the reduction of organic solvent consumption, exclusion of sample component degradation, improvement of extraction efficiency and selectivity, elimination of additional sample clean-up and pre-concentration step before chromatographic analysis. The paper shows the possibility of MSPD application for qualitative and quantitative analysis of essential oil components in the following herbs: thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), mint (Mentha piperita), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L.), marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), savory (Satureja hortensis L.), and oregano (Origanum vulgare). The results obtained using MSPD are compared to two other sample preparation methods: steam distillation (SD) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). The results presented in the paper prove that the total amount and the composition of the essential oil component obtained by MSPD are equivalent to those gained by one of the most effective extraction technique, PLE. PMID:20071125

  13. Activity of (-)alpha-bisabolol against Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Morales-Yuste, M; Morillas-Márquez, F; Martín-Sánchez, J; Valero-López, A; Navarro-Moll, M C

    2010-03-01

    Many of the drugs used to treat leishmaniasis are associated with numerous adverse effects. Agents of natural origin have shown activity against different parasites. With this background, an in vitro study was conducted on the activity of (-)alpha-bisabolol, the principal component of Chamomilla recutita essential oil, against Leishmania infantum promastigotes, the main species responsible for human leishmaniasis in Spain. At the two highest concentrations tested (1000 and 500mug/ml), (-)alpha-bisabolol and pentamidine (control agent) achieved 100% inhibition of L. infantum promastigote. These in vitro data can be considered promising in support of the therapeutic use of (-)alpha-bisabolol preparations to treat leishmaniasis caused by L. infantum species. PMID:19577452

  14. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic

  15. Effects of migratory geese on plant communities of an Alaskan salt marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zacheis, A.; Hupp, J.W.; Ruess, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) on two salt marsh plant communities in Cook Inlet, Alaska, a stopover area used during spring migration. From 1995 to 1997 we compared plant species composition and biomass on plots where geese were excluded from feeding with paired plots where foraging could occur. 2. Foraging intensity was low (650-1930 goose-days km-2) compared to other goose-grazing systems. 3. Canada geese fed mainly on above-ground shoots of Triglochin maritimum, Puccinellia spp. and Carex ramenskii, whereas the majority of the snow goose diet consisted of below-ground tissues of Plantago maritima and Triglochin maritimum. 4. Plant communities responded differently to goose herbivory. In the sedge meadow community, where feeding was primarily on above-ground shoots, there was no effect of grazing on the dominant species Carex ramenskii and Triglochin maritimum. In the herb meadow community, where snow geese fed on Plantago maritima roots and other below-ground tissues, there was a difference in the relative abundance of plant species between treatments. Biomass of Plantago maritima and Potentilla egedii was lower on grazed plots compared with exclosed, whereas biomass of Carex ramenskii was greater on grazed plots. There was no effect of herbivory on total standing crop biomass in either community. The variable effect of herbivory on Carex ramenskii between communities suggests that plant neighbours and competitive interactions are important factors in a species' response to herbivory. In addition, the type of herbivory (above- or below-ground) was important in determining plant community response to herbivory. 5. Litter accumulation was reduced in grazed areas compared with exclosed in both communities. Trampling of the previous year's litter into the soil surface by geese incorporated more litter into soils in grazed areas. 6. This study illustrates that even light herbivore

  16. [PHLEBODIA (diosmine): a role in the management of bleeding nonprolapsed hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Kecmanović, D; Pavlov, M; Ceranić, M; Sepetkovski, A; Kovacevi, P; Stamenković, A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a role of diosmine in the management of bleeding nonprolapsed hemorrhoids. From November 2003 to January 2004, 60 patients were treated with Phlebodia (diosmine). Total colonoscopy was performed at the discretion of the authors according to the age, symptoms and genetic factors of the patient. Patients were treated with Phlebodia (diosmine, 3x1, 5 days) and in addition a bulk agent (3,26 g plantago ovata sachet, twice daily, for the period of next three months). Hemorrhoidal bleeding stopped after 3,2 days. Diosmine, used with fiber supplements, rapidly and safely stops bleeding from nonprolapsed hemorrhoids. PMID:16119324

  17. Determination of the content of elements in some wild medicinal plants of Uzbekistan by radioactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhammedov, S.; Tillaeva, K.; Badalov, N.B.

    1987-06-01

    The authors have developed a complex of activation methods of analysis using a nuclear reactor (nuclear activation analysis) and a cyclotron (charged-particle activation analysis). The methods have been used to determine the concentrations of more than 20 elements in five medicinal plants native to Uzbekistan: Syrian rue (Peganum harmala L.), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), peppermint (Mentha piperata L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), and ziziphora (Ziziphora bungeana Yur.). The results of radio-activation analysis were compared with the results of standard spectral analysis performed in another laboratory and the accuracy of the procedures developed was evaluated on the basis of the results.

  18. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    França, F; Lago, E L; Marsden, P D

    1996-01-01

    This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (L(V)b) among the rural population of a cocoa-producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plants species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale, Anacardiaceae), used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta,Melastomataceae) 39%, alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus, Lamiaceae) 33%, mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae) 31%, erva-de-santa-maria (Solanum americanum, Solanaceae) (25%) and transagem (Plantago major, Plantaginaceae) 2%. PMID:8701041

  19. Review on medicinal uses, pharmacological, phytochemistry and immunomodulatory activity of plants.

    PubMed

    Akram, M; Hamid, A; Khalil, A; Ghaffar, A; Tayyaba, N; Saeed, A; Ali, M; Naveed, A

    2014-01-01

    Since ancient times, plants have been an exemplary source of medicine. Researchers have discovered some important compounds from plants. The present work constitutes a review of the medicinal plants whose immunomodulant activity has been proven. We performed PUBMED, EMBASE, Google scholar searches for research papers of medicinal plants having immunomodulant activity. Medicinal plants used by traditional physicians or reported as having immunomodulant activity include Acacia concocinna, Camellia sinensis, Lawsonia inermis Linn, Piper longum Linn, Gelidium amansii, Petroselinum crispum, Plantago major and Allium sativum. Immunomodulant activities of some of these medicinal plants have been investigated. The medicinal plants documented have immunomodulant activity and should be further investigated via clinical trial. PMID:25280022

  20. [Does mugwort pollenosis occur in children in the northern region?].

    PubMed

    Lelong, M; Henard, J; Bras, C; Castelain, C; Thelliez, P; Miersman, R; Duprey, J

    1986-10-01

    Is Mugwort pollenosis frequent among children in North of France? In North of France where no ragweed grows, mugwort (artemisia) is after grasses and plantago, the third pollenosis in children. Among 184 children with summer clinical signs, positive cutaneous tests with a mugwort extract are noted in 40 patients (21%). RAST are positive only in 23 on 34 children with positive cutaneous test. Among the 40 children only two are less 5 years old and 26 are more 10 years old. Respiratory provocation tests confirm in 13/19 cases a sensitization of upper or lower respiratory tract. No food allergy exists among those children. PMID:3453725

  1. Laxative drug products for over-the-counter human use; psyllium ingredients in granular dosage forms. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-03-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule establishing that over-the-counter (OTC) laxative drug products in granular dosage form containing the bulk-forming psyllium ingredients (psyllium (hemicellulose), psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid, psyllium seed, psyllium seed (blond), psyllium seed husks, plantago ovata husks, and plantago seed) are not generally recognized as safe and effective (GRASE) and are misbranded. This final rule includes, but is not limited to, any granules that are swallowed dry prior to drinking liquid; dispersed, suspended, or partially dissolved in liquid prior to swallowing; chewed, partially chewed, or unchewed, and then washed down (or swallowed) with liquid; or sprinkled over food. FDA is issuing this final rule after considering reports of esophageal obstruction associated with the use of psyllium laxatives in granular dosage form. These cases continue to occur despite efforts to promote safe use through label warnings and directions. This final rule does not apply to psyllium laxatives in nongranular dosage forms, such as powders, tablets, or wafers. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products. PMID:17450664

  2. Pesticide residues in some herbs growing in agricultural areas in Poland.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Elżbieta; Jankowski, Kazimierz

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess residue content of plant protection products in selected herbs: Achillea millefolium L., Cichorium intybus L., Equisetum arvense L., Polygonum persicaria L., Plantago lanceolata L., and Plantago major L. The study comprises herbs growing in their natural habitat, 1 and 10 m away from crop fields. The herbs, 30 plants of each species, were sampled during the flowering stage between 1 and 20 July 2014. Pesticide residue content was measured with the QuECHERS method in the dry matter of leaves, stalks, and inflorescence, all mixed together. Out of six herb species growing close to wheat and maize fields, pesticide residues were found in three species: A. millefolium L., E. arvense L., and P. lanceolata L. Most plants containing the residues grew 1 m away from the wheat field. Two active substances of fungicides were found: diphenylamine and tebuconazole, and one active substance of insecticides: chlorpyrifos-ethyl. Those substances are illegal to use on herbal plants. Samples of E. arvense L. and P. lanceolata L. contained two active substances each, which constituted 10% of all samples, while A. millefolium L. contained one substance, which is 6.6% of all samples. PMID:26612566

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of the plastid inverted repeat: the effects of expansion, contraction, and loss on substitution rates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andan; Guo, Wenhu; Gupta, Sakshi; Fan, Weishu; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2016-03-01

    Rates of nucleotide substitution were previously shown to be several times slower in the plastid inverted repeat (IR) compared with single-copy (SC) regions, suggesting that the IR provides enhanced copy-correction activity. To examine the generality of this synonymous rate dependence on the IR, we compared plastomes from 69 pairs of closely related species representing 52 families of angiosperms, gymnosperms, and ferns. We explored the breadth of IR boundary shifts in land plants and demonstrate that synonymous substitution rates are, on average, 3.7 times slower in IR genes than in SC genes. In addition, genes moved from the SC into the IR exhibit lower synonymous rates consistent with other IR genes, while genes moved from the IR into the SC exhibit higher rates consistent with other SC genes. Surprisingly, however, several plastid genes from Pelargonium, Plantago, and Silene have highly accelerated synonymous rates despite their IR localization. Together, these results provide strong evidence that the duplicative nature of the IR reduces the substitution rate within this region. The anomalously fast-evolving genes in Pelargonium, Plantago, and Silene indicate localized hypermutation, potentially induced by a higher level of error-prone double-strand break repair in these regions, which generates substitutional rate variation. PMID:26574731

  4. Screening of medicinal plants for induction of somatic segregation activity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Ramos Ruiz, A; De la Torre, R A; Alonso, N; Villaescusa, A; Betancourt, J; Vizoso, A

    1996-07-01

    Knowledge about mutagenic properties of plants commonly used in traditional medicine is limited. A screening for genotoxic activity was carried out in aqueous or alcoholic extracts prepared from 13 medicinal plants widely used as folk medicine in Cuba: Lepidium virginicum L. (Brassicaceae): Plantago major L. and Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae); Ortosiphon aristatus Blume, Mentha x piperita L., Melissa officinalis L. and Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae); Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae); Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae); Piper auritum HBK. (Piperaceae); Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardeaceae) and Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae). A plate incorporation assay with Aspergillus nidulans was employed, allowing detection of somatic segregation as a result of mitotic crossing-over, chromosome malsegregation or clastogenic effects. Aspergillus nidulans D-30, a well-marked strain carrying four recessive mutations for conidial color in heterozygosity, which permitted the direct visual detection of segregants, was used throughout this study. As a result, only in the aqueous extract of one of the plants screened (Momordica charantia) a statistical significant increase in the frequency of segregant sectors per colony was observed, and consequently, a genotoxic effect is postulated. PMID:8771452

  5. Ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in pigs and pets in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya; Brauer, Gerhard

    2007-09-30

    This paper documents the medicinal plants used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in dogs, cats and pigs in British Columbia, Canada. Ethnoveterinary data was collected over a 6-month period in 2003. The majority of the information on pets came from 2 naturopaths, 10 herbalists, 5 dog trainers, breeders and pet shop owners, 9 holistic veterinarians and 6 of 27 organic farmers. Two pig farmers joined the study in the final stages. The following plants were used as anthelmintics: Artemisia cina O. Berg and C.F. Schmidt, Artemisia vulgaris L., Artemisia annua, Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (all Asteraceae), Mentha piperita L. and Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) (Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae), Cucurbita pepo L. (Cucurbitaceae), Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb (Myrtaceae), Gentiana lutea L. (Gentianaceae), Hydrastis canadensis L. (Ranunculaceae), Juglans nigra L. (Juglandaceae), Olea europaea L. (Oleaceae) and Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae)). Stomach problems were treated with: Achillea millefolium L. (Asteraceae), Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Asphodelaceae), Elytrigia repens (L.) Desv. ex Nevski (Poaceae), Frangula purshiana (DC.) Cooper (Rhamnaceae), Juniperus communis L. (Cupressaceae), Melissa officinalis L. and M. piperita L. (Lamiaceae), Petroselinum crispum L. (Apiaceae), Plantago major L. and Plantago ovata Forssk. (Plantaginaceae) Rumex crispus L. and Rumex obtusifolius L. (Polygonaceae), Ulmus fulva Michx. (Ulmaceae) and Zingiber officinalis Roscoe (Zingiberaceae). There is insufficient information available to assess the anthelmintic efficacies of C. officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Eugenia caryophyllata and O. europaea; the other plants have mid- to high-level validity for their ethnoveterinary uses. PMID:17628343

  6. [Effects of medicinal fiber on colonic transit in patients with irritable colon syndrome].

    PubMed

    Soifer, L O; De Paula, J A; Caruso, P

    1987-01-01

    Twenty patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, 14 patients with pain and constipation and 6 patients with pain and diarrhoea, were studied in order to: a) Evaluate the symptomatic response to a Plantago Ovatae fiber medicine. b) Study with radio-opaque markers the colonic transit modifications that could explain the therapeutic responses. There were observed the following results: 1) Pain decreased or disappeared in 80% of the patients. 2) Constipation decreased or disappeared in 78.6% of the patients. 3) Diarrhoea decreased or disappeared in 5 of the 6 patients that were studied. 4) There was a significative increase of the feces weight without changes of the dry residue. 5) Taking all the patients as a whole the number of the retained radio-opaque markers was the same before and after the active treatment. If we evaluate the patients with constipation and the patients with diarrhoea separately the first group shows an acceleration of the colonic transit (fewer retained markers) and the second group shows a decrease of the colonic transit (more retained markers). We draw the conclusion that the Plantago Ovatae fiber regulates or moderates the colon motility and enables a physiological balance of the colonic transit. PMID:2849850

  7. Aquatic and terrestrial plant species with potential to remove heavy metals from storm-water.

    PubMed

    Fritioff, Asa; Greger, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of storm-water polluted with heavy metals should be possible in percolation systems, ponds, or wetlands. The aim of this work was to find plant species for such systems that are efficient in the uptake of Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb. Plants were collected from percolation and wetland areas and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. Results showed that submersed and free-floating plants had the capacity to take up high levels of Cu, Zn, and Pb into their shoots. With roots having a concentration factor above 1, the terrestrial plants show efficient stabilization of Cd and Zn and emergent plants show corresponding stabilisation of Zn. In addition, Potamogeton natans, Alisma plantago-aquatica, and Filipendula ulmaria were used in a controlled experiment. The shoots of P. natans and the roots of A. plantago-aquatica were found to accumulate even higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Pb than found in the field-harvested plants. Similar results were found for Cd in shoots and Pb in roots of F. ulmaria. Our conclusion is that submersed plant species seem to be the most efficient for removal of heavy metals from storm-water. PMID:14750429

  8. Phytochrome Intermediates and Action Spectra for Light Perception by Dry Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Michael R.; Frankland, Barry

    1984-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that far-red irradiation of dry Lactuca sativa L. seeds results in inhibition of subsequent germination. Although red has no effect on dry seeds, a red irradiation following a farred irradiation reverses the effect of far-red. This phenomenon is most noticeable in seeds with artificially raised levels of phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. Qualitatively similar results have been found for the seeds of Plantago major L., Sinapis arvensis L., and Bromus sterilis L. Action spectra studies on Plantago seeds show that the action peaks for promotion and inhibition of germination of hydrated seeds are at 660 and 730 nanometers, respectively. The action spectrum for inhibition of subsequent germination following irradiation of dry seeds is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that for hydrated seeds, with an action peak at 730 nanometers, indicating absorption by phytochrome in the far-red absorbing form. However, the action spectrum for the reversal of this far-red effect on dry seeds has a broad peak at 680 nanometers and subsidiary peaks at 650 and 600 nanometers. It is proposed that this effect is due to light absorption by the phytochrome intermediate complex meta-Fa, and that the action spectrum reflects the in vivo absorption properties of this intermediate. PMID:16663467

  9. Impact of common cytostatic drugs on pollen fertility in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Mišík, Miroslav; Kundi, Michael; Pichler, Clemens; Filipic, Metka; Rainer, Bernhard; Mišíková, Katarina; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2016-08-01

    Cytostatic drugs are among the most toxic chemicals which are produced. Many of them cause damage of the genetic material which may affect the fertility of higher organisms. To study the impact of the widely used anticancer drugs [cisplatin (CisPt), etoposide (Et), and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)] on the reproduction of higher plants, pollen abortion experiments were conducted with species which belong to major plant families, namely with Tradescantia paludosa (Commelinaceae), Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae), Chelidonium majus (Papaveraceae), and Alisma plantago-aquatica (Alismataceae). All compounds increased the frequencies of abortive grains. The lowest effective doses were in general in a narrow range (i.e., 1 and 10 mg/kg of dry soil). The effects of the individual drugs were similar in T. paludosa, A. plantago-aquatica, and Ch. majus, while A. thaliana was consistently less sensitive. The highest abortion rate was obtained in most experiments with CisPt, followed by 5-FU and Et. Comparisons of the doses which caused effects in the present experiments in the different species with the predicted environment concentrations and with the levels of the cytostatics which were detected in hospital wastewaters show that the realistic environmental concentrations of the drugs are 4-6 orders of magnitude lower. Therefore, it is unlikely that these drugs affect the fertility of higher plants in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:25779110

  10. [Allelopathic effects of invasive weed Solidago canadensis on native plants].

    PubMed

    Mei, Lingxiao; Chen, Xin; Tang, Jianjun

    2005-12-01

    With growth chamber method, this paper studied the allelopathic potential of invasive weed Solidago canadensis on native plant species. Different concentration S. canadensis root and rhizome extracts were examined, and the test plants were Trifolium repens, Trifolium pretense, Medicago lupulina, Lolium perenne, Suaeda glauca, Plantago virginica, Kummerowia stipulacea, Festuca arundinacea, Ageratum conyzoides, Portulaca oleracea, and Amaranthus spinosus. The results showed that the allelopathic inhibitory effect of the extracts from both S. canadensis root and rhizome was enhanced with increasing concentration, and rhizome extracts had a higher effect than root extracts. At the lowest concentration (1:60), root extract had little effect on the seed germination and seedling growth of T. repens, but rhizome extract could inhibit the germination of all test plants though the inhibitory effect varied with different species. The inhibition was the greatest for grass, followed by forb and legume. 1:60 (m:m) rhizome extract had similar effects on seed germination and radicel growth, but for outgrowth, the extract could inhibit Kummerowia stipulacea, Amaranthus spinosus and Festuca arundinacea, had no significant impact on Lolium perenne, Plantago virginica, Ageratum conyzoides, Portulaca oleracea and Amaranthus spinosus, and stimulated Trifolium repens, Trifolium pretense and Medicago lupulina. PMID:16515192

  11. Levels of organophosphorus pesticides in medicinal plants commonly consumed in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sarkhail, Parisa; Yunesian, Masud; Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Sarkheil, Pantea; Rastkari, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    The frequent occurrence of pesticide residues in herbal materials was indicated by previous studies. In this study, the concentration of some of the organophosphorus pesticides including parathion, malathion, diazinon and pirimiphos methyl in different kinds of medicinal plants were determined. The samples were collected randomly from ten local markets of different areas of Iran. At the detection limit of 0.5 ng g-1, parathion and pirimiphos methyl were not detected in any of the samples. Some amounts of malathion and diazinon were found in Zataria, Matricaria chamomile, Spearmint and Cumin Seed samples while, the concentrations of target organophosphorus pesticides in Borage samples were below the detection limits of the methods which could be a result of intensive transformation of organophosphorus pesticides by Borage. In addition the organophosphorus pesticides were detected in all of the samples below the maximum residue levels (MRLs) proposed by the international organizations. PMID:23351610

  12. Determination of mineral and trace elements in some medicinal herbs and their infusions consumed in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Başgel, S; Erdemoğlu, S B

    2006-04-15

    Fourteen mineral and trace elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn) were determined in the herbs and their infusions consumed for medical purposes in Turkey such as chamomile (Matricaria chammomile L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), linden (Tilia vulgaris), nettle (Urtica dioical), rosehip (Fr.Rosa caninae), sage (Salvia officinalis) and senna tea (Cassia anqustifolia). Microwave digestion procedure was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal herbs. Element concentrations in the medicinal herbs and their infusions were determined by FAAS and ICP-AES. The accuracy and precision were verified against a GBW 07605 Poplar leaves and Tea certified reference material. The mineral and trace element content of medicinal herbs and their infusions showed a wide variability. However, distribution of the elements in the infusions is not high and it is nil especially for Cd, Co, Cr and Pb. PMID:15907975

  13. Metabolic and antioxidant profiles of herbal infusions and decoctions.

    PubMed

    Fotakis, Charalambos; Tsigrimani, Diamantina; Tsiaka, Thalia; Lantzouraki, Dimitra Z; Strati, Irini F; Makris, Constantinos; Tagkouli, Dimitra; Proestos, Charalampos; Sinanoglou, Vassilia J; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis

    2016-11-15

    This study implements NMR metabolomics and spectrophotometric studies (Folin-Ciocalteu, FRAP, ABTS) to infusions and decoctions of ten plant species in order to assess and compare the metabolic and antioxidant profiles for each botanical family. Multivariate and univariate data analyses highlighted the differences among the samples and pinpointed specific classes of compounds for each plant species as well as infusions and decoctions. The identified phenolic compounds by NMR, as well as the antioxidant profile, framed a trend of increased values in infusions compared to the decoctions. Moreover, the infusion procedure positively affected the extractability of the phenolic compounds compared to decoctions. The highest total phenolic content was found in Mentha spicata, while the lowest in Matricaria chamomilla preparations, irrespective of the preparation method. The preparation time for the decoctions was examined showing that the 15min preparations were generally found richer in phenolics and of higher antioxidant capacity. PMID:27283718

  14. Genotoxicity and anti-genotoxicity of some traditional medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Romero-Jiménez, Magdalena; Campos-Sánchez, Juan; Analla, Mohamed; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles

    2005-08-01

    Six herbal infusions used worldwide (Matricaria chamomilla, Tilia cordata, Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Uncaria tomentosa and Valeriana officinalis) were assayed for anti-genotoxicity using the Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. All these infusions are traditionally used for various medical purposes, including anti-inflammatory processes. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidative genotoxicant to test the anti-genotoxic potency of the medicinal infusions. None of these infusions showed a significant genotoxicity, quite the reverse they were able to behave as desmutagens, detoxifying the mutagen hydrogen peroxide. The phenolic content of such herbal infusions is argued to be the possible scavenger of reactive oxygen radicals produced by the hydrogen peroxide. PMID:16005256

  15. Antifungal activity and composition of essential oils of Conyza canadensis herbs and roots.

    PubMed

    Veres, Katalin; Csupor-Löffler, Boglárka; Lázár, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from herbs and roots of Conyza canadensis (horseweed), collected in Hungary, were obtained by hydrodistillation. The chemical compositions of the oils were analysed by combination of GC and GC/MS. The major constituent of the oil obtained from the aerial parts of horseweed was limonene (78%), while the main component of root oil was 2Z,8Z-matricaria ester. The antimicrobial activities of the oils were tested on Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, reference fungal strains, and fungal strains isolated from patients (Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichophyton, Rhodotorula, and Aspergillus) by agar disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. None of the oils showed any activity against the tested bacterial strains, but exhibited moderate-to-strong activity against all fungi with the only exception of A. fumigatus. The highest zone of inhibition was observed in case of Cryptococcus neoformans and Trichophyton interdigitalis. PMID:23049473

  16. Antifungal Activity and Composition of Essential Oils of Conyza canadensis Herbs and Roots

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Katalin; Csupor-Löffler, Boglárka; Lázár, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from herbs and roots of Conyza canadensis (horseweed), collected in Hungary, were obtained by hydrodistillation. The chemical compositions of the oils were analysed by combination of GC and GC/MS. The major constituent of the oil obtained from the aerial parts of horseweed was limonene (78%), while the main component of root oil was 2Z,8Z-matricaria ester. The antimicrobial activities of the oils were tested on Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, reference fungal strains, and fungal strains isolated from patients (Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichophyton, Rhodotorula, and Aspergillus) by agar disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. None of the oils showed any activity against the tested bacterial strains, but exhibited moderate-to-strong activity against all fungi with the only exception of A. fumigatus. The highest zone of inhibition was observed in case of Cryptococcus neoformans and Trichophyton interdigitalis PMID:23049473

  17. Antibacterial effects of the essential oils of commonly consumed medicinal herbs using an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Marin, Petar D; Brkić, Dejan; van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2010-11-01

    The chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from 10 commonly consumed herbs: Citrus aurantium, C. limon, Lavandula angustifolia, Matricaria chamomilla, Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Thymus vulgaris and Salvia officinalis have been determined. The antibacterial activity of these oils and their main components; i.e. camphor, carvacrol, 1,8-cineole, linalool, linalyl acetate, limonene, menthol, a-pinene, b-pinene, and thymol were assayed against the human pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Micrococcus flavus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enteritidis, S. epidermidis, S. typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. The highest and broadest activity was shown by O. vulgare oil. Carvacrol had the highest antibacterial activity among the tested components. PMID:21030907

  18. Urease Inhibitory Activities of some Commonly Consumed Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Mahernia, Shabnam; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Mojab, Faraz; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Urease enzyme has a crucial role in the persistent habitation of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) that induces gastrointestinal diseases, in particular gastritis, duodenal, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plants have long been utilized as the biggest source of substances with medicinal properties from natural origin and therefore result in less toxicity and adverse side effects upon usage. 15 medicinal plant extracts were examined against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction. Each herb was extracted using 80% aqueous methanol. The more effective extracts were further tested and their IC50 values were determined. Three plant extracts including Ginkgo biloba, Rhus coriaria, and Matricaria inodora were found to be the most effective ones with IC50 values of 36.17, 80.29, and 100.6 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26330884

  19. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by extracts and constituents from Angelica archangelica and Geranium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Steinthor; Gudbjarnason, Sigmundur

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of several Icelandic medicinal herbs. Ethanolic extracts of Angelica archangelica seeds and the aerial parts of Geranium sylvaticum proved effective, with IC50 values of 2.20 mg/ml and 3.56 mg/ml, respectively. The activity of imperatorin and xanthotoxin from A. archangelica was measured. Xanthotoxin proved much more potent than imperatorin, with an IC50 value of 155 microg/ml (0.72 mM) but that for imperatorin was above 274 microg/ml (1.01 mM). However, furanocoumarins seem to have a minor part in the total activity of this extract. Synergistic interaction was observed between the extracts of A. archangelica and G. sylvaticum. Several medicinal herbs (Achillea millefolium, Filipendula ulmaria, Thymus praecox and Matricaria maritima) did not show AChE inhibitory activity. PMID:18069242

  20. Efficacy of Slim339 in reducing body weight of overweight and obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Toromanyan, Edward; Aslanyan, Gayane; Amroyan, Elmira; Gabrielyan, Emil; Panossian, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    A double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study has been carried out in order to evaluate the effect of orally self-administered Slim339, a proprietary fixed combination of Garcinia cambogia extract with calcium pantothenate (standardized for the content of hydroxycitric acid and pantothenic acid) and extracts of Matricaria chamomilla, Rosa damascena, Lavandula officinalis and Cananga odorata, on body weight in overweight and obese volunteers. During a 60-day treatment period, the average reduction in body weight for the group receiving Slim339 (n = 30) was 4.67% compared with 0.63% for the placebo group (n = 28) (p < 0.0001). Weight losses of >or=3 kg were recorded for 23 subjects in the treatment group and only one in the placebo group. It is concluded that Slim339 represents a potential therapy for obesity. PMID:17639559

  1. Land Contamination and Soil-Plant Interactions in the Imperina Valley Mine (Belluno, Venetian Region, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Wahsha, Mohammad; Fontana, Silvia; Zilioli, Diana

    2010-05-01

    In Italy, ore exploitation, particularly that of mixed sulphides, has been abandoned since the final thirty years of the last century, and a quantity of mine dumps has been discharged in wide areas of the land, provoking evident environmental damages to landscape, soil and vegetation, with potential risk for human health. The present study concerns the distribution and mobility of heavy metals (Ni, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe and Mn) in the soils of a mine site and their transfer to wild flora. Soils and wild plants were sampled from mixed sulphides mine dumps in Imperina valley (Belluno, Italy), and the concentrations of heavy metals were determined. Chemical analyses carried out on 10 soil profiles (mostly entisols) of the mineralised area revealed metal concentrations generally above the international target levels (Cu up to 3160 mg kg-1 , Pb up to 23600 mg kg-1, Zn up to 1588 mg kg-1, Fe up to 52,30 %). The concentrations of Ni, Cr and Mn, instead, are below the reference limits. Moreover, a highly significant correlation was observed between the concentrations of metals in soils (Fe, Pb, Zn and Cu). Metal concentration in selected wild plants of the mineralized area is moderately high, in particolar Cu, Pb, Zn in the roots of Plantago major, Pb and Zn in the leaves of Taraxacum officinale, Zn and Pb in Salix spp. The translocation coefficient (BAC) from soil to plant (hypogean portion), and within the plant (epigean portion) vary from 0,37 in Plantago major to 2,97 in Silene dioica, two known accumulator plants. Salix spp present high translocation coefficients from soil to plant, and from roots to leaves. In particular, essential metals present a translocation coefficient ≥1 (with the order Mn>Zn>Cu>Fe), while toxic metals have coefficients <1 (Pb

  2. Arabinoxylan-mediated synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles having exceptional high stability.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad; Iram, Fozia; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Saeed, Muhammad Z; Raza, Mohsin; Alam, Shehzad

    2013-02-15

    A green synthesis of highly stable gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) using arabinoxylan (AX) from ispaghula (Plantago ovata) seed husk is being reported. The NPs were synthesized by stirring a mixture of AX and HAuCl(4)·H(2)O or AgNO(3), separately, below 100 °C for less than an hour, where AX worked as the reducing and the stabilizing agent. The synthesized NPs were characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size was (silver: 5-20 nm and gold: 8-30 nm) found to be dependent on pH, temperature, reaction time and concentrations of AX and the metal salts used. The NPs were poly-dispersed with a narrow range. They were stable for more than two years time. PMID:23399234

  3. Role of trace elements in somatic embryogenesis A PIXE study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Mishra, D.; Chakraborty, A.; Sudarshan, M.

    2008-03-01

    Proton induced X-ray emission was used to study the trace elemental profiles of embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus of an important cash crop of India - Plantago ovata. Somatic embryogenesis, a well-known process for plant regeneration and crop improvement is modulated by various factors such as ionizing radiation and micro nutrients in the growth media. The present work reports the trace element variation in normal and irradiated callus tissue of P. ovata. Embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus tissues were exposed to gamma rays from a 60Co gamma source. The absorbed dose ranged from 10 to 100 Gy. Subsequent experiments showed significant dose dependent alterations in K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr in both the embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus. The precise involvement of these elements has been discussed in light of somatic embryogenesis of the selected medicinal plant.

  4. Production, purification, and characterization of antifungal metabolite from Pseudomonas aeruginosa SD12, a new strain obtained from tannery waste polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Dharni, Seema; Alam, Mansoor; Kalani, Komal; Abdul-Khaliq; Samad, Abdul; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2012-05-01

    A new strain, SD12, was isolated from tannery waste polluted soil and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the basis of phenotypic traits and by comparison of 16S rRNA sequences. This bacterium exhibited broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against phytopathogenic fungi. The strain produced phosphatases, cellulases, proteases, pectinases, and HCN and also retained its ability to produce hydroxamate-type siderophore. A bioactive metabolite was isolated from P. aeruginosa SD12 and was characterized as 1-hydroxyphenazine ((1-OH-PHZ) by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analysis. The strain was used as a biocontrol agent against root rot and wilt disease of pyrethrum caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The stain is also reported to increase the growth and biomass of Plantago ovata. The purified compound, 1-hydroxyphenazine, also showed broad-spectrum antagonistic activity towards a range of phytopathogenic fungi, which is the first report of its kind. PMID:22561863

  5. New calorimetric system and some results of water phase transition research in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Bakradze, N; Kiziria, E; Sokhadze, V; Gogichaishvili, Sh; Vardidze, E

    2007-01-01

    The principle of operation and main parameters of the recently created scanning differential reverse microcalorimeter of the new generation are presented. The microcalorimeter is destined for studying water crystallization and ice melting processes in heterogeneous systems, including plant and animal cells and tissues in the temperature range of 20 to -55 degrees C. In order to obtain maximum information from the experimental results respective algorithms and applied software package were developed. The results of studies of water crystallization and ice melting processes in different parts of common plantain (Plantago major L.) root, as a certain model system, can give us information on the peculiarities of the studied processes in complex, heterogeneous systems. PMID:17522730

  6. Iranian medicinal plants for diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Mirhashemi, Seyyed Mehdi; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Sarkhail, Parisa

    2013-05-01

    In the Iranian traditional medicine a significant usage of herbs is promoted for their anti-diabetic activity. The aim of this review to assess the efficacy of glucose lowering effects of medicinal plants cultivated in Iran. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library Database, Ebsco and Google Scholar from database inception conducted up to May 2012. A total of 85 studies (18 humans and 67 animals) examining 62 plants were reviewed. The quality of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) assessed by using the Jadad scale. Among the RCTs studies, the best results in glycemic control was found in Aloe vera, Citrullus colocynthus, Plantago ovata, Silybum marianum, Rheum ribes and Urtica dioica. The majority of plants that have been studied for antidiabetic activity showed promising results. However, efficacy and safety of the most plants used in the treatment of diabetes are not sufficient. PMID:24498803

  7. Pollen calendar of the city of Salamanca (Spain). Aeropalynological analysis for 1981-1982 and 1991-1992.

    PubMed

    Hernández Prieto, M; Lorente Toledano, F; Romo Cortina, A; Dávila González, I; Laffond Yges, E; Calvo Bullón, A

    1998-01-01

    We report a study on the contents of airborne pollen in the city of Salamanca (Spain) aimed at establishing a pollen calendar for the city for the yearly periods of maximum concentrations, relating these with quantifiable atmospheric variables over two two-year periods with an interval of 10 years between them: 1981-82 and 1991-92. The pollen was captured with Burkard spore-traps, based on Hirst's volumetric method. Determinations were made daily and were used to make preparations, previously stained with basic fuscin, for study under light microscopy at x 1,000 magnification. 946 preparations were analyzed, corresponding to the same number of days distributed over 150 weeks of the periods studied. The results afforded the identification of 48 different types of pollen grain: Grasses (Poaceae), Olea europea (olive), Quercus rotundifolia (Holm-oak), other Quercus spp. (Q. pyrenaica, Q. suber, Q. faginea, etc.), Cupressaceae (Cupressus sempervivens, C. arizonica, Juniperus communis etc.), Plantago (Plantago lanceolata, Plantago media, etc.), Pinaceae (Pinus communis, Abies alba, etc.), Rumex sp. (osier), Urtica dioica (nettle), Parietaria (Parietaria officinalis, P. judaica), Chenopodio-Amaranthaceae (Chenopodium sp., Amaranthus sp., Salsola kali, etc.), Artemisia vulgaris (Artemisia), other Compositae (Taraxacum officinalis, Hellianthus sp. etc.), Castanea sativa (Chestnut), Ligustrum sp. (privet), Betula sp. (birch), Alnus sp. (common alder), Fraxinus sp (ash), Populus sp. (poplar), Salix sp. (willow), Ulmus sp. (elm), Platanus sp. (plantain, plane), Carex sp. (sweet flag), Erica sp. (common heather), Leguminosae or Fabaceae:--Papillionaceae (Medicago sp.; Cercis sp., Robina sp.)--Cesalpinoideae Acacia sp. (Acacia),--Mimosoideae: Sophora japonica, Umbelliferae (Foeniculum sp., Cirsium sp., etc.), Centaurea sp., Cistus sp. (rock rose), Typha sp (bulrush), Mirtaceae (Myrtus communis), Juglans regia (Walnut), Galium verum, Filipendula sp. (spirea/drop wort), Rosaceae

  8. Industrial Application Of Psyllium: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliq, Rehana; Tita, Ovidiu; Antofie, Maria Mihaela; Sava, Camelia

    2015-09-01

    Plantago ovata is economically an important medicinal plant commonly cultivated in different parts of India, Pakistan and Iran and some part of Europe. It has a long history of traditional uses with healing properties. There are various applications of seed husk and its marketable products for medicine and industrial uses. The seed husk is commonly called as psyllium or isabgol has a potential role in the treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal and bowel diseases. The intent of this review was to highlight the industrial uses of psyllium for the food products and therapeutic purposes. There is also considerable interest of local people, scientific communities and industries in the medical and food supplement application of psyllium husk and mucilage with specific health benefits.

  9. Challenges to understand plant responses to wind.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Yusuke; Anten, Niels P R

    2011-07-01

    Understanding plant response to wind is complicated as this factor entails not only mechanical stress but also affects leaf microclimate. In a recent study, we found that plant responses to mechanical stress (MS) may be different and even in the opposite direction to those of wind. MS-treated Plantago major plants produced thinner more elongated leaves while those in wind did the opposite. The latter can be associated with the drying effect of wind as is further supported by data on petiole anatomy presented here. These results indicate that plant responses to wind will depend on the extent of water stress. It should also be recognized that the responses to wind may differ between different parts of a plant and between plant species. Physiological research on wind responses should thus focus on the signal sensing and transduction of both the mechanical and drought signals associated with wind, and consider both plant size and architecture. PMID:21617382

  10. Co-infection alters population dynamics of infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Susi, Hanna; Barrès, Benoit; Vale, Pedro F; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Co-infections by multiple pathogen strains are common in the wild. Theory predicts co-infections to have major consequences for both within- and between-host disease dynamics, but data are currently scarce. Here, using common garden populations of Plantago lanceolata infected by two strains of the pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis, either singly or under co-infection, we find the highest disease prevalence in co-infected treatments both at the host genotype and population levels. A spore-trapping experiment demonstrates that co-infected hosts shed more transmission propagules than singly infected hosts, thereby explaining the observed change in epidemiological dynamics. Our experimental findings are confirmed in natural pathogen populations-more devastating epidemics were measured in populations with higher levels of co-infection. Jointly, our results confirm the predictions made by theoretical and experimental studies for the potential of co-infection to alter disease dynamics across a large host-pathogen metapopulation. PMID:25569306

  11. Elemental characterization of wild edible plants from countryside and urban areas.

    PubMed

    Renna, Massimiliano; Cocozza, Claudio; Gonnella, Maria; Abdelrahman, Hamada; Santamaria, Pietro

    2015-06-15

    Thirteen elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Co, Cd, Ni and Pb) in 11 different wild edible plants (WEP) (Amaranthus retroflexus, Foeniculum vulgare, Cichorium intybus, Glebionis coronaria, Sonchus spp., Borago officinalis, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, Sinapis arvensis, Papaver rhoeas, Plantago lagopus and Portulaca oleracea) collected from countryside and urban areas of Bari (Italy) were determined. B.officinalis and P.rhoeas could represent good nutritional sources of Mn and Fe, respectively, as well as A.retroflexus and S.arvensis for Ca. High intake of Pb and Cd could come from P.lagopus and A.retroflexus (1.40 and 0.13 mg kg(-1) FW, respectively). WEP may give a substantial contribution to the elements intake for consumers, but in some cases they may supply high level of elements potentially toxic for human health. Anyway, both ANOVA and PCA analyses have highlighted the low influence of the harvesting site on the elements content. PMID:25660854

  12. Naturally-assisted metal phytoextraction by Brassica carinata: role of root exudates.

    PubMed

    Quartacci, Mike F; Irtelli, Barbara; Gonnelli, Cristina; Gabbrielli, Roberto; Navari-Izzo, Flavia

    2009-10-01

    Due to relatively high chelant dosages and potential environmental risks it is necessary to explore different approaches in the remediation of metal-contaminated soils. The present study focussed on the removal of metals (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) from a multiple metal-contaminated soil by growing Brassica carinata plants in succession to spontaneous metallicolous populations of Pinus pinaster, Plantago lanceolata and Silene paradoxa. The results showed that the growth of the metallicolous populations increased the extractable metal levels in the soil, which resulted in a higher accumulation of metals in the above-ground parts of B. carinata. Root exudates of the three metallicolous species were analysed to elucidate their possible role in the enhanced metal availability. The presence of metals stimulated the exudation of organic and phenolic acids as well as flavonoids. It was suggested that root exudates played an important role in solubilising metals in soil and in favouring their uptake by roots. PMID:19497650

  13. Concentration of caesium-137, cobalt-60 and potassium-40 in some wild and edible plants around the nuclear power plant in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Djingova, R; Kuleff, I

    2002-01-01

    The activities of 137Cs, 60Co and 40K were determined in samples of wild (Taraxacum officinale, Plantago lanceolata and Populus nigra 'Italica') and edible (vegetable, corn, fruit) plants as well as soil collected from the 30 km safety zone of the Bulgarian NPP "Kozloduy" and comparisons with earlier measurements and analyses of samples from other regions and with literature values were performed. The derived transfer factors for 137Cs and 40K from soil to plants ranged between 0.002 and 0.009 for 137Cs, and between 0.09 and 0.35 for 40K. The individual effective dose (calculated from the present results and data on the activity of other foodstuffs and from information about dietary habits) comprises 4.5% of the annual dose limit. PMID:11848152

  14. Phenological records as a complement to aerobiological data.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Rafael; Silva, Inmaculada; Gonzalo, Angela; Moreno, Alfonsa; Pérez, Remedios; Fernández, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Phenological studies in combination with aerobiological studies enable one to observe the relationship between the release of pollen and its presence in the atmosphere. To obtain a suitable comparison between the daily variation of airborne pollen concentrations and flowering, it is necessary for the level of accuracy of both sets of data to be as similar as possible. To analyse the correlation between locally observed flowering data and pollen counts in pollen traps in order to set pollen information forecasts, pollen was sampled using a Burkard volumetric pollen trap working continuously from May 1993. For the phenological study we selected the main pollen sources of the six pollen types most abundant in our area: Cupressaceae, Platanus, Quercus, Plantago, Olea, and Poaceae with a total of 35 species. We selected seven sites to register flowering or pollination, two with semi-natural vegetation, the rest being urban sites. The sites were visited weekly from March to June in 2007, and from January to June in 2008 and 2009. Pollen shedding was checked at each visit, and recorded as the percentage of flowers or microsporangia in that state. There was an association between flowering phenology and airborne pollen records for some of the pollen types (Platanus, Quercus, Olea and Plantago). Nevertheless, for the other types (Cupressaceae and Poaceae) the flowering and airborne pollen peaks did not coincide, with up to 1 week difference in phase. Some arguments are put forward in explanation of this phenomenon. Phenological studies have shown that airborne pollen results from both local and distant sources, although the pollen peaks usually appear when local sources are shedding the greatest amounts of pollen. Resuspension phenomena are probably more important than long-distance transport in explaining the presence of airborne pollen outside the flowering period. This information could be used to improve pollen forecasts. PMID:20354733

  15. Late-glacial and Holocene record of vegetation and climate from Cynthia Bay, Lake St Clair, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, F. V. L.; Colhoun, E. A.; Barton, C. E.

    2000-10-01

    A Late-glacial-Holocene pollen record was obtained from a 3.96 m sediment core taken from Lake St Clair, central Tasmania. Modern vegetation and pollen analyses formed the basis for interpretation of the vegetation and climate history. Following deglaciation and before ca. 18450 yr BP Podocarpus lawrencei coniferous heath and Astelia-Plantago wet alpine herbfield became established at Lake St Clair. A distinct Poaceae-Plantago peak occurs between 18450 and 11210 yr BP and a mean annual temperature depression from ca. 6.2°C to 3°C below present is inferred for this period. The marked reduction in Podocarpus and strong increase of Poaceae suggests reduced precipitation levels during the period of widespread deglaciation (ca. 18.5-11 kyr BP). The local Late Pleistocene-Holocene non-forest to forest biostratigraphical boundary is dated at 11.2 kyr BP. It is characterised by expansion of the subalpine taxa Athrotaxis/Diselma with Nothofagus gunnii, and by the establishment of Nothofagus cunninghamii with Eucalyptus spp. A Phyllocladus bulge prior to the expansion of Nothofagus cunninghamii, reported at other Tasmanian sites, is not present at Lake St Clair. Nothofagus cunninghamii cool temperate rainforest peaked at 7800 yr BP, probably under wetter climatic conditions than present. The maximum development of rainforest in the early-middle Holocene may indicate that the temperature was slightly warmer than present, but the evidence is not definitive. The expansion of Eucalyptus spp. and Poaceae after 6000 yr BP may be partly a disclimax effect as a result of Aboriginal burning, but appears also to reflect reduced precipitation. The changes in vegetation and inferred climate can be explained by major changes in synoptic patterns of southern Australia and the adjacent southwest Pacific.

  16. Phenological records as a complement to aerobiological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormo, Rafael; Silva, Inmaculada; Gonzalo, Ángela; Moreno, Alfonsa; Pérez, Remedios; Fernández, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Phenological studies in combination with aerobiological studies enable one to observe the relationship between the release of pollen and its presence in the atmosphere. To obtain a suitable comparison between the daily variation of airborne pollen concentrations and flowering, it is necessary for the level of accuracy of both sets of data to be as similar as possible. To analyse the correlation between locally observed flowering data and pollen counts in pollen traps in order to set pollen information forecasts, pollen was sampled using a Burkard volumetric pollen trap working continuously from May 1993. For the phenological study we selected the main pollen sources of the six pollen types most abundant in our area: Cupressaceae, Platanus, Quercus, Plantago, Olea, and Poaceae with a total of 35 species. We selected seven sites to register flowering or pollination, two with semi-natural vegetation, the rest being urban sites. The sites were visited weekly from March to June in 2007, and from January to June in 2008 and 2009. Pollen shedding was checked at each visit, and recorded as the percentage of flowers or microsporangia in that state. There was an association between flowering phenology and airborne pollen records for some of the pollen types ( Platanus, Quercus, Olea and Plantago). Nevertheless, for the other types (Cupressaceae and Poaceae) the flowering and airborne pollen peaks did not coincide, with up to 1 week difference in phase. Some arguments are put forward in explanation of this phenomenon. Phenological studies have shown that airborne pollen results from both local and distant sources, although the pollen peaks usually appear when local sources are shedding the greatest amounts of pollen. Resuspension phenomena are probably more important than long-distance transport in explaining the presence of airborne pollen outside the flowering period. This information could be used to improve pollen forecasts.

  17. Analysis of serpentinophytes from north-east of Portugal for trace metal accumulation--relevance to the management of mine environment.

    PubMed

    Freitas, H; Prasad, M N V; Pratas, J

    2004-03-01

    In north-east of Portugal, the serpentinized area is about 8000 ha with a characteristic geology and flora. The serpentine plant community and respective soils were analyzed to examine the trace metal budget in different tissues of the plants exhibiting resistance to trace metals. One hundred and thirty five plant species belonging to 39 families and respective soils have been analyzed for total Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Substantial amounts of Ni, Cr, Co and Mn were detected in plant tissues which are listed below: NI: Alyssum serpyllifolium (38105); Bromus hordeaceus (1467); Linaria spartea (492); Plantago radicata (140); Lavandula stoechas (118) and Cistus salvifolius (114); CR: L. spartea (706.7); Ulmus procera (173.4); A. serpyllifolium (129.3); Cistus ladanifer (40.8); L. stoechas (29.5); P. radicata (27.81); Setariopsis verticillata (25.7); Plantago lanceolata (24); Digitalis purpurea (23.4); Logfia minima (23.1); Arenaria querioides (23); Hieracium peleteranum (22.7); Arenaria montana (14.5); CO: A. serpyllifolium (145.1); L. spartea (63.2); P. radicata (10.4); H. peleteranum (7.3); Lepidium heterophyllum (6.9); A. querioides (6.6); C. salvifolius (6.5); C. ladanifer (6.3); L. stoechas (6.1); Anthyllis lotoides (6.1); L. minima (6.1); Euphorbia falcata (5.7) and B. hordeaceus (5.6); MN: A. serpyllifolium (830); L. spartea (339); L. stoechas (187.1); L. minima (182.7); Castanea sativa (125); Spergula pentandra (124); P. radicata (119); Cytisus striatus (115.4); Quercus pyrenaica (110); Teucrium scorodonia (109.4); Fraxinus vulgaris (109); Anthyllis sampaiana (108); Quercus ilex (108). The significance of serpentine flora, need for conservation of these fragile and environmentally invaluable plant resources for possible use for in situ remediation of metalliferous substrates are presented in this paper. PMID:14675842

  18. Effects of bacterial inoculants on the indigenous microbiome and secondary metabolites of chamomile plants

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ruth; Köberl, Martina; Mostafa, Amr; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; Monschein, Marlene; Jensen, Kenneth B.; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria fulfill important functions for plant growth and health. However, our knowledge about the impact of bacterial treatments on the host's microbiome and physiology is limited. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of bacterial inoculants on the microbiome of chamomile plants Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert grown in a field under organic management in Egypt. Chamomile seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous Gram-positive strains (Streptomyces subrutilus Wbn2-11, Bacillus subtilis Co1-6, Paenibacillus polymyxa Mc5Re-14) from Egypt and three European Gram-negative strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18) already known for their beneficial plant-microbe interaction. Molecular fingerprints of 16S rRNA gene as well as real-time PCR analyses did not show statistically significant differences for all applied bacterial antagonists compared to the control. In contrast, a pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the community structure of bacteria between the treatments. These differences could be clearly shown by a shift within the community structure and corresponding beta-diversity indices. Moreover, B. subtilis Co1-6 and P. polymyxa Mc5Re-14 showed an enhancement of the bioactive secondary metabolite apigenin-7-O-glucoside. This indicates a possible new function of bacterial inoculants: to interact with the plant microbiome as well as to influence the plant metabolome. PMID:24600444

  19. Effect of the ultrasound-assisted preliminary maceration on the efficiency of the essential oil distillation from selected herbal raw materials.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Radosław; Kowalska, Grażyna; Jamroz, Jerzy; Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Metyk, Damian

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study was the estimation of the ultrasound-assisted preliminary maceration effect on the efficiency of essential oil distillation and on its qualitative and quantitative composition. The experiment included analyses on three herbal materials, i.e. peppermint leaves (Mentha piperita L.), marjoram herb (Origanum majorana L.), and chamomile flowers (Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert). The study showed that the application of preliminary water maceration of raw material, augmented with ultrasounds, had a statistically significant increasing effect on the amount of oil distilled, in the case of mint leaf from 1.32% to 1.46% v/w, and in the case of marjoram herb from 1.13% to 1.27% v/w. In the case of chamomile flowers no significant effect of ultrasound on the amount of oil obtained was observed. Generally, comparing the composition of essential oils obtained in the experiments with the requirements of the relevant standards no unfavourable effect of the distillation augmenting techniques applied was noted. Therefore, it should be expected that the studied distillates of volatile fractions will have the desired biological activity. PMID:25541066

  20. The influence of purge times on the yields of essential oil components extracted from plants by pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Wianowska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different purge times on the yield of the main essential oil constituents of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), and chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L.) was investigated. The pressurized liquid extraction process was performed by applying different extraction temperatures and solvents. The results presented in the paper show that the estimated yield of essential oil components extracted from the plants in the pressurized liquid extraction process is purge time-dependent. The differences in the estimated yields are mainly connected with the evaporation of individual essential oil components and the applied solvent during the purge; the more volatile an essential oil constituent is, the greater is its loss during purge time, and the faster the evaporation of the solvent during the purge process is, the higher the concentration of less volatile essential oil components in the pressurized liquid extraction receptacle. The effect of purge time on the estimated yield of individual essential oil constituents is additionally differentiated by the extraction temperature and the extraction ability of the applied solvent. PMID:25902980

  1. Quantification of Sesquiterpene Lactones in Asteraceae Plant Extracts: Evaluation of their Allergenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Salapovic, Helena; Geier, Johannes; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs), mainly those with an activated exocyclic methylene group, are important allergens in Asteraceae (Compositae) plants. As a screening tool, the Compositae mix, consisting of five Asteraceae plant extracts with allergenic potential (feverfew, tansy, arnica, yarrow, and German chamomile) is part of several national patch test baseline series. However, the SL content of the Compositae mix may vary due to the source material. Therefore, a simple spectrophotometric method for the quantitative measurement of SLs with the α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone moiety was developed, giving the percentage of allergenic compounds in plant extracts. The method has been validated and five Asteraceae extracts, namely feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.), arnica (Arnica montana L.), yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.), and German chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L. Rauschert) that have been used in routine patch test screening were evaluated. A good correlation could be found between the results obtained using the proposed spectrophotometric method and the corresponding clinical results. Thus, the introduced method is a valuable tool for evaluating the allergenic potential and for the simple and efficient quality control of plant extracts with allergenic potential. PMID:24106675

  2. Comparison of antimicrobial activity of essential oils, plant extracts and methylparaben in cosmetic emulsions: 2 months study.

    PubMed

    Herman, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the preservative effectiveness of plant extracts (Matricaria chamomilla, Aloe vera, Calendula officinalis) and essential oils (Lavandulla officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum) with methylparaben in cosmetic emulsions against skin microflora during 2 months of application by volunteers. Cosmetic emulsions with extracts (2.5 %), essential oils (2.5 %), methylparaben (0.4 %) or placebo were tested by 40 volunteers during 2 months of treatment. In order to determine microbial purity of the emulsions, the samples were taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of application. Throughout the trial period it was revealed that only cinnamon oil completely inhibited the growth of bacteria, yeast and mould, as compared to all other essential oils, plant extracts and methylparaben in the tested emulsions. This result shows that cinnamon oil could successfully replace the use of methylparaben in cosmetics, at the same time ensuring microbiological purity of a cosmetic product under its in-use and storage conditions. PMID:24891745

  3. Warfarin interactions with medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Milić, Natasa; Milosević, Natasa; Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Bozić, Teodora; Abenavoli, Ludovico; Borrelli, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Recognition of the adverse effects of medicinal herbs is not routine and the reports on such effects are even less frequent in clinical practice. Potential herb-drug interactions are of a major safety concern, especially for drugs with narrow therapeutic indices like warfarin, which can lead to severe adverse reactions that are sometimes life-threatening. The interactions between warfarin and medicinal herbs described in the literature have been summarized in this paper relying on Medline database (via PubMed) using the key words: warfarin, herbal supplements and interactions. The references on the analyzed literature have been investigated in order to collect the existing data. The case reports with severe adverse effects such as spontaneous postoperative bleeding, formation of hematomas, hematemesis, melena, thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage and/or subdural hematomas after concomitant use of warfarin and the medicinal herbs: Panax ginseng, Hypericum perforatum, Salvia milthiorizza, Gingko biloba, Serenoa repens, Angelica sinensis, Vaccinium species, Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Tanacetum parthenium, Lucium barbarum, Matricaria chamomilla, Boswellia serrata and Camellia sinensis have been estimated. Some of the interactions between warfarin and medicinal herbs have been well assessed proving that they are closely-dependent. The interactions between warfarin and medicinal herbs, not generally reported in previous reviews, are presented in our review. The health professionals who are involved in treating the patients are expected to be fully informed about the interactions between warfarin and medicinal herbs in order to minimize the health risks of the patients. PMID:25233607

  4. The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health

    PubMed Central

    Köberl, Martina; Schmidt, Ruth; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however, the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is (i) to introduce novel insights into the plant microbiome with a focus on medicinal plants, (ii) to provide details about plant- and microbe-derived ingredients of medicinal plants, and (iii) to discuss possibilities for plant growth promotion and plant protection for commercial cultivation of medicinal plants. In addition, we also present a case study performed both to analyse the microbiome of three medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L., and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.) cultivated on organically managed Egyptian desert farm and to develop biological control strategies. The soil microbiome of the desert ecosystem was comprised of a high abundance of Gram-positive bacteria of prime importance for pathogen suppression under arid soil conditions. For all three plants, we observed a clearly plant-specific selection of the microbes as well as highly specific diazotrophic communities that overall identify plant species as important drivers in structural and functional diversity. Lastly, native Bacillus spec. div. strains were able to promote plant growth and elevate the plants’ flavonoid production. These results underline the numerous links between the plant-associated microbiome and the plant metabolome. PMID:24391634

  5. Effect-Directed Discovery of Bioactive Compounds Followed by Highly Targeted Characterization, Isolation and Identification, Exemplarily Shown for Solidago virgaurea.

    PubMed

    Móricz, Ágnes M; Ott, Péter G; Häbe, Tim T; Darcsi, András; Böszörményi, Andrea; Alberti, Ágnes; Krüzselyi, Dániel; Csontos, Péter; Béni, Szabolcs; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2016-08-16

    A nontargeted, effect-directed screening (bioprofiling) and a subsequent highly targeted characterization of antibacterial compounds from plant matrices is demonstrated on the example of Solidago virgaurea root extracts. The procedure comprises high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) coupled with six bacterial bioassays including two plant pathogens, a radical scavenging assay, an acetylcholinesterase assay as well as in situ and ex situ mass spectrometric analyses. In situ mass spectra were directly recorded from the adsorbent using the Direct Analysis in Real Time interface (HPTLC-DART-MS), whereas ex situ mass spectra were recorded using an elution head-based interface (HPTLC-ESI-MS). For further bioassay-guided isolation of the main antimicrobial compounds, flash chromatographic fractionation and semipreparative high-performance liquid chromatographic purification were used and nuclear magnetic resonance data allowed the identification of the unknown antimicrobial compounds as 2Z,8Z- and 2E,8Z-matricaria esters. The discovered antibacterial activity was confirmed and specified by a luminometric assay and as minimal inhibitory concentration in the liquid phase. PMID:27433973

  6. Reproduction of Pratylenchus penetrans on 24 Common Weeds in Potato Fields in Québec

    PubMed Central

    Bélair, G.; Dauphinais, N.; Benoit, D. L.; Fournier, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-four weeds commonly found in commercial potato fields in Quebec were evaluated for their host suitability to the root-lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, under greenhouse conditions. Brown mustard (Brassica juncea) and rye (Secale cereale) were included as susceptible controls and forage pearl millet hyb. CFPM 101 (Pennisetum glaucum) as a poor host. Pratylenchus penetrans multiplied well on 22 of the 24 weed species tested (Pf/Pi ≥ rye or brown mustard). Cirsium arvense, Leucanthemum vulgare and Matricaria discoida were classified as very good hosts with a Pf/Pi ranging from 1.60 to 2.54, while Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Cyperus esculentus were classified as poor hosts with a Pf/Pi from 0.01 to 0.15. Amaranthus powellii, A. retrqflexus, Raphanus raphanistrum, Rorippa palustris, Cerastium fontanum, Spergula arvensis, Stellaria media, Chenopodium album, Vicia cracca, Elytrigia repens, Digitaria ischaemum, Echinochloa crusgalli, Panicum capillare, Setaria faberii, S. pumila, S. viridis, Polygonum convolvulus, P. scabrum and P. persicaria were intermediate hosts with Pf/Pi values ranging from 0.33 to 2.01. The plant species and the botanical family had a significant impact on nematode reproduction. The Brassicaceae family resulted in the greatest reproduction of P. penetrans, and the Cyperaceae resulted in the least. The plant life-cycle (annual vs. perennial) had no impact on nematode population. PMID:19259506

  7. Can medical herbs stimulate regeneration or neuroprotection and treat neuropathic pain in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sven; Beckmann, Kathrin; Franconi, Giovanna; Meyer-Hamme, Gesa; Friedemann, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN) has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan), Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto), Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto), and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto). The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN. PMID:23983777

  8. Assessment of microbiological cleanness of selected medicinal herbs in relations to the level of resource fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Sobczak, Paweł; Wróblewska, Paula; Adamczuk, Piotr; Cholewa, Grażyna; Zawiślak, Kazimierz; Mazur, Jacek; Panasiewicz, Marian; Wojciechowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Herbs are commonly used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Their vast use is connected with their antibacterial or antioxidising properties, as well as numerous pro-health properties. The aim of the presented research was assessment of the quantitative and qualitative composition of moulds which contaminate samples of dried herbs: Sage (Salvia officinalis L.), Camomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) and Melissa (Mellisa officinalis L.) with different degrees of resource fragmentation. The dried herbs investigated had a characteristic mould content below 1•10(6) CFU/g according to the recommendations of the European Herbal Infusions Association (EHIA). The most contaminated resource turned out to be Camomile, the least--Melissa. The most often isolated moulds were: Aspergillus, Penicillium, Ulocladium, Alternaria. Moreover, it was observed that more fragmented dried herbs were characteristic of lower--by approx. 40-55% microbiological contamination--depending on the type of tested herb, which might be connected with the time of dried herbs' processing, higher aeration, moisture changes or mechanical damaging of fungi's fragments in the case of a resource with higher fragmentation. High contamination of a herbal resource might be harmful for a consumer, and moulds and their metabolites in the form of mitotoxins might constitute a threat for human health. To keep all the sensory features and activity of herbs' active substances, it is extremely important to secure their high microbiological quality. PMID:24364459

  9. Ethnobotanical survey in the Palestinian area: a classification of the healing potential of medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ali-Shtayeh, M S; Yaniv, Z; Mahajna, J

    2000-11-01

    An ethnobotanical survey was carried out in the West Bank to evaluate the relative efficacy of the plants used to treat skin diseases and prostate cancer. A total number of 102 informants, 30 years and older and either native born or had been living in the West Bank for more than 30 years, were interviewed using a previously prepared questionnaire. Of about 165 plant species mentioned by the informants, 63 (38.1%) were mentioned by three or more informants. On the basis of their primary uses, 21 of these plants were reported to relieve skin disorders, 17 for urinary system disorders, 16 for gastric disorders, nine for cancer and prostate disorders, eight for arthritis, five for respiratory problems, and five for other ailments. Indices on fidelity levels (FLs), relative popularity level (RPL), and rank-order priority (ROP) were calculated. Plants were classified in two groups: 'popular' (RPL=1) or 'unpopular' (RPL<1). The following plant species were classified as popular in this study: Teucrium polium, Matricaria aurea, Urtica pilulifera, Paronychia argentea, Petroselinum sativum, and Salvia fruticosa. The remaining 57 species were classified as 'unpopular'. Fifty-nine plants were claimed to be effective against cancer and prostate disorders, which include Arum dioscorides, U. pilulifera, Allium sativum, Viscum cruciatum, and Allium cepa. PMID:11025160

  10. Unexpected Behavior of Some Nitric Oxide Modulators under Cadmium Excess in Plant Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kováčik, Jozef; Babula, Petr; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Hedbavny, Josef; Jarošová, Markéta

    2014-01-01

    Various nitric oxide modulators (NO donors - SNP, GSNO, DEA NONOate and scavengers – PTIO, cPTIO) were tested to highlight the role of NO under Cd excess in various ontogenetic stages of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla). Surprisingly, compared to Cd alone, SNP and PTIO elevated Cd uptake (confirmed also by PhenGreen staining) but depleted glutathione (partially ascorbic acid) and phytochelatins PC2 and PC3 in both older plants (cultured hydroponically) and seedlings (cultured in deionised water). Despite these anomalous impacts, fluorescence staining of NO and ROS confirmed predictable assumptions and revealed reciprocal changes (decrease in NO but increase in ROS after PTIO addition and the opposite after SNP application). Subsequent tests using alternative modulators and seedlings confirmed changes to NO and ROS after application of GSNO and DEA NONOate as mentioned above for SNP while cPTIO altered only NO level (depletion). On the contrary to SNP and PTIO, GSNO, DEA NONOate and cPTIO did not elevate Cd content and phytochelatins (PC2, PC3) were rather elevated. These data provide evidence that various NO modulators are useful in terms of NO and ROS manipulation but interactions with intact plants affect metal uptake and must therefore be used with caution. In this view, cPTIO and DEA NONOate revealed the less pronounced side impacts and are recommended as suitable NO scavenger/donor in plant physiological studies under Cd excess. PMID:24626462

  11. Occupational allergy caused by flowers.

    PubMed

    de Jong, N W; Vermeulen, A M; Gerth van Wijk, R; de Groot, H

    1998-02-01

    We describe 14 consecutive patients with complaints due to the handling of flowers. The symptoms varied from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma to urticaria. Most patients had professions in the flower industry. Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed with home-made pollen extracts from 17 different flowers known to be the most commonly grown and sold in The Netherlands RAST against mugwort, chrysanthemum, and solidago was performed. The diagnosis of atopy against flowers was based on work-related symptoms due to the handling of flowers, positive SPT with flower extracts, and positive RAST. The concordance between SPT and case history was 74%, and that between SPT and RAST was 77% Extensive cross-sensitization was seen to pollen of several members of the Compositae family (e.g., Matricaria, chrysanthemum, solidago) and to pollen of the Amaryllidaceae family (Alstroemeria and Narcissus). Homemade flower extracts can be used to confirm IgE-mediated flower allergy. Mugwort can be used as a screening test for possible flower allergy. For most patients, the allergy led to a change of profession. PMID:9534922

  12. Antigenotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis induction by apigenin, bisabolol, and protocatechuic acid.

    PubMed

    Anter, Jaouad; Romero-Jiménez, Magdalena; Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Villatoro-Pulido, Myriam; Analla, Mohamed; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés

    2011-03-01

    Medicinal plants represent an important resource in new drug research. Antioxidant properties of plants can help to scavenge reactive oxygen species. The objective of this work was to evaluate the genotoxic, antigenotoxic, tumoricidal, and apoptotic effect of some major phenols (apigenin, bisabolol, and protocatechuic acid) from two medicinal plants, Matricaria chamomilla and Uncaria tomentosa. The wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of the three phenols. The human model of HL-60 leukemia cells was used for the assessment of the cytotoxic effect, growth, and cellular viability. The apoptotic effect was evaluated using a DNA fragmentation assay based on the formation of internucleosomal units. Protocatechuic acid (0.25 and 1 mM), apigenin (0.46 and 1.85 mM), and bisabolol (0.56 and 2.24 mM) did not exhibit any genotoxic effect. The three phenols showed an antigenotoxic effect against the hydrogen peroxide effect and also exhibited tumoricidal activity. Apigenin (2.24-35.96 mM) showed a lower 50% inhibitory concentration (0.75 and 3.87 mM for the trypan blue test and WST-8 colorimetric assay, respectively) than bisabolol and protocatechuic acid. These phenolics also induced apoptosis in HL-60 leukemia cells. This study suggests that the antioxidant activity of Chamomilla and Uncaria could be partially responsible of their beneficial activity. PMID:21182433

  13. Beverage and culture. "Zhourat", a multivariate analysis of the globalization of a herbal tea from the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Obón, Concepción; Rivera, Diego; Alcaraz, Francisco; Attieh, Latiffa

    2014-08-01

    The "Zhourat" herbal tea consists of a blend of wild flowers, herbs, leaves and fruits and is a typical beverage of Lebanon and Syria. We aim to evaluate cultural significance of "Zhourat", to determine cultural standards for its formulation including key ingredients and to determine acceptable variability levels in terms of number of ingredients and their relative proportions, in summary what is "Zhourat" and what is not "Zhourat" from an ethnobotanical perspective. For this purpose we develop a novel methodology to describe and analyse patterns of variation of traditional multi-ingredient herbal formulations, beverages and teas and to identify key ingredients, which are characteristics of a particular culture and region and to interpret health claims for the mixture. Factor analysis and hierarchical clustering techniques were used to display similarities between samples whereas salience index was used to determine the main ingredients which could help to distinguish a standard traditional blend from a global market-addressed formulation. The study revealed 77 main ingredients belonging to 71 different species of vascular plants. In spite of the "Zhourat's" highly variable content, the salience analysis resulted in a determined set of key botanical components including Rosa x damascena Herrm., Althaea damascena Mouterde, Matricaria chamomilla L., Aloysia citrodora Palau, Zea mays L. and Elaeagnus angustifolia L. The major health claims for "Zhourat" as digestive, sedative and for respiratory problems are culturally coherent with the analysis of the traditional medicinal properties uses of its ingredients. PMID:24703931

  14. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    PubMed Central

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  15. Ethnobotanical survey of the medicinal flora used by the Caribs of Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Girón, L M; Freire, V; Alonzo, A; Cáceres, A

    1991-09-01

    An ethnobotanical survey was conducted among the Carib population of Guatemala in 1988-1989. In general terms, the sample surveyed possessed a relatively good standard of living. Results indicated that health services were utilized by the population, and that domestic medicine, mainly plants (96.9%) was used by 15% of the population. One hundred and nineteen plants used for medicinal purposes were collected, of which 102 (85.7%) could be identified; a list of these together with the information provided for each plant is presented. The most frequently reported plants used as medicine are: Acalypha arvensis, Cassia alata, Cymbopogon citratus, Melampodium divaricatum. Momordica charantia, Neurolaena lobata, Ocimum basilicum, Petiveria alliacea and Solanum nigrescens. Most of these plants are found in the region, but some are brought from the Highlands or outside of the country, such as Malva parviflora, Matricaria chamomilla, Peumus boldus, Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis and Tagetes lucida. This survey demonstrated that the Carib population of Guatemala has survived in a transcultural environment of African and native Amerindian beliefs. PMID:1795521

  16. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Quentin; Ameline, Arnaud; Doury, Géraldine; Le Roux, Vincent; Couty, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species). The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1) the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2) the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems. PMID:26270046

  17. Essential oils and herbal extracts as antimicrobial agents in cosmetic emulsion.

    PubMed

    Herman, Anna; Herman, Andrzej Przemysław; Domagalska, Beata Wanda; Młynarczyk, Andrzej

    2013-06-01

    The cosmetic industry adapts to the needs of consumers seeking to limit the use of preservatives and develop of preservative-free or self-preserving cosmetics, where preservatives are replaced by raw materials of plant origin. The aim of study was a comparison of the antimicrobial activity of extracts (Matricaria chamomilla, Aloe vera, Calendula officinalis) and essential oils (Lavandulla officinallis, Melaleuca alternifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum) with methylparaben. Extracts (2.5 %), essential oils (2.5 %) and methylparaben (0.4 %) were tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Candida albicans ATCC 14053. Essentials oils showed higher inhibitory activity against tested microorganism strain than extracts and methylparaben. Depending on tested microorganism strain, all tested extracts and essential oils show antimicrobial activity 0.8-1.7 and 1-3.5 times stronger than methylparaben, respectively. This shows that tested extracts and essential oils could replace use of methylparaben, at the same time giving a guarantee of microbiological purity of the cosmetic under its use and storage. PMID:24426114

  18. The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; Schmidt, Ruth; Ramadan, Elshahat M; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however, the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is (i) to introduce novel insights into the plant microbiome with a focus on medicinal plants, (ii) to provide details about plant- and microbe-derived ingredients of medicinal plants, and (iii) to discuss possibilities for plant growth promotion and plant protection for commercial cultivation of medicinal plants. In addition, we also present a case study performed both to analyse the microbiome of three medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L., and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.) cultivated on organically managed Egyptian desert farm and to develop biological control strategies. The soil microbiome of the desert ecosystem was comprised of a high abundance of Gram-positive bacteria of prime importance for pathogen suppression under arid soil conditions. For all three plants, we observed a clearly plant-specific selection of the microbes as well as highly specific diazotrophic communities that overall identify plant species as important drivers in structural and functional diversity. Lastly, native Bacillus spec. div. strains were able to promote plant growth and elevate the plants' flavonoid production. These results underline the numerous links between the plant-associated microbiome and the plant metabolome. PMID:24391634

  19. Comparisons of diazotrophic communities in native and agricultural desert ecosystems reveal plants as important drivers in diversity.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; Erlacher, Armin; Ramadan, Elshahat M; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Müller, Henry; Bragina, Anastasia; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Diazotrophs provide the only biological source of fixed atmospheric nitrogen in the biosphere. Although they are the key player for plant-available nitrogen, less is known about their diversity and potential importance in arid ecosystems. We investigated the nitrogenase gene diversity in native and agricultural desert soil as well as within root-associated microbiota of medicinal plants grown in Egypt through the combination of nifH-specific qPCR, fingerprints, amplicon pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization-confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although the diazotrophic microbiota were characterized by generally high abundances and diversity, statistically significant differences were found between both soils, the different microhabitats, and between the investigated plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L. and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.). We observed a considerable community shift from desert to agriculturally used soil that demonstrated a higher abundance and diversity in the agro-ecosystem. The endorhiza was characterized by lower abundances and only a subset of species when compared to the rhizosphere. While the microbiomes of the Asteraceae were similar and dominated by potential root-nodulating rhizobia acquired primarily from soil, the perennial S. distichum generally formed associations with free-living nitrogen fixers. These results underline the importance of diazotrophs in desert ecosystems and additionally identify plants as important drivers in functional gene pool diversity. PMID:26705571

  20. Antifungal activity of essential oils from Iranian plants against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sharifzadeh, Aghil; Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assay the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants against both fluconazole (FLU)-resistant and FLU-susceptible C. albicans strains isolated from HIV positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). Materials and Methods: The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation method from Myrtus communis (My. communis), Zingiber officinale roscoe (Z. officinale roscoe), Matricaria chamomilla (Ma. chamomilla), Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) and Origanum vulgare (O. vulgare). The susceptibility test was based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical compositions of the essential oils were obtained by gas chromatography- mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Results: In GC-MS analysis, thymol (63.40%), linalool (42%), α-pinene (27.87%), α-pinene (22.10%), and zingiberene (31.79%) were found to be the major components of T. ammi, O. vulgare, My. communis, Ma. chamomilla and Z. officinale roscoe, respectively. The results showed that essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. O. vulgare and T. ammi essential oils were found to be the most efficient (P<0.05). The main finding was that the susceptibilities of FLU-resistant C. albicans to essential oils were higher than those of the FLU-susceptible yeasts. Conclusion: Results of this study indicated that the oils from medicinal plants could be used as potential anti FLU-resistant C. albicans agents. PMID:27222835

  1. Role of Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and its secondary hosts in plum pox virus propagation.

    PubMed

    Manachini, B; Casati, P; Cinanni, L; Bianco, P

    2007-08-01

    Plum pox virus (family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, PPV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of plants in the genus Prunus, particularly Prunus persica L. The role of the Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) as a vector of PPV-M, and its role in spreading PPV-M, was investigated. PPV-M-infected peach trees were used as inoculum sources, and transmission to 15 herbaceous species commonly present in and around peach orchards was evaluated. The presence of PPV-M in secondary hosts after aphid transmission was verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests. The results indicate that Saponaria ocymoides L., Pisum sativum L., Trifolium repens L., Trifolium pratense L., Lepidium sativum L., Matricaria chamomilla L., Centaurea cyanus L., Bellis perennis L., Papaver rhoeas L., and Zinnia elegans L. became infected. Although Lupinus polyphyllus Lindley, Taraxacum officinale L., Achillea millefolium L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., and Linum rubrum L. did not become infected, they are hosts of M. persicae. Among the 10 positive species that were infected, the species most common in peach orchards, T. pratense, T. repens, B. perennis, and M. chamomilla, were used as source plants for the transmission studies to the peach tree. Our study reveals the ability of M. persicae to transmit PPV-M from herbaceous hosts to peach trees, describes PPV-M symptoms in herbaceous species, and discusses the role of M. persicae and its hosts as a source of PPV-M in peach orchards. PMID:17849850

  2. A preliminary investigation of the jack-bean urease inhibition by randomly selected traditionally used herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Biglar, Mahmood; Soltani, Khadijeh; Nabati, Farzaneh; Bazl, Roya; Mojab, Faraz; Amanlou, Massoud

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to different clinical and pathological outcomes in humans, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric neoplasia and even gastric cancer and its eradiation dependst upon multi-drug therapy. The most effective therapy is still unknown and prompts people to make great efforts to find better and more modern natural or synthetic anti-H. pylori agents. In this report 21 randomly selected herbal methanolic extracts were evaluated for their effect on inhibition of Jack-bean urease using the indophenol method as described by Weatherburn. The inhibition potency was measured by UV spectroscopy technique at 630 nm which attributes to released ammonium. Among these extracts, five showed potent inhibitory activities with IC50 ranges of 18-35 μg/mL. These plants are Matricaria disciforme (IC50:35 μg/mL), Nasturtium officinale (IC50:18 μg/mL), Punica granatum (IC50:30 μg/mL), Camelia sinensis (IC50:35 μg/mL), Citrus aurantifolia (IC50:28 μg/mL). PMID:24250509

  3. Can Medical Herbs Stimulate Regeneration or Neuroprotection and Treat Neuropathic Pain in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sven; Beckmann, Kathrin; Franconi, Giovanna; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN) has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan), Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto), Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto), and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto). The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN. PMID:23983777

  4. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    PubMed

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  5. A quantitative ethnopharmacological documentation of natural pharmacological agents used by pediatric patients in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Mahomoodally, M Fawzi; Sreekeesoon, D Priyamka

    2014-01-01

    The pediatric population constitutes the most vulnerable patients due to a dearth of approved drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to probe novel natural pharmacological agents in an endeavour to develop new drugs to address pediatric illnesses. To date, no studies have explored the use of natural therapies for pediatric health care in Mauritius. Parents (n = 325) from different regions of the island were interviewed. Quantitative indexes such as fidelity level (FL), informant consensus factor (F IC), and use-value (UV) were calculated. Thirty-two plants were reported to be used by pediatric patients. Gastrointestinal disorders (F IC = 0.97) encompassing regurgitation, infantile colic, and stomach aches were the most common ailments managed with herbs. Matricaria chamomilla used for infantile colic and its pharmacological properties has previously been documented for pediatric patients. Product from A. mellifera (UV = 0.75) was the most utilized zootherapy for managing cough. Most plants and animal products reported in this study have bioactive constituents supported by existing scientific literature but their use for the pediatric population is scant. The present ethnopharmacological study has opened new perspectives for further research into their pharmacology, which can subsequently support and facilitate timely pediatric medicinal product development. PMID:24949418

  6. A Quantitative Ethnopharmacological Documentation of Natural Pharmacological Agents Used by Pediatric Patients in Mauritius

    PubMed Central

    Mahomoodally, M. Fawzi; Sreekeesoon, D. Priyamka

    2014-01-01

    The pediatric population constitutes the most vulnerable patients due to a dearth of approved drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to probe novel natural pharmacological agents in an endeavour to develop new drugs to address pediatric illnesses. To date, no studies have explored the use of natural therapies for pediatric health care in Mauritius. Parents (n = 325) from different regions of the island were interviewed. Quantitative indexes such as fidelity level (FL), informant consensus factor (FIC), and use-value (UV) were calculated. Thirty-two plants were reported to be used by pediatric patients. Gastrointestinal disorders (FIC = 0.97) encompassing regurgitation, infantile colic, and stomach aches were the most common ailments managed with herbs. Matricaria chamomilla used for infantile colic and its pharmacological properties has previously been documented for pediatric patients. Product from A. mellifera (UV = 0.75) was the most utilized zootherapy for managing cough. Most plants and animal products reported in this study have bioactive constituents supported by existing scientific literature but their use for the pediatric population is scant. The present ethnopharmacological study has opened new perspectives for further research into their pharmacology, which can subsequently support and facilitate timely pediatric medicinal product development. PMID:24949418

  7. Investigation of the effect of chamazulene on lipid peroxidation and free radical processes.

    PubMed

    Rekka, E A; Kourounakis, A P; Kourounakis, P N

    1996-06-01

    Oxygen toxicity and related free radical reactions are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions, like atherosclerosis, inflammation, gastric ulceration, neuronal degeneration, tumour promotion. The flowers of Matricaria chamomilla, Asteraceae, have been used therapeutically for conditions in which oxidative stress is supposed to be implicated. We considered interesting to investigate the effect of Chamazulene, the active substance of chamomile, on free radical processes. Membrane lipid peroxidation was induced by Fe2+/ascorbate and assessed as the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive material. The hydroxyl radical scavenging activity was studied as the competition of Chamazulene with DMSO for HO. generated by Fe3+/ascorbate. Finally, the interaction of Chamazulene with the N-centered stable free radical DPPH was estimated photometrically (517 nm). It was found that Chamazulene inhibited lipid peroxidation in a concentration and time dependent manner presenting an IC50 of 18 microM after 45 min incubation. It could also inhibit the autoxidation of DMSO (33 mM) by 76% at 25 mM, and had a weak capacity to interact with DPPH. In conclusion, Chamazulene presents interesting properties concerning radical processes. PMID:8827832

  8. Chamomile flower extract-directed CuO nanoparticle formation for its antioxidant and DNA cleavage properties.

    PubMed

    Duman, Fatih; Ocsoy, Ismail; Kup, Fatma Ozturk

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) using a medicinal plant (Matricaria chamomilla) flower extract as both reducing and capping agent and investigate their antioxidant activity and interaction with plasmid DNA (pBR322).The CuO NPs were characterized using Uv-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), DLS (dynamic light scattering), XRD (X-ray diffraction), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray) spectroscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The CuO NPs exhibited nearly mono-distributed and spherical shapes with diameters of 140 nm size. UV-Vis absorption spectrum of CuO NPs gave a broad peak around 285 and 320 nm. The existence of functional groups on the surface of CuO NPs was characterized with FT-IR analysis. XRD pattern showed that the NPs are in the form of a face-centered cubic crystal. Zeta potential value was measured as -20 mV due to the presence of negatively charged functional groups in plant extract. Additionally, we demonstrated concentration-dependent antioxidant activity of CuO NPs and their interaction with plasmid DNA. We assumed that the CuO NPs both cleave and break DNA double helix structure. PMID:26706538

  9. Determination of Heavy Metals Concentration in Traditional Herbs Commonly Consumed in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Dghaim, Rania; Al Khatib, Safa; Rasool, Husna; Ali Khan, Munawwar

    2015-01-01

    Herbs are extensively consumed in the United Arab Emirates for their flavoring and medicinal properties. This study aimed at determining the concentration of heavy metals in selected traditional herbs consumed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A total of 81 samples of seven herbs, parsley (Petroselinum crispum), basil (Ocimum basilicum), sage (Salvia officinalis), oregano (Origanum vulgare), mint (Mentha spicata), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), and chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), were purchased from the local market in Dubai and analyzed for their cadmium, lead, copper, iron, and zinc contents. Microwave-assisted digestion was applied for the dissolution of the samples and heavy metals concentration was determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). Metals were found to be present in varied concentrations in the herb samples. The concentration ranges were found as follows: less than 0.1–1.11 mg·kg−1 for cadmium, less than 1.0–23.52 mg·kg−1 for lead, 1.44–156.24 mg·kg−1 for copper, 12.65–146.67 mg·kg−1 for zinc, and 81.25–1101.22 mg·kg−1 for iron. The findings of the study suggest that most of the analyzed herbs contained unsafe levels of heavy metals that exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits (PL). PMID:26000023

  10. Determination of heavy metals concentration in traditional herbs commonly consumed in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Dghaim, Rania; Al Khatib, Safa; Rasool, Husna; Ali Khan, Munawwar

    2015-01-01

    Herbs are extensively consumed in the United Arab Emirates for their flavoring and medicinal properties. This study aimed at determining the concentration of heavy metals in selected traditional herbs consumed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A total of 81 samples of seven herbs, parsley (Petroselinum crispum), basil (Ocimum basilicum), sage (Salvia officinalis), oregano (Origanum vulgare), mint (Mentha spicata), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), and chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), were purchased from the local market in Dubai and analyzed for their cadmium, lead, copper, iron, and zinc contents. Microwave-assisted digestion was applied for the dissolution of the samples and heavy metals concentration was determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). Metals were found to be present in varied concentrations in the herb samples. The concentration ranges were found as follows: less than 0.1-1.11 mg·kg(-1) for cadmium, less than 1.0-23.52 mg·kg(-1) for lead, 1.44-156.24 mg·kg(-1) for copper, 12.65-146.67 mg·kg(-1) for zinc, and 81.25-1101.22 mg·kg(-1) for iron. The findings of the study suggest that most of the analyzed herbs contained unsafe levels of heavy metals that exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits (PL). PMID:26000023

  11. Comparisons of diazotrophic communities in native and agricultural desert ecosystems reveal plants as important drivers in diversity

    PubMed Central

    Köberl, Martina; Erlacher, Armin; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Müller, Henry; Bragina, Anastasia; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Diazotrophs provide the only biological source of fixed atmospheric nitrogen in the biosphere. Although they are the key player for plant-available nitrogen, less is known about their diversity and potential importance in arid ecosystems. We investigated the nitrogenase gene diversity in native and agricultural desert soil as well as within root-associated microbiota of medicinal plants grown in Egypt through the combination of nifH-specific qPCR, fingerprints, amplicon pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization–confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although the diazotrophic microbiota were characterized by generally high abundances and diversity, statistically significant differences were found between both soils, the different microhabitats, and between the investigated plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L. and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.). We observed a considerable community shift from desert to agriculturally used soil that demonstrated a higher abundance and diversity in the agro-ecosystem. The endorhiza was characterized by lower abundances and only a subset of species when compared to the rhizosphere. While the microbiomes of the Asteraceae were similar and dominated by potential root-nodulating rhizobia acquired primarily from soil, the perennial S. distichum generally formed associations with free-living nitrogen fixers. These results underline the importance of diazotrophs in desert ecosystems and additionally identify plants as important drivers in functional gene pool diversity. PMID:26705571

  12. Plants used for making recreational tea in Europe: a review based on specific research sites.

    PubMed

    Sõukand, Renata; Quave, Cassandra L; Pieroni, Andrea; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Tardío, Javier; Kalle, Raivo; Łuczaj, Łukasz; Svanberg, Ingvar; Kolosova, Valeria; Aceituno-Mata, Laura; Menendez-Baceta, Gorka; Kołodziejska-Degórska, Iwona; Pirożnikow, Ewa; Petkevičius, Rolandas; Hajdari, Avni; Mustafa, Behxhet

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a review of local plants used in water infusions as aromatic and refreshing hot beverages (recreational tea) consumed in food-related settings in Europe, and not for specific medicinal purposes. The reviewed 29 areas are located across Europe, covering the post-Soviet countries, eastern and Mediterranean Europe. Altogether, 142 taxa belonging to 99 genera and 40 families were reported. The most important families for making herbal tea in all research areas were Lamiaceae and Asteraceae, while Rosaceae was popular only in eastern and central Europe. With regards to botanical genera, the dominant taxa included Mentha, Tilia, Thymus, Origanum, Rubus and Matricaria. The clear favorite was Origanum vulgare L., mentioned in 61% of the regions. Regionally, other important taxa included Rubus idaeus L. in eastern Europe, Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All. in southern Europe and Rosa canina L. in central Europe. Future research on the pharmacological, nutritional and chemical properties of the plants most frequently used in the tea-making process is essential to ensure their safety and appropriateness for daily consumption. Moreover, regional studies dedicated to the study of local plants used for making recreational tea are important to improve our understanding of their selection criteria, cultural importance and perceived properties in Europe and abroad. PMID:23941692

  13. Inhibition of proinflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages by polyphenols derived from chamomile, meadowsweet and willow bark.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Harbourne, Niamh; Marete, Eunice; Martyn, Danika; Jacquier, Jc; O'Riordan, Dolores; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-04-01

    Antiinflammatory compounds in the diet can alleviate excessive inflammation, a factor in the pathogenesis of common diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and diabetes. This study examined three European herbs, chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria L.) and willow bark (Salix alba L.), which have been traditionally used to treat inflammation and their potential for use as antiinflammatory agents. Aqueous herbal extracts and isolated polyphenolic compounds (apigenin, quercetin and salicylic acid, 0-100 μM) were incubated with THP1 macrophages, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured. At concentrations of 10 μM, both apigenin and quercetin reduced IL-6 significantly ( p < 0.05). Apigenin at 10 μM and quercetin at 25 μM reduced TNF-α significantly ( p < 0.05). Amongst the herbal extracts, willow bark had the greatest antiinflammatory activity at reducing IL-6 and TNF-α production. This was followed by meadowsweet and then chamomile. The lowest effective antiinflammatory concentrations were noncytotoxic (MTT mitochondrial activity assay). The Comet assay, which was used to study the protective effect of the isolated phenols against oxidative damage, showed positive results for all three polyphenols. These are the first findings that demonstrate the antiinflammatory capacity of these herbal extracts. PMID:22711544

  14. Reproduction of Pratylenchus penetrans on 24 Common Weeds in Potato Fields in Québec.

    PubMed

    Bélair, G; Dauphinais, N; Benoit, D L; Fournier, Y

    2007-12-01

    Twenty-four weeds commonly found in commercial potato fields in Quebec were evaluated for their host suitability to the root-lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, under greenhouse conditions. Brown mustard (Brassica juncea) and rye (Secale cereale) were included as susceptible controls and forage pearl millet hyb. CFPM 101 (Pennisetum glaucum) as a poor host. Pratylenchus penetrans multiplied well on 22 of the 24 weed species tested (Pf/Pi >/= rye or brown mustard). Cirsium arvense, Leucanthemum vulgare and Matricaria discoida were classified as very good hosts with a Pf/Pi ranging from 1.60 to 2.54, while Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Cyperus esculentus were classified as poor hosts with a Pf/Pi from 0.01 to 0.15. Amaranthus powellii, A. retrqflexus, Raphanus raphanistrum, Rorippa palustris, Cerastium fontanum, Spergula arvensis, Stellaria media, Chenopodium album, Vicia cracca, Elytrigia repens, Digitaria ischaemum, Echinochloa crusgalli, Panicum capillare, Setaria faberii, S. pumila, S. viridis, Polygonum convolvulus, P. scabrum and P. persicaria were intermediate hosts with Pf/Pi values ranging from 0.33 to 2.01. The plant species and the botanical family had a significant impact on nematode reproduction. The Brassicaceae family resulted in the greatest reproduction of P. penetrans, and the Cyperaceae resulted in the least. The plant life-cycle (annual vs. perennial) had no impact on nematode population. PMID:19259506

  15. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Quentin; Ameline, Arnaud; Doury, Géraldine; Le Roux, Vincent; Couty, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species). The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1) the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2) the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems. PMID:26270046

  16. An in vitro evaluation of human cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibition by selected commercial herbal extracts and tinctures.

    PubMed

    Budzinski, J W; Foster, B C; Vandenhoek, S; Arnason, J T

    2000-07-01

    Serial dilutions of 21 commercial ethanolic herbal extracts and tinctures, and 13 related pure plant compounds have been analyzed for their in vitro cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibitory capability via a fluorometric microtitre plate assay. Roughly 75% of the commercial products and 50% of the pure compounds showed significant inhibition of CYP3A4 metabolite formation. For each herbal product and pure compound exhibiting dose-dependency, the inhibition values were used to generate median inhibitory concentration (IC50) curves using linear regression. Among the commercial extracts, Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal), Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort), and Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw) had the lowest IC50 values at < 1% full strength, followed by Echinacea angustifolia roots, Trifolium pratense (wild cherry), Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile), and Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), which had IC50 values ranging from 1%-2% of full strength. Dillapiol, hypericin, and naringenin had the lowest IC50 values among the pure plant compounds at < 0.5 mM; dillapiol was the most potent inhibitor at 23.3 times the concentration of the positive CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole. Utilizing high-throughput screening methodologies for assessing CYP3A4 inhibition by natural products has important implications for predicting the likelihood of potential herbal-drug interactions, as well as determining candidates for further in-depth analyses. PMID:10969720

  17. Development and in vitro evaluation of biopolymers as a delivery system against periodontopathogen microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Galan-Wong, Luis J; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are considered key pathogens in periodontitis. The treatment consists of oral hygiene education, instrumentation for removal of calculus (scaling), chemotherapy and periodontal surgery. Several agents are commercially available; these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicine and the use of biomaterials are considered good alternatives. Chitosan and pullulan are polymers that have been proposed due to their favorable properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and adhesion ability. They can be used as local delivery systems of active principles of plant extracts. Thymus vulgaris, Matricaria chamomilla, Croton lechleri, Calendula officinalis L. and Juliana adstringens Schl. are known to have medicinal activity, and they are used in Mexican traditional medicine. Their extracts were tested in vitro for antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans, using agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The antimicrobial activity of films from biopolymers with plant extracts was evaluated by measuring the zones of inhibition against the tested organisms. The aim of this study was to develop bioadhesive films from chitosan and pullulan with added plant extracts and determine the antimicrobial activity of films against periodontal pathogens. PMID:21053691

  18. Plants used for making recreational tea in Europe: a review based on specific research sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a review of local plants used in water infusions as aromatic and refreshing hot beverages (recreational tea) consumed in food-related settings in Europe, and not for specific medicinal purposes. The reviewed 29 areas are located across Europe, covering the post-Soviet countries, eastern and Mediterranean Europe. Altogether, 142 taxa belonging to 99 genera and 40 families were reported. The most important families for making herbal tea in all research areas were Lamiaceae and Asteraceae, while Rosaceae was popular only in eastern and central Europe. With regards to botanical genera, the dominant taxa included Mentha, Tilia, Thymus, Origanum, Rubus and Matricaria. The clear favorite was Origanum vulgare L., mentioned in 61% of the regions. Regionally, other important taxa included Rubus idaeus L. in eastern Europe, Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All. in southern Europe and Rosa canina L. in central Europe. Future research on the pharmacological, nutritional and chemical properties of the plants most frequently used in the tea-making process is essential to ensure their safety and appropriateness for daily consumption. Moreover, regional studies dedicated to the study of local plants used for making recreational tea are important to improve our understanding of their selection criteria, cultural importance and perceived properties in Europe and abroad. PMID:23941692

  19. A Preliminary Investigation of the Jack-Bean Urease Inhibition by Randomly Selected Traditionally Used Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Biglar, Mahmood; Soltani, Khadijeh; Nabati, Farzaneh; Bazl, Roya; Mojab, Faraz; Amanlou, Massoud

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to different clinical and pathological outcomes in humans, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric neoplasia and even gastric cancer and its eradiation dependst upon multi-drug therapy. The most effective therapy is still unknown and prompts people to make great efforts to find better and more modern natural or synthetic anti-H. pylori agents. In this report 21 randomly selected herbal methanolic extracts were evaluated for their effect on inhibition of Jack-bean urease using the indophenol method as described by Weatherburn. The inhibition potency was measured by UV spectroscopy technique at 630 nm which attributes to released ammonium. Among these extracts, five showed potent inhibitory activities with IC50 ranges of 18-35 μg/mL. These plants are Matricaria disciforme (IC50:35 μg/mL), Nasturtium officinale (IC50:18 μg/mL), Punica granatum (IC50:30 μg/mL), Camelia sinensis (IC50:35 μg/mL), Citrus aurantifolia (IC50:28 μg/mL). PMID:24250509

  20. Extraction, Characterization, Stability and Biological Activity of Flavonoids Isolated from Chamomile Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Janmejai K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Dried flowers of Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) are largely used for their medicinal properties. In the present study, we examined the pharmacological properties of aqueous and methanolic fraction isolated from two varieties of German chamomile. HPLC-MS analysis of chamomile extract confirmed apigenin-7-O-glucoside as the major constituent of chamomile; some minor glycoside components were observed along with essential oils. These glucosides are highly stable in solution at different temperature range and their degradation occurs after long-term storage and extraction conditions at different pH and solvent. Methanolic fraction isolated from chamomile flowers demonstrated higher biologic response in inhibiting cell growth and causing induction of apoptosis in various human cancer cell lines compared to aqueous chamomile fraction. Apigenin glucosides inhibited cancer cell growth through deconjugation of glycosides that occurs in the cellular compartment to produce aglycone, apigenin. Taken together, the pharmacological profile of chamomile extract was dependent upon extraction process, storage conditions which affected the biological activity. PMID:20098626

  1. Antibacterial activity against Clostridium genus and antiradical activity of the essential oils from different origin.

    PubMed

    Kačániová, Miroslava; Vukovič, Nenad; Horská, Elena; Salamon, Ivan; Bobková, Alica; Hleba, Lukáš; Fiskelová, Martina; Vatľák, Alexander; Petrová, Jana; Bobko, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial and antiradical activities of 15 essential oils were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods against Clostridium genus and antioxidant properties of essential oils by testing their scavenging effect on DPPH radicals activities. We determined the antibacterial activity of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium hystoliticum, Clostridium intestinale, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium ramosum. We obtained the original commercial essential oils samples of Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus montana, Mentha piperita, Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia montana, Origanum vulgare L. (2 samples), Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abies alba Mill., Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch and Thymus vulgaris L. produced in Slovakia (Calendula a.s., Nova Lubovna, Slovakia). The results of the disk diffusion method showed very high essential oils activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Pimpinella anisum, against C. hystoliticum was found at Pinus sylvestris, against C. intestinale was found at Satureia hortensis L., against C. perfringens was found at Origanum vulgare L. and against C. ramosum was found at Pinus sylvestris. The results of broth microdilution assay showed that none of the essential oils was active against C. hystoliticum. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. intestinale was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. perfringens was found at Satureia montana and against C. ramosum was found at Abius alba and Carum carvi. Antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity was determined at several solutions of oil samples (50 μL.mL(-1)-0.39 μL.mL(-1)) and the best scavenging effect for the highest concentration (50 μL.mL(-1)) was observed. The antioxidant properties

  2. Vegetation change, goats, and religion: a 2000-year history of land use in southern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, Helen V.; Dupont, Lydie; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Kuhlmann, Holger

    2009-07-01

    Understanding past human-climate-environment interactions is essential for assessing the vulnerability of landscapes and ecosystems to future climate change. This is particularly important in southern Morocco where the current vegetation is impacted by pastoralism, and the region is highly sensitive to climate variability. Here, we present a 2000-year record of vegetation, sedimentation rate, XRF chemical element intensities, and particle size from two decadal-resolved, marine sediment cores, raised from offshore Cape Ghir, southern Morocco. The results show that between 650 and 850 AD the sedimentation rate increased dramatically from 100 cm/1000 years to 300 cm/1000 years, and the Fe/Ca and pollen flux doubled, together indicating higher inputs of terrestrial sediment. Particle size measurements and end-member modelling suggest increased fluvial transport of the sediment. Beginning at 650 AD pollen levels from Cichorioideae species show a sharp rise from 10% to 20%. Pollen from Atemisia and Plantago, also increase from this time. Deciduous oak pollen percentages show a decline, whereas those of evergreen oak barely change. The abrupt increase in terrestrial/fluvial input from 650 to 850 AD occurs, within the age uncertainty, of the arrival of Islam (Islamisation) in Morocco at around 700 AD. Historical evidence suggests Islamisation led to population increase and development of southern Morocco, including expanded pastoralism, deforestation and agriculture. Livestock pressure may have changed the vegetation structure, accounting for the increase in pollen from Cichorioideae, Plantago, and Artemisia, which include many weedy species. Goats in particular may have played a dominant role as agents of erosion, and intense browsing may have led to the decline in deciduous oak; evergreen oak is more likely to survive as it re-sprouts more vigorously after browsing. From 850 AD to present sedimentation rates, Fe/Ca ratios and fluvial discharge remain stable, whereas

  3. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially. PMID:12881977

  4. In vitro anti-hepatoma activity of fifteen natural medicines from Canada.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Liu, Li-Teh; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2002-08-01

    Fifteen crude drugs, Stellaria media Cyrill. (Caryophyllaceae), Calendula officinalis L. (Compositae), Achillea millefolium L. (Compositae), Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae), Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae), Borago officinalis L. (Boraginaceae), Satureja hortensis L. (Labiatae), Coptis groenlandica Salisb. (Ranunculaceae), Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (Leguminosae), Origanum majorana L. (Labiatae), Centella asiatica L. (Umbelliferae), Caulophyllum thalictroides Mich. (Berberidaceae), Picea rubens Sargent. (Pinaceae), Rhamnus purshiana D.C. (Rhamnaceae) and Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae), which have been used as folk medicine in Canada, were evaluated for their anti-hepatoma activity on five human liver-cancer cell lines, i.e. HepG2/C3A, SK-HEP-1, HA22T/VGH, Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5. The samples were examined by in vitro evaluation for their cytotoxicity. The results showed that the effects of crude drugs on hepatitis B virus genome-containing cell lines were different from those against non hepatitis B virus genome-containing cell lines. C. groenlandica was observed to be the most effective against the growth of all five cell lines and its chemotherapeutic values will be of interest for further studies. PMID:12203264

  5. Soil organisms shape the competition between grassland plant species.

    PubMed

    Sabais, Alexander C W; Eisenhauer, Nico; König, Stephan; Renker, Carsten; Buscot, François; Scheu, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Decomposers and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) both determine plant nutrition; however, little is known about their interactive effects on plant communities. We set up a greenhouse experiment to study effects of plant competition (one- and two-species treatments), Collembola (Heteromurus nitidus and Protaphorura armata), and AMF (Glomus intraradices) on the performance (above- and belowground productivity and nutrient uptake) of three grassland plant species (Lolium perenne, Trifolium pratense, and Plantago lanceolata) belonging to three dominant plant functional groups (grasses, legumes, and herbs). Generally, L. perenne benefited from being released from intraspecific competition in the presence of T. pratense and P. lanceolata. However, the presence of AMF increased the competitive strength of P. lanceolata and T. pratense against L. perenne and also modified the effects of Collembola on plant productivity. The colonization of roots by AMF was reduced in treatments with two plant species suggesting that plant infection by AMF was modified by interspecific plant interactions. Collembola did not affect total colonization of roots by AMF, but increased the number of mycorrhizal vesicles in P. lanceolata. AMF and Collembola both enhanced the amount of N and P in plant shoot tissue, but impacts of Collembola were less pronounced in the presence of AMF. Overall, the results suggest that, by differentially affecting the nutrient acquisition and performance of plant species, AMF and Collembola interactively modify plant competition and shape the composition of grassland plant communities. The results suggest that mechanisms shaping plant community composition can only be understood when complex belowground interactions are considered. PMID:22678109

  6. Manipulating the antioxidant capacity of halophytes to increase their cultural and economic value through saline cultivation.

    PubMed

    Boestfleisch, Christian; Wagenseil, Niko B; Buhmann, Anne K; Seal, Charlotte E; Wade, Ellie Merrett; Muscolo, Adele; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Halophytes, salt-tolerant plants, are a source of valuable secondary metabolites with potential economic value. The steady-state pools of many stress-related metabolites are already enhanced in halophytes when compared with glycophytes, but growth under conditions away from the optimum can induce stress and consequently result in changes to secondary metabolites such as antioxidants. However, direct evidence for increasing the concentration of valuable secondary metabolites as a consequence of altering the salinity of the growing environment still remains equivocal. To address this, we analysed a range of metabolites with antioxidant capacity (including total phenols, flavonoids, ascorbate, reduced/oxidized glutathione and reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes) in seedlings and plants from different families (Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae, Plantaginaceae and Rhizophoraceae) and habitats grown under different salt concentrations. We show that it is possible to manipulate the antioxidant capacity of plants and seedlings by altering the saline growing environment, the length of time under saline cultivation and the developmental stage. Among the species studied, the halophytes Tripolium pannonicum, Plantago coronopus, Lepidium latifolium and Salicornia europaea demonstrated the most potential as functional foods or nutraceuticals. PMID:25125698

  7. Earthworms drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities in post-mining sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Obdřej; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Previous field observations indicated that earthworms promote late-successional plant species and reduce collembolan numbers at post-mining sites in the Sokolov coal mining district (Czech Republic). Here, we established a laboratory pot experiment to test the effect of earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffm.) and litter of low, medium, and high quality (the grass Calamagrostis epigejos, the willow Salix caprea, and the alder Alnus glutinosa, respectively) on late successional plants (grasses Arrhenatherum elatius and Agrostis capillaris, legumes Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium medium, and non-leguminous dicots Centaurea jacea and Plantago lanceolata) in spoil substrate originating from Sokolov post-mining sites and naturally inhabited by abundant numbers of Collembola. The earthworms increased plant biomass, especially that of the large-seeded A. elatius, but reduced the number of plant individuals, mainly that of the small-seeded A. capillaris and both legumes. Litter quality affected plant biomass, which was highest with S. caprea litter, but did not change the number of plant individuals. Litter quality did not modify the effect of earthworms on plants; the effect of litter quality and earthworms was only additive. Species composition of Collembola community was altered by litter quality, but earthworms reduced the number of individuals, increased the number of species, and increased species evenness consistently across the litter qualities. Because the results of this experiment were consistent with the field observations, we conclude that earthworms help drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities on post-mining sites.

  8. Earthworms drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities in post-mining sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Uteseny, Karoline; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous field observations indicated that earthworms promote late-successional plant species and reduce collembolan numbers at post-mining sites in the Sokolov coal mining district (Czech Republic). Here, we established a laboratory pot experiment to test the effect of earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffm.) and litter of low, medium, and high quality (the grass Calamagrostis epigejos, the willow Salix caprea, and the alder Alnus glutinosa, respectively) on late successional plants (grasses Arrhenatherum elatius and Agrostis capillaris, legumes Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium medium, and non-leguminous dicots Centaurea jacea and Plantago lanceolata) in spoil substrate originating from Sokolov post-mining sites and naturally inhabited by abundant numbers of Collembola. The earthworms increased plant biomass, especially that of the large-seeded A. elatius, but reduced the number of plant individuals, mainly that of the small-seeded A. capillaris and both legumes. Litter quality affected plant biomass, which was highest with S. caprea litter, but did not change the number of plant individuals. Litter quality did not modify the effect of earthworms on plants; the effect of litter quality and earthworms was only additive. Species composition of Collembola community was altered by litter quality, but earthworms reduced the number of individuals, increased the number of species, and increased species evenness consistently across the litter qualities. Because the results of this experiment were consistent with the field observations, we conclude that earthworms help drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities on post-mining sites.

  9. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies.

    PubMed

    Triantafillidis, John K; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different studies have been reported. The results showed that in the majority of the studies, herbal therapy reduced the inflammatory activity of experimental colitis and diminished the levels of many inflammatory indices, including serum cytokines and indices of oxidative stress. The most promising plant and herbal products were tormentil extracts, wormwoodherb, Aloe vera, germinated barley foodstuff, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, Panax notoginseng, Ixeris dentata, green tea, Cordia dichotoma, Plantago lanceolata, Iridoidglycosides, and mastic gum. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit via various mechanisms, including immune regulation, anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-κB, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing these natural substances should be urgently conducted. PMID:27366027

  10. Influence of wind on daily airborne pollen counts in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    tareq Majeed, Husam; Periago, Cristina; Alarcón, Marta; De Linares, Concepción; Belmonte, Jordina

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to analize the influence of wind (speed and direction) on the daily airborne pollen counts recorded in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula) of 21 pollen taxa recorded at 6 aerobiological stations: Barcelona, Bellaterra, Girona, Lleida Manresa, and Tarragona for the period 2004-2014. The taxa studied are Alnus, Betula, Castanea, Cupressaceae, Fagus, Fraxinus, Olea, Pinus, Platanus, total Quercus, Quercus deciduous type, Quercus evergreen type, Ulmus, Corylus, Pistacia, Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae, Plantago, Poaceae, Polygonaceae, and Urticaceae. The mean daily wind direction was divided into 8 sectors: N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W and NW. For each sector, the correlation between the daily pollen concentrations and wind speed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was computed and compared with the wind rose charts. The results showed that Tarragona was the station with more significant correlations followed by Bellaterra, Lleida and Manresa. On the other hand, Artemisia was the most correlated taxon with mainly negative values, and Fagus was the least. The W wind direction showed the largest number of significant correlations, mostly positive, while the N direction was the least and negatively correlated.

  11. Effects of Mulching Tolerant Plant Straw on Soil Surface on Growth and Cadmium Accumulation of Galinsoga parviflora

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lijin; Liao, Ming’an; Ren, Yajun; Luo, Li; Zhang, Xiao; Yang, Daiyu; He, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Pot and field experiments were conducted to study the effects of mulching with straw of cadmium (Cd) tolerant plants (Ranunculus sieboldii, Mazus japonicus, Clinopodium confine and Plantago asiatica) on growth and Cd accumulation of Galinsoga parviflora in Cd-contaminated soil. In the pot experiment, mulching with M. japonicus straw increased the root biomass, stem biomass, leaf biomass, shoot biomass, plant height and activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase) of G. parviflora compared with the control, whereas mulching with straws of R. sieboldii, C. confine and P. asiatica decreased these parameters. Straws of the four Cd-tolerant plants increased the Cd content in roots of G. parviflora compared with the control. However, only straws of M. japonicus and P. asiatica increased the Cd content in shoots of G. parviflora, reduced the soil pH, and increased the soil exchangeable Cd concentration. Straw of M. japonicus increased the amount of Cd extraction in stems, leaves and shoots of G. parviflora by 21.11%, 29.43% and 24.22%, respectively, compared with the control, whereas straws of the other three Cd-tolerant plants decreased these parameters. In the field experiment, the M. japonicus straw also increased shoot biomass, Cd content in shoots, and amount of Cd extraction in shoots of G. parviflora compared with the control. Therefore, straw of M. japonicus can be used to improve the Cd extraction ability of G. parviflora from Cd-contaminated soil. PMID:25490210

  12. Glomus perpusillum, a new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Błaszkowski, Janusz; Kovács, Gábor M; Balázs, Tímea

    2009-01-01

    A new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species of genus Glomus, G. perpusillum (Glomeromycota), forming small, hyaline spores is described and illustrated. Spores of G. perpusillum were formed in hypogeous aggregates and occasionally inside roots. They are globose to subglobose, (10-)24(-30) microm diam, rarely egg-shaped, oblong to irregular, 18-25 x 25-63 microm. The single spore wall of G. perpusillum consists of two permanent layers: a finely laminate, semiflexible to rigid outer layer and a flexible to semiflexible inner layer. The inner layer becomes plastic and frequently contracts in spores crushed in PVLG-based mountants and stains reddish white to grayish red in Melzer's reagent. Glomus perpusillum was associated with roots of Ammophila arenaria colonizing sand dunes of the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Calambrone, Italy, and this is the only site of its occurrence known to date. In single-species cultures with Plantago lanceolata as host plant, G. perpusillum formed vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza. Phylogenetic analyses of partial SSU sequences of nrDNA placed the species in Glomus group A with no affinity to its subgroups. The sequences of G. perpusillum unambiguously separated from the sequences of described Glomus species and formed a distinct clade together with in planta arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal sequences found in alpine plants. PMID:19397199

  13. Digestibility and bulking effect of ispaghula husks in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Marteau, P; Flourié, B; Cherbut, C; Corrèze, J L; Pellier, P; Seylaz, J; Rambaud, J C

    1994-12-01

    The digestibility of ispaghula, a mucilage from Plantago ovata composed mainly of arabinoxylans, and its faecal bulking effect were studied in seven healthy volunteers who ingested a low fibre controlled diet plus either placebo or 18 g/day of ispaghula for two 15 day periods. Whole gut transit time and gas excretion in breath and flatus were not different during the periods of ispaghula and placebo ingestion. Faecal wet and dry weights rose significantly, however, during ispaghula ingestion. Faecal short chain fatty acid concentrations and the molar proportions of propionic and acetic acids also increased. Most of the ispaghula had reached the caecum four hours after ingestion in an intact highly polymerised form. During ispaghula ingestion, the increase in the faecal output of neutral sugars was accounted for by the faecal excretion of arabinose and xylose in an intact highly polymerised form; the apparent digestibilities of these sugars were 24 (11) and 53% (6) respectively (mean (SEM)). In conclusion, ispaghula is more resistant to fermentation than previously reported in humans, and its bulking effect largely results from intact material. PMID:7829013

  14. Common environmental allergens causing respiratory allergy in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, A B; Kumar, Pawan

    2002-03-01

    Respiratory allergy affects all age groups but the children are the worst affected by the respiratory allergy. Bioparticles from different biological sources are the main cause of allergy. Pollen grains, fungal spores, insect and other materials of biological origin form the most important allergen load in the air. For the efficient diagnosis of the allergy and its effective treatment it is very important to know about the prevalence, seasonal and annual variations of aeroallergens of the area. India being the climatically diversed country, there is diversity in the flora and fauna of different parts of the country. Atmospheric surveys carried out in different parts of India reveal that, Alanus nitida, Amarantus spinosus, Argemone mexicana Cocos nucifera, Betula utilis, Borasus flabellifer, Caraica papaya, Cedrus deodara, Cassia fistula, Parthenium, Chenopodium album, Dodonaea viscosa, Malotus phillipensis, Plantago ovata, Prosopis juliflora, Ricinus communis, Holoptelea intergifolia are the allergenically important pollens of the country. Among the fungal aeroallergens, Alternaria, Candida aibieans, Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus japonicus, Cladosporium cladosporoides, Fusarium roseum, Ganoderma lucidum,Neurospora sitophila Helminthosporium, Ustilago trtici, Uromyses are important allergens. Dust mites D. farinae, D.pteronyssinus are also important source of inhalant allergens particularly in the coastal areas of the country. Cockroaches, beetles, weevils, mosquitoes, house flies also contribute towards the aeroallergen load and are allergenically implicated. Avoidance of the indoor and outdoor aeroallergens is recommended for better management of respiratory allergy. PMID:12003301

  15. Ispaghula mucilage-gellan mucoadhesive beads of metformin HCl: development by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2014-07-17

    Response surface methodology based on 3(2) factorial design was used to develop ispaghula (Plantago ovata F.) husk mucilage (IHM)-gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl through Ca(2+)-ion cross-linked ionotropic-gelation technique for the use in oral drug delivery. GG to IHM ratio and cross-linker (CaCl2) concentration were investigated as independent variables. Drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release after 10h (R10h, %) were analyzed as dependent variables. The optimized mucoadhesive beads (F-O) showed DEE of 94.24 ± 4.18%, R10h of 59.13 ± 2.27%. These beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR analyses. The in vitro drug release from these beads showed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism over 10h. The optimized beads showed pH-dependent swelling and good mucoadhesivity with the goat intestinal mucosa. The optimized IHM-GG mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl exhibited significant antidiabetic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over 10h. PMID:24702916

  16. Taurocholic acid adsorption during non-starch polysaccharide fermentation: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, I C; Eastwood, M A

    1995-08-01

    The association of radiolabelled taurocholic acid with the solid fraction of a faecal fermentation mixture was measured. A human faecal inoculum was incubated with [24-14C]taurocholic acid and several non-starch polysaccharide sources (pectin, wheat bran, ispaghula (Plantago ovata) husk and seed), glucose or a substrate-free control. Portions of fermentation mixture were taken at 0, 3, 6, 21 and 24 h and centrifuged to acquire a supernatant fraction and a pellet containing the fermentation residue. 14C was measured in supernatant fractions and pellets at all time points. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured at 0 and 24 h to confirm bacterial growth. Radioactivity in the pellet increased over time for all substrates. Glucose resulted in the greatest incorporation of taurocholic acid into the pellet, followed by pectin. At 24 h the proportion of the total radioactivity found in the pellet was 92% for glucose, 79% for pectin, 60% for wheat bran, 59% for ispaghula seed, 53% for ispaghula husk and 26% for the control (mean of duplicates). Glucose and pectin produced the greatest quantity of VFA at 24 h. VFA production was highly correlated with radioactivity in the pellet (r0.976, P < 0.005). These results suggest that the bile acid binding capacity of a faecal culture mixture may be strongly influenced by the fermentability of the available substrate and hence related to bacterial metabolic activity. PMID:7547839

  17. Mechanism of gene amplification via yeast autonomously replicating sequences.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Shelly; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, M K

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  18. The DUF579 domain containing proteins IRX15 and IRX15-L affect xylan synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob K; Kim, Hoon; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; Orler, Robert; Ralph, John; Wilkerson, Curtis G

    2011-05-01

    Xylan is the principal hemicellulose in the secondary cell walls of eudicots and in the primary and secondary cell walls of grasses and cereals. The biosynthesis of this important cell wall component has yet to be fully determined although a number of proteins have been shown to be required for xylan synthesis. To discover new genes involved in xylan biosynthesis we explored the psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk) seed mucilaginous layer through EST profiling. This tissue synthesizes large amounts of a complex heteroxylan over a short period of time. By comparing abundant transcripts in this tissue with abundant transcripts specifically present during secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis thaliana, where glucuronoxylan biosynthesis is pronounced, we identified two Arabidopsis genes likely involved in xylan biosynthesis. These genes encode proteins containing a Domain of Unknown Function (DUF) 579 and were designated IRREGULAR XYLEM (IRX) 15 and IRX15-LIKE (IRX15-L). We obtained Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout lines for the two genes and analyzed their lower stems for changes in neutral monosaccharide composition. No changes were observed in each of these mutants, although the irx15 irx15-L double mutant displayed a moderate reduction in stem xylose. Further characterization of the irx15 irx15-L mutant revealed irregular secondary cell wall margins in fiber cells and a lower xylan degree of polymerization. Through these studies we conclude that IRX15 and IRX15-L function in a redundant manner and are involved in xylan biosynthesis. PMID:21288268

  19. Influence of two commercial fibers in the pharmacokinetics of ethinylestradiol in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fernández, N; Diez, M J; Terán, M T; García, J J; Calle, A P; Sierra, M

    1998-08-01

    Fiber formulations are used in human nutrition owing to their beneficial properties for health. It is probable that ingestion of fiber coincides with the oral administration of drugs, and a modification of its oral absorption, and therefore of its pharmacokinetics, can appear. In the present study, the compartmental and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters of ethinylestradiol (EE) in rabbits after oral administration were determined. It was also studied whether the presence of two different fiber formulations [A, wheat bran (76.5%), fruit fiber (12%) and guar gum (2%) and B, Plantago ovata seeds (65%) and P. ovata seed cuticles (2.2%)] in the gastrointestinal tract modified the pharmacokinetics of EE when administered at the same time. Three groups of rabbits were used: control, fiber A and fiber B. The animals in all three groups received 1 mg/kg b. wt. EE. The estrogen was administered alone in the control group and in the presence of 4 g of fiber A and fiber B, respectively, in the other two groups. After compartmental (two-compartment open model) and noncompartmental analyses of plasma concentrations, statistical analysis revealed that the presence of fiber (both A and B) decreased between 29% and 35% the extent of EE absorbed (represented by the pharmacokinetic parameters area under the curve and the maximum plasma concentration) without affecting the rate of the absorption process (represented by the time to reach maximum concentration and the absorption rate constant). PMID:9694944

  20. Dietary fiber down-regulates colonic tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide production in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitic rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Gálvez, Julio; Lorente, Maria Dolores; Concha, Angel; Camuesco, Desirée; Azzouz, Shamira; Osuna, Antonio; Redondo, Luis; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed the beneficial effects exerted by dietary fiber in human inflammatory bowel disease, which were associated with an increased production of SCFA in distal colon. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the probable mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of a fiber-supplemented diet (5% Plantago ovata seeds) in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis, with special attention to its effects on the production of some of the mediators involved in the inflammatory response, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and nitric oxide (NO). Rats were fed the fiber-supplemented diet for 2 wk before TNBS colitis induction and thereafter until colonic evaluation 1 wk later. The results obtained showed that dietary fiber supplementation facilitated recovery from intestinal insult as evidenced both histologically, by a preservation of intestinal cytoarchitecture, and biochemically, by a significant reduction in colonic myeloperoxidase activity and by restoration of colonic glutathione levels. This intestinal anti-inflammatory effect was associated with lower TNFalpha levels and lower NO synthase activity in the inflamed colon, showing significant differences when compared with nontreated colitic rats. Moreover, the intestinal contents from fiber-treated colitic rats showed a significantly higher production of SCFA, mainly butyrate and propionate. We conclude that the increased production of these SCFA may contribute to recovery of damaged colonic mucosa because they constitute substrates for the colonocyte and, additionally, that they can inhibit the production of proinflammatory mediators, such as TNFalpha and NO. PMID:12421838

  1. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  2. The effects on photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation to long-term elevation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration: An assessment of the response of Trifolium Repens L. cv. Blanca grown at F.A.C.E.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.E.

    1994-11-01

    Understanding how photosynthetic capacity acclimates to elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations is vital in predicting the response of important grassland species such as Trifolium repens. Previous studies of acclimatization have been carried out in artificial experimental conditions, such as acrylic greenhouses or controlled environment chambers. The advent of FACE technology has enabled a large area of crop to be fumigated in the field, providing more realistic growing conditions. Pure stands of Trifolium repens L. cv. Blanca grown at either 355 or 600{mu}mol mol{sup -1} CO{sub 2} were examined, and their photosynthetic response to elevated Ca determined via gas exchange studies. Rates of photosynthesis of young, fully expanded leaves were increased between 21 and 36% when grown and measured at elevated CO{sub 2}. This increase in A corresponded to a decrease in g{sub S} of between 18 and 52%. No acclimation effect was observed in the most frequently cut stands, whilst the response of stands clipped only 4 times per year was more variable. When down regulation of V{sub cmax} did occur, this was not nearly as marked as that which occurred in 3 other temperate species (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, Ranunculus friesianus, Plantago lanceolata (L.) J. & C. Presl.), at similar growth regimes. No acclimation of stomatal frequency, SI or pore length was found to occur in the enriched clover stands.

  3. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most important clinical trials conducted so far refer to the use of mastic gum, tormentil extracts, wormwood herb, aloe vera, triticum aestivum, germinated barley foodstuff, and boswellia serrata. In ulcerative colitis, aloe vera gel, triticum aestivum, andrographis paniculata extract and topical Xilei-san were superior to placebo in inducing remission or clinical response, and curcumin was superior to placebo in maintaining remission; boswellia serrata gum resin and plantago ovata seeds were as effective as mesalazine, whereas oenothera biennis had similar relapse rates as ω-3 fatty acids in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. In Crohn’s disease, mastic gum, Artemisia absinthium, and Tripterygium wilfordii were superior to placebo in inducing remission and preventing clinical postoperative recurrence, respectively. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit by different mechanisms including immune regulation, antioxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-kappa B, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing the most commonly used natural substances should urgently be conducted. PMID:25830661

  4. Analysis of airborne pollen concentrations in Zagreb, Croatia, 2002.

    PubMed

    Peternel, Renata; Culig, Josip; Mitić, Bozena; Vukusić, Ivan; Sostar, Zvonimir

    2003-01-01

    Employing the volumetric method by use of a Hirst sampler, a total of 71,286 pollen grains, as many as 94.20% of them allergenic, were recorded in the air samples from the city of Zagreb during the 2002 pollen season. Among identified pollen of 35 plant species/genera/families, 23 were allergenic: Taxus/Juniperus, Alnus sp., Fraxinus sp., Betula sp., Corylus sp., Poaceae, Urticaceae, Artemisia sp., Ambrosia sp., Carpinus sp., Castanea sp., Chenopodiaceae, Salix sp., Populus sp., Ulmus sp., Juglans sp., Quercus sp., Platanus sp., Fagus sp., Plantago sp., Pinus sp., Picea sp. and Abies sp. The pollen of these plants also cause the majority of pollinosis in Europe. Study results and the pollen calendar designed for the 2002 pollen season for the City of Zagreb provide useful data for allergologists to reach an accurate diagnosis. The calendar also provides timely information on airborne pollen types and air concentrations for individuals with pollen hypersensitivity, thus allowing them to adjust their daily activities so as to minimize their contact with allergens and improve their quality of life both at home and at work. PMID:12852741

  5. Evaluation of two Brazilian indigenous plants for phytostabilization and phytoremediation of copper-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, R; Bortolon, L; Pieniz, S; Bento, F M; Camargo, F A O

    2015-11-01

    Indigenous plants have been grown naturally and vigorously in copper contaminated soils. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the phytoremediation ability of two indigenous plants naturally grown in two vineyard soils copper contaminated, and in a copper mining waste. However, it was evaluated the macro and micronutrient uptake and the potential of phytoremediation. So, a greenhouse study was carried out with Bidens pilosa and Plantago lanceolata in samples of vineyard soils (Inceptisol and Mollisol) copper contaminated, and in a copper mining waste. Plant growth, macro and micronutrient up take, tolerance index (TI), translocation factor (TF), metal extraction ratio (MER), bioaccumulation factor (BCF), plant effective number of the shoots (PENs), and plant effective number of the total plant (PENt) were analyzed. Both plants grown in vineyard soils showed high phytomass production and TI. P. lanceolata plants cultivated in the Inceptisol showed the highest copper concentrations in the shoots (142 mg kg-1), roots (964 mg kg-1) and entire plants (1,106 mg kg-1). High levels of copper were phytoaccumulated from the Inceptisol by B. pilosa and P. lanceolata with 3,500 and 2,200 g ha-1 respectively. Both B. pilosa and P. lanceolata plants showed characteristics of high copper hyperaccumulator. Results showed that both species play an important role in the natural copper phytoaccumulation in both vineyard soils contaminated with copper, being important to its phytoremediation. PMID:26675903

  6. Digestible energy content of pasture species in growing European wild boar (Sus scrofa L.).

    PubMed

    Quijada, R P; Bitsch, N I; Hodgkinson, S M

    2012-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the apparent energy digestibility of six pasture species frequently grazed by European wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) and to estimate the digestible energy (DE) consumption from pasture by grazing wild boar. Seven diets were prepared; a base diet (BD) which did not contain any pasture species, diets D1 to D5 which included 75% of the BD and 25% of the dried pasture species Lolium perenne (D1), Festuca arundinacea (D2), Agrostis capillaris (D3), Bromus staminius (D4) or Trifolium repens (D5) and D6 which contained 85% BD and 15% dried Plantago lanceolata. Seven purebred European wild boar (initial liveweight 24.4 ± 0.8 kg, average ± SEM) were given access to the diets following a Latin Square design. The animals received each diet for eight days, with faecal sampling on days 6, 7 and 8. The total apparent DE consumption from pasture by grazing wild boar was estimated using previously collected pasture consumption data from wild boar. The digestibility coefficients and DE contents of the pasture species ranged from 0.29 to 0.65, and 5.8 to 12.6 MJ/kg DM respectively, with L. perenne and P. lanceolata having the greatest digestibility coefficients and DE contents. The wild boar were estimated to satisfy between 52% and 142% of their maintenance energy requirements through pasture consumption. Grazing wild boar are able to utilise an important proportion of the energy present in pasture species. PMID:21575078

  7. Higher-order interaction between molluscs and sheep affecting seedling numbers in grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clear Hill, B. H.; Silvertown, J.

    Vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores are both important in mesotrophic grasslands and these two different classes of herbivore potentially interact in their effect upon plant populations. We used two field experiments to test for higher order interactions (HOIs) among sheep, slugs and seedlings, using the mechanistic definition that an HOI occurs when the presence of one species modifies the interaction between two others. In each experiment slug addition and slug-removal treatments were nested inside treatments that altered sheep grazing intensity and timing, and the emergence, of seedlings from experimentally sown seeds was monitored. In Experiment 1, seedling numbers of Cerastium fontanum were increased by intense summer grazing by sheep in both slug-addition and slugremoval treatment, but winter grazing by sheep only increased seedling emergence if slugs were removed. In Experiment 2, winter grazing by sheep significantly reduced total seedling emergence of four species sown ( Lotus corniculatus, Plantago lanceolata, Leucanthemum vulgare, Achillea millefolium), but the effect was only seen where slugs were removed. Though the experimental system is a relatively simple one with only four components (sheep, slugs, seedlings and the matrix vegetation), higher order interactions, a combination of direct and indirect effects and possible switching behaviour by slugs are all suggested by our results.

  8. Counter effects of N. Sativa L. and P. ovate L. on indicative markers of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Afshan Syed; Sheikh, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    The broad spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) diseases ranges from simple liver inflammation to steatosis, leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis. Four groups of weaning (30g) Rattus norvegicus were designated as W-0, W-I, W-II and W-III. For sixteen weeks group W-0 was given standard pallet diet, group I consumed diet "A" (20% fat Sucrose + 33% tea whitener + 34% ground pallet diet +13% water), group W-II was fed on diet "B" (50g Nigella sativa seeds/kg of A) and group W-III was provided with diet "C" (50g Plantago ovata husks /Kg of A). The analysis of CBC, LFTs, and Lipid profile revealed that there were highly significant changes (P<0.001) in the MCV, PLT, Hb, MCH, MCHC, RBC, RDW%, WBC, MPV, Triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL and the significant alterations (P<0.01) in albumin, AST, bilirubin, AST/ALT, HDL and cholesterol/HDL were observed in the experimental groups when compared with control by using one way ANOVA. We concluded that high-energy diet can alter the blood profile. Moreover fat plummeting agents have counter impact on the hematology as well as serology of diet induced NAFLD in R. norvegicus. PMID:26826811

  9. Impact of plant species evenness, dominant species identity and spatial arrangement on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities in a model grassland.

    PubMed

    Massaccesi, L; Bardgett, R D; Agnelli, A; Ostle, N; Wilby, A; Orwin, K H

    2015-03-01

    Plant communities, through species richness and composition, strongly influence soil microorganisms and the ecosystem processes they drive. To test the effects of other plant community attributes, such as the identity of dominant plant species, evenness, and spatial arrangement, we set up a model mesocosm experiment that manipulated these three attributes in a full factorial design, using three grassland plant species (Anthoxanthum odoratum, Plantago lanceolata, and Lotus corniculatus). The impact of the three community attributes on the soil microbial community structure and functioning was evaluated after two growing seasons by ester-linked phospholipid fatty-acids analysis, substrate-induced respiration, basal respiration, and nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates. Our results suggested that the dominant species identity had the most prevalent influence of the three community attributes, with significant effects on most of the measured aspects of microbial biomass, composition and functioning. Evenness had no effects on microbial community structure, but independently influenced basal respiration. Its effects on nitrogen cycling depended on the identity of the dominant plant species, indicating that interactions among species and their effects on functioning can vary with their relative abundance. Systems with an aggregated spatial arrangement had a different microbial community composition and a higher microbial biomass compared to those with a random spatial arrangement, but rarely differed in their functioning. Overall, it appears that dominant species identity was the main driver of soil microorganisms and functioning in these model grassland communities, but that other plant community attributes such as evenness and spatial arrangement can also be important. PMID:25407622

  10. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different studies have been reported. The results showed that in the majority of the studies, herbal therapy reduced the inflammatory activity of experimental colitis and diminished the levels of many inflammatory indices, including serum cytokines and indices of oxidative stress. The most promising plant and herbal products were tormentil extracts, wormwoodherb, Aloe vera, germinated barley foodstuff, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, Panax notoginseng, Ixeris dentata, green tea, Cordia dichotoma, Plantago lanceolata, Iridoidglycosides, and mastic gum. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit via various mechanisms, including immune regulation, anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-κB, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing these natural substances should be urgently conducted. PMID:27366027

  11. Plants increase arsenic in solution but decrease the non-specifically bound fraction in the rhizosphere of an alkaline, naturally rich soil.

    PubMed

    Obeidy, Carole; Bravin, Matthieu N; Bouchardon, Jean-Luc; Conord, Cyrille; Moutte, Jacques; Guy, Bernard; Faure, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We aimed at determining the major physical-chemical processes that drive arsenic (As) dynamic in the rhizosphere of four species (Holcus lanatus, Dittrichia viscosa, Lotus corniculatus, Plantago lanceolata) tested for phytostabilization. Experiments were performed with an alkaline soil naturally rich in As. Composition of the soil solution of planted and unplanted pots was monitored every 15 days for 90 days, with a focus on the evolution of As concentrations in solution and in the non-specifically bound (i.e. easily exchangeable) fraction. The four species similarly increased As concentration in solution, but decreased As concentration in the non-specifically bound fraction. The major part (60%) of As desorbed from the non-specifically bound fraction in planted pots was likely redistributed on the less available fractions of As on the solid phase. A second part (35%) of desorbed As was taken up by plants. The minor part (5%) of desorbed As supplied As increase in solution. To conclude, plants induced a substantial redistribution of As on the less available fractions in the rhizosphere, as expected in phytostabilization strategies. Plants however concomitantly increased As concentration in the rhizosphere solution which may contribute to As transfer through plant uptake and leaching. PMID:26707185

  12. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts. PMID:11695884

  13. Chemical and in vitro assessment of Alaskan coastal vegetation antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Joshua; Lila, Mary Ann

    2013-11-20

    Alaska Native (AN) communities have utilized tidal plants and marine seaweeds as food and medicine for generations, yet the bioactive potential of these resources has not been widely examined. This study screened six species of Alaskan seaweed ( Fucus distichus , Saccharina latissima , Saccharina groenlandica , Alaria marginata , Pyropia fallax , and Ulva lactuca ) and one tidal plant ( Plantago maritima ) for antioxidant activity. Total polyphenolic content (TPC) was determined, and chemical antioxidant capacity was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, ferrous ion chelating, and nitric oxide (NO) inhibition assays. In vitro inhibition of radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and NO synthesis was evaluated in a RAW 264.7 macrophage culture. Greatest TPC (557.2 μg phloroglucinol equivalents (PGE)/mg extract) was discovered in the ethyl acetate fraction of F. distichus, and highest DDPH scavenging activity was exhibited by F. distichus and S. groenlandica fractions (IC50 = 4.29-5.12 μg/mL). These results support the potential of Alaskan coastal vegetation, especially the brown algae, as natural sources of antioxidants for preventing oxidative degeneration and maintaining human health. PMID:24147955

  14. Psyllium fibre and the metabolic control of obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moreno, L A; Tresaco, B; Bueno, G; Fleta, J; Rodríguez, G; Garagorri, J M; Bueno, M

    2003-09-01

    In children and adolescents from developed countries, obesity prevalence has strongly increased in the last decades and insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance are frequently observed. Some dietary components such as low glycemic index foods and dietary fibre could be used in order to improve glucose homeostasis in these children. Psyllium or ispaghula husk (the husk of the seeds of Plantago ovata) is a mixture of neutral and acid polysaccharides containing galacturonic acid with a ratio of soluble/insoluble fibre of 70/30. Some foods could potentially be enriched with psyllium, like breads, breakfast cereals, pasta and snack foods. The aim of this review was to assess the usefulness of psyllium in the management of obese children and adolescents with abnormalities of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. After psyllium supplementation, the percentage change in postprandial glucose in type 2 diabetes patients, ranged from -12.2 to -20.2%. In hypercholesterolemic children, the effect of psyllium in LDL-cholesterol serum concentrations ranged from 2.78 to -22.8%; the effect in HDL-cholesterol from -4.16 to 3.05%; and the effect on triglycerides from 8.49 to -19.54%. The reviewed evidence seems to show that psyllium improves glucose homeostasis and the lipid and lipoprotein profile; however, more well controlled trials and further studies are needed to clarify it's effects and the mechanisms involved. PMID:15000455

  15. Mucopolysaccharides from psyllium involved in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, W; Das, P K; Middelkoop, E; Verschoor, J; Storey, L; Regnier, C

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharides derived from the husk of psyllium (Plantago ovata) have properties beneficial for wound cleansing and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that these mucopolysaccharides also limit scar formation. Our in vitro and in vivo studies aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved, e.g., fluid absorption, bacterial adherence and in vitro stimulatory effects on macrophages, which are pivotal in wound healing. The mucopolysaccharides contained in a sachet (Askina Cavity) or in a hydrocolloid mixture (Askina Hydro) were found to have a gradual and sustained absorbency over a period of 7 days, amounting to 4-6 times their weight in water. The swelling index was 9 mm after 312 h. Adherence of wound bacteria to the mucopolysaccharides started after 2 h and was more pronounced after 3 h. Semiquantitative measurements of bacterial adherence used centrifugation and subsequent optical density determinations of supernatant. These confirmed the strong adherence potential of psyllium particles. Lactic acid dehydrogenase staining of pretreated cultured human skin explants did not reveal toxicity of the mucopolysaccharides derived from psyllium husk. Langerhans' cell migration from the epidermis was negligible and interleukin-1 beta expression in the explants was not significant, supporting the very low allergenic potential of psyllium. The characteristics of mucopolysaccharide granulate derived from psyllium husk in Askina Cavity and Askina Hydro related to fluid absorption, bacterial adherence, biocompatibility, stimulation of macrophages, irritancy response and allergenicity showed an optimal profile, supporting the good clinical performance of wound healing products containing psyllium husk. PMID:11951574

  16. [Photosynthetic characteristics and coenological survey of Lactuca serriola in its invaded area].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shui-Liang; Fang, Fang; Ni, Liping; Chen, Wanlin; Shi, Laidi

    2006-12-01

    Lactuca serriola, a national class quarantine object, is a new invasive species in the coastal area of Southeast China. The coenological survey showed that because of its big individual, L. serriola could easily form dominant population in its invaded area, and its main accompany species were Conyza canadensis, C. bonarinisis, Bidentis bipinnata, Oenothera laciniata, Ipomoea hederacea, Setaria viridis, Daucus carota, Xanthium sibiricum, Erigeron annuus, L. indica, Humulus scandens, Solanum nigrum and Aster sublatus. The measurements with LCA-4 portable photosynthesis and transpiration system (ADC, England) revealed that the net photosynthetic rate of L. serriola was as high as 21.22 +/- 0.45 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1), being slightly lower than that of E. annuus and C. bonarinisis, similar to that of C. canadensis, and higher than that of Chenopodium album, Plantago virginica and L. indica. Based on the photosynthesis-light response equation, the theoretic light compensation point of L. serriola was 37.58 micromol m(-2) x s(-1), its theoretic light saturation point was 1 480 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), and theoretic maximal net photosynthetic rate was 20.81 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1). A distinct "noon break" phenomenon was observed in L. serriola photosynthesis, which might result from the high stomatal resistance against high light intensity and temperature. The main factors affecting the net photosynthetic rate of L. serriola were leaf photosynthetic active radiation, stomatal conductance, and leaf transpiration rate. PMID:17330472

  17. Common plants as alternative analytical tools to monitor heavy metals in soil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Herbaceous plants are common vegetal species generally exposed, for a limited period of time, to bioavailable environmental pollutants. Heavy metals contamination is the most common form of environmental pollution. Herbaceous plants have never been used as natural bioindicators of environmental pollution, in particular to monitor the amount of heavy metals in soil. In this study, we aimed at assessing the usefulness of using three herbaceous plants (Plantago major L., Taraxacum officinale L. and Urtica dioica L.) and one leguminous (Trifolium pratense L.) as alternative indicators to evaluate soil pollution by heavy metals. Results We employed Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to assess the concentration of selected heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cr and Pd) in soil and plants and we employed statistical analyses to describe the linear correlation between the accumulation of some heavy metals and selected vegetal species. We found that the leaves of Taraxacum officinale L. and Trifolium pratense L. can accumulate Cu in a linearly dependent manner with Urtica dioica L. representing the vegetal species accumulating the highest fraction of Pb. Conclusions In this study we demonstrated that common plants can be used as an alternative analytical tool for monitoring selected heavy metals in soil. PMID:22594441

  18. Arabidopsis POLYOL TRANSPORTER5, a new member of the monosaccharide transporter-like superfamily, mediates H+-Symport of numerous substrates, including myo-inositol, glycerol, and ribose.

    PubMed

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Geiger, Dietmar; Stadler, Ruth; Klebl, Franz; Landouar-Arsivaud, Lucie; Lemoine, Rémi; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Six genes of the Arabidopsis thaliana monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) superfamily share significant homology with polyol transporter genes previously identified in plants translocating polyols (mannitol or sorbitol) in their phloem (celery [Apium graveolens], common plantain [Plantago major], or sour cherry [Prunus cerasus]). The physiological role and the functional properties of this group of proteins were unclear in Arabidopsis, which translocates sucrose and small amounts of raffinose rather than polyols. Here, we describe POLYOL TRANSPORTER5 (AtPLT5), the first member of this subgroup of Arabidopsis MST-like transporters. Transient expression of an AtPLT5-green fluorescent protein fusion in plant cells and functional analyses of the AtPLT5 protein in yeast and Xenopus oocytes demonstrate that AtPLT5 is located in the plasma membrane and characterize this protein as a broad-spectrum H+-symporter for linear polyols, such as sorbitol, xylitol, erythritol, or glycerol. Unexpectedly, however, AtPLT5 catalyzes also the transport of the cyclic polyol myo-inositol and of different hexoses and pentoses, including ribose, a sugar that is not transported by any of the previously characterized plant sugar transporters. RT-PCR analyses and AtPLT5 promoter-reporter gene plants revealed that AtPLT5 is most strongly expressed in Arabidopsis roots, but also in the vascular tissue of leaves and in specific floral organs. The potential physiological role of AtPLT5 is discussed. PMID:15598803

  19. Channel Response to Low-Elevation Desert Fire: The King Valley Fire of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Griffiths, Peter G.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Boyer, Diane E.

    2007-01-01

    In late September to early October 2005, a fire swept north from the Yuma Proving Grounds and into the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), traveling mainly along desert wash systems and low-relief alluvial fans. This fire burned 9,975 ha, moving through xeroriparian systems in washes as well as low-elevation desert ecosystems in King Valley, a major area of designated wilderness in the southern part of the Kofa NWR. Using satellite imagery, we determined that 9,255 ha of the Kofa NWR in King Valley burned. The fine-fuel loading for the fire was mostly a native forb (Plantago insularis), and the desert environment that was burned was mostly low-cover creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) scrub with scattered palo verde (Cercidium microphyllum). The wash environments had significant tree cover, including ironwood (Olneya tesota), blue palo verde (Cercidium floridum), desert willow (Chilopsis linearis), and/or smoke tree (Psorothamnus spinosa). This report presents monitoring data collected in June 2006 and January-February 2007 on the effects of this fire on channel morphology in King Valley.

  20. Fire occurrence and tussock size modulate facilitation by Ampelodesmos mauritanicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incerti, Guido; Giordano, Daniele; Stinca, Adriano; Senatore, Mauro; Termolino, Pasquale; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2013-05-01

    Facilitation has been reported for a wide range of plant communities, with evidence of interactions between protégé and nurse plants shifting during their ontogenetic cycles. This study showed that large Ampelodesmos mauritanicus tussocks can act as nurse for different species, but only after fire occurrence. Large tussocks are typically composed by an external belt of living tillers surrounding dead standing tillers in the inner area, thus being arranged as a “ring” shape. A low plant diversity in unburned sites, dominated by intact Ampelodesmos tussocks, was related to the intense aboveground competition due to space physical limitation by standing tillers, as well as to the reduction of light availability at ground level. In contrast, after burning, tussocks resprouted only in their external belts, leaving empty inner areas. During post-fire recovery, several species (e.g. Plantago spp., Trifolium spp., Carlina spp.) recolonize the bare soil among different tussocks. On the other hand, a moss (Funaria hygrometrica) and several herbaceous and woody plants (e.g. Spartium junceum, Calicotome villosa, Quercus pubescens subsp. pubescens) were selectively distributed within the ash-full central areas of burned Ampelodesmos tussocks. In summary, the study reported evidence of changing prevalence in the interplay of competition and facilitation effects between small and large Ampelodesmos tussocks, respectively. These results suggest a broad significance of the interactions between fire occurrence and ontogenetic phases of the dominant species in affecting the restoration dynamics of natural plant communities.

  1. Effects of Mycorrhizal and Endophytic Fungi on Plant Community: a Microcosm Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyun

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of foliar endophytic fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on plant community structure in experimental microcosms containing an assemblage of five species of plants (Oenothera odorata, Plantago asiatica, Trifolium repens, Isodon japonicas and Aster yomena). Leaves of Sasa borealis, Potentilla fragarioides, and Viola mandshurica were collected in Chungbuk, Korea. Endophytic fungi were isolated from the surface sterilized leaves and identified to species level using molecular and morphological techniques. Four isolates of the endophytic fungi were inoculated to the leaves of host plants in the microcosms. Also, three species of AMF spores were extracted from pure cultures and the mixture of the three species inoculated to the roots of the plants. After four months of growth in a green house, effects of both symbiotic fungi on plant species diversity, community composition and productivity were examined. The plant species diversity showed significant differences with inoculation of the symbiotic fungi. Results indicate that AMF significantly affect plant productivity and plant community structure. PMID:24015095

  2. Effects of mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi on plant community: a microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Eom, Ahn-Heum

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of foliar endophytic fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on plant community structure in experimental microcosms containing an assemblage of five species of plants (Oenothera odorata, Plantago asiatica, Trifolium repens, Isodon japonicas and Aster yomena). Leaves of Sasa borealis, Potentilla fragarioides, and Viola mandshurica were collected in Chungbuk, Korea. Endophytic fungi were isolated from the surface sterilized leaves and identified to species level using molecular and morphological techniques. Four isolates of the endophytic fungi were inoculated to the leaves of host plants in the microcosms. Also, three species of AMF spores were extracted from pure cultures and the mixture of the three species inoculated to the roots of the plants. After four months of growth in a green house, effects of both symbiotic fungi on plant species diversity, community composition and productivity were examined. The plant species diversity showed significant differences with inoculation of the symbiotic fungi. Results indicate that AMF significantly affect plant productivity and plant community structure. PMID:24015095

  3. Antihyperglycemic effect of crude extracts of some Egyptian plants and algae.

    PubMed

    AbouZid, Sameh Fekry; Ahmed, Osama Mohamed; Ahmed, Rasha Rashad; Mahmoud, Ayman; Abdella, Ehab; Ashour, Mohamed Badr

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem. Various plant extracts have proven antidiabetic activity and are considered as promising substitution for antidiabetic drugs. The antihyperglycemic effect of 16 plants and 4 algae, commonly used in Egypt for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, was investigated. A diabetes model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide (120 mg/kg body weight [b.wt.]), then streptozotocin (200 mg/kg b.wt.) after 15 min. Hydroethanolic extracts (80%) of the plants and algae under investigation were prepared. The extracts were orally administered to nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by a gastric tube at doses 10 or 50 mg/kg b.wt. for 1 week. The antidiabetic activity was assessed by detection of serum glucose concentrations at the fasting state and after 2 h of oral glucose loading (4.2 mg/kg b.wt.). Extracts prepared from Cassia acutifolia, Fraxinus ornus, Salix aegyptiaca, Cichorium intybus, and Eucalyptus globulus showed the highest antihyperglycemic activity among the tested plants. Extracts prepared from Sonchus oleraceus, Bougainvillea spectabilis (leaves), Plantago psyllium (seeds), Morus nigra (leaves), and Serena repens (fruits) were found to have antihyperglycemic potentials. Extracts prepared from Caulerpa lentillifera and Spirulina versicolor showed the most potent antihyperglycemic activity among the tested algae. However, some of the tested plants have insulinotropic effects, all assessed algae have not. Identification of lead compounds from these plants and algae for novel antidiabetic drug development is recommended. PMID:24404976

  4. Botanicals: an alternative remedy to radiotherapy-induced dysuria.

    PubMed

    Jaladat, Amir Mohammad; Atarzadeh, Fatemeh; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Mofid, Bahram; Mosalaie, Ahmad; Farhan, Farshid; Amin, Gholamreza

    2015-02-01

    Everyday, many patients get radiotherapy for prostatic, rectal, uterine cervix and other pelvic organs cancer. Dysuria is common in pelvic, especially prostate radiotherapy, but there is not any established and confirmed treatment for this therapeutic side effect. Therefore, an alternative therapeutic method, using herbal preparation, may be an effective solution. This study seeks a defensible suggestion in Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM). In ITM, a few medicinal herbs such as Plantago psyllium, Cydonia oblonga, Portulaca oleracea and some species of Malvaceae and Cucurbitaceae family are indicated in treating dysuria secondary to urethral moisturizing layer defect and inflammatory disorders. Most of these herbs have mucilaginous characteristics and tissue regeneration ability. This choice can be an appropriate one for radiotherapy-induced dysuria as it is produced by a similar pathophysiology with bladder cell layer injury and urethritis. Pharmacological properties such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ulcerogenic activity of the offered herbs make its use justifiable. In lack of sufficient clinical trials to clarify the clinical outcome, further clinical investigation seems to be necessary. PMID:25637157

  5. Soil sand content can alter effects of different taxa of mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass production of grassland species

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Johann G.; Frank, Thomas; Drapela, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this greenhouse experiment we tested whether (i) ubiquitous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) taxa (Glomus claroideum, Glomus geosporum, Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae) singly and in a mixture differently affect growth and biomass production of four co-occurring grassland species (grass: Arrhenatherum elatius, non-leguminous forbs: Plantago lanceolata, Salvia pratensis and leguminous forb Trifolium pratense), and (ii) different soil sand contents alter AMF influence. We hypothesized that AMF effects on plants will increase with an increased AMF diversity and with increasing sand content. Percent AMF colonization of roots differed between plant species and AMF taxa and was higher with higher sand content. Plant growth responses to AMF were species-specific both regarding plants and AMF. Generally, biomass production of the non-leguminous forbs was the most responsive, the grass species the least and the legume intermediate both for AMF treatments and sand content. Across species, AMF influence on plant biomass increased with increasing soil sand content. Plant species growing in soil containing a mix of four AMF taxa showed similar growth responses than species in soil containing only one AMF taxon. These results suggest that both interference among AMF taxa and soil sand content can trigger the influence of AMF on plant production in grassland species. PMID:26109837

  6. Glomus drummondii and G. walkeri, two new species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota).

    PubMed

    Błaszkowski, Janusz; Renker, Carsten; Buscot, François

    2006-05-01

    Two new ectocarpic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, Glomus drummondii and G. walkeri (Glomeromycota), found in maritime sand dunes of northern Poland and those adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea are described and illustrated. Mature spores of G. drummondii are pastel yellow to maize yellow, globose to subglobose, (58-)71(-85) micromdiam, or ovoid, 50-80x63-98 microm. Their wall consists of three layers: an evanescent, hyaline, short-lived outermost layer, a laminate, smooth, pastel yellow to maize yellow middle layer, and a flexible, smooth, hyaline innermost layer. Spores of G. walkeri are white to pale yellow, globose to subglobose, (55-)81(-95) micromdiam, or ovoid, 60-90x75-115 microm, and have a spore wall composed of three layers: a semi-permanent, hyaline outermost layer, a laminate, smooth, white to pale yellow middle layer, and a flexible, smooth, hyaline innermost layer. In Melzer's reagent, only the inner- and outermost layers stain reddish white to greyish rose in G. drummondii and G. walkeri, respectively. Both species form vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in one-species cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the host plant. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and parts of the LSU of the nrDNA of spores placed both species in Glomus Group B sensu Schüssler et al. [Schüssler A, Schwarzott D, Walker C, 2001. A new fungal phylum, the Glomeromycota: phylogeny and evolution. Mycolological Research 105: 1413-1421.]. PMID:16769509

  7. Non-experimental validation of ethnoveterinary plants and indigenous knowledge used for backyard pigs and chickens in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Lans, C; Georges, K; Brown, G

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study on ethnoveterinary medicines used for backyard pigs and backyard chickens in Trinidad and Tobago. Research data was collected from 1995 to September 2000. Six plants are used for backyard pigs. Crushed leaves of immortelle (Erythrina pallida, E. micropteryx) are used to remove dead piglets from the uterus. Leaf decoctions of bois canôt (Cecropia peltata) and bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) are used for labour pains or leaves are fed as a postpartum cleanser. Boiled green papaya fruit (Carica papaya) is fed to pigs to induce milk let-down. The leaves and flowers of male papaya plants (Carica papaya) are fed to deworm pigs. Sour orange juice (Citrus aurantium) is given to pigs to produce lean meat, and coffee grounds are used for scours. Eyebright and plantain leaves (Plantago major) are used for eye injuries of backyard chickens. Worm grass (Chenopodium ambrosioides) and cotton bush (Gossypium species) are used as anthelmintics. Aloe gel (Aloe vera) is used for internal injuries and the yellow sap from the cut Aloe vera leaf or the juice of Citrus limonia is used to purge the birds. A literature review revealed few toxicity concerns and the potential usefulness of the plants. PMID:17944308

  8. Interrelations between herbage yield, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, lutein, protein, and fiber in non-leguminous forbs, forage legumes, and a grass-clover mixture as affected by harvest date.

    PubMed

    Elgersma, Anjo; Søegaard, Karen; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2015-01-21

    Pastures with diverse botanical composition may enhance animal-derived product quality. A recent study demonstrated high vitamin concentrations and yields in some forb species. The objectives of the present study were to investigate interrelations between herbage yields, vitamin concentrations, protein and fiber contents and analyze the effect of harvest date. We hypothesized that interrelations would be similar across investigated forage species. Four nonleguminous forbs: salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor), caraway (Carum carvi), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), three legumes: yellow sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis), lucerne (Medicago sativa), and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)-white clover (Trifolium repens) mixture were sown in a field trial with two replicated and randomized blocks. Forage in 1.5 m × 9 m plots was grown in two consecutive years and cut four times per year (May-October). Analyses of variance were performed. In most herbages, α-tocopherol and β-carotene were positively correlated as were β-carotene and lutein; all vitamins were negatively correlated with fiber content and herbage yield. β-Carotene was positively correlated with protein content. α-Tocopherol and β-carotene contents were generally highest in October and lowest in July. Our results showed similar interrelationships in most investigated species, and we suggest that these species may be mixed when designing novel biodiverse mixtures for particular product quality characteristics. PMID:25573460

  9. [Identification of plantaginis semen based on ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences].

    PubMed

    Song, Ming; Zhang, Ya-Qin; Lin, Yun-Han; Tu, Yuan; Ma, Xiao-Xi; Sun, Wei; Xiang, Li; Jiao, Wen-Jing; Liu, Xia

    2014-06-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences used as DNA barcodes to distinguish Plantaginis Semen from its adulterants, we collected 71 samples of Plantaginis Semen and its adulterants. The ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences were aligned through Clustal W, and the genetic distances were calculated by kimura 2-parameter (K2P) model and the Neighbor-Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees were constructed using MEGA 5.1. The results indicated that the ITS2 sequence lengths of Plantago asiatica and P. depressa were 199 bp and 200 bp, respectively; the maximum intra-specific K2P distance were lower than the minimum inter-specific K2P distance; the NJ tree based on ITS2 sequence indicated that Plantaginis Semen and its adulterants could be distinguished clearly. The sequence lengths of psbA-trnH of both P. asiatica and P. depressa were 340 bp; the maximum intra-specific K2P distances were lower than the minimum inter-specific K2P distance; the NJ tree based on psbA-trnH sequence showed that Plantaginis Semen can be distinguished clearly from its adulterants except for P. major. Therefore, ITS2 sequences can be used as an ideal DNA barcode to distinguish Plantaginis Semen from its adulterants. PMID:25244750

  10. Analysis of arsenic and antimony distribution within plants growing at an old mine site in Ouche (Cantal, France) and identification of species suitable for site revegetation.

    PubMed

    Jana, Ulrike; Chassany, Vincent; Bertrand, Georges; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Aubry, Emmanuel; Boudsocq, Simon; Laffray, Daniel; Repellin, Anne

    2012-11-15

    One of the objectives of this study was to assess the contamination levels in the tailings of an old antimony mine site located in Ouche (Cantal, France). Throughout the 1.3 ha site, homogenous concentrations of antimony and arsenic, a by-product of the operation, were found along 0-0.5 m-deep profiles. Maximum concentrations for antimony and arsenic were 5780 mg kg(-1) dry tailings and 852 mg kg(-1) dry tailings, respectively. Despite the presence of the contaminants and the low pH and organic matter contents of the tailings, several patches of vegetation were found. Botanical identification determined 12 different genera/species. The largest and most abundant plants were adult pines (Pinus sylvestris), birches (Betula pendula) and the bulrush (Juncus effusus). The distribution of the metalloids within specimens of each genera/species was analysed in order to deduce their concentration and translocation capacities. This was the second goal of this work. All plant specimens were highly contaminated with both metalloids. Most were root accumulators with root to shoot translocation factors <1. Whereas contamination levels were high overall, species with both a low translocation factor and a low root accumulation coefficient were identified as suitable candidates for the complete revegetation of the site. Species combining those characteristics were the perennials P. sylvestris, B. pendula, Cytisus scoparius and the herbaceous Plantago major, and Deschampsia flexuosa. PMID:22789654

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana IRX10 and two related proteins from psyllium and Physcomitrella patens are xylan xylosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Krüger; Johnson, Nathan Robert; Wilkerson, Curtis Gene

    2014-10-01

    The enzymatic mechanism that governs the synthesis of the xylan backbone polymer, a linear chain of xylose residues connected by β-1,4 glycosidic linkages, has remained elusive. Xylan is a major constituent of many kinds of plant cell walls, and genetic studies have identified multiple genes that affect xylan formation. In this study, we investigate several homologs of one of these previously identified xylan-related genes, IRX10 from Arabidopsis thaliana, by heterologous expression and in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase assay. We find that an IRX10 homolog from the moss Physcomitrella patens displays robust activity, and we show that the xylosidic linkage formed is a β-1,4 linkage, establishing this protein as a xylan β-1,4-xylosyltransferase. We also find lower but reproducible xylan xylosyltransferase activity with A. thaliana IRX10 and with a homolog from the dicot plant Plantago ovata, showing that xylan xylosyltransferase activity is conserved over large evolutionary distance for these proteins. PMID:25139408

  12. Aerobiological study in east-central Iberian Peninsula: pollen diversity and dynamics for major taxa.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Badia, Rosa; Rapp, Ana; Vaquero, Consolación; Fernández-González, Federico

    2011-01-01

    A study was made of airborne pollen counts in Cuenca (east-central Iberian Peninsula, Spain), using data obtained over a 3-year period (2008-2010). This is the first such study carried out in the World Heritage city of Cuenca, situated in the large region of Castilla-La Mancha. Air monitoring was performed using the sampling and analysis procedures recommended by the Spanish Aerobiology Network. Sampling commenced in mid- 2007, and provided the first recorded pollen-spectrum for the area. The greatest pollen-type diversity was recorded in spring, whilst the highest pollen counts (over 80 percent of the annual total) were observed between February and June. The lowest counts were found in September, November and December. The 10 leading taxa, in order of abundance, were: Cupressaceae, Quercus, Urticaceae, Pinus, Olea, Poaceae, Populus, Platanus, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae and Plantago. The pollen calendar was thus typically Mediterrean, and comprised the 27 pollen types reaching 10-day mean counts of over 1 grain/m(3) of air. Maximum concentration values during the day were recorded between 12:00-20:00, coinciding with the highest temperatures and lowest humidity levels. The pollen types responsible for most allergies in the city of Cuenca, ordered by the number of days on which risk levels were reached, were: Poaceae, Urticaceae, Cupressaceae, Olea, Platanus and Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae. PMID:21736275

  13. Thermal analysis of some natural polysaccharide materials by isoconversional method.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad S; Massey, Shazma; Akbar, Jamshed; Ashraf, Chaudhary M; Masih, Rashid

    2013-09-01

    Isoconversional thermal analysis of some important polysaccharides from functional foods is reported. Various thermal parameters including apparent activation energy (Ea), pre-exponential factor (A) were worked out, and the fitness of data to different models describing the degradation kinetics of polysaccharides was studied. The polysaccharides from Mimosa pudica (MP), Plantago ovata (PO), Argyreia speciosa (AS), Acacia nilotica (AN), P. ovata husk (HK) and Acacia modesta (AM) exhibited multistep degradation while those from Astragalus gummifer (AG), Salvia aegyptiaca (SA) and Ocimum basicilicum (OB) degraded mainly in single step. Generally, the degradation was exothermal. The average Ea values as determined by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method were found to be in the range 132-187 kJ mol(-1). The mean comprehensive index of thermal stability (ITS) fell in the range 0.33-0.43. All the materials under investigation except those from SA and AS appear to be as stable as some of the important commercial materials used as pharmaceutical ingredients. Model-fitting analysis revealed that the major degradation step follows first-order kinetics. PMID:23578630

  14. Influence of wind direction on pollen concentration in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Palacios, I.; Tormo Molina, R.; Muñoz Rodríguez, A. F.

    The daily pollen concentration in the atmosphere of Badajoz (SW Spain) was analysed over a 6-year period (1993-1998) using a volumetric aerobiological trap. The results for the main pollination period are compared with the number of hours of wind each day in the four quadrants: 1 (NE), 2 (SE), 3 (SW) and 4 (NW). The pollen source distribution allowed 16 pollen types to be analysed as a function of their distribution in the four quadrants with respect to the location of the trap. Four of them correspond to species growing in an irrigated farmland environment (Amaranthaceae-Chenopodiaceae, Plantago, Scirpus, and Typha), five to riparian and woodland species (Salix, Fraxinus, Alnus, Populus, and Eucalyptus), four to urban ornamentals (Ulmus, Arecaceae, Cupressaceae, and Casuarina), and three which include the most frequent pollen grains of widely distributed species (Poaceae, Quercus, and Olea). The results show that the distribution of the sources and the wind direction play a very major role in determining the pollen concentration in the atmosphere when these sources are located in certain quadrants, and that the widely distributed pollen sources show no relationship with wind direction. In some years the values of the correlations were not maintained, which leads one to presume that, in order to draw significant conclusions and establish clear patterns of the influence of wind direction, a continuous and more prolonged study will be required.

  15. Ecological and evolutionary implications of spatial heterogeneity during the off-season for a wild plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ayco J M; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2014-04-01

    While recent studies have elucidated many of the factors driving parasite dynamics during the growing season, the ecological and evolutionary dynamics during the off-season (i.e. the period between growing seasons) remain largely unexplored. We combined large-scale surveys and detailed experiments to investigate the overwintering success of the specialist plant pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis on its patchily distributed host plant Plantago lanceolata in the Åland Islands. Twelve years of epidemiological data establish the off-season as a crucial stage in pathogen metapopulation dynamics, with c. 40% of the populations going extinct during the off-season. At the end of the growing season, we observed environmentally mediated variation in the production of resting structures, with major consequences for spring infection at spatial scales ranging from single individuals to populations within a metapopulation. Reciprocal transplant experiments further demonstrated that pathogen population of origin and overwintering site jointly shaped infection intensity in spring, with a weak signal of parasite adaptation to the local off-season environment. We conclude that environmentally mediated changes in the distribution and evolution of parasites during the off-season are crucial for our understanding of host-parasite dynamics, with applied implications for combating parasites and diseases in agriculture, wildlife and human disease systems. PMID:24372358

  16. Age, growth and size interact with stress to determine life span and mortality.

    PubMed

    Roach, Deborah Ann

    2012-10-01

    Individuals in a large experimental field population, of the short-lived perennial species Plantago lanceolata, were followed to determine the sources of variation that influence mortality and life span. The design included multiple age groups with initially similar genetic structure, which made it possible to separate age effects from period effects and to identify the genetic component to variation in life span. During a period of stress, individuals of all ages showed parallel increases in mortality but different cohorts experienced this period of high mortality at different ages. This then influenced the distribution of life spans across cohorts. Age and size-age interactions influenced mortality during the period of stress. Smaller individuals died but only if they were old. Additionally, growth and age interacted with stress such that older individuals had negative growth and high mortality whereas younger individuals had positive growth and relatively lower mortality during stress. The results of this study show that it is not simply the environment that can have a major impact on demography in natural populations; rather, age, size and growth can interact with the environment to influence mortality and life span when the environment is stressful. PMID:22664575

  17. Nephroprotection of plantamajoside in rats treated with cadmium.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ha-Young; Seo, Dong-Won; Hong, Chung-Oui; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Yang, Sung-Yong; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), an environmental and industrial pollutant, generates free radicals responsible for oxidative stress. Cd can also lead to various renal toxic damage such as the proximal tubules and glomerulus dysfunction. Plantamajoside (PMS), a major compound of Plantago asiatica (PA), was reported to have the antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of PMS on Cd-induced renal damage in the NRK-52E cell and rat kidney tissue. Cd exposure increased the ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, serum biochemical values of renal damage, and mRNA and protein expressions of KIM-1 in vitro and in vivo. The significant reduction in glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio and activities of antioxidant enzymes were also observed in the rats treated with Cd. PMS significantly decreased the ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, thus enhancing GSH/GSSG ratio, antioxidant enzyme activities in the cells and rats, and improved histochemical appearances, indicating that PMS has protective activities against Cd-induced renal injury. PMID:25499790

  18. The impact of spatial scale and habitat configuration on patterns of trait variation and local adaptation in a wild plant parasite.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ayco J M; Horns, Felix; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Theory indicates that spatial scale and habitat configuration are fundamental for coevolutionary dynamics and how diversity is maintained in host-pathogen interactions. Yet, we lack empirical data to translate the theory to natural host-parasite systems. In this study, we conduct a multiscale cross-inoculation study using the specialist wild plant pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis on its host plant Plantago lanceolata. We apply the same sampling scheme to a region with highly fragmented (Åland) and continuous (Saaremaa) host populations. Although theory predicts higher parasite virulence in continuous regions, we did not detect differences in traits conferring virulence among the regions. Patterns of adaptation were highly scale dependent. We detected parasite maladaptation among regions, and among populations separated by intermediate distances (6.0-40.0 km) within the fragmented region. In contrast, parasite performance did not vary significantly according to host origin in the continuous landscape. For both regions, differentiation among populations was much larger for genetic variation than for phenotypic variation, indicating balancing selection maintaining phenotypic variation within populations. Our findings illustrate the critical role of spatial scale and habitat configuration in driving host-parasite coevolution. The absence of more aggressive strains in the continuous landscape, in contrast to theoretical predictions, has major implications for long-term decision making in conservation, agriculture, and public health. PMID:24372603

  19. Antiplasmodial activity of ethanolic extracts of some selected medicinal plants from the northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Sangian, Hadi; Faramarzi, Hossein; Yazdinezhad, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed Javad; Zamani, Zahra; Noubarani, Maryam; Ramazani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    The effectiveness of antimalarial drugs is declining at an ever accelerating rate, with consequent increase in malaria-related morbidity and mortality. The newest antiplasmodial drug from plants is needed to overcome this problem. The aim of this study was to assess antimalarial activity of the ethanolic extracts of 10 different medicinal plants from eight families against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain. The selection of the hereby studied plants was based on the existing information on their local ethnobotanic history. Plants were dried, powdered, and macerated in a hydroalcoholic solution. Resulting extracts have been assessed for in vitro and in vivo antimalarial and brine shrimp toxicity activities. Of 10 plant species tested, four plants: Althea officinalis L. (Malvaceae), Myrtus communis Linn (Myrtaceae), Plantago major (Plantaginaceae), and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Papilionaceae) displayed promising antimalarial activity in vitro (50% inhibitory concentration values of 62.77, 42.18, 40.00, and 13.56 μg/mL, respectively) with no toxicity against brine shrimp larvae. The crude extracts of three active plants, G. glabra, M. communis, and A. officinalis, also significantly reduced parasitemia in vivo in female Swiss albino mice at a dose of 400 mg/kg compared to no treatment. Antiplasmodial activities of extracts of A. officinalis and M. communis are reported for the first time. PMID:23922204

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced shifts in foliar metabolism and photosynthesis mirror the developmental stage of the symbiosis and are only partly driven by improved phosphate uptake.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Rabea; Baier, Markus C; Müller, Caroline

    2014-12-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) plants, the plant delivers photoassimilates to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF), whereas the mycosymbiont contributes, in addition to other beneficial effects, to phosphate (PO4(3-)) uptake from the soil. Thereby, the additional fungal carbon (C) sink strength in roots and improved plant PO4(3-) nutrition may influence aboveground traits. We investigated how the foliar metabolome of Plantago major is affected along with the development of root symbiosis, whether the photosynthetic performance is affected by AM, and whether these effects are mediated by improved PO4(3-) nutrition. Therefore, we studied PO4(3-)-limited and PO4(3-)-supplemented controls in comparison with mycorrhizal plants at 20, 30, and 62 days postinoculation with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis. Foliar metabolome modifications were determined by the developmental stage of symbiosis, with changes becoming more pronounced over time. In a well-established stage of mature mutualism, about 60% of the metabolic changes and an increase in foliar CO2 assimilation were unrelated to the significantly increased foliar phosphorus (P) content. We propose a framework relating the time-dependent metabolic changes to the shifts in C costs and P benefits for the plant. Besides P-mediated effects, the strong fungal C sink activity may drive the changes in the leaf traits. PMID:25162317

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal degradation of pentose- and hexose-based carbohydrate polymers.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Jamshed; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Massey, Shazma; Masih, Rashid

    2012-10-15

    This work aims at study of thermal degradation kinetics and mechanism of pentose- and hexose-based carbohydrate polymers isolated from Plantago ovata (PO), Salvia aegyptiaca (SA) and Ocimum basilicum (OB). The analysis was performed by isoconversional method. The materials exhibited mainly two-stage degradation. The weight loss at ambient-115°C characterized by low activation energy corresponds to loss of moisture. The kinetic triplets consisting of E, A and g(α) model of the materials were determined. The major degradation stage represents a loss of high boiling volatile components. This stage is exothermic in nature. Above 340°C complete degradation takes place leaving a residue of 10-15%. The master plots of g(α) function clearly differentiated the degradation mechanism of hexose-based OB and SA polymers and pentose-based PO polymer. The pentose-based carbohydrate polymer showed D(4) type and the hexose-based polymers showed A(4) type degradation mechanism. PMID:22939355

  2. Long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment of a pasture community: Species richness, dominance, and succession

    SciTech Connect

    Potvin, C.; Vasseur, L.

    1997-04-01

    The present study addresses responses of a pasture community to CO{sub 2} enrichment in situ. It focused on two levels of organization. We examined changes in both community properties and species-specific responses during long-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} concentration. The underlying hypothesis is that CO{sub 2} enrichment could change community composition. At the community level, we observed higher species richness and lesser dominance under enriched than ambient CO{sub 2}. Two species were apparently central in explaining our results. Agropyran repens and Plantago major. The cover of this first species increased only under ambient CO{sub 2}. Conversely, the cover of the latter species decreased under ambient CO{sub 2} but remained stable under enriched CO{sub 2}. Species were pooled into dicots and monocots to examine space acquisition. Changes in monocot cover through time were more tightly coupled with that of dicots under ambient than high CO{sub 2}. Enrichment with CO{sub 2} appeared to have a positive effect on the early-successional species, preventing the complete dominance by late-successional species. In fact, under elevated CO{sub 2} early-and late-successional species were coexisting. Therefore, our results suggest the possibility that succession patterns might be altered by CO{sub 2} enrichment apparently because enriched CO{sub 2} stimulates the growth of dicots. 40 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Comparison of diagnostic techniques for the detection and differentiation of Cherry leaf roll virus strains for quarantine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lebas, B S M; Veerakone, S; Liefting, L W; Tang, J; Perez-Egusquiza, Z; von Bargen, S; Ward, L

    2016-08-01

    Some strains of Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV) are considered as quarantine pests in New Zealand. CLRV was detected in seven plant host species: Actinidia chinensis, Hydrangea macrophylla, Malus domestica, Plantago major, Ribes rubrum, Rubus idaeus and Rumex sp. collected from New Zealand between 2005 and 2012. Biological, serological and molecular techniques were compared for the detection and differentiation of CLRV isolates. The biological analysis revealed differences in symptomatology and disease severity among the isolates. The five isolates tested by ELISA were serologically related to each other using polyclonal antisera with only one out of four commercially-available antisera successfully detecting all of them. The phylogenetic analysis of sequences obtained from parts of the coat protein, polymerase and 3'-untranslated regions revealed that the New Zealand CLRV isolates clustered into two closely related but distinct phylogenetic groups with some isolates grouping differently depending on the gene studied. The New Zealand CLRV isolates were clearly distinct to overseas isolates found in phylogenetic groups A, D and E. The conventional RT-PCR using primers targeting the CLRV coat protein coding region is recommended for determining sequence differences between strains. These findings will be useful in making regulatory decisions with regard to the testing requirements and the CLRV strains to be regulated in New Zealand. PMID:27129669

  4. Context-dependent effects of induced resistance under co-infection in a plant-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2011-09-01

    The ability of a parasite strain to establish and grow on its host may be drastically altered by simultaneous infection by other parasite strains, and dynamics under multiple infection have been suggested to be a major force driving pathogen evolution. Here, I studied whether hosts' induced defenses mediate dynamics of multiple infection of the fungal pathogen, Podosphaera plantaginis, infecting Plantago lanceolata. A laboratory study of sequential infections, where interaction between pathogen strains was prevented, showed that ability to establish remained unaffected, but prior infection elevates the host's resistance to the degree that subsequent infection development is significantly reduced. However, when inoculated plants and their healthy controls were planted back into their natural populations, hosts with prior infection became more heavily infected by the subsequent infections than the initially healthy plants. Hence, a controlled short-term laboratory study is a poor predictor of the host's ability to mediate multiple infection during the course of natural epidemics. These results have applied implications for priming where the plants' defenses are elicited to provide protection against further attack, highlighting the importance of testing priming under natural conditions for relevant time scales. PMID:25568016

  5. Local adaptation at range edges: comparing elevation and latitudinal gradients.

    PubMed

    Halbritter, A H; Billeter, R; Edwards, P J; Alexander, J M

    2015-10-01

    Local adaptation at range edges influences species' distributions and how they respond to environmental change. However, the factors that affect adaptation, including gene flow and local selection pressures, are likely to vary across different types of range edge. We performed a reciprocal transplant experiment to investigate local adaptation in populations of Plantago lanceolata and P. major from central locations in their European range and from their latitudinal and elevation range edges (in northern Scandinavia and Swiss Alps, respectively). We also characterized patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation in populations using molecular markers. Range-centre plants of P. major were adapted to conditions at the range centre, but performed similarly to range-edge plants when grown at the range edges. There was no evidence for local adaptation when comparing central and edge populations of P. lanceolata. However, plants of both species from high elevation were locally adapted when compared with plants from high latitude, although the reverse was not true. This asymmetry was associated with greater genetic diversity and less genetic differentiation over the elevation gradient than over the latitudinal gradient. Our results suggest that adaptation in some range-edge populations could increase their performance following climate change. However, responses are likely to differ along elevation and latitudinal gradients, with adaptation more likely at high-elevation. Furthermore, based upon these results, we suggest that gene flow is unlikely to constrain adaptation in range-edge populations of these species. PMID:26201435

  6. Lupine inhalation induced asthma in a child.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ancillo, Alvaro; Gil-Adrados, Ana C; Domínguez-Noche, Carmen; Cosmes, Pedro M

    2005-09-01

    The ingestion of lupine seed flour has been reported as a cause of allergic reactions. There is some evidence of its allergenic potential after inhalation. An 8-year-old asthmatic child, who was allergic to peanut, was studied in our clinic with the suspicion of an adverse drug reaction due to salbutamol. He suffered an asthma attack while playing with his brother, who had been eating lupine seed as snack; surprisingly, the asthma attack worsened with salbutamol. The skin tests showed a positive result with Lupinus albus extract, peanut, garbanzo bean, navy bean, pea, green bean, lentil, soy, Olea europea pollen, grass pollen and Plantago lanceolata pollen. The prick-by-prick tests both from dried seeds and those preserved in salt and water were strongly positive. Serum specific IgE antibodies were positive to Lupine albus (1.43 kU/l), peanut (4.32 kU/l), soy (2.15 kU/l), lentil (3.12 kU/l) and garbanzo (0.7 kU/l). After informed consent salbutamol was well tolerated but the patient had asthma in 5 min of manipulation of the lupine seeds. In our case, reactivity with other legumes was also demonstrated, but only peanut allergy was relevant because boiled legumes were tolerated. It is also notorious that anamnesis is so important to assess the true etiological agents of asthma. PMID:16176404

  7. Vegetational response to human colonisation of the coastal and volcanic environments of Ketilsstaðir, southern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlendsson, Egill; Edwards, Kevin J.; Buckland, Paul C.

    2009-09-01

    Tephra-dated, high-resolution pollen profiles from Ketilsstaðir, southern Iceland, indicate a largely unwooded pre-settlement environment, a probable consequence of the exposed coastal location. The degree of change associated with the Norse landnám is more limited than in many Icelandic pollen diagrams. There are three main periods of change in the post-settlement vegetational development of the area. Firstly, Norse settlement affected the hydrology of the bog, resulting in the near-disappearance of Sphagnum and agricultural activity led to a reduction of some species (e.g. Angelica spp. and, Salix). Secondly, the establishment of probable permanent settlement in the mid-11th century AD initiated expansion of such apophytic taxa as Plantago spp. Lactuceae, Ranunculus spp. and Pteridophytes. Thirdly, the ≥ 10 cm thick Katla tephra, deposited in AD 1357, enhanced drainage of the bog surface, favouring dryland taxa (e.g. Poaceae, Galium and Lactuceae). The tephra deposit and the associated drainage probably caused or contributed to the local extinction of the wetland beetle Hydraena britteni. The study has enabled a series of natural and humanly-related issues to be addressed including tephra-vegetation relationships, the anthropogenic reduction in plant diversity, and comparisons between historical and environmental settlement records.

  8. Seasonal and intradiurnal variation of airborne pollen concentrations in Bodrum, SW Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tosunoglu, Aycan; Bicakci, Adem

    2015-04-01

    An aeropalynological study was performed in Bodrum, the famous tourism center in southwestern Turkey with a Hirst-type volumetric 7-day pollen and spore trap for 2 years (2007-2008). In Bodrum, 25,099 pollen grains as a mean value belonging to 41 taxa were recorded annually during the study period, and pollen grains from woody plant taxa had the largest atmospheric contribution of 86.99% and 24 taxa. However, 17 herbaceous plant taxa constituted 12.82% of the annual total pollen count, and 0.19% were unidentified. An average annual pollen index of 22.66% was recorded in March, despite differences from year to year. The highest pollen variability of 34 taxa was recorded in April and May. Predominant pollen types belonged to Cupressaceae/Taxaceae (42.73%), Quercus (15.95%), Pinus (9.78%), Olea europaea (9.04%), Poaceae (5.50%), Betula (1.82%), Pistacia (1.74%), Morus (1.72%), Urticaceae (1.46%), and Plantago (1.28%) and generated 91.03 of the annual total. In total, 32.59% of the mean annual total pollen index was recorded in the morning, and less pollen was recorded in the evening (18.71%). Maximum pollen concentration was recorded between 11:00 and 12:00 a.m. PMID:25750068

  9. Manipulating the antioxidant capacity of halophytes to increase their cultural and economic value through saline cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Boestfleisch, Christian; Wagenseil, Niko B.; Buhmann, Anne K.; Seal, Charlotte E.; Wade, Ellie Merrett; Muscolo, Adele; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Halophytes, salt-tolerant plants, are a source of valuable secondary metabolites with potential economic value. The steady-state pools of many stress-related metabolites are already enhanced in halophytes when compared with glycophytes, but growth under conditions away from the optimum can induce stress and consequently result in changes to secondary metabolites such as antioxidants. However, direct evidence for increasing the concentration of valuable secondary metabolites as a consequence of altering the salinity of the growing environment still remains equivocal. To address this, we analysed a range of metabolites with antioxidant capacity (including total phenols, flavonoids, ascorbate, reduced/oxidized glutathione and reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes) in seedlings and plants from different families (Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae, Plantaginaceae and Rhizophoraceae) and habitats grown under different salt concentrations. We show that it is possible to manipulate the antioxidant capacity of plants and seedlings by altering the saline growing environment, the length of time under saline cultivation and the developmental stage. Among the species studied, the halophytes Tripolium pannonicum, Plantago coronopus, Lepidium latifolium and Salicornia europaea demonstrated the most potential as functional foods or nutraceuticals. PMID:25125698

  10. Desert fires fueled by native annual forbs: effects of fire on communities of plants and birds in the lower Sonoran Desert of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esque, Todd C.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Van Riper, Charles, III; McCreedy, Chris; Smythe, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, fire ignited by humans swept from Yuma Proving Grounds into Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona, burning ca. 9,255 ha of Wilderness Area. Fuels were predominantly the native forb Plantago ovata. Large fires at low elevations were rare in the 19th and 20th centuries, and fires fueled by native vegetation are undocumented in the southwestern deserts. We estimated the area damaged by fire using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, which are more accurate and reduce subjectivity of aerial surveys of perimeters of fires. Assemblages of upland and xeroriparian plants lost 91 and 81% of live cover, respectively, in fires. The trees Olneya tesota and Cercidium had high amounts of top-kill. King Valley was an important xeroriparian corridor for birds. Species richness of birds decreased significantly following the fire. Numbers of breeding birds were lower in burned areas of King Valley 3 years post-fire, compared to numbers in nearby but unburned Alamo Wash. Although birds function within a large geographic scale, the extent of this burn still influenced the relative abundance of local species of breeding birds. This suggests that breeding birds respond to conditions of localized burns and slow recovery of vegetation contributes to continued lower numbers of birds in the burned sites in King Valley.

  11. Interactions between the jasmonic and salicylic acid pathway modulate the plant metabolome and affect herbivores of different feeding types.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, R; Heise, A-M; Persicke, M; Müller, C

    2014-07-01

    The phytohormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) mediate induced plant defences and the corresponding pathways interact in a complex manner as has been shown on the transcript and proteine level. Downstream, metabolic changes are important for plant-herbivore interactions. This study investigated metabolic changes in leaf tissue and phloem exudates of Plantago lanceolata after single and combined JA and SA applications as well as consequences on chewing-biting (Heliothis virescens) and piercing-sucking (Myzus persicae) herbivores. Targeted metabolite profiling and untargeted metabolic fingerprinting uncovered different categories of plant metabolites, which were influenced in a specific manner, indicating points of divergence, convergence, positive crosstalk and pronounced mutual antagonism between the signaling pathways. Phytohormone-specific decreases of primary metabolite pool sizes in the phloem exudates may indicate shifts in sink-source relations, resource allocation, nutrient uptake or photosynthesis. Survival of both herbivore species was significantly reduced by JA and SA treatments. However, the combined application of JA and SA attenuated the negative effects at least against H. virescens suggesting that mutual antagonism between the JA and SA pathway may be responsible. Pathway interactions provide a great regulatory potential for the plant that allows triggering of appropriate defences when attacked by different antagonist species. PMID:24372400

  12. Larval growth rate is associated with the composition of the gut microbiota in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, L; Ikonen, S; Makkonen, H; Hanski, I

    2016-07-01

    The rapidly increasing body of literature on commensal microbiota has revealed a large phylotypic and functional diversity of microbes associated with vertebrates and invertebrates. In insects, the gut microbiota plays a role in digestion and metabolism of the host as well as protects the host against pathogens. In the study reported here, we sampled gut microbiota of the larvae of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia). The larvae were collected from the field or reared in the laboratory. This butterfly has two host plant species, Plantago lanceolata and Veronica spicata, and the host plant species is known from previous studies to influence larval growth rate. However, our results demonstrate that about 50 % of the variation in larval growth rate can be attributed to the effect of the gut microbial composition plus the joint effect of microbiota and the host plant species, while host plant species alone makes no significant contribution. Our results support previous studies showing that diet influences the gut microbiota but, more unexpectedly, that the composition of the gut microbiota significantly influences larval growth rate. We suggest that host plant effects on larval growth and development observed in many previous studies may be mediated via the gut microbiota. While we measured the growth rate only in laboratory-reared larvae, the similarity of the gut microbial composition between samples from field-collected and laboratory-reared larvae suggests that the results can be generalized to natural conditions. PMID:27000942

  13. Early vs. asymptotic growth responses of herbaceous plants to elevated CO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.C.; Jasienski, M.; Bazzaz, F.A. . Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology)

    1999-07-01

    Although many studies have examined the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on plant growth,'' the dynamics of growth involve at least two parameters, namely, an early rate of exponential size increase and an asymptotic size reached late in plant ontogeny. The common practice of quantifying CO[sub 2] responses as a single response ratio thus obscures two qualitatively distinct kinds of effects. The present experiment examines effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on both early and asymptotic growth parameters in eight C[sub 3] herbaceous plant species (Abutilon theophrasti, Cassia obtusifolia, Plantago major, Rumex crispus, Taraxacum officinale, Dactylis glomerata, Lolium multiflorum, and Panicum dichotomoflorum). Plants were grown for 118--172 d in a factorial design of CO[sub 2] (350 and 700 [micro]L/L) and plant density (individually grown vs. high-density monocultures) under edaphic conditions approximating those of coastal areas in Massachusetts. For Abutilon theophrasti, intraspecific patterns of plant response were also assessed using eight genotypes randomly sampled from a natural population and propagated as inbred lines.

  14. The influence of plant species on the plant/air partitioning coefficients of PCBs and chlorinated benzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Koemp, P.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The plant/air partitioning coefficients (K{sub PA}) of pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene and 16 PCB congeners were determined in five different grass and herb species common to Central Europe (Lolium multiflorum, Trifolium repens, Plantago lanceolata, Crepis biennis, Achillea millefolium). The measurements were conducted between 5 C and 35 C using a solid phase fugacity meter. Octanol/air partition coefficients (K{sub OA}) were also measured over a similar temperature range. In all cases an excellent linear relationship between log K{sub PA} and log K{sub OA} was observed (r{sup 2} between 0.80 and 0.99). However, while the slope of this relationship was 1 for Lolium multiflorum (ryegrass), in agreement with previous work, the slopes of the log K{sub PA} vs. log K{sub OA} plot were less than 1 for the other 4 species, lying as low as 0.49 for Achillea millefolium (yarrow). Large differences in the enthalpy of phase change (plant/air) were also observed between the different species, but these differences were not related to the differences in the partition coefficients. These observations demonstrate that the contaminant storage properties of plants are variable, and that the lipophilic compartment in some plants is considerably more polar than octanol. This places constraints on the applicability of current models of plant uptake, almost all of which assume that the lipophilic compartment behaves like octanol, and reinforces the need for more research into the contaminant storage properties of plants.

  15. The effect of spatial scale on interactions between two weevils and their food plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Mohd Norowi; Perry, Joe N.; Powell, Wilf; Rennolls, Keith

    1999-09-01

    The effect of spatial scale on the interactions between the weevils Gymnetron pascuorum Gyll. and Mecinus pyraster Herbst and their host plant, ribwort plantain Plantago lanceolata L., was studied. Both weevils developed in plantain seedheads but occupied different niches within the seedhead. Seedheads were sampled annually from 162 plants at each of two experimental sites consisting of a series of habitat patches of two distinct sizes. Data were analysed from three site-years. Our results suggest that the density of available seedheads varied among years and this had a direct effect on abundance. M. pyraster, which develops in the stem within the seedhead, was more sensitive to changes in seedhead density than was G. pascuorum, which develops within the seeds themselves. The presence of a hedgerow along one side of the experimental site affected the pattern of colonisation of newly-created habitat patches by G. pascuorum but not by M. pyraster. Changes in spatial scale did not affect the variability of seedhead and insect densities. G. pascuorum had an aggregated distribution at all the spatial scales considered, but the distribution of M. pyraster was very scale dependent. The distributions of the two weevil species were positively associated amongst infested plants but not amongst infested seedheads. Behavioural and ecological factors that could explain the results of the data analyses are discussed.

  16. Impact of an invasive nitrogen-fixing tree on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the development of native species.

    PubMed

    Guisande-Collazo, Alejandra; González, Luís; Souza-Alonso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate soil biotrophs that establish intimate relationships with 80 % of terrestrial plant families. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi obtain carbon from host plants and contribute to the acquisition of mineral nutrients, mainly phosphorus. The presence of invasive plants has been identified as a soil disturbance factor, often conditioning the structure and function of soil microorganisms. Despite the investigation of many aspects related to the invasion ofAcacia dealbata, the effect produced on the structure of AMF communities has never been assessed. We hypothesize thatA. dealbatamodifies the structure of AMF community, influencing the establishment and growth of plants that are dependent on these mutualisms. To validate our hypothesis, we carried out denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and also grew plants ofPlantago lanceolatain pots using roots of native shrublands or fromA. dealbata, as inoculum of AMF. Cluster analyses from DGGE indicated an alteration in the structure of AMF communities in invaded soils. After 15 weeks, we found that plants grown in pots containing native roots presented higher stem and root growth and also produced higher biomass in comparison with plants grown withA. dealbatainoculum. Furthermore, plants that presented the highest biomass and growth exhibited the maximum mycorrhizal colonization and phosphorus content. Moreover, fluorescence measurements indicated that plants grown withA. dealbatainoculum even presented higher photosynthetic damage. Our results indicate that the presence of the invaderA. dealbatamodify the composition of the arbuscular fungal community, conditioning the establishment of native plants. PMID:26984185

  17. Ecological Impacts of Development in the Hudson River Marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, D. C.; Peteet, D. M.; Kleinstein, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    Piermont Marsh, located approximately 40 kilometers north of the mouth of the Hudson River, provides an opportunity to evaluate local and regional vegetation shifts primarily due to changes in land use over the past 600 years. A high-resolution palynological record from Piermont Marsh, NY shows consistent presence of "weedy" genera (Ambrosia, Plantago, and Rumex) beginning around 1760. This increase in herbaceous genera is also marked by a decline in arboreal taxa, attributed to land clearance by settlers. Typha (cattail) also experiences a very large increase coincident with the rise in weedy genera, accounting for as much as 70% of pollen grains counted in a sample. Although the profile for Gramineae (grass) appears consistent throughout the core, grain size separations show periods dominated by the native marsh Spartina species downcore and the invasive Phragmites in recent decades. A pre-settlement interval shows a period of decreased pollen deposition and increased charcoal, which could be due to sea level change, drought, or Native American use. Comparison with other marsh records in the Hudson River estuary shows general agreement in chronology with interesting differences in sedimentation rate, which can be attributed to sea level change, natural disturbance, or anthropogenic influences of development.

  18. Paradox of plant growth promotion potential of rhizobacteria and their actual promotion effect on growth of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Massimiliano; Ratering, Stefan; Suarez, Christian; Zapata Montoya, Ana Maria; Geissler-Plaum, Rita; Schnell, Sylvia

    2015-12-01

    From the rhizosphere of two salt tolerant plant species, Hordeum secalinum and Plantago winteri growing in a naturally salt meadow, 100 strains were isolation on enrichment media for various plant growth-promoting (PGP) functions (ACC deaminase activity, auxin synthesis, calcium phosphate mobilization and nitrogen fixation). Based on the taxonomic affiliation of the isolated bacteria and their enrichment medium 22 isolates were selected to test their growth promotion effect on the crop barley (Hordeum vulgare) under salt stress in pot experiment. In parallel the isolates were characterized in pure culture for their plant growth-promoting activities. Surprisingly the best promotors did not display a promising set of PGP activities. Isolates with multiple PGP-activities in pure culture like Microbacterium natoriense strain E38 and Pseudomonas brassicacearum strain E8 did not promote plant growth. The most effective isolate was strain E108 identified as Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, which increased barley growth up to 300%. In pure culture strain E108 showed only two out of six plant growth promoting activities and would have been neglected. Our results highlight that screening based on pure culture assays may not be suitable for recognition of best plant growth promotion candidates and could preclude the detection of both new PGPR and new plant promotion mechanisms. PMID:26640049

  19. Natural variation of fecundity components in a widespread plant with dimorphic seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braza, Rita; Arroyo, J.; García, M. B.

    2010-09-01

    The number and size of seeds are the basis of the quantity and quality components of female reproductive fitness in plants, playing a central role in the evolutionary ecology of life history diversification. In this study we show and analyze the natural variability of several fecundity variables (fruit set, seed production per fruit, seed size, total seed production per plant, and proportion of small seeds) in Plantago coronopus, a widespread, short-lived herb with dimorphic seeds. The structure of such variability was examined at the individual, population (eight locations with different environments within the same region), and life history levels (annual vs perennial), and correlated to soil fertility. There was no divergence associated to the life history for any of the variables studied. Total seed production (the quantity component of female fitness) was correlated with maternal resources, while the size of the large mucilaginous, basal seeds, and the proportion of the small apical seeds (quality component) were more associated to environmental resources. Thus, internal and external resources shape different fitness components, maximizing seed production, and fitting the size and proportion of different kind of seeds to local conditions irrespective of life history. P. coronopus illustrates the versatility of short-lived widespread plants to combine fecundity traits in a flexible manner, in order to increase fitness at each of the many possible habitats they occupy over heterogeneous environments.

  20. Does vegetation complexity affect host plant chemistry, and thus multitrophic interactions, in a human-altered landscape?

    PubMed

    Wäschke, Nicole; Hancock, Christine; Hilker, Monika; Obermaier, Elisabeth; Meiners, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic land use may shape vegetation composition and affect trophic interactions by altering concentrations of host plant metabolites. Here, we investigated the hypotheses that: (1) plant N and defensive secondary metabolite contents of the herb Plantago lanceolata are affected by land use intensity (LUI) and the surrounding vegetation composition (=plant species richness and P. lanceolata density), and that (2) changes in plant chemistry affect abundances of the herbivorous weevils Mecinus pascuorum and Mecinus labilis, as well as their larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus, in the field. We determined plant species richness, P. lanceolata density, and abundances of the herbivores and the parasitoid in 77 grassland plots differing in LUI index in three regions across Germany. We also measured the N and secondary metabolite [the iridoid glycosides (IGs) aucubin and catalpol] contents of P. lanceolata leaves. Mixed-model analysis revealed that: (1) concentrations of leaf IGs were positively correlated with plant species richness; leaf N content was positively correlated with the LUI index. Furthermore: (2) herbivore abundance was not related to IG concentrations, but correlated negatively with leaf N content. Parasitoid abundance correlated positively only with host abundance over the three regions. Structural equation models revealed a positive impact of IG concentrations on parasitoid abundance in one region. We conclude that changes in plant chemistry due to land use and/or vegetation composition may affect higher trophic levels and that the manifestation of these effects may depend on local biotic or abiotic features of the landscape. PMID:25986560

  1. Late Quaternary vegetation, fire and climate history reconstructed from two cores at Cerro Toledo, Podocarpus National Park, southeastern Ecuadorian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunschön, Corinna; Behling, Hermann

    2009-11-01

    The last ca. 20,000 yr of palaeoenvironmental conditions in Podocarpus National Park in the southeastern Ecuadorian Andes have been reconstructed from two pollen records from Cerro Toledo (04°22'28.6"S, 79°06'41.5"W) at 3150 m and 3110 m elevation. Páramo vegetation with high proportions of Plantago rigida characterised the last glacial maximum (LGM), reflecting cold and wet conditions. The upper forest line was at markedly lower elevations than present. After ca. 16,200 cal yr BP, páramo vegetation decreased slightly while mountain rainforest developed, suggesting rising temperatures. The trend of increasing temperatures and mountain rainforest expansion continued until ca. 8500 cal yr BP, while highest temperatures probably occurred from 9300 to 8500 cal yr BP. From ca. 8500 cal yr BP, páramo vegetation re-expanded with dominance of Poaceae, suggesting a change to cooler conditions. During the late Holocene after ca. 1800 cal yr BP, a decrease in páramo indicates a change to warmer conditions. Anthropogenic impact near the study site is indicated for times after 2300 cal yr BP. The regional environmental history indicates that through time the eastern Andean Cordillera in South Ecuador was influenced by eastern Amazonian climates rather than western Pacific climates.

  2. Impact of an invasive nitrogen-fixing tree on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the development of native species

    PubMed Central

    Guisande-Collazo, Alejandra; González, Luís; Souza-Alonso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate soil biotrophs that establish intimate relationships with 80 % of terrestrial plant families. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi obtain carbon from host plants and contribute to the acquisition of mineral nutrients, mainly phosphorus. The presence of invasive plants has been identified as a soil disturbance factor, often conditioning the structure and function of soil microorganisms. Despite the investigation of many aspects related to the invasion of Acacia dealbata, the effect produced on the structure of AMF communities has never been assessed. We hypothesize that A. dealbata modifies the structure of AMF community, influencing the establishment and growth of plants that are dependent on these mutualisms. To validate our hypothesis, we carried out denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and also grew plants of Plantago lanceolata in pots using roots of native shrublands or from A. dealbata, as inoculum of AMF. Cluster analyses from DGGE indicated an alteration in the structure of AMF communities in invaded soils. After 15 weeks, we found that plants grown in pots containing native roots presented higher stem and root growth and also produced higher biomass in comparison with plants grown with A. dealbata inoculum. Furthermore, plants that presented the highest biomass and growth exhibited the maximum mycorrhizal colonization and phosphorus content. Moreover, fluorescence measurements indicated that plants grown with A. dealbata inoculum even presented higher photosynthetic damage. Our results indicate that the presence of the invader A. dealbata modify the composition of the arbuscular fungal community, conditioning the establishment of native plants. PMID:26984185

  3. Rapid Plant Identification Using Species- and Group-Specific Primers Targeting Chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  4. Screening of some plants used in the Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Holetz, Fabíola Barbiéri; Pessini, Greisiele Lorena; Sanches, Neviton Rogério; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias

    2002-10-01

    Extracts of 13 Brazilian medicinal plants were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts. Of these, 10 plant extracts showed varied levels of antibacterial activity. Piper regnellii presented a good activity against Staphylococus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, a moderate activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a weak activity against Escherichia coli. Punica granatum showed good activity on S. aureus and was inactive against the other standard strains. Eugenia uniflora presented moderate activity on both S. aureus and E. coli. Psidium guajava,Tanacetum vulgare, Arctium lappa, Mikania glomerata, Sambucus canadensis, Plantago major and Erythrina speciosa presented some degree of antibacterial activity. Spilanthes acmella, Lippia alba, and Achillea millefolium were considered inactive. Five of the plant extracts presented compounds with Rf values similar to the antibacterial compounds visible on bioautogram. Of these, three plants belong to the Asteraceae family. This may mean that the same compounds are responsible for the antibacterial activity in these plants. Anticandidal activity was detected in nine plant extracts (P. guajava, E. uniflora, P. granatum, A. lappa, T. vulgare, M. glomerata, L. alba, P. regnellii, and P. major). The results might explain the ethnobotanical use of the studied species for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:12471432

  5. How does an Al-hyperaccumulator plant respond to a natural field gradient of soil phytoavailable Al?

    PubMed

    Serrano, H C; Pinto, M J; Martins-Loução, M A; Branquinho, C

    2011-09-01

    The physiological ability of plants to cope with Al-toxicity has attracted considerable attention. In this study we used an endemic Al-hyperaccumulator plant, Plantago almogravensis, which is the only known representative of the Plantaginaceae with this trait growing under a field gradient of Al, to understand the root and shoot patterns of Al accumulation and tolerance in its natural environment. We analysed phytoavailable elements in the soil and their accumulation in the plant. For the first time under field conditions, the accumulation pattern of an Al-hyperaccumulator showed a saturation curve with a maximum accumulation capacity being reached (ca. 3.0 mg g(-1)). The Al toxicity was not associated with the expected reduction in the Ca and Mg uptake by the plant. Iron was accumulated in a more linear pattern. The magnitude and the proportion of the elements found in the apoplastic fraction of the root, compared to the soil and plant internal fractions, suggested that the control of uptake occurs at the rhizospheric level. Unlike the majority of the Al-hyperaccumulator plants that are found in tropical humid areas, this plant is described from a sub-arid Mediterranean climate, subject to drought conditions which give it a unique status that deserves to be studied further. PMID:21774964

  6. Plant trait expression responds to establishment timing.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Angela J; Leahy, S Conor; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Burns, Jean H

    2015-06-01

    Trait divergence between co-occurring individuals could decrease the strength of competition between these individuals, thus promoting their coexistence. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated establishment timing for four congeneric pairs of perennial plants and assessed trait plasticity. Because soil conditions can affect trait expression and competition, we grew the plants in field-collected soil from each congener. Competition was generally weak across species, but the order of establishment affected divergence in biomass between potmates for three congeneric pairs. The type of plastic response differed among genera, with trait means of early-establishing individuals of Rumex and Solanum spp. differing from late-establishing individuals, and trait divergence between potmates of Plantago and Trifolium spp. depending on which species established first. Consistent with adaptive trait plasticity, higher specific leaf area (SLA) and root-shoot ratio in Rumex spp. established later suggest that these individuals were maximizing their ability to capture light and soil resources. Greater divergence in SLA correlated with increased summed biomass of competitors, which is consistent with trait divergence moderating the strength of competition for some species. Species did not consistently perform better in conspecific or congener soil, but soil type influenced the effect of establishment order. For example, biomass divergence between Rumex potmates was greater in R. obtusifolius soil regardless of which species established first. These results suggest that plant responses to establishment timing act in a species-specific fashion, potentially enhancing coexistence in plant communities. PMID:25616649

  7. Elevated CO{sub 2} and leaf shape: Are dandelions getting toothier?

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.C.; Bazzaz, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Heteroblastic leaf development in Taraxacum officinale is compared between plants grown under ambient (350 ppm) vs. elevated (700 ppm) CO{sub 2} levels. Leaves of elevated CO{sub 2} plants exhibited more deeply incised leaf margins and relatively more slender leaf laminae than leaves of ambient CO{sub 2} plants. These differences were found to be significant in allometric analyses that controlled for differences in leaf size, as well as analyses that controlled for leaf development order. The effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on leaf shape were most pronounced when plants were grown individually, but detectable differences were also found in plants grown at high density. Although less dramatic than in Taraxacum, significant effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on leaf shape were also found in two other weedy rosette species, Plantago major and Rumex crispus. These observations support the long-standing hypothesis that leaf carbohydrate level plays an important role in regulating heteroblastic leaf development, though elevated CO{sub 2} may also affect leaf development through direct hormonal interactions or increased leaf water potential. In Taraxacum, pronounced modifications of leaf shape were found at CO{sub 2} levels predicted to occur within the next century. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Effects of herbicide-treated host plants on the development of Mamestra brassicae L. caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melanie; Geisthardt, Martin; Brühl, Carsten A

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides are widely used pesticides that affect plants by changing their chemistry. In doing so, herbicides might also influence the quality of plants as food for herbivores. To study the effects of herbicides on host plant quality, 3 plant species (Plantago lanceolata L., P. major L., and Ranunculus acris L.) were treated with sublethal rates of either a sulfonylurea (Atlantis WG, Bayer CropScience) or a glyphosate (Roundup LB Plus, Monsanto) herbicide, and the development of caterpillars of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae L. that fed on these plants was observed. Of the 6 tested plant-herbicide combinations, 1 combination (R. acris + sulfonylurea herbicide) resulted in significantly lower caterpillar weight, increased time to pupation, and increased overall development time compared with larvae that were fed unsprayed plants. These results might be caused by a lower nutritional value of these host plants or increased concentrations of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant defense. The results of the present and other studies suggest potential risks to herbivores that feed on host plants treated with sublethal rates of herbicides. However, as the effects of herbicides on host plant quality appear to be species-specific and as there are numerous plant-herbicide-herbivore relationships in agricultural landscapes, a general reduction in herbicide contamination of nontarget habitats (e.g., field margins) might mitigate the negative effects of herbicides on host plant quality. PMID:25143001

  9. In situ stomatal responses to long-term CO 2 enrichment in calcareous grassland plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Wolfgang; Körner, Christian

    A calcareous grassland community growing under full season CO 2 enrichment at low altitude in the Swiss Jura mountains was investigated for diurnal and seasonal variations of leaf diffusive conductance. A new CO 2 enrichment method (Screen aided CO 2 control, SACC) permitted in situ leaf porometry under natural climatic conditions without disturbance of plants. At 600 ppm CO 2, leaf conductance in the dominant species, Bromus erectus (a species so far not showing a growth response to elevated CO 2) was reduced to half the values measured in controls. In contrast, leaf conductance in Carex flacca, a species of low cover (the only species so far exhibiting a dramatic growth stimulation by CO 2 fertilization) remained almost unaffected by elevated CO 2. Sanguisorba minor, Plantago media, and Cirsium acaule showed intermediate responses. Trifolium montanum, studied only on a single day, showed a reduction like Bromus. Differences between treatments were largest under humid conditions and disappeared during dry periods. In none of the species studied did stomatal density or stomatal index differ between treatments. A parallel investigation of whole ecosystem evapotranspiration indicated only small (<10%) and non significant CO 2 responses, suggesting that both aerodynamic effects at the canopy level and a great interspecific variation of leaf level responses overshadow the clear CO 2 response of Bromus stomata. The different stomatal responses to CO 2 enrichment are likely to alter species specific water consumption, and may thus affect community structure in the long run.

  10. Do fungivores trigger the transfer of protective metabolites from host plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae?

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Marie; Pel, Roel; Ooms, Astra; Bücking, Heike; Jansa, Jan; Ellers, Jacintha; van Straalen, Nico M; Wouda, Tjalf; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Kiers, E Toby

    2013-09-01

    A key objective in ecology is to understand how cooperative strategies evolve and are maintained in species networks. Here, we focus on the tri-trophic relationship between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, host plants, and fungivores to ask if host plants are able to protect their mutualistic mycorrhizal partners from being grazed. Specifically, we test whether secondary metabolites are transferred from hosts to fungal partners to increase their defense against fungivores. We grew Plantago lanceolata hosts with and without mycorrhizal inoculum, and in the presence or absence of fungivorous springtails. We then measured fungivore effects on host biomass and mycorrhizal abundance (using quantitative PCR) in roots and soil. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to measure host metabolites in roots, shoots, and hyphae, focusing on catalpol, aucubin, and verbascoside. Our most striking result was that the metabolite catalpol was consistently found in AM fungal hyphae in host plants exposed to fungivores. When fungivores were absent, catalpol was undetectable in hyphae. Our results highlight the potential for plant-mediated protection of the mycorrhizal hyphal network. PMID:24279273

  11. Soil influence on the performance of 26 native herbaceous plants suitable for sustainable Mediterranean landscaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretzel, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice; Benvenuti, Stefano; Bravi, Alessio; Malorgio, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    Native herbaceous plants have the potential for renaturalizing and recovering derelict soils, such as urban or anthropized soils. Ecological restoration following the establishment of a native wildflower meadow should lead to a reduction in management costs and to the preservation of native plant populations. This study was aimed at determining the ecological characteristics and the cultivation needs of 26 herbaceous species native to Italy and southern Europe in order to identify their landscape potential in low-maintenance conditions. The species were selected on the basis of their adaptation to unproductive soils in semi-natural and rural areas, and on their ornamental value, including their ability to attract insects. Mono-specific plots were set up in three different soils. Seed germination, seedling emergence, flowering dynamics, and plant growth were determined. Dormancy-breaking treatments were effective in improving the germination of most species. The percentage of field establishment and biomass appeared to be affected by the physical and chemical characteristics of the soil. Soil texture slightly affected seedling emergence, whereas soil texture and the C and N levels affected plant growth, the number of flowers and the duration of flowering. Dianthus carthusianorum, Verbascum blattaria, Matricaria chamomilla and Hypochoeris radicata developed a higher biomass per plant in the soils with a low nutrient content, indicating their adaptability to infertile soils. Daucus carota, Papaver rhoeas, Verbascum sinuatum, Coleostephus myconis produced a higher biomass per plant in the most fertile soil, where they appeared to show a higher potential when competing with other species. The ecological characteristics shown by the native plants are extremely important in terms of combining seeds of different species to create and to maintain semi-natural herbaceous communities in low-maintenance landscapes.

  12. The therapeutic effects of chamomilla tincture mouthwash on oral aphthae: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedi, Seyyed-Amir; Sanatkhani, Majid; Pakfetrat, Atessa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common clinical condition producing painful ulcerations in the oral cavity. However, there has been no optimal therapeutic approach. Topical and systemic steroids commonly prescribed for the condition have local and systemic side-effects. Recently, there is growing tendency toward herbal medication in the modern society. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of a chamomilla mouth rinse on reducing the signs and symptoms of aphthous lesions in comparison with a placebo mouth rinse. Material and Methods: A randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed on 36 patients, from cases diagnosed with RAS, attending the Department of Oral Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. They were randomly divided into two groups: the intervention group(A), receiving chamomilla mouth rinse, and the control group (B) receiving a placebo rinse. The ability of the solution to control the pain and burning sensation and the number and size of the ulcers were evaluated. Results: The number of ulcers in the 3rd visit (four days after treatment) showed a significant difference between the groups (P<0.001). The pain and burning sensation (VAS) was reduced significantly in the test group in the 2nd (p=0.001),3rd and 4th visit (P<0.001). Conclusions: Chamomilla mouth rinse was effective in the treatment of RAS, controlling the pain and burning sensation without producing any adverse side effects and can be advised as an alternative RAS treatment. Key words:Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, chamomilla mouth rinse, matricaria chamomilla, aphthous lesion treatment. PMID:25674322

  13. Pharmaceutical prerequisites for a multi-target therapy.

    PubMed

    Kroll, U; Cordes, C

    2006-01-01

    The quality of a phytomedicine is defined by the quality of the herbal drug, the manufacturing of the drug preparations and the properties of the finished product, taking into account the special requirements of the individual herbal species in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards [2003. Medicinal Products for Human and Veterinary Use. Eudralex, vol. 4 (2003/94/EC)]. The quality control of the complete process is based on pharmacognostic methods, characteristic fingerprint chromatograms, defined amounts of marker substances, physicochemical characteristics and microbiological monitoring. For a herbal multi-component preparation used in multi-target therapy, these pharmaceutical prerequisites have to be ensured for all components and for their combination, as is exemplified by Iberogast((R)) (STW 5) a fixed combination of hydroethanolic extracts of bitter candytuft (Iberis amara), angelica root (Angelicae radix), milk thistle fruit (Silybi mariani fructus), celandine herb (Chelidonii herba), caraway fruit (Carvi fructus), liquorice root (Liquiritiae radix), peppermint herb (Menthae piperitae folium), balm leaf (Melissae folium) and chamomile flower (Matricariae flos) using in the therapy of gastrointestinal complaints (Rösch et al., 2006). The prerequisites for the quality of each of its components according to actual standards are at first the cultivation of the plant material according to the Guidelines for Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) conditions of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants [1998. Z. Arzn. Gew. Pfl. 3, 166-178] to yield a defined raw material of high quality. Characteristic compounds of the extracts had to be identified and different analytical methods such as HPLC, with low coefficients of variation had to be developed to analyze each of the standardized ethanolic extracts and the finished product. At the example of the extract of I. amara these necessary investigations are described. The variability of the plant material in its

  14. Levels of some microelements and essential heavy metals in herbal teas in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Mihaljev, Zeljko; Zivkov-Balos, Milica; Cupić, Zeljko; Jaksić, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Levels of Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Mo, Co, Ni, Se, Sn and Al were determined in 14 medicinal plants from Serbia, which are widely used in phytopharmacy as herbal teas. The following plants were investigated: yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.), basil (Ocimum hasilicum L.), St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.), peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.), field horsetail (Equisetum arvense L.), stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.), thyme (Thymus serpyllum L.), maize silk (Zea mays L. - Maydis stigma), hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.), marshmallow (Althaea officinalis L.), chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), rosehip/dog rose (Rosa canina L.), winter savory (Satureja montana L.) and spearmint (Mentha spicata L.). A total of 16 samples of different parts of medicinal plants (root, leaf, flower, herba) were examined, whereby 13 samples were delivered in original package and three samples were loose leaf herbs. Samples were prepared using the microwave digestion technique, and measurements were performed applying the atomic absorption spectrometry and mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. Contents of microelements in the examined samples were in the range: Mn (23.86 - 453.71 mg/kg); Fe (61.87 - 673.0 mg/kg); Cu (6.68 - 24.46 mg/kg); Zn (16.11 - 113.81 mg/kg); Mo (0.576 - 4.265 mg/kg); Co (0.039 - 0.532 mg/kg); Se (0.036 - 0.146 mg/kg); Ni (0.738 - 6.034 mg/kg); Al (154.0 - 3015.0 mg/kg) and Sn (2.68 - 10.22 mg/kg). According to determined amounts of microelements, the investigated samples of herbal teas are considered safe for human consumption. PMID:25265817

  15. Activities of ten essential oils towards Propionibacterium acnes and PC-3, A-549 and MCF-7 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yuangang; Yu, Huimin; Liang, Lu; Fu, Yujie; Efferth, Thomas; Liu, Xia; Wu, Nan

    2010-05-01

    Ten essential oils, namely, mint (Mentha spicata L., Lamiaceae), ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc., Zingiberaceae), lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f., Rutaceae), grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf., Rutaceae), jasmine (Jasminum grandiflora L., Oleaceae), lavender (Mill., Lamiaceae), chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L., Compositae), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae), rose (Rosa damascena Mill., Rosaceae) and cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum N. Lauraceae) were tested for their antibacterial activities towards Propionibacterium acnes and in vitro toxicology against three human cancer cell lines. Thyme, cinnamon and rose essential oils exhibited the best antibacterial activities towards P. acnes, with inhibition diameters of 40 +/- 1.2 mm, 33.5 +/- 1.5 mm and 16.5 +/- 0.7 mm, and minimal inhibitory concentrations of 0.016% (v/v), 0.016% (v/v) and 0.031% (v/v), respectively. Time-kill dynamic procedures showed that thyme, cinnamon, rose, and lavender essential oils exhibited the strongest bactericidal activities at a concentration of 0.25% (v/v), and P. acnes was completely killed after 5 min. The thyme essential oil exhibited the strongest cytotoxicity towards three human cancer cells. Its inhibition concentration 50% (IC(50)) values on PC-3, A549 and MCF-7 tumor cell lines were 0.010% (v/v), 0.011% (v/v) and 0.030% (v/v), respectively. The cytotoxicity of 10 essential oils on human prostate carcinoma cell (PC-3) was significantly stronger than on human lung carcinoma (A549) and human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines. PMID:20657472

  16. Lousicidal, ovicidal and repellent efficacy of some essential oils against lice and flies infesting water buffaloes in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khater, Hanem F; Ramadan, Mohamed Y; El-Madawy, Reham S

    2009-10-14

    The lousicidal and repellent effects of five essential oils were investigated for the first time against the buffalo louse, Haematopinus tuberculatus, and flies infesting water buffaloes in Qalyubia Governorate, Egypt. For the in vitro studies, filter paper contact bioassays were used to test the oils and their lethal activities were compared with that of d-phenothrin. Four minutes post-treatment, the median lethal concentration, LC50, values were 2.74, 7.28, 12.35, 18.67 and 22.79% for camphor (Cinnamomum camphora), onion (Allium cepa), peppermint (Mentha piperita), chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) and rosemary oils (Rosmarinus officinalis), respectively, whereas for d-phenothrin, it was 1.17%. The lethal time (50) (LT50) values were 0.89, 2.75, 15.39, 21.32, 11.60 and 1.94 min after treatment with 7.5% camphor, onion, peppermint, chamomile, rosemary and d-phenothrin, respectively. All the materials used except rosemary, which was not applied, were ovicidal to the eggs of H. tuberculatus. Despite the results of the in vitro assays, the in vivo treatments revealed that the pediculicidal activity was more pronounced with oils. All treated lice were killed after 0.5-2 min, whereas with d-phenothrin, 100% mortality was reached only after 120 min. The number of lice infesting buffaloes was significantly reduced 3, 6, 4, 6 and 9 days after treatment with camphor, peppermint, chamomile, onion, and d-phenothrin, respectively. Moreover, the oils and d-phenothrin significantly repelled flies, Musca domestica, Stomoxys calcitrans, Haematobia irritans and Hippobosca equina, for 6 and 3 days post-treatment, respectively. No adverse effects were noted on either animals or pour-on operators after exposure to the applied materials. Consequently, some Egyptian essential oils show potential for the development of new, speedy and safe lousicides and insect repellents for controlling lice and flies which infest water buffaloes. PMID:19596520

  17. Evaluation of Phosphorylated Psyllium Seed Polysaccharide as a Release Retardant.

    PubMed

    Rao, Monica R P; Warrier, Deepa U; Rao, Shivani H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to modify psyllium seed polysaccharide and evaluate the modified polysaccharide as release retardant in tablets employing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride as model drug. Studies on polysaccharide from psyllium husk has been reported but no work has been reported on characterization and modification of the polysaccharide present in the psyllium (Plantago ovata) seed and the use of the modified polysaccharide as a release retardant in tablets. In this study, the seed gum was modified using sodium trimetaphosphate as crosslinking agent. Sustained release matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride were prepared by wet granulation using various drug-polymer ratios. The polymers investigated were psyllium polysaccharide, phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide and widely used release retardant hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, drug content, swelling profile and in vitro dissolution studies. The matrix tablets containing 1:3 proportion of drug-phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide was found to have higher hardness as compared to tablets containing 1:1 and 1:2 proportions. The results of swelling behavior in water showed that the tablets containing 1:3 drug:phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide ratio had swelling comparable to that of tablets containing 1:3 drug:hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ratio. The in vitro dissolution studies shows that the dissolution rate was retarded from 98.41 to 37.6% in 6 h with increase in concentration of phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide from 100 to 300 mg. Formulations containing psyllium polysaccharide showed complete drug release in 8 h whereas those formulated with phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide exhibited extended drug release over the 12 h period. Drug release kinetic studies revealed that drug release followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model. PMID:26798177

  18. Spatial pattern affects diversity-productivity relationships in experimental meadow communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamošová, Tereza; Doležal, Jiří; Lanta, Vojtěch; Lepš, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Plant species create aggregations of conspecifics as a consequence of limited seed dispersal, clonal growth and heterogeneous environment. Such intraspecific aggregation increases the importance of intraspecific competition relative to interspecific competition which may slow down competitive exclusion and promote species coexistence. To examine how spatial aggregation impacts the functioning of experimental assemblages of varying species richness, eight perennial grassland species of different growth form were grown in random and aggregated patterns in monocultures, two-, four-, and eight-species mixtures. In mixtures with an aggregated pattern, monospecific clumps were interspecifically segregated. Mixed model ANOVA was used to test (i) how the total productivity and productivity of individual species is affected by the number of species in a mixture, and (ii) how these relationships are affected by spatial pattern of sown plants. The main patterns of productivity response to species richness conform to other studies: non-transgressive overyielding is omnipresent (the productivity of mixtures is higher than the average of its constituent species so that the net diversity, selection and complementarity effects are positive), whereas transgressive overyielding is found only in a minority of cases (average of log(overyielding) being close to zero or negative). The theoretical prediction that plants in a random pattern should produce more than in an aggregated pattern (the distances to neighbours are smaller and consequently the competition among neighbours stronger) was confirmed in monocultures of all the eight species. The situation is more complicated in mixtures, probably as a consequence of complicated interplay between interspecific and intraspecific competition. The most productive species ( Achillea, Holcus, Plantago) were competitively superior and increased their relative productivity with mixture richness. The intraspecific competition of these species is

  19. The role of acoustic screens in distribution of technogenic magnetic particles and chemical pollution in roadside soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawer, Małgorzata; Magiera, Tadeusz; Szuszkiewicz, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    Roads constructed nowadays should by all means be functional for their motorized users but at the same time their effect on the environment ought to be limited to the minimum. Despite the existence of various methods for preventing from negative influence of roads on the environment, there is still lack of adequate techniques to monitor and reduce the spreading of roadside pollution in the air and soils. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of acoustic screens on spreading and deposition of solid pollutants deriving from car emissions, based on their quantitative and qualitative analysis. During this study, measurements of magnetic susceptibility and analyses of heavy metals as well as Pt and Rh contents in soil and plant samples (Taraxacum officinale, Plantago major, Parthenocissus quinquefolia) collected near different kinds of acoustic screens ("green walls", Plexiglass, sawdust concrete, steel panels and earth embankments) have been done. Previous investigations showed showed that most of traffic emission is deposited in the close vicinity of the roads (up to 10 m) and the level of contamination decreased with increasing distance from the road edge. However, the results of this project indicate that, in the area where the acoustic screens are located, this distribution is disturbed and the additional enrichment of heavy metals in soil about 10 - 15 m behind screens is observed. Spatial distribution of heavy metal contents in soil samples corresponds to its magnetic susceptibility values. High contents of Fe, Zn, Mn and Pb was observed next to acoustic screens made of sawdust concrete and steel panels. Additionally, concentration of Zn in soil samples collected close to these screens exceeded threshold value. Analyses of plants showed that the highest content of examined elements and highest values of magnetic susceptibility were recorded near road edge. What is more, samples of Parthenocissus quinquefolia collected at height 0.2 m were characterized

  20. Legacy of earthworms' engineering effects enlarges the actual effects of earthworms on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrák, Obdřej; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms were recognized as key factor responsible for changes from early to late successional plant communities. They incorporate organic matter into the soil and creates there persistent structures, which improves conditions for plant growth. Earthworm activity might be therefore expected to be more important in early stages of the succession, when earthworm colonization of previously earthworm free soil starts, than in the late stages of the succession, where the soil was previously modified by earthworms. However, earthworms affect plants also via other effects such as increase of nutrient availability. The relative importance of soil structure modification and other earthworm effects on plants is poorly known, despite it is important for both theoretical and applied ecology. To test the effect of earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Aporrectodea caliginosa) on plants we performed microcosm laboratory experiment, where earthworms were affecting early successional (Poa compressa, Medicago lupulina, and Daucus carota) and late successional (Arrhenatherum elatius, Lotus corniculatus, and Plantago laceolata) plat species in soil previously unaffected by earthworms and in soil with previous long term effect of earthworms. These soils were taken from the early and late successional monitoring sites of the Sokolov coal mining district with known history. Earthworms increased plant biomass proportionally more in late successional soil. It was mainly because they increased availability of nutrients (nitrate and potassium) and plants get higher advantage out of this in late successional soil. Earthworms increased plant biomass of both early and late successional species, but late successional species suppressed early successional species in competition. This suppression was more intensive in presence of earthworms and in late successional soil. We therefore found multiplicative effect between earthworm soil engineering activity and their other effects, which might be

  1. A hyperparasite affects the population dynamics of a wild plant pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Tollenaere, C; Pernechele, B; Mäkinen, H S; Parratt, S R; Németh, M Z; Kovács, G M; Kiss, L; Tack, A J M; Laine, A-L

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the impact of natural enemies of plant and animal pathogens on their host's population dynamics is needed to determine the role of hyperparasites in affecting disease dynamics, and their potential for use in efficient control strategies of pathogens. Here, we focus on the long-term study describing metapopulation dynamics of an obligate pathogen, the powdery mildew (Podosphaera plantaginis) naturally infecting its wild host plant (Plantago lanceolata) in the fragmented landscape of the Åland archipelago (southwest Finland). Regionally, the pathogen persists through a balance of extinctions and colonizations, yet factors affecting extinction rates remain poorly understood. Mycoparasites of the genus Ampelomyces appear as good candidates for testing the role of a hyperparasite, i.e. a parasite of other parasites, in the regulation of their fungal hosts' population dynamics. For this purpose, we first designed a quantitative PCR assay for detection of Ampelomyces spp. in field-collected samples. This newly developed molecular test was then applied to a large-scale sampling within the Åland archipelago, revealing that Ampelomyces is a widespread hyperparasite in this system, with high variability in prevalence among populations. We found that the hyperparasite was more common on leaves where multiple powdery mildew strains coexist, a pattern that may be attributed to differential exposure. Moreover, the prevalence of Ampelomyces at the plant level negatively affected the overwinter survival of its fungal host. We conclude that this hyperparasite may likely impact on its host population dynamics and argue for increased focus on the role of hyperparasites in disease dynamics. PMID:25204419

  2. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus geosporum in European saline, sodic and gypsum soils.

    PubMed

    Landwehr, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Ulrich; Wilde, Petra; Nawrath, Kerstin; Tóth, Tibor; Biró, Borbála; Bothe, Hermann

    2002-08-01

    Plants of saline and sodic soils of the Hungarian steppe and of gypsum rock in the German Harz mountains, thus soils of high ionic strength and electric conductivity, were examined for their colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Roots of several plants of the saline and sodic soils such as Artemisia maritima, Aster tripolium or Plantago maritima are strongly colonized and show typical AMF structures (arbuscules, vesicles) whereas others like the members of the Chenopodiaceae, Salicornia europaea, Suaeda maritima or Camphorosma annua, are not. The vegetation of the gypsum rock is totally different, but several plants are also strongly colonized there. The number of spores in samples from the saline and sodic soils examined is rather variable, but high on average, although with an apparent low species diversity. Spore numbers in the soil adjacent to the roots of plants often, but not always, correlate with the degree of AMF colonization of the plants. As in German salt marshes [Hildebrandt et al. (2001)], the dominant AMF in the Hungarian saline and sodic soils is Glomus geosporum. All these isolates provided nearly identical restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of spore DNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cloning and sequencing of several PCR products of the ITS regions indicated that ecotypes of the G. geosporum/ Glomus caledonium clade might exist at the different habitats. A phylogenetic dendrogram constructed from the ITS or 5.8S rDNA sequences was nearly identical to the one published for 18S rDNA data (Schwarzott et al. 2001). It is tempting to speculate that specific ecotypes may be particularly adapted to the peculiar saline or sodic conditions in such soils. They could have an enormous potential in conferring salt resistance to plants. PMID:12189475

  3. In vitro assay for the anti-Brucella activity of medicinal plants against tetracycline-resistant Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Hossein; Darabpour, Esmaeil; Gholipour, Mahnaz; Seyyed Nejad, Seyyed Mansour

    2010-07-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis caused by four species of brucella, has a high morbidity. Brucella melitensis is the main causative agent of brucellosis in both human and small ruminants. As an alternative to conventional antibiotics, medicinal plants are valuable resources for new agents against antibiotic-resistant strains. The aim of this study was to investigate the usage of native plants for brucellosis treatment. For this purpose, the anti-brucella activities of ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Salvia sclarea, Oliveria decumbens, Ferulago angulata, Vitex pseudo-negundo, Teucrium polium, Plantago ovata, Cordia myxa, and Crocus sativus were assessed. The activity against a resistant Br. melitensis strain was determined by disc diffusion method at various concentrations from 50-400 mg/ml. Antibiotic discs were also used as a control. Among the evaluated herbs, six plant (Salvia sclarea, Oliveria decumbens, Ferulago angulata, Vitex pseudo-negundo, Teucrium polium, and Crocus sativus) showed anti-brucella activity. Oliveria decumbens was chosen as the most effective plant for further studies. A tested isolate exhibited resistance to tetracycline, nafcillin, oxacillin, methicillin, and colistin. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for Oliveria decumbens against resistant Br. melitensis were the same (5 mg/ml), and for gentamicin they were both 2 mg/ml. Time-kill kinetics for a methanolic extract of Oliveria decumbens was 7 h whereas for an ethanolic extract it was 28 h. Also, Oliveria decumbens extracts showed a synergistic effect in combination with doxycycline and tetracycline. In general, the similar values of MIC and MBC for Oliveria decumbens suggest that these extracts could act as bactericidal agents against Br. melitensis. In addition to Oliveria decumbens, Crocus sativus and Salvia sclarea also had good anti-brucella activity and these should be considered for further study. PMID:20593515

  4. Discovery of diversity in xylan biosynthetic genes by transcriptional profiling of a heteroxylan containing mucilaginous tissue.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob K; Johnson, Nathan; Wilkerson, Curtis G

    2013-01-01

    The exact biochemical steps of xylan backbone synthesis remain elusive. In Arabidopsis, three non-redundant genes from two glycosyltransferase (GT) families, IRX9 and IRX14 from GT43 and IRX10 from GT47, are candidates for forming the xylan backbone. In other plants, evidence exists that different tissues express these three genes at widely different levels, which suggests that diversity in the makeup of the xylan synthase complex exists. Recently we have profiled the transcripts present in the developing mucilaginous tissue of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk). This tissue was found to have high expression levels of an IRX10 homolog, but very low levels of the two GT43 family members. This contrasts with recent wheat endosperm tissue profiling that found a relatively high abundance of the GT43 family members. We have performed an in-depth analysis of all GTs genes expressed in four developmental stages of the psyllium mucilagenous layer and in a single stage of the psyllium stem using RNA-Seq. This analysis revealed several IRX10 homologs, an expansion in GT61 (homologs of At3g18170/At3g18180), and several GTs from other GT families that are highly abundant and specifically expressed in the mucilaginous tissue. Our current hypothesis is that the four IRX10 genes present in the mucilagenous tissues have evolved to function without the GT43 genes. These four genes represent some of the most divergent IRX10 genes identified to date. Conversely, those present in the psyllium stem are very similar to those in other eudicots. This suggests these genes are under selective pressure, likely due to the synthesis of the various xylan structures present in mucilage that has a different biochemical role than that present in secondary walls. The numerous GT61 family members also show a wide sequence diversity and may be responsible for the larger number of side chain structures present in the psyllium mucilage. PMID:23761806

  5. Spatial variation in disease resistance: from molecules to metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Anna-Liisa; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Dodds, Peter N.; Thrall, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Variation in disease resistance is a widespread phenomenon in wild plant-pathogen associations. Here, we review current literature on natural plant-pathogen associations to determine how diversity in disease resistance is distributed at different hierarchical levels – within host individuals, within host populations, among host populations at the metapopulation scale and at larger regional scales. We find diversity in resistance across all spatial scales examined. Furthermore, variability seems to be the best counter-defence of plants against their rapidly evolving pathogens. We find that higher diversity of resistance phenotypes also results in higher levels of resistance at the population level. Overall, we find that wild plant populations are more likely to be susceptible than resistant to their pathogens. However, the degree of resistance differs strikingly depending on the origin of the pathogen strains used in experimental inoculation studies. Plant populations are on average 16% more resistant to allopatric pathogen strains than they are to strains that occur within the same population (48 % vs. 32 % respectively). Pathogen dispersal mode affects levels of resistance in natural plant populations with lowest levels detected for hosts of airborne pathogens and highest for waterborne pathogens. Detailed analysis of two model systems, Linum marginale infected by Melampsora lini, and Plantago lanceolata infected by Podosphaera plantaginis, show that the amount of variation in disease resistance declines towards higher spatial scales as we move from individual hosts to metapopulations, but evaluation of multiple spatial scales is needed to fully capture the structure of disease resistance. Synthesis: Variation in disease resistance is ubiquitous in wild plant-pathogen associations. While the debate over whether the resistance structure of plant populations is determined by pathogen-imposed selection versus non-adaptive processes remains unresolved, we do

  6. Mesolithic agriculture in Switzerland? A critical review of the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinner, Willy; Nielsen, Ebbe H.; Lotter, André F.

    2007-05-01

    Accumulating palaeobotanical evidence points to agricultural activity in Central Europe well before the onset of the Neolithic, commonly dated at ca 5500-5200 cal BC. We reinvestigated an existing pollen profile from Soppensee with refined taxonomical resolution by further subdividing the Cerealia pollen type into Triticum t. and Avena t. because the sediments at this site currently provide the highest temporal resolution and precision for the period of interest among all sites in Switzerland. Our new results are in agreement with previous high-resolution investigations from Switzerland showing scattered but consistent presence of pollen of Cerealia, Plantago lanceolata, and other cultural plants or weeds during the late Mesolithic period (6700-5500 cal BC). Chronologically, this palynological evidence for sporadic agricultural activities coincides with a major break in material culture at ca 6700 cal BC (i.e. the transition from early to late Mesolithic). Here, we review possible arguments against palaeobotanical evidences of Mesolithic agriculture (e.g. chronological uncertainties, misidentification, contamination, long-distance transport) and conclude that none of these can explain the consistent pollen pattern observed at several sites. The palynological evidence can, of course, not prove the existence of pre-ceramic agriculture in Central Europe. However, it is so coherent that this topic should be addressed by systematic archaeobotanical analyses in future archaeological studies. If our interpretation should turn out to be true, our conclusions would have fundamental implications for the Neolithic history of Europe. Currently, it is intensely debated whether Central European agriculture developed locally under the influence of incoming ideas from areas where Neolithic farming had already developed earlier (e.g. southeastern Europe) or whether it was introduced by immigrating farmers. On the basis of our results, we suggest that agriculture developed locally

  7. Maritime halophyte species from southern Portugal as sources of bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria João; Gangadhar, Katkam N; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nyberg, Nils T; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João; Custódio, Luísa

    2014-04-01

    Extracts of five halophytes from southern Portugal (Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, Mesembryanthemum edule, Juncus acutus, Plantago coronopus and Halimione portulacoides), were studied for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and in vitro antitumor properties. The most active extracts towards the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical were the methanol extracts of M. edule (IC₅₀ = 0.1 mg/mL) and J. acutus (IC₅₀ = 0.4 mg/mL), and the ether extracts of J. acutus (IC₅₀ = 0.2 mg/mL) and A. macrostachyum (IC₅₀ = 0.3 mg/mL). The highest radical scavenging activity (RSA) against the 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical was obtained in the ether extract of J. acutus (IC₅₀ = 0.4 mg/mL) and H. portulacoides (IC₅₀ = 0.9 mg/mL). The maximum total phenolic content (TPC) was found in the methanol extract of M. edule (147 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g) and in the ether extract of J. acutus (94 mg GAE/g). Significant decreases in nitric oxide (NO) production were observed after incubation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the chloroform extract of H. portulacoides (IC₅₀ = 109 µg/mL) and the hexane extract of P. coronopus (IC₅₀ = 98.0 µg/mL). High in vitro cytotoxic activity and selectivity was obtained with the ether extract of J. acutus. Juncunol was identified as the active compound and for the first time was shown to display selective in vitro cytotoxicity towards various human cancer cells. PMID:24727393

  8. Late Mesolithic and early Neolithic forest disturbance: a high resolution palaeoecological test of human impact hypotheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, James B.; Blackford, Jeffrey J.; Rowley-Conwy, Peter A.

    2013-10-01

    The transition in north-west Europe from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Late Mesolithic to the pioneer farming societies of the early Neolithic is not well understood, either culturally or palaeoecologically. In Britain the final transition was rapid but it is unclear whether novel Neolithic attributes were introduced by immigrants who supplanted the native hunter-gatherers, or whether the latest Mesolithic foragers gradually adopted elements of the Neolithic economic package. In this study, relatively coarse- (10 mm interval) and fine-resolution (2 mm), multi-proxy palaeoecological data including pollen, charcoal and NPPs including fungi, have been used to investigate two phases of vegetation disturbance of (a) distinctly Late Mesolithic and (b) early Neolithic age, at an upland site in northern England in a region with both a Neolithic and a Late Mesolithic archaeological presence. We identify and define the palaeoecological characteristics of these two disturbance phases, about a millennium apart, in order to investigate whether differing land-use techniques can be identified and categorised as of either foraging or early farming cultures. The Late Mesolithic phase is defined by the repetitive application of fire to the woodland to encourage a mosaic of productive vegetation regeneration patches, consistent with the promotion of Corylus and to aid hunting. In this phase, weed species including Plantago lanceolata, Rumex and Chenopodiaceae are frequent, taxa which are normally associated with the first farmers. The early Neolithic phase, including an Ulmus decline, has characteristics consistent with 'forest farming', possibly mainly for domestic livestock, with an inferred succession of tree girdling, fire-prepared cultivation, and coppice-woodland management. Such fine-resolution, potentially diagnostic land-use signatures may in future be used to recognise the cultural complexion of otherwise enigmatic woodland disturbance phases during the centuries of

  9. Effects of ungulates and prairie dogs on seed banks and vegetation in a North American mixed-grass prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahnestock, J.T.; Larson, D.L.; Plumb, G.E.; Detling, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between vegetation cover and soil seed banks was studied in five different ungulate herbivoreprairie dog treatment combinations at three northern mixed-grass prairie sites in Badlands National Park, South Dakota. There were distinct differences in both the seed bank composition and the aboveground vegetation between the off-prairie dog colony treatments and the on-colony treatments. The three on-colony treatments were similar to each other at all three sites with vegetation dominated by the forbs Dyssodia papposa, Hedeoma spp., Sphaeralcea coccinea, Conyza canadensis, and Plantago patagonica and seed banks dominated by the forbs Verbena bracteata and Dyssodia papposa. The two off-colony treatments were also similar to each other at all three sites. Vegetation at these sites was dominated by the grasses Pascopyrum smithii, Bromus tectorum and Bouteloua gracilis and the seed banks were dominated by several grasses including Bromus tectorum, Monroa squarrosa, Panicum capillare, Sporobolus cryptandra and Stipa viridula. A total of 146 seedlings representing 21 species germinated and emerged from off-colony treatments while 3069 seedlings comprising 33 species germinated from on-colony treatments. Fifteen of the forty species found in soil seed banks were not present in the vegetation, and 57 of the 82 species represented in the vegetation were not found in the seed banks. Few dominant species typical of mixed-grass prairie vegetation germinated and emerged from seed banks collected from prairie dog colony treatments suggesting that removal of prairie dogs will not result in the rapid reestablishment of representative mixed-grass prairie unless steps are taken to restore the soil seed bank.

  10. Factors influencing the establishment of floristically rich grasslands on a restored landfill site

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Natural revegetation on landfill sites often results in a species poor sward dominated by Elymus repens (Shaw, 1983; Davis, 1988; Wong, 1988). The aim of this study was primarily to investigate the mechanism by which E.repens achieved such apparent domination and secondly to investigate various methods to establish floristically rich grasslands on a restored landfill site. Low rates of germination and survival were recorded from seeds of Plantago lanceolata, Centaureau nigrand Leucanthemum vulgare sown into a sward of E.repens on a restored landfill site in Essex, even during periods with adequate soil water. Plants of P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L. vulgare were grown in pots and transplanted into the sward of E.repens. Over the following two years a significant decrease in crown cover of these species was recorded. In areas where E.repens had been treated with herbicide or mown, seedlings and introduced plants of P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L.vulgare increased in cover over two years. Stomatal conductance of P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L.vulgare was reduced when these species were growing with E.repens even during periods with adequate soil water. P.lanceolata, C.nigra and L.vulgare growing with E.repens on restored landfill has been shown experimentally to result in reduced cover. It is suggested that this is due to competition in combination potentially, with allelochemical effects of E.repens. Successful establishment of a floristically rich grass mix was achieved by the reduction in cover of E.repens by herbicide or mowing. On newly restored landfill a careful balance between soil treatments, fertilizer levels and subsequent management in the form of mowing must be attained in order to establish floristically rich grasslands. The results from this study show that by utilizing various management techniques a floristically rich grass mix could be established on a restored landfill site.

  11. A hyperparasite affects the population dynamics of a wild plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Tollenaere, C; Pernechele, B; Mäkinen, H S; Parratt, S R; Németh, M Z; Kovács, G M; Kiss, L; Tack, A J M; Laine, A-L

    2014-12-01

    Assessing the impact of natural enemies of plant and animal pathogens on their host's population dynamics is needed to determine the role of hyperparasites in affecting disease dynamics, and their potential for use in efficient control strategies of pathogens. Here, we focus on the long-term study describing metapopulation dynamics of an obligate pathogen, the powdery mildew (Podosphaera plantaginis) naturally infecting its wild host plant (Plantago lanceolata) in the fragmented landscape of the Åland archipelago (southwest Finland). Regionally, the pathogen persists through a balance of extinctions and colonizations, yet factors affecting extinction rates remain poorly understood. Mycoparasites of the genus Ampelomyces appear as good candidates for testing the role of a hyperparasite, i.e. a parasite of other parasites, in the regulation of their fungal hosts' population dynamics. For this purpose, we first designed a quantitative PCR assay for detection of Ampelomyces spp. in field-collected samples. This newly developed molecular test was then applied to a large-scale sampling within the Åland archipelago, revealing that Ampelomyces is a widespread hyperparasite in this system, with high variability in prevalence among populations. We found that the hyperparasite was more common on leaves where multiple powdery mildew strains coexist, a pattern that may be attributed to differential exposure. Moreover, the prevalence of Ampelomyces at the plant level negatively affected the overwinter survival of its fungal host. We conclude that this hyperparasite may likely impact on its host population dynamics and argue for increased focus on the role of hyperparasites in disease dynamics. PMID:25204419

  12. Distribution of Pb, Cd and Ba in soils and plants of two contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Pichtel, J; Kuroiwa, K; Sawyerr, H T

    2000-10-01

    Evaluation of metal accumulation in soils and plants is of environmental importance due to their health effects on humans and other biota. Soil material and plant tissue were collected along transects in two heavily contaminated facilities, a Superfund site and a lead-acid battery dump, and analyzed for metal content. Soil lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and barium (Ba) concentrations for the Superfund site averaged 55,480, 8.5 and 132.3 mg/kg, respectively. Soil Pb occurred primarily in the carbonate, sulfide/residual and organic chemical fractions (41.6, 28.6 and 16.7%, respectively). Soil Pb, Cd and Ba concentrations for the dump site averaged 29,400, 3.9 and 1130 mg/kg, respectively. Soil Pb occurred mostly in the organic and carbonate fractions as 48.5 and 42.5%, respectively. Pb uptake in the two sites ranged from non-detectable (Agrostemma githago, Plantago rugelii, Alliaria officinalis shoots), to 1800 mg/kg (Agrostemma githago root). Cd uptake was maximal in Taraxacum officinale at 15.4 mg/kg (Superfund site). In the majority > or =65%) of the plants studied, root Pb and Cd content was higher than that for the shoots. Tissue Pb correlated slightly with exchangeable and soluble soil Pb; however, tissue Cd was poorly correlated with soil Cd species. None of the sampled plants accumulated measurable amounts of Ba. Those plants that removed most Pb and Cd were predominantly herbaceous species, some of which produce sufficient biomass to be practical for phytoremediation technologies. Growth chamber studies demonstrated the ability of T. officinale and Ambrosia artemisiifolia to successfully remove soil Pb and Cd during repeated croppings. Tissue Pb was correlated with exchangeable soil Pb at r(2)=0.68 in Ambrosia artemisiifolia. PMID:15092867

  13. Mid-late Holocene climatic changes in the Southwestern Iberian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, S.; Naughton, F.; Rodrigues, T.; Drago, T.; Sanchez-Goñi, M.; Freitas, C.

    2012-04-01

    Vegetation (pollen analysis) and alkenone-derived Sea Surface Temperature (SST) reconstructions from a south western Iberian shelf core (POPEI VC2B) (36°53'12,99'' N, 8°03'57,98'' W) show orbital and suborbital climate variability at extremely high resolution for the last 6000 years in this region. In particular, the mid-late Holocene is marked by a long-term cooling revealed by the gradual decrease of arboreal pollen (AP) percentages and SST which parallels the general decreasing trend of the δ18-O isotope composition recorded in Greenland ice records and the decrease of the mid-latitudes summer insolation. The short-term vegetation changes, reflecting millennial scale climatic variability, are clearly identified in the POPEI VC2B over the last 6000 years. In particular, the basement of this record is marked by the presence of semi-desert plants (Chenopodiaceae, Artemisia and Ephedra) reflecting dry conditions. These particular dry conditions have been detected elsewhere in the southern Iberian Peninsula and in North African records. Following the particularly dry period, there is a decline of semi-desert plants and an increase of Ericaceae and Pinus associated with establishment of an incipient forest of Quercus deciduous type reflecting temperate and humid conditions. This period was followed by a decrease of arboreal pollen percentages, suggesting a relative climate cooling. Finally, the last 2500/2000 years, are marked by the presence of anthropogenic associations (including Cerealia-type, Plantago lanceolata-coronopus type, and Olea) and are characterized by several vegetation and climate oscillations associated with the Roman Period (RP), the Dark Ages (DA), the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA), and the Little Ice Age (LIA).

  14. Choosing and using diversity indices: insights for ecological applications from the German Biodiversity Exploratories

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E Kathryn; Caruso, Tancredi; Buscot, François; Fischer, Markus; Hancock, Christine; Maier, Tanja S; Meiners, Torsten; Müller, Caroline; Obermaier, Elisabeth; Prati, Daniel; Socher, Stephanie A; Sonnemann, Ilja; Wäschke, Nicole; Wubet, Tesfaye; Wurst, Susanne; Rillig, Matthias C

    2014-01-01

    Biodiversity, a multidimensional property of natural systems, is difficult to quantify partly because of the multitude of indices proposed for this purpose. Indices aim to describe general properties of communities that allow us to compare different regions, taxa, and trophic levels. Therefore, they are of fundamental importance for environmental monitoring and conservation, although there is no consensus about which indices are more appropriate and informative. We tested several common diversity indices in a range of simple to complex statistical analyses in order to determine whether some were better suited for certain analyses than others. We used data collected around the focal plant Plantago lanceolata on 60 temperate grassland plots embedded in an agricultural landscape to explore relationships between the common diversity indices of species richness (S), Shannon’s diversity (H’), Simpson’s diversity (D1), Simpson’s dominance (D2), Simpson’s evenness (E), and Berger–Parker dominance (BP). We calculated each of these indices for herbaceous plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, aboveground arthropods, belowground insect larvae, and P. lanceolata molecular and chemical diversity. Including these trait-based measures of diversity allowed us to test whether or not they behaved similarly to the better studied species diversity. We used path analysis to determine whether compound indices detected more relationships between diversities of different organisms and traits than more basic indices. In the path models, more paths were significant when using H’, even though all models except that with E were equally reliable. This demonstrates that while common diversity indices may appear interchangeable in simple analyses, when considering complex interactions, the choice of index can profoundly alter the interpretation of results. Data mining in order to identify the index producing the most significant results should be avoided, but simultaneously

  15. Evaluation of Phosphorylated Psyllium Seed Polysaccharide as a Release Retardant

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Monica R. P.; Warrier, Deepa U.; Rao, Shivani H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to modify psyllium seed polysaccharide and evaluate the modified polysaccharide as release retardant in tablets employing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride as model drug. Studies on polysaccharide from psyllium husk has been reported but no work has been reported on characterization and modification of the polysaccharide present in the psyllium (Plantago ovata) seed and the use of the modified polysaccharide as a release retardant in tablets. In this study, the seed gum was modified using sodium trimetaphosphate as crosslinking agent. Sustained release matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride were prepared by wet granulation using various drug-polymer ratios. The polymers investigated were psyllium polysaccharide, phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide and widely used release retardant hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, drug content, swelling profile and in vitro dissolution studies. The matrix tablets containing 1:3 proportion of drug-phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide was found to have higher hardness as compared to tablets containing 1:1 and 1:2 proportions. The results of swelling behavior in water showed that the tablets containing 1:3 drug:phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide ratio had swelling comparable to that of tablets containing 1:3 drug:hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ratio. The in vitro dissolution studies shows that the dissolution rate was retarded from 98.41 to 37.6% in 6 h with increase in concentration of phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide from 100 to 300 mg. Formulations containing psyllium polysaccharide showed complete drug release in 8 h whereas those formulated with phosphorylated psyllium polysaccharide exhibited extended drug release over the 12 h period. Drug release kinetic studies revealed that drug release followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model. PMID:26798177

  16. Psyllium decreased serum glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin significantly in diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Larijani, Bagher; Akhoondzadeh, Shahin; Fakhrzadeh, Hossein; Dastpak, Arezoo; Bandarian, Fatemeh; Rezai, Afsaneh; Badi, Hassanali Naghdi; Emami, Tara

    2005-11-14

    Psyllium is a bulk-forming laxative and is high in both fiber and mucilage. The beneficial effect of dietary fiber in the management of type II diabetes, has not been totally demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to determine the plasma-lowering effects of 5.1g b.i.d. of psyllium husk fiber, as an adjunct to dietary and drug therapy on lipid and glucose levels, in patients with type II diabetes. Patients were randomly selected from an outpatient clinic of primary care to participate in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in which Plantago ovata Forsk., or placebo was given in combination with their anti-diabetic drugs. Forty-nine subjects were included in the study that were given diet counseling before the study and then followed for 8 weeks in the treatment period. Fasting plasma glucose (FBS) was measured every 2 weeks, and total plasma cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), and insulin levels were measured every 4 weeks. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was also measured at the beginning and ending of the study. The test products (psyllium or placebo) were supplied to subjects in identically labeled foil packets containing a 5.1g dose of product, to consume two doses per day, half an hour before breakfast and dinner. Both products were well tolerated, with no serious adverse events related to treatment was reported in either. Better gastric tolerance to metformin was recorded in the psyllium group. FBS, and HbA1c, showed a significant reduction (p<0.05), whereas HDL-C increased significantly (p<0.05) following psyllium treatment. LDL/HDL ratio was significantly decreased (p<0.05). Our results show that 5.1g b.i.d. of psyllium for persons with type II diabetes is safe, well tolerated, and improves glycemic control. PMID:16154305

  17. Discovery of diversity in xylan biosynthetic genes by transcriptional profiling of a heteroxylan containing mucilaginous tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jacob K.; Johnson, Nathan; Wilkerson, Curtis G.

    2013-01-01

    The exact biochemical steps of xylan backbone synthesis remain elusive. In Arabidopsis, three non-redundant genes from two glycosyltransferase (GT) families, IRX9 and IRX14 from GT43 and IRX10 from GT47, are candidates for forming the xylan backbone. In other plants, evidence exists that different tissues express these three genes at widely different levels, which suggests that diversity in the makeup of the xylan synthase complex exists. Recently we have profiled the transcripts present in the developing mucilaginous tissue of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk). This tissue was found to have high expression levels of an IRX10 homolog, but very low levels of the two GT43 family members. This contrasts with recent wheat endosperm tissue profiling that found a relatively high abundance of the GT43 family members. We have performed an in-depth analysis of all GTs genes expressed in four developmental stages of the psyllium mucilagenous layer and in a single stage of the psyllium stem using RNA-Seq. This analysis revealed several IRX10 homologs, an expansion in GT61 (homologs of At3g18170/At3g18180), and several GTs from other GT families that are highly abundant and specifically expressed in the mucilaginous tissue. Our current hypothesis is that the four IRX10 genes present in the mucilagenous tissues have evolved to function without the GT43 genes. These four genes represent some of the most divergent IRX10 genes identified to date. Conversely, those present in the psyllium stem are very similar to those in other eudicots. This suggests these genes are under selective pressure, likely due to the synthesis of the various xylan structures present in mucilage that has a different biochemical role than that present in secondary walls. The numerous GT61 family members also show a wide sequence diversity and may be responsible for the larger number of side chain structures present in the psyllium mucilage. PMID:23761806

  18. Proposal for field sampling of plants and processing in the lab for environmental metabolic fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Samples for plant metabolic fingerprinting are prepared generally by metabolism quenching, grinding of plant material and extraction of metabolites in solvents. Further concentration and derivatisation steps follow in dependence of the sample nature and the available analytical platform. For plant material sampled in the field, several methods are not applicable, such as, e.g., collection in liquid nitrogen. Therefore, a protocol was established for sample pre-treatment, grinding, extraction and storage, which can be used for analysis of field-collected plant material, which is further processed in the laboratory. Ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata L., Plantaginaceae) was used as model plant. The quality criteria for method suitability were high reproducibility, extraction efficiency and handling comfort of each subsequent processing step. Results Highest reproducibility of results was achieved by sampling fresh plant material in a solvent mixture of methanol:dichloromethane (2:1), crushing the tissue with a hand-held disperser and storing the material until further processing. In the laboratory the material was extracted threefold at different pH. The gained extracts were separated with water (2:1:1 methanol:dichloromethane:water) and the aqueous phases used for analysis by LC-MS, because the polar metabolites were in focus. Chromatograms were compared by calculating a value Ξ for similarities. Advantages and disadvantages of different sample pre-treatment methods, use of solvents and solvent mixtures, influence of pH, extraction frequency and duration, and storing temperature are discussed with regard to the quality criteria. Conclusions The proposed extraction protocol leads to highly reproducible metabolic fingerprints and allows optimal handling of field-collected plant material and further processing in the laboratory, which is demonstrated for an exemplary field data-set. Calculation of Ξ values is a useful tool to judge similarities between

  19. SNP Design from 454 Sequencing of Podosphaera plantaginis Transcriptome Reveals a Genetically Diverse Pathogen Metapopulation with High Levels of Mixed-Genotype Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tollenaere, Charlotte; Susi, Hanna; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Koskinen, Patrik; Tack, Ayco; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Frilander, Mikko J.; Lehtonen, Rainer; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular tools may greatly improve our understanding of pathogen evolution and epidemiology but technical constraints have hindered the development of genetic resources for parasites compared to free-living organisms. This study aims at developing molecular tools for Podosphaera plantaginis, an obligate fungal pathogen of Plantago lanceolata. This interaction has been intensively studied in the Åland archipelago of Finland with epidemiological data collected from over 4,000 host populations annually since year 2001. Principal Findings A cDNA library of a pooled sample of fungal conidia was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 549,411 reads were obtained and annotated into 45,245 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 65.2% of the assembled sequences. The transcriptome assembly was screened for SNP loci, as well as for functionally important genes (mating-type genes and potential effector proteins). A genotyping assay of 27 SNP loci was designed and tested on 380 infected leaf samples from 80 populations within the Åland archipelago. With this panel we identified 85 multilocus genotypes (MLG) with uneven frequencies across the pathogen metapopulation. Approximately half of the sampled populations contain polymorphism. Our genotyping protocol revealed mixed-genotype infection within a single host leaf to be common. Mixed infection has been proposed as one of the main drivers of pathogen evolution, and hence may be an important process in this pathosystem. Significance The developed SNP panel offers exciting research perspectives for future studies in this well-characterized pathosystem. Also, the transcriptome provides an invaluable novel genomic resource for powdery mildews, which cause significant yield losses on commercially important crops annually. Furthermore, the features that render genetic studies in this system a challenge are shared with the majority of obligate parasitic species, and hence our results provide methodological insights

  20. Arctic ground squirrels of the mammoth-steppe: paleoecology of Late Pleistocene middens (˜24 000 29 450 14C yr BP), Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazula, Grant D.; Froese, Duane G.; Elias, Scott A.; Kuzmina, Svetlana; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents paleoecological analyses of 48 fossil arctic ground squirrel ( Spermophilus parryii) middens (nests and caches) recovered from ice-rich loess sediments in the Klondike region of west-central Yukon Territory. AMS radiocarbon dates and stratigraphic association of middens with Dawson tephra (˜25 300 14C yr BP), indicate these paleoecological data reflect the onset of glacial conditions of early Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and terminal MIS 3 (˜24 000-29 450 14C yr BP). Plant macrofossils include at least 60 plant taxa, including diverse graminoids ( Poa, Elymus trachycaulus, Kobresia myosuroides), steppe forbs ( Penstemon gormanii, Anemone patens var. multifida, Plantago cf. canescens), tundra forbs ( Draba spp., Bistorta vivipara), dwarf shrubs ( Salix cf. arctica, S. cf. polaris), sage ( Artemisia frigida) and rare trees ( Picea mariana). Many of these taxa identified in the middens represent the first recorded fossils for these plants in Eastern Beringia and add to our knowledge of the floristic composition of Pleistocene vegetation and biogeography in this region. Fossil beetles include typical members of the Eastern Beringian steppe-tundra fauna ( Lepidophorus lineaticollis and Connatichela artemisiae) and others suggesting predominantly dry, open habitats. Cache forage selection is suggested by some plant taxa which were particularly frequent and abundant in the middens ( Bistorta vivipara, Kobresia myosuroides, Ranunculus spp., Potentilla, Erysimum cf. cheiranthoides, Poa, Carex and Draba). Factors such as proximity of vegetation to burrows and abundance of fruits and seeds per plant were probably important in cache selection. Glacial conditions enabled arctic ground squirrels to form widespread and dense populations in regions such as the Klondike in which they are rare or absent at present. This fossil midden record supports previous hypotheses that suggest arctic ground squirrels evolved in and are well-adapted to the open, steppe

  1. Glomus africanum and G. iranicum, two new species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota).

    PubMed

    Błaszkowski, Janusz; Kovács, Gábor M; Balázs, Tímea K; Orlowska, Elzbieta; Sadravi, Mehdi; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François

    2010-01-01

    Two new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species (Glomeromycota) of genus Glomus, G. africanum and G. iranicum, are described and illustrated. Both species formed spores in loose clusters and singly in soil and G. iranicum sometimes inside roots. G. africanum spores are pale yellow to brownish yellow, globose to subglobose, (60-)87(-125) μm diam, sometimes ovoid to irregular, 80-110 x 90-140 μm. The spore wall consists of a semipermanent, hyaline, outer layer and a laminate, smooth, pale yellow to brownish yellow, inner layer, which always is markedly thinner than the outer layer. G. iranicum spores are hyaline to pastel yellow, globose to subglobose, (13-)40(-56) μm diam, rarely egg-shaped, prolate to irregular, 39-54 x 48-65 μm. The spore wall consists of three smooth layers: one mucilaginous, short-lived, hyaline, outermost; one permanent, semirigid, hyaline, middle; and one laminate, hyaline to pastel yellow, innermost. Only the outermost spore wall layer of G. iranicum stains red in Melzer's reagent. In the field G. africanum was associated with roots of five plant species and an unrecognized shrub colonizing maritime sand dunes of two countries in Europe and two in Africa, and G. iranicum was associated with Triticum aestivum cultivated in southwestern Iran. In one-species cultures with Plantago lanceolata as the host plant G. africanum and G. iranicum formed arbuscular mycorrhizae. Phylogenetic analyses of partial SSU sequences of nrDNA placed the two new species in Glomus group A. Both species were distinctly separated from sequences of described Glomus species. PMID:20943558

  2. Septoglomus fuscum and S. furcatum, two new species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota).

    PubMed

    Blaszkowski, Janusz; Chwat, Gerard; Kovács, Gábor M; Gáspár, Bence K; Ryszka, Przemyslaw; Orlowska, Elzbieta; Pagano, Marcela C; Araújo, Francisca S; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François

    2013-01-01

    Two new arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, (Glomeromycota) Septoglomus fuscum and S. furcatum, are described and illustrated. Spores of S. fuscum usually occur in loose hypogeous clusters, rarely singly in soil or inside roots, and S. furcatum forms only single spores in soil. Spores of S. fuscum are brownish orange to dark brown, globose to subglobose, (20-)47(-90) μm diam, rarely ovoid, 21-50 × 23-60 μm. Their spore wall consists of a semi-persistent, semi-flexible, orange white to golden yellow, rarely hyaline, outer layer, easily separating from a laminate, smooth, brownish orange to dark brown inner layer. Spores of S. furcatum are reddish brown to dark brown, globose to subglobose, (106-) 138(-167) μm diam, rarely ovoid, 108-127 × 135-160 μm, usually with one subtending hypha that is frequently branched below the spore base, or occasionally with two subtending hyphae located close together. Spore walls consists of a semipermanent, hyaline to light orange outermost layer, a semipermanent, hyaline to golden yellow middle layer, and a laminate, smooth, reddish brown to dark brown innermost layer. None of the spore-wall layers of S. fuscum and S. furcatum stain in Melzer's reagent. In the field, S. fuscum was associated with roots of Arctotheca populifolia colonizing maritime dunes located near Strand in South Africa and S. furcatum was associated with Cordia oncocalyx growing in a dry forest in the Ceará State, Brazil. In single-species cultures with Plantago lanceolata as host plant, S. fuscum and S. furcatum formed arbuscular mycorrhizae. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU, ITS and LSU nrDNA sequences placed the two new species in genus Septoglomus and both new taxa were separated from described Septoglomus species. PMID:23233507

  3. Broad spectrum bioactive sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Sarruf, Fernanda Daud; Salgado-Santos, Idalina Maria Nunes; Haroutiounian-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Baby, André Rolim

    2008-11-01

    The development of sunscreens containing reduced concentration of chemical UV filters, even though, possessing broad spectrum effectiveness with the use of natural raw materials that improve and infer UV absorption is of great interest. Due to the structural similarities between polyphenolic compounds and organic UV filters, they might exert photoprotection activity. The objective of the present research work was to develop bioactive sunscreen delivery systems containing rutin, Passiflora incarnata L. and Plantago lanceolata extracts associated or not with organic and inorganic UV filters. UV transmission of the sunscreen delivery system films was performed by using diffuse transmittance measurements coupling to an integrating sphere. In vitro photoprotection efficacy was evaluated according to the following parameters: estimated sun protection factor (SPF); Boot's Star Rating category; UVA/UVB ratio; and critical wavelength (lambda(c)). Sunscreen delivery systems obtained SPF values ranging from 0.972+/-0.004 to 28.064+/-2.429 and bioactive compounds interacted with the UV filters positive and negatively. This behavior may be attributed to: the composition of the delivery system; the presence of inorganic UV filter and quantitative composition of the organic UV filters; and the phytochemical composition of the P. incarnata L. and P. lanceolata extracts. Among all associations of bioactive compounds and UV filters, we found that the broad spectrum sunscreen was accomplished when 1.68% (w/w) P. incarnata L. dry extract was in the presence of 7.0% (w/w) ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, 2.0% (w/w) benzophenone-3 and 2.0% (w/w) TiO(2). It was demonstrated that this association generated estimated SPF of 20.072+/-0.906 and it has improved the protective defense against UVA radiation accompanying augmentation of the UVA/UVB ratio from 0.49 to 0.52 and lambda(c) from 364 to 368.6nm. PMID:18662760

  4. Medical Mucilage Used in Traditional Persian Medicine Practice

    PubMed Central

    Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehdi, Pasalar; Jafari, Jamileh Mahdavi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucilage compounds are pharmaceutically important polysaccharides that have an extensive range of applications, including binding agents, thickeners, water retention agents, emulsion stabilizers, suspending agents, disintegrates, film formers, and gelling agents. A historical approach to medical science written by Iranian scholars could help in identifying excellent ideas and provide valuable information in this field for proper application. The aim of the current study was to introduce some mucilage uses derived from traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Methods: In this literature review, we assessed a few main traditional manuscripts of Iranian medicine, including the books Al Havi, Canon of Medicine, Qarabadine-kabir, Zakhireh-ye Khwarazm shahi, Tuhfat ul-Momineen and Makhzan-ul-Adwiah. The word “loab” in the aforementioned books were searched and all data about mucilage compounds were collected. Results: The use of medicinal plants containing mucilage in Iran dates back to ancient times. In traditional Persian manuscripts, mucilage is one of the most cited applications of medicinal plants for therapeutic objectives. There are various mucilage-producing plants in TPM such as Malva silvestris, Linum usitissimum, Althaea officinalis, Plantago psyllium, Descureania sophia and Ziziphus vulgaris. They have been used traditionally via oral or topical routes for respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary, musculoskeletal, and genital systems as well as skin disorders. Certain applications are unique and promising for today’s chronic ailments. Conclusion: A scientific assessment of these valuable manuscripts would provide a better insight into the thoughts of the past sages and applicable for clinical use of the mucilage compounds. This may lead to research opportunities in the future. PMID:27516674

  5. The vegetational history of the Balkans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, K. J.

    The vegetational history of the Balkans from the last glacial through to present features a dynamic system not subject to immigration of additional taxa. Many temperate taxa appear to have survived in this region during the last glacial in low but persistent populations. Evidence suggests that a greater diversity of taxa existed in the mid to high altitude sites probably where the climate was more humid. At the lateglacial/Holocene transition many tree taxa expanded simultaneously with no evidence of the time-transgressive appearance of taxa which is taken to be indicative of differential immigration in northern Europe. Expansion of temperate woodland was at least 1000 years earlier than in northern Europe suggesting that this was the minimum time for migration of temperate trees into northern Europe. Changes in the composition of the early Holocene woodland included expansion of Pistacia between 9000 and 8000 14C BP, a change in the forest dominants between 8000 and 7000 14C BP, and the appearance and increase of Carpinus orient./Ostrya, Abies. Carpinus betulus and Fagus between 7500 and 5000 14C BP. Since all types were present in the region from the lateglacial, it is suggested that factors other than migration are responsible for their population increase. These factors are considered and include climate, soil development, establishment time and anthropogenic disturbance. Development of the present day landscape started at approximately 4500 14C BP with the onset of anthropogenic disturbance. Clearance resulted in the increase of open ground herbaceous types with grasses, Cerealia-type and Plantago lanceolata. New trees also to become established included Juglans, Olea, Castanea and Platanus. At least two of these types ( Juglans and Castanea) were present in the Balkans during the lateglacial suggesting that although some types were imported by the Greeks/Romans others may have expanded in situ as a result of a favourable niche being created by anthropogenic

  6. Response of endangered plant species to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zubek, Szymon; Turnau, Katarzyna; Tsimilli-Michael, Merope; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-02-01

    Three endangered plant species, Plantago atrata and Pulsatilla slavica, which are on the IUCN red list of plants, and Senecio umbrosus, which is extinct in the wild in Poland, were inoculated with soil microorganisms to evaluate their responsiveness to inoculation and to select the most effective microbial consortium for application in conservation projects. Individuals of these taxa were cultivated with (1) native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) isolated from natural habitats of the investigated species, (2) a mixture of AMF strains available in the laboratory, and (3) a combination of AMF lab strains with rhizobacteria. The plants were found to be dependent on AMF for their growth; the mycorrhizal dependency for P. atrata was 91%, S. umbrosus-95%, and P. slavica-65%. The applied inocula did not significantly differ in the stimulation of the growth of P. atrata and S. umbrosus, while in P. slavica, native AMF proved to be the less efficient. We therefore conclude that AMF application can improve the ex situ propagation of these three threatened taxa and may contribute to the success of S. umbrosus reintroduction. A multilevel analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients by the JIP test permitted an in vivo evaluation of plant vitality in terms of biophysical parameters quantifying photosynthetic energy conservation, which was found to be in good agreement with the results concerning physiological parameters. Therefore, the JIP test can be used to evaluate the influence of AMF on endangered plants, with the additional advantage of being applicable in monitoring in a noninvasive way the acclimatization of reintroduced species in nature. PMID:19011910

  7. Structural analysis of xyloglucans in the primary cell walls of plants in the subclass Asteridae.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matt; Jia, Zhonghua; Peña, Maria J; Cash, Michael; Harper, April; Blackburn, Alan R; Darvill, Alan; York, William S

    2005-08-15

    The structures of xyloglucans from several plants in the subclass Asteridae were examined to determine how their structures vary in different taxonomic orders. Xyloglucans, solubilized from plant cell walls by a sequential (enzymatic and chemical) extraction procedure, were isolated, and their structures were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. All campanulids examined, including Lactuca sativa (lettuce, order Asterales), Tenacetum ptarmiciflorum (dusty miller, order Asterales), and Daucus carota (carrot, order Apiales), produce typical xyloglucans that have an XXXG-type branching pattern and contain alpha-d-Xylp-, beta-D-Galp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xylp-, and alpha-L-Fucp-(1-->2)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xylp- side chains. However, the lamiids produce atypical xyloglucans. For example, previous analyses showed that Capsicum annum (pepper) and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato), two species in the order Solanales, and Olea europaea (olive, order Lamiales) produce xyloglucans that contain arabinosyl and galactosyl residues, but lack fucosyl residues. The XXGG-type xyloglucans produced by Solanaceous species are less branched than the XXXG-type xyloglucan produced by Olea europaea. This study shows that Ipomoea pupurea (morning glory, order Solanales), Ocimum basilicum (basil, order Lamiales), and Plantago major (plantain, order Lamiales) all produce xyloglucans that lack fucosyl residues and have an unusual XXGGG-type branching pattern in which the basic repeating core contains five glucose subunits in the backbone. Furthermore, Neruim oleander (order Gentianales) produces an XXXG-type xyloglucan that contains arabinosyl, galactosyl, and fucosyl residues. The appearance of this intermediate xyloglucan structure in oleander has implications regarding the evolutionary development of xyloglucan structure and its role in primary plant cell walls. PMID:15975566

  8. Plantamajoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via suppressing NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Despite developments in the knowledge and therapy of acute lung injury in recent decades, mortality remains high, and there is usually a lack of effective therapy. Plantamajoside, a major ingredient isolated from Plantago asiatica L. (Plantaginaceae), has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of plantamajoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice has not been investigated. The present study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of plantamajoside on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. The results of histopathological changes as well as the lung wet-to-dry ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity showed that plantamajoside ameliorated the lung injury that was induced by LPS. qPCR and ELISA assays demonstrated that plantamajoside suppressed the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 is an important sensor in LPS infection. Molecular studies showed that the expression of TLR4 was inhibited by plantamajoside administration. Further study was conducted on nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) using pathways using western blots. The results showed that plantamajoside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, JNK and ERK. All results indicated that plantamajoside has protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, plantamajoside may be a potential therapy for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:27089391

  9. Long-term deforestation in NW Spain: linking the Holocene fire history to vegetation change and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaal, Joeri; Carrión Marco, Yolanda; Asouti, Eleni; Martín Seijo, Maria; Martínez Cortizas, Antonio; Costa Casáis, Manuela; Criado Boado, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    The Holocene fire regime is thought to have had a key role in deforestation and shrubland expansion in Galicia (NW Spain) but the contribution of past societies to vegetation burning remains poorly understood. This may be, in part, due to the fact that detailed fire records from areas in close proximity to archaeological sites are scarce. To fill this gap, we performed charcoal analysis in five colluvial soils from an archaeological area (Campo Lameiro) and compared the results to earlier studies from this area and palaeo-ecological literature from NW Spain. This analysis allowed for the reconstruction of the vegetation and fire dynamics in the area during the last ca 11 000 yrs. In the Early Holocene, Fabaceae and Betula sp. were dominant in the charcoal record. Quercus sp. started to replace these species around 10 000 cal BP, forming a deciduous forest that prevailed during the Holocene Thermal Maximum until ˜5500 cal BP. Following that, several cycles of potentially fire-induced forest regression with subsequent incomplete recovery eventually led to the formation of an open landscape dominated by shrubs (Erica sp. and Fabaceae). Major episodes of forest regression were (1) ˜5500-5000 cal BP, which marks the mid-Holocene cooling after the Holocene Thermal Maximum, but also the period during which agropastoral activities in NW Spain became widespread, and (2) ˜2000-1500 cal BP, which corresponds roughly to the end of the Roman Warm Period and the transition from the Roman to the Germanic period. The low degree of chronological precision, which is inherent in fire history reconstructions from colluvial soils, made it impossible to distinguish climatic from human-induced fires. Nonetheless, the abundance of synanthropic pollen indicators (e.g. Plantago lanceolata and Urtica dioica) since at least ˜6000 cal BP strongly suggests that humans used fire to generate and maintain pasture.

  10. Cellvibrio diazotrophicus sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of salt meadow plants and emended description of the genus Cellvibrio.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Christian; Ratering, Stefan; Kramer, Irina; Schnell, Sylvia

    2014-02-01

    Two Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic, nitrogen-fixing, rod-shaped bacteria, designated strains E20 and E50(T), were isolated from the rhizosphere of salt meadow plants Plantago winteri and Hordeum secalinum, respectively, near Münzenberg, Germany. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis both strains E20 and E50(T) are affiliated with the genus Cellvibrio, sharing the highest similarity with Cellvibrio gandavensis LMG 18551(T) (96.4%) and (97.1%), respectively. Strains E20 and E50(T) were oxidase and catalase-positive, grew at a temperature range between 16 and 37 °C and in the presence of 0-5% NaCl (w/v). The DNA G+C contents were 52.1 mol% (E20) and 51.6 mol% (E50(T)). Major fatty acids of strains E20 and E50(T) were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH), C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(12 : 0), C(18 : 0) and C(12 : 0) 3-OH. The DNA-DNA relatedness of the strains to Cellvibrio gandavensis LMG 18551(T) was 39% for strain E20 and 58% for strain E50(T). The nitrogen fixation capability of strains E20 and E50(T) was confirmed by the acetylene reduction assay. On the basis of our polyphasic taxonomic study, strains E20 and E50(T) represent a novel species of the genus Cellvibrio, for which the name Cellvibrio diazotrophicus is proposed. The type strain of Cellvibrio diazotrophicus is E50(T) ( = LMG 27267(T) = KACC 17069(T)). An emended description of the genus Cellvibrio is proposed based on the capability of fixing nitrogen and growth in presence of up to 5% NaCl (w/v). PMID:24105943

  11. Vegetation, Fire and Climate Over the Last 2000 Yrs in Central West Patagonia (45°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Martinez, R. P.; Simi, E. I.; Moreno, P. I.

    2014-12-01

    We report high-resolution pollen and charcoal records from lake sediments obtained from Lago Mellizas and Lago Churrasco to reconstruct the history of vegetation, fire and past variations of the southern westerly winds (SWW) over the last 2000 years. Both sites are located near to the climate-modulated forest-steppe ecotone in central west Patagonia. In this region the SWW are the only source of precipitation and is ideal for reconstructing past changes in atmospheric circulation. This is facilitated by the marked west-east precipitation gradient across the Patagonian Andes that induces a zonation of the regional vegetation which can be used for inferring past changes in precipitation regimes based on fossil pollen records. Furthermore, the Chilean-European colonization process in central west Patagonia started early in the 20th century, allowing characterization of natural vegetation and climate variability in the absence of human disturbance until the end of the 19th century. The pollen records shows dominance of Nothofagus deciduous forests with minor fluctuations and low herb and aquatics abundances, which suggest humid climate conditions. We detect a major change in the pollen stratigraphy at 200 cal yr BP, when started a sustained decreasing trend in Nothofagus, along with increases of Poaceae and aquatics plants (Cyperaceae, Myriophyllum). We interpret these changes as a forest opening and centripetal expansion of littoral environments toward the lake center driven by lake-level lowering in response to lowered precipitation brought by the SWW. Pinus, Rumex, Plantago, which indicate human perturbation, increase in 1900 AD. Macroscopic charcoal increases at 1750, 1400, 850-700, 500, and 200 cal yr BP, suggesting local fires, followed by sharp increases during the last 100 years. We interpret the pre-20th century charcoal peaks as dry intervals with lowered SWW influence. Acknowledgement: Fondecyt 1121141, Fondap 15110009, and ICM grants P02-51 and NC120066.

  12. Urban particulate pollution reduction by four species of green roof vegetation in a UK city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speak, A. F.; Rothwell, J. J.; Lindley, S. J.; Smith, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    Urban particulate pollution in the UK remains at levels which have the potential to cause negative impacts on human health. There is a need, therefore, for mitigation strategies within cities, especially with regards to vehicular sources. The use of vegetation as a passive filter of urban air has been previously investigated, however green roof vegetation has not been specifically considered. The present study aims to quantify the effectiveness of four green roof species - creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), red fescue (Festuca rubra), ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) and sedum (Sedum album) - at capturing particulate matter smaller than 10 μm (PM10). Plants were grown in a location away from major road sources of PM10 and transplanted onto two roofs in Manchester city centre. One roof is adjacent to a major traffic source and one roof is characterised more by urban background inputs. Significant differences in metal containing PM10 capture were found between sites and between species. Site differences were explained by proximity to major sources. Species differences arise from differences in macro and micro morphology of the above surface biomass. The study finds that the grasses, A. stolonifera and F. rubra, are more effective than P. lanceolata and S. album at PM10 capture. Quantification of the annual PM10 removal potential was calculated under a maximum sedum green roof installation scenario for an area of the city centre, which totals 325 ha. Remediation of 2.3% (±0.1%) of 9.18 tonnes PM10 inputs for this area could be achieved under this scenario.

  13. Enhancing agents for phytoremediation of soil contaminated by cyanophos.

    PubMed

    Ali Romeh, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Cyanophos is commonly used in Egypt to control various agricultural and horticultural pests. It is a strong contaminant in the crop culturing environments because it is highly persistent and accumulates in the soil. This contaminant can be removed by phytoremediation, which is the use of plants to clean-up pollutants. Here we tested several several strategies to improve the effectiveness of this technology, which involved various techniques to solubilize contaminants. The phytoremediation efficiency of Plantago major L. was improved more by liquid silicon dioxide (SiO₂) than by other solubility-enhancing agents, resulting in the removal of significant amounts of cyanophos from contaminated soil. Liquid SiO₂ increased the capacity of P. major L. to remove cyanophos from soil by 45.9% to 74.05%. In P. major L. with liquid SiO₂, leaves extracted more cyanophos (32.99 µg/g) than roots (13.33 µg/g) over 3 days. The use of solubilization agents such as surfactants, hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin (HPßCD), natural humic acid acid (HA), and Tween 80 resulted in the removal of 60 convergents of cyanophos from polluted soil. Although a batch equilibrium technique showed that use of HPßCD resulted in the efficient removal of cyanophos from soil, a greater amount of cyanophos was removed by P. major L. with SiO₂. Moreover, a large amount of cyanophos was removed from soil by rice bran. This study indicates that SiO₂ can improve the efficiency of phytoremediation of cyanophos. PMID:25847752

  14. A Late-Glacial/Holocene Pollen Record from the Eastern Andes of Northern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Barbara C. S.; Rodbell, Donald T.

    1995-09-01

    A pollen and sediment record of a core 4.2-m-long from Laguna Baja (7°42' S, 77°32' W, 3575 m) in the Cordillera Oriental of northern Peru suggests several episodes of major vegetational and climatic change over the past 13,000 yr. The oldest pollen assemblage consists of a mixture of paramo elements (tropical alpine vegetation), including high percentages of Poaceae (40%) that decline upward, moist montane forest (Compositae and Polylepis), and wet montane forest (e.g., Hedyosmum and Podocarpaceae). Organic carbon content range from <2% to 8%. About 11,600 yr B.P. this mixed pollen assemblage was replaced by Poaceae (>60%), with high percentages of Jamesonia, a fern characteristic of paramo and decreasing values of Plantago tubulosa and the wet montane forest elements Hedyosmum and Podocarpaceae. Charcoal percentages are at a maximum during this period, magnetic susceptibility and sand percentages are high, and percentages of organic matter are low. Several explanations for these changes are possible, including a reduction in temperature and moisture, more frequent periods of aridity with increased fires, or natural succession. The Holocene record begins with pronounced increases in organic carbon and pollen of wet montane forest, primarily Hedyosmum , Podacarpaceae, and Urticales. High values of Podocarpaceae pollen (>35%) and a decline in charcoal suggest temperature and moisture levels above modern-day values. Wet montane forest pollen remain high and charcoal values are low from about 10,000 to 6000 yr B.P., suggesting that warm and moist conditions prevailed for about 4000 yr. Subsequently Podocarpaceae and Urticales decline, and for a brief time Alnus is prominent in the pollen record. Following the Alnus maximum at about 5000 yr B.P., Poaceae, Ambrosia and Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae become frequent. Increased paramo and disturbance indicator pollen suggest increased anthropogenic activities in this region from the middle Holocene to the present.

  15. A rapid and sensitive determination of aucubin in rat plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its pharmacokinetic application.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Deng, Zhipeng; Guo, Hong; Ling, Peixue

    2012-09-01

    A sensitive, accurate, rapid and robust LC-MS-MS method for the quantification of aucubin, a major bioactive constituent of Aucuba japonica, Eucommia ulmoides and Plantago asiatica, was established and validated in rat plasma. Plasma samples were simply precipitated by adding methanol and the supernatant was chromatographed by a Diamonsil® C(18)(2) column with the mobile phase comprising a mixture of 10 mm ammonium acetate in methanol and that in water with the ratio of 50:50 (v/v). Quantification of aucubin was performed by mass spectrometry in the multiple-reaction monitoring mode with positive atmospheric ionization at m/z 364 → 149 for aucubin, and m/z 380 → 165 for catalpol (IS), respectively. The retention time was 2.47 and 2.44 min for aucubin and the IS, respectively. The calibration curve (10.0-30,000 ng/mL) was linear (r²  > 0.99) and the lower limit of quantification was 10.0 ng/mL in the rat plasma sample. The method showed satisfactory results such as sensitivity, specificity, precision, accuracy, recovery, freeze-thaw and long-term stability. This simple LC-MS method was successfully applied in a pharmacokinetic study carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats after oral administration of aucubin at a single dose of 50 mg/kg. Herein the pharmacokinetic study of aucubin is reported for the first time. PMID:22113886

  16. Urban particulate pollution reduction by four species of green roof vegetation in a UK city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speak, A.; Rothwell, J.; Lindley, S.; Smith, C.

    2012-12-01

    Urban particulate pollution in the UK remains at levels which have the potential to cause negative impacts on human health. There is a need, therefore, for mitigation strategies within cities, especially with regards to vehicular sources. The use of vegetation as a passive filter of urban air has been previously investigated, however green roof vegetation has not been specifically considered. The present study aims to quantify the effectiveness of four green roof species - creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera), red fescue (Festuca rubra), ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) and sedum (Sedum album) - at capturing particulate matter smaller than 10μm (PM10). Plants were grown in a location away from major road sources of PM10 and transplanted onto two roofs in Manchester city centre. One roof is adjacent to a major traffic source and one roof is characterised more by urban background inputs. Significant differences in metal containing PM10 capture were found between sites and between species. Site differences were explained by proximity to major sources. Species differences arise from differences in macro and micro morphology of the above surface biomass. The study finds that the grasses, A. stolonifera and F. rubra, are more effective than P. lanceolata and S. album at PM10 capture. Quantification of the annual PM10 removal potential was calculated under a maximum sedum green roof installation scenario for an area of the city centre, which totals 325 ha. Remediation of 2.3% (±0.1%) of 9.18 tonnes PM10 inputs for this area could be achieved under this scenario.

  17. Molecular biodiversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in trace metal-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Saad El Din; Boon, Eva; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    We assessed the indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) community structure from the roots and associated soil of Plantago major (plantain) plants growing on sites polluted with trace metals (TM) and on unpolluted sites. Uncontaminated and TM-contaminated sites containing As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sn and Zn were selected based on a survey of the TM concentration in soils of community gardens in the City of Montréal. Total genomic DNA was extracted directly from these samples. PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), augmented by cloning and sequencing, as well as direct sequencing techniques, was all used to investigate AMF community structure. We found a decreased di