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Sample records for matrix proteins catenins

  1. Amyloid precursor protein modulates β-catenin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuzhi; Bodles, Angela M

    2007-01-01

    Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Elucidating the function of APP should help understand AD pathogenesis and provide insights into therapeutic designs against this devastating neurodegenerative disease. Results We demonstrate that APP expression in primary neurons induces β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (S33/37/T41) residues, which is a prerequisite for β-catenin ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation. APP-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin resulted in the reduction of total β-catenin levels, suggesting that APP expression promotes β-catenin degradation. In contrast, treatment of neurons with APP siRNAs increased total β-catenin levels and decreased β-catenin phosphorylation at residues S33/37/T41. Further, β-catenin was dramatically increased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from APP knockout animals. Acute expression of wild type APP or of familial AD APP mutants in primary neurons downregulated β-catenin in membrane and cytosolic fractions, and did not appear to affect nuclear β-catenin or β-catenin-dependent transcription. Conversely, in APP knockout CA1 pyramidal cells, accumulation of β-catenin was associated with the upregulation of cyclin D1, a downstream target of β-catenin signaling. Together, these data establish that APP downregulates β-catenin and suggest a role for APP in sustaining neuronal function by preventing cell cycle reactivation and maintaining synaptic integrity. Conclusion We have provided strong evidence that APP modulates β-catenin degradation in vitro and in vivo. Future studies may investigate whether APP processing is necessary for β-catenin downregulation, and determine if excessive APP expression contributes to AD pathogenesis through abnormal β-catenin downregulation. PMID:18070361

  2. Connections between cadherin-catenin proteins, spindle misorientation, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin mediated adhesion is an important determinant of tissue architecture in multicellular organisms. Cancer progression and maintenance is frequently associated with loss of their expression or functional activity, which not only leads to decreased cell-cell adhesion, but also to enhanced tumor cell proliferation and loss of differentiated characteristics. This review is focused on the emerging implications of cadherin-catenin proteins in the regulation of polarized divisions through their connections with the centrosomes, cytoskeleton, tissue tension and signaling pathways; and illustrates how alterations in cadherin-catenin levels or functional activity may render cells susceptible to transformation through the loss of their proliferation-differentiation balance. PMID:26451345

  3. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  4. A High-Content Imaging Screen for Cellular Regulators of β-Catenin Protein Abundance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xin; Montoute, Monica; Bee, Tiger W; Lin, Hong; Kallal, Lorena A; Liu, Yan; Agarwal, Pankaj; Wang, Dayuan; Lu, Quinn; Morrow, Dwight; Pope, Andrew J; Wu, Zining

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal accumulation of β-catenin protein, a key transcriptional activator required for Wnt signaling, is the hallmark of many tumor types, including colon cancer. In normal cells, β-catenin protein level is tightly controlled by a multiprotein complex through the proteosome pathway. Mutations in the components of the β-catenin degradation complex, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Axin, lead to β-catenin stabilization and the constitutive activation of target genes. Since the signal transduction of Wnt/β-catenin is mainly mediated by protein-protein interactions, this pathway has been particularly refractory to conventional target-based small-molecule screening. Here we designed a cellular high-content imaging assay to detect β-catenin protein through immunofluorescent staining in the SW480 colon cancer cell line, which has elevated β-catenin endogenously. We demonstrate that the assay is robust and specific to screen a focused biologically diverse chemical library set against known targets that play diverse cellular functions. We identified a number of hits that reduce β-catenin levels without causing cell death. These hits may serve as tools to understand the dynamics of β-catenin degradation. This study demonstrates that detecting cell-based β-catenin protein stability is a viable approach to identifying novel mechanisms of β-catenin regulation as well as small molecules of therapeutic potential. PMID:26656867

  5. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80+ CD11b+ and Ly6Clow CD11b+ macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  6. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  7. HSP105 recruits protein phosphatase 2A to dephosphorylate β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nancy; Kakunda, Michael; Pham, Victoria; Lill, Jennie R; Du, Pan; Wongchenko, Matthew; Yan, Yibing; Firestein, Ron; Huang, XiaoDong

    2015-04-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway causes accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus to initiate the transcription of the target genes. Without Wnt stimulation, β-catenin forms a complex with axin (axis inhibitor), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and undergoes phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination. Phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), interestingly, also are components of this degradation complex; therefore, a balance must be reached between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. How this balance is regulated is largely unknown. Here we show that a heat shock protein, HSP105, is a previously unidentified component of the β-catenin degradation complex. HSP105 is required for Wnt signaling, since depletion of HSP105 compromises β-catenin accumulation and target gene transcription upon Wnt stimulation. Mechanistically, HSP105 depletion disrupts the integration of PP2A into the β-catenin degradation complex, favoring the hyperphosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin. HSP105 is overexpressed in many types of tumors, correlating with increased nuclear β-catenin protein levels and Wnt target gene upregulation. Furthermore, overexpression of HSP105 is a prognostic biomarker that correlates with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients as well as melanoma patients participating in the BRIM2 clinical study. PMID:25645927

  8. HSP105 Recruits Protein Phosphatase 2A To Dephosphorylate β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nancy; Kakunda, Michael; Pham, Victoria; Lill, Jennie R.; Du, Pan; Wongchenko, Matthew; Yan, Yibing; Firestein, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway causes accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus to initiate the transcription of the target genes. Without Wnt stimulation, β-catenin forms a complex with axin (axis inhibitor), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and undergoes phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination. Phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), interestingly, also are components of this degradation complex; therefore, a balance must be reached between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. How this balance is regulated is largely unknown. Here we show that a heat shock protein, HSP105, is a previously unidentified component of the β-catenin degradation complex. HSP105 is required for Wnt signaling, since depletion of HSP105 compromises β-catenin accumulation and target gene transcription upon Wnt stimulation. Mechanistically, HSP105 depletion disrupts the integration of PP2A into the β-catenin degradation complex, favoring the hyperphosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin. HSP105 is overexpressed in many types of tumors, correlating with increased nuclear β-catenin protein levels and Wnt target gene upregulation. Furthermore, overexpression of HSP105 is a prognostic biomarker that correlates with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients as well as melanoma patients participating in the BRIM2 clinical study. PMID:25645927

  9. Destabilization of Heterologous Proteins Mediated by the GSK3β Phosphorylation Domain of the β-Catenin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Xian; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Wu, Ningning; He, Yunfeng; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hongmei; Wen, Sheng; Deng, Fang; Liao, Zhan; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junhui; Qin, Xinyue; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; He, Tong-Chuan; Zhou, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in development and cellular processes. The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling activation is the stabilization of β-catenin protein in cytoplasm and/or nucleus. The stability of β-catenin is the key to its biological functions and is controlled by the phosphorylation of its amino-terminal degradation domain. Aberrant activation of β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of human cancers. It has been recently suggested that GSK3β may play an essential role in regulating global protein turnover. Here, we investigate if the GSK3β phosphorylation site-containing degradation domain of β-catenin is sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins. Methods and Results We engineer chimeric proteins by fusing β-catenin degradation domain at the N- and/or C-termini of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In both transient and stable expression experiments, the chimeric GFP proteins exhibit a significantly decreased stability, which can be effectively antagonized by lithium and Wnt1. An activating mutation in the destruction domain significantly stabilizes the fusion protein. Furthermore, GSK3 inhibitor SB-216763 effectively increases the GFP signal of the fusion protein. Conversely, the inhibition of Wnt signaling with tankyrase inhibitor XAV939 results in a decrease in GFP signal of the fusion proteins, while these small molecules have no significant effects on the mutant destruction domain-GFP fusion protein. Conclusion Our findings strongly suggest that the β-catenin degradation domain may be sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins in Wnt signaling-dependent manner. It is conceivable that the chimeric GFP proteins may be used as a functional reporter to measure the dynamic status of β-catenin signaling, and to identify potential anticancer drugs that target β-catenin signaling. PMID:24335169

  10. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets {beta}-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of {beta}-catenin and results in the accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of {beta}-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of {beta}-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin, thereby potentiated {beta}-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of {beta}-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of {beta}-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

  11. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets beta-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of beta-catenin and results in the accumulation of beta-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of beta-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates beta-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of beta-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of beta-catenin, thereby potentiated beta-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of beta-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of beta-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. PMID:20307497

  12. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin/CREB binding protein (CBP) signaling reverses pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, William R.; Chi, Emil Y.; Ye, Xin; Nguyen, Cu; Tien, Ying-tzang; Zhou, Beiyun; Borok, Zea; Knight, Darryl A.; Kahn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)/usual interstitial pneumonia is a ravaging condition of progressive lung scarring and destruction. Anti-inflammatory therapies including corticosteroids have limited efficacy in this ultimately fatal disorder. An important unmet need is to identify new agents that interact with key molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis to prevent progression or reverse fibrosis in these patients. Because aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade occurs in lungs of patients with IPF, we have targeted this pathway for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis using ICG-001, a small molecule that specifically inhibits T-cell factor/β-catenin transcription in a cyclic AMP response-element binding protein binding protein (CBP)-dependent fashion. ICG-001 selectively blocks the β-catenin/CBP interaction without interfering with the β-catenin/p300 interaction. We report here that ICG-001 (5 mg/kg per day) significantly inhibits β-catenin signaling and attenuates bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice, while concurrently preserving the epithelium. Administration of ICG-001 concurrent with bleomycin prevents fibrosis, and late administration is able to reverse established fibrosis and significantly improve survival. Because no effective treatment for IPF exists, selective inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcription suggests a potential unique therapeutic approach for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:20660310

  13. Protein kinase A activation enhances β-catenin transcriptional activity through nuclear localization to PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Davuluri, Ramana V; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of β-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of β-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on β-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, β-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between β-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of β-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

  14. Positive cross talk between protein kinase D and β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells: impact on β-catenin nuclear localization and phosphorylation at Ser552.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Han, Liang; Sinnett-Smith, James; Han, Li-Li; Stevens, Jan V; Rozengurt, Nora; Young, Steven H; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Given the fundamental role of β-catenin signaling in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and the growth-promoting function of protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in these cells, we hypothesized that PKDs mediate cross talk with β-catenin signaling. The results presented here provide several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis. We found that stimulation of intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist angiotensin II (ANG II), a potent inducer of PKD activation, promoted endogenous β-catenin nuclear localization in a time-dependent manner. A significant increase was evident within 1 h of ANG II stimulation (P< 0.01), peaked at 4 h (P< 0.001), and declined afterwards. GPCR stimulation also induced a marked increase in β-catenin-regulated genes and phosphorylation at Ser(552) in intestinal epithelial cells. Exposure to preferential inhibitors of the PKD family (CRT006610 or kb NB 142-70) or knockdown of the isoforms of the PKD family prevented the increase in β-catenin nuclear localization and phosphorylation at Ser(552) in response to ANG II. GPCR stimulation also induced the formation of a complex between PKD1 and β-catenin, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation that depended on PKD1 catalytic activation, as it was abrogated by cell treatment with PKD family inhibitors. Using transgenic mice that express elevated PKD1 protein in the intestinal epithelium, we detected a marked increase in the localization of β-catenin in the nucleus of crypt epithelial cells in the ileum of PKD1 transgenic mice, compared with nontransgenic littermates. Collectively, our results identify a novel cross talk between PKD and β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26739494

  15. Bisindoylmaleimide I suppresses adipocyte differentiation through stabilization of intracellular {beta}-catenin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Munju; Park, Seoyoung; Gwak, Jungsug; Kim, Dong-Eun; Yea, Sung Su; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-02-29

    The Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway plays important roles in cell differentiation. Activation of this pathway, likely by Wnt-10b, has been shown to inhibit adipogenesis in cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mice. Here we revealed that bisindoylmaleimide I (BIM), which is widely used as a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. BIM increased {beta}-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) and up-regulated intracellular {beta}-catenin levels in HEK293 cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. BIM significantly decreased intracellular lipid accumulation and reduced expression of important adipocyte marker genes including peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and CAATT enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate that BIM inhibits adipogenesis by increasing the stability of {beta}-catenin protein in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells.

  16. Protein Kinase PKN1 Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    James, Richard G.; Bosch, Katherine A.; Kulikauskas, Rima M.; Yang, Peitzu T.; Robin, Nick C.; Toroni, Rachel A.; Biechele, Travis L.; Berndt, Jason D.; von Haller, Priska D.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Chien, Andy J.; Moon, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in phosphoproteomics have made it possible to monitor changes in protein phosphorylation that occur at different steps in signal transduction and have aided the identification of new pathway components. In the present study, we applied this technology to advance our understanding of the responses of melanoma cells to signaling initiated by the secreted ligand WNT3A. We started by comparing the phosphopeptide patterns of cells treated with WNT3A for different periods of time. Next, we integrated these data sets with the results from a siRNA screen that targeted protein kinases. This integration of siRNA screening and proteomics enabled us to identify four kinases that exhibit altered phosphorylation in response to WNT3A and that regulate a luciferase reporter of β-catenin-responsive transcription (β-catenin-activated reporter). We focused on one of these kinases, an atypical PKC kinase, protein kinase N1 (PKN1). Reducing the levels of PKN1 with siRNAs significantly enhances activation of β-catenin-activated reporter and increases apoptosis in melanoma cell lines. Using affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry, we then found that PKN1 is present in a protein complex with a WNT3A receptor, Frizzled 7, as well as with proteins that co-purify with Frizzled 7. These data establish that the protein kinase PKN1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and sensitizes melanoma cells to cell death stimulated by WNT3A. PMID:24114839

  17. Chibby drives β catenin cytoplasmic accumulation leading to activation of the unfolded protein response in BCR-ABL1+ cells.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Manuela; Leo, Elisa; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Campi, Virginia; Borsi, Enrica; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease caused by the constitutive tyrosine kinase (TK) activity of the BCR-ABL fusion protein. However, the phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC) is sustained by β catenin rather than by the BCR-ABL TK. β catenin activity in CML is contingent upon its stabilization proceeding from the BCR-ABL-induced phosphorylation at critical residues for interaction with the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) destruction complex or GSK3 inactivating mutations. Here we studied the impact of β catenin antagonist Chibby (CBY) on β catenin signaling in BCR-ABL1+ cells. CBY is a small conserved protein which interacts with β catenin and impairs β catenin-mediated transcriptional activation through two distinct molecular mechanisms: 1) competition with T cell factor (TCF) or lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) for β catenin binding; and 2) nuclear export of β catenin via interaction with 14-3-3. We found that its enforced expression in K562 cell line promoted β catenin cytoplasmic translocation resulting in inhibition of target gene transcription. Moreover, cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR). CBY-driven cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin is also a component of BCR-ABL1+ cell response to the TK inhibitor Imatinib (IM). It evoked the UPR activation leading to the induction of BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) by UPR sensors. BIM, in turn, contributed to the execution phase of apoptosis in the activation of ER resident caspase 12 and mobilization of Ca(2+) stores. PMID:23707389

  18. Protein 4.1R links E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and modulates adherens junction integrity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaomin; Guo, Xinhua; Debnath, Gargi; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2009-07-01

    Protein 4.1R (4.1R) is the prototypical member of the protein 4.1 superfamily comprising of the protein 4.1 family (4.1R, 4.1B, 4.1G and 4.1N) and ERM family (ezrin, radixin and meosin). These proteins in general serve as adaptors between the membrane and the cytoskeleton. Here we show that 4.1R expressed in the gastric epithelial cells associates with adherens junction protein beta-catenin. Biochemical examination of 4.1R-deficient stomach epithelia revealed a selective reduction of beta-catenin which is accompanied by a weaker linkage of E-cadherin to the cytoskeleton. In addition, organization of actin cytoskeleton was altered in 4.1R-deficient cells. Moreover, histological examination revealed that cell-cell contacts are impaired and gastric glands are disorganized in 4.1R null stomach epithelia. These results demonstrate an important and previously unidentified role of 4.1R in linking the cadherin/catenin complex to the cytoskeleton through its direct interaction with beta-catenin and in regulating the integrity of adherens junction. PMID:19376086

  19. Regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munemitsu, S; Albert, I; Souza, B; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P

    1995-01-01

    The APC tumor-suppressor protein associates with beta-catenin, a cell adhesion protein that is upregulated by the WNT1 oncogene. We examined the effects of exogenous APC expression on the distribution and amount of beta-catenin in a colorectal cancer cell containing only mutant APC. Expression of wild-type APC caused a pronounced reduction in total beta-catenin levels by eliminating an excessive supply of cytoplasmic beta-catenin indigenous to the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line. This reduction was due to an enhanced rate of beta-catenin protein degradation. Truncated mutant APC proteins, characteristic of those associated with cancer, lacked this activity. Mutational analysis revealed that the central region of the APC protein, which is typically deleted or severely truncated in tumors, was responsible for the down-regulation of beta-catenin. These results suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of mutant APC may be compromised due to a defect in its ability to regulate beta-catenin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708772

  20. The inner nuclear membrane protein Emerin regulates β-catenin activity by restricting its accumulation in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Ewa; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Barker, Nick; van de Wetering, Mark; Clevers, Hans; Dorobek, Margareth; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Broers, Jos L V; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Salpingidou, Georgia; Wilson, Robert G; Ellis, Juliet A; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Emerin is a type II inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein of unknown function. Emerin function is likely to be important because, when it is mutated, emerin promotes both skeletal muscle and heart defects. Here we show that one function of Emerin is to regulate the flux of β-catenin, an important transcription coactivator, into the nucleus. Emerin interacts with β-catenin through a conserved adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-like domain. When GFP-emerin is expressed in HEK293 cells, β-catenin is restricted to the cytoplasm and β-catenin activity is inhibited. In contrast, expression of an emerin mutant, lacking its APC-like domain (GFP-emerinΔ), dominantly stimulates β-catenin activity and increases nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. Human fibroblasts that are null for emerin have an autostimulatory growth phenotype. This unusual growth phenotype arises through enhanced nuclear accumulation and activity of β-catenin and can be replicated in wild-type fibroblasts by transfection with constitutively active β-catenin. Our results support recent findings that suggest that INM proteins can influence signalling pathways by restricting access of transcription coactivators to the nucleus. PMID:16858403

  1. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  2. [CELL CONTACT PROTEIN BETA-CATENIN IN EPENDYMAL AND EPITHELIAL CELLS OF THE CHOROID PLEXUS OF THE CEREBRAL LATERAL VENTRICLES].

    PubMed

    Kirik, O V; Sufieyva, D A; Nazarenkova, A V; Korzhevskiy, D E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution pattern of cellular contacts protein beta-catenin in the choroid plexus and ependyma of lateral ventricles of the brain. The study was conducted on frontal sections of the brain of Wistar rats (n = 10) using polyclonal antibodies against beta-catenin. The obtained preparations were analyzed by microscopy in transmitted light and using confocal laser microscopy. To study the distribution of beta-catenin in different projections, three-dimensional reconstruction was performed. The study demonstrated different distribution patterns of this protein in ependyma and choroid plexus. Unlike ependyma, in the cells of the choroid plexus beta-catenin was distributed in the same way as in simple epithelial tissues (on the basal and lateral borders of the cells). This may indicate different tissue attribution of the ependyma and the choroid plexus epithelium, despite their common origin. PMID:27487660

  3. SRSF1 and SRSF9 RNA binding proteins promote Wnt signalling-mediated tumorigenesis by enhancing β-catenin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Huang, Binlu; Shi, Zhen; Han, Jiayu; Wang, Ying; Huangfu, Jieqiong; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling is widely implicated in embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The key event in Wnt signalling activation is β-catenin accumulation, which is controlled by both its production and degradation. However, much more emphasis has been placed on the understanding of its degradation. Here, we show that the synthesis of β-catenin protein, which requires a group of serine/arginine-rich splicing factors (SRSF), also contributes to its tumorigenic activity. Overexpression of SRSF1 and SRSF9 promote β-catenin accumulation via the recruitment of β-catenin mRNA and by enhancing its translation in an mTOR-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, like SRSF1, SRSF9 is also an oncogene, and is frequently overexpressed in multiple types of human tumours. Finally, our results suggest that promoting degradation and blocking production of β-catenin synergistically reduce β-catenin levels under pathological conditions and that a combinational therapy could be a promising approach for the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:23592547

  4. Murrayafoline A attenuates the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by promoting the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyuk; Gwak, Jungsug; Cho, Munju; Ryu, Min-Jung; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Gye Won; Yun, Mi-Young; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Shin, Jae-Gook; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular lesions in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling and subsequent up-regulation of {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT) occur frequently during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that suppress CRT, we screened natural compounds in a cell-based assay for detection of TOPFalsh reporter activity. Murrayafoline A, a carbazole alkaloid isolated from Glycosmis stenocarpa, antagonized CRT that was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) or LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin without altering its N-terminal phosphorylation at the Ser33/37 residues, marking it for proteasomal degradation, or the expression of Siah-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Murrayafoline A repressed the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is known {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes and thus inhibited the proliferation of various colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that murrayafoline A may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for use in the treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Transmembrane protein 64 reciprocally regulates osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation by modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Kim, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Seoung-Hoon; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-09-01

    Age-related osteoporosis is associated with a reciprocal decrease in bone formation and an increase in adiposity in the bone marrow niche. We previously reported Transmembrane protein 64 (Tmem64) to be an important regulator of osteoclast function; however, its precise role in osteoblasts has not yet been established. Here, we showed that ablation of the Tmem64 gene in mice resulted in markedly increased osteoblast and reduced adipocyte differentiation from bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs). Conversely, Tmem64 overexpression inhibited osteogenesis and accelerated adipogenesis. Furthermore, BMSCs isolated from Tmem64 knockout mice formed a greater number of colony-forming unit-osteoblasts and a lower number of colony-forming unit-adipocytes than the wild type controls. Mechanistically, the expression level of β-catenin, the key Wnt signaling molecule, increased significantly, and its nuclear translocation was enhanced in Tmem64-deficient cells. Introduction of Tmem64 significantly suppressed β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in an in vitro co-transfection experiment as well as during an in vivo experiment involving BAT-Gal reporter mice. These results demonstrate that Tmem64 plays an important role in the regulation of mesenchymal lineage allocation by modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25979161

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  7. Higher Matrix Stiffness Upregulates Osteopontin Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Mediated by Integrin β1/GSK3β/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    You, Yang; Zheng, Qiongdan; Dong, Yinying; Wang, Yaohui; Zhang, Lan; Xue, Tongchun; Xie, Xiaoying; Hu, Chao; Wang, Zhiming; Chen, Rongxin; Wang, Yanhong; Cui, Jiefeng; Ren, Zhenggang

    2015-01-01

    Increased stromal stiffness is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and progression. However, the molecular mechanism by which matrix stiffness stimuli modulate HCC progress is largely unknown. In this study, we explored whether matrix stiffness-mediated effects on osteopontin (OPN) expression occur in HCC cells. We used a previously reported in vitro culture system with tunable matrix stiffness and found that OPN expression was remarkably upregulated in HCC cells with increasing matrix stiffness. Furthermore, the phosphorylation level of GSK3β and the expression of nuclear β-catenin were also elevated, indicating that GSK3β/β-catenin pathway might be involved in OPN regulation. Knock-down analysis of integrin β1 showed that OPN expression and p-GSK3β level were downregulated in HCC cells grown on high stiffness substrate compared with controls. Simultaneously, inhibition of GSK-3β led to accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and its enhanced nuclear translocation, further triggered the rescue of OPN expression, suggesting that the integrin β1/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway is specifically activated for matrix stiffness-mediated OPN upregulation in HCC cells. Tissue microarray analysis confirmed that OPN expression was positively correlated with the expression of LOX and COL1. Taken together, high matrix stiffness upregulated OPN expression in HCC cells via the integrin β1/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. It highlights a new insight into a pathway involving physical mechanical signal and biochemical signal molecules which contributes to OPN expression in HCC cells. PMID:26280346

  8. RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) regulates migration, differentiation and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Christian; Egea, Virginia; Megens, Remco T A; Pitsch, Thomas; Santovito, Donato; Weber, Christian; Ries, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The membrane-anchored glycoprotein RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) inhibits expression and activity of certain matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby suppressing tumor cell metastasis. However, RECK's role in physiological cell function is largely unknown. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are able to differentiate into various cell types and represent promising tools in multiple clinical applications including the regeneration of injured tissues by endogenous or transplanted hMSCs. RNA interference of RECK in hMSCs revealed that endogenous RECK suppresses the transcription and biosynthesis of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-2 but does not influence the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, membrane type (MT)1-MMP and TIMP-1 in these cells. Knockdown of RECK in hMSCs promoted monolayer regeneration and chemotactic migration of hMSCs, as demonstrated by scratch wound and chemotaxis assay analyses. Moreover, expression of endogenous RECK was upregulated upon osteogenic differentiation and diminished after adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. RECK depletion in hMSCs reduced their capacity to differentiate into the osteogenic lineage whereas adipogenesis was increased, demonstrating that RECK functions as a master switch between both pathways. Furthermore, knockdown of RECK in hMSCs attenuated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as indicated by reduced stability and impaired transcriptional activity of β-catenin. The latter was determined by analysis of the β-catenin target genes Dickkopf1 (DKK1), axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and a luciferase-based β-catenin-activated reporter (BAR) assay. Our findings demonstrate that RECK is a regulator of hMSC functions suggesting that modulation of RECK may improve the development of hMSC-based therapeutical approaches in regenerative medicine. PMID:26459448

  9. The APC tumor suppressor binds to C-terminal binding protein to divert nuclear beta-catenin from TCF.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Fumihiko; Bienz, Mariann

    2004-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an important tumor suppressor in the colon. APC antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the Wnt effector beta-catenin by promoting its nuclear export and its proteasomal destruction in the cytoplasm. Here, we show that a third function of APC in antagonizing beta-catenin involves C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). APC is associated with CtBP in vivo and binds to CtBP in vitro through its conserved 15 amino acid repeats. Failure of this association results in elevated levels of beta-catenin/TCF complexes and of TCF-mediated transcription. Notably, CtBP is neither associated with TCF in vivo nor does mutation of the CtBP binding motifs in TCF-4 alter its transcriptional activity. This questions the idea that CtBP is a direct corepressor of TCF. Our evidence indicates that APC is an adaptor between beta-catenin and CtBP and that CtBP lowers the availability of free nuclear beta-catenin for binding to TCF by sequestering APC/beta-catenin complexes. PMID:15525529

  10. Amer2 protein is a novel negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling involved in neuroectodermal patterning.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Astrid S; Tanneberger, Kristina; Schambony, Alexandra; Behrens, Jürgen

    2012-01-13

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is negatively controlled by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor, which induces proteasomal degradation of β-catenin as part of the β-catenin destruction complex. Amer2 (APC membrane recruitment 2; FAM123A) is a direct interaction partner of APC, related to the tumor suppressor Amer1/WTX, but its function in Wnt signaling is not known. Here, we show that Amer2 recruits APC to the plasma membrane by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids via lysine-rich motifs and that APC links β-catenin and the destruction complex components axin and conductin to Amer2. Knockdown of Amer2 increased Wnt target gene expression and reporter activity in cell lines, and overexpression reduced reporter activity, which required membrane association of Amer2. In Xenopus embryos, Amer2 is expressed mainly in the dorsal neuroectoderm and neural tissues. Down-regulation of Amer2 by specific morpholino oligonucleotides altered neuroectodermal patterning, which could be rescued by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Lef1 that interferes with β-catenin-dependent transcription. Our data characterize Amer2 for the first time as a negative regulator of Wnt signaling both in cell lines and in vivo and define Amer proteins as a novel family of Wnt pathway regulators. PMID:22128170

  11. Nucleoporin 62-Like Protein Activates Canonical Wnt Signaling through Facilitating the Nuclear Import of β-Catenin in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojie; Gu, Qilin; Lin, Li; Li, Shaoyang; Zhong, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoporin p62 (Nup62) localizes in the central channel of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and regulates nuclear pore permeability and nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the developmental roles of Nup62 in vertebrates remain largely unclear. Zebrafish Nup62-like protein (Nup62l) is a homolog of mammalian Nup62. The nup62l gene is maternally expressed, but its transcripts are ubiquitously distributed during early embryogenesis and enriched in the head, pharynx, and intestine of developing embryos. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway positively modulates nup62l transcription, while Bmp signaling acts downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to negatively regulate nup62l expression. Overexpression of nup62l dorsalized embryos and enhanced gastrula convergence and extension (CE) movements. In contrast, knockdown of Nup62l led to ventralized embryos, an impediment to CE movements, and defects in specification of midline organ progenitors. Mechanistically, Nup62l acts as an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through interaction with and facilitation of nuclear import of β-catenin-1/2 in zebrafish. Thus, Nup62l regulates dorsoventral patterning, gastrula CE movements, and proper specification of midline organ precursors through mediating the nuclear import of β-catenins in zebrafish. PMID:25605329

  12. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Simona Roxana; Crăciun, Alexandra Mărioara

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors. PMID:27547048

  13. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology

    PubMed Central

    GHEORGHE, SIMONA ROXANA; CRĂCIUN, ALEXANDRA MĂRIOARA

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors. PMID:27547048

  14. Mangiferin exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and β-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongzhong; Huang, Jing; Yang, Bing; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yin, Xuedong; Peng, Weiyan; Cheng, Wei; Wan, Jingyuan; Luo, Fuling; Li, Hongyuan; Ren, Guosheng

    2013-10-01

    Although mangiferin which is a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone has exhibited promising anticancer activities, the detailed molecular mechanism of mangiferin on cancers still remains enigmatic. In this study, the anticancer activity of mangiferin was evaluated in breast cancer cell line-based in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that mangiferin treatment resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that mangiferin induced decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and -9, and reversal of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, it was demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibited the activation of β-catenin pathway. Subsequent experiments showed that inhibiting β-catenin pathway might play a central role in mangiferin-induced anticancer activity through modulation of MMP-7 and -9, and EMT. Consistent with these findings in vitro, the antitumor potential was also verified in mangiferin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice where significantly decreased tumor volume, weight and proliferation, and increased apoptosis were obtained, with lower expression of MMP-7 and -9, vimentin and active β-catenin, and higher expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that mangiferin might be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against breast cancer. - Highlights: • Mangiferin inhibits growth and metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin down-regulates MMP-7 and -9 in breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin induces the reversal of EMT in metastatic breast cancer cells. • Mangiferin inhibits the activation of β-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. • Inhibiting β-catenin is responsible for the antitumor activity of mangiferin.

  15. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates {beta}-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a {gamma}-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and {beta}-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3{beta} inactivation and accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of {beta}-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on {beta}-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis.

  16. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering. PMID:26545748

  17. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems - at least partially - in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. PMID:27157140

  18. HER2 and β-catenin protein location: importance in the prognosis of breast cancer patients and their correlation when breast cancer cells suffer stressful situations.

    PubMed

    Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Shortrede, Jorge E; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana; Cayado-Gutiérrez, Niubys; Castro, Gisela N; Zoppino, Felipe C M; Guerrero, Martín; Martinis, Estefania; Wuilloud, Rodolfo; Gómez, Nidia N; Biaggio, Verónica; Orozco, Javier; Gago, Francisco E; Ciocca, Leonardo A; Fanelli, Mariel A; Ciocca, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    In human breast cancer, β-catenin localization has been related with disease prognosis. Since HER2-positive patients are an important subgroup, and that in breast cancer cells a direct interaction of β-catenin/HER2 has been reported, in the present study we have explored whether β-catenin location is related with the disease survival. The study was performed in a tumor bank from patients (n = 140) that did not receive specific anti-HER2 therapy. The proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry in serial sections, 47 (33.5%) patients were HER2-positive with a long follow-up. HER2-positive patients that displayed β-catenin at the plasma membrane (completely surrounding the tumour cells) showed a significant better disease-free survival and overall survival than the patients showing the protein on other locations. Then we explored the dynamics of the co-expression of β-catenin and HER2 in human MCF-7 and SKBR3 cells exposed to different stressful situations. In untreated conditions MCF-7 and SKBR3 cells showed very different β-catenin localization. In MCF-7 cells, cadmium administration caused a striking change in β-catenin localization driving it from plasma membrane to cytoplasmic and perinuclear areas and HER2 showed a similar localization patterns. The changes induced by cadmium were compared with heat shock, H2O2 and tamoxifen treatments. In conclusion, this study shows the dynamical associations of HER2 and β-catenin and their changes in subcellular localizations driven by stressful situations. In addition, we report for the first time the correlation between plasma membrane associated β-catenin in HER2-positive breast cancer and survival outcome, and the importance of the protein localization in breast cancer samples. PMID:25636904

  19. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. Conditional Activation of β-Catenin Signaling Leads to Severe Defects in Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meina; Tang, Dezhi; Shu, Bing; Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Hao, Suyang; Dresser, Karen A.; Shen, Jie; Im, Hee-Jeong; Sampson, Erik R.; Rubery, Paul T.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Schwarz, Edward M.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Wang, Yongjun; Chen, Di

    2013-01-01

    Objective The incidence of low back pain is extremely high and is often linked to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. The mechanism of this disease is currently unknown. In this study, we have investigated the role of β-catenin signaling in IVD tissue function. Methods β-catenin protein levels were measured in disc samples derived from patients with disc degeneration and normal subjects by immunohistochemistry (IHC). To generate β-catenin conditional activation (cAct) mice, Col2a1-CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with β-cateninfx(Ex3)/fx(Ex3) mice. Changes in disc tissue morphology and function were analyzed by micro-CT, histology and real-time PCR assays. Results We found that β-catenin protein was up-regulated in disc tissues from patients with disc degeneration. To assess the effects of increased β-catenin on disc tissue we generated β-catenin cAct mice. Overexpression of β-catenin in disc cells led to extensive osteophyte formation in 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin cAct mice which were associated with significant changes in the cells and extracellular matrix of disc tissues and growth plate. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that activation of β-catenin could enhance Runx2-dependent Mmp13 and Adamts5 expression. Moreover, genetic ablation of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 under β-catenin cAct background, or treatment of β-catenin cAct mice with a specific MMP13 inhibitor, ameliorated the mutant phenotype. Conclusions β-catenin signaling pathway plays a critical role in disc tissue function. PMID:22422036

  1. p300/β-Catenin Interactions Regulate Adult Progenitor Cell Differentiation Downstream of WNT5a/Protein Kinase C (PKC).

    PubMed

    Rieger, Megan E; Zhou, Beiyun; Solomon, Nicola; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Li, Changgong; Nguyen, Cu; Liu, Yixin; Pan, Jie-Hong; Minoo, Parviz; Crandall, Edward D; Brody, Steven L; Kahn, Michael; Borok, Zea

    2016-03-18

    Maintenance of stem/progenitor cell-progeny relationships is required for tissue homeostasis during normal turnover and repair. Wnt signaling is implicated in both maintenance and differentiation of adult stem/progenitor cells, yet how this pathway serves these dichotomous roles remains enigmatic. We previously proposed a model suggesting that specific interaction of β-catenin with either of the homologous Kat3 co-activators, p300 or CREB-binding protein, differentially regulates maintenance versus differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Limited knowledge of endogenous mechanisms driving differential β-catenin/co-activator interactions and their role in adult somatic stem/progenitor cell maintenance versus differentiation led us to explore this process in defined models of adult progenitor cell differentiation. We focused primarily on alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cells, progenitors of distal lung epithelium, and identified a novel axis whereby WNT5a/protein kinase C (PKC) signaling regulates specific β-catenin/co-activator interactions to promote adult progenitor cell differentiation. p300/β-catenin but not CBP/β-catenin interaction increases as AT2 cells differentiate to a type I (AT1) cell-like phenotype. Additionally, p300 transcriptionally activates AT1 cell-specific gene Aqp-5. IQ-1, a specific inhibitor of p300/β-catenin interaction, prevents differentiation of not only primary AT2 cells, but also tracheal epithelial cells, and C2C12 myoblasts. p300 phosphorylation at Ser-89 enhances p300/β-catenin interaction, concurrent with alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. WNT5a, a traditionally non-canonical WNT ligand regulates Ser-89 phosphorylation and p300/β-catenin interactions in a PKC-dependent manner, likely involving PKCζ. These studies identify a novel intersection of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling in adult progenitor cell differentiation that has important implications for targeting β-catenin to modulate adult progenitor cell

  2. p120 Catenin-Associated Fer and Fyn Tyrosine Kinases Regulate β-Catenin Tyr-142 Phosphorylation and β-Catenin-α-Catenin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Castaño, Julio; Pálmer, Héctor G.; Heisterkamp, Nora; García de Herreros, Antonio; Duñach, Mireia

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin has a key role in the formation of adherens junction through its interactions with E-cadherin and α-catenin. We show here that interaction of β-catenin with α-catenin is regulated by the phosphorylation of β-catenin Tyr-142. This residue can be phosphorylated in vitro by Fer or Fyn tyrosine kinases. Transfection of these kinases to epithelial cells disrupted the association between both catenins. We have also examined whether these kinases are involved in the regulation of this interaction by K-ras. Stable transfectants of the K-ras oncogene in intestinal epithelial IEC18 cells were generated which show little α-catenin-β-catenin association with respect to control clones; this effect is accompanied by increased Tyr-142 phosphorylation and activation of Fer and Fyn kinases. As reported for Fer, Fyn kinase is constitutively bound to p120 catenin; expression of K-ras induces the phosphorylation of p120 catenin on tyrosine residues increasing its affinity for E-cadherin and, consequently, promotes the association of Fyn with the adherens junction complex. Yes tyrosine kinase also binds to p120 catenin but only upon activation, and stimulates Fer and Fyn tyrosine kinases. These results indicate that p120 catenin acts as a docking protein facilitating the activation of Fer/Fyn tyrosine kinases by Yes and demonstrate the role of these p120 catenin-associated kinases in the regulation of β-catenin-α-catenin interaction. PMID:12640114

  3. β catenin in health: A review

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma

    2015-01-01

    β catenin belongs to the armadillo family of proteins. It plays a crucial role in developmental and homeostatic processes. Wnts are a family of 19 secreted glycoproteins that transduce multiple signaling cascades, including the canonical Wnt/β catenin pathway, Wnt/Ca2+ pathway and the Wnt/polarity pathway. This is a review on β catenin, Wnt proteins and their secretion, the signaling pathway, the associated factors and the crucial role of β catenin in odontogenesis. PMID:26604501

  4. β catenin in health: A review.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma

    2015-01-01

    β catenin belongs to the armadillo family of proteins. It plays a crucial role in developmental and homeostatic processes. Wnts are a family of 19 secreted glycoproteins that transduce multiple signaling cascades, including the canonical Wnt/β catenin pathway, Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway and the Wnt/polarity pathway. This is a review on β catenin, Wnt proteins and their secretion, the signaling pathway, the associated factors and the crucial role of β catenin in odontogenesis. PMID:26604501

  5. The levels of epithelial anchor proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 are altered by E7 of human papillomaviruses 5 and 8.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Sandra; Hufbauer, Martin; Marx, Benjamin; Tok, Ali; Majewski, Slawomir; Pfister, Herbert; Akgül, Baki

    2016-02-01

    Infection with viruses of the genus Betapapillomavirus, β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV), is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and HPV8 in patients with the skin disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The relocalization of the junctional bridging proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumour invasion. Here, we report that β-catenin and ZO-1 are strongly upregulated by the E7 oncoproteins of HPV5 and HPV8 in keratinocytes grown in organotypic skin cultures. Although the membrane-tethered form of β-catenin was elevated, no signs of β-catenin activity within the canonical Wnt signalling pathway could be detected. The upregulation of β-catenin and ZO-1 could also be confirmed in the skin of HPV8 transgenic mice as well as in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of EV patients. These data provide the first evidence that β-catenin and ZO-1 are direct targets of E7 of the oncogenic β-HPV types 5 and 8. The ability to deregulate these epithelial junction proteins may contribute to the oncogenic potential of these viruses in human skin. PMID:26645068

  6. Localization of peroxisomal matrix proteins by photobleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Buch, Charlotta; Hunt, Mary C.; Alexson, Stefan E.H.; Hallberg, Einar

    2009-10-16

    The distribution of some enzymes between peroxisomes and cytosol, or a dual localization in both these compartments, can be difficult to reconcile. We have used photobleaching in live cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins to show that imported bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins are retained in the peroxisome. The high mobility of the GFP-fusion proteins in the cytosol and absence of peroxisomal escape makes it possible to eliminate the cytosolic fluorescence by photobleaching, to distinguish between exclusively cytosolic proteins and proteins that are also present at low levels in peroxisomes. Using this technique we found that GFP tagged bile acid-CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) was exclusively localized in the cytosol in HeLa cells. We conclude that the cytosolic localization was due to its carboxyterminal non-consensus peroxisomal targeting signal (-SQL) since mutation of the -SQL to -SKL resulted in BAAT being efficiently imported into peroxisomes.

  7. αT-Catenin Is a Constitutive Actin-binding α-Catenin That Directly Couples the Cadherin·Catenin Complex to Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Wickline, Emily D.; Dale, Ian W.; Merkel, Chelsea D.; Heier, Jonathon A.; Stolz, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    α-Catenin is the primary link between the cadherin·catenin complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian αE-catenin is allosterically regulated: the monomer binds the β-catenin·cadherin complex, whereas the homodimer does not bind β-catenin but interacts with F-actin. As part of the cadherin·catenin complex, αE-catenin requires force to bind F-actin strongly. It is not known whether these properties are conserved across the mammalian α-catenin family. Here we show that αT (testes)-catenin, a protein unique to amniotes that is expressed predominantly in the heart, is a constitutive actin-binding α-catenin. We demonstrate that αT-catenin is primarily a monomer in solution and that αT-catenin monomer binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as strongly as αE-catenin homodimer. The β-catenin·αT-catenin heterocomplex also binds F-actin with high affinity unlike the β-catenin·αE-catenin complex, indicating that αT-catenin can directly link the cadherin·catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we show that a mutation in αT-catenin linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, V94D, promotes homodimerization, blocks β-catenin binding, and in cardiomyocytes disrupts localization at cell-cell contacts. Together, our data demonstrate that αT-catenin is a constitutively active actin-binding protein that can physically couple the cadherin·catenin complex to F-actin in the absence of tension. We speculate that these properties are optimized to meet the demands of cardiomyocyte adhesion. PMID:27231342

  8. Abnormal expression of key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway of articular cartilage in a rat model of exercise-induced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SHEN-SHEN; ZHOU, PU; ZHANG, YANQIU

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular pathogenesis of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in exercise-induced osteoarthritis (OA), 30 male healthy Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups (control, normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups) in order to establish the exercise-induced OA rat model. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Runx-2, BMP-2, Ctnnb1, Sox-9, collagen II, Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin in chon-drocytes were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA levels of Runx-2, BMP-2 and Ctnnb1 were upregulated in the normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups; while Runx-2 and BMP-2 were upregulated in the injured exercise-induced OA group when compared with the normal exercise-induced OA group. The protein levels of Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin were increased and collagen II was reduced in the normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups. Ctnnb1, Wnt-3a and β-catenin, which are key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, were abnormally expressed in chondrocytes of the exercise-induced OA rat model. Ctnnb1, β-catenin and Wnt-3a were suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced OA by abnormally activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway during physical exercise due to excessive pressure. The results of the present study may provide an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of exercise-induced OA. PMID:26794964

  9. G protein-coupled receptor 30 mediates estrogen-induced proliferation of primordial germ cells via EGFR/Akt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chutian; Yu, Minli; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2012-07-01

    In vertebrates, estrogens are required for the normal development and function of postnatal gonads. However, it remains unclear whether estrogens are able to modulate development of the fetal germ cells. Here, we show that, unexpectedly, chicken primordial germ cells (PGC) lacking estrogen receptor α/β still proliferate in response to 17β-estradiol (E(2)). This is due to the capacity of G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), existing on PGC, to directly bind E(2). Knockdown experiments suggest that GPR30 is required for E(2)-stimulated PGC proliferation. Furthermore, this estrogen-induced activation of GPR30 is revealed to occur through the Gβγ-subunit protein-dependent and through the matrix metalloproteinase-dependent transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation results in a series of intracellular events, including activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/serine-threonine kinase/β-catenin pathway, which are followed by the induction of c-fos, c-myc, cyclin D1/E, and B-cell lymphoma 2 expression, and the inhibition of B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein expression and caspase3/9 activity. This eventually leads to decreased apoptosis and increased PGC proliferation. Collectively, these findings offer novel insights into the dynamic mechanism of estrogen action on PGC proliferation and suggest that E(2)/GPR30 signaling might play an important role in regulating fetal germ cell development, particularly at the stage before sexual differentiation. PMID:22635679

  10. Wnt/β-catenin signalling and podocyte dysfunction in proteinuric kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Liu, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are unique, highly specialized, terminally differentiated cells that are integral components of the kidney glomerular filtration barrier. Podocytes are vulnerable to a variety of injuries and in response they undergo a series of changes ranging from hypertrophy, autophagy, dedifferentiation, mesenchymal transition and detachment to apoptosis, depending on the nature and extent of the insult. Emerging evidence indicates that Wnt/β-catenin signalling has a central role in mediating podocyte dysfunction and proteinuria. Wnts are induced and β-catenin is activated in podocytes in various proteinuric kidney diseases. Genetic or pharmacologic activation of β-catenin is sufficient to impair podocyte integrity and causes proteinuria in healthy mice, whereas podocyte-specific ablation of β-catenin protects against proteinuria after kidney injury. Mechanistically, Wnt/β-catenin controls the expression of several key mediators implicated in podocytopathies, including Snail1, the renin–angiotensin system and matrix metalloproteinase 7. Wnt/β-catenin also negatively regulates Wilms tumour protein, a crucial transcription factor that safeguards podocyte integrity. Targeted inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signalling preserves podocyte integrity and ameliorates proteinuria in animal models. This Review highlights advances in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in mediating podocyte injury, and describes the therapeutic potential of targeting this pathway for the treatment of proteinuric kidney disease. PMID:26055352

  11. A Simple Method to Assess Abundance of the β-Catenin Signaling Pool in Cells.

    PubMed

    Flozak, Annette S; Lam, Anna P; Gottardi, Cara J

    2016-01-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a dual-function cell-cell adhesion/transcriptional co-activator protein and an essential transducer of canonical Wnt signals. Although a number of established techniques and reagents are available to quantify the nuclear signaling activity of β-catenin (e.g., TCF-dependent reporter assays, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, and generation of N-terminally hypophosphorylated β-catenin), there are cell-type and context-dependent limitations of these methods. Since the posttranscriptional stabilization of β-catenin outside of the cadherin complex appears universally required for β-catenin signaling, the following method allows for simple assessment of the cadherin-free fraction of β-catenin in cells, using a GST-tagged form of ICAT (Inhibitor of β-Catenin and Tcf) as an affinity matrix. This method is more sensitive and quantitative than immunofluorescence and may be useful in studies that implicate TCF-independent signaling events. PMID:27590151

  12. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 activated enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 complex could activate enamelin gene transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 can directly bind to enamelin 5' regulatory region. {yields} Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling can upregulate enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells. -- Abstract: Enamelin is an ameloblast-specific matrix protein believed to play essential roles in enamel formation. However, mechanisms of enamelin transcription regulation are not clear. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 is a key transcriptional complex involved in tooth development. In this study, the role of {beta}-catenin/LEF1 in enamelin expression was investigated. The 5'-flanking region of the mouse enamelin gene was analyzed and cloned. Co-transfection analysis and mutation assays revealed that two conserved LEF1 responsive elements located at -1002 and -597 bp upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site could augment transcriptional activity of the enamelin. The interaction between the enamelin elements and {beta}-catenin/LEF1 was further confirmed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, LiCl treatment induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin and elevated endogenous enamelin expression in mouse ameloblast-like cells. The results suggested that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling could function in enamelin gene expression by direct interaction through two conserved LEF1 responsive elements on the enamelin gene in ameloblast-like cells.

  13. Beyond β-catenin: prospects for a larger catenin network in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Pierre D; Gottardi, Cara J

    2016-01-01

    β-catenin is widely regarded as the primary transducer of canonical WNT signals to the nucleus. In most vertebrates, there are eight additional catenins that are structurally related to β-catenin, and three α-catenin genes encoding actin-binding proteins that are structurally related to vinculin. Although these catenins were initially identified in association with cadherins at cell-cell junctions, more recent evidence suggests that the majority of catenins also localize to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Moreover, the number of catenins reported to be responsive to canonical WNT signals is increasing. Here, we posit that multiple catenins form a functional network in the nucleus, possibly engaging in conserved protein-protein interactions that are currently better characterized in the context of actin-based cell junctions. PMID:26580716

  14. Wnt activated β-catenin and YAP proteins enhance the expression of non-coding RNA component of RNase MRP in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinjoo; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2015-01-01

    RMRP, the RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) part of the RNase MRP complex functioning in mitochondrial and ribosomal RNA processing. Even though various mutations in the RMRP gene are linked to developmental defects and pathogenesis, its relevance to cancer etiology has not been well established. Here we examined the expression of RMRP and found a significant increase in colorectal and breast cancer patient tissues. So we tested whether the oncogenic signaling pathways, Wnt/β-catenin and Hippo/YAP pathways, are relevant to the enhanced expression of RMRP in cancer cells because of the predicted β-catenin/TCF and YAP/TBX5 elements in the upstream regions of the RMRP gene. As expected, Wnt signal activation significantly induced the RMRP transcription thru β-catenin and YAP transcription factors. More importantly, YAP protein was critical for RMRP transcription by association to the proximal site near the transcription start site of the RMRP gene, a Pol III promoter, along with β-catenin and TBX5 proteins. We propose that the interplay of Wnt and Hippo signaling pathways could regulate target genes, coding or non-coding, by the β-catenin/YAP/TBX5 transcription complex in cancer cells. PMID:26415221

  15. Regulation of protumorigenic pathways by Insulin like growth factor binding protein2 and its association along with β-catenin in breast cancer lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin like growth factor binding proteins modulate the mitogenic and pro survival effects of IGF. Elevated expression of IGFBP2 is associated with progression of tumors that include prostate, ovarian, glioma among others. Though implicated in the progression of breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms involved in IGFBP2 actions are not well defined. This study investigates the molecular targets and biological pathways targeted by IGFBP2 in breast cancer. Methods Transcriptome analysis of breast tumor cells (BT474) with stable knockdown of IGFBP2 and breast tumors having differential expression of IGFBP2 by immunohistochemistry was performed using microarray. Differential gene expression was established using R-Bioconductor package. For validation, gene expression was determined by qPCR. Inhibitors of IGF1R and integrin pathway were utilized to study the mechanism of regulation of β-catenin. Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical staining was performed on breast tumors and experimental cells, respectively for β-catenin and IGFBP2 expression. Results Knockdown of IGFBP2 resulted in differential expression of 2067 up regulated and 2002 down regulated genes in breast cancer cells. Down regulated genes principally belong to cell cycle, DNA replication, repair, p53 signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, Wnt signaling. Whole genome expression analysis of breast tumors with or without IGFBP2 expression indicated changes in genes belonging to Focal adhesion, Map kinase and Wnt signaling pathways. Interestingly, IGFBP2 knockdown clones showed reduced expression of β- catenin compared to control cells which was restored upon IGFBP2 re-expression. The regulation of β-catenin by IGFBP2 was found to be IGF1R and integrin pathway dependent. Furthermore, IGFBP2 and β-catenin are co-ordinately overexpressed in breast tumors and correlate with lymph node metastasis. Conclusion This study highlights regulation of β-catenin by IGFBP2 in breast cancer cells and

  16. All Trans-Retinoic Acid Mediates MED28/HMG Box-Containing Protein 1 (HBP1)/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Huang, Chun-Yin; Li, Chun-I

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin A is required for normal body function, including vision, epithelial integrity, growth, and differentiation. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a family member of vitamin A, has been explored in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of cancer. Dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and disrupted cadherin-catenin complex often contribute to colorectal malignancy. MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, is found highly expressed in breast and colorectal cancers. Our laboratory has also reported that MED28 regulates cell growth, migration, and invasion in human breast cancer cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of ATRA on MED28 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer. HCT116, HT29, SW480, and SW620, four human colorectal cancer cell lines representing different stages of carcinogenesis and harboring critical genetic changes, were employed. Our data indicated that regardless of genetic variations among these cells, suppression of MED28 reduced the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and nuclear β-catenin, but increased the expression of E-cadherin and HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) where HBP1 has been described as a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The reporter activity of an HBP1 promoter increased upon MED28 knockdown, but decreased upon MED28 overexpression. ATRA reduced the expression of MED28 and mimicked the effect of MED28 suppression in down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, ATRA can reverse the suppressive effect of MED28 on HBP1 and E-cadherin and inactivate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer, suggesting a protective effect of ATRA against colorectal cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1796-1803, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660958

  17. Matrix Gla protein inhibition of tooth mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kaipatur, N R; Murshed, M; McKee, M D

    2008-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization is regulated by mineral ion availability, proteins, and other molecular determinants. To investigate protein regulation of mineralization in tooth dentin and cementum, and in alveolar bone, we expressed matrix Gla protein (MGP) ectopically in bones and teeth in mice, using an osteoblast/odontoblast-specific 2.3-kb Col1a1 promoter. Mandibles were analyzed by radiography, micro-computed tomography, light microscopy, histomorphometry, and transmission electron microscopy. While bone and tooth ECMs were established in the Col1a1-Mgp mice, extensive hypomineralization was observed, with values of unmineralized ECM from four- to eight-fold higher in dentin and alveolar bone when compared with that in wild-type tissues. Mineralization was virtually absent in tooth root dentin and cellular cementum, while crown dentin showed "breakthrough" areas of mineralization. Acellular cementum was lacking in Col1a1-Mgp teeth, and unmineralized osteodentin formed within the pulp. These results strengthen the view that bone and tooth mineralization is critically regulated by mineralization inhibitors. PMID:18719210

  18. The regenerating spinal cord of gecko maintains unaltered expression of β-catenin following tail amputation.

    PubMed

    Song, Honghua; Man, Lili; Wang, Yingjie; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-03-01

    The Wingless/Integrated (Wnt) signaling pathway plays important roles in central nervous system (CNS) development and regeneration, and β-catenin, the central component, has been considered in association with adult neurogenesis. To decipher its roles on spontaneous spinal cord regeneration, we cloned β-catenin from Gekko japonicus and examined its function in regenerating spinal cord. The protein was localized in the neurons and oligodendrocytes and maintained a stable expression levels during the spinal cord regeneration. The temporal pattern of expression has been found to be completely distinct with those of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Experiments of gain-of-function by overexpression of full length β-catenin or stabilized ΔN90-β-catenin revealed that the accumulated protein attenuates the elongation of neurites and oligodendrocyte process. Knockdown of endogenous β-catenin, however, decreased proliferation of oligodendrocytes by affecting expression of downstream lef1 and c-jun. The upregulated extracellular matrix fibronectin in injured cord was found to be inefficient in regulation of β-catenin expression. Our results suggest that a tightly regulated stable expression of β-catenin is required for the spontaneous spinal cord regeneration. PMID:25178821

  19. Beta-catenin expression in human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, T.; Shiozaki, H.; Shibamoto, S.; Oka, H.; Kimura, Y.; Tamura, S.; Inoue, M.; Monden, T.; Ito, F.; Monden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion in tissue is mainly regulated by homotypic interaction of cadherin molecules, which are anchored to the cytoskeleton via cytoplasmic proteins, including alpha- and beta-catenin. Although we previously demonstrated that alpha-catenin is crucial for cadherin function in vivo, little is known about the role of beta-catenin. We examined the expression of beta-catenin in human carcinoma samples along with normal tissue (esophagus, stomach, and colon) by immunostaining using our antibody for beta-catenin. Normal epithelium strongly expressed beta-catenin. However, beta-catenin expression was frequently reduced in primary tumors of the esophagus (10 of 15, 67%), stomach (9 of 19, 47%), and colon (11 of 22, 50%). From an immunoprecipitation study, we found that beta-catenin forms a complex with E-cadherin not only in the normal epithelium but also in cancerous tissues. In coexpression patterns of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, 43 (77%) of the 56 tumors showed a similar expression of both molecules, whereas the other 13 tumors (23%) showed positive staining for E-cadherin and reduced expression of beta-catenin. These findings suggest that beta-catenin forms a complex with E-cadherin in vivo and down-regulation of beta-catenin expression is associated with malignant transformation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546224

  20. Apical Membrane Localization of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor Protein and Subcellular Distribution of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex in Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is implicated in the majority of hereditary and sporadic colon cancers. APC is known to function as a tumor suppressor through downregulation of β-catenin as part of a high molecular weight complex known as the β-catenin destruction complex. The molecular composition of the intact complex and its site of action in the cell are still not well understood. Reports on the subcellular localization of APC in various cell systems have differed significantly and have been consistent with an association with a cytosolic complex, with microtubules, with the nucleus, or with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. To better understand the role of APC and the destruction complex in colorectal cancer, we have begun to characterize and isolate these complexes from confluent polarized human colon epithelial cell monolayers and other epithelial cell types. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that a predominant fraction of APC associates tightly with the apical plasma membrane in a variety of epithelial cell types. This apical membrane association is not dependent on the mutational status of either APC or β-catenin. An additional pool of APC is cytosolic and fractionates into two distinct high molecular weight complexes, 20S and 60S in size. Only the 20S fraction contains an appreciable portion of the cellular axin and small but detectable amounts of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and β-catenin. Therefore, it is likely to correspond to the previously characterized β-catenin destruction complex. Dishevelled is almost entirely cytosolic, but does not significantly cofractionate with the 20S complex. The disproportionate amount of APC in the apical membrane and the lack of other destruction complex components in the 60S fraction of APC raise questions about whether these pools of APC take part in the degradation of β-catenin, or alternatively, whether they could be involved in other functions of the protein that

  1. Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated expression of stem cell proteins are associated with osteosarcoma side population cells of high tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    YI, XI-JUN; ZHAO, YU-HUA; QIAO, LI-XIANG; JIN, CHUN-LEI; TIAN, JING; LI, QIU-SHI

    2015-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, the presence of a small sub-population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have a significant implication on cancer treatment and are responsible for tumor recurrence. Previous studies have reported that alterations in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling are crucial in the maintenance of CSCs. In the present study, the characteristic features and activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in CSCs from osteosarcoma, an aggressive human bone tumor, were investigated. In total, ~2.1% of the cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells were identified in the osteosarcoma samples. The results of subsequent western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the protein levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1 were markedly upregulated in the fluorescence-activated cell sorted osteosarcoma SP cells. In addition, the elevated expression levels of stem cell proteins, including CD133, nestin Oct-4, Sox-2 and Nanog were significantly higher in the SP cells, which contributed to self-renewal and enhanced the proliferation rate of the SP cells. Furthermore, the SP cells were found to be highly invasive and able to form tumors in vivo. Taken together, these data suggested that the identification of novel anticancer drugs, which suppress the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and its downstream pathway may assist in eradicating osteosarcoma stem cells. PMID:26134785

  2. Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevated expression of stem cell proteins are associated with osteosarcoma side population cells of high tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xi-Jun; Zhao, Yu-Hua; Qiao, Li-Xiang; Jin, Chun-Lei; Tian, Jing; Li, Qiu-Shi

    2015-10-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, the presence of a small sub‑population of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have a significant implication on cancer treatment and are responsible for tumor recurrence. Previous studies have reported that alterations in the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling are crucial in the maintenance of CSCs. In the present study, the characteristic features and activation of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling in CSCs from osteosarcoma, an aggressive human bone tumor, were investigated. In total, ~2.1% of the cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells were identified in the osteosarcoma samples. The results of subsequent western blot and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the protein levels of β‑catenin and cyclin D1 were markedly upregulated in the fluorescence‑activated cell sorted osteosarcoma SP cells. In addition, the elevated expression levels of stem cell proteins, including CD133, nestin Oct‑4, Sox‑2 and Nanog were significantly higher in the SP cells, which contributed to self‑renewal and enhanced the proliferation rate of the SP cells. Furthermore, the SP cells were found to be highly invasive and able to form tumors in vivo. Taken together, these data suggested that the identification of novel anticancer drugs, which suppress the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling and its downstream pathway may assist in eradicating osteosarcoma stem cells. PMID:26134785

  3. The RNA-binding protein hnRNPA2 regulates β-catenin protein expression and is overexpressed in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Villasevil, M Eugenia M; Nixon, Colin; Ahmad, Imran; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The RNA-binding protein hnRNPA2 (HNRNPA2B1) is upregulated in cancer, where it controls alternative pre-mRNA splicing of cancer-relevant genes. Cytoplasmic hnRNPA2 is reported in aggressive cancers, but is functionally uncharacterized. We explored the role of hnRNPA2 in prostate cancer (PCa). Methods: hnRNPA2 function/localization/expression in PCa was determined using biochemical approaches (colony forming/proliferation/luciferase reporter assays/flow cytometry/immunohistocytochemistry). Binding of hnRNPA2 within cancer-relevant 3′-UTR mRNAs was identified by bioinformatics. Results: RNAi-mediated knockdown of hnRNPA2 reduced colony forming and proliferation, while hnRNPA2 overexpression increased proliferation of PCa cells. Nuclear hnRNPA2 is overexpressed in high-grade clinical PCa, and is also observed in the cytoplasm in some cases. Ectopic expression of a predominantly cytoplasmic variant hnRNPA2-ΔRGG also increased PCa cell proliferation, suggesting that cytoplasmic hnRNPA2 may also be functionally relevant in PCa. Consistent with its known cytoplasmic roles, hnRNPA2 was associated with 3′-UTR mRNAs of several cancer-relevant mRNAs including β-catenin (CTNNB1). Both wild-type hnRNPA2 and hnRNPA2-ΔRGG act on CTNNB1 3′-UTR mRNA, increasing endogenous CTNNB1 mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression and nuclear localization. Conclusion: Nuclear and cytoplasmic hnRNPA2 are present in PCa and appear to be functionally important. Cytoplasmic hnRNPA2 may affect the cancer cell phenotype through 3′-UTR mRNA-mediated regulation of β-catenin expression and other cancer-relevant genes. PMID:24823909

  4. Green tea polyphenol, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, induces toxicity in human skin cancer cells by targeting β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Tripti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2013-12-01

    The green tea polyphenol, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects in several skin tumor models, and efforts are continued to investigate the molecular targets responsible for its cytotoxic effects to cancer cells. Our recent observation that β-catenin is upregulated in skin tumors suggested the possibility that the anti-skin carcinogenic effects of EGCG are mediated, at least in part, through its effects on β-catenin signaling. We have found that treatment of the A431 and SCC13 human skin cancer cell lines with EGCG resulted in reduced cell viability and increased cell death and that these cytotoxic effects were associated with inactivation of β-catenin signaling. Evidence of EGCG-induced inactivation of β-catenin included: (i) reduced accumulation of nuclear β-catenin; (ii) enhanced levels of casein kinase1α, reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and increased phosphorylation of β-catenin on critical serine{sup 45,33/37} residues; and (iii) reduced levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which are down-stream targets of β-catenin. Treatment of cells with prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) enhanced the accumulation of β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin signaling. Treatment with either EGCG or an EP2 antagonist (AH6809) reduced the PGE{sub 2}-enhanced levels of cAMP, an upstream regulator of β-catenin. Inactivation of β-catenin by EGCG resulted in suppression of cell survival signaling proteins. siRNA knockdown of β-catenin in A431 and SCC13 cells reduced cell viability. Collectively, these data suggest that induction of cytotoxicity in skin cancer cells by EGCG is mediated by targeting of β-catenin signaling and that the β-catenin signaling is upregulated by inflammatory mediators. - Highlights: • EGCG inhibits cancer cell viability through inactivation of β-catenin signaling. • Inactivation of β-catenin involves the downregulation of inflammatory mediators. • EGCG

  5. Human VE-Cadherin Fusion Protein as an Artificial Extracellular Matrix Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation Functions of Endothelial Cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Shuai, Qizhi; Li, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Chao; Cao, Lei; Hu, Feifei; Akaike, Toshihiro; Wang, Jian-xi; Gu, Zhongwei; Yang, Jun

    2016-03-14

    In an attempt to enhance endothelial cell capture and promote the vascularization of engineered tissue, we biosynthesized and characterized the recombinant fusion protein consisting of human vascular endothelial-cadherin extracellular domain and immunoglobulin IgG Fc region (hVE-cad-Fc) to serve as a bioartificial extracellular matrix. The hVE-cad-Fc protein naturally formed homodimers and was used to construct hVE-cad-Fc matrix by stably adsorbing on polystyrene plates. Atomic force microscop assay showed uniform hVE-cad-Fc distribution with nanorod topography. The hVE-cad-Fc matrix markedly promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhesion and proliferation with fibroblastoid morphology. Additionally, the hVE-cad-Fc matrix improved HUVECs migration, vWF expression, and NO release, which are closely related to vascularization. Furthermore, the hVE-cad-Fc matrix activated endogenous VE-cadherin/β-catenin proteins and effectively triggered the intracellular signals such as F-actin stress fiber, p-FAK, AKT, and Bcl-2. Taken together, hVE-cad-Fc could be a promising bioartificial matrix to promote vascularization in tissue engineering. PMID:26859785

  6. Enolase 1 (ENO1) and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3) regulate Wnt/β-catenin-driven trans-differentiation of murine alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mutze, Kathrin; Vierkotten, Sarah; Milosevic, Jadranka; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alveolar epithelium represents a major site of tissue destruction during lung injury. It consists of alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells. ATII cells are capable of self-renewal and exert progenitor function for ATI cells upon alveolar epithelial injury. Cell differentiation pathways enabling this plasticity and allowing for proper repair, however, are poorly understood. Here, we applied proteomics, expression analysis and functional studies in primary murine ATII cells to identify proteins and molecular mechanisms involved in alveolar epithelial plasticity. Mass spectrometry of cultured ATII cells revealed a reduction of carbonyl reductase 2 (CBR2) and an increase in enolase 1 (ENO1) and protein disulfide-isomerase associated 3 (PDIA3) protein expression during ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation. This was accompanied by increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Notably, ENO1 and PDIA3, along with T1α (podoplanin; an ATI cell marker), exhibited decreased protein expression upon pharmacological and molecular Wnt/β-catenin inhibition in cultured ATII cells, whereas CBR2 levels were stabilized. Moreover, we analyzed primary ATII cells from mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury, a model exhibiting activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo. We observed reduced CBR2 significantly correlating with surfactant protein C (SFTPC), whereas ENO1 and PDIA3 along with T1α were increased in injured ATII cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENO1, as well as PDIA3, in primary ATII cells led to reduced T1α expression, indicating diminished cell trans-differentiation. Our data thus identified proteins involved in ATII-to-ATI cell trans-differentiation and suggest a Wnt/β-catenin-driven functional role of ENO1 and PDIA3 in alveolar epithelial cell plasticity in lung injury and repair. PMID:26035385

  7. Matrix Gla protein reinforces angiogenic resolution.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bikram; Albig, Allan R

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is an ECM molecule commonly associated with dysfunctions of large blood vessels such as arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis. However, the exact role of MGP in the microvasculature is not clear. Utilizing a mouse MGP knockout model we found that MGP suppresses angiogenic sprouting from mouse aorta restricts microvascular density in cardiac and skeletal muscle, and is an endogenous inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. Similarly, morpholino based knockdown of MGP in zebrafish embryos caused a progressive loss of luminal structures in intersegmental vessels, a phenotype reminiscent of Dll4/Notch inhibition. Accordingly, MGP suppressed Notch-dependent Hes-1 promoter activity and expression of Jagged1 mRNA relative to Dll4 mRNA. However, inhibition of BMP but not Notch or VEGF signaling reversed the excessive angiogenic sprouting phenotype of MGP knockout aortic rings suggesting that MGP may normally suppress angiogenic sprouting by blocking BMP signaling. Collectively, these results suggest that MGP is a multi-functional inhibitor of normal and abnormal angiogenesis that may function by coordinating with both Notch and BMP signaling pathways. PMID:23110920

  8. Novel role of STRAP in progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer through Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guandou; Zhang, Bixiang; Yang, Shanzhong; Jin, Lin; Datta, Arunima; Bae, Sejong; Chen, Xiaoping; Datta, Pran K

    2016-01-01

    Serine-Threonine Kinase Receptor-Associated Protein (STRAP) interacts with a variety of proteins and influences a wide range of cellular processes. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we show the molecular mechanism by which STRAP induces CRC metastasis by promoting β-catenin signaling through its stabilization. We have genetically engineered a series of murine and human CRC and lung cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of STRAP on cell migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumorigenicity and metastasis in vivo. Downregulation of STRAP inhibits invasion, tumorigenicity, and metastasis of CRC cells. Mechanistically, STRAP binds with GSK-3β and reduces the phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, and degradation of β-catenin through preventing its binding to the destruction complex. This leads to an inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduction in the expression of downstream targets, such as Cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and ß-TrCP. In human CRC specimens, higher STRAP expression correlates significantly with β-catenin expression with increased nuclear levels (R =0.696, p < .0001, n =128). Together, these results suggest that STRAP increases invasion and metastasis of CRC partly through inhibiting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of β-catenin and promoting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26910283

  9. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  10. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; van der Veer, Eric P.; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K.; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3′UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  11. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Ruben G; van der Veer, Eric P; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3'UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  12. EGF Inhibits Wnt/β-Catenin-Induced Osteoblast Differentiation by Promoting β-Catenin Degradation.

    PubMed

    Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Lee, Hye-Lim; Baek, Kyunghwa; Woo, Kyung Mi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Gwan-Shik

    2015-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and canonical Wnts are representative developmental signals that enhance osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Previously, we demonstrated that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation by inducing Smurf1 expression. However, the regulatory role of EGF in Wnt/β-catenin-induced osteoblast differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGF on Wnt/β-catenin signaling-induced osteoblast differentiation using the C2C12 cell line. EGF significantly suppressed the expression of osteoblast marker genes, which were induced by Wnt3a and a GSK-3β inhibitor. EGF increased the expression levels of Smurf1 mRNA and protein. Smurf1 knockdown rescued Wnt/β-catenin-induced osteogenic marker gene expression in the presence of EGF. EGF treatment or Smurf1 overexpression did not affect β-catenin mRNA expression levels, but reduced β-catenin protein levels and TOP-Flash activity. EGF and Smurf1 promoted β-catenin ubiquitination. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed that Smurf1 associates with β-catenin. These results suggest that EGF/Smurf1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin-induced osteogenic differentiation and that Smurf1 downregulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling by enhancing proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. PMID:26015066

  13. Matrix Rigidity Activates Wnt Signaling through Down-regulation of Dickkopf-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Liu, Yiuying; Gurler, Hilal; Kim, Mijung; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre A.; Rooper, Lisa; Shepard, Jaclyn; Weiss, Michael; Shea, Lonnie D.; Penzes, Peter; Ravosa, Matthew J.; Stack, M. Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Cells respond to changes in the physical properties of the extracellular matrix with altered behavior and gene expression, highlighting the important role of the microenvironment in the regulation of cell function. In the current study, culture of epithelial ovarian cancer cells on three-dimensional collagen I gels led to a dramatic down-regulation of the Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf-1 with a concomitant increase in nuclear β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin/Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Increased three-dimensional collagen gel invasion was accompanied by transcriptional up-regulation of the membrane-tethered collagenase membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, and an inverse relationship between dickkopf-1 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed in human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Similar results were obtained in other tissue-invasive cells such as vascular endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanism for functional coupling of matrix adhesion with Wnt signaling. PMID:23152495

  14. The nucleolar protein NIFK promotes cancer progression via CK1α/β-catenin in metastasis and Ki-67-dependent cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Su, Chia-Yi; Wu, Pei-Yu; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Pan, Wen-An; Jan, Yi-Hua; Chang, Yu-Chang; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chen, Chi-Long; Ger, Luo-Ping; Chang, Hong-Tai; Yang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Shyy, John Y-J; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar protein interacting with the FHA domain of pKi-67 (NIFK) is a Ki-67-interacting protein. However, its precise function in cancer remains largely uninvestigated. Here we show the clinical significance and metastatic mechanism of NIFK in lung cancer. NIFK expression is clinically associated with poor prognosis and metastasis. Furthermore, NIFK enhances Ki-67-dependent proliferation, and promotes migration, invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo via downregulation of casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a suppressor of pro-metastatic TCF4/β-catenin signaling. Inversely, CK1α is upregulated upon NIFK knockdown. The silencing of CK1α expression in NIFK-silenced cells restores TCF4/β-catenin transcriptional activity, cell migration, and metastasis. Furthermore, RUNX1 is identified as a transcription factor of CSNK1A1 (CK1α) that is negatively regulated by NIFK. Our results demonstrate the prognostic value of NIFK, and suggest that NIFK is required for lung cancer progression via the RUNX1-dependent CK1α repression, which activates TCF4/β-catenin signaling in metastasis and the Ki-67-dependent regulation in cell proliferation. PMID:26984280

  15. The nucleolar protein NIFK promotes cancer progression via CK1α/β-catenin in metastasis and Ki-67-dependent cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Su, Chia-Yi; Wu, Pei-Yu; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Pan, Wen-An; Jan, Yi-Hua; Chang, Yu-Chang; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chen, Chi-Long; Ger, Luo-Ping; Chang, Hong-Tai; Yang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Shyy, John Y-J; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar protein interacting with the FHA domain of pKi-67 (NIFK) is a Ki-67-interacting protein. However, its precise function in cancer remains largely uninvestigated. Here we show the clinical significance and metastatic mechanism of NIFK in lung cancer. NIFK expression is clinically associated with poor prognosis and metastasis. Furthermore, NIFK enhances Ki-67-dependent proliferation, and promotes migration, invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo via downregulation of casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a suppressor of pro-metastatic TCF4/β-catenin signaling. Inversely, CK1α is upregulated upon NIFK knockdown. The silencing of CK1α expression in NIFK-silenced cells restores TCF4/β-catenin transcriptional activity, cell migration, and metastasis. Furthermore, RUNX1 is identified as a transcription factor of CSNK1A1 (CK1α) that is negatively regulated by NIFK. Our results demonstrate the prognostic value of NIFK, and suggest that NIFK is required for lung cancer progression via the RUNX1-dependent CK1α repression, which activates TCF4/β-catenin signaling in metastasis and the Ki-67-dependent regulation in cell proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11288.001 PMID:26984280

  16. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials. PMID:26851341

  17. Atomic resolution structure of Moloney murine leukemia virus matrix protein and its relationship to other retroviral matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Nico; Harlos, Karl; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David; Fry, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    Matrix proteins associated with the viral membrane are important in the formation of the viral particle and in virus maturation. The 1.0 A crystal structure of the ecotropic Gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) matrix protein reveals the conserved topology of other retroviral matrix proteins, despite undetectable sequence similarity. The N terminus (normally myristylated) is exposed and adjacent to a basic surface patch, features likely to contribute to membrane binding. The four proteins in the asymmetric unit make varied contacts. The M-MuLV matrix structure is intermediate, between those of the lentiviruses and other retroviruses. The protein fold appears to be maintained, in part, by the conservation of side chain packing, which may provide a useful tool for searching for weak distant similarities in proteins. PMID:12467570

  18. Gene evolution and functions of extracellular matrix proteins in teeth.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2013-03-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides physical support for tissues, but it is also critical for tissue development, homeostasis and disease. Over 300 ECM molecules have been defined as comprising the "core matrisome" in mammals through the analysis of whole genome sequences. During tooth development, the structure and functions of the ECM dynamically change. In the early stages, basement membranes (BMs) separate two cell layers of the dental epithelium and the mesenchyme. Later in the differentiation stages, the BM layer is replaced with the enamel matrix and the dentin matrix, which are secreted by ameloblasts and odontoblasts, respectively. The enamel matrix genes and the dentin matrix genes are each clustered in two closed regions located on human chromosome 4 (mouse chromosome 5), except for the gene coded for amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein, which is located on the sex chromosomes. These genes for enamel and dentin matrix proteins are derived from a common ancestral gene, but as a result of evolution, they diverged in terms of their specific functions. These matrix proteins play important roles in cell adhesion, polarity, and differentiation and mineralization of enamel and dentin matrices. Mutations of these genes cause diseases such as odontogenesis imperfect (OI) and amelogenesis imperfect (AI). In this review, we discuss the recently defined terms matrisome and matrixome for ECMs, as well as focus on genes and functions of enamel and dentin matrix proteins. PMID:23539364

  19. STAT3 paradoxically stimulates β-catenin expression but inhibits β-catenin function

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahem, Salih; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh; Baloch, Kanwal; Muhammad, Belal; Fadhil, Wakkas; Jackson, Darryl; Nateri, Abdolrahman S; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signalling and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) are oncogenic signalling pathways which are deregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we investigated the interaction of these two pathways. Firstly, we investigated biochemical interaction by inhibiting STAT3 and β-catenin (through gene knock-down and dominant-negative TCF4 expression) in nine CRC cell lines. β-catenin inhibition did not affect STAT3 levels, whereas STAT3 knock-down resulted in reduced β-catenin mRNA and protein levels. The reduction in β-catenin protein was not prevented by proteasome inhibition, and IL6-induced STAT3 activation resulted in increased β-catenin mRNA. This suggests that STAT3 positively regulates β-catenin (at a transcriptional level) and evaluation of 44 CRCs by immunostaining supported this by showing an association between nuclear STAT3 expression and nuclear β-catenin (P = 0.022). We tested the functional interaction between STAT3 and Wnt signalling by knocking down STAT3 and β-catenin individually and in combination. Knock-down of β-catenin and STAT3 individually inhibited cell proliferation (P < 0. 001 for each) through G1 arrest. However, simultaneous knock-down of STAT3 and β-catenin had a significantly weaker effect than knock-down of β-catenin alone (P < 0.01). Knock-down of STAT3 and β-catenin, individually and together, inhibited cell motility (P < 0.001) without evidence of interaction. We conclude that STAT3 regulates β-catenin but β-catenin does not regulate STAT3. The STAT3/β-catenin interaction is complex but may reduce the proliferative activity of β-catenin possibly by taking β-catenin protein beyond the optimal level. This may indicate biological differences in tumours where both STAT3 and β-catenin are activated compared to those where only one is activated. PMID:25348333

  20. Nipah virus matrix protein: expert hacker of cellular machines.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Ruth E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-08-01

    Nipah virus (NiV, Henipavirus) is a highly lethal emergent zoonotic paramyxovirus responsible for repeated human outbreaks of encephalitis in South East Asia. There are no approved vaccines or treatments, thus improved understanding of NiV biology is imperative. NiV matrix protein recruits a plethora of cellular machinery to scaffold and coordinate virion budding. Intriguingly, matrix also hijacks cellular trafficking and ubiquitination pathways to facilitate transient nuclear localization. While the biological significance of matrix nuclear localization for an otherwise cytoplasmic virus remains enigmatic, the molecular details have begun to be characterized, and are conserved among matrix proteins from divergent paramyxoviruses. Matrix protein appropriation of cellular machinery will be discussed in terms of its early nuclear targeting and later role in virion assembly. PMID:27350027

  1. Adaptable Lipid Matrix Promotes Protein-Protein Association in Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Polyansky, Anton A; Fleck, Markus; Volynsky, Pavel E; Efremov, Roman G

    2015-09-01

    The cell membrane is "stuffed" with proteins, whose transmembrane (TM) helical domains spontaneously associate to form functionally active complexes. For a number of membrane receptors, a modulation of TM domains' oligomerization has been shown to contribute to the development of severe pathological states, thus calling for detailed studies of the atomistic aspects of the process. Despite considerable progress achieved so far, several crucial questions still remain: How do the helices recognize each other in the membrane? What is the driving force of their association? Here, we assess the dimerization free energy of TM helices along with a careful consideration of the interplay between the structure and dynamics of protein and lipids using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in the hydrated lipid bilayer for three different model systems - TM fragments of glycophorin A, polyalanine and polyleucine peptides. We observe that the membrane driven association of TM helices exhibits a prominent entropic character, which depends on the peptide sequence. Thus, a single TM peptide of a given composition induces strong and characteristic perturbations in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which may facilitate the initial "communication" between TM helices even at the distances of 20-30 Å. Upon tight helix-helix association, the immobilized lipids accommodate near the peripheral surfaces of the dimer, thus disturbing the packing of the surrounding. The dimerization free energy of the modeled peptides corresponds to the strength of their interactions with lipids inside the membrane being the lowest for glycophorin A and similarly higher for both homopolymers. We propose that the ability to accommodate lipid tails determines the dimerization strength of TM peptides and that the lipid matrix directly governs their association. PMID:26575933

  2. Polyether sulfone/hydroxyapatite mixed matrix membranes for protein purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfen; Wu, Lishun

    2014-07-01

    This work proposes a novel approach for protein purification from solution using mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprising of hydroxyapatite (HAP) inside polyether sulfone (PES) matrix. The influence of HAP particle loading on membrane morphology is studied. The MMMs are further characterized concerning permeability and adsorption capacity. The MMMs show purification of protein via both diffusion as well as adsorption, and show the potential of using MMMs for improvements in protein purification techniques. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein. The properties and structures of MMMs prepared by immersion phase separation process were characterized by pure water flux, BSA adsorption and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  3. The role of the wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in formation and maintenance of bone and teeth.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peipei; Bonewald, L F

    2016-08-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is known as one of the important molecular cascades that regulate cell fate throughout lifespan. The Wnt signaling pathway is further separated into the canonical signaling pathway that depends on the function of β-catenin (Wnt/β-catenin pathway) and the noncanonical pathways that operate independently of β-catenin (planar cell polarity pathway and Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway). The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is complex and consists of numerous receptors, inhibitors, activators, modulators, phosphatases, kinases and other components. However, there is one central, critical molecule to this pathway, β-catenin. While there are at least 3 receptors, LRP 4, 5 and 6, and over twenty activators known as the wnts, and several inhibitors such as sclerostin, dickkopf and secreted frizzled-related protein, these all target β-catenin. These regulators/modulators function to target β-catenin either to the proteasome for degradation or to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Therefore, the interaction of β-catenin with different factors and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway will be the subject of this review with a focus on how this pathway relates to and functions in the formation and maintenance of bone and teeth based on mainly basic and pre-clinical research. Also in this review, the role of this pathway in osteocytes, bone cells embedded in the mineralized matrix, is covered in depth. This pathway is not only important in mineralized tissue growth and development, but for modulation of the skeleton in response to loading and unloading and the viability and health of the adult and aging skeleton. PMID:27210503

  4. Convergence of 3′,5′-Cyclic Adenosine 5′-Monophosphate/Protein Kinase A and Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β/β-Catenin Signaling in Corpus Luteum Progesterone Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A.; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and β-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3β at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of β-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated β-catenin (Δ90 β-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3β (GSK-S9A) reduced β-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of β-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3β/β-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH. PMID:19819952

  5. Cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complex protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Covian, Raul

    2012-01-01

    It has become appreciated over the last several years that protein phosphorylation within the cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complexes is extensive. Given the importance of oxidative phosphorylation and the balance of energy metabolism in the heart, the potential regulatory effect of these classical signaling events on mitochondrial function is of interest. However, the functional impact of protein phosphorylation and the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for it are relatively unknown. Exceptions include the well-characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase regulatory system. The first task of this review is to update the current status of protein phosphorylation detection primarily in the matrix and evaluate evidence linking these events with enzymatic function or protein processing. To manage the scope of this effort, we have focused on the pathways involved in energy metabolism. The high sensitivity of modern methods of detecting protein phosphorylation and the low specificity of many kinases suggests that detection of protein phosphorylation sites without information on the mole fraction of phosphorylation is difficult to interpret, especially in metabolic enzymes, and is likely irrelevant to function. However, several systems including protein translocation, adenine nucleotide translocase, cytochrome c, and complex IV protein phosphorylation have been well correlated with enzymatic function along with the classical dehydrogenase systems. The second task is to review the current understanding of the kinase/phosphatase system within the matrix. Though it is clear that protein phosphorylation occurs within the matrix, based on 32P incorporation and quantitative mass spectrometry measures, the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for this process is ill-defined. An argument is presented that remnants of the much more labile bacterial protein phosphoryl transfer system may be present in the matrix and that the

  6. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei-ling; Qiu, Long-hai; Lian, Jia-yan; Li, Jia-chun; Hu, Jun; Liu, Xiao-lin

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group) alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group). As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves. PMID:27127495

  8. Beta-catenin and BMP-2 synergize to promote osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation.

    PubMed

    Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Sheikh, Sharmin; Stains, Joseph P; Salazar, Valerie S; Cheng, Su-Li; Chen, Di; Civitelli, Roberto

    2005-02-01

    Mutations of critical components of the Wnt pathway profoundly affect skeletal development and maintenance, probably via modulation of beta-catenin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that beta-catenin is involved in mesenchymal lineage allocation to osteogenic cells using a beta-catenin mutant with constitutive transcriptional activity (DeltaN151). Although this stable beta-catenin had no effects by itself on osteogenic differentiation of multipotent embryonic cell lines, it synergized with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) resulting in dramatic stimulation of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin gene expression, and matrix mineralization. Likewise, DeltaN151 and BMP-2 synergistically stimulated new bone formation after subperiosteal injection in mouse calvaria in vivo. Conversely, DeltaN151 prevented adipogenic differentiation from pre-adipocytic or uncommitted mesenchymal cells in vitro. Intriguingly, the synergism with BMP-2 on gene transcription occurred without altering expression of Cbfa1/Runx2, suggesting actions independent or downstream of this osteoblast-specific transcription factor. Thus, beta-catenin directs osteogenic lineage allocation by enhancing mesenchymal cell responsiveness to osteogenic factors, such as BMP-2, in part via Tcf/Lef dependent mechanisms. In vivo, this synergism leads to increased new bone formation. PMID:15526274

  9. ECM1 regulates tumor metastasis and CSC-like property through stabilization of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-m; Nam, K; Oh, S; Lim, J; Kim, R K; Shim, D; Choi, J-h; Lee, S-J; Yu, J-H; Lee, J W; Ahn, S H; Shin, I

    2015-12-10

    Extracellular Matrix Protein 1 (ECM1) is a marker for tumorigenesis and is correlated with invasiveness and poor prognosis in various types of cancer. However, the functional role of ECM1 in cancer metastasis is unclear. Here, we detected high ECM1 level in breast cancer patient sera that was associated with recurrence of tumor. The modulation of ECM1 expression affected not only cell migration and invasion, but also sphere-forming ability and drug resistance in breast cancer cell lines. In addition, ECM1 regulated the gene expression associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression and cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance. Interestingly, ECM1 increased β-catenin expression at the post-translational level through induction of MUC1, which was physically associated with β-catenin. Indeed, the association between β-catenin and the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail was increased by ECM1. Furthermore, forced expression of β-catenin altered the gene expression that potentiated EMT progression and CSC phenotype maintenance in the cells. These data provide evidence that ECM1 has an important role in cancer metastasis through β-catenin stabilization. PMID:25746001

  10. Low expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in aggressive nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, YOUTU; BAI, JIWEI; HONG, LINCHUAN; LIU, CHUNHUI; YU, SHENGYUAN; YU, GUOQIANG; ZHANG, YAZHUO

    2016-01-01

    The identification of a specific molecular marker for aggressiveness of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) is urgently required in order to guide the clinical diagnosis and treatment of NFPAs. In the present study, low expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) in NFPAs was demonstrated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results confirmed an abnormal accumulation of free β-catenin in the nuclei of NFPAs, which is the core step for the activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway. Furthermore, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, the downstream proteins of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway, were overexpressed in aggressive NFPAs. These findings demonstrated the activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway in aggressive NFPAs. In addition, sFRP2 expression was observed to be inversely correlated to the aggressiveness of NFPAs. Therefore, sFRP2 may act as a tumor suppressor through modulation of the cellular cytosolic pool of β-catenin in NFPAs. Furthermore, the expression of sFRP2 may serve as a biomarker for NFPAs aggressiveness and prognosis. PMID:27347125

  11. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells.

  12. Conformal Nanopatterning of Extracellular Matrix Proteins onto Topographically Complex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Jallerat, Quentin; Szymanski, John M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a method for conformal nanopatterning of extracellular matrix proteins onto engineered surfaces independent of underlying microtopography. This enables fibronectin, laminin, and other proteins to be applied to biomaterial surfaces in complex geometries inaccessible using traditional soft lithography techniques. Engineering combinatorial surfaces that integrate topographical and biochemical micropatterns enhances control of the biotic-abiotic interface, used here to understand cardiomyocyte response to competing physical and chemical cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25506720

  13. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  14. Malignant gliomas induce and exploit astrocytic mesenchymal-like transition by activating canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Wang, Yajing; Liu, Xiuting; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kequan; Wang, Qing; Hu, Rong

    2016-07-01

    The complex microenvironment of malignant gliomas plays a dynamic and usually cancer-promoting role in glioma progression. Astrocytes, the major stromal cells in the brain, can be activated by glioma microenvironment, resulting in a layer of reactive astrocytes surrounding the gliomas. Reactive astrocytes are universally characterized with the upregulation of glial fibrillary protein and glycoprotein podoplanin. In this work, we investigated the role of reactive astrocytes on malignant glioma microenvironment and the potential mechanism by which glioma cells activated the tumor-associated astrocytes (TAAs). The reactive astrocytes were observed around gliomas in the intracranial syngeneic implantation of rat C6 and mouse GL261 glioma cells in vivo, as well as primary astrocytes cultured with glioma cells condition medium in vitro. Besides, reactive astrocytes exhibited distinct epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition and enhanced migration and invasion activity, with the decrease of E-cadherin and concomitant increase of vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases. Furthermore, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated in TAAs. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor XAV939 and β-catenin plasmid were used to verify the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on TAAs and their invasion ability. Taken together, our findings established that glioma cells remarkably activated astrocytes via upregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling, with obviously mesenchymal-like transition and increased migration and invasion ability, indicating that glioma cells may stimulate adjacent astrocytes to degrade extracellular matrix and thereby promoting tumor invasiveness. PMID:27236327

  15. The first armadillo repeat is involved in the recognition and regulation of beta-catenin phosphorylation by protein kinase CK1.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Victor H; Ferrarese, Anna; Venerando, Andrea; Marin, Oriano; Allende, Jorge E; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2006-12-26

    Multiple phosphorylation of beta-catenin by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in the Wnt pathway is primed by CK1 through phosphorylation of Ser-45, which lacks a typical CK1 canonical sequence. Synthetic peptides encompassing amino acids 38-64 of beta-catenin are phosphorylated by CK1 on Ser-45 with low affinity (K(m) approximately 1 mM), whereas intact beta-catenin is phosphorylated at Ser-45 with very high affinity (K(m) approximately 200 nM). Peptides extended to include a putative CK1 docking motif (FXXXF) at 70-74 positions or a F74AA mutation in full-length beta-catenin had no significant effect on CK1 phosphorylation efficiency. beta-Catenin C-terminal deletion mutants up to residue 181 maintained their high affinity, whereas removal of the 131-181 fragment, corresponding to the first armadillo repeat, was deleterious, resulting in a 50-fold increase in K(m) value. Implication of the first armadillo repeat in beta-catenin targeting by CK1 is supported in that the Y142E mutation, which mimics phosphorylation of Tyr-142 by tyrosine kinases and promotes dissociation of beta-catenin from alpha-catenin, further improves CK1 phosphorylation efficiency, lowering the K(m) value to <50 nM, approximating the physiological concentration of beta-catenin. In contrast, alpha-catenin, which interacts with the N-terminal region of beta-catenin, prevents Ser-45 phosphorylation of CK1 in a dose-dependent manner. Our data show that the integrity of the N-terminal region and the first armadillo repeat are necessary and sufficient for high-affinity phosphorylation by CK1 of Ser-45. They also suggest that beta-catenin association with alpha-catenin and beta-catenin phosphorylation by CK1 at Ser-45 are mutually exclusive. PMID:17172446

  16. Minor proteins and enzymes of the Drosophila eggshell matrix.

    PubMed

    Fakhouri, Mazen; Elalayli, Maggie; Sherling, Daniel; Hall, Jacklyn D; Miller, Eric; Sun, Xutong; Wells, Lance; LeMosy, Ellen K

    2006-05-01

    The Drosophila eggshell provides an in vivo model system for extracellular matrix assembly, in which programmed gene expression, cell migrations, extracellular protein trafficking, proteolytic processing, and cross-linking are all required to generate a multi-layered and regionally complex architecture. While abundant structural components of the eggshell are known and are being characterized, less is known about non-abundant structural, regulatory, and enzymatic components that are likely to play critical roles in eggshell assembly. We have used sensitive mass spectrometry-based analyses of fractionated eggshell matrices to validate six previously predicted eggshell proteins and to identify eleven novel components, and have characterized the expression patterns of many of their mRNAs. Among these are several putative structural or regulatory (non-enzymatic) proteins, most larger in mass than the major eggshell proteins and often showing preferential expression in follicle cells overlying specific structural features of the eggshell. Of particular note are the putative enzymes, some likely to be involved in matrix cross-linking (two yellow family members previously implicated in eggshell integrity, a heme peroxidase, and a small-molecule oxidoreductase) and others possibly involved in matrix proteolysis or adhesion (proteins related to cathepsins B and D). This work provides a framework for future molecular studies of eggshell assembly. PMID:16515779

  17. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  18. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser89 is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S89 was substituted with G89 (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  19. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser(89) is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S(89) was substituted with G(89) (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  20. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  1. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Elise; Hendaoui, Ismaïl; Coulouarn, Cédric; Ribault, Catherine; Leseur, Julie; Eliat, Pierre-Antoine; Mebarki, Sihem; Corlu, Anne; Clément, Bruno; Musso, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [3H] thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying non functional APC. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  2. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, E; Hendaoui, I; Coulouarn, C; Ribault, C; Leseur, J; Eliat, P-A; Mebarki, S; Corlu, A; Clément, B; Musso, O

    2011-01-27

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [(3)H]-thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate, inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying nonfunctional Adenomatous polyposis coli. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  3. Proteins of insoluble matrix of avian (gallus gallus) eggshell.

    PubMed

    Miksík, Ivan; Eckhardt, Adam; Sedláková, Pavla; Mikulikova, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    The protein composition of the insoluble avian eggshell matrix was studied. The determination of these proteins insoluble in water (EDTA-insoluble) was carried out using enzymatic cleavage followed by a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The influence of various enzymes on the protein splitting also was studied. The distribution of proteins depends on the type of layer (localization within the eggshell): ovocalyxin-32 was found mainly in the outer layer (the cuticle); ovocleidin-116 and 17 and ovocalyxin-36 were found throughout the whole eggshell, whereas ovalbumin was only found in the inner layer, the mammillary. The pigment (protoporphyrin IX) was mainly found in the cuticle and is incorporated into the protein network. PMID:17364661

  4. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Kusum; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Chu, Yanxia; Richards, Thomas; Sciurba, Joshua; Myerburg, Michael; Zhang, Yingze; Parwani, Anil V.; Gibson, Kevin F.; Kaminski, Naftali

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and life threatening disease with median survival of 2.5–3 years. The IPF lung is characterized by abnormal lung remodeling, epithelial cell hyperplasia, myofibroblast foci formation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Analysis of gene expression microarray data revealed that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a non-collagenous extracellular matrix protein is among the most significantly up-regulated genes (Fold change 13, p-value <0.05) in IPF lungs. This finding was confirmed at the mRNA level by nCounter® expression analysis in additional 115 IPF lungs and 154 control lungs as well as at the protein level by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that COMP was expressed in dense fibrotic regions of IPF lungs and co-localized with vimentin and around pSMAD3 expressing cells. Stimulation of normal human lung fibroblasts with TGF-β1 induced an increase in COMP mRNA and protein expression. Silencing COMP in normal human lung fibroblasts significantly inhibited cell proliferation and negatively impacted the effects of TGF-β1 on COL1A1 and PAI1. COMP protein concentration measured by ELISA assay was significantly increased in serum of IPF patients compared to controls. Analysis of serum COMP concentrations in 23 patients who had prospective blood draws revealed that COMP levels increased in a time dependent fashion and correlated with declines in force vital capacity (FVC). Taken together, our results should encourage more research into the potential use of COMP as a biomarker for disease activity and TGF-β1 activity in patients with IPF. Hence, studies that explore modalities that affect COMP expression, alleviate extracellular matrix rigidity and lung restriction in IPF and interfere with the amplification of TGF-β1 signaling should be persuaded. PMID:24376648

  5. Opposing actions of the synapse-associated protein of 97-kDa molecular weight (SAP97) and Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) on Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Boccitto, M; Doshi, S; Newton, I P; Nathke, I; Neve, R; Dong, F; Mao, Y; Zhai, J; Zhang, L; Kalb, R

    2016-06-21

    It has been suggested that synapse-associated protein of 97-kDa molecular weight (SAP97) is a susceptibility factor for childhood and adult neuropsychiatric disorders. SAP97 is a scaffolding protein that shares direct and indirect binding partners with the Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene product, a gene with strong association with neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we investigated the possibility that these two proteins converge upon a common molecular pathway. Since DISC1 modifies Wnt/β-catenin signaling via changes in glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) phosphorylation, we asked if SAP97 impacts Wnt/β-catenin signaling and GSK3β phosphorylation. We find that SAP97 acts as inhibitor of Wnt signaling activity and can suppress the stimulatory effects of DISC1 on β-catenin transcriptional activity. Reductions in SAP97 abundance also decrease GSK3β phosphorylation. In addition, we find that over expression of DISC1 leads to an increase in the abundance of SAP97, by inhibiting its proteasomal degradation. Our findings suggest that SAP97 and DISC1 contribute to maintaining Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity within a homeostatic range by regulating GSK3β phosphorylation. PMID:27026592

  6. Targeting the β-catenin nuclear transport pathway in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Cara; Sharma, Manisha; Henderson, Beric R

    2014-08-01

    The nuclear localization of specific proteins is critical for cellular processes such as cell division, and in recent years perturbation of the nuclear transport cycle of key proteins has been linked to cancer. In particular, specific gene mutations can alter nuclear transport of tumor suppressing and oncogenic proteins, leading to cell transformation or cancer progression. This review will focus on one such factor, β-catenin, a key mediator of the canonical wnt signaling pathway. In response to a wnt stimulus or specific gene mutations, β-catenin is stabilized and translocates to the nucleus where it binds TCF/LEF-1 transcription factors to transactivate genes that drive tumor formation. Moreover, the nuclear import and accumulation of β-catenin correlates with clinical tumor grade. Recent evidence suggests that the primary nuclear transport route of β-catenin is independent of the classical Ran/importin import machinery, and that β-catenin directly contacts the nuclear pore complex to self-regulate its own entry into the nucleus. Here we propose that the β-catenin nuclear import pathway may provide an opportunity for identification of specific drug targets and inhibition of β-catenin nuclear function, much like the current screening of drugs that block binding of β-catenin to LEF-1/TCFs. Here we will discuss the diverse mechanisms regulating nuclear localization of β-catenin and their potential as targets for anticancer agent development. PMID:24820952

  7. Signaling function of alpha-catenin in microtubule regulation.

    PubMed

    Shtutman, Michael; Chausovsky, Alexander; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Schiefermeier, Natalia; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Kam, Zvi; Fuchs, Elaine; Geiger, Benjamin; Borisy, Gary G; Bershadsky, Alexander D

    2008-08-01

    Centrosomes control microtubule dynamics in many cell types, and their removal from the cytoplasm leads to a shift from dynamic instability to treadmilling behavior and to a dramatic decrease of microtubule mass (Rodionov et al., 1999; PNAS 96:115). In cadherin-expressing cells, these effects can be reversed:non-centrosomal cytoplasts that form cadherin-mediated adherens junctions display dense arrays of microtubules (Chausovsky et al., 2000; Nature Cell Biol 2:797). In adherens junctions, cadherin's cytoplasmic domain binds p120 catenin and beta-catenin, which in turn binds alpha-catenin. To elucidate the roles of the cadherin-associated proteins in regulating microtubule dynamics, we prepared GFP-tagged, plasma membrane targeted or untargeted p120 catenin, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin and tested their ability to rescue the loss of microtubule mass caused by centrosomal removal in the poorly adhesive cell line CHO-K1. Only membrane targeting of alpha-catenin led to a significant increase in microtubule length and density in centrosome-free cytoplasts. Expression of non-membrane-targeted alpha-catenin produced only a slight effect, while both membrane-targeted and non-targeted p120 and beta-catenin were ineffective in this assay. Together, these findings suggest that alpha-catenin is able to regulate microtubule dynamics in a centrosome-independent manner. PMID:18677116

  8. Signaling function of α-catenin in microtubule regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shtutman, Michael; Chausovsky, Alexander; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Schiefermeier, Natalia; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Kam, Zvi; Fuchs, Elaine; Geiger, Benjamin; Borisy, Gary G.; Bershadsky, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomes control microtubule dynamics in many cell types, and their removal from the cytoplasm leads to a shift from dynamic instability to treadmilling behavior and to a dramatic decrease of microtubule mass (Rodionov et al., 1999; PNAS 96:115). In cadherin-expressing cells, these effects can be reversed: non-centrosomal cytoplasts that form cadherin-mediated adherens junctions display dense arrays of microtubules (Chausovsky et al., 2000; Nature Cell Biol 2:797). In adherens junctions, cadherin’s cytoplasmic domain binds p120 catenin and β-catenin, which in turn binds α-catenin. To elucidate the roles of the cadherin-associated proteins in regulating microtubule dynamics, we prepared GFP-tagged, plasma membrane targeted or untargeted p120 catenin, α-catenin and β-catenin and tested their ability to rescue the loss of microtubule mass caused by centrosomal removal in the poorly adhesive cell line CHO-K1. Only membrane targeting of α-catenin led to a significant increase in microtubule length and density in centrosome-free cytoplasts. Expression of non-membrane-targeted α-catenin produced only a slight effect, while both membrane-targeted and non-targeted p120 and β-catenin were ineffective in this assay. Together, these findings suggest that α-catenin is able to regulate microtubule dynamics in a centrosome-independent manner. PMID:18677116

  9. Pooled-matrix protein interaction screens using Barcode Fusion Genetics.

    PubMed

    Yachie, Nozomu; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Mellor, Joseph C; Weile, Jochen; Jacob, Yves; Verby, Marta; Ozturk, Sedide B; Li, Siyang; Cote, Atina G; Mosca, Roberto; Knapp, Jennifer J; Ko, Minjeong; Yu, Analyn; Gebbia, Marinella; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Tyagi, Tanya; Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Roth, Jonathan F; Wong, Cassandra; Musa, Louai; Snider, Jamie; Liu, Yi-Chun; Yu, Haiyuan; Braun, Pascal; Stagljar, Igor; Hao, Tong; Calderwood, Michael A; Pelletier, Laurence; Aloy, Patrick; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput binary protein interaction mapping is continuing to extend our understanding of cellular function and disease mechanisms. However, we remain one or two orders of magnitude away from a complete interaction map for humans and other major model organisms. Completion will require screening at substantially larger scales with many complementary assays, requiring further efficiency gains in proteome-scale interaction mapping. Here, we report Barcode Fusion Genetics-Yeast Two-Hybrid (BFG-Y2H), by which a full matrix of protein pairs can be screened in a single multiplexed strain pool. BFG-Y2H uses Cre recombination to fuse DNA barcodes from distinct plasmids, generating chimeric protein-pair barcodes that can be quantified via next-generation sequencing. We applied BFG-Y2H to four different matrices ranging in scale from ~25 K to 2.5 M protein pairs. The results show that BFG-Y2H increases the efficiency of protein matrix screening, with quality that is on par with state-of-the-art Y2H methods. PMID:27107012

  10. Thermal stability of matrix protein from Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Morán, Irene Sánchez; Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Barroso, Isabel Muñoz; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Zhadan, Galina; Gómez, Javier; Shnyrov, Valery L; Villar, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The thermal stability of the matrix protein (M protein) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been investigated using high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at pH 7.4. The thermal folding/unfolding of M protein at this pH value is a reversible process involving a highly cooperative transition between folded and unfolded monomers with a transition temperature (Tm) of 63 °C, an unfolding enthalpy, ΔH(Tm), of 340 kcal mol(-1), and the difference in heat capacity between the native and denatured states of the protein, ΔCp, of 5.1 kcal K(-1) mol(-1). The heat capacity of the native state of the protein is in good agreement with the values calculated using a structure-based parameterization, whereas the calculated values for the hypothetical fully-unfolded state of the protein is higher than those determined experimentally. This difference between the heat capacity of denatured M protein and the heat capacity expected for an unstructured polypeptide of the same sequence, together with the data derived from the heat-induced changes in the steady-state fluorescence of the protein, indicates that the polypeptide chain maintains a significant amount of residual structure after thermal denaturation. PMID:23916643

  11. Role of matrix protein in cytopathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, D; Harmison, G G; Schubert, M

    1990-01-01

    The matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) plays an important structural role in viral assembly, and it also has a regulatory role in viral transcription. We demonstrate here that the M protein has an additional function. It causes visible cytopathic effects (CPE), as evidenced by the typical rounding of polygonal cells after VSV infection. We have analyzed a temperature-sensitive mutant of the M protein of VSV (tsG33) which is defective in viral assembly and which fails to cause morphological changes of the cells after infection at the nonpermissive temperature (40 degrees C). Interestingly, this defect in viral assembly as well as the CPE were reversible. Microinjection of antisense oligonucleotides which specifically inhibit M protein translation also inhibited the occurrence of CPE. Most importantly, when cells were transfected with a cDNA encoding the temperature-sensitive M protein of tsG33, no CPE was observed at the nonpermissive temperature. However, when these cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (32 degrees C), they rounded up and detached from the dish. These results demonstrate that M protein in the absence of the other viral proteins causes rounding of the cells, probably through a disorganization of the cytoskeleton. The absence of CPE at the nonpermissive temperature is correlated with an abnormal dotted staining pattern of M in these cells, suggesting that the mutant M protein may self-aggregate or associate with membranes rather than interact with cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:2157054

  12. URG11 promotes gastric cancer growth and invasion by activation of β-catenin signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Sun, Shiren; Lian, Zhaorui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Juan; Xie, Huahong; Fan, Rui; Song, Jiugang; Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Jie; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), a new gene upregulated by Heptatitis B Virus X protein (HBx), was previously shown to activate β-catenin and promote hepatocellular growth and tumourigenesis. Although the oncogenic role of URG11 in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma has been well documented, its relevance to other human malignancies and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we reported a novel function of URG11 to promote gastric cancer growth and metastasis. URG11 was found to be highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent nontumourous ones by immunohistochemical staining and western blot. Knockdown of URG11 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively attenuated the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness and metastatic potential of gastric cancer cells. URG11 inhibition led to decreased expression of β-catenin and its nuclear accumulation in gastric cancer cells and extensive costaining between URG11 and β-catenin was observed in gastric cancer tissues. Transient transfection assays with the β-catenin promoter showed that it was inhibited by URG11-specific small inhibitory RNA. Moreover, suppression of endogenous URG11 expression results in decreased activation of β-catenin/TCF and its downstream effector genes, cyclinD1 and membrane type 1 matrix metallopeptidase (MT1-MMP), which are known to be involved in cell proliferation and invasion, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest that URG11 contributes to gastric cancer growth and metastasis at least partially through activation of β-catenin signalling pathway. These findings also propose a promising target for gene therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:19413886

  13. Procaine Inhibits Osteo/Odontogenesis through Wnt/β-Catenin Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Herencia, Carmen; Diaz-Tocados, Juan Miguel; Jurado, Lidia; Montes de Oca, Addy; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria Encarnación; Martín-Alonso, Carmen; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M.; Vergara, Noemi; Rodríguez, Mariano; Almadén, Yolanda; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodontitis is a complex pathology characterized by the loss of alveolar bone. The causes and the mechanisms that promote this bone resorption still remain unknown. The knowledge of the critical regulators involved in the alteration of alveolar bone homeostasis is of great importance for developing molecular therapies. Procaine is an anesthetic drug with demethylant properties, mainly used by dentists in oral surgeries. The inhibitor role of Wnt signaling of procaine was described in vitro in colon cancer cells. Methods In this work we evaluated the role of procaine (1 uM) in osteo/odontogenesis of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Similarly, the mechanisms whereby procaine achieves these effects were also studied. Results Procaine administration led to a drastic decrease of calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining and an increase in the expression of Matrix Gla Protein. With respect to osteo/odontogenic markers, procaine decreased early and mature osteo/odontogenic markers. In parallel, procaine inhibited canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, observing a loss of nuclear β-catenin, a decrease in Lrp5 and Frizzled 3, a significant increase of sclerostin and Gsk3β and an increase of phosphorylated β-catenin. The combination of osteo/odontogenic stimuli and Lithium Chloride decreased mRNA expression of Gsk3β, recovered by Procaine. Furthermore it was proved that Procaine alone dose dependently increases the expression of Gsk3β and β-catenin phosphorylation. These effects of procaine were also observed on mature osteoblast. Interestingly, at this concentration of procaine no demethylant effects were observed. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that procaine administration drastically reduced the mineralization and osteo/odontogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin pathway through the increase of Gsk3β expression and β-catenin phosphorylation. PMID:27257912

  14. Interaction of EGFR to δ-catenin leads to δ-catenin phosphorylation and enhances EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongfeng; Ryu, Taeyong; Shrestha, Nensi; Yuan, Tingting; Kim, Hangun; Shrestha, Hridaya; Cho, Young-Chang; Seo, Young-Woo; Song, Woo Keun; Kim, Kwonseop

    2016-01-01

    Expression of δ-catenin reportedly increases during late stage prostate cancer. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that expression of EGFR is enhanced in hormone refractory prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated the possible correlation between EGFR and δ-catenin in prostate cancer cells. We found that EGFR interacted with δ-catenin and the interaction decreased in the presence of EGF. We also demonstrated that, on one hand, EGFR phosphorylated δ-catenin in a Src independent manner in the presence of EGF and on the other hand, δ-catenin enhanced protein stability of EGFR and strengthened the EGFR/Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Our findings added a new perspective to the interaction of EGFR to the E-cadherin complex. They also provided novel insights to the roles of δ-catenin in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26883159

  15. Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 5 Attenuates High Phosphate-Induced Calcification in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by Inhibiting the Wnt/ß-Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dai; Diao, Zongli; Han, Xue; Liu, Wenhu

    2016-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is highly prevalent and represents a major cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. High phosphate (HP) levels are strongly associated with VC in this population. Secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (SFRP5), one of the inhibitors of the Wnt pathway, is a known anti-inflammatory adipokine with a positive effect on metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, in addition to its anticancer potency. However, the role of SFRP5 in the pathophysiology of VC is unclear. This work aimed to study the mechanism of action of SFRP5 on the progression of HP-induced VC, which resembles the CKD-related VC, through its direct effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Addition of SFRP5 significantly inhibited HP-induced calcification of VSMCs as determined by Alizarin red staining and calcium content. The inhibitory effect of SFRP5 on calcification of VSMCs was due to the suppression of HP-induced expression of calcification and osteoblastic markers. In addition, SFRP5 abrogated HP-induced activation of the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway, which plays a key role in the pathogenesis of VC. The specificity of SFRP5 for the inhibition of calcification of VSMCs was confirmed by using a neutralizing antibody to SFRP5. Our results suggest that SFRP5 inhibits HP-induced calcification of VSMCs by inhibiting the expression of calcification and osteoblastic markers, as well as the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway. Our study may indicate that SFRP5 is a potential therapeutic agent in calcification of VSMCs. PMID:26895007

  16. Enhancement of Runx2 expression is potentially linked to β-catenin accumulation in canine intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Munetaka; Aikawa, Takeshi; Hakozaki, Takaharu; Arai, Kiyotaka; Ochi, Hiroki; Haro, Hirotaka; Tagawa, Masahiro; Asou, Yoshinori; Hara, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) greatly affects the quality of life. The nucleus pulposus (NP) of chondrodystrophic dog breeds (CDBs) is similar to the human NP because the cells disappear with age and are replaced by fibrochondrocyte-like cells. Because IVDD develops as early as within the first year of life, we used canines as a model to investigate the in vitro mechanisms underlying IVDD. The mechanism underlying age-related IVDD, however, is poorly understood. Several research groups have suggested that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in IVDD. However, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signals in IVD cells is not yet well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling could enhance Runx2 expression in IVDD and lead to IVD calcification. Nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue was obtained from Beagle dogs after evaluation of the degeneration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Histological analysis showed that lack of Safranin-O staining, calcified area, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13-positive cells increased with progression of the degeneration. Furthermore, the levels of β-catenin- and Runx2-positive cells also increased. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the MRI signal intensity and mRNA expression levels of β-catenin and Runx2 are correlated in NP tissues. Moreover, supplementation of LiCl induced β-catenin accumulation and Runx2 expression. In contrast, FH535 inhibited LiCl-induced upregulation. These results suggest that Runx2 transcript and protein expression, potentially in combination with β-catenin accumulation, are enhanced in degenerated and calcified intervertebral discs of CDBs. PMID:24916026

  17. The β-catenin destruction complex.

    PubMed

    Stamos, Jennifer L; Weis, William I

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is highly regulated to insure the correct temporal and spatial activation of its target genes. In the absence of a Wnt stimulus, the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin is degraded by a multiprotein "destruction complex" that includes the tumor suppressors Axin and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), the Ser/Thr kinases GSK-3 and CK1, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and the E3-ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP. The complex generates a β-TrCP recognition site by phosphorylation of a conserved Ser/Thr-rich sequence near the β-catenin amino terminus, a process that requires scaffolding of the kinases and β-catenin by Axin. Ubiquitinated β-catenin is degraded by the proteasome. The molecular mechanisms that underlie several aspects of destruction complex function are poorly understood, particularly the role of APC. Here we review the molecular mechanisms of destruction complex function and discuss several potential roles of APC in β-catenin destruction. PMID:23169527

  18. Molecular mechanisms mediating vascular calcification: role of matrix Gla protein.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Diane; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2006-10-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a higher incidence of vascular calcification and a greatly increased risk of cardiovascular death. The mechanisms involved in the accelerated vascular calcification observed in CKD have recently become clearer, leading to the hypothesis that a lack of natural inhibitors of calcification may trigger calcium deposition. One of these inhibitory factors, matrix Gla protein (MGP), is the focus of the present review. MGP, originally isolated from bone, is a vitamin K-dependent protein that is also highly expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells. MGP has been confirmed as a calcification-inhibitor in numerous studies; however, its mechanism of action is not completely understood. It potentially acts in several ways to regulate calcium deposition including: (i) binding calcium ions and crystals; (ii) antagonizing bone morphogenetic protein and altering cell differentiation; (iii) binding to extracellular matrix components; and (iv) regulating apoptosis. Its expression is regulated by several factors including retinoic acid, vitamin D and extracellular calcium ions, and a reduced form of vitamin K (KH2) is important in maintaining MGP in an active form. Therefore, strategies aimed at increasing its expression and activity may be beneficial in tipping the balance in favour of inhibition of calcification in CKD. PMID:17014561

  19. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) promote Wnt/Wg signaling through stabilization of beta-catenin/Arm and stimulation of target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wendy; Swarup, Sharan; Chen, Joanna; Ishitani, Tohru; Verheyen, Esther M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway represents a conserved signaling cascade involved in diverse biological processes. Misregulation of Wnt/Wg signal transduction has profound effects on development. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) represent a novel family of serine/threonine kinases. Members of this group (in particular Hipk2) are implicated as important factors in transcriptional regulation to control cell growth, apoptosis and development. Here, we provide genetic and phenotypic evidence that the sole Drosophila member of this family, Hipk, functions as a positive regulator in the Wg pathway. Expression of hipk in the wing rescues loss of the Wg signal, whereas loss of hipk can enhance decreased wg signaling phenotypes. Furthermore, loss of hipk leads to diminished Arm protein levels, whereas overexpression of hipk promotes the Wg signal by stabilizing Arm, resulting in activation of Wg responsive targets. In Wg transcriptional assays, Hipk enhanced Tcf/Arm-mediated gene expression in a kinase-dependent manner. In addition, Hipk can bind to Arm and Drosophila Tcf, and phosphorylate Arm. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, Hipk was found to promote the stabilization of Arm. We observe similar molecular interactions between Lef1/beta-catenin and vertebrate Hipk2, suggesting a direct and conserved role for Hipk proteins in promoting Wnt signaling. PMID:19088090

  20. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: A macroarray study

    PubMed Central

    FUTYMA, KONRAD; MIOTŁA, PAWEŁ; RÓŻYŃSKA, KRYSTYNA; ZDUNEK, MAŁGORZATA; SEMCZUK, ANDRZEJ; RECHBERGER, TOMASZ; WOJCIEROWSKI, JACEK

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs. PMID:25231141

  1. Analysis of protein dynamics in the pericellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; Young, Dylan

    2015-03-01

    The pericellular matrix (PCM) is a low density, hydrated polymer coating that extends into the extracellular space from the surface of many living cells. The PCM controls access to cell and tissue surfaces, regulating a diverse set of processes from cell adhesion to protein transport and storage. The cell coat consists of a malleable backbone - the large polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) - with its structure, its material properties, and its bio-functionality tuned by a diverse set of HA binding proteins. These proteins add charge, cross-links and growth factor-like ligands into the brush. Dynamic interactions between the HA and its binding proteins can be observed using single particle tracking in a fluorescence microscope. The resulting single molecule trajectories can contain evidence of site hoping, with the proteins dynamically moving between different states of motion as they bind and unbind from the HA. Here, we present an evaluation of hidden Markov models for the analysis of such multi-mobility trajectories. Simulated trajectories are used to probe the limits of this approach for molecular trajectories of limited length and the results are used to inform the design of particle tracking experiments.

  2. Associations of beta-catenin alterations and MSI screening status with expression of key cell cycle regulating proteins and survival from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their pivotal roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interrelationship and prognostic significance of beta-catenin alterations and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer (CRC) needs to be further clarified. In this paper, we studied the associations between beta-catenin overexpression and MSI status with survival from CRC, and with expression of p21, p27, cyclin D1 and p53, in a large, prospective cohort study. Methods Immunohistochemical MSI-screening status and expression of p21, p27 and p53 was assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 cases of incident CRC in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Chi Square and Spearman’s correlation tests were used to explore the associations between beta-catenin expression, MSI status, clinicopathological characteristics and investigative parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the relationship between beta-catenin overexpression, MSI status and cancer specific survival (CSS). Results Positive MSI screening status was significantly associated with older age, female sex, proximal tumour location, non-metastatic disease, and poor differentiation, and inversely associated with beta-catenin overexpression. Beta-catenin overexpression was significantly associated with distal tumour location, low T-stage and well-differentiated tumours. Patients with MSI tumours had a significantly prolonged CSS in the whole cohort, and in stage III-IV disease, also in multivariable analysis, but not in stage I-II disease. Beta-catenin overexpression was associated with a favourable prognosis in the full cohort and in patients with stage III-IV disease. Neither MSI nor beta-catenin status were predictive for response to adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively treated stage III patients. P53 and p27 expression was positively associated with beta-catenin overexpression and inversely associated with MSI. Cyclin D1 expression was positively associated with MSI

  3. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26780384

  4. Expression of bone matrix proteins in urolithiasis model rats.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Fujita, K; Sasaki, S; Sato, M; Sugimoto, M; Hirota, S; Kitamura, Y; Nomura, S; Kohri, K

    1999-08-01

    Urinary calcium stones are a pathological substance, and they show similarities to physiological mineralization and other pathological mineralizations. The expression of messenger (m) RNAs of osteopontin (OPN), matrix Gla protein (MGP), osteonectin (ON) and osteocalcin (OC) in bones and teeth has been described. We previously identified OPN as an important stone matrix protein. In addition, the spontaneous calcification of arteries and cartilage in mice lacking MGP was recently reported, a finding which indicates that MGP has a function as an inhibitor of mineralization. Here, we examined the mRNA expressions of OPN, MGP, ON, and OC in the kidneys of stone-forming model rats administered an oxalate precursor, ethylene glycol (EG) for up to 28 days. The Northern blotting showed that the mRNA expressions of OPN and MGP were markedly increased with the administration of EG, but their expression patterns differed. The OPN mRNA expression reached the maximal level at day 7 after the initiation of the EG treatment and showed no significant difference after 14 and 28 days, whereas the MGP mRNA expression rose gradually to day 28. The in situ hybridization demonstrated that the cell type expressing OPN mRNA was different from that expressing MGP. We suggest that OPN acts on calcification and MGP acts on suppression. PMID:10460895

  5. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process. PMID:26968261

  6. Interactions of Plakoglobin and [beta]-Catenin with Desmosomal Cadherins BASIS OF SELECTIVE EXCLUSION OF [alpha]- AND [beta]-CATENIN FROM DESMOSOMES

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hee-Jung; Gross, Julia C.; Pokutta, Sabine; Weis, William I.; Stanford-MED

    2009-11-18

    Plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin are homologous armadillo repeat proteins found in adherens junctions, where they interact with the cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins and with {alpha}-catenin. Plakoglobin, but normally not {beta}-catenin, is also a structural constituent of desmosomes, where it binds to the cytoplasmic domains of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins and desmocollins. Here, we report structural, biophysical, and biochemical studies aimed at understanding the molecular basis of selective exclusion of {beta}-catenin and {alpha}-catenin from desmosomes. The crystal structure of the plakoglobin armadillo domain bound to phosphorylated E-cadherin shows virtually identical interactions to those observed between {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin. Trypsin sensitivity experiments indicate that the plakoglobin arm domain by itself is more flexible than that of {beta}-catenin. Binding of plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin to the intracellular regions of E-cadherin, desmoglein1, and desmocollin1 was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. Plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin bind strongly and with similar thermodynamic parameters to E-cadherin. In contrast, {beta}-catenin binds to desmoglein-1 more weakly than does plakoglobin. {beta}-Catenin and plakoglobin bind with similar weak affinities to desmocollin-1. Full affinity binding of desmoglein-1 requires sequences C-terminal to the region homologous to the catenin-binding domain of classical cadherins. Although pulldown assays suggest that the presence of N- and C-terminal {beta}-catenin 'tails' that flank the armadillo repeat region reduces the affinity for desmosomal cadherins, calorimetric measurements show no significant effects of the tails on binding to the cadherins. Using purified proteins, we show that desmosomal cadherins and {alpha}-catenin compete directly for binding to plakoglobin, consistent with the absence of {alpha}-catenin in desmosomes.

  7. FIP200 inhibits β-catenin-mediated transcription by promoting APC-independent β-catenin ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Choi, J D; Ryu, M; Ae Park, M; Jeong, G; Lee, J-S

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase-family-interacting protein of 200 kDa (FIP200) has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions, including cell adhesion, autophagy, development and proliferation. Furthermore, FIP200 is considered to have tumor-suppressive activity, which may be correlated with its inactivation in human breast cancers, in addition to its role as an important signal transduction node. Herein, we report that FIP200 interacts with the oncoprotein β-catenin. Moreover, FIP200 promotes destabilization of wild-type β-catenin, but not a cancer-causing form of β-catenin, and as a result represses the β-catenin-mediated transcription. FIP200-induced degradation of β-catenin is independent of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) of the well-established β-catenin destruction complex (glycogen synthase kinase-3β/axin/APC), in a component of β-catenin E3 ubiquitin ligase, β-TrCP-dependent manner. Thus, the APC-independent β-catenin degradation by FIP200 suggests a role for FIP200 in tumor suppression in the presence of APC dysfunction. These findings reveal a new and important function of FIP200 in regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:22751121

  8. Characterization of the proteins comprising the integral matrix of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryonic spicules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, C. E.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we enumerate and characterize the proteins that comprise the integral spicule matrix of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins reveals that there are 12 strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins and approximately three dozen less strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins. The majority of the proteins have acidic isoelectric points; however, there are several spicule matrix proteins that have more alkaline isoelectric points. Western blotting analysis indicates that SM50 is the spicule matrix protein with the most alkaline isoelectric point. In addition, two distinct SM30 proteins are identified in embryonic spicules, and they have apparent molecular masses of approximately 43 and 46 kDa. Comparisons between embryonic spicule matrix proteins and adult spine integral matrix proteins suggest that the embryonic 43-kDa SM30 protein is an embryonic isoform of SM30. An adult 49-kDa spine matrix protein is also identified as a possible adult isoform of SM30. Analysis of the SM30 amino acid sequences indicates that a portion of SM30 proteins is very similar to the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin proteins.

  9. δ-Catenin interacts with LEF-1 and negatively regulates its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    He, Yongfeng; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Hangun; Kim, Kwonseop

    2015-08-01

    δ-Catenin and β-catenin belong to different subfamilies of armadillo proteins but share some common binding partners, such as E-cadherin. This is the first study that demonstrated a novel common binding partner for δ-catenin and β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1). We found that the N-terminus of δ-catenin (amino acids 85-325) bound to the middle region of LEF-1 unlike β-catenin. Overexpressed δ-catenin entered the nucleus and inhibited LEF-1-mediated transcriptional activity in Bosc23 and DLD-1 cell lines. The current study provided novel insights that will provide a better understanding of the effects of δ-catenin on Wnt/LEF-1-mediated transcriptional activity. PMID:25808920

  10. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Study Reveals that Protein Kinase A Regulates Neural Stem Cell Differentiation Through Phosphorylation of Catenin Beta-1 and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxin; Li, Zheyi; Shen, Hongyan; Zhang, Zhong; Yin, Yuxin; Wang, Qingsong; Zhao, Xuyang; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is central to the understanding of multiple cellular signaling pathways responsible for regulating the self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Here we performed a large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis of rat fetal NSCs using strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation and citric acid-assisted two-step enrichment with TiO2 strategy followed by nanoLC-MS/MS analysis. Totally we identified 32,546 phosphosites on 5,091 phosphoproteins, among which 23,945 were class I phosphosites, and quantified 16,000 sites during NSC differentiation. More than 65% of class I phosphosites were novel when compared with PhosphoSitePlus database. Quantification results showed that the early and late stage of NSC differentiation differ greatly. We mapped 69 changed phosphosites on 20 proteins involved in Wnt signaling pathway, including S552 on catenin beta-1 (Ctnnb1) and S9 on glycogen synthase kinase 3β (Gsk3β). Western blotting and real-time PCR results proved that Wnt signaling pathway plays critical roles in NSC fate determination. Furthermore, inhibition and activation of PKA dramatically affected the phosphorylation state of Ctnnb1 and Gsk3β, which regulates the differentiation of NSCs. Our data provides a valuable resource for studying the self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:2090-2101. PMID:27097102

  11. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  12. The identification of matrix Gla protein in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hale, J E; Fraser, J D; Price, P A

    1988-04-25

    The vitamin K-dependent bone protein matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) protein (MGP) has been identified by radioimmunoassay in the guanidine extract of rat cartilage. MGP was present in all cartilages tested at levels comparable to the MGP level in bone. Western blot analysis indicated that the molecular weight of cartilage MGP is the same as bone MGP, and Northern blot analysis revealed that MGP mRNA from cartilage is the same size as the MGP mRNA from bone. The structurally related vitamin K-dependent protein bone Gla protein could not be detected in cartilage by radioimmunoassay or by Northern blot analysis. The discovery that MGP is synthesized by growth plate cartilage could provide an explanation for the excessive growth plate mineralization disorder seen in rats treated with the vitamin K antagonist warfarin and the punctate mineralization of the growth plate seen in infants whose mothers received warfarin in the first trimester of pregnancy (the fetal warfarin syndrome). Both disorders appear to be caused by the inactivation of a vitamin K-dependent mineralization inhibitor in cartilage, an inhibitor which we suggest is MGP. PMID:3258600

  13. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-05-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin affects its subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of β-catenin in Hela and Bcap-37 cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, He-Ya; Zhang, Ding-Guo; Wang, Hong-Wei; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2014-06-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin and transcriptional activity of β-catenin in Hela and Bcap-37 cells, genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) was used to inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation in cells. Our results showed the total β-catenin protein levels were mainly equal in Hela, Bcap-37 and HK-2 cells, β-catenin was mainly present in nucleus in Hela and Bcap-37cells, while in HK-2 cell β-catenin was mainly located in cytoplasm. Genistein could inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin and downregulate nuclear β-catenin expression in Hela and Bcap-37 cells. In addition, genistein suppressed Ki-67 promoter activity and Ki-67 protein level, thus promoted cell apoptosis. Furthermore, β-catenin could increase the Ki-67 promoter activity in Hela and Bcap-37 cells. From these findings we conclude that tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin can regulate the cellular distribution of β-catenin and affect the transcriptional activity of β-catenin. PMID:24759800

  15. p120 catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hendley, Audrey M.; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M.; Wang, Yue J.; Cleveland, Megan H.; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W.; Roeser, Jeffrey C.; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B.; Leach, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120f/f pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development. PMID:25523391

  16. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  17. Association of ebola virus matrix protein VP40 with microtubules.

    PubMed

    Ruthel, Gordon; Demmin, Gretchen L; Kallstrom, George; Javid, Melodi P; Badie, Shirin S; Will, Amy B; Nelle, Timothy; Schokman, Rowena; Nguyen, Tam L; Carra, John H; Bavari, Sina; Aman, M Javad

    2005-04-01

    Viruses exploit a variety of cellular components to complete their life cycles, and it has become increasingly clear that use of host cell microtubules is a vital part of the infection process for many viruses. A variety of viral proteins have been identified that interact with microtubules, either directly or via a microtubule-associated motor protein. Here, we report that Ebola virus associates with microtubules via the matrix protein VP40. When transfected into mammalian cells, a fraction of VP40 colocalized with microtubule bundles and VP40 coimmunoprecipitated with tubulin. The degree of colocalization and microtubule bundling in cells was markedly intensified by truncation of the C terminus to a length of 317 amino acids. Further truncation to 308 or fewer amino acids abolished the association with microtubules. Both the full-length and the 317-amino-acid truncation mutant stabilized microtubules against depolymerization with nocodazole. Direct physical interaction between purified VP40 and tubulin proteins was demonstrated in vitro. A region of moderate homology to the tubulin binding motif of the microtubule-associated protein MAP2 was identified in VP40. Deleting this region resulted in loss of microtubule stabilization against drug-induced depolymerization. The presence of VP40-associated microtubules in cells continuously treated with nocodazole suggested that VP40 promotes tubulin polymerization. Using an in vitro polymerization assay, we demonstrated that VP40 directly enhances tubulin polymerization without any cellular mediators. These results suggest that microtubules may play an important role in the Ebola virus life cycle and potentially provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention against this highly pathogenic virus. PMID:15795257

  18. A homologue gene of β-catenin participates in the development of shrimps and immune response to bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ya-Kai; Ding, Ding; Wang, Hui-Min; Kang, Cui-Jie

    2015-11-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein that is involved in many physiological processes, including development, cell proliferation, cell migration, and apoptosis. However, the function of β-Catenin in crustacean is unknown. In this study, the first shrimp homologous gene of β-catenin in Marsupenaeus japonicus (i.e., Mjβ-catenin) was identified and characterized. The full-length of the complementary DNA of Mjβ-catenin is 3130 bp, including a 2463 bp open reading frame that encodes 821 amino acid. Multiple alignment of β-Catenin proteins suggested that the Armadillo/β-Catenin-like repeat domains were conserved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that β-Catenin from shrimp was clustered into one group with invertebrate β-Catenin. The transcription of β-catenin in various development stages of shrimp was detected and persistently increased as the shrimp matured. In adult shrimp, β-catenin was widely distributed in detected tissues and has the relatively high expression level in gills, hemocytes, testes, and ovaries. The transcripts of β-catenin in tissues of adult shrimp were significantly up-regulated at various time points after infecting with Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio anguillarum, and white-spot syndrome virus. Furthermore, knockdown of β-catenin resulted in impaired bacterial clearance ability and increased virus copy in shrimp in vivo. Therefore, β-Catenin in shrimp participates in the development and immune response of shrimps. PMID:26334791

  19. Structure of equine infectious anemia virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Hideki; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David I

    2002-02-01

    The Gag polyprotein is key to the budding of retroviruses from host cells and is cleaved upon virion maturation, the N-terminal membrane-binding domain forming the matrix protein (MA). The 2.8-A resolution crystal structure of MA of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus, reveals that, despite showing no sequence similarity, more than half of the molecule can be superimposed on the MAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). However, unlike the structures formed by HIV-1 and SIV MAs, the oligomerization state observed is not trimeric. We discuss the potential of this molecule for membrane binding in the light of conformational differences between EIAV MA and HIV or SIV MA. PMID:11799182

  20. Structure of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Hideki; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David I.

    2002-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is key to the budding of retroviruses from host cells and is cleaved upon virion maturation, the N-terminal membrane-binding domain forming the matrix protein (MA). The 2.8-Å resolution crystal structure of MA of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus, reveals that, despite showing no sequence similarity, more than half of the molecule can be superimposed on the MAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). However, unlike the structures formed by HIV-1 and SIV MAs, the oligomerization state observed is not trimeric. We discuss the potential of this molecule for membrane binding in the light of conformational differences between EIAV MA and HIV or SIV MA. PMID:11799182

  1. A novel miR-34a target, protein kinase D1, stimulates cancer stemness and drug resistance through GSK3/β-catenin signaling in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, EunSun; Kang, Hyeok-Gu; Koo, Yoonjin; Lee, Eun Ji; Ko, Je Yeong; Kong, Hyun Kyung; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    One of the properties of human breast cancer cells is cancer stemness, which is characterized by self-renewal capability and drug resistance. Protein kinase D1 (PRKD1) functions as a key regulator of many cellular processes and is downregulated in invasive breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that PRKD1 was upregulated in MCF-7-ADR human breast cancer cells characterized by drug resistance. Additionally, we discovered that PRKD1 expression was negatively regulated by miR-34a binding to the PRKD1 3′-UTR. PRKD1 expression increased following performance of a tumorsphere formation assay in MCF-7-ADR cells. We also found that reduction of PRKD1 by ectopic miR-34a expression or PRKD1 siRNA treatment resulted in suppressed self-renewal ability in breast cancer stem cells. Furthermore, we confirmed that the PRKD1 inhibitor CRT0066101 reduced phosphorylated PKD/PKCμ, leading to suppression of breast cancer stemness through GSK3/β-catenin signaling. PRKD1 inhibition also influenced apoptosis initiation in MCF-7-ADR cells. Tumors from nude mice treated with miR-34a or CRT0066101 showed suppressed tumor growth, proliferation, and induced apoptosis. These results provide evidence that regulation of PRKD1, a novel miR-34a target, contributes to overcoming cancer stemness and drug resistance in human breast cancer. PMID:26895471

  2. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells. PMID:24635174

  3. PRELP (proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein) promotes osteoblastic differentiation of preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by regulating the β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Chengzhi; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Shi, Liang; Wang, Huaxin; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-02-12

    Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) is a collagen-binding proteoglycan highly expressed in the developing bones. Recent studies indicated that PRELP could inhibit osteoclastogenesis as a NF-κB inhibitor. However, its role during osteoblast differentiation is still unclear. In this study, we confirmed that the expression of PRELP increased with the osteogenesis induction of preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Down-regulation of PRELP expression by shRNA reduced ALP activity, mineralization and expression of osteogenic marker gene Runx2. Our microarray analysis data suggested that β-catenin may act as a hub gene in the PRELP-mediated gene network. We validated furtherly that PRELP knockdown could inhibit the level of connexin43, a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation by affecting β-catenin protein expression, and its nuclear translocation in MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. Therefore, this study established a new role of PRELP in modulating β-catenin/connexin43 pathway and osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26809092

  4. {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haeyong; Bae, Sungmin; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, Sang-In; Yoon, Yoosik

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} Baicalin maintains the levels of {beta}-Catenin during adipogenesis. {yields} {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin. {yields} Baicalin maintains the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway during adipogenesis. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin reportedly inhibits adipogenesis through the down-regulations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}. We report that baicalin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits adipogenesis by modulating {beta}-Catenin. During 3T3-L1 cell adipogenesis, {beta}-Catenin was down-regulated, but baicalin treatment maintained {beta}-Catenin expression. Anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin were significantly attenuated by {beta}-Catenin siRNA transfection. {beta}-Catenin siRNA rescued the reduced expressions of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, fatty acid binding protein 4 and lipoprotein lipase by baicalin. Furthermore, baicalin modulated members of the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway by maintaining the expressions of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, disheveled (DVL)2 and DVL3. These findings suggest that {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin.

  5. Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by stimulating β-catenin-lymphoid enhancer factor-1 complex assembly independent of β-catenin nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Cara; Lui, Christina; Brocardo, Mariana G; Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R

    2015-11-01

    β-Catenin transduces the Wnt signaling pathway and its nuclear accumulation leads to gene transactivation and cancer. Rac1 GTPase is known to stimulate β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt target genes and we confirmed this activity. Here we tested the recent hypothesis that Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by enhancing β-catenin nuclear import; however, we found that silencing/inhibition or up-regulation of Rac1 had no influence on nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. To better define the role of Rac1, we employed proximity ligation assays (PLA) and discovered that a significant pool of Rac1-β-catenin protein complexes redistribute from the plasma membrane to the nucleus upon Wnt or Rac1 activation. More importantly, active Rac1 was shown to stimulate the formation of nuclear β-catenin-lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF-1) complexes. This regulation required Rac1-dependent phosphorylation of β-catenin at specific serines, which when mutated (S191A and S605A) reduced β-catenin binding to LEF-1 by up to 50%, as revealed by PLA and immunoprecipitation experiments. We propose that Rac1-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin stimulates Wnt-dependent gene transactivation by enhancing β-catenin-LEF-1 complex assembly, providing new insight into the mechanism of cross-talk between Rac1 and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26403202

  6. The diversity of shell matrix proteins: genome-wide investigation of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Endo, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Naoki; Limura, Kurin; Isowa, Yukinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Miki, Takumi; Nakayama, Seiji; Nogawa, Chihiro; Notazawa, Atsuto; Ohmori, Fumito; Sarashina, Isao; Suzuki, Michio; Takagi, Ryousuke; Takahashi, Jun; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Yokoo, Naoki; Satoh, Nori; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Wada, Hiroshi; Samata, Tetsuro; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-10-01

    In molluscs, shell matrix proteins are associated with biomineralization, a biologically controlled process that involves nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. Identification and characterization of shell matrix proteins are important for better understanding of the adaptive radiation of a large variety of molluscs. We searched the draft genome sequence of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and annotated 30 different kinds of shell matrix proteins. Of these, we could identified Perlucin, ependymin-related protein and SPARC as common genes shared by bivalves and gastropods; however, most gastropod shell matrix proteins were not found in the P. fucata genome. Glycinerich proteins were conserved in the genus Pinctada. Another important finding with regard to these annotated genes was that numerous shell matrix proteins are encoded by more than one gene; e.g., three ACCBP-like proteins, three CaLPs, five chitin synthase-like proteins, two N16 proteins (pearlins), 10 N19 proteins, two nacreins, four Pifs, nine shematrins, two prismalin-14 proteins, and 21 tyrosinases. This diversity of shell matrix proteins may be implicated in the morphological diversity of mollusc shells. The annotated genes reported here can be searched in P. fucata gene models version 1.1 and genome assembly version 1.0 ( http://marinegenomics.oist.jp/pinctada_fucata ). These genes should provide a useful resource for studies of the genetic basis of biomineralization and evaluation of the role of shell matrix proteins as an evolutionary toolkit among the molluscs. PMID:24125645

  7. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Modolo, Filipe; Biz, Michelle Tillmann; Martins, Marília Trierveiller; Machado de Sousa, Suzana Orsini; de Araújo, Ney Soares

    2010-03-01

    Altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components has been reported in several pathologies; however, few ECM proteins have been evaluated in adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT). The aim of this study was to analyze the expression and distribution of the ECM proteoglycans: biglycan and decorin; and glycoproteins: osteonectin, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin in the AOT. Three-micrometer sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were evaluated employing a streptavidin-biotin immunohistochemical method with the antibodies against the proteins previously cited. Only the osteonectin was expressed in the epithelial cells. The eosinophilic amorphous material and the connective tissue showed expression of all components studied. The calcification foci expressed only osteopontin. In conclusion, the low expression of the components studied in neoplastic epithelial cells suggests that the epithelial cells act probably as stimulators of the expression by the stroma, which in turn can act as agonist or antagonist of the tumor growth. These results suggest that the components studied probably have a key role in the biological behavior of the AOT. PMID:20070486

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax dysregulates beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Mariko; Kikuchi, Akira; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Mori, Naoki

    2006-11-01

    Dysregulation of beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in the malignant transformation of cells. However, the role of beta-catenin in the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced transformation of T cells is unknown. Here we found that beta-catenin protein was overexpressed in the nucleus and that beta-catenin-dependent transcription was significantly enhanced in Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines compared to that in Tax-negative HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Transfection with beta-catenin-specific small interfering RNA inhibited the growth of the Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected T-cell line HUT-102. Transient transfection of Tax appeared to enhance beta-catenin-dependent transcription by stabilizing the beta-catenin protein via activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein. HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines overexpressing beta-catenin also showed increased Akt activity via Tax activation of the cAMP response element-binding protein, resulting in the phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, which phosphorylates beta-catenin for ubiquitination. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 reduced beta-catenin expression in Tax-positive T-cell lines, and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta by lithium chloride restored beta-catenin expression in Tax-negative T-cell lines. Finally, we showed that dominant-negative Akt inhibited Tax-induced beta-catenin-dependent transcription. These results indicate that Tax activates beta-catenin through the Akt signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that activation of beta-catenin by Tax may be important in the transformation of T cells by HTLV-1 infection. PMID:16920823

  9. Recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin is necessary for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A; Gannon, Olivia J; Tang, Dale D

    2015-04-01

    β-Catenin is a key component that connects transmembrane cadherin with the actin cytoskeleton at the cell-cell interface. However, the role of the β-catenin/cadherin interaction in smooth muscle has not been well characterized. Here stimulation with acetylcholine promoted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Knockdown of β-catenin by lentivirus-mediated shRNA attenuated smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 and actin polymerization in response to contractile activation were not reduced by β-catenin knockdown. In addition, the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain disrupted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin. Force development, but not myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin polymerization, was reduced by the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain. Furthermore, actin polymerization and microtubules have been implicated in intracellular trafficking. In this study, the treatment with the inhibitor latrunculin A diminished the interaction of β-catenin with N-cadherin in smooth muscle. In contrast, the exposure of smooth muscle to the microtubule depolymerizer nocodazole did not affect the protein-protein interaction. Together, these findings suggest that smooth muscle contraction is mediated by the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin, which may facilitate intercellular mechanotransduction. The association of β-catenin with N-cadherin is regulated by actin polymerization during contractile activation. PMID:25713069

  10. beta-Galactosidase enzyme fragment complementation for the measurement of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Verkaar, Folkert; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Smits, Jos F M; Zaman, Guido J R

    2010-04-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is an important regulator of cell polarity, proliferation, and stem cell maintenance during development and adulthood. Wnt proteins induce the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin, which regulates the expression of Wnt-responsive genes through association with TCF/LEF transcription factors. Aberrant Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in a plethora of pathologies and, most notably, underlies initiation and expansion of several cancers. Here, we apply enzyme fragment complementation to measure the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin. beta-Catenin was tagged with a peptide fragment of beta-galactosidase and transfected into cells expressing a corresponding deletion mutant of the enzyme exclusively in the nucleus. Stimulation of the cells with recombinant Wnt-3a restored beta-galactosidase activity in a dose-dependent manner with nanomolar potency. Using the assay, we confirmed that Wnt-5a represses beta-catenin-driven reporter gene activity downstream of nuclear entry of beta-catenin. In addition, we tested a library of >2000 synthetic chemical compounds for their ability to induce beta-catenin nuclear accumulation. The immunosuppressive protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin (AEB-071) was identified as an activator of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling at micromolar concentrations. It was confirmed that the compound stabilizes endogenous beta-catenin protein and can induce TCF/LEF-dependent gene transcription. Subsequent biochemical profiling of >200 kinases revealed both isoforms of glycogen synthase kinase 3, as previously unappreciated targets of sotrastaurin. We show that the beta-catenin nuclear accumulation assay contributes to our knowledge of molecular interactions within the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and can be used to find new therapeutics targeting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.-Verkaar, F., Blankesteijn, W. M., Smits, J. F. M., Zaman, G. J. R. beta-Galactosidase enzyme fragment complementation for the measurement of Wnt/beta-catenin

  11. Inhibition of Wnt signaling by cucurbitacin B in breast cancer cells: reduction of Wnt-associated proteins and reduced translocation of galectin-3-mediated β-catenin to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dakeng, Sumana; Duangmano, Suwit; Jiratchariyakul, Weena; U-Pratya, Yaowalak; Bögler, Oliver; Patmasiriwat, Pimpicha

    2012-01-01

    The cucurbitacins are tetracyclic triterpenes found in plants of the family Cucurbitaceae. Cucurbitacins have been shown to have anti-cancer and anti-inflamatory activities. We investigated the anti-cancer activity of cucurbitacin B extracted from Thai medicinal plant Trichosanthes cucumerina Linn. Cell viability was assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Results indicated that cucurbitacin B from T. cucumerina Linn. has a cytotoxic effect on breast cancer cell lines SKBR-3 and MCF-7 with an IC50 of 4.60 and 88.75 µg/ml, respectively. Growth inhibition was attributed to G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Cyclin D1, c-Myc, and β-catenin expression levels were reduced. Western blot analysis showed increased PARP cleavage and decreased Wnt-associated signaling molecules β-catenin, galectin-3, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and corresponding changes in phosphorylated GSK-3β levels. Cucurbitacin B treatment inhibited translocation to the nucleus of β-catenin and galectin-3. The depletion of β-catenin and galectin-3 in the nucleus was confirmed by cellular protein fractionation. T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF)-dependent transcriptional activity was disrupted in cucurbitacin B treated cells as tested by a TCF reporter assay. The relative luciferase activity was reduced when we treated cells with cucurbitacin B compound for 24 h. Our data suggest that cucurbitacin B may in part induce apoptosis and exert growth inhibitory effect via interruption the Wnt signaling. PMID:21866566

  12. Inhibition of Wnt signaling by cucurbitacin B in breast cancer cells: Reduction of Wnt associated proteins and reduced translocation of galectin-3-mediated β-catenin to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Dakeng, Sumana; Duangmano, Suwit; Jiratchariyakul, Weena; U-Pratya, Yaowalak; Bögler, Oliver; Patmasiriwat, Pimpicha

    2011-01-01

    The cucurbitacins are tetracyclic triterpenes found in plants of the family Cucurbitaceae. Cucurbitacins have been shown to have anticancer and anti-inflamatory activities. We investigated the anticancer activity of cucurbitacin B extracted from Thai medicinal plant Trichosanthes cucumerina Linn. Cell viability was assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Results indicated that cucurbitacin B from T. cucumerina Linn. has a cytotoxic effect on breast cancer cell lines SKBR-3 and MCF-7 with an IC50 of 4.60 and 88.75 μg/ml, respectively. Growth inhibition was attributed to G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Cyclin D1, c-Myc and β-catenin expression levels were reduced. Western blot analysis showed increased PARP cleavage and decreased Wnt-associated signaling molecules β-catenin, galectin-3, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and corresponding changes in phosphorylated GSK-3β levels. Cucurbitacin B treatment inhibited translocation to the nucleus of β-catenin and galectin-3. The depletion of β-catenin and galectin-3 in the nucleus was confirmed by cellular protein fractionation. T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF)-dependent transcriptional activity was disrupted in cucurbitacin B treated cells as tested by a TCF reporter assay. The relative luciferase activity was reduced when we treated cells with cucurbitacin B compound for 24 hours. Our data suggest that cucurbitacin B may in part induce apoptosis and exert growth inhibitory effect via interruption the Wnt signaling. PMID:21866566

  13. Analysing the impact of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of β-catenin and its antagonists APC, Axin and GSK3 on Wnt/β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Yvonne; Rateitschak, Katja; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-11-01

    The canonical Wnt signalling pathway plays a critical role in development and disease. The key player of the pathway is β-catenin. Its activity is mainly regulated by the destruction complex consisting of APC, Axin and GSK3. In the nucleus, the complex formation of β-catenin and TCF initiates target gene expression. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the role of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of APC, Axin, and GSK3 and the inactivation of β-catenin by the destruction complex in Wnt/β-catenin signalling. We address the following questions: Can nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of APC, Axin and GSK3 increase the [β-catenin/TCF] concentration? And, how is the [β-catenin/TCF] concentration influenced by phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of nuclear β-catenin? Based on experimental findings, we develop a compartmental model and conduct several simulation experiments. Our analysis reveals the following key findings: 1) nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of β-catenin and its antagonists can yield a spatial separation between the said proteins, which results in a breakdown of β-catenin degradation, followed by an accumulation of β-catenin and hence leads to an increase of the [β-catenin/TCF] concentration. Our results strongly suggest that Wnt signalling can benefit from nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of APC, Axin and GSK3, although they are in general β-catenin antagonising proteins. 2) The total robustness of the [β-catenin/TCF] output is closely linked to its absolute concentration levels. We demonstrate that the compartmental separation of β-catenin and the destruction complex does not only lead to a maximization, but additionally to an increased robustness of [β-catenin/TCF] signalling against perturbations in the cellular environment. 3) A nuclear accumulation of the destruction complex renders the pathway robust against fluctuations in Wnt signalling and against changes in the compartmental distribution of β-catenin. 4) Elucidating the impact of

  14. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt. PMID:27350246

  15. The ins and outs of APC and β-catenin nuclear transport

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Beric R.; Fagotto, Francois

    2002-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and β-catenin, two key interacting proteins implicated in development and cancer, were recently found to traffic into and out of the nucleus in response to internal and external signals. The two proteins can enter and exit the nucleus independently, a discovery that has prompted debate about the previously proposed role of APC as a β-catenin chaperone. Here, we review the regulation of APC and β-catenin subcellular localization, in particular in cancer cells. We speculate that, in non-stimulated cells, APC actively exports β-catenin from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where its levels are regulated by degradation; and, conversely, that, in cancer cells or those stimulated by Wnt signaling, β-catenin degradation is inhibited and the accruing protein is capable of moving between the nucleus and cytoplasm independently of APC. Models that link APC and β-catenin transport to function are discussed. PMID:12223464

  16. The ins and outs of APC and beta-catenin nuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Beric R; Fagotto, Francois

    2002-09-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and beta-catenin, two key interacting proteins implicated in development and cancer, were recently found to traffic into and out of the nucleus in response to internal and external signals. The two proteins can enter and exit the nucleus independently, a discovery that has prompted debate about the previously proposed role of APC as a beta-catenin chaperone. Here, we review the regulation of APC and beta-catenin subcellular localization, in particular in cancer cells. We speculate that, in non-stimulated cells, APC actively exports beta-catenin from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where its levels are regulated by degradation; and, conversely, that, in cancer cells or those stimulated by Wnt signaling, beta-catenin degradation is inhibited and the accruing protein is capable of moving between the nucleus and cytoplasm independently of APC. Models that link APC and beta-catenin transport to function are discussed. PMID:12223464

  17. δ-Catenin Activates Rho GTPase, Promotes Lymphangiogenesis and Growth of Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, P. Charles

    2015-01-01

    δ-catenin, an adherens junctions protein, is not only involved in early development, cell-cell adhesion and cell motility in neuronal cells, but it also plays an important role in vascular endothelial cell motility and pathological angiogenesis. In this study, we report a new function of δ-catenin in lymphangiogenesis. Consistent with expression of δ-catenin in vascular endothelial cells, we detected expression of the gene in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Ectopic expression of δ-catenin in LECs increased cell motility and lymphatic vascular network formation in vitro and lymphangiogenesis in vivo in a Matrigel plug assay. Conversely, knockdown of δ-catenin in LECs impaired lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis shows that δ-catenin regulates activation of Rho family small GTPases, key mediators in cell motility. δ-catenin activates Rac1 and Cdc42 but inhibits RhoA in LECs. Notably, blocking of Rac1 activation impaired δ-catenin mediated lymphangiogenesis in a Matrigel assay. Consistently, loss of δ-catenin in mice inhibited the growth of tumor metastases. Taken together, these findings identify a new function of δ-catenin in lymphangiogenesis and tumor growth/metastasis, likely through modulation of small Rho GTPase activation. Targeting δ-catenin may offer a new way to control tumor metastasis. PMID:25635825

  18. Photolytic Cross-Linking to Probe Protein-Protein and Protein-Matrix Interactions in Lyophilized Powders.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lavanya K; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-01

    Protein structure and local environment in lyophilized formulations were probed using high-resolution solid-state photolytic cross-linking with mass spectrometric analysis (ssPC-MS). In order to characterize structure and microenvironment, protein-protein, protein-excipient, and protein-water interactions in lyophilized powders were identified. Myoglobin (Mb) was derivatized in solution with the heterobifunctional probe succinimidyl 4,4'-azipentanoate (SDA) and the structural integrity of the labeled protein (Mb-SDA) confirmed using CD spectroscopy and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Mb-SDA was then formulated with and without excipients (raffinose, guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn HCl)) and lyophilized. The freeze-dried powder was irradiated with ultraviolet light at 365 nm for 30 min to produce cross-linked adducts that were analyzed at the intact protein level and after trypsin digestion. SDA-labeling produced Mb carrying up to five labels, as detected by LC-MS. Following lyophilization and irradiation, cross-linked peptide-peptide, peptide-water, and peptide-raffinose adducts were detected. The exposure of Mb side chains to the matrix was quantified based on the number of different peptide-peptide, peptide-water, and peptide-excipient adducts detected. In the absence of excipients, peptide-peptide adducts involving the CD, DE, and EF loops and helix H were common. In the raffinose formulation, peptide-peptide adducts were more distributed throughout the molecule. The Gdn HCl formulation showed more protein-protein and protein-water adducts than the other formulations, consistent with protein unfolding and increased matrix interactions. The results demonstrate that ssPC-MS can be used to distinguish excipient effects and characterize the local protein environment in lyophilized formulations with high resolution. PMID:26204425

  19. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K.; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K. Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  20. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  1. BMP‐9‐induced osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors requires functional canonical Wnt/β‐catenin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ni; Song, Wen‐Xin; Luo, Jinyong; Luo, Xiaoji; Chen, Jin; Sharff, Katie A.; Bi, Yang; He, Bai‐Cheng; Huang, Jia‐Yi; Zhu, Gao‐Hui; Su, Yu‐Xi; Jiang, Wei; Tang, Min; He, Yun; Wang, Yi; Chen, Liang; Zuo, Guo‐Wei; Shen, Jikun; Pan, Xiaochuan; Reid, Russell R.; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP‐9) is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)‐β/BMP superfamily, and we have demonstrated that it is one of the most potent BMPs to induce osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here, we sought to investigate if canonical Wnt/β‐catenin signalling plays an important role in BMP‐9‐induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Wnt3A and BMP‐9 enhanced each other’s ability to induce alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in MSCs and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Wnt antagonist FrzB was shown to inhibit BMP‐9‐induced ALP activity more effectively than Dkk1, whereas a secreted form of LPR‐5 or low‐density lipoprotein receptor‐related protein (LRP)‐6 exerted no inhibitory effect on BMP‐9‐induced ALP activity. β‐Catenin knockdown in MSCs and MEFs diminished BMP‐9‐induced ALP activity, and led to a decrease in BMP‐9‐induced osteocalcin reporter activity and BMP‐9‐induced expression of late osteogenic markers. Furthermore, β‐catenin knockdown or FrzB overexpression inhibited BMP‐9‐induced mineralization in vitro and ectopic bone formation in vivo, resulting in immature osteogenesis and the formation of chondrogenic matrix. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis indicated that BMP‐9 induced recruitment of both Runx2 and β‐catenin to the osteocalcin promoter. Thus, we have demonstrated that canonical Wnt signalling, possibly through interactions between β‐catenin and Runx2, plays an important role in BMP‐9‐induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. PMID:19175684

  2. p15RS/RPRD1A (p15INK4b-related sequence/regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain-containing protein 1A) interacts with HDAC2 in inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yanquan; Li, Jun; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Zhou, Yifan; Wu, Yinyuan; Feng, Yarui; Zhou, Yu; Su, Fuqin; Jia, Baoqing; Wang, Dong; Chang, Zhijie

    2015-04-10

    We previously reported that p15RS (p15INK4b-related sequence), a regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing protein, inhibited Wnt signaling by interrupting the formation of the β-catenin·TCF4 complex. However, how p15RS functions as an intrinsic repressor to repress transcription remains unclear. In this study, we show that p15RS, through a specific interaction with HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2), a deacetylase that regulates gene transcription, maintains histone H3 in a deacetylated state in the promoter region of Wnt-targeted genes where β-catenin·TCF4 is bound. We observed that histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the ability of p15RS in inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Depletion of HDAC2 markedly disabled p15RS inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Interestingly, overexpression of p15RS decreases the level of acetylated histone H3 in the c-MYC promoter. Finally, we demonstrate that p15RS significantly enhances the association of HDAC2 and TCF4 and enhances the occupancy of HDAC2 to DNA, resulting in the deacetylation of histone H3 and the failure of β-catenin interaction. We propose that p15RS acts as an intrinsic transcriptional repressor for Wnt/β-catenin-mediated gene transcription at least partially through recruiting HDAC2 to occupy the promoter and maintaining deacetylated histone H3. PMID:25697359

  3. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P.; Adams, Ralf H.; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  4. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P; Adams, Ralf H; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  5. Stabilized β-Catenin Functions through TCF/LEF Proteins and the Notch/RBP-Jκ Complex To Promote Proliferation and Suppress Differentiation of Neural Precursor Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Kagawa, Tetsushi; Inoue, Toshihiro; Nonaka, Aya; Takada, Shinji; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Taga, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor cells are mutually exclusive during brain development. Despite its importance for precursor cell self renewal, the molecular linkage between these two events has remained unclear. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) promotes neural precursor cell proliferation and concurrently inhibits their differentiation, suggesting a cross talk between proliferation and differentiation signaling pathways downstream of the FGF receptor. We demonstrate that FGF2 signaling through phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase activation inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and leads to the accumulation of β-catenin in a manner different from that in the Wnt canonical pathway. The nuclear accumulated β-catenin leads to cell proliferation by activating LEF/TCF transcription factors and concurrently inhibits neuronal differentiation by potentiating the Notch1-RBP-Jκ signaling pathway. β-Catenin and the Notch1 intracellular domain form a molecular complex with the promoter region of the antineurogenic hes1 gene, allowing its expression. This signaling interplay is especially essential for neural stem cell maintenance, since the misexpression of dominant-active GSK3β completely inhibits the self renewal of neurosphere-forming stem cells and prompts their neuronal differentiation. Thus, the GSK3β/β-catenin signaling axis regulated by FGF and Wnt signals plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neural stem/precursor cells by linking the cell proliferation to the inhibition of differentiation. PMID:18852283

  6. New Functions for Alpha-Catenins in Health and Disease: From Cancer to Heart Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vite, Alexia; Li, Jifen; Radice, Glenn L.

    2015-01-01

    Strong cell-cell adhesion mediated by adherens junctions is dependent on anchoring the transmembrane cadherin molecule to the underlying actin cytoskeleton. To do this, cadherin cytoplasmic domain interacts with catenin proteins, which include α-catenin that binds directly to filamentous actin. Originally thought to be a static structure, the connection between the cadherin/catenin adhesion complex and the actin cytoskeleton is now considered to be dynamic and responsive to both intercellular and intracellular signals. Alpha-catenins are mechanosensing proteins that undergo conformational change in response to cytoskeletal tension thus modifying the linkage between the cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. There are three α-catenin isoforms expressed in mouse and human: αE-catenin (CTNNA1), αN-catenin (CTNNA2), and αT-catenin (CTNNA3). This review summarizes recent progress in understanding the in vivo function(s) of α-catenins in tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The role of α-catenin in the regulation of cellular proliferation will be discussed in the context of cancer and regeneration. PMID:25673211

  7. Pharmacological modulation of beta-catenin and its applications in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin (β-catenin) is a multifunction protein with a central role in physiological homeostasis. Its abnormal expression leads to various diseases including cancer. In normal physiology, β-catenin either maintains integrity of epithelial tissues or controls transcription of various genes on extracellular instigations. In epithelial tissues, β-catenin functions as a component of the cadherin protein complex and regulates epithelial cell growth and intracellular adhesion. In Wnt signalling, β-catenin is a major transcriptional modulator and plays a crucial role in embryogenesis, stem cell renewal and organ regeneration. Aberrant expression of β-catenin can induce malignant pathways in normal cells and its abnormal activity is also exploited by existing malignant programmes. It acts as an oncogene and modulates transcription of genes to drive cancer initiation, progression, survival and relapse. Abnormal expression and function of β-catenin in cancer makes it a putative drug target. In the past decade, various attempts have been made to identify and characterize various pharmacological inhibitors of β-catenin. Many of these inhibitors are currently being investigated for their anticancer activities in a variety of cancers. The first half of this review will focus on the role of β-catenin in cancer initiation, maintenance, progression and relapse whereas the second half will briefly summarize the recent progress in development of agents for the pharmacological modulation of β-catenin activity in cancer therapeutics. PMID:23490077

  8. Progressive changes in the protein composition of the nuclear matrix during rat osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Dworetzky, S I; Fey, E G; Penman, S; Lian, J B; Stein, J L; Stein, G S

    1990-01-01

    Primary cultures of fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts undergo a developmental sequence with respect to the temporal expression of genes encoding osteoblast phenotypic markers. Based on previous suggestions that gene-nuclear matrix associations are involved in regulating cell- and tissue-specific gene expression, we investigated the protein composition of the nuclear matrix during this developmental sequence by using high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The nuclear matrix was isolated at times during a 4-week culture period that represent the three principal osteoblast phenotypic stages: proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) maturation, and mineralization. The most dramatic changes in the nuclear matrix protein patterns occurred during transitions from the proliferation to the ECM maturation stage and from ECM maturation to the mineralization period, with only minor variations in the profiles within each period. These stage-specific changes, corresponding to the major transition points in gene expression, indicate that the nuclear matrix proteins reflect the progressive differentiation of the bone cell phenotype. Subcultivation of primary cells delays mineralization, and a corresponding delay was observed for the nuclear matrix protein patterns. Thus, the sequential changes in protein composition of the nuclear matrix that occur during osteoblast differentiation represent distinct stage-specific markers for maturation of the osteoblast to an osteocytic cell in a bone-like mineralized ECM. These changes are consistent with a functional involvement of the nuclear matrix in mediating modifications of developmental gene expression. Images PMID:2352938

  9. Diverse Basis of β-Catenin Activation in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Implications in Biology and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Hirohisa; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Imai, Katsunori; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Higashi, Takaaki; Arima, Kota; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Beppu, Toru; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Aim β-catenin signaling is a major oncogenic pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Since β-catenin phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and casein kinase 1ε (CK1ε) results in its degradation, mutations affecting these phosphorylation sites cause β-catenin stabilization. However, the relevance of missense mutations in non-phosphorylation sites in exon 3 remains unclear. The current study explores significance of such mutations in addition to addressing the clinical and biological implications of β-catenin activation in human HCC. Methods Gene alteration in exon3 of CTNNB1, gene expression of β-catenin targets such as glutamate synthetase (GS), axin2, lect2 and regucalcin (RGN), and protein expression of β-catenin were examined in 125 human HCC tissues. Results Sixteen patients (12.8%) showed conventional missense mutations affecting codons 33, 37, 41, and 45. Fifteen additional patients (12.0%) had other missense mutations in codon 32, 34, and 35. Induction of exon3 mutation caused described β-catenin target gene upregulation in HCC cell line. Interestingly, conventional and non-phosphorylation site mutations were equally associated with upregulation of β-catenin target genes. Nuclear localization of β-catenin was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.0461). Of these patients with nuclear β-catenin localization, loss of described β-catenin target gene upregulation showed significant poorer overall survival than others (p = 0.0001). Conclusion This study suggests that both conventional and other missense mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 lead to β-catenin activation in human HCC. Additionally, the mechanism of nuclear β-catenin localization without upregulation of described β-catenin target genes might be of clinical importance depending on distinct mechanism. PMID:27100093

  10. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V

    2015-09-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  11. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B.; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V.

    2015-01-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  12. Interactions Between β-Catenin and Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathways Mediate Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Are Dependent on the Transcriptional Co-activator cAMP-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Beiyun; Liu, Yixin; Kahn, Michael; Ann, David K.; Han, Arum; Wang, Hongjun; Nguyen, Cu; Flodby, Per; Zhong, Qian; Krishnaveni, Manda S.; Liebler, Janice M.; Minoo, Parviz; Crandall, Edward D.; Borok, Zea

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and Wnt are crucial to many biological processes, although specific targets, rationale for divergent outcomes (differentiation versus block of epithelial proliferation versus epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)) and precise mechanisms in many cases remain unknown. We investigated β-catenin-dependent and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) interactions in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the context of EMT and pulmonary fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that ICG-001, a small molecule specific inhibitor of the β-catenin/CBP (but not β-catenin/p300) interaction, ameliorates and reverses pulmonary fibrosis and inhibits TGF-β1-mediated α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen induction in AEC. We now demonstrate that TGF-β1 induces LEF/TCF TOPFLASH reporter activation and nuclear β-catenin accumulation, while LiCl augments TGF-β-induced α-SMA expression, further confirming co-operation between β-catenin- and TGF-β-dependent signaling pathways. Inhibition and knockdown of Smad3, knockdown of β-catenin and overexpression of ICAT abrogated effects of TGF-β1 on α-SMA transcription/expression, indicating a requirement for β-catenin in these Smad3-dependent effects. Following TGF-β treatment, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated direct interaction between endogenous Smad3 and β-catenin, while chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-re-ChIP identified spatial and temporal regulation of α-SMA via complex formation among Smad3, β-catenin, and CBP. ICG-001 inhibited α-SMA expression/transcription in response to TGF-β as well as α-SMA promoter occupancy by β-catenin and CBP, demonstrating a previously unknown requisite TGF-β1/β-catenin/CBP-mediated pro-EMT signaling pathway. Clinical relevance was shown by β-catenin/Smad3 co-localization and CBP expression in AEC of IPF patients. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach to pulmonary fibrosis by specifically

  13. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  14. Design of an Osteoinductive Extracellular Fibronectin Matrix Protein for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Lee, Dong-Sung; Choi, Ilsan; Pham, Le B. Hang; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell-matrix interactions play an important role in osteogenesis. Here, we constructed a novel osteoinductive fibronectin matrix protein (oFN) for bone tissue engineering, designed to combine the integrin-binding modules from fibronectin (iFN) and a strong osteoinductive growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein-2. Compared with iFN, the purified oFN matrix protein caused a significant increase in cell adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells (p < 0.05). PMID:25853265

  15. Porcine dentin matrix protein 1: gene structure, cDNA sequence, and expression in teeth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Iwata, Takanori; Hu, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Hengmin; Hu, Jan C.-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic non-collagenous protein that is necessary for the proper biomineralization of bone, cartilage, cementum, dentin, and enamel. Dentin matrix protein 1 is highly phosphorylated and potentially glycosylated, but there is no experimental data identifying which specific amino acids are modified. For the purpose of facilitating the characterization of DMP1 from pig, which has the advantage of large developing teeth for obtaining protein in quantity and extensive structural information concerning other tooth matrix proteins, we characterized the porcine DMP1 cDNA and gene structure, raised anti-peptide immunoglobulins that are specific for porcine DMP1, and detected DMP1 protein in porcine tooth extracts and histological sections. Porcine DMP1 has 510 amino acids, including a 16-amino acid signal peptide. The deduced molecular weight of the secreted, unmodified protein is 53.5 kDa. The protein has 93 serines and 12 threonines in the appropriate context for phosphorylation, and four asparagines in a context suitable for glycosylation. Dentin matrix protein 1 protein bands with apparent molecular weights between 30 and 45 kDa were observed in partially purified dentin extracts. In developing teeth, immunohistochemistry localized DMP1 in odontoblasts and the dentinal tubules of mineralized dentin and in ameloblasts, but not in the enamel matrix. PMID:16460339

  16. Therapeutic intervention of proanthocyanidins on the migration capacity of melanoma cells is mediated through PGE2 receptors and β-catenin signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Mudit; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Kappes, John C; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer and a leading cause of death from skin diseases mainly due to its propensity to metastasis. Due to metastatic tendency, melanoma is often associated with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling mechanism. Blocking β-catenin activation may be a good strategy to block melanoma-associated mortality. We have shown earlier that grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) inhibit melanoma cell migration via targeting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression. Here we explored further whether inhibition of inflammatory mediators-mediated activation of β-catenin by GSPs is associated with the inhibition of melanoma cell migration. Our study revealed that PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) agonists promote melanoma cell migration while PGE2 receptor antagonist suppressed the migration capacity of melanoma cells. GSPs treatment inhibit butaprost (EP2 agonist) or Cay10580 (EP4 agonist) induced migration of melanoma cells. Western blot analysis revealed that GSPs reduced cellular accumulation of β-catenin, and decreased the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and MITF, downstream targets of β-catenin in melanoma cells. GSPs also reduced the protein expressions of PI3K and p-Akt in the same set of experiment. To verify that β-catenin is a specific molecular target of GSPs, we compared the effect of GSPs on cell migration of β-catenin-activated (Mel1241) and β-catenin-inactivated (Mel1011) melanoma cells. GSPs inhibit cell migration of Mel1241 cells but not of Mel1011 cells. Additionally, in vivo bioluminescence imaging data indicate that dietary administration of GSPs (0.5%, w/w) in supplementation with AIN76A control diet inhibited the migration/extravasation of intravenously injected melanoma cells in lungs of immune-compromised nude mice, and that this effect of GSPs was associated with an inhibitory effect on the activation of β-catenin and its downstream targets, such as MMPs, in lungs as a target organ. PMID

  17. Therapeutic intervention of proanthocyanidins on the migration capacity of melanoma cells is mediated through PGE2 receptors and β-catenin signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Mudit; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Kappes, John C; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer and a leading cause of death from skin diseases mainly due to its propensity to metastasis. Due to metastatic tendency, melanoma is often associated with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling mechanism. Blocking β-catenin activation may be a good strategy to block melanoma-associated mortality. We have shown earlier that grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) inhibit melanoma cell migration via targeting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression. Here we explored further whether inhibition of inflammatory mediators-mediated activation of β-catenin by GSPs is associated with the inhibition of melanoma cell migration. Our study revealed that PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) agonists promote melanoma cell migration while PGE2 receptor antagonist suppressed the migration capacity of melanoma cells. GSPs treatment inhibit butaprost (EP2 agonist) or Cay10580 (EP4 agonist) induced migration of melanoma cells. Western blot analysis revealed that GSPs reduced cellular accumulation of β-catenin, and decreased the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and MITF, downstream targets of β-catenin in melanoma cells. GSPs also reduced the protein expressions of PI3K and p-Akt in the same set of experiment. To verify that β-catenin is a specific molecular target of GSPs, we compared the effect of GSPs on cell migration of β-catenin-activated (Mel1241) and β-catenin-inactivated (Mel1011) melanoma cells. GSPs inhibit cell migration of Mel1241 cells but not of Mel1011 cells. Additionally, in vivo bioluminescence imaging data indicate that dietary administration of GSPs (0.5%, w/w) in supplementation with AIN76A control diet inhibited the migration/extravasation of intravenously injected melanoma cells in lungs of immune-compromised nude mice, and that this effect of GSPs was associated with an inhibitory effect on the activation of β-catenin and its downstream targets, such as MMPs, in lungs as a target organ. PMID

  18. The role of matrix proteins in the control of nacreous layer deposition during pearl formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Li, Jiale; Xiang, Liang; Sun, Juan; Zheng, Guilan; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    To study the function of pearl oyster matrix proteins in nacreous layer biomineralization in vivo, we examined the deposition on pearl nuclei and the expression of matrix protein genes in the pearl sac during the early stage of pearl formation. We found that the process of pearl formation involves two consecutive stages: (i) irregular calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition on the bare nucleus and (ii) CaCO3 deposition that becomes more and more regular until the mature nacreous layer has formed on the nucleus. The low-expression level of matrix proteins in the pearl sac during periods of irregular CaCO3 deposition suggests that deposition may not be controlled by the organic matrix during this stage of the process. However, significant expression of matrix proteins in the pearl sac was detected by day 30–35 after implantation. On day 30, a thin layer of CaCO3, which we believe was amorphous CaCO3, covered large aragonites. By day 35, the nacreous layer had formed. The whole process is similar to that observed in shells, and the temporal expression of matrix protein genes indicated that their bioactivities were crucial for pearl development. Matrix proteins controlled the crystal phase, shape, size, nucleation and aggregation of CaCO3 crystals. PMID:21900328

  19. PEX5, the shuttling import receptor for peroxisomal matrix proteins, is a redox-sensitive protein.

    PubMed

    Apanasets, Oksana; Grou, Cláudia P; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Wang, Bo; Nordgren, Marcus; Dodt, Gabriele; Azevedo, Jorge E; Fransen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome maintenance depends on the import of nuclear-encoded proteins from the cytosol. The vast majority of these proteins is destined for the peroxisomal lumen and contains a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal, called PTS1. This targeting signal is recognized in the cytosol by the receptor PEX5. After docking at the peroxisomal membrane and release of the cargo into the organelle matrix, PEX5 is recycled to the cytosol through a process requiring monoubiquitination of an N-terminal, cytosolically exposed cysteine residue (Cys11 in the human protein). At present, the reason why a cysteine, and not a lysine residue, is the target of ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that PTS1 protein import into human fibroblasts is a redox-sensitive process. We also demonstrate that Cys11 in human PEX5 functions as a redox switch that regulates PEX5 activity in response to intracellular oxidative stress. Finally, we show that exposure of human PEX5 to oxidized glutathione results in a ubiquitination-deficient PEX5 molecule, and that substitution of Cys11 by a lysine can counteract this effect. In summary, these findings reveal that the activity of PEX5, and hence PTS1 import, is controlled by the redox state of the cytosol. The potential physiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24118911

  20. PathwayMatrix: visualizing binary relationships between proteins in biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular activation pathways are inherently complex, and understanding relations across many biochemical reactions and reaction types is difficult. Visualizing and analyzing a pathway is a challenge due to the network size and the diversity of relations between proteins and molecules. Results In this paper, we introduce PathwayMatrix, a visualization tool that presents the binary relations between proteins in the pathway via the use of an interactive adjacency matrix. We provide filtering, lensing, clustering, and brushing and linking capabilities in order to present relevant details about proteins within a pathway. Conclusions We evaluated PathwayMatrix by conducting a series of in-depth interviews with domain experts who provided positive feedback, leading us to believe that our visualization technique could be helpful for the larger community of researchers utilizing pathway visualizations. PathwayMatrix is freely available at https://github.com/CreativeCodingLab/PathwayMatrix. PMID:26361499

  1. N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuping; Minaisah, Rose-Marie; Ferraro, Elisa; Li, Chen; Porter, Lauren J; Zhou, Can; Gao, Fang; Zhang, Junyi; Rajgor, Dipen; Autore, Flavia; Shanahan, Catherine M; Warren, Derek T

    2016-07-15

    The spatial compartmentalisation of biochemical signalling pathways is essential for cell function. Nesprins are a multi-isomeric family of proteins that have emerged as signalling scaffolds, herein, we investigate the localisation and function of novel nesprin-2 N-terminal variants. We show that these nesprin-2 variants display cell specific distribution and reside in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that nesprin-2 N-terminal variants colocalised with β-catenin at cell-cell junctions in U2OS cells. Calcium switch assays demonstrated that nesprin-2 and β-catenin are lost from cell-cell junctions in low calcium conditions whereas emerin localisation at the NE remained unaltered, furthermore, an N-terminal fragment of nesprin-2 was sufficient for cell-cell junction localisation and interacted with β-catenin. Disruption of these N-terminal nesprin-2 variants, using siRNA depletion resulted in loss of β-catenin from cell-cell junctions, nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin and augmented β-catenin transcriptional activity. Importantly, we show that U2OS cells lack nesprin-2 giant, suggesting that the N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling independently of the NE. Together, these data identify N-terminal nesprin-2 variants as novel regulators of β-catenin signalling that tether β-catenin to cell-cell contacts to inhibit β-catenin transcriptional activity. PMID:27321956

  2. Monitoring interactions and dynamics of endogenous beta-catenin with intracellular nanobodies in living cells.

    PubMed

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D; Scholz, Armin M; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  3. Monitoring Interactions and Dynamics of Endogenous Beta-catenin With Intracellular Nanobodies in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S.; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D.; Scholz, Armin M.; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  4. NF-{kappa}B p65 represses {beta}-catenin-activated transcription of cyclin D1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Injoo; Choi, Yong Seok; Jeon, Mi-Ya; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 transcription is directly activated by {beta}-catenin; however, {beta}-catenin-induced cyclin D1 transcription is reduced by NF-{kappa}B p65. {yields} Protein-protein interaction between NF-{kappa}B p65 and {beta}-catenin might be responsible for p65-mediated repression of cyclin D1. {yields} One of five putative binding sites, located further upstream of other sites, is the major {beta}-catenin binding site in the cyclin D1 promoter. {yields} NF-{kappa}B binding site in cyclin D1 is occupied not only by p65 but also by {beta}-catenin, which is dynamically regulated by the signal. -- Abstract: Signaling crosstalk between the {beta}-catenin and NF-{kappa}B pathways represents a functional network. To test whether the crosstalk also occurs on their common target genes, the cyclin D1 promoter was used as a model because it contains binding sites for both proteins. {beta}-catenin activated transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter, while co-expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 reduced {beta}-catenin-induced transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed lithium chloride-induced binding of {beta}-catenin on one of the T-cell activating factor binding sites. More interestingly, {beta}-catenin binding was greatly reduced by NF-{kappa}B p65, possibly by the protein-protein interaction between the two proteins. Such a dynamic and complex binding of {beta}-catenin and NF-{kappa}B on promoters might contribute to the regulated expression of their target genes.

  5. Interplay of matrix stiffness and protein tethering in stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jessica H.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Choi, Yu Suk; Hribar, Kolin C.; Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Chen, Shaochen; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells regulate their fate by binding to, and contracting against, the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been proposed that in addition to matrix stiffness and ligand type, the degree of coupling of fibrous protein to the surface of the underlying substrate, that is, tethering and matrix porosity, also regulates stem cell differentiation. By modulating substrate porosity without altering stiffness in polyacrylamide gels, we show that varying substrate porosity did not significantly change protein tethering, substrate deformations, or the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stromal cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Varying protein-substrate linker density up to 50-fold changed tethering, but did not affect osteogenesis, adipogenesis, surface-protein unfolding or underlying substrate deformations. Differentiation was also unaffected by the absence of protein tethering. Our findings imply that the stiffness of planar matrices regulates stem cell differentiation independently of protein tethering and porosity.

  6. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  7. Nesprin-2 Interacts with α-Catenin and Regulates Wnt Signaling at the Nuclear Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Sascha; Schneider, Maria; Daugherty, Rebecca L.; Gottardi, Cara J.; Eming, Sabine A.; Beijer, Asa; Noegel, Angelika A.; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos

    2010-01-01

    Nesprins and emerin are structural nuclear envelope proteins that tether nuclei to the cytoskeleton. In this work, we identified the cytoskeleton-associated α-N/E-catenins as novel nesprin-2-binding partners. The association involves the C termini of nesprin-2 giant and α-N/E-catenins. α-E/T/N-catenins are known primarily for their roles in cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Here, we show that, in addition, α-catenin forms complexes with nesprin-2 that include β-catenin and emerin. We demonstrate that the depletion of nesprin-2 reduces both the amount of active β-catenin inside the nucleus and T-cell factor/lymphoid-enhancing factor-dependent transcription. Taken together, these findings suggest novel nesprin-2 functions in cellular signaling. Moreover, we propose that, in contrast to emerin, nesprin-2 is a positive regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:20801886

  8. Magnesium inhibits Wnt/β-catenin activity and reverses the osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Addy; Guerrero, Fatima; Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Madueño, Juan A; Herencia, Carmen; Peralta, Alan; Almaden, Yolanda; Lopez, Ignacio; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico; Gundlach, Kristina; Büchel, Janine; Peter, Mirjam E; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Rodriguez, Mariano; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium reduces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro but the mechanism has not been revealed so far. This work used only slightly increased magnesium levels and aimed at determining: a) whether inhibition of magnesium transport into the cell influences VSMC calcification, b) whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a key mediator of osteogenic differentiation, is modified by magnesium and c) whether magnesium can influence already established vascular calcification. Human VSMC incubated with high phosphate (3.3 mM) and moderately elevated magnesium (1.4 mM) significantly reduced VSMC calcification and expression of the osteogenic transcription factors Cbfa-1 and osterix, and up-regulated expression of the natural calcification inhibitors matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The protective effects of magnesium on calcification and expression of osteogenic markers were no longer observed in VSMC cultured with an inhibitor of cellular magnesium transport (2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate [2-APB]). High phosphate induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway as demonstrated by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus, increased expression of the frizzled-3 gene, and downregulation of Dkk-1 gene, a specific antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The addition of magnesium however inhibited phosphate-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, TRPM7 silencing using siRNA resulted in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Additional experiments were performed to test the ability of magnesium to halt the progression of already established VSMC calcification in vitro. The delayed addition of magnesium decreased calcium content, down-regulated Cbfa-1 and osterix and up-regulated MGP and OPG, when compared with a control group. This effect was not observed when 2-APB was added. In conclusion, magnesium transport through the cell membrane is important to inhibit VSMC calcification in vitro

  9. Detecting protein-protein interactions with a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    You, Zhu-Hong; Li, Jianqiang; Gao, Xin; He, Zhou; Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ying-Ke; Ji, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and their interactions lie at the heart of most underlying biological processes. Consequently, correct detection of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Although the convenience brought by high-throughput experiment in technological advances makes it possible to detect a large amount of PPIs, the data generated through these methods is unreliable and may not be completely inclusive of all possible PPIs. Targeting at this problem, this study develops a novel computational approach to effectively detect the protein interactions. This approach is proposed based on a novel matrix-based representation of protein sequence combined with the algorithm of support vector machine (SVM), which fully considers the sequence order and dipeptide information of the protein primary sequence. When performed on yeast PPIs datasets, the proposed method can reach 90.06% prediction accuracy with 94.37% specificity at the sensitivity of 85.74%, indicating that this predictor is a useful tool to predict PPIs. Achieved results also demonstrate that our approach can be a helpful supplement for the interactions that have been detected experimentally. PMID:26000305

  10. Non-collagenous protein screening in the human chondrodysplasias: link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, V; Do, T P; Chaminade, F; Maroteaux, P; Stanescu, R

    1994-05-15

    A gel-electrophoretic screening for link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin abnormalities was performed in fetuses, newborn infants, and children with various types of chondrodysplasia. Microdissected freeze-dried sections of upper tibial growth cartilage were extracted with 4M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors. After dialysis against 8M urea, the extracts were submitted to stepwise ion-exchange chromatography to separate the large proteoglycans (aggrecans) from the other components. The latter were analyzed by gel electrophoresis, electrotransferred onto nitrocellulose membranes, and reacted with specific antibodies. Control samples from individuals with apparently normal growth were analyzed in the same runs. Two link protein bands with abnormal electrophoretic migration were found in a sporadic case of spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Three link protein bands with the same migration as in the control samples were found in thanatophoric dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, Desbuquois dysplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and diastrophic dysplasia. In several pathologic cases with normal electrophoretic pattern of the link proteins, small link protein fragments appeared after reduction. The gel electrophoretic pattern of COMP was studied in thanatophoric dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, fibrochondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, and Kniest dysplasia. In all these cases the pattern was the same as in the control samples. The main band of fibromodulin had a normal migration rate in fibrochondrogenesis, Desbuquois dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia. It was delayed in diastrophic dysplasia. PMID:8030664

  11. SP PROTEINS AND RUNX2 MEDIATE REGULATION OF MATRIX GLA PROTEIN (MGP) EXPRESSION BY PARATHYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Suttamanatwong, Supaporn; Jensen, Eric D; Shilling, Jody; Franceschi, Renny T.; Carlson, Ann E.; Mansky, Kim C.; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram

    2009-01-01

    As part of its catabolic action in bone, parathyroid hormone (PTH) inhibits extracellular matrix mineralization. We previously showed that PTH dose-dependently induces matrix gla protein (MGP) expression in osteoblasts and this induction is at least partially responsible for PTH-mediated inhibition of mineralization. Recently, we identified PKA and ERK/MAPK as the key signaling pathways involved in PTH regulation of MGP expression. The goal of this study was to further characterize the mechanism by which PTH stimulates expression of MGP. Deletion analysis of the murine Mgp gene promoter identified a PTH-responsive region between -173 bp and -49 bp. Using gel-mobility shift assays we found that Sp1, Sp3 and Runx2 bind to distinct sites within this region. Mutation of either the Sp or the Runx2 site reduced MGP induction by PTH, while mutation of both sites completely abolished PTH responsiveness. Overexpression of Runx2 or Sp1 activated the Mgp reporter, while Sp3 was a dose-dependent repressor of MGP expression. Collectively, these data show that PTH regulates MGP gene transcription in osteoblasts through altered activities of Sp and Runx2 transcription factors. PMID:19306294

  12. Identification of a novel matrix protein contained in a protein aggregate associated with collagen in fish otoliths.

    PubMed

    Tohse, Hidekazu; Takagi, Yasuaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2008-05-01

    In the biomineralization processes, proteins are thought to control the polymorphism and morphology of the crystals by forming complexes of structural and mineral-associated proteins. To identify such proteins, we have searched for proteins that may form high-molecular-weight (HMW) aggregates in the matrix of fish otoliths that have aragonite and vaterite as their crystal polymorphs. By screening a cDNA library of the trout inner ear using an antiserum raised against whole otolith matrix, a novel protein, named otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64), was identified. The protein was found to have a molecular mass of 64 kDa, and to contain two tandem repeats and a Glu-rich region. The structure of the protein and that of its DNA are similar to those of starmaker, a protein involved in the polymorphism control in the zebrafish otoliths [Söllner C, Burghammer M, Busch-Nentwich E, Berger J, Schwarz H, Riekel C & Nicolson T (2003) Science302, 282-286]. (45)Ca overlay analysis revealed that the Glu-rich region has calcium-binding activity. Combined analysis by western blotting and deglycosylation suggested that OMM-64 is present in an HMW aggregate with heparan sulfate chains. Histological observations revealed that OMM-64 is expressed specifically in otolith matrix-producing cells and deposited onto the otolith. Moreover, the HMW aggregate binds to the inner ear-specific short-chain collagen otolin-1, and the resulting complex forms ring-like structures in the otolith matrix. Overall, OMM-64, by forming a calcium-binding aggregate that binds to otolin-1 and forming matrix protein architectures, may be involved in the control of crystal morphology during otolith biomineralization. PMID:18410381

  13. Roles of the ITAM and PY motifs of Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A in the inhibition of epithelial cell differentiation and activation of {beta}-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jennifer A; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2005-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is important for maintenance of latency in infected B lymphocytes. Through its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and PY motifs, LMP2A is able to block B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, bind BCR-associated kinases, and manipulate the turnover of itself and these kinases via a PY-mediated interaction with the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases. In epithelial cells, LMP2A has been shown to activate the phosphatidylinositol 3'-OH kinase/Akt and beta-catenin signaling pathways. In the present study, the biological consequences of LMP2A expression in the normal human foreskin keratinocyte (HFK) cell line were investigated and the importance of the ITAM and PY motifs for LMP2A signaling effects in HFK cells was ascertained. The ITAM was essential for the activation of Akt by LMP2A in HFK cells, while both the ITAM and PY motifs contributed to LMP2A-mediated accumulation and nuclear translocation of the oncoprotein beta-catenin. LMP2A inhibited induction of differentiation in an assay conducted with semisolid methylcellulose medium, and the PY motifs were critical for this inhibition. LMP2A is expressed in the EBV-associated epithelial malignancies nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma, and these data indicate that LMP2A affects cellular processes that likely contribute to carcinogenesis. PMID:15681438

  14. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  15. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A; Harris, William A

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  16. Characterization of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Annavarapu, Srinivas R; Cialfi, Samantha; Dominici, Carlo; Kokai, George K; Uccini, Stefania; Ceccarelli, Simona; McDowell, Heather P; Helliwell, Timothy R

    2013-10-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and accounts for about 5% of all malignant paediatric tumours. β-Catenin, a multifunctional nuclear transcription factor in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, is active in myogenesis and embryonal somite patterning. Dysregulation of Wnt signaling facilitates tumour invasion and metastasis. This study characterizes Wnt/β-catenin signaling and functional activity in paediatric embryonal and alveolar RMS. Immunohistochemical assessment of paraffin-embedded tissues from 44 RMS showed β-catenin expression in 26 cases with cytoplasmic/membranous expression in 9/14 cases of alveolar RMS, and 15/30 cases of embryonal RMS, whereas nuclear expression was only seen in 2 cases of embryonal RMS. The potential functional significance of β-catenin expression was tested in four RMS cell lines, two derived from embryonal (RD and RD18) RMS and two from alveolar (Rh4 and Rh30) RMS. Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of Wnt-associated proteins including β-catenin, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, disheveled, axin-1, naked, LRP-6 and cadherins in all cell lines. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence studies of the cell lines (after stimulation by human recombinant Wnt3a) showed reduced phosphorylation of β-catenin, stabilization of the active cytosolic form and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Reporter gene assay demonstrated a T-cell factor/lymphoid-enhancing factor-mediated transactivation in these cells. In response to human recombinant Wnt3a, the alveolar RMS cells showed a significant decrease in proliferation rate and induction of myogenic differentiation (myogenin, MyoD1 and myf5). These data indicate that the central regulatory components of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling are expressed and that this pathway is functionally active in a significant subset of RMS tumours and might represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:23999248

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Protein GRP-78 Mediates Endocytosis of Dentin Matrix Protein 1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Hao, Jianjun; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Blond, Sylvie; George, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), a phosphorylated protein present in the mineral phase of both vertebrates and invertebrates, is a key regulatory protein during biogenic formation of mineral deposits. Previously we showed that DMP1 is localized in the nuclear compartment of preosteoblasts and preodontoblasts. In the nucleus DMP1 might play an important role in the regulation of genes that control osteoblast or odontoblast differentiation. Here, we show that cellular uptake of DMP1 occurs through endocytosis. Interestingly, this process is initiated by DMP1 binding to the glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP-78) localized on the plasma membrane of preodontoblast cells. Binding of DMP1 to GRP-78 receptor was determined to be specific and saturable with a binding dissociation constant KD = 85 nm. We further depict a road map for the endocytosed DMP1 and demonstrate that the internalization is mediated primarily by caveolae and that the vesicles containing DMP1 are routed to the nucleus along microtubules. Immunohistochemical analysis and binding studies performed with biotin-labeled DMP1 confirm spatial co-localization of DMP1 and GRP-78 in the preodontoblasts of a developing mouse molar. Co-localization of DMP1 with GRP-78 was also observed in T4-4 preodontoblast cells, dental pulp stem cells, and primary preodontoblasts. By small interfering RNA techniques, we demonstrate that the receptor for DMP1 is GRP-78. Therefore, binding of DMP1 with GRP-78 receptor might be an important mechanism by which DMP1 is internalized and transported to the nucleus during bone and tooth development. PMID:18757373

  18. The first minutes in the life of a peroxisomal matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ana F; Francisco, Tânia; Rodrigues, Tony A; Grou, Cláudia P; Azevedo, Jorge E

    2016-05-01

    In the field of intracellular protein sorting, peroxisomes are most famous by their capacity to import oligomeric proteins. The data supporting this remarkable property are abundant and, understandably, have inspired a variety of hypothetical models on how newly synthesized (cytosolic) proteins reach the peroxisome matrix. However, there is also accumulating evidence suggesting that many peroxisomal oligomeric proteins actually arrive at the peroxisome still as monomers. In support of this idea, recent data suggest that PEX5, the shuttling receptor for peroxisomal matrix proteins, is also a chaperone/holdase, binding newly synthesized peroxisomal proteins in the cytosol and blocking their oligomerization. Here we review the data behind these two different perspectives and discuss their mechanistic implications on this protein sorting pathway. PMID:26408939

  19. Cross-reactive, linear B cell epitopes of the influenza virus matrix protein 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Evaluate antibody responses to the conserved influenza matrix protein. Background: Little is known about the B cell epitopes in conserved internal influenza proteins or their role in viral immunity and immunopathogenesis. Based on epitope information present in the Immune Epitope Database...

  20. FHL2 mediates dexamethasone-induced mesenchymal cell differentiation into osteoblasts by activating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling-dependent Runx2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Haÿ, Eric; Vaudin, Pascal; Charbord, Pierre; Schüle, Roland; Marie, Pierre J; Fromigué, Olivia

    2008-11-01

    The differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into osteoblasts is a crucial step in bone formation. However, the mechanisms involved in the early stages of osteogenic differentiation are not well understood. In this study, we identified FHL2, a member of the LIM-only subclass of the LIM protein superfamily, that is up-regulated during early osteoblast differentiation induced by dexamethasone in murine and human MSCs. Gain-of-function studies showed that FHL2 promotes the expression of the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, as well as in vitro extracellular matrix mineralization in murine and human mesenchymal cells. Knocking down FHL2 using sh-RNA reduces basal and dexamethasone-induced osteoblast marker gene expression in MSCs. We demonstrate that FHL2 interacts with beta-catenin, a key player involved in bone formation induced by Wnt signaling. FHL2-beta-catenin interaction potentiates beta-catenin nuclear translocation and TCF/LEF transcription, resulting in increased Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase expression, which was inhibited by the Wnt inhibitor DKK1. Reduction of Runx2 transcriptional activity using a mutant Runx2 results in inhibition of FHL2-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in MSCs. These findings reveal that FHL2 acts as an endogenous activator of mesenchymal cell differentiation into osteoblasts and mediates osteogenic differentiation induced by dexamethasone in MSCs through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling- dependent Runx2 expression. PMID:18653765

  1. Tumor matrix protein collagen XIα1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raglow, Zoe; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is increasingly recognized as an essential player in cancer development and progression. Collagens are one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix, and have themselves been implicated in many aspects of neoplastic transformation. Collagen XI is a minor collagen whose main physiologic function is to regulate the diameter of major collagen fibrils. The α1 chain of collagen XI (colXIα1), has known pathogenic roles in several musculoskeletal disorders. Recent research has highlighted the importance of colXIα1 in many types of cancer, including its roles in metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance, as well as its potential utility in screening tests and as a therapeutic target. High levels of colXIα1 overexpression have been reported in multiple expression profile studies examining differences between cancerous and normal tissue, and between beginning and advanced stage cancer. Its expression has been linked to poor progression-free and overall survival. The consistency of this data across cancer types is particularly striking, including colorectal, ovarian, breast, head and neck, lung, and brain cancers. This review discusses the role of collagen XIα1 in cancer and its potential as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:25511741

  2. Yeast pex1 cells contain peroxisomal ghosts that import matrix proteins upon reintroduction of Pex1

    PubMed Central

    Knoops, Kèvin; de Boer, Rinse; Kram, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Pex1 and Pex6 are two AAA-ATPases that play a crucial role in peroxisome biogenesis. We have characterized the ultrastructure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome-deficient mutants pex1 and pex6 by various high-resolution electron microscopy techniques. We observed that the cells contained peroxisomal membrane remnants, which in ultrathin cross sections generally appeared as double membrane rings. Electron tomography revealed that these structures consisted of one continuous membrane, representing an empty, flattened vesicle, which folds into a cup shape. Immunocytochemistry revealed that these structures lack peroxisomal matrix proteins but are the sole sites of the major peroxisomal membrane proteins Pex2, Pex10, Pex11, Pex13, and Pex14. Upon reintroduction of Pex1 in Pex1-deficient cells, these peroxisomal membrane remnants (ghosts) rapidly incorporated peroxisomal matrix proteins and developed into peroxisomes. Our data support earlier views that Pex1 and Pex6 play a role in peroxisomal matrix protein import. PMID:26644511

  3. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of avian eggshell matrix and uterine fluid proteins associated with eggshell mechanical property.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congjiao; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Eggshell strength is a crucial economic trait for table egg production. During the process of eggshell formation, uncalcified eggs are bathed in uterine fluid that plays regulatory roles in eggshell calcification. In this study, a label-free MS-based protein quantification technology was used to detect differences in protein abundance between eggshell matrix from strong and weak eggs (shell matrix protein from strong eggshells and shell matrix protein from weak eggshells) and between the corresponding uterine fluids bathing strong and weak eggs (uterine fluid bathing strong eggs and uterine fluid bathing weak eggs) in a chicken population. Here, we reported the first global proteomic analysis of uterine fluid. A total of 577 and 466 proteins were identified in uterine fluid and eggshell matrix, respectively. Of 447 identified proteins in uterine fluid bathing strong eggs, up to 357 (80%) proteins were in common with proteins in uterine fluid bathing weak eggs. Similarly, up to 83% (328/396) of the proteins in shell matrix protein from strong eggshells were in common with the proteins in shell matrix protein from weak eggshells. The large amount of common proteins indicated that the difference in protein abundance should play essential roles in influencing eggshell strength. Ultimately, 15 proteins mainly relating to eggshell matrix specific proteins, calcium binding and transportation, protein folding and sorting, bone development or diseases, and thyroid hormone activity were considered to have closer association with the formation of strong eggshell. PMID:24151251

  4. SET7/9 regulates cancer cell proliferation by influencing β-catenin stability.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changchun; Wang, Donglai; Liu, Xiangyu; Gu, Bo; Du, Yipeng; Wei, Fu-Zheng; Cao, Lin-Lin; Song, Boyan; Lu, Xiaopeng; Yang, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Qian; Hou, Tianyun; Li, Meiting; Wang, Lina; Wang, Haiying; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2015-10-01

    β-Catenin, which is a key mediator of the wingless-integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin signaling pathway, plays an important role in cell proliferation, cell fate determination, and tumorigenesis, by regulating the expression of a wide range of target genes. Although a variety of posttranslational modifications are involved in β-catenin activity, the role of lysine methylation in β-catenin activity is largely unknown. In this study, su(var)3-9, enhancer-of-zeste, trithorax (SET) domain-containing protein 7 (SET7/9), a lysine methyltransferase, interacted with and methylated β-catenin, as demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction and methylation were significantly enhanced in response to H2O2 stimulation. A mutagenesis assay and mass spectrometric analyses revealed that β-catenin was monomethylated by SET7/9 at lysine residue 180. Methylated β-catenin was easily recognized by phosphokinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β for degradation. Consistent with this finding, the mutated β-catenin (K180R) that cannot be methylated exhibited a longer half-life than did the methylated β-catenin. The consequent depletion of SET7/9 by shRNA or the mutation of the β-catenin (K180R) significantly enhanced the expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes such as c-myc and cyclin D1 and promoted the growth of cancer cells. Together, these results provide a novel mechanism by which Wnt/β-catenin signaling is regulated in response to oxidative stress. PMID:26116705

  5. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  6. Identification of plakoglobin domains required for association with N-cadherin and alpha-catenin.

    PubMed

    Sacco, P A; McGranahan, T M; Wheelock, M J; Johnson, K R

    1995-08-25

    Cadherins are calcium-dependent, cell surface glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion. To function in cell-cell adhesion, the transmembrane cadherin molecule must be associated with the cytoskeleton via cytoplasmic proteins known as catenins. Three catenins, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and gamma-catenin (also known as plakoglobin), have been identified. The domain of the cadherin molecule important for its interaction with the catenins has been mapped to the COOH-terminal 70 amino acids, but less is known about regions of the catenins that allow them to associate with one another or with the cadherin molecule. In this study we have transfected carboxyl-terminal deletions of plakoglobin into the human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 and used immunofluorescence localization and co-immunoprecipitation to map the regions of plakoglobin that allow it to associate with N-cadherin and with alpha-catenin. Plakoglobin is an armadillo family member containing 13 weakly similar internal repeats. These data show that the alpha-catenin-binding region maps within the first repeat and the N-cadherin-binding region maps within repeats 7 and 8. PMID:7650039

  7. Rhabdovirus Matrix Protein Structures Reveal a Novel Mode of Self-Association

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Gholami, Alireza; Talbi, Chiraz; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus) and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus), revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins. PMID:19112510

  8. Cadherins and catenins in dendrite and synapse morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eunju; Yuan, Li; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized specialized cells. Neuronal integrity and functional roles are critically dependent on dendritic architecture and synaptic structure, function and plasticity. The cadherins are glycosylated transmembrane proteins that form cell adhesion complexes in various tissues. They are associated with a group of cytosolic proteins, the catenins. While the functional roles of the complex have been extensively investigates in non-neuronal cells, it is becoming increasingly clear that components of the complex have critical roles in regulating dendritic and synaptic architecture, function and plasticity in neurons. Consistent with these functional roles, aberrations in components of the complex have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we discuss the roles of the classical cadherins and catenins in various aspects of dendrite and synapse architecture and function and their relevance to human neurological disorders. Cadherins are glycosylated transmembrane proteins that were initially identified as Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion molecules. They are present on plasma membrane of a variety of cell types from primitive metazoans to humans. In the past several years, it has become clear that in addition to providing mechanical adhesion between cells, cadherins play integral roles in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The cadherin family is composed of more than 100 members and classified into several subfamilies, including classical cadherins and protocadherins. Several of these cadherin family members have been implicated in various aspects of neuronal development and function.1-3 The classical cadherins are associated with a group of cytosolic proteins, collectively called the catenins. While the functional roles of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex have been extensively investigated in epithelial cells, it is now clear that components of the complex are well expressed in central neurons at different

  9. Advanced bone formation in mice with a dominant-negative mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β gene due to activation of Wnt/β-catenin protein signaling.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Patrick J; Kim, Dong Wook; Logan, John G; Davis, Sean; Walker, Robert L; Meltzer, Paul S; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Williams, Graham R

    2012-05-18

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) acts in chondrocytes and bone-forming osteoblasts to control bone development and maintenance, but the signaling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Thrb(PV/PV) mice have a severely impaired pituitary-thyroid axis and elevated thyroid hormone levels due to a dominant-negative mutant T(3) receptor (TRβ(PV)) that cannot bind T(3) and interferes with the actions of wild-type TR. Thrb(PV/PV) mice have accelerated skeletal development due to unknown mechanisms. We performed microarray studies in primary osteoblasts from wild-type mice and Thrb(PV/PV) mice. Activation of the canonical Wnt signaling in Thrb(PV/PV) mice was confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis of Wnt target gene expression in bone during postnatal growth. By contrast, T(3) treatment inhibited Wnt signaling in osteoblastic cells, suggesting that T(3) inhibits the Wnt pathway by facilitating proteasomal degradation of β-catenin and preventing its accumulation in the nucleus. Activation of the Wnt pathway in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, however, results from a gain of function for TRβ(PV) that stabilizes β-catenin despite the presence of increased thyroid hormone levels. These studies demonstrate novel interactions between T(3) and Wnt signaling pathways in the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation. PMID:22442145

  10. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by disrupting nuclear β-catenin/TCF-1 complex: critical role of STAT-3.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Kartick C; Fofaria, Neel M; Gupta, Parul; Ranjan, Alok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2015-05-10

    Aberrant activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling is related to the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of capsaicin on β-catenin/TCF signaling. In a concentration and time-dependent study, we observed that capsaicin treatment inhibits the activation of dishevelled (Dsh) protein DvI-1 in L3.6PL, PanC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells. Capsaicin treatment induced GSK-3β by inhibiting its phosphorylation and further activated APC and Axin multicomplex, leading to the proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. Expression of TCF-1 and β-catenin-responsive proteins, c-Myc and cyclin D1 also decreased in response to capsaicin treatment. Pre-treatment of cells with MG-132 blocked capsaicin-mediated proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. To establish the involvement of β-catenin in capsaicin-induced apoptosis, cells were treated with LiCl or SB415286, inhibitors of GSK-3β. Our results reveal that capsaicin treatment suppressed LiCl or SB415286-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. Our results further showed that capsaicin blocked nuclear translocation of β-catenin, TCF-1 and p-STAT-3 (Tyr705). The immunoprecipitation results indicated that capsaicin treatment reduced the interaction of β-catenin and TCF-1 in the nucleus. Moreover, capsaicin treatment significantly decreased the phosphorylation of STAT-3 at Tyr705. Interestingly, STAT-3 over expression or STAT-3 activation by IL-6, significantly increased the levels of β-catenin and attenuated the effects of capsaicin in inhibiting β-catenin signaling. Finally, capsaicin mediated inhibition of orthotopic tumor growth was associated with inhibition of β-catenin/TCF-1 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells was associated with inhibition of β-catenin signaling due to the dissociation of β-catenin/TCF-1 complex and the process was orchestrated by STAT-3. PMID:25869100

  11. β-catenin as a potential key target for tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuejun; Zheng, Shuhua; An, Na; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Popplewell, Linda; Liang, Aihua; Li, Ke; Hu, Changchen; Zhu, Yajing

    2011-10-01

    β-catenin is a multifunctional protein identified to be pivotal in embryonic patterning, organogenesis and adult homeostasis. It plays a critical structural role in mediating cadherin junctions and is also an essential transcriptional co-activator in the canonical Wnt pathway. Evidence has been documented that both the canonical Wnt pathway and cadherin junctions are deregulated or impaired in a plethora of human malignancies. In the light of this, there has been a recent surge in elucidating the mechanisms underlying the etiology of cancer development from the perspective of β-catenin. Here, we focus on the emerging roles of β-catenin in the process of tumorigenesis by discussing novel functions of old players and new proteins, mechanisms identified to mediate or interact with β-catenin and the most recently unraveled clinical implications of β-catenin regulatory pathways toward tumor suppression. PMID:21455986

  12. Rabies virus matrix protein induces apoptosis by targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zan, Jie; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Wang, Hai-Long; Mo, Kai-Kun; Yan, Yan; Xu, Yun-Bin; Liao, Min; Su, Shuo; Hu, Rong-Liang; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2016-09-10

    Apoptosis, as an innate antiviral defense, not only functions to limit viral replication by eliminating infected cells, but also contribute to viral dissemination, particularly at the late stages of infection. A highly neurotropic CVS strain of rabies virus induces apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. However, the detailed mechanism of CVS-mediated neuronal apoptosis is not entirely clear. Here, we show that CVS induces apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway by dissipating mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and AIF. CVS blocks Bax activation at the early stages of infection; while M protein partially targets mitochondria and induces mitochondrial apoptosis at the late stages of infection. The α-helix structure spanning 67-79 amino acids of M protein is essential for mitochondrial targeting and induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that CVS functions on mitochondria to regulate apoptosis at different stages of infection, so as to for viral replication and dissemination. PMID:27426727

  13. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  14. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24706108

  15. Growth-arrest-specific 7C protein inhibits tumor metastasis via the N-WASP/FAK/F-actin and hnRNP U/β-TrCP/β-catenin pathways in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jer-Wei; Mao, Jiou-Shan; Tsai, Charng-Dar; Wu, Pei-Chen; Lin, Cuei-Jyuan; Lu, Yi-Lin; Liao, Sheng-You; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Hsu, Han-Shui

    2015-01-01

    Growth-arrest-specific 7 (GAS7) belongs to a group of adaptor proteins that coordinate the actin cytoskeleton. Among human GAS7 isoforms, only GAS7C possesses a Src homology 3 domain. We report here that GAS7C acts as a migration suppressor and can serve as a prognostic biomarker in lung cancer. GAS7C overexpression reduces lung cancer migration, whereas GAS7C knockdown enhances cancer cell migration. Importantly, ectopically overexpressed GAS7C binds tightly with N-WASP thus inactivates the fibronectin/integrin/FAK pathway, which in turn leads to the suppression of F-actin dynamics. In addition, overexpression of GAS7C sequesters hnRNP U and thus decreases the level of β-catenin protein via the β-TrCP ubiquitin-degradation pathway. The anti-metastatic effect of GAS7C overexpression was also confirmed using lung cancer xenografts. Our clinical data indicated that 23.6% (25/106) of lung cancer patients showed low expression of GAS7C mRNA which correlated with a poorer overall survival. In addition, low GAS7C mRNA expression was detected in 60.0% of metastatic lung cancer patients, indicating an association between low GAS7C expression and cancer progression. A significant inverse correlation between mRNA expression and promoter hypermethylation was also found, which suggests that the low level of GAS7C expression was partly due to promoter hypermethylation. Our results provide novel evidence that low GAS7C correlates with poor prognosis and promotes metastasis in lung cancer. Low GAS7C increases cancer cell motility by promoting N-WASP/FAK/F-actin cytoskeleton dynamics. It also enhances β-catenin stability via hnRNP U/β-TrCP complex formation. Therefore, GAS7C acts as a metastasis suppressor in lung cancer. PMID:26506240

  16. Osteoblast fibronectin mRNA, protein synthesis, and matrix are unchanged after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Gilbertson, V.

    1999-01-01

    The well-defined osteoblast line, MC3T3-E1 was used to examine fibronectin (FN) mRNA levels, protein synthesis, and extracellular FN matrix accumulation after growth activation in spaceflight. These osteoblasts produce FN extracellular matrix (ECM) known to regulate adhesion, differentiation, and function in adherent cells. Changes in bone ECM and osteoblast cell shape occur in spaceflight. To determine whether altered FN matrix is a factor in causing these changes in spaceflight, quiescent osteoblasts were launched into microgravity and were then sera activated with and without a 1-gravity field. Synthesis of FN mRNA, protein, and matrix were measured after activation in microgravity. FN mRNA synthesis is significantly reduced in microgravity (0-G) when compared to ground (GR) osteoblasts flown in a centrifuge simulating earth's gravity (1-G) field 2.5 h after activation. However, 27.5 h after activation there were no significant differences in mRNA synthesis. A small but significant reduction of FN protein was found in the 0-G samples 2.5 h after activation. Total FN protein 27.5 h after activation showed no significant difference between any of the gravity conditions, however, there was a fourfold increase in absolute amount of protein synthesized during the incubation. Using immunofluorescence, we found no significant differences in the amount or in the orientation of the FN matrix after 27.5 h in microgravity. These results demonstrate that FN is made by sera-activated osteoblasts even during exposure to microgravity. These data also suggest that after a total period of 43 h of spaceflight FN transcription, translation, or altered matrix assembly is not responsible for the altered cell shape or altered matrix formation of osteoblasts.

  17. Proteomic identification of novel proteins from the calcifying shell matrix of the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Trinkler, Nolwenn; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Guichard, Nathalie; Becchi, Michel; Paillard, Christine; Marin, Frédéric

    2011-10-01

    The shell of the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum is composed of more than 99% calcium carbonate and of a small amount of organic matrix (around 0.2%). In this study, we developed one of the first proteomic approaches applied to mollusc shell in order to characterise the matrix proteins that are believed to be essential for the formation of the biomineral. The insoluble organic matrix, purified after demineralisation of the shell powder with cold acetic acid (5%), was digested with trypsin enzyme and then separated on nano-LC prior to nanospray/quadrupole time-of-flight analysis. MS/MS spectra were searched against the above 11,000 EST sequences available on the NCBI public database for Venerupis. Using this approach, we were able to identify partial or full-length sequence transcripts that encode for shell matrix proteins. These include three novel shell proteins whose sequences do not present any homologous proteins or already described domains, two putative protease inhibitor proteins containing Kazal-type domains, and a putative Ca(2+)-binding protein containing two EF-hand domains. Biomineral formation and evolutionary implications are discussed. PMID:21221694

  18. Angiopoietin-like 4 Interacts with Matrix Proteins to Modulate Wound Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yan Yih; Pal, Mintu; Chong, Han Chung; Zhu, Pengcheng; Tan, Ming Jie; Punugu, Lakshmi; Tan, Chek Kun; Huang, Royston-Luke; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Ding, Jeak Ling; Kersten, Sander; Tan, Nguan Soon

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic cell-matrix interaction is crucial for a rapid cellular response to changes in the environment. Appropriate cell behavior in response to the changing wound environment is required for efficient wound closure. However, the way in which wound keratinocytes modify the wound environment to coordinate with such cellular responses remains less studied. We demonstrated that angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) produced by wound keratinocytes coordinates cell-matrix communication. ANGPTL4 interacts with vitronectin and fibronectin in the wound bed, delaying their proteolytic degradation by metalloproteinases. This interaction does not interfere with integrin-matrix protein recognition and directly affects cell-matrix communication by altering the availability of intact matrix proteins. These interactions stimulate integrin- focal adhesion kinase, 14-3-3, and PKC-mediated signaling pathways essential for effective wound healing. The deficiency of ANGPTL4 in mice delays wound re-epithelialization. Further analysis revealed that cell migration was impaired in the ANGPTL4-deficient keratinocytes. Altogether, the findings provide molecular insight into a novel control of wound healing via ANGPTL4-dependent regulation of cell-matrix communication. Given the known role of ANGPTL4 in glucose and lipid homeostasis, it is a prime therapeutic candidate for the treatment of diabetic wounds. It also underscores the importance of cell-matrix communication during angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. PMID:20729546

  19. A substitution matrix for structural alphabet based on structural alignment of homologous proteins and its applications.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Manoj; Gowri, Venkataraman S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Offmann, Bernard

    2006-10-01

    Analysis of protein structures based on backbone structural patterns known as structural alphabets have been shown to be very useful. Among them, a set of 16 pentapeptide structural motifs known as protein blocks (PBs) has been identified and upon which backbone model of most protein structures can be built. PBs allows simplification of 3D space onto 1D space in the form of sequence of PBs. Here, for the first time, substitution probabilities of PBs in a large number of aligned homologous protein structures have been studied and are expressed as a simplified 16 x 16 substitution matrix. The matrix was validated by benchmarking how well it can align sequences of PBs rather like amino acid alignment to identify structurally equivalent regions in closely or distantly related proteins using dynamic programming approach. The alignment results obtained are very comparable to well established structure comparison methods like DALI and STAMP. Other interesting applications of the matrix have been investigated. We first show that, in variable regions between two superimposed homologous proteins, one can distinguish between local conformational differences and rigid-body displacement of a conserved motif by comparing the PBs and their substitution scores. Second, we demonstrate, with the example of aspartic proteinases, that PBs can be efficiently used to detect the lobe/domain flexibility in the multidomain proteins. Lastly, using protein kinase as an example, we identify regions of conformational variations and rigid body movements in the enzyme as it is changed to the active state from an inactive state. PMID:16894618

  20. Regulatory effects of matrix protein variations on influenza virus growth.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, J; Toyoda, T; Nakayama, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    Influenza virus A/WSN/33 forms large plaques (> 3 mm diameter) on MDCK cells whereas A/Aichi/2/68 forms only small plaques (< 1 mm diameter). Fast growing reassortants (AWM), isolated by mixed infection of MDCK cells with these two virus strains in the presence of anti-WSN antibodies, all carried the M gene from WSN. On MDCK cells, these reassortants produced progeny viruses as rapidly as did WSN, and the virus yield was as high as Aichi. The fast-growing reassortants overcame the growth inhibitory effect of lignins. Pulse-labeling experiments at various times after virus infection showed that the reassortant AWM started to synthesize viral proteins earlier than Aichi. Taken together, we conclude that upon infecting MDCK cells, the reassortant viruses advance rapidly into the growth cycle, thereby leading to an elevated level of progeny viruses in the early period of infection. Possible mechanisms of the M gene involvement in the determination of virus growth rate are discussed, in connection with multiple functions of the M proteins. PMID:8257290

  1. [Effect of fibronectin on the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in periodontal ligament cells].

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Wu, Z; Zhou, Y

    1996-11-01

    Immunofluorescence staining method and fluorescence spectrophotometry were used to study the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in periodontal ligament cells (PDL cells) when exogenous fibronectin (FN) existed. The results showed that the right amount of exogenous FN (0.044 mumol/l) could increase the amount of type I collagen and type III collagen in PDL cells (P < 0.01), inhibit the synthesis of FN itself (P < 0.01). It suggested that exogenous FN can effect the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins so as to promote a new connective tissue attachment formation. PMID:9592289

  2. Differential expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Dhore, C R; Cleutjens, J P; Lutgens, E; Cleutjens, K B; Geusens, P P; Kitslaar, P J; Tordoir, J H; Spronk, H M; Vermeer, C; Daemen, M J

    2001-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of regulators of bone formation and osteoclastogenesis in human atherosclerosis because accumulating evidence suggests that atherosclerotic calcification shares features with bone calcification. The most striking finding of this study was the constitutive immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein in nondiseased aortas and the absence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin in nondiseased aortas and early atherosclerotic lesions. When atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated calcification or bone formation, BMP-2, BMP-4, osteopontin, and osteonectin were upregulated. Interestingly, this upregulation was associated with a sustained immunoreactivity of matrix Gla protein, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein. The 2 modulators of osteoclastogenesis (osteoprotegerin [OPG] and its ligand, OPGL) were present in the nondiseased vessel wall and in early atherosclerotic lesions. In advanced calcified lesions, OPG was present in bone structures, whereas OPGL was only present in the extracellular matrix surrounding calcium deposits. The observed expression patterns suggest a tight regulation of the expression of bone matrix regulatory proteins during human atherogenesis. The expression pattern of both OPG and OPGL during atherogenesis might suggest a regulatory role of these proteins not only in osteoclastogenesis but also in atherosclerotic calcification. PMID:11742876

  3. A Protein Involved in the Assembly of an Extracellular Calcium Storage Matrix*

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBankTM data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  4. A protein involved in the assembly of an extracellular calcium storage matrix.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Lilah; Shechter, Assaf; Tom, Moshe; Yudkovski, Yana; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu David; Pamuru, Ramachandra Reddy; Khalaila, Isam; Bentov, Shmuel; Berman, Amir; Sagi, Amir

    2010-04-23

    Gastroliths, the calcium storage organs of crustaceans, consist of chitin-protein-mineral complexes in which the mineral component is stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. To date, only three proteins, GAP 65, gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP), and orchestin, have been identified in gastroliths. Here, we report a novel protein, GAP 10, isolated from the gastrolith of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus and specifically expressed in its gastrolith disc. The encoding gene was cloned by partial sequencing of the protein extracted from the gastrolith matrix. Based on an assembled microarray cDNA chip, GAP 10 transcripts were found to be highly (12-fold) up-regulated in premolt gastrolith disc and significantly down-regulated in the hypodermis at the same molt stage. The deduced protein sequence of GAP 10 lacks chitin-binding domains and does not show homology to known proteins in the GenBank data base. It does, however, have an amino acid composition that has similarity to proteins extracted from invertebrate and ascidian-calcified extracellular matrices. The GAP 10 sequence contains a predicted signal peptide and predicted phosphorylation sites. In addition, the protein is phosphorylated and exhibits calcium-binding ability. Repeated daily injections of GAP 10 double strand RNA to premolt C. quadricarinatus resulted in a prolonged premolt stage and in the development of gastroliths with irregularly rough surfaces. These findings suggest that GAP 10 may be involved in the assembly of the gastrolith chitin-protein-mineral complex, particularly in the deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate. PMID:20150428

  5. An Overview of the Medical Applications of Marine Skeletal Matrix Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the medicinal potential of marine organisms has attracted increasing attention. This is due to their immense diversity and adaptation to unique ecological niches that has led to vast physiological and biochemical diversification. Among these organisms, marine calcifiers are an abundant source of novel proteins and chemical entities that can be used for drug discovery. Studies of the skeletal organic matrix proteins of marine calcifiers have focused on biomedical applications such as the identification of growth inducing proteins that can be used for bone regeneration, for example, 2/4 bone morphogenic proteins (BMP). Although a few reports on the functions of proteins derived from marine calcifiers can be found in the literature, marine calcifiers themselves remain an untapped source of proteins for the development of innovative pharmaceuticals. Following an overview of the current knowledge of skeletal organic matrix proteins from marine calcifiers, this review will focus on various aspects of marine skeletal protein research including sources, biosynthesis, structures, and possible strategies for chemical or physical modification. Special attention will be given to potential medical applications and recent discoveries of skeletal proteins and polysaccharides with biologically appealing characteristics. In addition, I will introduce an effective protocol for sample preparation and protein purification that includes isolation technology for biopolymers (of both soluble and insoluble organic matrices) from coralline algae. These algae are a widespread but poorly studied group of shallow marine calcifiers that have great potential for marine drug discovery. PMID:27626432

  6. Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels in Mesangial Cells Inhibit Matrix Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Wang, Yanxia; Davis, Mark E; Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Chaudhari, Sarika; Begg, Malcolm; Ma, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix derived from glomerular mesangial cells is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy. Ca(2+) signals mediated by store-operated Ca(2+) channels regulate protein production in a variety of cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells on extracellular matrix protein expression. In cultured human mesangial cells, activation of store-operated Ca(2+) channels by thapsigargin significantly decreased fibronectin protein expression and collagen IV mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibition of the channels by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly increased the expression of fibronectin and collagen IV. Similarly, overexpression of stromal interacting molecule 1 reduced, but knockdown of calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai1) increased fibronectin protein expression. Furthermore, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly augmented angiotensin II-induced fibronectin protein expression, whereas thapsigargin abrogated high glucose- and TGF-β1-stimulated matrix protein expression. In vivo knockdown of Orai1 in mesangial cells of mice using a targeted nanoparticle siRNA delivery system resulted in increased expression of glomerular fibronectin and collagen IV, and mice showed significant mesangial expansion compared with controls. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of stromal interacting molecule 1 in mesangial cells by recombinant adeno-associated virus-encoded shRNA markedly increased collagen IV protein expression in renal cortex and caused mesangial expansion in rats. These results suggest that store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells negatively regulate extracellular matrix protein expression in the kidney, which may serve as an endogenous renoprotective mechanism in diabetes. PMID:25788524

  7. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) membrane recruitment 3, a member of the APC membrane recruitment family of APC-binding proteins, is a positive regulator of Wnt-β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Brauburger, Katharina; Akyildiz, Senem; Ruppert, Jan G; Graeb, Michael; Bernkopf, Dominic B; Hadjihannas, Michel V; Behrens, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) membrane recruitment (Amer) family proteins Amer1/Wilms tumour gene on the X chromosome and Amer2 are binding partners of the APC tumour suppressor protein, and act as negative regulators in the Wnt signalling cascade. So far, nothing has been known about the third member of the family, Amer3. Here we show that Amer3 binds to the armadillo repeat domain of APC, similarly to Amer1 and Amer2. Amer3 also binds to the Wnt pathway regulator conductin/axin2. Furthermore, we identified Amer1 as binding partner of Amer3. Whereas Amer1 and Amer2 are linked to the plasma membrane by an N-terminal membrane localization domain, Amer3 lacks this domain. Amer3 localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus of epithelial cells, and this is dependent on specific nuclear import and export sequences. Functionally, exogenous Amer3 enhances the expression of a β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent reporter gene, and knockdown of endogenous Amer3 reduces Wnt target gene expression in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, Amer3 acts as an activator of Wnt signalling, in contrast to Amer1 and Amer2, which are inhibitors, suggesting a nonredundant role of Amer proteins in the regulation of this pathway. Our data, together with those of previous studies, provide a comprehensive picture of similarities and differences within the Amer protein family. PMID:24251807

  8. Beta-catenin in disease

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, BR; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on “β-catenin in health”, in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review. PMID:27601825

  9. Beta-catenin in disease.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, B R; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on "β-catenin in health", in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review. PMID:27601825

  10. Versatile Photocrosslinked Protein Hydrogel Matrix for Magnetic-Nanoparticle-Doping and Biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fengying; Li, Shanpeng; Yang, Hai; Wang, Zhirui; Li, Aiwu

    2016-02-01

    A versatile template biomaterial was facilely obtained by ultraviolet (UV) photocrosslinking approach using protein molecules as building blocks. As-formed photocrosslinked protein hydrogel matrix (PPHM) was proved to be composed of covalently bound and dense packing protein molecules. Therefore, the PPHM was endowed with highly smooth topograghy with an average roughness of approximately 5 nm, and was self-supporting and flexible. The PPHM could be easily functionalized by doping Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles inside the protein hydrogel. Further, PPHM was experimentally demonstrated to be used as a applicable template for biomineralization. PMID:27433606

  11. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  12. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  13. Beta-catenin is essential for ameloblast movement during enamel development.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaomu; Xu, Mingang; Millar, Sarah E; Bartlett, John D

    2016-06-01

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein that plays key roles in cadherin-based cell adherens junctions and in the Wnt signaling pathway. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway can regulate transcription factors that control cell movement/invasion. We investigated whether β-catenin regulates ameloblast movement through canonical Wnt signaling. The morphological and physical properties of enamel were assessed in enamel from control and β-catenin conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC) were used to investigate the potential roles of β-catenin in cell migration and in E-cadherin expression. Compared with controls, incisors from β-catenin cKO mice were short, blunt, and where enamel was present, it was soft and malformed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dysplastic rod pattern within the enamel of incisors from β-catenin cKO mice, and Vickers microhardness measurements confirmed that mice with β-catenin ablated from their enamel organ had enamel that was significantly softer than normal. Amelogenesis was disrupted in the absence of β-catenin and the ameloblasts did not differentiate properly. We further demonstrated that migration of ALCs was inhibited in vitro and that E-cadherin expression was significantly up-regulated when ALCs were treated with the β-catenin inhibitor, ICG-001. Beta-catenin ablation causes enamel malformation in mice and this phenotype may occur, in part, by a lack of ameloblast differentiation and/or movement necessary to form the decussating enamel rod structure. PMID:26957367

  14. Expression and colocalization of β-catenin and lymphoid enhancing factor-1 in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Tyler M; Vezina, Chad M; Ricke, Emily A; Halberg, Richard B; Huang, Wei; Peterson, Richard E; Ricke, William A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively investigate β-catenin and LEF1 abundance, subcellular localization, and colocalization across benign and staged prostate cancer (PCa) specimens. A tissue microarray containing tumor-adjacent histologically benign prostate tissue (BPT; n = 48 patients), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN; n = 25), localized PCa (n = 42), aggressive PCa (n = 31), and metastases (n = 22) was stained using multiplexed immunohistochemistry with antibodies toward E-cadherin, β-catenin, and LEF1. Multispectral imaging was used for quantitation, and protein expression and colocalization was evaluated across PCa progression. Stromal nuclear β-catenin abundance was greater in HGPIN and PCa compared with BPT (P < .05 for both), and epithelial nuclear β-catenin abundance was lower in metastatic PCa than in BPT (P < .05 for both). Epithelial and stromal nuclear LEF1 abundance was greater in HGPIN compared with BPT, whereas epithelial nuclear LEF1 was also greater in metastases. The proportion of epithelial and stromal nuclear double-positive β-catenin(+)/LEF1(+) cells was greater in HGPIN compared with BPT. In addition, the proportion of epithelial β-catenin(+)/LEF1(+) cells was greater in localized PCa and metastases compared with BPT. A significant amount of stromal cells were positive for LEF1 but not β-catenin. β-Catenin and LEF1 abundance were negatively correlated in the epithelium (P < .0001) but not the stroma (P > .05). We conclude that β-catenin and LEF1 colocalization is increased in HGPIN and metastasis relative to BPT, suggesting a role for β-catenin/LEF1-mediated transcription in both malignant transformation and metastasis of PCa. Furthermore, our results suggest that LEF1 abundance alone is not a reliable readout for β-catenin activity in prostate tissues. PMID:27067790

  15. Activation of the wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Polymyositis, Dermatomyositis and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuchen; Liang, Zonglai; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dandan; Zhao, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a critical role in embryonic development and adult-tissue homeostasis. Recent investigations implicate the importance of wnt/β-catenin signaling in normal wound healing and its sustained activation being associated with fibrogenesis. We investigated the immunolocalization and activation of wnt/β-catenin in polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis of β-catenin were performed in muscle specimens from 6 PM, 8 DM, and 6 DMD subjects. The β-catenin/Tcf4 DNA-binding activity in muscle was studied using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and serum wnt/β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity was measured using a luciferase reporter gene assay. Results Immunoreactivity for β-catenin was found in the cytoplasm and nuclei of muscle fibers in PM, DM, and DMD. The protein level of β-catenin was elevated, and EMSA analysis confirmed the activation of wnt/β-catenin signaling. The transcriptional activities of β-catenin/Tcf in the circulation were increased in patients with PM, DM, and DMD, especially in those with interstitial lung disease, and these transcriptional activities decreased when PM or DM patients exhibited obvious clinical improvements. Conclusions Our findings indicate that wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated in PM, DM, and DMD. Its activation in muscle tissue and the circulation may play a role in modulating muscle regeneration and be at least partly involved in the process of muscle and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27165423

  16. LRPPRC is a mitochondrial matrix protein that is conserved in metazoans

    SciTech Connect

    Sterky, Fredrik H.; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Samuelsson, Tore; Larsson, Nils-Goeran

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} LRPPRC orthologs are restricted to metazoans. {yields} LRPPRC is imported to the mitochondrial matrix. {yields} No evidence of nuclear isoform. -- Abstract: LRPPRC (also called LRP130) is an RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat protein. LRPPRC has been recognized as a mitochondrial protein, but has also been shown to regulate nuclear gene transcription and to bind specific RNA molecules in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We here present a bioinformatic analysis of the LRPPRC primary sequence, which reveals that orthologs to the LRPPRC gene are restricted to metazoan cells and that all of the corresponding proteins contain mitochondrial targeting signals. To address the subcellular localization further, we have carefully analyzed LRPPRC in mammalian cells and identified a single isoform that is exclusively localized to mitochondria. The LRPPRC protein is imported to the mitochondrial matrix and its mitochondrial targeting sequence is cleaved upon entry.

  17. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 inhibits activation of the β-catenin signaling in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yuxuan; Wu, Shaoping

    2015-01-01

    The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) family, including TIMP-2, regulates the activity of multifunctional metalloproteinases in pathogenesis of melanoma. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is constitutively activated and plays a critical role in melanoma progression. However, the relationship between TIMP-2 expression and β-catenin activity is still unclear. We hypothesize that TIMP-2 over expression inhibits the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in melanoma cells. Protein expression, distribution, and transcriptional activity of β-catenin were assayed in established stable melanoma cell lines: parental A2058 expressing, A2058 T2-1 over-expressing (T2-1), and A2058 T2R-7 under-expressing (T2R-7) TIMP-2. Compared to T2-1 cells at the basal level, T2R-7 showed significantly lower amount protein and weaker immunofluorescence staining of β-catenin. This regulation is through posttranslational level via ubiquitination. Functionally, proliferation and cell growth were lower in T2R-7 compared to A2058 and T2-1. Lithium treatment was used to mimics activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In T2R-7 cells under-expressing TIMP2, lithium significantly increased total β-catenin, nuclear β-catenin, and its downstream protein phosphor-c-Myc (S62). Nuclear β-catenin staining was enhanced in T2R-7. Beta-catenin transcriptional activity and cell proliferation were also increased significantly. Axins inhibit β-catenin pathway via GSK-3 β. We further found the ratio of p-GSK-3 β (S9) to β-catenin and protein levels of Axins were significantly lower, whereas downstream Wnt 11 was high in T2R-7 treated with lithium. Collectively, the high level of TIMP-2 protein inhibits the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, thus suppressing proliferation. Insights in the molecular mechanisms of TIMP-2 may provide promising opportunities for anti-proliferative therapeutic intervention. PMID:25839957

  18. Conservation of Transit Peptide-Independent Protein Import into the Mitochondrial and Hydrogenosomal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sriram; Stölting, Jan; Zimorski, Verena; Rada, Petr; Tachezy, Jan; Martin, William F.; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of protein import was a key step in the endosymbiotic acquisition of mitochondria. Though the main translocon of the mitochondrial outer membrane, TOM40, is ubiquitous among organelles of mitochondrial ancestry, the transit peptides, or N-terminal targeting sequences (NTSs), recognised by the TOM complex, are not. To better understand the nature of evolutionary conservation in mitochondrial protein import, we investigated the targeting behavior of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and vice versa. Hydrogenosomes import yeast mitochondrial proteins even in the absence of their native NTSs, but do not import yeast cytosolic proteins. Conversely, yeast mitochondria import hydrogenosomal proteins with and without their short NTSs. Conservation of an NTS-independent mitochondrial import route from excavates to opisthokonts indicates its presence in the eukaryote common ancestor. Mitochondrial protein import is known to entail electrophoresis of positively charged NTSs across the electrochemical gradient of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Our present findings indicate that mitochondrial transit peptides, which readily arise from random sequences, were initially selected as a signal for charge-dependent protein targeting specifically to the mitochondrial matrix. Evolutionary loss of the electron transport chain in hydrogenosomes and mitosomes lifted the selective constraints that maintain positive charge in NTSs, allowing first the NTS charge, and subsequently the NTS itself, to be lost. This resulted in NTS-independent matrix targeting, which is conserved across the evolutionary divide separating trichomonads and yeast, and which we propose is the ancestral state of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:26338186

  19. Matrix Gla Protein is Associated with Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis but not with Coronary Artery Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Atherosclerotic coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is an inhibitor of calcification in vivo. However, little is known regarding the distribution of circulating MGP, and its associations with CHD...

  20. Inhibition of Melanogenesis by the Pyridinyl Imidazole Class of Compounds: Possible Involvement of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bellei, Barbara; Pitisci, Angela; Izzo, Enzo; Picardo, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    While investigating the role of p38 MAPK in regulating melanogenesis, we found that pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors class compounds as well as the analog compound SB202474, which does not inhibit p38 MAPK, suppressed both α-MSH-induced melanogenesis and spontaneous melanin synthesis. In this study, we demonstrated that the inhibitory activity of the pyridinyl imidazoles correlates with inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Imidazole-treated cells showed a reduction in the level of Tcf/Lef target genes involved in the β-catenin signaling network, including ubiquitous genes such as Axin2, Lef1, and Wisp1 as well as cell lineage-restricted genes such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and dopachrome tautomerase. Although over-expression of the Wnt signaling pathway effector β-catenin slightly restored the melanogenic program, the lack of complete reversion suggested that the imidazoles interfered with β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity rather than with β-catenin expression. Accordingly, we did not observe any significant change in β-catenin protein expression. The independence of p38 MAPK activity from the repression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was confirmed by small interfering RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression, which by contrast, stimulated β-catenin-driven gene expression. Our data demonstrate that the small molecule pyridinyl imidazoles possess two distinct and opposite mechanisms that modulate β-catenin dependent transcription: a p38 inhibition-dependent effect that stimulates the Wnt pathway by increasing β-catenin protein expression and an off-target mechanism that inhibits the pathway by repressing β-catenin protein functionality. The p38-independent effect seems to be dominant and, at least in B16-F0 cells, results in a strong block of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:22427932

  1. Suppression of β-catenin Signaling Pathway in Human Prostate Cancer PC3 Cells by Delphinidin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Delphinidin possesses strong anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. Suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a potential strategy for chemoprevention and therapy. As aberrant activation of the β-catenin signaling pathway contributes to prostate cancer progression, we evaluated the effect of delphinidin on this pathway in human PC3 prostate cancer cells. An MTT assay showed that treatment with delphinidin (15–180 μM, 72 hours) resulted in a dose-dependent growth inhibition of cells. Treatment with delphinidin increased the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues on β-catenin and decreased the levels of cytoplasmic β-catenin. Moreover, treatment with delphinidin inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin and the expression of β-catenin target genes such as cyclin D1, c-myc, Axin-2, and T cell factor-1. Delphinidin also induced the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and the expression of adenomatous polyposis coli and Axin proteins. Our results indicate that inhibition of cell growth by delphinidin is mediated, at least in part, through modulation of the β-catenin signaling pathway. We suggest that delphinidin is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27390740

  2. Increased nuclear ?-catenin expression in oral potentially malignant lesions: A marker of epithelial dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana, Andrea; Aitken, Juan-Pablo; Rojas, Carolina; Ortega, Ana-Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background Deregulation of ?-catenin is associated with malignant transformation; however, its relationship with potentially malignant and malignant oral processes is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the nuclear ?-catenin expression in oral dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Material and Methods Cross sectional study. Immunodetection of ?-catenin was performed on 72 samples, with the following distribution: 21 mild dysplasia, 12 moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia 3, 36 OSCC including 19 well differentiated, 15 moderately differentiated and 2 poorly differentiated. Through microscopic observation the number of positive cells per 1000 epithelial cells was counted. For the statistical analysis, the Kruskal Wallis test was used. Results Nuclear expression of ?-catenin was observed in all samples with severe and moderate dysplasia, with a median of 267.5, in comparison to mild dysplasia whose median was 103.75. Only 10 samples (27.7%) with OSCC showed nuclear expression, with statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our results are consistent with most of the reports which show increased presence of ?-catenin in severe and moderate dysplasia compared to mild dysplasia; however the expression of nuclear ?-catenin decreased after starting the invasive neoplastic process. This suggests a role for this protein in the progression of dysplasia and early malignant transformation to OSCC. Immunodetection of ?-catenin could be a possible immune marker in the detection of oral dysplasia. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), ?-catenin, oral dysplasia. PMID:26241451

  3. δ-Catenin Regulates Spine Architecture via Cadherin and PDZ-dependent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Seong, Eunju; Beuscher, James L; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-04-24

    The ability of neurons to maintain spine architecture and modulate it in response to synaptic activity is a crucial component of the cellular machinery that underlies information storage in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Here we show a critical role for δ-catenin, a component of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex, in regulating spine head width and length in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. The loss of Ctnnd2, the gene encoding δ-catenin, has been associated with the intellectual disability observed in the cri du chat syndrome, suggesting that the functional roles of δ-catenin are vital for neuronal integrity and higher order functions. We demonstrate that loss of δ-catenin in a mouse model or knockdown of δ-catenin in pyramidal neurons compromises spine head width and length, without altering spine dynamics. This is accompanied by a reduction in the levels of synaptic N-cadherin. The ability of δ-catenin to modulate spine architecture is critically dependent on its ability to interact with cadherin and PDZ domain-containing proteins. We propose that loss of δ-catenin during development perturbs synaptic architecture leading to developmental aberrations in neural circuit formation that contribute to the learning disabilities in a mouse model and humans with cri du chat syndrome. PMID:25724647

  4. Immunolocalization of skeletal matrix proteins in tissue and mineral of the coral Stylophora pistillata.

    PubMed

    Mass, Tali; Drake, Jeana L; Peters, Esther C; Jiang, Wenge; Falkowski, Paul G

    2014-09-01

    The precipitation and assembly of calcium carbonate skeletons by stony corals is a precisely controlled process regulated by the secretion of an ECM. Recently, it has been reported that the proteome of the skeletal organic matrix (SOM) contains a group of coral acid-rich proteins as well as an assemblage of adhesion and structural proteins, which together, create a framework for the precipitation of aragonite. To date, we are aware of no report that has investigated the localization of individual SOM proteins in the skeleton. In particular, no data are available on the ultrastructural mapping of these proteins in the calcification site or the skeleton. This information is crucial to assessing the role of these proteins in biomineralization. Immunological techniques represent a valuable approach to localize a single component within a calcified skeleton. By using immunogold labeling and immunohistochemical assays, here we show the spatial arrangement of key matrix proteins in tissue and skeleton of the common zooxanthellate coral, Stylophora pistillata. To our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time that, at the nanoscale, skeletal proteins are embedded within the aragonite crystals in a highly ordered arrangement consistent with a diel calcification pattern. In the tissue, these proteins are not restricted to the calcifying epithelium, suggesting that they also play other roles in the coral's metabolic pathways. PMID:25139990

  5. Immunolocalization of skeletal matrix proteins in tissue and mineral of the coral Stylophora pistillata

    PubMed Central

    Mass, Tali; Drake, Jeana L.; Peters, Esther C.; Jiang, Wenge; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation and assembly of calcium carbonate skeletons by stony corals is a precisely controlled process regulated by the secretion of an ECM. Recently, it has been reported that the proteome of the skeletal organic matrix (SOM) contains a group of coral acid-rich proteins as well as an assemblage of adhesion and structural proteins, which together, create a framework for the precipitation of aragonite. To date, we are aware of no report that has investigated the localization of individual SOM proteins in the skeleton. In particular, no data are available on the ultrastructural mapping of these proteins in the calcification site or the skeleton. This information is crucial to assessing the role of these proteins in biomineralization. Immunological techniques represent a valuable approach to localize a single component within a calcified skeleton. By using immunogold labeling and immunohistochemical assays, here we show the spatial arrangement of key matrix proteins in tissue and skeleton of the common zooxanthellate coral, Stylophora pistillata. To our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time that, at the nanoscale, skeletal proteins are embedded within the aragonite crystals in a highly ordered arrangement consistent with a diel calcification pattern. In the tissue, these proteins are not restricted to the calcifying epithelium, suggesting that they also play other roles in the coral’s metabolic pathways. PMID:25139990

  6. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  7. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding. PMID:25351253

  8. Bioinformatics Knowledge Map for Analysis of Beta-Catenin Function in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2015-01-01

    Given the wealth of bioinformatics resources and the growing complexity of biological information, it is valuable to integrate data from disparate sources to gain insight into the role of genes/proteins in health and disease. We have developed a bioinformatics framework that combines literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases to create knowledge “maps” of genes/proteins of interest. We applied this approach to the study of beta-catenin, a cell adhesion molecule and transcriptional regulator implicated in cancer. The knowledge map includes post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein-protein interactions, disease-associated mutations, and transcription factors co-activated by beta-catenin and their targets and captures the major processes in which beta-catenin is known to participate. Using the map, we generated testable hypotheses about beta-catenin biology in normal and cancer cells. By focusing on proteins participating in multiple relation types, we identified proteins that may participate in feedback loops regulating beta-catenin transcriptional activity. By combining multiple network relations with PTM proteoform-specific functional information, we proposed a mechanism to explain the observation that the cyclin dependent kinase CDK5 positively regulates beta-catenin co-activator activity. Finally, by overlaying cancer-associated mutation data with sequence features, we observed mutation patterns in several beta-catenin PTM sites and PTM enzyme binding sites that varied by tissue type, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which beta-catenin mutations can contribute to cancer. The approach described, which captures rich information for molecular species from genes and proteins to PTM proteoforms, is extensible to other proteins and their involvement in disease. PMID:26509276

  9. N-terminal specific conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica P; Kassianidou, Elena; MacDonald, James I; Francis, Matthew B; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels have been used extensively to study cell responses to the mechanical and biochemical properties of extracellular matrix substrates. A key step in fabricating these substrates is the conjugation of cell adhesion proteins to the polyacrylamide surfaces, which typically involves nonspecifically anchoring these proteins via side-chain functional groups. This can result in a loss of presentation control and altered bioactivity. Here, we describe a new functionalization strategy in which we anchor full-length extracellular matrix proteins to polyacrylamide substrates using 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, which can be co-polymerized into polyacrylamide gels and used to immobilize proteins by their N-termini. This one-step reaction proceeds under mild aqueous conditions and does not require additional reagents. We demonstrate that these substrates can readily conjugate to various extracellular matrix proteins, as well as promote cell adhesion and spreading. Notably, this chemistry supports the assembly and cellular remodeling of large collagen fibers, which is not observed using conventional side-chain amine-conjugation chemistry. PMID:27348850

  10. Molecular force probe measurement of antigen I/II-matrix protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Soell, Martine; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Hannig, Matthias; Haïkel, Youssef; Sano, Hidehiko; Selimovic, Denis

    2010-12-01

    Viridans streptococci possess a family of immunologically and structurally related cell-surface proteins, termed antigen I/II, which may function as adhesins and enable oral streptococci to adhere to saliva-coated surfaces and matrix proteins. Here we used atomic force microscopy in the molecular force mode to measure the specific interaction forces between antigen I/II and two matrix proteins, collagen and fibronectin. These matrix proteins provide important binding sites for adherence of oral streptococcal in dentinal caries and endocarditis, respectively. Antigen I/II-coated cantilever tips were brought into contact with collagen- or fibronectin-coated silica coverslips. For the protein I/II-fibronectin interaction experiments, the mean strength of the last ruptures was 216 pN, with most of the detachments located around 125 pN. In antigen I/II-collagen interaction experiments, the mean strength of the last rupture forces corresponded to 136 pN, with the most frequent unbinding force around 75 pN. Thus, our findings definitely suggest that, under the present experimental conditions, antigen I/II binds more strongly to fibronectin than to type I collagen. This might be of relevance for the attachment of viridians streptococci to surfaces exposed to strong hydrodynamic shearing forces under in vivo conditions. PMID:21083620