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Sample records for matter dominated universe

  1. Phase space analysis of bulk viscous matter dominated universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan, Athira; Mathew, Titus K.

    2016-06-01

    We consider a Friedmann model of the universe with bulk viscous matter and radiation as the cosmic components. We study the asymptotic properties in the equivalent phase space by considering the three cases for the bulk viscous coefficient as (i) ζ = ζ 0, a constant (ii) ζ ={ζ}_0+{ζ}_1overset{\\cdot /a}{a} , depending on velocity of the expansion of the universe and (iii) ζ ={ζ}_0+{ζ}_1overset{\\cdot /a}{a}+{ζ}_2overset{\\cdot \\cdot /a}{overset{\\cdot }{a}} , depending both on velocity and acceleration of the expansion of the universe. It is found that all the three cases predicts the late acceleration of the universe. However, a conventional realistic behaviour of the universe, i.e., a universe having an initial radiation dominated phase, followed by decelerated matter dominated phase and then finally evolving to accelerated epoch, is shown only when ζ = ζ 0, a constant. For the other two cases, it does not show either a prior conventional radiation dominated phase or a matter dominated phase of the universe.

  2. Bulk viscous matter-dominated Universes: asymptotic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; García-Salcedo, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Tame; Nucamendi, Ulises; Quiros, Israel E-mail: rigarcias@ipn.mx E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2013-08-01

    By means of a combined use of the type Ia supernovae and H(z) data tests, together with the study of the asymptotic properties in the equivalent phase space — through the use of the dynamical systems tools — we demonstrate that the bulk viscous matter-dominated scenario is not a good model to explain the accepted cosmological paradigm, at least, under the parametrization of bulk viscosity considered in this paper. The main objection against such scenarios is the absence of conventional radiation and matter-dominated critical points in the phase space of the model. This entails that radiation and matter dominance are not generic solutions of the cosmological equations, so that these stages can be implemented only by means of unique and very specific initial conditions, i. e., of very unstable particular solutions. Such a behavior is in marked contradiction with the accepted cosmological paradigm which requires of an earlier stage dominated by relativistic species, followed by a period of conventional non-relativistic matter domination, during which the cosmic structure we see was formed. Also, we found that the bulk viscosity is positive just until very late times in the cosmic evolution, around z < 1. For earlier epochs it is negative, been in tension with the local second law of thermodynamics.

  3. Large scale structure in universes dominated by cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. Richard

    1986-01-01

    The theory of Gaussian random density field peaks is applied to a numerical study of the large-scale structure developing from adiabatic fluctuations in models of biased galaxy formation in universes with Omega = 1, h = 0.5 dominated by cold dark matter (CDM). The angular anisotropy of the cross-correlation function demonstrates that the far-field regions of cluster-scale peaks are asymmetric, as recent observations indicate. These regions will generate pancakes or filaments upon collapse. One-dimensional singularities in the large-scale bulk flow should arise in these CDM models, appearing as pancakes in position space. They are too rare to explain the CfA bubble walls, but pancakes that are just turning around now are sufficiently abundant and would appear to be thin walls normal to the line of sight in redshift space. Large scale streaming velocities are significantly smaller than recent observations indicate. To explain the reported 700 km/s coherent motions, mass must be significantly more clustered than galaxies with a biasing factor of less than 0.4 and a nonlinear redshift at cluster scales greater than one for both massive neutrino and cold models.

  4. Distribution of dark matter, galaxies, and the intergalactic medium in a cold dark matter dominated universe

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, D.; Vishniac, E.T.; Chiang, W.H.

    1988-11-01

    The evolution and distribution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) have been studied, along with collisionless dark matter in a Universe dominated by cold dark matter. The Einstein-deSitter universe with omega sub 0 = 1 and h = 0.5 was considered (here h = H sub 0 bar 100/kms/Mpc and H sub 0 is the present value of the Hubble constant). It is assumed that initially dark matter composes 90 pct and baryonic matter composes 10 pct of total mass, and that the primordial baryonic matter is comprised of H and He, with the abundance of He equal to 10 pct of H by number. Galaxies are allowed to form out of the IGM, if the total density and baryonic density satisfy an overdensity criterion. Subsequently, the newly formed galaxies release 10 to the 60th ergs of energy into the IGM over a period of 10 to the 8th years. Calculations have been performed with 32 to the 3rd dark matter particles and 32 to the 3rd cells in a cube with comoving side length L = 9.6/h Mpc. Dark matter particles and galaxies have been followed with an N-body code, while the IGM has been followed with a fluid code.

  5. Recent heavy-particle decay in a matter-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, K. A.; Seckel, D.; Vishniac, E.

    1985-01-01

    The cold matter scenario for galaxy formation solves the dark matter problem very nicely on small scales corresponding to galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is, however, difficult to reconcile with a Universe with an Einstein-deSitter value of (UC OMEGA) = 1. Cold matter and (UC OMEGA) = 1 can be made compatible while retaining the feature that the Universe is matter dominated today. This is done by means of heavy (cold) particles whose decay subsequently leads to the unbinding of a large fraction of lighter clustered matter.

  6. The distribution of dark matter, galaxies, and the intergalactic medium in a cold dark matter dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Chiang, Wei-Hwan

    1988-01-01

    The evolution and distribution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) have been studied, along with collisionless dark matter in a Universe dominated by cold dark matter. The Einstein-deSitter universe with omega sub 0 = 1 and h = 0.5 was considered (here h = H sub 0 bar 100/kms/Mpc and H sub 0 is the present value of the Hubble constant). It is assumed that initially dark matter composes 90 pct and baryonic matter composes 10 pct of total mass, and that the primordial baryonic matter is comprised of H and He, with the abundance of He equal to 10 pct of H by number. Galaxies are allowed to form out of the IGM, if the total density and baryonic density satisfy an overdensity criterion. Subsequently, the newly formed galaxies release 10 to the 60th ergs of energy into the IGM over a period of 10 to the 8th years. Calculations have been performed with 32 to the 3rd dark matter particles and 32 to the 3rd cells in a cube with comoving side length L = 9.6/h Mpc. Dark matter particles and galaxies have been followed with an N-body code, while the IGM has been followed with a fluid code.

  7. Dilaton dominance in the early universe dilutes dark matter relic abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Lahanas, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    The role of the dilaton field and its coupling to matter may result in a dilution of dark matter (DM) relic densities. This is to be contrasted with quintessence scenarios in which relic densities are augmented, due to modification of the expansion rate, since the Universe is not radiation dominated at DM decoupling. The dilaton field, besides this, affects relic densities through its coupling to dust which tends to decrease relic abundances. Thus two separate mechanisms compete with each other resulting, in general, in a decrease of the relic density. This feature may be welcomed and can help the situation if direct dark matter experiments point towards small neutralino-nucleon cross sections, implying small neutralino annihilation rates and hence large relic densities, at least in the popular supersymmetric scenarios. In the presence of a diluting mechanism, both experimental constraints can be met. The role of the dilaton for this mechanism has been studied in the context of the noncritical string theory but in this work we follow a rather general approach assuming that the dilaton dominates only at early eras long before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  8. Transition from a matter-dominated era to a dark energy universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'Ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Štefančić, Hrvoje

    2006-10-01

    We develop a general program of the unification of a matter-dominated era with an acceleration epoch for scalar-tensor theory or a dark fluid. The general reconstruction of the scalar-tensor theory is fulfilled. The explicit form of the scalar potential for which the theory admits a matter-dominated era, a transition to an acceleration, and an (asymptotically de Sitter) acceleration epoch consistent with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data is found. The interrelation of the epochs of deceleration-acceleration transition and matter dominance-dark energy transition for dark fluids with a general equation of state (EOS) is investigated. We give several examples of such models with explicit EOS (using redshift parametrization) where matter-dark energy domination transition may precede the deceleration-acceleration transition. As a by-product, the reconstruction scheme is applied to scalar-tensor theory to define the scalar potentials which may produce the dark matter effect. The obtained modification of Newton potential may explain the rotation curves of galaxies.

  9. Environmental Effects on Evolution of Cluster Galaxies in a Λ-dominated Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2003-04-01

    We investigate environmental effects on evolution of bright cluster galaxies (L>L*) in a Λ-dominated cold dark matter universe using a combination of dissipationless N-body simulations and a semianalytic galaxy formation model. The N-body simulations enable us to calculate orbits of galaxies in simulated clusters. Therefore, we can incorporate stripping of cold gas from galactic disks by ram pressure (RP) from the intracluster medium into our model. In this paper we study how ram pressure stripping (RPS) and small starburst induced by a minor merger affect colors, star formation rates (SFRs), and morphologies of cluster galaxies. These processes are new ingredients in our model and have not been studied sufficiently. We find that the RPS is not important for colors and SFRs of galaxies in the cluster core if the star formation timescale is properly chosen, because the star formation is sufficiently suppressed by consumption of the cold gas in the disks. Then observed color and SFR gradients can be reproduced without the RPS. The small starburst triggered by a minor merger hardly affects the SFRs and colors of the galaxies as well. We also examine whether these two processes can resolve the known problem that the hierarchical clustering models based on the major merger-driven bulge formation scenario predict too few galaxies of intermediate bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T) in clusters. When the minor burst is taken into account, the intermediate B/T population is increased, and the observed morphology gradients in clusters are successfully reproduced. Without the minor burst, the RPS cannot increase the intermediate B/T population. On the other hand, when the minor burst is considered, the RPS also plays an important role in formation of the intermediate B/T galaxies. We present redshift evolution of morphological fractions predicted by our models. The predicted number ratios of the intermediate B/T galaxies to the bulge-dominated galaxies show nearly flat or

  10. Correlation of QSO absorption lines in universes dominated by cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, J.; Hogan, C.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the redshift correlations between QSO absorption-line systems are investigated in the context of 'cold dark matter' cosmological models. Particles in 'particle-mesh' N-body simulations are interpreted as absorbing clouds at epochs corresponding to mean redshifts, z, of 0.0, 1.25, and 3.0. The velocity correlation function for absorbing clouds is found by passing lines-of-sight through the systems and computing velocity differences for those particles which lie close to the lines. It depends strongly on z and Omega but only weakly, if at all, on the number density, diameter or mass of the clouds. Two interpretations are possible: (1) the heavy element absorption systems are associated with galaxies which are an unbiased sample of the mass distribution in an Omega(0) = 0.2 universe or (2) the Lyman-alpha absorbers are an unbiased sample of the mass in an Omega(0) = 1 universe and the heavy-element absorption systems, like galaxies, are more strongly clustered than the mass.

  11. Exploring a matter-dominated model with bulk viscosity to drive the accelerated expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2010-08-01

    We explore the viability of a bulk viscous matter-dominated Universe to explain the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. The model is composed by a pressureless fluid with bulk viscosity of the form ζ = ζ{sub 0}+ζ{sub 1}H where ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} are constants and H is the Hubble parameter. The pressureless fluid characterizes both the baryon and dark matter components. We study the behavior of the Universe according to this model analyzing the scale factor as well as some curvature scalars and the matter density. On the other hand, we compute the best estimated values of ζ{sub 0} and ζ{sub 1} using the type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) probe. We find that from all the possible scenarios for the Universe, the preferred one by the best estimated values of (ζ{sub 0},ζ{sub 1}) is that of an expanding Universe beginning with a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion at early times, and with a smooth transition in recent times to an accelerated expansion epoch that is going to continue forever. The predicted age of the Universe is a little smaller than the mean value of the observational constraint coming from the oldest globular clusters but it is still inside of the confidence interval of this constraint. A drawback of the model is the violation of the local second law of thermodynamics in redshifts z∼>1. However, when we assume ζ{sub 1} = 0, the simple model ζ = ζ{sub 0} evaluated at the best estimated value for ζ{sub 0} satisfies the local second law of thermodynamics, the age of the Universe is in perfect agreement with the constraint of globular clusters, and it also has a Big-Bang, followed by a decelerated expansion with the smooth transition to an accelerated expansion epoch in late times, that is going to continue forever.

  12. A model for the distribution of dark matter, galaxies, and the intergalactic medium in a cold dark matter-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Chiang, Wei-Hwan

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the cold-dark-matter (CDM) and baryonic components of CDM-dominated cosmological models are characterized, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. The evolution and distribution of matter in an Einstein-de Sitter universe on length scales small enough so that the Newtonian approximation is valid is followed chronologically, assuming (1) that the galaxies, CDM, and the intergalactic medium (IGM) are coupled by gravity, (2) that galaxies form by taking mass and momentum from the IGM, and (3) that the IGM responds to the energy input from the galaxies. The results of the numerical computations are presented in extensive graphs and discussed in detail.

  13. Large N-body simulations of a universe dominated by cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that pure gravitational evolution from an initial random density field with the standard cold dark matter (CDM) power spectrum does occasionally lead to filaments, walls, and voids remarkably like those seen in observed samples. A problem with the flat CDM model is the degree of streaming of galaxies relative to their velocity dispersion. A biased open CDM model seems to be more compatible with the observational data though it requires a higher amplitude of microwave background fluctuations.

  14. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  15. Dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter-a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations-from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology-a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)-fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  16. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  17. Can a matter-dominated model with constant bulk viscosity drive the accelerated expansion of the universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Avelino, Arturo; Nucamendi, Ulises E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx

    2009-04-15

    We test a cosmological model which the only component is a pressureless fluid with a constant bulk viscosity as an explanation for the present accelerated expansion of the universe. We classify all the possible scenarios for the universe predicted by the model according to their past, present and future evolution and we test its viability performing a Bayesian statistical analysis using the SCP ''Union'' data set (307 SNe Ia), imposing the second law of thermodynamics on the dimensionless constant bulk viscous coefficient {zeta}-tilde and comparing the predicted age of the universe by the model with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. The best estimated values found for {zeta}-tilde and the Hubble constant H{sub 0} are: {zeta}-tilde = 1.922{+-}0.089 and H{sub 0} = 69.62{+-}0.59 (km/s)Mpc{sup -1} with a {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} = 314 ({chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} = 1.031). The age of the universe is found to be 14.95{+-}0.42 Gyr. We see that the estimated value of H{sub 0} as well as of {chi}{sup 2}{sub d.o.f} are very similar to those obtained from {Lambda}CDM model using the same SNe Ia data set. The estimated age of the universe is in agreement with the constraints coming from the oldest globular clusters. Moreover, the estimated value of {zeta}-tilde is positive in agreement with the second law of thermodynamics (SLT). On the other hand, we perform different forms of marginalization over the parameter H{sub 0} in order to study the sensibility of the results to the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized. We found that it is almost negligible the dependence between the best estimated values of the free parameters of this model and the way how H{sub 0} is marginalized in the present work. Therefore, this simple model might be a viable candidate to explain the present acceleration in the expansion of the universe.

  18. Can massless neutrinos dominate the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.

    1980-11-19

    The restrictions from cosmological considerations on masses and lifetimes of neutral, weakly interacting fermions are reviewed. In particular, the possibility that the massless decay products of a heavy neutrino dominate the energy density of the present universe is discussed in detail. 4 figures.

  19. Dark matter in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-03-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: most of the material in the universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments -- structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation -- and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 71 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Dark matter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: Most of the material in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments--structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation--and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 63 refs.

  1. Dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand. Most of the radiation in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation; it is dark. The dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of the critical density; baryonic matter contributes between 1.1 and 12 percent of the critical. The case for the spatially flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments - structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation - and by some observational data. If Omega is indeed unity, or even just significantly greater than 0.1, then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark matter candidates: an axion of mass 10 (exp -6) eV to 10 (exp -4) eV; a neutrino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either planned or are underway.

  2. Magnetised Strings in Λ-Dominated Anisotropic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, G. K.; Yadav, Anil Kumar; Dewangan, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have searched the existence of Λ-dominated anisotropic universe filled with magnetized strings. The observed acceleration of universe has been explained by introducing a positive cosmological constant Λ in the Einstein's field equation which is mathematically equivalent to dark energy with equation of state (EOS) parameter set equal to -1. The present values of the matter and the dark energy parameters (Ω m )0 & (ΩΛ)0 are estimated for high red shift (.3 ≤ z ≤ 1.4) SN Ia supernova data's of observed apparent magnitude along with their possible error taken from Union 2.1 compilation. It is found that the best fit value for (Ω m )0 & (ΩΛ)0 are 0.2920 & 0.7076 respectively which are in good agreement with recent astrophysical observations in the latest surveys like WMAP and Plank. Various physical parameters such as the matter and dark energy densities, the present age of the universe and the present value of deceleration parameter have been obtained on the basis of the values of (Ω m )0 & (ΩΛ)0.Also, we have estimated that the acceleration would have begun in the past at z = 0.6845 i. e. 6.2341 Gyrs before from now.

  3. Are Quasar Jets Matter Or Poynting Flux Dominated?

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Madejski, Greg M.; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Begelman, Mitchell C.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-10-03

    If quasar jets are accelerated by magnetic fields but terminate as matter dominated, where and how does the transition occur between the Poynting-dominated and matter-dominated regimes? To address this question, we study constraints which are imposed on the jet structure by observations at different spatial scales. We demonstrate that observational data are consistent with a scenario where the acceleration of a jet occurs within 10{sup 3-4}R{sub g}. In this picture, the non-thermal flares--important defining attributes of the blazar phenomenon--are produced by strong shocks formed in the region where the jet inertia becomes dominated by matter. Such shocks may be formed due to collisions between the portions of a jet accelerated to different velocities, and the acceleration differentiation is very likely to be related to global MHD instabilities.

  4. Dark matter in a bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Kang, Jin U; Li, Changhong E-mail: jin.u.kang2@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We investigate a new scenario of dark matter production in a bouncing universe, in which dark matter was produced completely out of equilibrium in the contracting as well as expanding phase. We explore possibilities of using dark matter as a probe of the bouncing universe, focusing on the relationship between a critical temperature of the bouncing universe and the present relic abundance of dark matter.

  5. Why Does the USA Dominate University League Tables?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mei; Shankar, Sriram; Tang, Kam Ki

    2011-01-01

    According to the Academic Ranking of World Universities, the world's top 500 universities are located in only 38 countries, with the USA alone having 157 of them. This article investigates the socioeconomic determinants of the wide performance gap between countries, and whether the USA's dominance is largely due to its economic power. A large…

  6. Our Lopsided Universe: The Matter with Anti-Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sekula, Steve

    2004-06-29

    Half of our universe appears to be missing, and scientists at SLAC and all over the world are trying to understand why. Don't miss this talk in which Steve Sekula will explain the core issues surrounding matter and anti-matter.

  7. Dark Matter Production in Non-Standard Early Universe Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehagen, Thomas Joseph

    Many dark matter candidates, including asymmetric Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and sterile neutrinos, are produced in the very early Universe, prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). We show that the relic abundance of asymmetric WIMPs and sterile neutrinos can be very sensitive to the expansion rate of the Universe prior to BBN. In particular, we find that if the production of asymmetric WIMPs occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, a larger WIMP annihilation cross section is required to produce the present dark matter density than if the WIMPs were produced during a standard, radiation dominated phase. Because of this, the present dark matter annihilation rate could be larger than that of symmetric dark matter produced in the standard cosmology. We also show that if the production of sterile neutrinos occurs during a non-standard cosmological phase, the relic number density of sterile neutrinos could be reduced with respect to the number expected in the standard cosmology, consequently relaxing current bounds on active-sterile neutrino mixing. Finally, we examine whether low reheating temperature cosmologies are allowed by current Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. We find the allowed range of reheating temperatures using monomial and binomial inflationary potentials, and a variety of reheating models. We show that an inflationary model with a φ1 potential and canonical reheating allows the possibility that dark matter could be produced during the reheating epoch, instead of when the Universe is radiation dominated.

  8. Cosmic-ray antiprotons as a probe of a photino-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Srednicki, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observational tests of the hypothesis that the universe is flat and dominated by dark matter in the form of massive photinos include the production of significant fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays in our galactic halo. Specification of the cosmological photino density and the masses of scalar quarks and leptons determines the present annihilation rate. The predicted number of low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons is comparable to the observed flux.

  9. Evolution of perturbations in a baryon-dominated universe - Gauge-invariant analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gouda, N.; Sasaki, M.; Suto, Y.; Hiroshima Univ.; California Univ., Berkeley; Ibaraki Univ., Mito )

    1989-06-01

    The evolution of scalar (density) perturbations in a baryon-dominated universe is comprehensively studied on the basis of a gauge-invariant method. In particular, the residual anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation are calculated and are compared with the recent observational upper limits. To the extent that the universe has not been reionized after recombination, the observed upper limits of the temperature anisotropies on small angular scales rule out the cosmological models without nonbaryonic dark matter. In turn, this would provide strong support for (nonbaryonic) dark matter, independently of the results of standard primordial nucleosynthesis. Reionization after recombination, if any, might allow an isocurvature baryonic universe as a viable model, only when the initial density power spectrum was very steep. 64 refs.

  10. The matter of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigel, F. Iu.

    Methods of cosmochemistry are described, and attention is given to the chemical composition of stars, the interstellar medium, small bodies in the solar system, the chemistry of the moon and other natural satellites, and planetary chemistry. The question of life in outer space is considered, and aspects of the genesis of the chemical elements are discussed, with attention given to big-bang theory and the role of the neutrino in the universe.

  11. Light and dark matter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This simulation follows the growth of density perturbations in both gas and dark matter components in a volume 1 billion light years on a side beginning shortly after the Big Bang and evolved to half the present age of the universe. It calculates the gravitational clumping of intergalactic gas and dark matter modeled using a computational grid of 64 billion cells and 64 billion dark matter particles. The simulation uses a computational grid of 4096^3 cells and took over 4,000,000 CPU hours to complete. Read more: http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2010/news100104.html

  12. Universal properties of dark matter halos.

    PubMed

    Boyarsky, A; Neronov, A; Ruchayskiy, O; Tkachev, I

    2010-05-14

    We discuss the universal relation between density and size of observed dark matter halos that was recently shown to hold on a wide range of scales, from dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters. Predictions of cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations are consistent with this relation. We demonstrate that this property of ΛCDM can be understood analytically in the secondary infall model. Qualitative understanding given by this model provides a new way to predict which deviations from ΛCDM or large-scale modifications of gravity can affect universal behavior and, therefore, to constrain them observationally. PMID:20866958

  13. Gravitational waves from first order phase transitions as a probe of an early matter domination era and its inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave background from a first order phase transition in a matter-dominated universe, and show that it has a unique feature from which important information about the properties of the phase transition and thermal history of the universe can be easily extracted. Also, we discuss the inverse problem of such a gravitational wave background in view of the degeneracy among macroscopic parameters governing the signal.

  14. The tunneling universe in scalar tensor theory with matter: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunggeun

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, the wavefunction of the universe with a tunneling boundary condition is considered in the context of the Brans Dicke-type theory with matter. In the \\gamma=0 (matter) case, the action is invariant under the field redefinition which is a sort of generalization of the scale factor duality. The universe undergoes quantum transition from a super-inflationary (pre-big bang) to a deflationary (post-big bang) phase. We calculate the transition rate from the wavefunction by solving the Wheeler DeWitt equation and obtain a non-vanishing value. We learn that for a special value of the Brans Dicke parameter the transition rate grows heavily. From the ten-dimensional string theory point of view this happens when three-dimensional branes (D3-brane) become dominant.

  15. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter. 3020.111 Section 3020.111 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant...

  16. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter. 3020.111 Section 3020.111 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant...

  17. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... matter. 3020.111 Section 3020.111 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter. (a) The Postal Service shall inform the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations...

  18. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... matter. 3020.111 Section 3020.111 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter. (a) The Postal Service shall inform the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations...

  19. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... matter. 3020.111 Section 3020.111 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter. (a) The Postal Service shall inform the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations...

  20. Missing dark matter in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    2012-04-01

    A sample of 11 thousand galaxies with radial velocities V LG < 3500 km/s is used to study the features of the local distribution of luminous (stellar) and dark matter within a sphere of radius of around 50 Mpc around us. The average density of matter in this volume, Ω m,loc = 0.08 ± 0.02, turns out to be much lower than the global cosmic density Ω m,glob = 0.28 ± 0.03. We discuss three possible explanations of this paradox: 1) galaxy groups and clusters are surrounded by extended dark halos, the major part of the mass of which is located outside their virial radii; 2) the considered local volume of the Universe is not representative, being situated inside a giant void; and 3) the bulk of matter in the Universe is not related to clusters and groups, but is rather distributed between them in the form of massive dark clumps. Some arguments in favor of the latter assumption are presented. Besides the two well-known inconsistencies of modern cosmological models with the observational data: the problem of missing satellites of normal galaxies and the problem of missing baryons, there arises another one—the issue of missing dark matter.

  1. G4beamline Particle Tracking in Matter Dominated Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Roberts, K.B. Beard, S. Ahmed, D. Huang, D.M. Kaplan

    2011-03-01

    The G4beamline program is a useful and steadily improving tool to quickly and easily model beam lines and experimental equipment without user programming. It has both graphical and command-line user interfaces. Unlike most accelerator physics codes, it easily handles a wide range of materials and fields, being particularly well suited for the study of muon and neutrino facilities. As it is based on the Geant4 toolkit, G4beamline includes most of what is known about the interactions of particles with matter. We are continuing the development of G4beamline to facilitate its use by a larger set of beam line and accelerator developers. A major new feature is the calculation of space-charge effects. G4beamline is open source and freely available at http://g4beamline.muonsinc.com

  2. Conceptualization and Utility of University Mattering: A Construct Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Megan K.; Finney, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather validity evidence for the University Mattering Scale. Theoretically based factor structures were tested, resulting in the four-factor conceptualization of mattering being championed. As predicted, university mattering related positively to academic motivational and relatedness constructs and negatively to…

  3. Universal properties of cold holographic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokela, Niko; Ramallo, Alfonso V.

    2015-07-01

    We study the collective excitations of holographic quantum liquids formed in the low energy theory living at the intersection of two sets of D-branes. The corresponding field theory dual is a supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with massless matter hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation of the gauge group which generically live on a defect of the unflavored theory. Working in the quenched (probe) approximation, we focus on determining the universal properties of these systems. We analyze their thermodynamics, the speed of first sound, the diffusion constant, and the speed of zero sound. We study the influence of temperature, chemical potential, and magnetic field on these quantities, as well as on the corresponding collisionless/hydrodynamic crossover. We also generalize the alternative quantization for all conformally AdS4 cases and study the anyonic correlators.

  4. Singular F(R) cosmology unifying early- and late-time acceleration with matter and radiation domination era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We present some cosmological models which unify the late- and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and the matter domination era, and we realize the cosmological models by using the theoretical framework of F(R) gravity. Particularly, the first model unifies the late- and early-time acceleration with the matter domination era, and the second model unifies all the evolution eras of our Universe. The two models are described in the same way at early and late times, and only the intermediate stages of the evolution have some differences. Each cosmological model contains two Type IV singularities which are chosen to occur one at the end of the inflationary era and one at the end of the matter domination era. The cosmological models at early times are approximately identical to the R 2 inflation model, so these describe a slow-roll inflationary era which ends when the slow-roll parameters become of order one. The inflationary era is followed by the radiation era and after that the matter domination era follows, which lasts until the second Type IV singularity, and then the late-time acceleration era follows. The models have two appealing features: firstly they produce a nearly scale invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations and a scalar-to-tensor ratio which are compatible with the most recent observational data and secondly, it seems that the deceleration–acceleration transition is crucially affected by the presence of the second Type IV singularity which occurs at the end of the matter domination era. As we demonstrate, the Hubble horizon at early times shrinks, as expected for an initially accelerating Universe, then during the matter domination era, it expands and finally after the Type IV singularity, the Hubble horizon starts to shrink again, during the late-time acceleration era. Intriguingly enough, the deceleration–acceleration transition, occurs after the second Type IV singularity. In addition, we investigate which F

  5. University Press Meeting Dominated by Donor Proposal and Digital Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    A surprise request for proposals from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and a forthcoming report on university publishing in the digital age were among topics discussed at the annual meeting of the Association of American University Presses. The offer from the Mellon Foundation concerns support for collaborative, monograph-centered projects in…

  6. Nuclear matter in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Celso de Camargo; da Cunha, Ivan Eugênio

    2015-12-01

    Recently, extreme conditions have been obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and at the Large Hadron collider. It is believed that these conditions are similar to the ones of the early Universe, in the time between 10-6s and 1s, approximately. In this work, the hadrons produced in this range of time will be studied, considering some aspects of the systems produced in the heavy-ion collisions. We will study a phase posterior to the phase transition (in fact it is believed to be a crossover) from the quark-gluon plasma, that is the hadronic phase of the Universe. We will show the model proposed in [1], considering the hadronic matter described by a relativistic model (similar to the Walecka model), considering particles described by quantum equations in a curved spacetime. This curvature is due to the mass and to the strong interactions that appears in the energy-momentum tensor. The set of the equations is proposed in the Robertson-Walker metric, and some approximate solutions are obtained.

  7. Nuclear matter in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Celso de Camargo; Cunha, Ivan Eugênio da

    2015-12-17

    Recently, extreme conditions have been obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and at the Large Hadron collider. It is believed that these conditions are similar to the ones of the early Universe, in the time between 10{sup −6}s and 1s, approximately. In this work, the hadrons produced in this range of time will be studied, considering some aspects of the systems produced in the heavy-ion collisions. We will study a phase posterior to the phase transition (in fact it is believed to be a crossover) from the quark-gluon plasma, that is the hadronic phase of the Universe. We will show the model proposed in [1], considering the hadronic matter described by a relativistic model (similar to the Walecka model), considering particles described by quantum equations in a curved spacetime. This curvature is due to the mass and to the strong interactions that appears in the energy-momentum tensor. The set of the equations is proposed in the Robertson-Walker metric, and some approximate solutions are obtained.

  8. Hubble induced mass in radiation-dominated universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takesako, Tomohiro

    2012-05-01

    We reconsider the effective mass of a scalar field which interact with visible sector via Planck-suppressed coupling in supergravity framework. We focus on the radiation-dominated (RD) era after inflation. In this era, the effective mass is given by thermal average of interaction terms. To make our analysis clear, we rely on Kadanoff-Baym equations to evaluate the thermal average. We find that, in RD era, a scalar field acquires the effective mass of the order of H.

  9. About matter and dark-energy domination eras in Rn gravity or lack thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Luisa G.; Patiño, Leonardo; Salgado, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    We provide further numerical evidence which shows that Rn models in f(R) metric gravity produce a late time acceleration in the Universe or a matter domination era (usually a transient one) but not both. Our results confirm the findings of Amendola et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 131302 (2007); PRLTAO0031-9007Phys. Rev. D 75, 083504 (2007); PRVDAQ1550-7998Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 16, 1555 (2007)IMPDEO0218-2718], but using a different approach that avoids the mapping to scalar-tensor theories of gravity, and therefore, spares us from any discussion or debate about frames (Einstein vs Jordan) which are endemic in this subject. This class of models has been used extensively in the literature as an alternative to dark energy, but should be considered ruled out for being inconsistent with the observations. Finally, we discuss a caveat in the analysis by Faraoni [Phys. Rev. D 83, 124044 (2011)PRVDAQ1550-7998], which was used to further constrain these models by using a chameleon mechanism.

  10. SUSY dark matter and non-universal gaugino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Birkedal-Hansen, Andreas

    2002-04-15

    In this talk the authors investigate the dark matter prospects for supersymmetric models with non-universal gaugino masses. They motivate the use of non-universal gaugino masses from several directions, including problems, with the current favorite scenario, the cMSSM. They then display new corridors of parameter space that allow an acceptable dark matter relic density once gaugino mass universality is relaxed. They finish with a specific string-derived model that allows this universality relaxation and then use the dark matter constraint to make specific statements about the hidden sector of the model.

  11. Chaotic spin precession in anisotropic universes and fermionic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the precession of a Dirac particle spin in some anisotropic Bianchi universes. This effect is present already in the Bianchi-I universe. In the Bianchi-IX universe it acquires the chaotic character due to the stochasticity of the oscillatory approach to the cosmological singularity. The related helicity flip of fermions in the veryearly Universe may produce the sterile particles contributing to dark matter.

  12. W/Z bremsstrahlung as the dominant annihilation channel for dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Jacques, Thomas D.; Dent, James B.; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Dark matter annihilation to leptons, {chi}{chi}{yields}ll, is necessarily accompanied by electroweak radiative corrections, in which a W or Z boson is radiated from a final-state particle. Given that the W and Z gauge bosons decay dominantly via hadronic channels, it is thus impossible to produce final-state leptons without accompanying protons, antiprotons, and gamma rays. Significantly, while many dark matter models feature a helicity-suppressed annihilation rate to fermions, radiating a massive gauge boson from a final-state fermion removes this helicity suppression, such that the branching ratios Br(l{nu}W), Br(l{sup +}l{sup -}Z), and Br({nu}{nu}Z) dominate over Br(ll). W/Z bremsstrahlung thus allows indirect detection of many weakly interacting massive particle models that would otherwise be helicity suppressed, or v{sup 2} suppressed. Antiprotons and even antideuterons become consequential final-state particles. This is an important result for future dark matter searches. We discuss the implications of W/Z bremsstrahlung for 'leptonic' dark matter models which aim to fit recent cosmic ray positron and antiproton data.

  13. Chemical characterization of microbial-dominated soil organic matter in the Garwood Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Simpson, André J.; Gregorich, Edward G.; Elberling, Bo; Hopkins, David W.; Sparrow, Ashley D.; Novis, Philip M.; Greenfield, Lawrence G.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2010-11-01

    Despite its harsh environmental conditions, terrestrial Antarctica contains a relatively large microbial biomass. Natural abundance carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures of organic materials in the dry valleys indicate mixed provenance of the soil organic matter (SOM) with varying proportions of contributions from lichens, mosses, lake-derived algae and cyanobacteria. Here we employed two complementary analytical techniques, biomarker measurements by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and solution-state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to provide further information at a molecular-level about the composition and possible source of SOM in the Garwood Valley, Antarctica. The predominance of branched alkanes and short-chain lipids in the solvent extracts indicates that the primary contribution to the SOM was microbial-derived. Chemical structures in the NaOH extracts from soils were also dominated by amide, peptides, and a CH 3-dominating aliphatic region that were characteristic of microbial signatures. Furthermore, the SOM in the Garwood Valley contained compounds that were different from those in the cyanobacteria-dominated mat from a nearby lake (including monoethyl alkanes and enriched side-chain protons). This observation suggests that easily degradable carbon sources from the nearby lake did not dominate the SOM, which is consistent with a fast turnover of the mat-derived organic matter found in the valley. This study highlights the important role of native soil microbes in the carbon transformation and biogeochemistry in terrestrial Antarctica.

  14. Ten Reasons Service Science Matters to Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spohrer, Jim; Fodell, Dianne; Murphy, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is being reshaped little by little every day. Slowly but surely, from the smallest community colleges to the teaching institutions to the most prestigious research universities, a new set of key performance indicators (KPIs) is transforming what excellence means in higher education. For developed and emerging market nations…

  15. Widespread grey matter pathology dominates the longitudinal cerebral MRI and clinical landscape of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Menke, Ricarda A L; Körner, Sonja; Filippini, Nicola; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    . Although a consistent core white matter pathology was found cross-sectionally, grey matter pathology was dominant longitudinally, and included progression in clinically silent areas such as the basal ganglia, believed to reflect their wider cortical connectivity. Such changes were significant across a range of apparently sporadic patients rather than being a genotype-specific effect. It is also suggested that the upper motor neuron lesion in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be relatively constant during the established symptomatic period. These findings have implications for the development of effective diagnostic versus therapeutic monitoring magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be characterized initially by a predominantly white matter tract pathological signature, evolving as a widespread cortical network degeneration. PMID:24951638

  16. Statistics of the cosmic Mach number from numerical simulations of a cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suto, Yasushi; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the cosmic Mach number, M, the ratio of the streaming velocity, v, to the random velocity dispersion, sigma, of galaxies in a given patch of the universe, which was performed on the basis of hydrodynamical simulations of the cold dark matter scenario. Galaxy formation is modeled by application of detailed physical processes rather than by the ad hoc assumption of 'bias' between dark matter and galaxy fluctuations. The correlation between M and sigma is found to be very weak for both components. No evidence is found for a physical 'velocity bias' in the quantities which appear in the definition of M. Standard cold-dark-matter-dominated universes are in conflict, at a statistically significant level, with the available observation, in that they predict a Mach number considerably lower than is observed.

  17. Action approach to cosmological perturbations: the second-order metric in matter dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo; Vernizzi, Filippo; Norena, Jorge

    2008-08-15

    We study nonlinear cosmological perturbations during post-inflationary evolution, using the equivalence between a perfect barotropic fluid and a derivatively coupled scalar field with Lagrangian [-({partial_derivative}{phi}){sup 2}]{sup (1+w)/2w}. Since this Lagrangian is just a special case of k-inflation, this approach is analogous to the one employed in the study of non-Gaussianities from inflation. We use this method to derive the second-order metric during matter dominance in the comoving gauge directly as a function of the primordial inflationary perturbation {zeta}. Going to Poisson gauge, we recover the metric previously derived in the literature.

  18. From Public University Dominance to Private University Policy Initiatives in Nigeria: The Push and Pull Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilusanya, Gboyega; Oyebade, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the precipitating and debilitating factors that occurred in the emergence and growth of the private university system in Nigeria. Three research questions guided the analysis and examined enrolment patterns in seven pre-2003 private universities, students' preferences for enrolment and the factors that encouraged and…

  19. The Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I will give here an overview of the present observational and theoretical situation regarding the question of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe and the related question of the existence of antimatter on a cosmological scale. I will also give a simple discussion of the role of CP (charge conjugation parity) violation in this subject.

  20. Modeling the quantum evolution of the universe through classical matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitelli, João Paulo M.; Letelier, Patricio S.

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that the canonical quantization of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) filled with a perfect fluid leads to nonsingular universes which, for later times, behave as their classical counterpart. This means that the expectation value of the scale factor (t) never vanishes and, as t→ infty , we recover the classical expression for the scale factor. In this paper, we show that such universes can be reproduced by classical cosmology given that the universe is filled with an exotic matter. In the case of a perfect fluid, we find an implicit equation of state (EoS). We then show that this single fluid with an implict EoS is equivalent to two non-interacting fluids, one of them representing stiff matter with negative energy density. In the case of two non-interacting scalar fields, one of them of the phantom type, we find their potential energy. In both cases we find that quantum mechanics changes completely the configuration of matter for small values of time, by adding a fluid or a scalar field with negative energy density. As time passes, the density of negative energy decreases and we recover the ordinary content of the classical universe. The more the initial wave function of the universe is concentrated around the classical big bang singularity, the more it is necessary to add negative energy, since this type of energy will be responsible for the removal of the classical singularity.

  1. Large-scale structure and matter in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Peacock, J A

    2003-11-15

    This paper summarizes the physical mechanisms that encode the type and quantity of cosmological matter in the properties of large-scale structure, and reviews the application of such tests to current datasets. The key lengths of the horizon size at matter-radiation equality and at last scattering determine the total matter density and its ratio to the relativistic density; acoustic oscillations can diagnose whether the matter is collisionless, and small-scale structure or its absence can limit the mass of any dark-matter relic particle. The most stringent constraints come from combining data on present-day galaxy clustering with data on CMB anisotropies. Such an analysis breaks the degeneracies inherent in either dataset alone, and proves that the Universe is very close to flat. The matter content is accurately consistent with pure cold dark matter, with ca. 25% of the critical density, and fluctuations that are scalar only, adiabatic and scale invariant. It is demonstrated that these conclusions cannot be evaded by adjusting either the equation of state of the vacuum, or the total relativistic density. PMID:14667313

  2. Universality of slip avalanches in flowing granular matter.

    PubMed

    Denisov, D V; Lörincz, K A; Uhl, J T; Dahmen, K A; Schall, P

    2016-01-01

    The search for scale-bridging relations in the deformation of amorphous materials presents a current challenge with tremendous applications in material science, engineering and geology. While generic features in the flow and microscopic dynamics support the idea of a universal scaling theory of deformation, direct microscopic evidence remains poor. Here, we provide the first measurement of internal scaling relations in the deformation of granular matter. By combining macroscopic force fluctuation measurements with internal strain imaging, we demonstrate the existence of robust scaling relations from particle-scale to macroscopic flow. We identify consistent power-law relations truncated by systematic pressure-dependent cutoff, in agreement with recent mean-field theory of slip avalanches in elasto-plastic materials, revealing the existence of a mechanical critical point. These results experimentally establish scale-bridging relations in the flow of matter, paving the way to a new universal theory of deformation. PMID:26883071

  3. Universality of slip avalanches in flowing granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, D. V.; Lörincz, K. A.; Uhl, J. T.; Dahmen, K. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-01-01

    The search for scale-bridging relations in the deformation of amorphous materials presents a current challenge with tremendous applications in material science, engineering and geology. While generic features in the flow and microscopic dynamics support the idea of a universal scaling theory of deformation, direct microscopic evidence remains poor. Here, we provide the first measurement of internal scaling relations in the deformation of granular matter. By combining macroscopic force fluctuation measurements with internal strain imaging, we demonstrate the existence of robust scaling relations from particle-scale to macroscopic flow. We identify consistent power-law relations truncated by systematic pressure-dependent cutoff, in agreement with recent mean-field theory of slip avalanches in elasto-plastic materials, revealing the existence of a mechanical critical point. These results experimentally establish scale-bridging relations in the flow of matter, paving the way to a new universal theory of deformation. PMID:26883071

  4. Astronomers Take the Measure of Dark Matter in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have obtained their most accurate determination to date of the amount of dark matter in galaxy clusters, the most massive objects in the universe. The results provide an important step towards a precise measurement of the total matter density of the universe. These results were presented today by Steven W. Allen of the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge, UK at a press conference at the `Two Years of Science with Chandra' symposium in Washington, DC. Allen and his colleagues Robert W. Schmidt and Andrew C. Fabian at the Institute of Astronomy observed a carefully chosen sample of five of the largest clusters of galaxies known, whose distances range from 1.5 to 4 billion light years. The team made temperature maps of the hot multimillion-degree gas that fills the clusters. "The temperature maps can be used to determine the mass needed to prevent the hot gas from escaping the clusters" explained Allen. "We found that the stars in the galaxies and hot gas together contribute only about 13 percent of the mass. The rest must be in the form of dark matter." The nature of the dark matter is not known, but most astronomers think that it is in the form of an as yet unknown type of elementary particle that contributes to gravity through its mass but otherwise interacts weakly with normal matter. These dark matter particles are often called WIMPs, an acronym for `weakly interacting massive particles'. Clusters of galaxies are vast concentrations of galaxies, hot gas and dark matter spanning millions of light years, held together by gravity. Because of their size, clusters of galaxies are thought to provide a fair sample of the proportion of dark matter in the universe as a whole. "The implication of our results is that we live in a low-density universe" said Allen. "The total mass-density is only about thirty percent of that needed to stop the universe from expanding forever." The result reinforces recent findings from

  5. Universality of slip avalanches in flowing granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, D. V.; Lörincz, K. A.; Uhl, J. T.; Dahmen, K. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-02-01

    The search for scale-bridging relations in the deformation of amorphous materials presents a current challenge with tremendous applications in material science, engineering and geology. While generic features in the flow and microscopic dynamics support the idea of a universal scaling theory of deformation, direct microscopic evidence remains poor. Here, we provide the first measurement of internal scaling relations in the deformation of granular matter. By combining macroscopic force fluctuation measurements with internal strain imaging, we demonstrate the existence of robust scaling relations from particle-scale to macroscopic flow. We identify consistent power-law relations truncated by systematic pressure-dependent cutoff, in agreement with recent mean-field theory of slip avalanches in elasto-plastic materials, revealing the existence of a mechanical critical point. These results experimentally establish scale-bridging relations in the flow of matter, paving the way to a new universal theory of deformation.

  6. [Dark matter and dark energy of the universe].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2005-01-01

    At the turn of the 20th Century, the Universe was thought to consist of our solar system, the Sun, planets, satellites and comets, floating under the Milky Way. The astronomers were ignorant of the existence of galaxies, clusters, quasars and black holes. Over the last ten years the Cosmology has made remarkable progress in our understanding of the composition of the Universe: 23 per cent is in an unknown form called dark matter; 73 per cent in another form called dark energy; 3 per cent is made of free hydrogen and helium atoms; 0.5 per cent makes up all the light we see in the night including the stars, clusters and superclusters; 0.3 per cent is in free neutrino particles; and finally, 0.03 per cent is in the heavier nuclei of which the Sun, the Earth and ourselves are made. In this work we study specially the dark matter and the dark energy. The first one appears to be attached to galaxies, and astronomers agree that it is cold, meaning that the particles that make up that matter are not moving fast. Very recently astronomers discovered that a tremendous amount of the so-cahled dark energy exists and that it is pushing and accelerating the expansion of the Universe. Should this expansion continue for another 14,000 million years, the sky will darken with only a handful of galaxies remaining visible. PMID:16463572

  7. MODELING OF THE HERMES SUBMILLIMETER SOURCE LENSED BY A DARK MATTER DOMINATED FOREGROUND GROUP OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gavazzi, R.; Cooray, A.; Conley, A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Beelen, A.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bridge, C.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Blundell, R.; Brisbin, D.; Burgarella, D.; Chanial, P.; Christopher, N.; Clements, D. L.; Cox, P.

    2011-09-10

    We present the results of a gravitational lensing analysis of the bright z{sub s} = 2.957 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) HERMES found in the Herschel/SPIRE science demonstration phase data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project. The high-resolution imaging available in optical and near-IR channels, along with CO emission obtained with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, allows us to precisely estimate the intrinsic source extension and hence estimate the total lensing magnification to be {mu} = 10.9 {+-} 0.7. We measure the half-light radius R{sub eff} of the source in the rest-frame near-UV and V bands that characterize the unobscured light coming from stars and find R{sub eff,*} = [2.0 {+-} 0.1] kpc, in good agreement with recent studies on the SMG population. This lens model is also used to estimate the size of the gas distribution (R{sub eff,gas} = [1.1 {+-} 0.5] kpc) by mapping back in the source plane the CO (J = 5 {yields} 4) transition line emission. The lens modeling yields a relatively large Einstein radius R{sub Ein} = 4.''10 {+-} 0.''02, corresponding to a deflector velocity dispersion of [483 {+-} 16] km s{sup -1}. This shows that HERMES is lensed by a galaxy group-size dark matter halo at redshift z{sub l} {approx} 0.6. The projected dark matter contribution largely dominates the mass budget within the Einstein radius with f{sub dm}(< R{sub Ein}) {approx} 80%. This fraction reduces to f{sub dm}(< R{sub eff,G1} {approx_equal} 4.5 kpc) {approx} 47% within the effective radius of the main deflecting galaxy of stellar mass M{sub *,G1} = [8.5 {+-} 1.6] x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. At this smaller scale the dark matter fraction is consistent with results already found for massive lensing ellipticals at z {approx} 0.2 from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey.

  8. Second order gravitational effects on CMB temperature anisotropy in {lambda} dominated flat universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-05-15

    We study second order gravitational effects of local inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background radiation in flat universes with matter and a cosmological constant {lambda}. We find that the general relativistic correction to the Newtonian approximation is negligible at second order provided that the size of the inhomogeneous region is sufficiently smaller than the horizon scale. For a spherically symmetric top-hat type quasilinear perturbation, the first order temperature fluctuation corresponding to the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is enhanced (suppressed) by the second order one for a compensated void (lump). As a function of redshift of the local inhomogeneity, the second order temperature fluctuations due to evolution of the gravitational potential have a peak before the matter-{lambda} equality epoch for a fixed comoving size and a density contrast. The second order gravitational effects from local quasilinear inhomogeneities at a redshift z{approx}1 may significantly affect the cosmic microwave background.

  9. Influence of time on metamorphism of sedimentary organic matter in liquid-dominated geothermal systems, western North America.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance data of sedimentary organic matter samples from six liquid-dominated geothermal systems are strongly temperature-dependent. Geologic evidence indicates that reaction duration ranges from approx 103 to 106 yr in these systems that appear to have near-maximum temperatures. The strong temperature dependence of vitrinite reflectance indicates that after about 104 yr, reaction duration has little or no influence on metamorphism of organic matter in liquid-dominated geothermal systems. These data indicate that vitrinite reflectance can be used to determine the maximum temperature reached in hot sedimentary basins of moderate longevity. -after Author

  10. Energy density of standing sound waves at the radiation-dominated phase of the universe expansion (hydrodynamic derivation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the early Universe up to hydrogen recombination in the Universe, the radiation pressure was much greater than the pressure of baryons and electrons. Moreover, the energy density of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons was greater than or close to the energy density contained in the rest mass of baryonic matter, i.e., the primordial plasma was a radiated-dominated one and the adiabatic index was close to 4/3. The small density perturbations from which the observed galaxies have grown grew as long as the characteristic perturbation scales exceeded the horizon of the Universe сt at that time. On smaller scales, the density perturbations were standing sound waves. Radiative viscosity and heat conduction must have led to the damping of sound waves on very small scales. After the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, J. Silk calculated the scales of this damping, which is now called Silk damping, knowing the CMBtemperature and assuming the density of baryons and electrons. Observations with the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the Planck satellite have revealed the predicted damping of acoustic peaks in the CMB power spectrum and confirmed one important prediction of the theory. In 1970, R.A. Sunyaev and Ya.B. Zeldovich showed that such energy release in the early Universe should lead to characteristic deviations of the CMB spectrum from the Planck one. The development of the technology of cryogenic detectors of submillimeter and millimeter wavelength radiation has made it possible to measure the CMB spectral distortions at 10-8 of its total intensity (PIXIE). This has sharply increased the interest of theoretical cosmologists in the problem of energy release when smallscale sound waves are damped. We have derived a relativistic formula for the energy of a standing sound wave in a photon-baryon-electron plasma from simple hydrodynamic and thermodynamic relations. This formula is applicable for an arbitrary relation between the

  11. Large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a baryon-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure in a universe with Omega(0) = 0.2 and h = 0.5 dominated by baryons in which cosmic strings provide the initial density perturbations. The numerical model yields a power spectrum. Nonlinear evolution confirms that the model can account for 700 km/s bulk flows and a strong cluster-cluster correlation, but does rather poorly on smaller scales. There is no visual 'filamentary' structure, and the two-point correlation has too steep a logarithmic slope. The value of G mu = 4 x 10 to the -6th is significantly lower than previous estimates for the value of G mu in baryon-dominated cosmic string models.

  12. Galaxies and gas in a cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Neal; Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, David H.

    1992-01-01

    We use a combined gravity/hydrodynamics code to simulate the formation of structure in a random 22 Mpc cube of a cold dark matter universe. Adiabatic compression and shocks heat much of the gas to temperatures of 10 exp 6 - 10 exp 7 K, but a fraction of the gas cools radiatively to about 10 exp 4 K and condenses into discrete, highly overdense lumps. We identify these lumps with galaxies. The high-mass end of their baryonic mass function fits the form of the observed galaxy luminosity function. They retain independent identities after their dark halos merge, so gravitational clustering produces groups of galaxies embedded in relatively smooth envelopes of hot gas and dark matter. The galaxy correlation function is approximately an r exp -2.1 power law from separations of 35 kpc to 7 Mpc. Galaxy fluctuations are biased relative to dark matter fluctuations by a factor b about 1.5. We find no significant 'velocity bias' between galaxies and dark matter particles. However, virial analysis of the simulation's richest group leads to an estimated Omega of about 0.3, even though the simulation adopts Omega = 1.

  13. Universal parametrization of thermal photon rates in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Matthew; Hohler, Paul; Rapp, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) radiation off strongly interacting matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions (HICs) encodes information on the high-temperature phases of nuclear matter. Microscopic calculations of thermal EM emission rates are usually rather involved and not readily accessible to broad applications in models of the fireball evolution which are required to compare with experimental data. An accurate and universal parametrization of the microscopic calculations is thus key to honing the theory behind the EM spectra. Here we provide such a parametrization for photon emission rates from hadronic matter, including the contributions from in-medium ρ mesons (which incorporate effects from baryons and antibaryons), as well as bremsstrahlung from π π scattering. Individual parametrizations for each contribution are numerically determined through nested fitting functions for photon energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV in chemically equilibrated matter of temperatures 100-180 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0-400 MeV. Special care is taken to extent the parametrizations to chemical off-equilibrium as encountered in HICs after chemical freeze-out. This provides a functional description of thermal photon rates within a 20% variation of the microscopically calculated values.

  14. Small-scale anisotropies in the microwave background in a baryon-dominated open universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gouda, N.; Sasaki, M.; Suto, Y.

    1987-10-01

    The anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in a baryon-dominated universe (BDU) are calculated using a gauge-invariant method. The theoretical predictions on a 4.5-arcmin angular scale are compared with the observational data of Uson and Wilkinson (1984). Both adiabatic and isocurvature scenarios predict roughly the same amplitudes of the anisotropies on this scale, in spite of the difference of the physical mechanism of the anisotropy generation. As a result, CMB isotropy requires that the density parameter of a BDU must be larger than 0.8 even in an isocurvature scenario. This conclusion is compatible with the observation of light elements only if the universe were fairly inhomogeneous at the epoch of primordial nucleosynthesis. In turn, to the extent that standard primordial nucleosynthesis predictions are assumed, the idea of a BDU based on either adiabatic or isocurvature models can be ruled out. 22 references.

  15. The universe dominated by oscillating scalar with non-minimal derivative coupling to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: mukaida@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the expansion law of the universe dominated by the oscillating scalar field with non-minimal derivative coupling to gravity as G{sup μν}∂{sub μ}φ∂{sub ν}φ. In this system the Hubble parameter oscillates with a frequency of the effective mass of the scalar field, which formerly caused a difficulty in analyzing how the universe expands. We find an analytical solution for power law potentials and interpret the solution in an intuitive way by using a new invariant of the system. As a result, we find marginally accelerated expansion for the quadratic potential and no accelerated expansion for the potential with higher power.

  16. Investigating Student Understanding of the Universe: Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, Melissa; Coble, K.; Cochran, G. L.; Hayes, V. L.; Camarillo, C. T.; Bailey, J. M.; McLin, K. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2011-05-01

    Student pre-course surveys reveal that students who enter the classroom have little knowledge or understanding of the concept of dark matter (DM). At Chicago State University, we enthusiastically introduce this concept to students through interactive tutorials and hands-on inquiry-based laboratory activities. We have analyzed pre and post laboratory assessments and student interviews to determine the extent to which these tutorials have helped our students to gain a more robust understanding of the topic. The results of this work will be presented. This project is a part of our efforts at CSU to reform our introductory astronomy course. This project is part of a larger study; also see our posters on student ideas about the age and expansion of the universe, the structure of the universe, and perceptions of astronomical sizes and distances. This work was supported by NASA ROSES E/PO Grant #NNXlOAC89G, as well as by the Illinois Space Grant Consortium and National Science Foundation CCLI Grant #0632563 at Chicago State University and the Fermi E/PO program at Sonoma State University.

  17. Redox properties of dissolved organic matter along redox gradients in two peatland-dominated forested catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Markus; Sander, Michael; Blodau, Christian; Peiffer, Stefan; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contributes significantly to the carbon cycle and influence the mobility of metals and contaminants. Water logged, riparian wetlands have been identified as an important source of DOM in catchments. As DOM export from wetlands often involves transitions in redox conditions, for a more mechanistic understanding of sources, mobilization processes and fate of DOM under different redox conditions additional analytical approaches are needed. In this study we combined established methods for DOM characterization, such as fluorescence spectroscopy and δ13CDOC, with mediated electrochemical reduction and oxidation of DOM for the determination the electron accepting and donating capacity (EAC/EDC). With this approach, we intended to test if the redox state of DOM can be used to identify and characterize its sources in catchments. To this end, we collected samples in two catchments - one dominated by fens and forest, the other by an ombrotrophic bog - from different hydrological compartments and from different source materials. EAC strongly decreased from oxic groundwater (6.4 ± 2.1 mmole- gC -1) to anoxic peat pore water (0.6 ± 0.5 mmole- gC -1). Contrarily, for EDC, there was no clear pattern to separate water compartments with different redox states. EDC seemed thus to depend mainly on the DOM source materials. Results of fluorescence spectroscopy and δ13CDOCconfirmed that changes in EDC were presumably due to changes in DOC quality rather than redox state. Moreover, comparing peat pore water and DOM in an adjacent erosion rill, EDC increased from 0.7 mmole- gC -1 in the anoxic pore water to 1.7 ± 0.2 mmole- gC -1 along the flow path in the oxic stream. This further suggested a different mobility of different DOM fractions, with higher EDC in more mobile DOM. This study indicates that combining electrochemical and spectroscopic methods for characterization of DOM quality and redox state can improve our understanding of source and fate

  18. Constraints on the very early universe from thermal WIMP dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, Manuel; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2007-11-15

    We investigate the relic density n{sub {chi}} of nonrelativistic long-lived or stable particles {chi} in nonstandard cosmological scenarios. We calculate the relic abundance starting from arbitrary initial temperatures of the radiation-dominated epoch, and derive the lower bound on the initial temperature T{sub 0}{>=}m{sub {chi}}/23, assuming that thermally produced {chi} particles account for the dark matter energy density in the Universe; this bound holds for all {chi} annihilation cross sections. We also investigate cosmological scenarios with modified expansion rate. Even in this case an approximate formula similar to the standard one is capable of predicting the final relic abundance correctly. Choosing the {chi} annihilation cross section such that the observed cold dark matter abundance is reproduced in standard cosmology, we constrain possible modifications of the expansion rate at T{approx}m{sub {chi}}/20, well before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  19. Natural NMSSM after LHC Run I and the Higgsino dominated dark matter scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junjie; He, Yangle; Shang, Liangliang; Su, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the impact of the direct searches for SUSY at LHC Run I on the naturalness of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). For this end, we first scan the vast parameter space of the NMSSM to get the region where the fine tuning measures Δ Z and Δ h at the electroweak scale are less than about 50, then we implement by simulations the constraints of the direct searches on the parameter points in the region. Our results indicate that although the direct search experiments are effective in excluding the points, the parameter intervals for the region and also the minimum reaches of Δ Z and Δ h are scarcely changed by the constraints, which implies that the fine tuning of the NMSSM does not get worse after LHC Run I. Moreover, based on the results we propose a natural NMSSM scenario where the lightest neutralino {tilde{χ}}_1^0 as the dark matter (DM) candidate is Higgsino-dominated. In this scenario, Δ Z and Δ h may be as low as 2 without conflicting with any experimental constraints, and intriguingly {tilde{χ}}_1^0 can easily reach the measured DM relic density due to its significant Singlino component. We exhibit the features of the scenario which distinguish it from the other natural SUSY scenario, including the properties of its neutralino-chargino sector and scalar top quark sector. We emphasize that the scenario can be tested either through searching for 3 l + E T miss signal at 14 TeV LHC or through future DM direct detection experiments.

  20. The Dynamical Structure of Dark Matter Halos with Universal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hese, Emmanuel; Baes, Maarten; Dejonghe, Herwig

    2009-01-01

    N-body simulations have unveiled several apparently universal properties of dark matter halos, including a cusped density profile, a power-law pseudo-phase-space density ρ/σ3 r , and a linear β-γ relation between the density slope and the velocity anisotropy. We present a family of self-consistent phase-space distribution functions (DFs) F(E, L), based on the Dehnen-McLaughlin Jeans models, that incorporate these universal properties very accurately. These DFs, derived using a quadratic programming technique, are analytical, positive, and smooth over the entire phase space and are able to generate four-parameter velocity anisotropy profiles β(r) with arbitrary asymptotic values β0 and β∞. We discuss the orbital structure of six radially anisotropic systems in detail and argue that, apart from its use for generating initial conditions for N-body studies, our dynamical modeling provides a valuable complementary approach to understand the processes involved in the formation of dark matter halos.

  1. Ecogeomorphology of Spartina patens-dominated tidal marshes: Soil organic matter accumulation, marsh elevation dynamics, and disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Ford, M.A.; Hensel, P.F.

    2004-01-01

    Marsh soil development and vertical accretion in Spartina patens (Aiton) Muhl.-dominated tidal marshes is largely dependent on soil organic matter accumulation from root-rhizome production and litter deposition. Yet there are few quantitative data sets on belowground production and the relationship between soil organic matter accumulation and soil elevation dynamics for this marsh type. Spartina patens marshes are subject to numerous stressors, including sea-level rise, water level manipulations (i.e., flooding and draining) by impoundments, and prescribed burning. These stressors could influence long-term marsh sustainability by their effect on root production, soil organic matter accumulation, and soil elevation dynamics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the interactions among vegetative production, soil organic matter accumulation and marsh elevation dynamics, or the ecogeomorphology, of Spartina patens-dominated tidal marshes. Additional studies are needed of belowground production/decomposition and soil elevation change (measured simultaneously) to better understand the links among soil organic matter accumulation, soil elevation change, and disturbance in this marsh type. From a management perspective, we need to better understand the impacts of disturbance stressors, both lethal and sub-lethal, and the interactive effect of multiple stressors on soil elevation dynamics in order to develop better management practices to safeguard marsh sustainability as sea level rises.

  2. Probing the matter and dark energy sources in a viable Big Rip model of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suresh

    2014-08-01

    Chevallier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrization for the equation of state (EoS) of dark energy in terms of cosmic redshift or scale factor have been frequently studied in the literature. In this study, we consider cosmic time-based CPL parametrization for the EoS parameter of the effective cosmic fluid that fills the fabric of spatially flat and homogeneous Robertson-Walker (RW) spacetime in General Relativity. The model exhibits two worthy features: (i) It fits the observational data from the latest H(z) and Union 2.1 SN Ia compilations matching the success of ΛCDM model. (ii) It describes the evolution of the Universe from the matter-dominated phase to the recent accelerating phase similar to the ΛCDM model but leads to Big Rip end of the Universe contrary to the everlasting de Sitter expansion in the ΛCDM model. We investigate the matter and dark energy sources in the model, in particular, behavior of the dynamical dark energy responsible for the Big Rip end of Universe.

  3. Declining Diversity in Abandoned Grasslands of the Carpathian Mountains: Do Dominant Species Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Csergő, Anna Mária; Demeter, László; Turkington, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Traditional haymaking has created exceptionally high levels of plant species diversity in semi-natural grasslands of the Carpathian Mountains (Romania), the maintenance of which is jeopardized by recent abandonment and subsequent vegetation succession. We tested the hypothesis that the different life history strategies of dominant grasses cause different patterns of diversity loss after abandonment of traditional haymaking in two types of meadow. Although diversity loss rate was not significantly different, the mechanism of loss depended on the life history of dominant species. In meadows co-dominated by competitive stress-tolerant ruderals, diversity loss occurred following the suppression of dominant grasses by tall forbs, whereas in meadows dominated by a stress-tolerant competitor, diversity loss resulted from increased abundance and biomass of the dominant grass. We conclude that management for species conservation in abandoned grasslands should manipulate the functional turnover in communities where the dominant species is a weaker competitor, and abundance and biomass of dominant species in communities where the dominant species is the stronger competitor. PMID:24014148

  4. Spin 1 /2 field and regularization in a de Sitter and radiation dominated universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suman

    2016-02-01

    We construct a simple algorithm to derive number density of spin 1 /2 particles created in spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes and resulting renormalized energy-momentum tensor within the framework of adiabatic regularization. Physical quantities thus found are in agreement with the known results. This formalism can be considered as an appropriate extension of the techniques originally introduced for scalar fields, applicable to fermions in curved space. We apply this formalism to compute the particle number density and the renormalized energy density and pressure analytically (wherever possible) and numerically, in two interesting cosmological scenarios: a de Sitter spacetime and a radiation dominated universe. Results prove the efficiency of the methodology presented here.

  5. Dark Matter in the Universe and in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    1999-01-01

    During the past four years, Prof. Kamionkowski and collaborators have made progress in research on the nature and distribution of dark-matter in the Universe and in the Galaxy, and on related topics in astrophysics and cosmology. We have made progress on research on the cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure, issues related to particle dark matter, and the gamma-ray-burst enigma. A significant fraction of the research supported by this ATP has been on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Prof. Kamionkowski and collaborators showed how the polarization of the CMB could be used to detect long-wavelength gravitational waves, such as those produced by inflation. With Kosowsky, Prof. Kamionkowski calculated the amplitude of a stochastic gravitational-wave background that could be detected for a satellite experiment of a given sensitivity and angular resolution. They showed that polarization should improve the sensitivity oa MAP to these gravity waves, and that the Planck Surveyor should do even better. Prof. Kamionkowski, Caldwell, and a student calculated and illustrated the CMB temperature/polarization pattern produced by a single plane-wave gravitational wave. They calculated the amplitude of such a wave that would be detectable with MAP and Planck, and compared that with the sensitivity of traditional gravitational-wave detectors like LIGO and LISA. With Lue and Wang, the PI showed how parity violation from new high-energy physics could conceivably give rise to an observable signature in the CMB polarization. With Loeb, Prof. Kamionkowski showed how measurement of the polarization of CMB photons scattered by hot gas in a cluster could be used to determine the quadrupole moment of the CMB incident on that cluster. Prof. Kamionkowski and Jaffe calculated the amplitude of secondary anisotropies produced by scattering of CMB photons from reionized regions. Research has also been carried out on probing the large-scale distribution of mass in the Universe

  6. Gravitational lensing in a cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; White, Simon D. M.

    1988-01-01

    Gravitational lensing due to mass condensations in a biased cold dark matter (CDM) universe is investigated using the Press-Schechter (1974) theory with density fluctuation amplitudes taken from previous N-body work. Under the critical assumption that CDM haloes have small core radii, a distribution of image angular separations for high-z lensed quasars with a peak at about 1 arcsec and a half-width of a factor of about 10. Allowing for selection effects at small angular separations, this is in good agreement with the observed separations. The estimated frequency of lensing is somewhat lower than that observed, but the discrepancy can be removed by invoking amplification bias and by making a small upward adjustment to the density fluctuation amplitudes assumed in the CDM model.

  7. The VLT Weighs the Invisible Matter in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    Shapes and Orientations of 76,000 Distant Galaxies Summary An international team of astronomers [1] has succeeded in mapping the "dark" (invisible) matter in the Universe, as seen in 50 different directions from the Earth. They find that, within the uncertainty, it is unlikely that mass alone would stop the current expansion of the Universe . This fundamental result is based on the powerful, but challenging method of "cosmic shear" . It depends on very accurate measurements of the apparent, weak distortion and preferential orientation of images of distant galaxies . This effect is caused by deflection of the light from those galaxies by the large mass concentrations in the Universe it encounters on its way to us. The larger these masses are, the larger are the apparent image distortions and the more pronounced are the alignments of neigbouring galaxy images. The new analysis was made possible by means of unique observational data, obtained under excellent conditions with the the ESO 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope and the multi-mode FORS1 instrument at the Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 32/00 : Sky field with images of distant galaxies observed with the VLT for this research programme, and compared with a reconstructed map of the distribution of mass in this direction. The VLT Observations ESO PR Photo 32/00 ESO PR Photo 32/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 252 pix - 35k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 504 pix - 232k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 1890 pix - 2.0Mb] Caption : PR Photo 32/00 shows an example of the mapping of the dark mass distribution in one of the 50 sky fields observed with the VLT and FORS1. To the left is the original image, a 36-min exposure in a near-infrared wavelength band. To the right is the reconstructed map of the mass (a "mass photo") in this direction, based on an analysis of the weak shear effect seen in the field; that is, on the measured elongations and directions of the axes of the galaxy images in this field. The brighter areas indicate the directions in which

  8. Sources and distribution of organic matter in a river-dominated estuary (Winyah Bay, SC, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; Teixeira, Maria J.; Perkey, David W.

    2003-08-01

    The sources and distribution of organic matter (OM) in surface waters and sediments from Winyah Bay (South Carolina, USA) were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques, including elemental, stable isotope and organic biomarker analyses. Several locations along the estuary salinity gradient were sampled during four different periods of contrasting river discharge and tidal range. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of surface waters ranged from 7 mg l -1 in the lower bay stations closest to the ocean to 20 mg l -1 in the river and upper bay samples. There was a general linear relationship between DOC concentrations and salinity in three of the four sampling periods. In contrast, particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations were significantly lower (0.1-3 mg l -1) and showed no relationship with salinity. The high molecular weight dissolved OM (HMW DOM) isolated from selected water samples collected along the bay displayed atomic carbon:nitrogen ratios ([C/N]a) and stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic carbon ( δ13C OC) that ranged from 10 to 30 and from -28 to -25‰, respectively. Combined, such compositions indicate that in most HMW DOM samples, the majority of the OM originates from terrigenous sources, with smaller contributions from riverine and estuarine phytoplankton. In contrast, the [C/N]a ratios of particulate OM (POM) samples varied significantly among the collection periods, ranging from low values of ˜5 to high values of >20. Overall, the trends in [C/N]a ratios indicated that algal sources of POM were most important during the early and late summer, whereas terrigenous sources dominated in the winter and early spring. In Winyah Bay bottom sediments, the concentrations of the mineral-associated OM were positively correlated with sediment surface area. The [C/N]a ratios and δ13C OC compositions of the bulk sedimentary OM ranged from 5 to 45 and from -28 to -23‰, respectively. These compositions were consistent

  9. Dark and baryonic matter in the MareNostrum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Khalatyan, A.; Sevilla, R.; Turchaninov, V.

    2006-11-01

    We report some results from one of the largest hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of large scale structures that has been done up to date. The MareNostrum Universe SPH simulation consists of 2 billion particles (2 × 10243) in a cubic box of 500 h-1 Mpc on a side. This simulation has been done in the MareNostrum parallel supercomputer at the Barcelona SuperComputer Center. Due to the large simulated volume and good mass resolution, our simulated catalog of dark matter halos comprises more than half a million objects with masses larger than a typical Milky Way galaxy halo. From this dataset we have studied several statistical properties such as the halo mass function, the distribution of shapes of dark and gas components within halos, the baryon fraction, cumulative void volume etc. This simulation is particularly useful to study the large scale distribution of baryons in the universe as a function of temperature and density. In this paper we also show the time evolution of the gas fractions at large scales.

  10. Physical processes effecting the baryonic matter content of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotova, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    We have discussed physical processes effecting the generation of the matter content of the Universe. First we have studied the processes effecting Big Bang Nucleosynthesis during which the chemical content of the baryonic component of the Universe was produced. We have provided detail numerical analysis of the BBN production of ^4He, Y_p, in the presence of ν_e ← ν_s neutrino oscillations, effective after electron neutrino decoupling. We have accounted for all known effects of neutrino oscillations on cosmological nucleosyntesis. We have obtained cosmological bounds corresponding to δ Y_p/Y_p= 5.2 % in correspondance with the recently found higher uncertainty in ^4He. Iso-helium contours for δ Y_p/Y_p > 5% and population of the ν_s state δ N_s = 0; 0.5; 0.7; 0.9, both for resonant and non-resonant oscillations have been calculated. Next we have studied the processes effecting the formation of the baryon content of the Universe. We have investigated a baryogenesis model based on Affleck and Dine baryogenesis scenario, Scalar Field Condensate (SFC) baryogenesis model. We have provided precise numerical analysis of the SFC baryogenesis model numerically accounting for the particle creation processes by the time varying scalar field. We have numerically obtained the dependence of the field and baryon charge evolution and their final values on the model's parameters, namely: the gauge coupling constant α, the Hubble constant during inflation H_I, the mass of the field m and the self coupling constants λ_i. We have found the range of the model parameters for which a baryon asymmetry value close to the observed one can be generated.

  11. Gender and Facial Dominance in Gaze Cuing: Emotional Context Matters in the Eyes That We Follow

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsen, Garian; van Zoest, Wieske; van Vugt, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Gaze following is a socio-cognitive process that provides adaptive information about potential threats and opportunities in the individual’s environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential interaction between emotional context and facial dominance in gaze following. We used the gaze cue task to induce attention to or away from the location of a target stimulus. In the experiment, the gaze cue either belonged to a (dominant looking) male face or a (non-dominant looking) female face. Critically, prior to the task, individuals were primed with pictures of threat or no threat to induce either a dangerous or safe environment. Findings revealed that the primed emotional context critically influenced the gaze cuing effect. While a gaze cue of the dominant male face influenced performance in both the threat and no-threat conditions, the gaze cue of the non-dominant female face only influenced performance in the no-threat condition. This research suggests an implicit, context-dependent follower bias, which carries implications for research on visual attention, social cognition, and leadership. PMID:23573199

  12. Gender and facial dominance in gaze cuing: emotional context matters in the eyes that we follow.

    PubMed

    Ohlsen, Garian; van Zoest, Wieske; van Vugt, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Gaze following is a socio-cognitive process that provides adaptive information about potential threats and opportunities in the individual's environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential interaction between emotional context and facial dominance in gaze following. We used the gaze cue task to induce attention to or away from the location of a target stimulus. In the experiment, the gaze cue either belonged to a (dominant looking) male face or a (non-dominant looking) female face. Critically, prior to the task, individuals were primed with pictures of threat or no threat to induce either a dangerous or safe environment. Findings revealed that the primed emotional context critically influenced the gaze cuing effect. While a gaze cue of the dominant male face influenced performance in both the threat and no-threat conditions, the gaze cue of the non-dominant female face only influenced performance in the no-threat condition. This research suggests an implicit, context-dependent follower bias, which carries implications for research on visual attention, social cognition, and leadership. PMID:23573199

  13. The accretion history of dark matter haloes - I. The physical origin of the universal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Camila A.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Schaye, Joop; Duffy, Alan R.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the universal accretion history of dark matter haloes is the first step towards determining the origin of their structure. We use the extended Press-Schechter formalism to derive the halo mass accretion history from the growth rate of initial density perturbations. We show that the halo mass history is well described by an exponential function of redshift in the high-redshift regime. However, in the low-redshift regime the mass history follows a power law because the growth of density perturbations is halted in the dark energy dominated era due to the accelerated expansion of the Universe. We provide an analytic model that follows the expression {M(z)=M0(1+z)^{af(M0)}e^{-f(M0)z}}, where M0 = M(z = 0), a depends on cosmology and f(M0) depends only on the linear matter power spectrum. The analytic model does not rely on calibration against numerical simulations and is suitable for any cosmology. We compare our model with the latest empirical models for the mass accretion history in the literature and find very good agreement. We provide numerical routines for the model online (available at https://bitbucket.org/astroduff/commah).

  14. An old quasar in a young dark energy-dominated universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2005-10-01

    Dark energy is the invisible fuel that seems to drive the current acceleration of the Universe. Its presence, which is inferred from an impressive convergence of high-quality observational results along with some apparently successful theoretical predictions, is also supported by the current estimates of the age of the Universe from dating of local and high-z objects. In this paper, we test the viability of several dark energy scenarios in the light of the age estimates of the high-redshift (z= 3.91) quasar APM 08279+5255. Using a chemodynamical model for the evolution of spheroids, we first reevaluate its current estimated age, as given by Hasinger, Schartel & Komossa. An age of 2.1 Gyr is set by the condition that Fe/O abundance ratio (normalized to solar values) of the model reaches 3.3, which is the best-fitting value obtained in the above reference. In the detailed chemodynamical modelling, the iron enrichment defines three relevant time-scales: (i) ~0.3 Gyr for the central region of the galaxy housing the quasar to reach a solar iron abundance; (ii) ~1 Gyr for the Fe/O abundance ratio to reach the solar value and (iii) ~2 Gyr for a highly suprasolar Fe/O abundance ratio (Fe/O = 2.5, suggested by the quasar APM 08279+5255). Therefore, a high value of the Fe/O abundance ratio for a quasar is a strong evidence that the quasar is old, which represents a severe constraint for cosmological scenarios. It is shown that for the currently accepted value of the matter density parameter, most of the existing dark energy scenarios cannot accommodate this old high-redshift object unless the Hubble parameter is as low as H0= 58kms-1Mpc-1, as recently advocated by Sandage and collaborators. Even considering less-stringent age limits, only cosmological models that predict a considerably old Universe at high-z can be compatible with the existence of this object. This is the case of the conventional ΛCDM scenario and some specific classes of brane world cosmologies.

  15. Universal Parametrization of Thermal Photon Production in Hadronic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Matthew; Hohler, Paul; Rapp, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    As the production of photons and dileptons from high-energy collisions is able to provide information on the high temperature and high density phases of nuclear matter, an improved and universal parametrization of the rather involved microscopic calculations is key to honing the theory behind this production. We focus on photon emission rates from hadronic many-body calculations of the in-medium rho spectral function, which includes the effects of baryons and antibaryons. Across a range of temperatures from 0.1 to 0.18 GeV and baryon chemical potentials from 0 to 0.4 GeV, a parametrization of thermal photon rates for energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV is numerically determined through the use of nested fitting methods. This provides a fully functional description of thermal photon production largely within an unprecedented 20% of the calculated values from the spectral function, a significant reduction in error from available parametrizations. The contribution of photons and dileptons from pion-pion bremsstrahlung is evaluated for the importance of its contribution. The functional form, coupled with the comparison to the bremsstrahlung production of thermal photons, will provide a baseline for guiding future studies. As the production of photons and dileptons from high-energy collisions is able to provide information on the high temperature and high density phases of nuclear matter, an improved and universal parametrization of the rather involved microscopic calculations is key to honing the theory behind this production. We focus on photon emission rates from hadronic many-body calculations of the in-medium rho spectral function, which includes the effects of baryons and antibaryons. Across a range of temperatures from 0.1 to 0.18 GeV and baryon chemical potentials from 0 to 0.4 GeV, a parametrization of thermal photon rates for energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV is numerically determined through the use of nested fitting methods. This provides a fully functional description of

  16. Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of the Environment: Does Ethnicity or Dominant Residential Experience Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjean-Perrotta, Blanche; Moseley, Christine; Cantu, Lucas E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors used drawings and sentence completions to investigate how 118 preservice elementary teachers defined the environment. The authors also examined the influence of ethnicity and dominant residential experience on the preservice teachers' perceptions of the environment. From the results of their study, the authors suggest…

  17. Use of ESI-FTICR-MS to Characterize Dissolved Organic Matter in Headwater Streams Draining Forest-Dominated and Pasture-Dominated Watersheds.

    PubMed

    Lu, YueHan; Li, Xiaping; Mesfioui, Rajaa; Bauer, James E; Chambers, R M; Canuel, Elizabeth A; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique revealing complexity and diversity of natural DOM molecules, but its application to DOM analysis in grazing-impacted agricultural systems remains scarce. In the present study, we presented a case study of using ESI-FTICR-MS in analyzing DOM from four headwater streams draining forest- or pasture-dominated watersheds in Virginia, USA. In all samples, most formulas were CHO compounds (71.8-87.9%), with other molecular series (CHOS, CHON, CHONS, and CHOP (N, S)) accounting for only minor fractions. All samples were dominated by molecules falling in the lignin-like region (H/C = 0.7-1.5, O/C = 0.1-0.67), suggesting the predominance of allochthonous, terrestrial plant-derived DOM. Relative to the two pasture streams, DOM formulas in the two forest streams were more similar, based on Jaccard similarity coefficients and nonmetric multidimensional scaling calculated from Bray-Curtis distance. Formulas from the pasture streams were characterized by lower proportions of aromatic formulas and lower unsaturation, suggesting that the allochthonous versus autochthonous contributions of organic matter to streams were modified by pasture land use. The number of condensed aromatic structures (CAS) was higher for the forest streams, which is possibly due to the controlled burning in the forest-dominated watersheds and suggests that black carbon was mobilized from soils to streams. During 15-day biodegradation experiments, DOM from the two pasture streams was altered to a greater extent than DOM from the forest streams, with formulas with H/C and O/C ranges similar to protein (H/C = 1.5-2.2, O/C = 0.3-0.67), lipid (H/C = 1.5-2.0, O/C = 0-0.3), and unsaturated hydrocarbon (H/C = 0.7-1.5, O/C = 0-0.1) being the most bioreactive groups. Aromatic compound formulas including CAS were preferentially removed during combined light+bacterial incubations

  18. Use of ESI-FTICR-MS to Characterize Dissolved Organic Matter in Headwater Streams Draining Forest-Dominated and Pasture-Dominated Watersheds

    PubMed Central

    Lu, YueHan; Li, Xiaping; Mesfioui, Rajaa; Bauer, James E.; Chambers, R. M.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) has proven to be a powerful technique revealing complexity and diversity of natural DOM molecules, but its application to DOM analysis in grazing-impacted agricultural systems remains scarce. In the present study, we presented a case study of using ESI-FTICR-MS in analyzing DOM from four headwater streams draining forest- or pasture-dominated watersheds in Virginia, USA. In all samples, most formulas were CHO compounds (71.8–87.9%), with other molecular series (CHOS, CHON, CHONS, and CHOP (N, S)) accounting for only minor fractions. All samples were dominated by molecules falling in the lignin-like region (H/C = 0.7–1.5, O/C = 0.1–0.67), suggesting the predominance of allochthonous, terrestrial plant-derived DOM. Relative to the two pasture streams, DOM formulas in the two forest streams were more similar, based on Jaccard similarity coefficients and nonmetric multidimensional scaling calculated from Bray-Curtis distance. Formulas from the pasture streams were characterized by lower proportions of aromatic formulas and lower unsaturation, suggesting that the allochthonous versus autochthonous contributions of organic matter to streams were modified by pasture land use. The number of condensed aromatic structures (CAS) was higher for the forest streams, which is possibly due to the controlled burning in the forest-dominated watersheds and suggests that black carbon was mobilized from soils to streams. During 15-day biodegradation experiments, DOM from the two pasture streams was altered to a greater extent than DOM from the forest streams, with formulas with H/C and O/C ranges similar to protein (H/C = 1.5–2.2, O/C = 0.3–0.67), lipid (H/C = 1.5–2.0, O/C = 0–0.3), and unsaturated hydrocarbon (H/C = 0.7–1.5, O/C = 0–0.1) being the most bioreactive groups. Aromatic compound formulas including CAS were preferentially removed during combined light

  19. The measure matters: Language dominance profiles across measures in Spanish–English bilingual children*

    PubMed Central

    BEDORE, LISA M.; PEÑA, ELIZABETH D.; SUMMERS, CONNIE L.; BOERGER, KARIN M.; RESENDIZ, MARIA D.; GREENE, KAI; BOHMAN, THOMAS M.; GILLAM, RONALD B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if different language measures resulted in the same classifications of language dominance and proficiency for a group of bilingual pre-kindergarteners and kindergarteners. Data were analyzed for 1029 Spanish–English bilingual pre-kindergarteners who spanned the full range of bilingual language proficiency. Parent questionnaires were used to quantify age of first exposure and current language use. Scores from a short test of semantic and morphosyntactic development in Spanish and English were used to quantify children’s performance. Some children who were in the functionally monolingual range based on interview data demonstrated minimal knowledge of their other languages when tested. Current use accounted for more of the variance in language dominance than did age of first exposure. Results indicate that at different levels of language exposure children differed in their performance on semantic and morphosyntax tasks. These patterns suggest that it may be difficult to compare the results of studies that employ different measures of language dominance and proficiency. Current use is likely to be a useful metric of bilingual development that can be used to build a comprehensive picture of child bilingualism. PMID:23565049

  20. Shape matters: Near-field fluid mechanics dominate the collective motions of ellipsoidal squirmers.

    PubMed

    Kyoya, K; Matsunaga, D; Imai, Y; Omori, T; Ishikawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Microswimmers show a variety of collective motions. Despite extensive study, questions remain regarding the role of near-field fluid mechanics in collective motion. In this paper, we describe precisely the Stokes flow around hydrodynamically interacting ellipsoidal squirmers in a monolayer suspension. The results showed that various collective motions, such as ordering, aggregation, and whirls, are dominated by the swimming mode and the aspect ratio. The collective motions are mainly induced by near-field fluid mechanics, despite Stokes flow propagation over a long range. These results emphasize the importance of particle shape in collective motion. PMID:26764823

  1. Resolving the influence of nitrogen abundances on sediment organic matter in macrophyte-dominated lakes, using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Wang, Shengrui; Jiao, Lixin; Yan, Caihong; Jin, Xiangcan

    2015-01-01

    A controlled experiment was designed to resolve the influence of nitrogen abundance on sediment organic matters in macrophyte-dominated lakes using fluorescence analysis. Macrophyte biomass showed coincident growth trends with time, but different variation rates with nitrogen treatment. All plant growth indexes with nitrogen addition (N, NH4Cl 100, 200, 400mg/kg, respectively) were lower than those of the control group. Four humic-like components, two autochthonous tryptophan-like components, and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component were identified using the parallel factor analysis model. The results suggested that the relative component changes of fluorescence in the colonized sediments were in direct relation to the change of root biomass with time. In the experiment, the root formation parameters of the plants studied were significantly affected by adding N in sediments, which may be related to the reason that the root growth was affected by N addition. Adding a low concentration of N to sediments can play a part in supplying nutrients to the plants. However, the intensive uptake of NH4(+) may result in an increase in the intracellular concentration of ammonia, which is highly toxic to the plant cells. Hence, our experiment results manifested that organic matter cycling in the macrophyte-dominated sediment was influenced by nitrogen enrichment through influencing vegetation and relevant microbial activity. PMID:25597678

  2. Drought-induced variability in dissolved organic matter composition in a marsh-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Seidel, Michael; Dittmar, Thorsten; Whitman, William B.; Moran, Mary Ann

    2015-08-01

    The composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an estuary characterized by extensive salt marsh vegetation was investigated at the molecular level using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and stable carbon isotope analyses. Samples from multiple seasons covered different hydrological regimes, including anomalously low-discharge conditions. The untargeted approach used allowed for identifying the DOM molecular signatures associated with different DOM sources in the estuary. DOM composition was strongly modulated by river discharge at monthly scales, with high river flow leading to significant increases in the terrigenous signature of the DOM throughout the estuary. During a severe/exceptional drought, estuarine DOM was imprinted with a distinct signature of marsh-derived compounds. The frequency of occurrence of anomalously low-discharge conditions seems to have increased over the last decades. If predictions of anthropogenically driven changes in hydroclimate are confirmed, they will likely be accompanied by changes in DOM composition in estuaries at multidecadal time scales.

  3. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown in Ref. [1] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). Ref. [2] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angular recoil spectrum, and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.

  4. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-06

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in Λ CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown in Ref. [1] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). Ref. [2] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angular recoil spectrum, and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Furthermore, observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.

  5. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-04-17

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model possesses. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the dark matter relic abundance can change significantly. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  6. Galaxy clusters and cold dark matter - A low-density unbiased universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) are tested against two fundamental properties of clusters of galaxies: the cluster mass function and the cluster correlation function. We find that standard biased CDM models are inconsistent with these observations for any bias parameter b. A low-density, low-bias CDM-type model, with or without a cosmological constant, appears to be consistent with both the cluster mass function and the cluster correlations. The low-density model agrees well with the observed correlation function of the Abell, Automatic Plate Measuring Facility (APM), and Edinburgh-Durham cluster catalogs. The model is in excellent agreement with the observed dependence of the correlation strength on cluster mean separation, reproducing the measured universal dimensionless cluster correlation. The low-density model is also consistent with other large-scale structure observations, including the APM angular galaxy-correlations, and for lambda = 1-Omega with the COBE results of the microwave background radiation fluctuations.

  7. White Matter Abnormalities Track Disease Progression in PSEN1 Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Monté, Gemma C; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Fortea, Juan; Lladó, Albert; Antonell, Anna; Balasa, Mircea; Bargalló, Nuria; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2016-02-20

    PSEN1 mutations are the most frequent cause of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD), and show nearly full penetrance. There is presently increasing interest in the study of biomarkers that track disease progression in order to test therapeutic interventions in ADAD. We used white mater (WM) volumetric characteristics and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to investigate correlations with the normalized time to expected symptoms onset (relative age ratio) and group differences in a cohort of 36 subjects from PSEN1 ADAD families: 22 mutation carriers, 10 symptomatic (SMC) and 12 asymptomatic (AMC), and 14 non-carriers (NC). Subjects underwent a 3T MRI. WM morphometric data and DTI metrics were analyzed. We found that PSEN1 MC showed significant negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (FA) and the relative age ratio in the genus and body of corpus callosum and corona radiate (p <  0.05 Family-wise error correction (FWE) at cluster level) and positive correlation with mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AxD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium of corpus callosum. SMC presented WM volume loss, reduced FA and increased MD, AxD, and RD in the anterior and posterior corona radiate, corpus callosum (p <  0.05 FWE) compared with NC. No significant differences were observed between AMC and NC in WM volume or DTI measures. These findings suggest that the integrity of the WM deteriorates linearly in PSEN1 ADAD from the early phases of the disease; thus DTI metrics might be useful to monitor the disease progression. However, the lack of significant alterations at the preclinical stages suggests that these indexes might not be good candidates for early markers of the disease. PMID:26923015

  8. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-06

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in Λ CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown in Ref. [1] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). Ref. [2] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angularmore » recoil spectrum, and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Furthermore, observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.« less

  9. Directional detection of dark matter in universal bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Ranjan

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that several small-scale structure anomalies in Λ CDM cosmology can be solved by strong self-interaction between dark matter particles. It was shown by Braaten and Hammer [Phys. Rev. D 88, 063511 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.063511] that the presence of a near threshold S-wave resonance can make the scattering cross section at nonrelativistic speeds come close to saturating the unitarity bound. This can result in the formation of a stable bound state of two asymmetric dark matter particles (which we call darkonium). The work of Laha and Braaten [Phys. Rev. D, 89, 103510 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.103510] studied the nuclear recoil energy spectrum in dark matter direct detection experiments due to this incident bound state. Here we study the angular recoil spectrum and show that it is uniquely determined up to normalization by the S-wave scattering length. Observing this angular recoil spectrum in a dark matter directional detection experiment will uniquely determine many of the low-energy properties of dark matter independent of the underlying dark matter microphysics.

  10. University Rankings: Do They Matter in the UK?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broecke, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of changes in university rankings on applicant and institution behaviour in the UK. When their rank worsens, universities are found to experience small but statistically significant reductions in the number of applications received as well as in the average tariff score of applicants…

  11. An Investigation on the Dominant Career Anchors of Faculty Members: The Case of Mersin University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unal, Burcu; Gizir, Sidika

    2014-01-01

    Due to social, economic, and political changes, as well as changing institutional priorities, the permeation of managerialism has impelled universities to redefine the roles and functions of its faculty members. Therefore, researchers from various disciplines have focused on the career choices and paths of such members. In this context, the…

  12. Loop quantum cosmology of a radiation-dominated flat FLRW universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowski, Tomasz; Pierini, Roberto; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2014-12-01

    We study the loop quantum cosmology of a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-time with a Maxwell field. We show that many of the qualitative properties derived for the case of a massless scalar field also hold for a Maxwell field. In particular, the big-bang singularity is replaced by a quantum bounce, and the operator corresponding to the matter energy density is bounded above by the same critical energy density. We also numerically study the evolution of wave functions that are sharply peaked in the low energy regime, and derive effective equations which very closely approximate the full quantum dynamics of sharply peaked states at all times, including the near-bounce epoch. In the process, the analytical and numerical methods originally used to study the dynamics in loop quantum cosmology for the case of a massless scalar field are substantially improved to handle the difficulties (that generically arise for matter content other than a massless scalar field) related to the presence of a Maxwell field.

  13. Universal clusters as building blocks of stable quantum matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Shimpei; García-García, Antonio M.; Naidon, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    We present an exploratory study that suggests that Efimov physics, a leading research theme in few-body quantum physics, can also induce stable many-body ground states whose building blocks are universal clusters. We identify a range of parameters in a mass-and-density-imbalanced two-species fermionic mixture for which the ground state is a gas of Efimov-related universal trimers. An explicit calculation of the trimer-trimer interaction reveals that the trimer phase is an SU(3) Fermi liquid stable against recombination losses. We propose to experimentally observe this phase in a fermionic 53Cr-6Li mixture.

  14. Distribution, sources and biogeochemistry of organic matter in a mangrove dominated estuarine system (Indian Sundarbans) during the pre-monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R.; Rixen, T.; Baum, A.; Malik, A.; Gleixner, G.; Jana, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    The sources and distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Indian Sundarbans mangrove and Hooghly estuarine system were examined during the pre-monsoon (summer) 2014. DOC is the dominant form of organic matter (OM) in the studied estuarine waters and represents a mixture of mangrove and riverine sources. Microbial degradation of land derived OM results in a high pCO2 in the Hooghly estuarine waters while enrichment in δ13C-DIC ascribes to CO2 uptake by phytoplankton in the Sundarbans water. Higher δ15N in the particulate organic nitrogen (PON) of the mangrove and marine zone could be associated with enhanced phytoplankton production sustained by nitrate from mangrove derived OM decomposition and/or nitrate imported from the Bay of Bengal. Low organic carbon contents and elemental ratios (TN/TOC) indicate an intense mineralization and transformation of OM in the sediments, resulting insignificantly different OM compositions compared to those of the three major sources: land derived OM, mangrove leaf litter (Avicennia marina) and in situ phytoplankton production.

  15. Galaxy formation in an Omega = 1 cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardeen, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A model for galaxy formation is proposed which assumes that bright galaxies form where the primordial density fluctuations exceed a high threshold. Most of the mass in the universe is uncondensed or associated with low surface brightness galaxies. Physical mechanisms and predicitons for the galaxy-galaxy correlation function are discussed.

  16. Does Gender Matter? University Library Access and Career Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daniella

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine how the gender of distance learning students related to variables such as the perception of the availability of library resources, technology available at home and work, technology provided by a university for distance learning, and career preparedness. A total of 166 master's students in the…

  17. Faculty Salary at Korean Universities: Does Publication Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jang C.; Cho, Jeung R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates empirically the role of research publications in an academic reward structure in Korea. Our sample includes 145 universities and colleges in Korea. Publication data for the academic year of 2012 show that top-tier research schools published more in international journals, while domestic journal publications were dominated…

  18. Do baryons trace dark matter in the early universe?

    PubMed

    Grin, Daniel; Doré, Olivier; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-12-23

    Baryon-density perturbations of large amplitude may exist if they are compensated by dark-matter perturbations such that the total density is unchanged. Primordial abundances and galaxy clusters allow these compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) to have amplitudes as large as ~10%. CIPs will modulate the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations--those due to the usual adiabatic perturbations--as a function of position on the sky. This leads to correlations between different spherical-harmonic coefficients of the temperature and/or polarization maps, and induces polarization B modes. Here, the magnitude of these effects is calculated and techniques to measure them are introduced. While a CIP of this amplitude can be probed on large scales with existing data, forthcoming CMB experiments should improve the sensitivity to CIPs by at least an order of magnitude. PMID:22243148

  19. Constraints on Universal Extra-Dimensional Dark Matter from Direct Detection Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpin, Trevor; Duda, Gintaras

    2011-04-01

    Detection of dark matter is one of the most challenging and important problems in astro-particle physics. One theory that produces a viable particle dark matter candidate is Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which the existence of a 4th spatial dimension is theorized. The extra dimension is not seen because it is compactifed on a circular orbifold whose radius is too small to be observed with current technology. What separates this theory over other Kaluza-Klein-type theories is that UED allows all standard model particles and fields to propagate in the extra dimension. The dark matter candidate in UED theories is a stable particle known as the Lightest Kaluza-Klein Particle or LKP, and the LKP can exist with sufficient relic density to serve as the dark matter. This work will present bounds on UED model parameters from direct dark matter searches such as the CDMS II.

  20. Macroscopic Universality: Why QCD in Matter is Subtle

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, R.A.; Nowak, M.A.; Papp, G.; Zahed, I. |||||

    1996-12-01

    We use a chiral random matrix model with 2{ital N}{sub {ital f}} flavors to mock up the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential. We show that the 1/{ital N} approximation breaks down in the quenched state with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The breakdown condition is set by the divergence of a two-point function that is shown to follow the general lore of macroscopic universality. In this state, the fermionic fluctuations are not suppressed in the large {ital N} limit. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Universality relationships in condensed matter - Bulk modulus and sound velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1988-01-01

    New forms for the bulk modulus and sound velocity of solids under compression, based on the universal equation of state of Vinet, Ferrante, Smith, and Rose (1987) are presented. These expressions are compared with a number of bulk modulus formulas previously utilized in high-pressure studies. It is demonstrated that this form yields a superior fit to experimental data to very high compressions, for a very wide range of solids. These solids cover the entire range of values of the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus which has been observed in high-pressure measurements.

  2. White matter pathology and disconnection in the frontal lobe in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Craggs, L J L; Yamamoto, Y; Ihara, M; Fenwick, R; Burke, M; Oakley, A E; Roeber, S; Duering, M; Kretzschmar, H; Kalaria, R N

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging indicates diffuse white matter (WM) changes are associated with cognitive impairment in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). We examined whether the distribution of axonal abnormalities is related to microvascular pathology in the underlying WM. Methods We used post-mortem brains from CADASIL subjects and similar age cognitively normal controls to examine WM axonal changes, microvascular pathology, and glial reaction in up to 16 different regions extending rostro-caudally through the cerebrum. Using unbiased stereological methods, we estimated length densities of affected axons immunostained with neurofilament antibody SMI32. Standard immunohistochemistry was used to assess amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity per WM area. To relate WM changes to microvascular pathology, we also determined the sclerotic index (SI) in WM arterioles. Results The degree of WM pathology consistently scored higher across all brain regions in CADASIL subjects (P < 0.01) with the WM underlying the primary motor cortex exhibiting the most severe change. SMI32 immunoreactive axons in CADASIL were invariably increased compared with controls (P < 0.01), with most prominent axonal abnormalities observed in the frontal WM (P < 0.05). The SIs of arterioles in CADASIL were increased by 25–45% throughout the regions assessed, with the highest change in the mid-frontal region (P = 0.000). Conclusions Our results suggest disruption of either cortico-cortical or subcortical-cortical networks in the WM of the frontal lobe that may explain motor deficits and executive dysfunction in CADASIL. Widespread WM axonal changes arise from differential stenosis and sclerosis of arterioles in the WM of CADASIL subjects, possibly affecting some axons of projection neurones connecting to targets in the subcortical structures. PMID:23844775

  3. Potential Rapid Effects on Soil Organic Matter Characteristics and Chemistry Following a Change in Dominant Litter Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, S. E.; Filley, T.; Conyers, G.; Stott, D.; McCormick, M.; Whigham, D.; Taylor, D.

    2006-12-01

    Changes in vegetation structure are expected in forests globally under predicted future climate scenarios. Shifts in type or quantity of litter inputs, which will be associated with changes in plant community, may influence soil organic matter (SOM) characteristics. We altered litter inputs in a mixed-deciduous forest at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center beginning in May 2004: litter removal, leaf amendment, and wood amendment plots were established in three old (120-150 y) and three young (50-70 y) forests. Plots were amended with wood and leaves collected locally from the dominant tree species, tulip poplar (Lirodendron tulipifera). 0-5 cm A horizon soil was collected in November 2005, 18 months after initial treatment, and physically fractionated first by dispersal in HMP and size separation (53 μm) to remove silts and clays then the >53 μm fraction by density (1.4 g cm-3) in SPT to separate the organic debris (light fraction, LF) from the mineral material. Soil with the greatest amount of C present within the LF came from the wood amendment treatment (35.2 ± 0.1%), followed by the leaf amendment (27.7 ± 0.0%) and the litter removal (24.5 ± 0.0%) treatments. In a pattern opposite of the other treatments, leaf amended soil from the old sites had less C within LF than the young. Potentially, a priming effect from the leaf addition at the old sites resulted in increased decomposition of soil LF. While at the young sites, invasive earthworms potentially provided a rapid, direct mode for incorporation of fresh leaf inputs into LF. Preliminary data indicate differences in lignin and cutin/suberin decay rates during litter decomposition between old and young sites. An investigation into the biopolymer composition of LF will determine whether altering litter inputs will ultimately influence SOM dynamics at both the old and young forest sites.

  4. An Expanding 4d Universe in a 5d Kaluza-Klein Cosmology with Higher Dimensional Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.

    In the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory, we investigate a (4+1)-dimensional universe consisting of a (4+1)-dimensional Robertson-Walker type metric coupled with a (4+1)-dimensional energy-momentum tensor. The matter part consists of an energy density together with a pressure subject to 4D part of the (4+1)-dimensional energy-momentum tensor. The dark part consists of just a dark pressure bar {p}, corresponding to the extra-dimension endowed by a scalar field, with no element of dark energy. It is shown that the reduced Einstein field equations are free of 4D pressure and are just affected by an effective pressure produced by the 4D energy density and dark pressure. It is then proposed that the expansion of the universe may be controlled by the equation of state in higher dimension rather than four dimensions. This may account for the current acceleration at the beginning or in the middle of matter dominant era.

  5. Status Tracking and Reporting the Quality Matters Process at the University of North Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamson, Nina; Babb, David; Schmidt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The University of North Georgia utilizes the internal Quality Matters (QM) process to review all their online courses. As our online course offerings have increased, the need to devise a system to track the QM process, ensure timely reviews, and begin recertification of previously reviewed courses was necessary. As a result, several reports have…

  6. Constrained Simulations of the Local Universe in Different Dark Matter Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Yepes, G.; Martinez-Vaquero, L. A.; Gottloeber, S.; Hoffman, Y.

    2009-04-17

    Constrained simulations of the Local Universe are an invaluable tool to investigate in detail the nature of dark matter particles. Thanks to them, we can simulate the formation of dark halos in environments pretty much like the one our Milky Way happened to live. A direct comparison with observations of our Local Universe can be made in this way, minimizing the effects of cosmic variance in the simulations. In this paper we present the results of a comparison of high-resolution simulated Local Group (LG) objects done in 3 different dark matter scenarios: The standard Cold Dark Matter and two Warm Dark Matter models with particles masses ranging from 3 to 1 keV, that are still compatible with high-redshift observations. We focus here on the study of substructures and mass profiles for the CDM and WDM LG objects and draw some conclusions about the limits on the mass of warm dark matter particles to be compatible with the most recently discovered Milky Way ultra-faint satellites.

  7. Ghost dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: naoshi@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We revisit ghost dark matter, the possibility that ghost condensation may serve as an alternative to dark matter. In particular, we investigate the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background evolution and the large-scale structure (LSS) in the ΛGDM universe, i.e. a late-time universe dominated by a cosmological constant and ghost dark matter. The FRW background of the ΛGDM universe is indistinguishable from that of the standard ΛCDM universe if M∼>1eV, where M is the scale of spontaneous Lorentz breaking. From the LSS we find a stronger bound: M∼>10eV. For smaller M, ghost dark matter would have non-negligible sound speed after the matter-radiation equality, and thus the matter power spectrum would significantly differ from observation. These bounds are compatible with the phenomenological upper bound M∼<100GeV known in the literature.

  8. Testing universal relations of neutron stars with a nonlinear matter-gravity coupling theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Y.-H.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T. E-mail: lmlin@phy.cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-02-01

    Due to our ignorance of the equation of state (EOS) beyond nuclear density, there is still no unique theoretical model for neutron stars (NSs). It is therefore surprising that universal EOS-independent relations connecting different physical quantities of NSs can exist. Lau et al. found that the frequency of the f-mode oscillation, the mass, and the moment of inertia are connected by universal relations. More recently, Yagi and Yunes discovered the I-Love-Q universal relations among the mass, the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment. In this paper, we study these universal relations in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. This theory differs from general relativity (GR) significantly only at high densities due to the nonlinear coupling between matter and gravity. It thus provides us an ideal case to test how robust the universal relations of NSs are with respect to the change of the gravity theory. Due to the apparent EOS formulation of EiBI gravity developed recently by Delsate and Steinhoff, we are able to study the universal relations in EiBI gravity using the same techniques as those in GR. We find that the universal relations in EiBI gravity are essentially the same as those in GR. Our work shows that, within the currently viable coupling constant, there exists at least one modified gravity theory that is indistinguishable from GR in view of the unexpected universal relations.

  9. Dark Energy and Dark Matter in Some Cosmological Models (as remnants of visible universe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Morcos, Abd

    2016-07-01

    Homogeneity and isotropy distribution of matter, have been considered in most of cosmological models. The formation possibility of clusters of galaxies in some stable models, have been studied. In the present work we are going to consider the dark energy and dark matter as the rest of the visible universe. The self-consistent model formulated in the context of the Generalized Field Theory , the standard model built in the General Theory of Relativity, and Saez and de Juan model constructed in the background of Møller Tetrad Theory of gravitation have been used. It is found these the dark matter and dark energy is related to a parameter ɛ. This parameter depends on the used model and availability of formation of condensations in it.

  10. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN GALAXIES AND DARK MATTER STRUCTURES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Tinker, Jeremy L. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (1) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (2) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (3) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy-halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark universe.

  11. WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara

    DOE Data Explorer

    Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

  12. The Connection between Galaxies and Dark Matter Structures in the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2012-07-11

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local Universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}CDM model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (a) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (b) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (c) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy - halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark Universe.

  13. Extreme cosmic ray dominated regions: a new paradigm for high star formation density events in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padeli P.; Thi, Wing-Fai; Miniati, Francesco; Viti, Serena

    2011-06-01

    We examine in detail the recent proposal that extreme cosmic ray dominated regions (CRDRs) characterize the interstellar medium of galaxies during events of high-density star formation, fundamentally altering its initial conditions (Papadopoulos 2010). Solving the coupled chemical and thermal state equations for dense UV-shielded gas reveals that the large CR energy densities in such systems [UCR ˜ few × (103-104) UCR, Gal] will indeed raise the minimum temperature of this phase (where the initial conditions of star formation are set) from ˜10 K (as in the Milky Way) to ˜50-100 K. Moreover in such extreme CRDRs the gas temperature remains fully decoupled from that of the dust, with Tkin≫Tdust, even at high densities [n(H2) ˜ 105-106 cm-3], quite unlike CRDRs in the Milky Way where Tk˜Tdust when n(H2) ≳ 105 cm-3. These dramatically different star formation initial conditions will (i) boost the Jeans mass of UV-shielded gas regions by factors of ˜10-100 with respect to those in quiescent or less extreme star-forming systems and (ii) 'erase' the so-called inflection point of the effective equation of state of molecular gas. Both these effects occur across the entire density range of typical molecular clouds, and may represent a new paradigm for all high-density star formation in the Universe, with CRs as the key driving mechanism, operating efficiently even in the high dust extinction environments of compact extreme starbursts. The characteristic mass of young stars will be boosted as a result, naturally yielding a top-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) and a bimodal star formation mode (with the occurrence of extreme CRDRs setting the branching point). Such CRDRs will be present in Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) and merger-driven gas-rich starbursts across the Universe where large amounts of molecular gas rapidly dissipate towards compact disc configurations where they fuel intense starbursts. In hierarchical galaxy formation models, CR

  14. Matters Arising. Australian University Quality Agency Feedback in Relation to the Academic Engagement of International Students Enrolled in Onshore University Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossman, Joanna; Burdett, Jane

    2012-01-01

    It is now commonplace to find quality audit processes being applied in universities internationally as a means of assessing the quality of teaching and learning. This article draws upon a thematic analysis of 14 second-round Australian Universities Quality Agency reports in order to explore matters arising from the academic engagement of…

  15. Helium-3 in Milky Way Reveals Abundance of Matter in Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's 140 Foot Radio Telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia, were able to infer the amount of matter created by the Big Bang, and confirmed that it accounts for only a small portion of the effects of gravity observed in the Universe. The scientists were able to make these conclusions by determining the abundance of the rare element helium-3 (helium with only one neutron and two protons in its nucleus) in the Milky Way Galaxy. The NRAO 140 Foot Radio Telescope The NRAO 140-Foot Radio Telescope "Moments after the Big Bang, protons and neutrons began to combine to form helium-3 and other basic elements," said Robert Rood of the University of Virginia. "By accurately measuring the abundance of this primordial element in our Galaxy today, we were able infer just how much matter was created when the Universe was only a few minutes old." Rood and his colleagues, Thomas Bania from Boston University and Dana Balser from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), report their findings in the January 3 edition of the scientific journal Nature. Rood began searching for helium-3 in the Milky Way Galaxy in 1978. At that time, scientists believed that stars like our Sun synthesized helium-3 in their nuclear furnaces. Surprisingly, Rood's observations indicated that there was far less of this element in the Galaxy than the current models predicted. "If stars were indeed producing helium-3, as scientists believed, then we should have detected this element in much greater concentrations," he said. This unexpected discovery prompted Rood and his colleagues to broaden their search, and to look throughout the Milky Way for signs of stellar production of helium-3. Over the course of two decades, the researchers discovered that regardless of where they looked -- whether in the areas of sparse star formation like the outer edges of the Galaxy, or in areas of intense star formation near center of the Galaxy -- the relative abundance of

  16. Phantom of the Universe: A State-of-the-Art Planetarium Show on Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Phantom of the Universe is a planetarium show premiering in 2016 that will showcase an exciting exploration of dark matter, from the Big Bang to the Large Hadron Collider. The show will reveal the first hints of its existence through the eyes of Fritz Zwicky. Viewers will marvel at the astral choreography witnessed by Vera Rubin in the Andromeda galaxy. They will plummet deep underground to see the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth. From there, they will end the journey at the Large Hadron Collider, speeding alongside particles before they collide in visually stunning explosions of light and sound, and learning how scientists around the world are collaborating to track down the constituent of dark matter. The show will be offered to planetariums worldwide free of charge. It will feature music composed by Mickey Hart (Apocalypse Now, The Twilight Zone, The Grateful Dead) and narration by Academy-Award winning actress Tilda Swinton, and showcase the creativity and directing prowess of Joao Pequenao and the writing and producing talents of award-winning filmmaker, Carey Ann Strelecki. See a flattened preview (with resulting distortions) at: http://PhantomOfTheUniverse.com/

  17. Non-universality of Dark-matter Halos: Cusps, Cores, and the Central Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Wojtak, Radosław; McLaughlin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Dark-matter halos grown in cosmological simulations appear to have central Navarro–Frenk–White-like density cusps with mean values of d{log}ρ /d{log}r≈ -1, and some dispersion, which is generally parametrized by the varying index α in the Einasto density profile fitting function. Non-universality in profile shapes is also seen in observed galaxy clusters and possibly dwarf galaxies. Here we show that non-universality, at any given mass scale, is an intrinsic property of DARKexp, a theoretically derived model for collisionless self-gravitating systems. We demonstrate that DARKexp—which has only one shape parameter, ϕ0—fits the dispersion in profile shapes of massive simulated halos as well as observed clusters very well. DARKexp also allows for cored dark-matter profiles, such as those found for dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We provide approximate analytical relations between DARKexp ϕ0, Einasto α, or the central logarithmic slope in the Dehnen–Tremaine analytical γ-models. The range in halo parameters reflects a substantial variation in the binding energies per unit mass of dark-matter halos.

  18. Visible and dark matter from a first-order phase transition in a baryon-symmetric universe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Trodden, Mark; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2012-02-28

    The similar cosmological abundances observed for visible and dark matter suggest a common origin for both. By viewing the dark matter density as a dark-sector asymmetry, mirroring the situation in the visible sector, we show that the visible and dark matter asymmetries may have arisen simultaneously through a first-order phase transition in the early universe. The additional scalar particles in the theory can mix with the standard Higgs boson and provide other striking signatures.

  19. Resonant sterile neutrino dark matter in the local and high-z Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozek, Brandon; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Abazajian, Kevork; Bullock, James S.

    2016-06-01

    Sterile neutrinos comprise an entire class of dark matter models that, depending on their production mechanism, can be hot, warm, or cold dark matter (CDM). We simulate the Local Group and representative volumes of the Universe in a variety of sterile neutrino models, all of which are consistent with the possible existence of a radiative decay line at ˜3.5 keV. We compare models of production via resonances in the presence of a lepton asymmetry (suggested by Shi & Fuller 1999) to `thermal' models. We find that properties in the highly non-linear regime - e.g. counts of satellites and internal properties of haloes and subhaloes - are insensitive to the precise fall-off in power with wavenumber, indicating that non-linear evolution essentially washes away differences in the initial (linear) matter power spectrum. In the quasi-linear regime at higher redshifts, however, quantitative differences in the 3D matter power spectra remain, raising the possibility that such models can be tested with future observations of the Lyman-α forest. While many of the sterile neutrino models largely eliminate multiple small-scale issues within the CDM paradigm, we show that these models may be ruled out in the near future via discoveries of additional dwarf satellites in the Local Group.

  20. Distinguishing Supersymmetry From Universal Extra Dimensions or Little Higgs Models With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    There are compelling reasons to think that new physics will appear at or below the TeV-scale. It is not known what form this new physics will take, however. Although The Large Hadron collider is very likely to discover new particles associated with the TeV-scale, it may be difficult for it to determine the nature of those particles, whether superpartners, Kaluza-Klein modes or other states. In this article, we consider how direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments may provide information complementary to hadron colliders, which can be used to discriminate between supersymmetry, models with universal extra dimensions, and Little Higgs theories. We find that, in many scenarios, dark matter experiments can be effectively used to distinguish between these possibilities.

  1. Grand unification and possible matter-antimatter domain structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and basic concepts for the development of a matter-antimatter domain cosmology are outlined within the framework of the grand unified gauge theory paradigm. It is shown how spontaneous CP symmetry breaking leads to such a domain sturcture in the universe. Astrophysical data such as the cosmic gamma-ray background spectrum, cosmic-ray p flux measurements, and galaxy clustering are found to favor this point of view. Future tests of this form of big-bang cosmology are suggested and discussed, including tests using deep underwater cosmic ray neutrino detectors.

  2. Soft CP violation and the global matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senjanovic, G.; Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Scenarios for baryon production are considered within the context of SU(5) and SO(10) grand unified theories where CP violation arises spontaneously. The spontaneous CP symmetry breaking then results in a matter-antimatter domain structure in the universe. Two possible, distinct types of theories of soft CP violation are defined. In the first type the CP nonconservation originates only from the breaking of SU(2) sub L X U(1) symmetry, and in the second type, even at the unification temperature scale, CP violation can emerge as a result of symmetry breaking by the vacuum expectation values of the superheavy Higgs sector scalars.

  3. Exotic dense-matter states pumped by a relativistic laser plasma in the radiation-dominated regime.

    PubMed

    Colgan, J; Abdallah, J; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Wagenaars, E; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Evans, R G; Gray, R J; Kaempfer, T; Lancaster, K L; McKenna, P; Rossall, A L; Skobelev, I Yu; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Zhidkov, A G; Woolsey, N C

    2013-03-22

    In high-spectral resolution experiments with the petawatt Vulcan laser, strong x-ray radiation of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from thin Al foils was observed at pulse intensities of 3 × 10(20) W/cm(2). The observations of spectra from these exotic states of matter are supported by detailed kinetics calculations, and are consistent with a picture in which an intense polychromatic x-ray field, formed from Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the electrostatic fields at the target surface, drives the KK hollow atom production. We estimate that this x-ray field has an intensity of >5 × 10(18) W/cm(2) and is in the 3 keV range. PMID:25166812

  4. University Programme Preferences of High School Science Students in Singapore and Reasons That Matter in Their Preferences: A Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oon, Pey-Tee; Subramaniam, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored an under-researched area in science education--the university programmes preferred by high school students who take physical science subjects and the reasons that matter in their preferences. A total of 1,071 upper secondary and pre-university students in Singapore, who take physical science subjects among their range of…

  5. Investigating organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon, Part 1 of 3: Estimating annual foliar biomass for a deciduous-dominant urban riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobieszczyk, Steven; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Goldman, Jami H.

    2014-11-01

    For this study, we explored the amount, type, and distribution of foliar biomass that is deposited annually as leaf litter to Fanno Creek and its floodplain in Portland, Oregon, USA. Organic matter is a significant contributor to the decreased dissolved oxygen concentrations observed in Fanno Creek each year and leaf litter is amongst the largest sources of organic matter to the stream channel and floodplain. Using a combination of field measurements and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data, the annual foliar biomass was estimated for 13 stream reaches along the creek. Biomass estimates were divided into two sets: (1) the annual foliage available from the entire floodplain overstory canopy, and (2) the annual foliage overhanging the stream, which likely contributes leaf litter directly to the creek each year. Based on these computations, an estimated 991 (±22%) metric tons (tonnes, t) of foliar biomass is produced annually above the floodplain, with about 136 t (±24%) of that foliage falling directly into Fanno Creek. The distribution of foliar biomass varies by reach, with between 150 and 640 t/km2 produced along the floodplain and between 400 and 1100 t/km2 available over the channel. Biomass estimates vary by reach based primarily on the density of tree cover, with forest-dominant reaches containing more mature deciduous trees with broader tree canopies than either wetland or urban-dominant reaches, thus supplying more organic material to the creek. By quantifying the foliar biomass along Fanno Creek we have provided a reach-scale assessment of terrestrial organic matter loading, thereby providing land managers useful information for planning future restoration efforts.

  6. Investigating organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon, Part 1 of 3: estimating annual foliar biomass for a deciduous-dominant urban riparian corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Goldman, Jami H.

    2014-01-01

    For this study, we explored the amount, type, and distribution of foliar biomass that is deposited annually as leaf litter to Fanno Creek and its floodplain in Portland, Oregon, USA. Organic matter is a significant contributor to the decreased dissolved oxygen concentrations observed in Fanno Creek each year and leaf litter is amongst the largest sources of organic matter to the stream channel and floodplain. Using a combination of field measurements and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data, the annual foliar biomass was estimated for 13 stream reaches along the creek. Biomass estimates were divided into two sets: (1) the annual foliage available from the entire floodplain overstory canopy, and (2) the annual foliage overhanging the stream, which likely contributes leaf litter directly to the creek each year. Based on these computations, an estimated 991 (±22%) metric tons (tonnes, t) of foliar biomass is produced annually above the floodplain, with about 136 t (±24%) of that foliage falling directly into Fanno Creek. The distribution of foliar biomass varies by reach, with between 150 and 640 t/km2 produced along the floodplain and between 400 and 1100 t/km2 available over the channel. Biomass estimates vary by reach based primarily on the density of tree cover, with forest-dominant reaches containing more mature deciduous trees with broader tree canopies than either wetland or urban-dominant reaches, thus supplying more organic material to the creek. By quantifying the foliar biomass along Fanno Creek we have provided a reach-scale assessment of terrestrial organic matter loading, thereby providing land managers useful information for planning future restoration efforts.

  7. Shifted cosmological parameter and shifted dust matter in a two-phase tachyonic field universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Murli Manohar; Pathak, Shankar Dayal

    2013-04-01

    We propose a model of the evolution of the tachyonic scalar field over two phases in the universe. The field components do not interact in phase I, while in the subsequent phase II, they change flavours due to relative suppression of the radiation contribution. In phase II, we allow them to interact mutually with time-independent perturbation in their equations of state, as Shifted Cosmological Parameter (SCP) and Shifted Dust Matter (SDM). We determine the solutions of their scaling with the cosmic redshift in both phases. We further suggest the normalised Hubble function diagnostic, which, together with the low- and high-redshift H( z) data and the concordance values of the present density parameters from the CMBR, BAO statistics etc., constrain the strength of interaction by imposing the viable conditions to break degeneracy in 3-parameter (γ, \\varepsilon, dot{φ}2) space. The range of redshifts ( z=0.1 to z=1.75) is chosen to highlight the role of interaction during structure formation, and it may lead to a future analysis of power spectrum in this model vis a vis Warm Dark Matter (WDM) or ΛCDM models. We further calculate the influence of interaction in determining the age of the universe at the present epoch, within the degeneracy space of model parameters.

  8. Sugars--dominant water-soluble organic compounds in soils and characterization as tracers in atmospheric particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Simoneit, Bernd R T; Elias, Vladimir O; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Rushdi, Ahmed I; Medeiros, Patricia M; Rogge, Wolfgang F; Didyk, Borys M

    2004-11-15

    The presence of saccharides is being reported for aerosols taken in urban, rural, and marine locales. The commonly found primary saccharides are alpha- and beta-glucose, alpha- and beta-fructose, sucrose, and mycose with lesser amounts of other monosaccharides. Saccharide polyols are also found in some airsheds and consist mainly of sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol, erythritol, and glycerol. In temperate climate areas these compounds increase from negligible concentrations in winter aerosols (usually dominated by levoglucosan and related anhydrosaccharides from biomass burning) to a maximum in late spring-summer, followed by a decrease to winter. The composition of the saccharide mixtures suggests soil and associated microbiota as the source. Saccharide analyses of soils confirmed these compositions. Therefore, we propose resuspension of soil (also unpaved road dust) from agricultural activities as a major component of aerosol particles and the saccharides are the source specific tracers. In addition, the saccharides as well as the anhydrosaccharide derivatives from biomass burning are completely water soluble and thus contribute significantly to the total water-soluble mass of aerosols. PMID:15573592

  9. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of dissolved organic matter from eight dominant aquatic macrophytes in Lake Dianchi, China.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaoxia; Xie, Li; Lin, Ying; Bai, Yingchen; Zhu, Yuanrong; Xie, Fazhi; Giesy, John P; Wu, Fengchang

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this research was to determine and compare the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of dissolved organic matters (DOM) from eight aquatic macrophytes in a eutrophic lake. C, H, N, and P in ground dry leaves and C, N, and P in DOM of the species were determined, and C/N, C/P, C/H, DOC/C, TDN/N, TDP/P, DOC/TDN, and DOC/TDP were calculated. Chemical structures of the DOM were characterized by the use of multiple techniques including UV-visible, FT-IR, and (13)C CP/MAS spectra. The results showed subtle differences in quantity and quality of DOM among species and life-forms. Except oriental pepper which had a C/H of 0.7, C/H of all the other species was 0.6. C/N and C/P of ground leaves was 10.5-17.3 and 79.4-225.3, respectively, which were greater in floating and submerged species than in the others. Parrot feather also had a small C/P (102.8). DOC/C, TDN/N, and TDP/P were 7.6-16.8, 5.5-22.6, and 22.9-45.6 %, respectively. Except C/N in emergent and riparian species, C/N in the other species and C/P in all the species were lower in their DOM than in the ground leaves. DOM of the macrophytes had a SUVA254 value of 0.83-1.80. The FT-IR and (13)C NMR spectra indicated that the DOM mainly contained polysaccharides and/or amino acids/proteins. Percent of carbohydrates in the DOM was 37.3-66.5 % and was highest in parrot feather (66.5 %) and crofton weed (61.5 %). DOM of water hyacinth, water lettuce, and sago pondweed may have the greatest content of proteins. Aromaticity of the DOM was from 6.9 % in water lettuce to 17.8 % in oriental pepper. DOM of the macrophytes was also different in polarity and percent of Ar-OH. Distinguished characteristics in quantity and quality of the macrophyte-derived DOM may induce unique environmental consequences in the lake systems. PMID:23666633

  10. Scale invariance and universality of force networks in static granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Somfai, Ellák; Nienhuis, Bernard

    2006-02-01

    Force networks form the skeleton of static granular matter. They are the key factor that determines mechanical properties such as stability, elasticity and sound transmission, which are important for civil engineering and industrial processing. Previous studies have focused on investigations of the global structure of external forces (the boundary condition) and on the probability distribution of individual contact forces. So far, however, precise knowledge of the disordered spatial structure of the force network has remained elusive. Here we report that molecular dynamics simulations of realistic granular packings reveal scale invariance of clusters of particles interacting by means of relatively strong forces. Despite visual variation, force networks for various values of the confining pressure and other parameters have identical scaling exponents and scaling function, thereby determining a universality class. Unexpectedly, the flat ensemble of force configurations (a simple generalization of equilibrium statistical mechanics) belongs to this universality class, whereas some widely studied simplified models do not. This implies that the elasticity of the grains and their geometrical disorder do not affect the universal mechanical properties.

  11. Dispersion Distance and the Matter Distribution of the Universe in Dispersion Space.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Sigurdson, Kris

    2015-09-18

    We propose that "standard pings," brief broadband radio impulses, can be used to study the three-dimensional clustering of matter in the Universe even in the absence of redshift information. The dispersion of radio waves as they travel through the intervening plasma can, like redshift, be used as a cosmological distance measure. Because of inhomogeneities in the electron density along the line of sight, dispersion is an imperfect proxy for radial distance and we show that this leads to calculable dispersion-space distortions in the apparent clustering of sources. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a new class of radio transients that are the prototypical standard ping and, due to their high observed dispersion, have been interpreted as originating at cosmological distances. The rate of fast radio bursts has been estimated to be several thousand over the whole sky per day and, if cosmological, the sources of these events should trace the large-scale structure of the Universe. We calculate the dispersion-space power spectra for a simple model where electrons and FRBs are biased tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe, and we show that the clustering signal could be measured using as few as 10 000 events. Such a survey is in line with what may be achieved with upcoming wide-field radio telescopes. PMID:26430980

  12. Mechanisms of land sea interactions the distribution of metals and sedimentary organic matter in sediments of a river-dominated Mediterranean karstic estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondi, Ivan; Lojen, Sonja; Juračić, Mladen; Prohić, Esad

    2008-10-01

    This paper examines disposal of metals and the origin, characteristics, and distribution of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) in a Mediterranean karstic estuary in the north-eastern Adriatic. This environment offers a real-time, small model system for studies of geochemical processes in microtidal Mediterranean estuaries that are infilling with sediments and classified as river-dominated disequilibrium estuaries. The results have shown that the longitudinal distribution of heavy metals in sediments follows the sedimentation dynamics and deposition pattern of river-borne, clay mineral particles. The highest concentration of metals was found in the restricted upper part of the estuary, characterized by rapid deposition of clay particles and terrestrial sedimentary organic matter, and decreases toward the open sea. The vertical distribution of metals in sediment cores depends on the prevailing pH and Eh conditions. Significant increases of the concentrations of metals in the uppermost strata are the result of recent anthropogenic inputs. The share of the terrestrial component in SOM, estimated by N/C org atomic ratios and δ 13C values, decreases with distance from the river mouth. The small vertical variation in δ 13C values of SOM indicates that a fast sedimentation rate overrides the diagenetically determined decomposition. The results obtained indicate that river-borne inorganic particles, natural terrigenous organic material, and anthropogenic metal loads are trapped in sediments of the estuarine system. Under the prevailing conditions, there is negligible transport towards the open sea.

  13. Fluxes of dissolved organic matter and mineral weathering products from Corn Belt landscapes dominated by subsurface drainage: large-scale soil and hydrologic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinski, N. A.; Yoo, K.; Strock, J.; Dalzell, B. J.; Finlay, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The human alteration of agricultural landscapes is one of the most important factors in pedologic and geomorphic change, and can influence hydrology and aquatic chemistry at large scales. Most of the Midwestern Corn Belt that is currently dominated by subsurface tile drainage (such as southern Minnesota) was historically prairie and wetland which had hydrologic flow-paths through organic-rich surface soil horizons, a condition that favored the export of dissolved organic matter. When hydrology is altered through subsurface drainage, adsorption of organic materials to mineral surfaces and increases in mineral weathering may result because more water is flowing through subsurface mineral soils. We suggest that the alteration of hydrologic flowpaths in agricultural landscapes can dramatically alter the rate of mineral weathering as well as surface export of weathering products and dissolved organic matter. This could be at least one contributing factor to observed increases in Mississippi River alkalinity over the past four decades. Here, we examine trends in dissolved organic carbon, total dissolved nitrogen, dissolved organic nitrogen, total suspended solids, and indicators of mineral weathering (Si, Ca, Na, K) from subsurface drainage systems located in southwestern MN. Then, using a simple conceptual model, we estimate the effects of subsurface drainage on the regional fluxes of these parameters and present directions for future research.

  14. Quasar-microlensing versus star-microlensing evidence of small-planetary-mass objects as the dominant inner-halo galactic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2011-11-01

    We examine recent results of two kinds of microlensing experiments intended to detect galactic dark matter objects, and we suggest that the lack of short period star-microlensing events observed for stars near the Galaxy does not preclude either the "rogue planets" identified from quasar-microlensing by Schild 1996 as the missing-mass of a lens galaxy, or the "Primordial Fog Particles" (PFPs) in Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps predicted by Gibson 1996 - 2000 as the dominant inner-halo galactic dark matter component from a new hydrodynamic gravitational structure formation theory. We point out that hydro-gravitational processes acting on a massive population of such micro-brown-dwarfs in their nonlinear accretional cascades to form stars gives intermittent lognormal number density np distributions for the PFPs within the PGC gas-stabilized-clumps. Hence, star-microlensing searches that focus on a small fraction of the sky assuming a uniform distribution for np are subject to vast underestimates of the mean ⟨np⟩mean. Sparse independent samples give modes 10-4 - 10-6 smaller than means of the highly skewed lognormal distributions expected. Quasar-microlensing searches with higher optical depths are less affected by np intermittency. We attempt to reconcile the results of the star-microlensing and quasar-microlensing studies, with particular reference to the necessarily hydrogenous and primordial small-planetary-mass range. We conclude that star microlensing searches cannot exclude and are unlikely even to detect these low-mass candidate-galactic-dark-matter-objects so easily observed by quasar-microlensing and so robustly predicted by the new theory.

  15. A Place for Materials Science: University of Pennsylvania's Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Brittany

    2013-03-01

    The University of Pennsylvania's Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM) opened its doors in 1965. Constructed to house cutting-edge research on Materials Science, the LRSM building was designed to foster interdisciplinary research among physicists, chemists and metallurgical engineers. Each of the five floors of the new building included a central facility, including a high magnetic field center, an analytical chemistry research center and an electron microscopy center. While primarily funded by the Department of Defense's Advanced Research Projects Agency, the LRSM also was also partly sponsored by industry. The LRSM received funding from Philadelphia Electric Company, General Electric Company, and IBM, among others. In this paper, I will study how the building was designed to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, while also becoming a place of intersection among academic, private, and governmental interests. This project is a collaboration with Hyungsub Choi.

  16. THE COYOTE UNIVERSE. II. COSMOLOGICAL MODELS AND PRECISION EMULATION OF THE NONLINEAR MATTER POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; Higdon, David; Williams, Brian J.; Lawrence, Earl; White, Martin; Habib, Salman; Wagner, Christian

    2009-11-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations is a foundational source of cosmological information. Precision cosmological probes targeted primarily at investigations of dark energy require accurate theoretical determinations of the power spectrum in the nonlinear regime. To exploit the observational power of future cosmological surveys, accuracy demands on the theory are at the 1% level or better. Numerical simulations are currently the only way to produce sufficiently error-controlled predictions for the power spectrum. The very high computational cost of (precision) N-body simulations is a major obstacle to obtaining predictions in the nonlinear regime, while scanning over cosmological parameters. Near-future observations, however, are likely to provide a meaningful constraint only on constant dark energy equation of state, 'wCDM', cosmologies. In this paper, we demonstrate that a limited set of only 37 cosmological models-the 'Coyote Universe' suite-can be used to predict the nonlinear matter power spectrum to 1% over a prior parameter range set by current cosmic microwave background observations. This paper is the second in a series of three, with the final aim to provide a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum for wCDM cosmologies.

  17. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Higdon, David; Wagner, Christian; Lawrence, Earl; Habib, Salman; Williams, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing and future large scale structure surveys targeted at the investigation of dark energy will enter the nonlinear regime of structure formation. In order to fully exploit the newly available information from this regime and to extract cosmological constraints. very accurate theoretical predictions are needed. Such predictions can currently only be obtained from costly precision N-body simulations. We have recently shown that it is possible to obtain predictions for the nonlinear matter power spectrum at the level of one-percent accuracy and that we can build a precise prediction scheme for the nonlinear power spectrum from a small set of cosmological models. In this paper we introduce the 'Coyote Universe' simulation suite which comprises more than 800 N-body simulations at different force and mass resolutions, spanning 38 wCDM cosmologies. This large simulation suite enables us to construct a prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum accurate at the 1% level out to k {approx_equal} 1 hMpc{sup -1}.

  18. The Coyote Universe. II. Cosmological Models and Precision Emulation of the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Katrin; Higdon, David; White, Martin; Habib, Salman; Williams, Brian J.; Lawrence, Earl; Wagner, Christian

    2009-11-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations is a foundational source of cosmological information. Precision cosmological probes targeted primarily at investigations of dark energy require accurate theoretical determinations of the power spectrum in the nonlinear regime. To exploit the observational power of future cosmological surveys, accuracy demands on the theory are at the 1% level or better. Numerical simulations are currently the only way to produce sufficiently error-controlled predictions for the power spectrum. The very high computational cost of (precision) N-body simulations is a major obstacle to obtaining predictions in the nonlinear regime, while scanning over cosmological parameters. Near-future observations, however, are likely to provide a meaningful constraint only on constant dark energy equation of state, "wCDM", cosmologies. In this paper, we demonstrate that a limited set of only 37 cosmological models—the "Coyote Universe" suite—can be used to predict the nonlinear matter power spectrum to 1% over a prior parameter range set by current cosmic microwave background observations. This paper is the second in a series of three, with the final aim to provide a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum for wCDM cosmologies.

  19. The Coyote Universe II: Cosmological Models and Precision Emulation of the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David; Williams, Brian J; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations is a foundational source of cosmological information. Precision cosmological probes targeted primarily at investigations of dark energy require accurate theoretical determinations of the power spectrum in the nonlinear regime. To exploit the observational power of future cosmological surveys, accuracy demands on the theory are at the one percent level or better. Numerical simulations are currently the only way to produce sufficiently error-controlled predictions for the power spectrum. The very high computational cost of (precision) N-body simulations is a major obstacle to obtaining predictions in the nonlinear regime, while scanning over cosmological parameters. Near-future observations, however, are likely to provide a meaningful constraint only on constant dark energy equation of state 'wCDM' cosmologies. In this paper we demonstrate that a limited set of only 37 cosmological models -- the 'Coyote Universe' suite -- can be used to predict the nonlinear matter power spectrum at the required accuracy over a prior parameter range set by cosmic microwave background observations. This paper is the second in a series of three, with the final aim to provide a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum for wCDM cosmologies.

  20. The universe in a box - Thermal effects in the standard cold dark matter scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, R. Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Jameson, Anthony; Liu, Feng

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to compute the evolution of a representative piece of the universe at a minimal resolution of a flux-based mesh code coupled with a standard particle-mesh dark matter code. It is found that, on scales greater than 1/h Mpc, dark matter is more clumped than gas. Bremsstrahlung and Compton cooling are unimportant on scales of 1 Mpc or greater. Shocks gradually heat the gas, leaving most of it in voids at T = 10 exp 3.5 K or less, but with a small fraction reaching T = 10 million K or more. Ultraviolet and soft X-ray emission from the heated gas is significant, providing an important part of the background radiation field and significant ionizing of the intergalactic medium. The mean induced Delta T/T for microwave background radiation in the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the spectrum is 1.1 x 10 to the -6th with fluctuation of 5.6 x 10 to the -7th on arcmin scales and a mean y parameter of 5.5 x 10 to the -7th, which is potentially detectable by the COBE satellite.

  1. A New Viewpoint (The expanding universe, Dark energy and Dark matter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwele, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Just as the relativity paradox once threatened the validity of physics in Albert Einstein's days, the cosmos paradox, the galaxy rotation paradox and the experimental invalidity of the theory of dark matter and dark energy threaten the stability and validity of physics today. These theories and ideas and many others, including the Big Bang theory, all depend almost entirely on the notion of the expanding universe, Edwin Hubble's observations and reports and the observational inconsistencies of modern day theoretical Physics and Astrophysics on related subjects. However, much of the evidence collected in experimental Physics and Astronomy aimed at proving many of these ideas and theories is ambiguous, and can be used to prove other theories, given a different interpretation of its implications. The argument offered here is aimed at providing one such interpretation, attacking the present day theories of dark energy, dark matter and the Big Bang, and proposing a new Cosmological theory based on a modification of Isaac Newton's laws and an expansion on Albert Einstein's theories, without assuming any invalidity or questionability on present day cosmological data and astronomical observations.

  2. Statistics of dark matter substructure - I. Model and universal fitting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fangzhou; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new, semi-analytical model describing the evolution of dark matter subhaloes. The model uses merger trees constructed using the method of Parkinson et al. to describe the masses and redshifts of subhaloes at accretion, which are subsequently evolved using a simple model for the orbit-averaged mass-loss rates. The model is extremely fast, treats subhaloes of all orders, accounts for scatter in orbital properties and halo concentrations, uses a simple recipe to convert subhalo mass to maximum circular velocity, and considers subhalo disruption. The model is calibrated to accurately reproduce the average subhalo mass and velocity functions in numerical simulations. We demonstrate that, on average, the mass fraction in subhaloes is tightly correlated with the `dynamical age' of the host halo, defined as the number of halo dynamical times that have elapsed since its formation. Using this relation, we present universal fitting functions for the evolved and unevolved subhalo mass and velocity functions that are valid for a broad range in host halo mass, redshift and Λ cold dark matter cosmology.

  3. Impact of organic matter source and quality on living benthic foraminiferal distribution on a river-dominated continental margin: A study of the Portuguese margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessandier, Pierre-Antoine; Bonnin, Jérôme; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bichon, Sabrina; Deflandre, Bruno; Grémare, Antoine; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-06-01

    Living (rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera were investigated on surface sediments from 23 stations from the river-dominated northwestern Portuguese margin. Samples were collected in March 2011, following the period of the maximum rainfall over the Iberian Peninsula, between 20 and 2000 m water depth along five cross-margin transects. Four of them are located off the Douro, Mondego, Tagus, and Sado Rivers and one off the Estremadura coast. The major objectives of this study are (1) to assess the impact of organic matter of various origin and quality on the benthic foraminifera and (2) to investigate the spatial differences of faunal distribution from coastal waters to the deep sea under river influences. To do this, sedimentological and biogeochemical characteristics of the sediments were identified by measuring grain size, oxygen penetration depth, total organic carbon (TOC) content, stable carbon isotopic composition of TOC (δ13CTOC) and concentration of pigments and amino acids. Based on the principal component and cluster analyses of the environmental data, three major geographical groups are identified: (1) deep stations, (2) coastal and middle slope stations, and (3) shelf stations under river influence. At the deepest stations, species are associated with high organic matter (OM) quantity but low OM quality, where Uvigerina mediterranea, Hoeglundina elegans, and agglutinated species such as Reophax scorpiurus or Bigenerina nodosaria are dominant. All stations off the Sado River, which is the most affected area by the anthropogenic influence, are also characterized by high quantity but low quality of OM with the minimum faunal density and diversity within the study area. Middle slope stations are associated with low OM content and coarse sediments (Q50) with the predominance of N. scaphum. Shallow shelf stations close to the Douro and Tagus River mouths show a dominance of taxa (e.g., Ammonia beccarii, Bulimina aculeata, Eggerelloides scaber, Nonion

  4. Impact of organic matter source and quality on living benthic foraminiferal distribution on a river-dominated continental margin: A study of the Portuguese Margin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, Jerome; Dessandier, Pierre-Antoine; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Deflandre, Bruno; Gremare, Antoine; Sinninghe-Damsté, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    Living (rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminifera were investigated on surface sediments from 23 stations from the river-dominated north-western Portuguese margin. Samples were collected in March 2011, following the period of the maximum rainfall over the Iberian Peninsula, between 20 and 2000 m water depth along five cross-margin transects. Four of them are located off the Douro, Mondego, Tagus and Sado rivers and one off the Estremadura coast. The major objectives of this study are hence 1) to compare the influence of the rivers on the distribution of benthic foraminifera and 2) assess the impact of organic matter of various origin and quality on the benthic micro faunas. To do this, sedimentological and biogeochemical characteristics of the sediments were identified by measuring grain size, oxygen penetration depth (OPD), total organic carbon (TOC) content, stable carbon isotopic composition of TOC (δ13CTOC) and concentration of pigments and amino acids. Based on the principal component (PCA) and cluster analyses of the environmental data, three major geographical groups are identified: (1) deep stations, (2) coastal and mid-slopestations, and (3) shelf stations under river influence.At the deepest stations, species are associated with high organic matter (OM) quantity but low OM quality, where Uvigerina mediterranea, Hoeglundina elegans and agglutinated species such as Reophax scorpiurus or Bigenerina nodosaria are dominant. All stations off the Sado River, which is the most affected area by the anthropogenic influence, are also characterized by high quantity but low quality of OM with the minimum faunal density and diversity within the study area. Mid-slope stations are associated with low OM content and coarse sediments (Q50) with the predominance of N. scaphum. Shallow shelf stations close to the Douro and Tagus river mouths show a dominance of taxa (e.g. Ammonia beccarii, Bulimina aculeata, Eggerelloides scaber, Nonion scaphum, Cancris auriculus and

  5. String cloud and domain walls with quark matter for a higher dimensional FRW universe in self creation cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halife, Caǧlar; Sezgin, Aygün

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we research a higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in Barber–s second theory when strange quark matter (SQM) and normal matter (NM) are attached to the string cloud and domain walls. We obtain zero string tension density for this model. We obtain dust quark matter solutions. This result agrees with Kiran and Reddy, Krori et al, Sahoo and Mishra and Reddy. In our solutions the quark matter transforms to other particles over time. We also obtain two different solutions for domain walls with quark and normal matters by using a deceleration parameter. Also, the features of the obtained solutions are discussed and some physical and kinematical quantities are generalized and discussed. Our results are consistent with Yılmaz, Adcox et al and Back et al in four and five dimensions.

  6. Making the Best of a World Dominated by League Tables? New Developments in the International Ranking of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Observatory on Borderless Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Two interesting initiatives have started to develop more balanced international league tables of universities. The first initiative is being taken by UK magazine the Times Higher Education (THE), which recently entered into a collaboration with both the international academic community and research-metrics company Thomsons Reuters to create an…

  7. A universal matter-wave interferometer with optical ionization gratings in the time-domain

    PubMed Central

    Haslinger, Philipp; Dörre, Nadine; Geyer, Philipp; Rodewald, Jonas; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interferometry with atoms1 and molecules2 has attracted a rapidly growing interest throughout the last two decades both in demonstrations of fundamental quantum phenomena and in quantum-enhanced precision measurements. Such experiments exploit the non-classical superposition of two or more position and momentum states which are coherently split and rejoined to interfere3-11. Here, we present the experimental realization of a universal near-field interferometer built from three short-pulse single-photon ionization gratings12,13. We observe quantum interference of fast molecular clusters, with a composite de Broglie wavelength as small as 275 fm. Optical ionization gratings are largely independent of the specific internal level structure and are therefore universally applicable to different kinds of nanoparticles, ranging from atoms to clusters, molecules and nanospheres. The interferometer is sensitive to fringe shifts as small as a few nanometers and yet robust against velocity-dependent phase shifts, since the gratings exist only for nanoseconds and form an interferometer in the time-domain. PMID:25983851

  8. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass

  9. Universal molecular features of refractory dissolved organic matter in fresh- and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Blasius, B.; Steinbrink, C.; Feenders, C.; Stumm, M.; Christoffers, J.; Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Osterholz, H.; Seibt, M.; Seidel, M.; Vähätalo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest pools of reduced carbon on Earth's surface. Its molecular structure and the reasons behind its stability in the aquatic environment are unknown. We present a mathematical model that predicts essential molecular features of refractory dissolved organic matter in fresh- and seawater. The model has only eight input variables and can accurately reproduce the presence and abundance of up to 10,000 molecular formulae in aquatic systems. The model was established with ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry data of North Pacific deep water (obtained on a 15 Tesla Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, FT-ICR-MS). We determined the molecular formulae of DOM with help of FT-ICR-MS in >1,000 samples from around the globe, covering a wide variety of open ocean, freshwater and coastal systems. The molecular formulae predicted from our North Pacific deep water model were present in all sea- and fresh water samples. In terrigenous DOM, we detected a second group of compounds that could also accurately be predicted with our model, by using a different set of eight input variables. This exclusively terrigenous compound group was more photo-reactive than the universal compound group. During a two-year sampling period at a continental shelf station, the universal DOM compounds were always present at their predicted abundance. During plankton blooms, additional compounds were produced that did not match our model and that did not persist on a longer term. The universal DOM pattern was also not observed in mesocosm experiments where algae and bacteria blooms were artificially induced. Refractory DOM in any aquatic system not only shares the same molecular formulae at the same relative abundance, but compounds with the same molecular formulae most likely have the same molecular structure, independent of the origin of DOM. Fragmentation experiments in the FT-ICR-MS on a wide range of molecular formulae revealed

  10. THE LIGHT/DARK UNIVERSE Light from Galaxies, Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James M.; Wesson, Paul S.

    1. The enigma of the dark night sky. 1.1. Why is the sky dark at night? 1.2. "By reason of distance". 1.3. Island Universe. 1.4. Non-uniform sources. 1.5. Tired light. 1.6. Absorption. 1.7. Fractal Universe. 1.8. Finite age. 1.9. Dark stars. 1.10. Curvature. 1.11. Ether voids. 1.12. Insufficient energy. 1.13. Light-matter interconversion. 1.14. Cosmic expansion. 1.15. Olbers' paradox today -- 2. The intensity of cosmic background light. 2.1. Bolometric intensity. 2.2. Time and redshift. 2.3. Matter, energy and expansion. 2.4. How important is expansion?. 2.5. Simple flat models. 2.6. Curved and multi-fluid models. 2.7. A bright sky at night? -- 3. The spectrum of cosmic background light. 3.1. Spectral intensity. 3.2. Luminosity density. 3.3. The delta function. 3.4. The normal distribution. 3.5. The thermal spectrum. 3.6. The spectra of galaxies. 3.7. The light of the night sky. 3.8. R.I.P. Olbers' paradox -- 4. Dark cosmology. 4.1. The four dark elements. 4.2. Baryons. 4.3. Dark matter. 4.4. Neutrinos. 4.5. Dark energy. 4.6. Cosmological concordance. 4.7. The coincidental Universe -- 5. The radio and microwave backgrounds. 5.1. The cosmological "constant". 5.2. The scalar field. 5.3. Decaying dark energy. 5.4. Energy density. 5.5. Source luminosity. 5.6. Bolometric intensity. 5.7. Spectral energy distribution. 5.8. Dark energy and the background light -- 6. The infrared and visible backgrounds. 6.1. Decaying axions. 6.2. Axion halos. 6.3. Bolometric intensity. 6.4. Axions and the background light -- 7. The ultraviolet background. 7.1. Decaying neutrinos. 7.2. Neutrino halos. 7.3. Halo luminosity. 7.4. Free-streaming neutrinos. 7.5. Extinction by gas and dust. 7.6. Neutrinos and the background light -- 8. The x-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds. 8.1. Weakly interacting massive particles. 8.2. Pair annihilation. 8.3. One-loop decay. 8.4. Tree-level decay. 8.5. Gravitinos. 8.6. WIMPs and the background light -- 9. The high-energy gamma-ray background. 9.1. Primordial

  11. The Accretion of Dark Matter Subhalos within the Cosmic Web: Primordial Anisotropic Distribution and its Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xi; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of galaxies displays anisotropy on different scales and it is often referred to as galaxy alignment. To understand the origin of galaxy alignments on small scales, one must investigate how galaxies were accreted in the early universe and quantify their primordial anisotropy at the time of accretion. In this paper we use N-body simulations to investigate the accretion of subhalos, focusing on their alignment with halo shape and the orientation of mass distribution on the large scale, defined using the Hessian matrix of the density field. The large/small (e1/e3) eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix define the fast/slow collapse direction of matter on the large scale. We find that: (1) the halo major axis is well aligned with the e3 (slow collapse) direction, and it is stronger for massive halos; (2) subhalos are predominantly accreted along the major axis of the host halo, and the alignment increases with the host halo mass. Most importantly, this alignment is universal; (3) accretion of subhalos with respect to the e3 direction is not universal. In massive halos, subhalos are accreted along the e3 (even more strongly than the alignment with the halo major axis), but in low-mass halos subhalos are accreted perpendicular to e3. The transitional mass is lower at high redshift. The last result well explains the puzzling correlation (both in recent observations and simulations) that massive galaxies/halos have their spin perpendicular to the filament, and the spin of low-mass galaxies/halos is slightly aligned with the filament, under the assumption that the orbital angular momentum of subhalos is converted to halo spin.

  12. How S-S' Di Quark Pairs Signify an Einstein Constant Dominated Cosmology and Facilitate Reconstruction of Initial Dark Matter Contributions to CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. W.

    2006-07-01

    We review the results of a model of how nucleation of a new universe occurs, assuming a di quark identification for soliton-anti soliton constituent parts of a scalar field. The initial potential system employed is semi classical in nature, becoming non-classical at the end of chaotic inflation at the same time cosmological expansion is dominated by the Einstein cosmological constant. The material below is now a proposal, in part accepted as a point of discussion as a white paper (appropriately) submitted to the Dark Energy Task Force, in its mission to advise (through its parent committees) the NSF, NASA and DOE. This was for helping to select both ground-based and space-based techniques for analyzing data as well as recommending the science requirements for a space-based dark energy mission.

  13. Regular black hole remnants and graviatoms with de Sitter interior as heavy dark matter candidates probing inhomogeneity of early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina; Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-07-01

    We address the question of regular primordial black holes with de Sitter interior, their remnants and gravitational vacuum solitons G-lumps as heavy dark matter candidates providing signatures for inhomogeneity of early universe, which is severely constrained by the condition that the contribution of these objects in the modern density does not exceed the total density of dark matter. Primordial black holes and their remnants seem to be most elusive among dark matter candidates. However, we reveal a nontrivial property of compact objects with de Sitter interior to induce proton decay or decay of neutrons in neutron stars. The point is that they can form graviatoms, binding electrically charged particles. Their observational signatures as dark matter candidates provide also signatures for inhomogeneity of the early universe. In graviatoms, the cross-section of the induced proton decay is strongly enhanced, what provides the possibility of their experimental searches. We predict proton decay paths induced by graviatoms in the matter as an observational signature for heavy dark matter searches at the IceCUBE experiment.

  14. 77 FR 16890 - In the Matter of ProElite, Inc. and Universal Guardian Holdings, Inc.: Order of Suspension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of ProElite, Inc. and Universal Guardian Holdings, Inc.: Order of Suspension of... current and accurate information concerning the securities of ProElite, Inc. because it has not filed...

  15. 75 FR 26822 - In the Matter of: Universal Property Development & Acquisition Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of: Universal Property Development & Acquisition Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading May 10, 2010. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of...

  16. 77 FR 4389 - In the Matter of Tornado Gold International Corp., Twin Faces East Entertainment Corp., Universal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of Tornado Gold International Corp., Twin Faces East Entertainment Corp., Universal... that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Tornado...

  17. Does the Choice of University Matter? A Study of the Differences across UK Universities in Life Sciences Students' Degree Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratti, Massimiliano

    2002-01-01

    Investigates differences across UK universities in 1993 life-sciences students' degree performance using individual-level data from the universities' Statistical Record. Analyzes differences across universities by specifying and estimating a subject-specific production function. Even after including a wide range of controls for the quality of…

  18. Singularity free N-body simulations called 'Dynamic Universe Model' don't require dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    For finding trajectories of Pioneer satellite (Anomaly), New Horizons satellite going to Pluto, the Calculations of Dynamic Universe model can be successfully applied. No dark matter is assumed within solar system radius. The effect on the masses around SUN shows as though there is extra gravitation pull toward SUN. It solves the Dynamics of Extra-solar planets like Planet X, satellite like Pioneer and NH for 3-Position, 3-velocity 3-accelaration for their masses, considering the complex situation of Multiple planets, Stars, Galaxy parts and Galaxy centre and other Galaxies Using simple Newtonian Physics. It already solved problems Missing mass in Galaxies observed by galaxy circular velocity curves successfully. Singularity free Newtonian N-body simulations Historically, King Oscar II of Sweden an-nounced a prize to a solution of N-body problem with advice given by Güsta Mittag-Leffler in 1887. He announced `Given a system of arbitrarily many mass points that attract each according to Newton's law, under the assumption that no two points ever collide, try to find a representation of the coordinates of each point as a series in a variable that is some known function of time and for all of whose values the series converges uniformly.'[This is taken from Wikipedia]. The announced dead line that time was1st June 1888. And after that dead line, on 21st January 1889, Great mathematician Poincaré claimed that prize. Later he himself sent a telegram to journal Acta Mathematica to stop printing the special issue after finding the error in his solution. Yet for such a man of science reputation is important than money. [ Ref Book `Celestial mechanics: the waltz of the planets' By Alessandra Celletti, Ettore Perozzi, page 27]. He realized that he has been wrong in his general stability result! But till now nobody could solve that problem or claimed that prize. Later all solutions resulted in singularities and collisions of masses, given by many people

  19. Reionization in a cold dark matter universe: The feedback of galaxy formation on the intergalactic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Giroux, Mark L.; Babul, Arif

    1994-01-01

    We study the coupled evolution of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the emerging structure in the universe in the context of the cold dark matter (CDM) model, with a special focus on the consequences of imposing reionization and the Gunn-Peterson constraint as a boundary condition on the model. We have calculated the time-varying density of the IGM by coupling our detailed, numerical calculations of the thermal and ionization balance and radiative transfer in a uniform, spatially averaged IGM of H and He, including the mean opacity of an evolving distribution of gas clumps which correspond to quasar absorption line clouds, to the linearized equations for the growth of density fluctuations in both the gaseous and dark matter components in a CDM universe. We use the linear growth equations to identify the fraction of the gas which must have collapsed out at each epoch, an approach similar in spirit to the so-called Press-Schechter formalism. We identify the IGM density with the uncollapsed baryon fraction. The collapsed fraction is postulated to be a source of energy injection into the IGM, by radiation or bulk hydrodynamical heating (e.g., via shocks) or both, at a rate which is marginally enough to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson constraint at z less than 5. Our results include the following: (1) We find that the IGM in a CDM model must have contained a substantial fraction of the total baryon density of the universe both during and after its reionization epoch. (2) As a result, our previous conclusion that the observed Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) at high redshift are not sufficient to ionize the IGM enough to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson constraint is confirmed. (3) We predict a detectable He II Gunn-Peterson effect at 304(1 + z) A in the spectra of quasars at a range of redshift z greater than or approx. 3, depending on the nature of the sources of IGM reionization. (4) We find, moreover, that a CDM model with high bias parameter b (i.e., b greater than or approx. 2

  20. The Coyote Universe. III. Simulation Suite and Precision Emulator for the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Earl; Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Higdon, David; Wagner, Christian; Habib, Salman; Williams, Brian

    2010-04-01

    Many of the most exciting questions in astrophysics and cosmology, including the majority of observational probes of dark energy, rely on an understanding of the nonlinear regime of structure formation. In order to fully exploit the information available from this regime and to extract cosmological constraints, accurate theoretical predictions are needed. Currently, such predictions can only be obtained from costly, precision numerical simulations. This paper is the third in a series aimed at constructing an accurate calibration of the nonlinear mass power spectrum on Mpc scales for a wide range of currently viable cosmological models, including dark energy models with w ≠ -1. The first two papers addressed the numerical challenges and the scheme by which an interpolator was built from a carefully chosen set of cosmological models. In this paper, we introduce the "Coyote Universe" simulation suite which comprises nearly 1000 N-body simulations at different force and mass resolutions, spanning 38 w CDM cosmologies. This large simulation suite enables us to construct a prediction scheme, or emulator, for the nonlinear matter power spectrum accurate at the percent level out to k ~= 1 h Mpc-1. We describe the construction of the emulator, explain the tests performed to ensure its accuracy, and discuss how the central ideas may be extended to a wider range of cosmological models and applications. A power spectrum emulator code is released publicly as part of this paper.

  1. The Relative Neighborhood Graph for Estimating Two-Dimensional Voids in the Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2006-04-01

    A new technique based on a graph-theoretical approach is proposed for identifying and estimating voids in two-dimensional galaxy distributions. A relative neighborhood graph is utilized for identifying two-dimensional voids. The loop angle that characterizes the size of the voids is defined, and the distribution function as well as the average of loop angles are used for estimating the voids statistically. We applied our new technique to two-dimensional voids in Cold Dark Matter (CDM) simulations. Low-density, middle-density, and high-density CDM models were adopted for examining the nature of two-dimensional voids. >From our analyses, we found that the average of the loop angle in the low-density CDM model is apparently larger than that in the middle-density or the high-density CDM models. However, the difference between the middle-density and the high-density CDM models is subtle. We also analyzed the observational two-dimensional galaxy distributions and compared the two-dimensional mock samples that are constructed from CDM simulations. From our analyses, we succeeded to restrict the density parameter of our universe.

  2. The correlation between emotional intelligence and gray matter volume in university students.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafei; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated the neurological substrates of emotional intelligence (EI), but none of them have considered the neural correlates of EI that are measured using the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale (SSREIS). This scale was developed based on the EI model of Salovey and Mayer (1990). In the present study, SSREIS was adopted to estimate EI. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate the gray matter volume (GMV) of 328 university students. Results found positive correlations between Monitor of Emotions and VBM measurements in the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, Utilization of Emotions was positively correlated with the GMV in the parahippocampal gyrus, but was negatively correlated with the VBM measurements in the fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, Social Ability had volume correlates in the vermis. These findings indicate that the neural correlates of the EI model, which primarily focuses on the abilities of individuals to appraise and express emotions, can also regulate and utilize emotions to solve problems. PMID:25282329

  3. Residual fluctuations in the matter and radiation distribution after the decoupling epoch. [of early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Wilson, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    The residual spectra of matter and radiation fluctuations in the early universe are investigated, and the evolution of primordial adiabatic and isothermal fluctuations through the decoupling epoch is studied. Amplification of adiabatic density fluctuations during decoupling, or velocity 'overshoot', is largely suppressed by Compton drag. Consequently, the amplitude of density fluctuations entering the horizon prior to decoupling is larger than hitherto assumed in the adiabatic theory. Damping of primordial adiabatic density fluctuations by an order of magnitude occurs on mass-scales of 3 x 10 to the 13th solar masses (Omega = 1) or 10 to the 14th solar masses (Omega = 0.2). Comparison of the residual radiation fluctuations with observational limits indicates that the adiabatic theory is only acceptable if re-ionization of the intergalactic medium results in additional scattering of the radiation after decoupling. Primordial isothermal fluctuations are found to yield radiation fluctuations which are insensitive to the assumed spectrum and lie a factor of about 5 below current limits

  4. The evolving intergalactic medium - The uncollapsed baryon fraction in a cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Giroux, Mark L.; Babul, Arif

    1991-01-01

    The time-varying density of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is calculated by coupling detailed numerical calculations of the thermal and ionization balance and radiative transfer in a uniform IGM of H and He to the linearized equations for the growth of density fluctuations in both gases and a dark component in a cold dark matter universe. The IGM density is identified with the collapsed baryon fraction. It is found that even if the IGM is never reheated, a significant fraction of the baryons remain uncollapsed at redshifts of four. If instead the collapsed fraction releases enough ionizing radiation or thermal energy to reionize the IGM by z greater than four as required by the Gunn-Peterson (GP) constraint, the uncollapsed fraction at z of four is even higher. The known quasar distribution is insufficient to supply the ionizing radiation necessary to satisfy the GP constraint in this case and, if stars are instead responsible, a substantial metallicity must have been produced by z of four.

  5. DARK MATTER DECAY AND ANNIHILATION IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE: CLUES FROM FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A. J.; Zandanel, F.; Prada, F.; Jeltema, T. E.; Yepes, G.; Klypin, A.; Hoffman, Y.; Gottloeber, S.; Sanchez-Conde, M. A.; Pfrommer, C. E-mail: fabio@iaa.es

    2011-01-01

    We present all-sky simulated Fermi maps of {gamma}-rays from dark matter (DM) decay and annihilation in the local universe. The DM distribution is obtained from a constrained cosmological simulation of the neighboring large-scale structure provided by the CLUES project. The DM fields of density and density squared are then taken as an input for the Fermi observation simulation tool to predict the {gamma}-ray photon counts that Fermi would detect in 5 years of an all-sky survey for given DM models. Signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) sky maps have also been obtained by adopting the current Galactic and isotropic diffuse background models released by the Fermi Collaboration. We point out the possibility for Fermi to detect a DM {gamma}-ray signal in local extragalactic structures. In particular, we conclude here that Fermi observations of nearby clusters (e.g., Virgo and Coma) and filaments are expected to give stronger constraints on decaying DM compared to previous studies. As an example, we find a significant S/N in DM models with a decay rate fitting the positron excess as measured by PAMELA. This is the first time that DM filaments are shown to be promising targets for indirect detection of DM. On the other hand, the prospects for detectability of annihilating DM in local extragalactic structures are less optimistic even with extreme cross-sections. We make the DM density and density squared maps publicly available online.

  6. Visible and dark matter from a first-order phase transition in a baryon-symmetric universe

    SciTech Connect

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R.; Trodden, Mark E-mail: trodden@physics.upenn.edu

    2012-02-01

    The similar cosmological abundances observed for visible and dark matter suggest a common origin for both. By viewing the dark matter density as a dark-sector asymmetry, mirroring the situation in the visible sector, we show that the visible and dark matter asymmetries may have arisen simultaneously through a first-order phase transition in the early universe. The dark asymmetry can then be equal and opposite to the usual visible matter asymmetry, leading to a universe that is symmetric with respect to a generalised baryon number. We present both a general structure, and a precisely defined example of a viable model of this type. In that example, the dark matter is ''atomic'' as well as asymmetric, and various cosmological and astrophysical constraints are derived. Testable consequences for colliders include a Z' boson that couples through the B−L charge to the visible sector, but also decays invisibly to dark sector particles. The additional scalar particles in the theory can mix with the standard Higgs boson and provide other striking signatures.

  7. Dark matter in ghost-free bigravity theory: From a galaxy scale to the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Katsuki; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2014-12-01

    We study the origin of dark matter based on the ghost-free bigravity theory with twin matter fluids. The present cosmic acceleration can be explained by the existence of graviton mass, while dark matter is required in several cosmological situations (the galactic missing mass, the cosmic structure formation and the cosmic microwave background observation). Assuming that the Compton wavelength of the massive graviton is shorter than a galactic scale, we show the bigravity theory can explain dark matter by twin matter fluid as well as the cosmic acceleration by tuning appropriate coupling constants.

  8. In situ, satellite measurement and model evidence on the dominant regional contribution to fine particulate matter levels in the Paris megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekmann, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Sciare, J.; Pandis, S. N.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Crippa, M.; Freutel, F.; Poulain, L.; Ghersi, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Beirle, S.; Zotter, P.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Bressi, M.; Fountoukis, C.; Petetin, H.; Szidat, S.; Schneider, J.; Rosso, A.; El Haddad, I.; Megaritis, A.; Zhang, Q. J.; Michoud, V.; Slowik, J. G.; Moukhtar, S.; Kolmonen, P.; Stohl, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Borbon, A.; Gros, V.; Marchand, N.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Colomb, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Borrmann, S.; Lawrence, M.; Baklanov, A.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-08-01

    A detailed characterization of air quality in the megacity of Paris (France) during two 1-month intensive campaigns and from additional 1-year observations revealed that about 70 % of the urban background fine particulate matter (PM) is transported on average into the megacity from upwind regions. This dominant influence of regional sources was confirmed by in situ measurements during short intensive and longer-term campaigns, aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from ENVISAT, and modeling results from PMCAMx and CHIMERE chemistry transport models. While advection of sulfate is well documented for other megacities, there was surprisingly high contribution from long-range transport for both nitrate and organic aerosol. The origin of organic PM was investigated by comprehensive analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), radiocarbon and tracer measurements during two intensive campaigns. Primary fossil fuel combustion emissions constituted less than 20 % in winter and 40 % in summer of carbonaceous fine PM, unexpectedly small for a megacity. Cooking activities and, during winter, residential wood burning are the major primary organic PM sources. This analysis suggests that the major part of secondary organic aerosol is of modern origin, i.e., from biogenic precursors and from wood burning. Black carbon concentrations are on the lower end of values encountered in megacities worldwide, but still represent an issue for air quality. These comparatively low air pollution levels are due to a combination of low emissions per inhabitant, flat terrain, and a meteorology that is in general not conducive to local pollution build-up. This revised picture of a megacity only being partially responsible for its own average and peak PM levels has important implications for air pollution regulation policies.

  9. In-situ, satellite measurement and model evidence for a~dominant regional contribution to fine particulate matter levels in the Paris Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekmann, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Sciare, J.; Pandis, S. N.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Crippa, M.; Freutel, F.; Poulain, L.; Ghersi, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Beirle, S.; Zotter, P.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Bressi, M.; Fountoukis, C.; Petetin, H.; Szidat, S.; Schneider, J.; Rosso, A.; El Haddad, I.; Megaritis, A.; Zhang, Q. J.; Michoud, V.; Slowik, J. G.; Moukhtar, S.; Kolmonen, P.; Stohl, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Borbon, A.; Gros, V.; Marchand, N.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Colomb, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Borrmann, S.; Lawrence, M.; Baklanov, A.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    A detailed characterization of air quality in Paris (France), a megacity of more than 10 million inhabitants, during two one month intensive campaigns and from additional one year observations, revealed that about 70% of the fine particulate matter (PM) at urban background is transported on average into the megacity from upwind regions. This dominant influence of regional sources was confirmed by in-situ measurements during short intensive and longer term campaigns, aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from ENVISAT, and modeling results from PMCAMx and CHIMERE. While advection of sulfate is well documented for other megacities, there was surprisingly high contribution from long-range transport for both nitrate and organic aerosol. The origin of organic PM was investigated by a comprehensive analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), radiocarbon and tracer measurements during two intensive campaigns. Primary fossil fuel combustion emissions contributed less than 20% in winter and 40% in summer to carbonaceous fine PM, unexpectedly little for a megacity. Cooking activities and, during winter, residential wood burning are the major primary organic PM sources. This analysis suggests that the major part of secondary organic aerosol is of modern origin, i.e. from biogenic precursors and from wood burning. Black carbon concentrations are on the lower end of values encountered in megacities worldwide, but still represent an issue for air quality. These comparatively low air pollution levels are due to a combination of low emissions per inhabitant, flat terrain, and a meteorology that is in general not conducive to local pollution build-up. This revised picture of a megacity only controlling part of its own average and peak PM levels has important implications for air pollution regulation policies.

  10. Introducing the Illustris Project: simulating the coevolution of dark and visible matter in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Springel, Volker; Torrey, Paul; Sijacki, Debora; Xu, Dandan; Snyder, Greg; Nelson, Dylan; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-10-01

    We introduce the Illustris Project, a series of large-scale hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. The highest resolution simulation, Illustris-1, covers a volume of (106.5 Mpc)3, has a dark mass resolution of 6.26 × 106 M⊙, and an initial baryonic matter mass resolution of 1.26 × 106 M⊙. At z = 0 gravitational forces are softened on scales of 710 pc, and the smallest hydrodynamical gas cells have an extent of 48 pc. We follow the dynamical evolution of 2 × 18203 resolution elements and in addition passively evolve 18203 Monte Carlo tracer particles reaching a total particle count of more than 18 billion. The galaxy formation model includes: primordial and metal-line cooling with self-shielding corrections, stellar evolution, stellar feedback, gas recycling, chemical enrichment, supermassive black hole growth, and feedback from active galactic nuclei. Here we describe the simulation suite, and contrast basic predictions of our model for the present-day galaxy population with observations of the local universe. At z = 0 our simulation volume contains about 40 000 well-resolved galaxies covering a diverse range of morphologies and colours including early-type, late-type and irregular galaxies. The simulation reproduces reasonably well the cosmic star formation rate density, the galaxy luminosity function, and baryon conversion efficiency at z = 0. It also qualitatively captures the impact of galaxy environment on the red fractions of galaxies. The internal velocity structure of selected well-resolved disc galaxies obeys the stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relation together with flat circular velocity curves. In the well-resolved regime, the simulation reproduces the observed mix of early-type and late-type galaxies. Our model predicts a halo mass dependent impact of baryonic effects on the halo mass function and the masses of haloes caused by feedback from supernova and active galactic nuclei.

  11. Dark Matter annihilations in halos and high-redshift sources of reionization of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that annihilations in the homogeneous fluid of dark matter (DM) can leave imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. However, the relevance of DM annihilations in halos for cosmological observables is still subject to debate, with previous works reaching different conclusions on this point. Also, all previous studies used a single type of parameterization for the astrophysical reionization, and included no astrophysical source for the heating of the intergalactic medium. In this work, we revisit these problems. When standard approaches are adopted, we find that the ionization fraction does exhibit a very particular (and potentially constraining) pattern, but the currently measurable τreio is left almost unchanged: in agreement with most of the previous literature, for plausible halo models we find that the modification of the signal with respect to the one coming from annihilations in the smooth background is tiny, below cosmic variance within currently allowed parameter space. However, if different and probably more realistic treatments of the astrophysical sources of reionization and heating are adopted, a more pronounced effect of the DM annihilation in halos is possible. We thus conclude that within currently adopted baseline models the impact of the virialised DM structures cannot be uncovered by CMB power spectra measurements, but a larger impact is possible if peculiar models are invoked for the redshift evolution of the DM annihilation signal or different assumptions are made for the astrophysical contributions. A better understanding (both theoretical and observational) of the reionization and temperature history of the universe, notably via the 21 cm signal, seems the most promising way for using halo formation as a tool in DM searches, improving over the sensitivity of current cosmological probes.

  12. Finding the Axion: The Search for the Dark Matter of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Carosi, G

    2006-11-03

    The nature of dark matter has been a mystery for over 70 years. One plausible candidate is the axion, an extremely light and weakly interacting particle, which results from the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong CP problem. In this proceedings I will briefly review the evidence for dark matter as well as the motivation for the existence of the axion as a prime dark matter candidate. I will then discuss the experimental methods to search for axion dark matter focusing on a sensitive cavity experiment (ADMX) being run at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. The Spheronic Toy Universe: How Special Relativity may be Visualised to Emerge from a Wave-Nature of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Manfred; Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    We construct an idealised universe for didactic purposes. This universe is assumed to consist of absolute Euclidean space and to be filled with a classical medium which allows for sound waves. A known solution to the wave equation describing the dynamics of the medium is a standing spherical wave. Although this is a problem of classical mechanics, we demonstrate that the Lorentz transformation is required to generate a moving solution from the stationary one. Both solutions are here collectively referred to as "spherons". These spherons exhibit properties which have analogues in the physical description of matter with rest mass, among them de Broglie like phase waves and at the same time "relativistic" effects such as contraction and a speed limit. This leads to a theory of special relativity by assuming the point of view of an observer made of such spheronic "matter". The argument made here may thus be useful as a visualisation or didactic approach to the real universe, in which matter has wave-like properties and obeys the laws of special relativity.

  14. University Leaders and University Performance in the United Kingdom: Is It "Who" Leads, or "Where" They Lead that Matters Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakwell, Glynis M.; Tytherleigh, Michelle Y.

    2010-01-01

    With key performance indicators (KPIs) part of everyday life in the higher education (HE) sector, universities have become increasingly concerned with league tables and performance indicator-led strategy and planning. The choice an institution makes concerning the KPIs it wishes to be evaluated on depends on its mission and objectives, with a Head…

  15. Student Graduation in Spain: To What Extent Does University Expenditure Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Estevez, Javier; Duch-Brown, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    Graduation rates (GRs) remain one of the most frequently applied measures of institutional performance. This paper analyzes the relationship between university characteristics and GRs in Spain, using a dataset for the entire public university system over the period 1998-2008. Since we observe the same university over several years, we address the…

  16. Sexual Attitudes and Behavior at Four Universities: Do Region, Race, and/or Religion Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, J. Kenneth, Sr.; Moore, Nelwyn B.; Earle, John R.; Davis, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain any differences in sexual attitudes, levels of premarital sexual involvement, and risk-taking sexual practices of college students at four distinctly different universities: a historic Black public university; a predominately white, Southern private university with a religious heritage; a Southwestern public…

  17. What Matters Most: Factors Influencing the University Application Choice Decisions of Korean International Students and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parslow, Breanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine factors influencing Korean parents' and students' university application choice decisions in three international schools in the Republic of Korea (South). Institutional and individual factors that influenced Korean students' university application choice decisions and their parents' university application…

  18. Hints about Dark, Light-Bending Matter in the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    New infrared observations of a gravitational lens About 20 cases of gravitationally lensed (GL) quasars are known. This special physical effect, also known as a cosmic mirage, occurs when the rays of light of a distant quasar on their way to us pass near a massive object, for instance a galaxy. As a result, two or more images of the same quasar will be seen near each other. This phenomenon is described in more detail in the Appendix. A new study by a group of three European astronomers, headed by Frederic Courbin ( Institut d'Astrophysique, Universite de Liege, Belgium, and Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France) [1], has led to the discovery of the object responsible for the double images of a remote quasar in the gravitational lens HE 1104-1805 . The investigation is based on infrared observations at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile and the `lensing system' turns out to be a distant, massive galaxy. Nevertheless, the geometry of the object is unusual and an additional gravitational lens of `dark' (invisible) matter may possibly be involved. This gravitational lens is also particularly well suited for future cosmological studies that aim at the determination of the Hubble constant and the expansion rate of the Universe. A new and detailed study of gravitational lenses It is rare among the relatively few, confirmed cases of gravitational lensing in the distant Universe, that the distribution of matter in the lensing system is well known. However, it is exactly this information that is needed to derive cosmological parameters by means of photometric monitoring of the brightness of the individual images in a gravitational lens [2]. The three astronomers have therefore undertaken a detailed study of some previously known gravitational lenses (or good candidate objects) with the primary aim to detect and map the associated lensing matter (refered to as the gravitational deflector or lensing object ). This is observationally quite difficult and time-consuming since

  19. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflamm...

  20. The Coyote Universe. I. Precision Determination of the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-05-01

    Near-future cosmological observations targeted at investigations of dark energy pose stringent requirements on the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the nonlinear clustering of matter. Currently, N-body simulations comprise the only viable approach to this problem. In this paper, we study various sources of computational error and methods to control them. By applying our methodology to a large suite of cosmological simulations we show that results for the (gravity-only) nonlinear matter power spectrum can be obtained at 1% accuracy out to k ~ 1 h Mpc-1. The key components of these high accuracy simulations are precise initial conditions, very large simulation volumes, sufficient mass resolution, and accurate time stepping. This paper is the first in a series of three; the final aim is a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum that improves current fitting formulae by an order of magnitude.

  1. THE COYOTE UNIVERSE. I. PRECISION DETERMINATION OF THE NONLINEAR MATTER POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-05-20

    Near-future cosmological observations targeted at investigations of dark energy pose stringent requirements on the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the nonlinear clustering of matter. Currently, N-body simulations comprise the only viable approach to this problem. In this paper, we study various sources of computational error and methods to control them. By applying our methodology to a large suite of cosmological simulations we show that results for the (gravity-only) nonlinear matter power spectrum can be obtained at 1% accuracy out to k {approx} 1 h Mpc{sup -1}. The key components of these high accuracy simulations are precise initial conditions, very large simulation volumes, sufficient mass resolution, and accurate time stepping. This paper is the first in a series of three; the final aim is a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum that improves current fitting formulae by an order of magnitude.

  2. Universal Design for Instruction: A Matter of Equitable Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Simone; Stuart, Shannon; Riall, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Universal design for instruction is an inclusive teaching model that the authors advocate for responding to the diverse learning needs of students in today's postsecondary classrooms. The goal of universally designed courses is to allow all students to have available a menu of choices by which they can access curriculum content, engage in learning…

  3. Academic Identity Tensions in the Public University: Which Values Really Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Richard P.; O'Donohue, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Our study explores the relationship between values and academic identity in the public university. Framing the study is the proposition public universities face academic identity tensions arising from pressures to combine and sustain competing and contradictory managerial (economic) and academic (professional) values systems. Academic responses to…

  4. Uncovering Reading Habits of University Students in Uganda: Does ICT Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlay, Samali V.; Sabi, Humphrey M.; Tsuma, Clive K.; Langmia, Kehbuma

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can improve reading habits among university students. We also investigated the influence of home culture, school culture and disposable income on reading habit. Our main objective was to assess the effect of ICT on the reading habit of particularly university students in…

  5. Who Matters to Universities? A Stakeholder Perspective on Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Valorisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benneworth, Paul; Jongbloed, Ben W.

    2010-01-01

    Valorisation is at the centre of many debates on the future of academic research. But valorisation has largely become narrowly understood in terms of universities' economic contributions through patenting, licensing, spin-off formation and technology transfer. This emergent restrictive definition of universities' societal impacts is a worrying…

  6. Evolution of Private Universities in Nigeria: Matters Arising and the Way Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ige, Akindele M.

    2013-01-01

    Many issues such as the increasing cases of unsatisfied demand for admission, moral decadence among students, incessant strikes, student unrest and cultism, among others necessitated the establishment of private alongside the federal and state universities in Nigeria. It is however expected that the advent of private universities will provide…

  7. How Public Universities Close Budget Gaps Matters for States. Schools in Crisis: Making Ends Meet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinne, Alicia; Roza, Marguerite; Murphy, Patrick; Gross, Betheny

    2012-01-01

    When the Great Recession took its toll on state budgets, public universities felt the pain. Many public universities attempted to offset reductions in state funds by raising tuition, shifting admission spots to more out-of-state students, and, in some cases, increasing enrollment. For a given budget gap, these three strategies should be weighted…

  8. Hydrodynamic vacuum sources of dark matter self-generation in an accelerating universe without a Big Bang

    SciTech Connect

    Chefranov, S. G.; Novikov, E. A.

    2010-11-15

    We have obtained a generalization of the hydrodynamic theory of vacuum in the context of general relativity. While retaining the Lagrangian character of general relativity, the new theory provides a natural alternative to the view that the singularity is inevitable in general relativity and the theory of a hot Universe. We show that the macroscopic source-sink motion as a whole of ordinary (dark) matter that emerges during the production of particles out of the vacuum can be a new source of gravitational vacuum polarization (determining the variability of the cosmological term in general relativity). We have removed the well-known problems of the cosmological constant by refining the physical nature of dark energy associated precisely with this hydrodynamically initiated variability of the vacuum energy density. A new exact solution of the modified general relativity equations that contains no free (fitting) parameter additional to those available in general relativity has been obtained. It corresponds to the continuous and metric-affecting production of ultralight dark matter particles (with mass m{sub 0} = ({h_bar}/c{sup 2}) {approx} 3 x 10{sup -66} g, k is the gravitational constant) out of the vacuum, with its density {rho}{sub 0}, constant during the exponential expansion of a spatially flat Universe, being retained. This solution is shown to be stable in the regime of cosmological expansion in the time interval -{infinity} < t < t{sub max}, when t = 0 corresponds to the present epoch and t{sub max}= 2/3H{sub 0}c{Omega}{sub 0m} {approx} 38 x 10{sup 9} yr at {Omega}{sub 0m} = {rho}{sub 0}/{rho}{sub c} {approx} 0.28 (H{sub 0} is the Hubble constant, {rho}{sub c} is the critical density). For t > t{sub max}, the solution becomes exponentially unstable and characterizes the inverse process of dark matter particle absorption by the vacuum in the regime of contraction of the Universe. We consider the admissibility of the fact that scalar massive photon pairs can be

  9. Criticality and big brake singularities in the tachyonic evolutions of closed Friedmann universes with cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Zsolt; Keresztes, Zoltán; Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu.; Gergely, László Á.

    2015-05-01

    The evolution of a closed Friedmann universe filled by a tachyon scalar field with a trigonometric potential and cold dark matter (CDM) is investigated. A subset of the evolutions consistent to 1 σ confidence level with the Union 2.1 supernova data set is identified. The evolutions of the tachyon field are classified. Some of them evolve into a de Sitter attractor, while others proceed through a pseudotachyonic regime into a sudden future singularity. Critical evolutions leading to big brake singularities in the presence of CDM are found and a new type of cosmological evolution characterized by singularity avoidance in the pseudotachyon regime is presented.

  10. Cosmological Simulations of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsberger, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Dark matter is supposed to be the backbone of structure formation in the universe. It dominates the energy content of the universe together with dark energy. Modern computer simulation allow the detailed prediction of the distribution of dark matter on very large and small scales. The main inputs for these simulations are the initial conditions observed through the cosmic microwave background and gravity as the main force behind structure formation. I will present in my talk recent advances in cosmological simulations and how state-of-the-art simulations lead to virtual universes which agree remarkably well with observations of the real universe. Despite this success the small-scale structure predicted by these simulations does not agree perfectly with observations. I will discuss possible solutions to these problems that might also point to new theories of dark matter.

  11. A PHOTON-DOMINATED REGION MODEL FOR THE FIR MID-J CO LADDER WITH UNIVERSAL ROTATIONAL TEMPERATURE IN STAR FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seokho; Park, Yong-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-08-01

    A photon-dominated region (PDR) is one of the leading candidate mechanisms for the origin of warm CO gas with near universal ∼300 K rotational temperature inferred from the CO emission detected toward embedded protostars by Herschel/PACS. We have developed a PDR model in general coordinates, where we can use the most adequate coordinate system for an embedded protostar having outflow cavity walls, to solve chemistry and gas energetics self-consistently for given UV radiation fields with different spectral shapes. Simple one-dimensional tests and applications show that FIR mid-J (14 ≤ J ≤ 24) CO lines are emitted from close to the surface of a dense region exposed to high UV fluxes. We apply our model to HH46 and find that the UV-heated outflow cavity wall can reproduce the mid-J CO transitions observed by Herschel/PACS. A model with UV radiation corresponding to a blackbody of 10,000 K results in a rotational temperature lower than 300 K, while models with the Draine interstellar radiation field and the 15,000 K blackbody radiation field predict a rotational temperature similar to the observed one.

  12. Depression and College Stress among University Undergraduates: Do Mattering and Self-Esteem Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Sarah K.; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson

    2008-01-01

    Depression and college stress, major concerns among undergraduates, are potentially related to self-esteem and mattering. This study investigated the interrelationships among these four variables. Participants included college students (199 males and 256 females) between the ages of 18 and 23. Significant sex differences were found with women…

  13. Matter antimatter domains: A possible solution to the CP domain wall problem in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohanty, A. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    An SU(5) grand unified theory model is used to show how the degeneracy between vacua with different spontaneously broken charge parity can be dynamically lifted by a condensate of heavy fermion pairs. This drives a phase transition to a unique vacuum state with definite charge parity. The transition eliminates the domain walls in a matter antimatter symmetric domain cosmology.

  14. Cosmological explosions from cold dark matter perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological-explosion model is examined for a universe dominated by cold dark matter in which explosion seeds are produced from the growth of initial density perturbations of a given form. Fragmentation of the exploding shells is dominated by the dark-matter potential wells rather than the self-gravity of the shells, and particular conditions are required for the explosions to bootstrap up to very large scales. The final distribution of dark matter is strongly correlated with the baryons on small scales, but uncorrelated on large scales.

  15. Using Dark Matter Haloes to Learn about Cosmic Acceleration: A New Proposal for a Universal Mass Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation provides a strong test of any cosmic acceleration model because a successful dark energy model must not inhibit or overpredict the development of observed large-scale structures. Traditional approaches to studies of structure formation in the presence of dark energy or a modified gravity implement a modified Press-Schechter formalism, which relates the linear overdensities to the abundance of dark matter haloes at the same time. We critically examine the universality of the Press-Schechter formalism for different cosmologies, and show that the halo abundance is best correlated with spherical linear overdensity at 94% of collapse (or observation) time. We then extend this argument to ellipsoidal collapse (which decreases the fractional time of best correlation for small haloes), and show that our results agree with deviations from modified Press-Schechter formalism seen in simulated mass functions. This provides a novel universal prescription to measure linear density evolution, based on current and future observations of cluster (or dark matter) halo mass function. In particular, even observations of cluster abundance in a single epoch will constrain the entire history of linear growth of cosmological of perturbations.

  16. Dark matter dynamics and indirect detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Merritt, David; /Rochester Inst. Tech.

    2005-04-01

    Non-baryonic, or ''dark'', matter is believed to be a major component of the total mass budget of the universe. We review the candidates for particle dark matter and discuss the prospects for direct detection (via interaction of dark matter particles with laboratory detectors) and indirect detection (via observations of the products of dark matter self-annihilations), focusing in particular on the Galactic center, which is among the most promising targets for indirect detection studies. The gravitational potential at the Galactic center is dominated by stars and by the supermassive black hole, and the dark matter distribution is expected to evolve on sub-parsec scales due to interaction with these components. We discuss the dominant interaction mechanisms and show how they can be used to rule out certain extreme models for the dark matter distribution, thus increasing the information that can be gleaned from indirect detection searches.

  17. Scalar-field-dominated cosmology with a transient acceleration phase.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F C; Alcaniz, J S; Lima, J A S; Silva, R

    2006-08-25

    A new cosmological scenario driven by a slow rolling homogeneous scalar field whose exponential potential V(Phi) has a quadratic dependence on the field Phi in addition to the standard linear term is discussed. The derived equation of state for the field predicts a transient accelerating phase, in which the Universe was decelerated in the past, began to accelerate at redshift z approximately 1, is currently accelerated, but, finally, will return to a decelerating phase in the future. This overall dynamic behavior is profoundly different from the standard evolution of the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, and may alleviate some conflicts in reconciling the idea of a dark-energy-dominated universe with observables in String or M theory. Some theoretical predictions for the present scalar field plus dark matter dominated stage are confronted with cosmological observations in order to test the viability of the scenario. PMID:17026287

  18. College and University Mergers: Recent Trends. Policy Matters: A Higher Education Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Given the current economic turbulence characterized, in part, by unprecedented business consolidations, talk of mergers has spread to higher education. At first glance, merger discussions may seem more appropriate to the corporate world than academe because American colleges and universities were not created in accordance with a centralized…

  19. Factors Influencing Student Satisfaction in Universities in the Gulf Region: Does Gender of Students Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parahoo, Sanjai K.; Harvey, Heather L.; Tamim, Rana M.

    2013-01-01

    While various research studies have focused on antecedents and consequences of student satisfaction, few studies have done so in the Gulf region. The objective of the present study was therefore to design and empirically examine a model of student satisfaction in a private university in the Gulf region that operates in a high-technology-enabled…

  20. The Biomedical Doctorate in the Contemporary University: Education or Training and Why It Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Chapman, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The form and function(s) of doctoral education continue to be a subject of much debate by stakeholders internal and external to the university. Notable concerns driving this debate derive from a seemingly discursive array of factors including increasing student numbers, increased understanding of the economic value of doctoral graduates,…

  1. Does Race Matter?--Outcomes of the First Year Experience in a Canadian University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, J. Paul

    1995-01-01

    Surveys of York University (Ontario) freshmen, 1,093 at entry and 1,129 at midyear, found that minority students came from more disadvantaged families than nonminority students. However, minority freshman year experiences were not all negative, and majority student experiences were not all positive. In general, freshman year outcomes were not…

  2. School-University Partnerships: What Do We Know and Why Do They Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Suzanne L.; Greher, Gena R.

    2007-01-01

    School-university partnerships are a fundamental link to strengthen teacher education reform. The formation of new partnerships in which academic faculty and in-service teachers assume expanded roles holds promise as a primary avenue toward developing content and contextual expertise of preservice music teachers and strengthening pre-K-12…

  3. When Culture and Learning Styles Matter: A Canadian University with Middle-Eastern Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke-Westcott, Tracey; Johnson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Transnational branch campuses of universities are a growing phenomenon, particularly in the Middle-East. The cultures of home institutions and host countries are often foreign to each other. The result is a cultural and learning style gap between faculty and students impacting students' learning and teachers' effectiveness. A pilot study of the…

  4. The Phase-Space Structure of Cold Dark Matter in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandarin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    A novel method allowing to compute density, velocity and other fields in cosmological N-body simulations with unprecedentedly high spatial resolution is described. It is based on the tessellation of the three-dimensional manifold representing cold dark matter in six-dimensional phase space. The density, velocity and other fields are computed by projecting the tessellation on configuration space. The application of this technique to cosmological N-body simulations in ΛCDM cosmology reveals a far more elaborate cosmic web then dot plots or self-adaptive SPH. In addition, this method allows to uniquely define physical voids and identify and study the caustic surfaces directly.

  5. University Programme Preferences of High School Science Students in Singapore and Reasons that Matter in their Preferences: A Rasch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oon, Pey-Tee; Subramaniam, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored an under-researched area in science education-the university programmes preferred by high school students who take physical science subjects and the reasons that matter in their preferences. A total of 1,071 upper secondary and pre-university students in Singapore, who take physical science subjects among their range of subjects, participated in this study. A survey method was adopted and the Rasch model was used to analyse the data. Overall, Business Studies was ranked as the predominant choice; nonetheless, scientific programmes such as Science, Engineering, and Mathematics are generally still well liked by the students. When gender differences were examined, we found that students largely followed gender-typical programme preferences, in which males tend to incline towards Engineering while females tend to incline towards Arts and Social Sciences. Students prefer a university programme based on their individual interest and ability, with career aspiration and remuneration coming next. Interestingly, females place greater emphasis on career aspiration than males. Some implications of the study are discussed.

  6. Dark matter: theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, M S

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the "standard model" of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for "new physics." The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10(-6)-10(-4) eV), a light neutrino (20-90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV-2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. PMID:11607395

  7. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  8. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  9. Sharing but not caring: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Fong, Chee Sheng; Fonseca, Nayara

    2016-09-01

    We consider scenarios where Dark Matter (DM) particles carry baryon and/or lepton numbers, which can be defined if there exist operators connecting the dark to the visible sector. As a result, the DM fields become intimately linked to the Standard Model (SM) ones and can be maximally asymmetric just like the ordinary matter. In particular, we discuss minimal scenarios where the DM is a complex scalar or a Dirac fermion coupled to operators with nonzero baryon and/or lepton numbers, and that consist of only SM fields. We consider an initial asymmetry stored in either the SM or the DM sector; the main role of these operators is to properly share the asymmetry between the two sectors, in accordance with observations. After the chemical decoupling, the DM and SM sectors do not care about each other as there is only an ineffective communication between them. Once the DM mass is specified, the Wilson coefficients of these operators are fixed by the requirement of the correct transfer of the asymmetry. We study the phenomenology of this framework at colliders, direct detection and indirect detection experiments. In particular, the LHC phenomenology is very rich and can be tested in different channels such as the two same-sign leptons with two jets, monojet and monojet with a monolepton.

  10. Fractal analysis of the dark matter and gas distributions in the Mare-Nostrum universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gaite, José

    2010-03-01

    We develop a method of multifractal analysis of N-body cosmological simulations that improves on the customary counts-in-cells method by taking special care of the effects of discreteness and large scale homogeneity. The analysis of the Mare-Nostrum simulation with our method provides strong evidence of self-similar multifractal distributions of dark matter and gas, with a halo mass function that is of Press-Schechter type but has a power-law exponent -2, as corresponds to a multifractal. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the dark matter and gas distributions are indistinguishable as multifractals. To determine if there is any gas biasing, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient, with negative but inconclusive results. Hence, we develop an effective Bayesian analysis connected with information theory, which clearly demonstrates that the gas is biased in a long range of scales, up to the scale of homogeneity. However, entropic measures related to the Bayesian analysis show that this gas bias is small (in a precise sense) and is such that the fractal singularities of both distributions coincide and are identical. We conclude that this common multifractal cosmic web structure is determined by the dynamics and is independent of the initial conditions.

  11. Dark matter, dark energy and the time evolution of masses in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solà, Joan

    2014-08-01

    The traditional "explanation" for the observed acceleration of the universe is the existence of a positive cosmological constant. However, this can hardly be a truly convincing explanation, as an expanding universe is not expected to have a static vacuum energy density. So, it must be an approximation. This reminds us of the so-called fundamental "constants" of nature. Recent and past measurements of the fine structure constant and of the proton-electron mass ratio suggest that basic quantities of the standard model, such as the QCD scale parameter, ΛQCD, might not be conserved in the course of the cosmological evolution. The masses of the nucleons and of the atomic nuclei would be time-evolving. This can be consistent with General Relativity provided the vacuum energy itself is a dynamical quantity. Another framework realizing this possibility is QHD (Quantum Haplodynamics), a fundamental theory of bound states. If one assumes that its running couplings unify at the Planck scale and that such scale changes slowly with cosmic time, the masses of the nucleons and of the DM particles, including the cosmological term, will evolve with time. This could explain the dark energy of the universe.

  12. The connection between galaxies and dark matter in the young universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Manso, Jesus

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of this work is to better understand how dark matter influences the formation and evolution of galaxies, from an observational perspective. To shed light on the galaxy-halo connection, I present an analysis of the angular clustering of high-redshift galaxies in the recently completed 94 deg2 Spitzer-SPT Deep Field survey. Applying flux and color cuts to the mid-infrared photometry efficiently selects galaxies at z ˜ 1.5 in the stellar mass range 1010 -- 1011[Mass compared to the Sun], yielding the largest sample used so far to study such a distant population. Halo occupation distributions were fit to the data, finding a prominent peak in the stellar-to-halo mass ratio at a halo mass of log(Mhalo/[Mass compared to the Sun]) = 12.44 +/- 0.08, 4.5 times higher than the z = 0 value. In addition, I cross-correlated this galaxy sample with far-infrared Herschel maps, in order to directly link star formation activity with dark matter halos. I found that the star formation efficiency of these halos increases steeply towards higher redshifts. The combination of these results supports the idea of an evolving mass threshold above which star formation is quenched. In order to test how galaxies trace the matter distribution at large scales, I computed the cross-correlation between the z ˜ 1.5 galaxies and the cosmic microwave background convergence map from the South Pole Telescope. The best fit yielded a galaxy bias b gkappa = 1.3 +/- 0.3, which is not consistent with the value from the galaxy auto-correlation, b gg = 2.2 +/- 0.1. This is a surprising and unexpected result, and I have not been able to determine whether it has a physical origin or it is due to an unaccounted systematic effect. In addition, I performed a test of the stellar masses of 4 galaxies at z = 1 in the EGS field. These galaxies were previously found to be so small and massive that it posed a problem in terms of their evolution to match low redshift relations. I took GTC optical spectra of

  13. Note on "Continuous matter creation and the acceleration of the universe: the growth of density fluctuations"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Jesus, J. F.; Oliveira, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Recently, de Roany and Pacheco (Gen Relativ Gravit, doi: 10.1007/s10714-010-1069-2 ) performed a Newtonian analysis on the evolution of perturbations for a class of relativistic cosmological models with Creation of Cold Dark Matter (CCDM) proposed by the present authors (Lima et al. in JCAP 1011:027, 2010). In this note we demonstrate that the basic equations adopted in their work do not recover the specific (unperturbed) CCDM model. Unlike to what happens in the original CCDM cosmology, their basic conclusions refer to a decelerating cosmological model in which there is no transition from a decelerating to an accelerating regime as required by SNe type Ia and complementary observations.

  14. Colliding with the Speed of Light, Using Low-Energy Photon-Photon Collision Study the Nature of Matter and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meggie

    2013-03-01

    Our research discovered logical inconsistence in physics and mathematics. Through reviewing the entire history of physics and mathematics we gained new understanding about our earlier assumptions, which led to a new interpretation of the wave function and quantum physics. We found the existing experimental data supported a 4-dimensional fractal structure of matter and the universe, we found the formation of wave, matter and the universe through the same process started from a single particle, and the process itself is a fractal that contributed to the diversity of matter. We also found physical evidence supporting a not-continuous fractal space structure. The new understanding also led to a reinterpretation of nuclear collision theories, based on this we succeeded a room-temperature low-energy photon-photon collision (RT-LE-PPC), this method allowed us to observe a topological disconnected fractal structure and succeeded a simulation of the formation of matter and the universe which provided evidences for the nature of light and matter and led to a quantum structure interpretation, and we found the formation of the universe started from two particles. However this work cannot be understood with current physics theories due to the logical problems in the current physics theories.

  15. Exact solutions of bulk viscous with string cloud attached to strange quark matter for higher dimensional FRW universe in Lyra geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćaǧlar, Halife; Aygün, Sezgin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have investigated bulk viscous with strange quark matter attached to the string cloud for higher dimensional Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in Lyra geometry. By using varying deceleration parameter and conservation equations we have solved Einstein Field Equations (EFE's) and obtained generalized exact solutions for our model. Also we have found that string is not survived for bulk viscous with strange quark matter attached to the string cloud in framework higher dimensional FRW universe in Lyra geometry. This result agrees with Kiran and Reddy, Krori et al, Sahoo and Mishra and Mohanty et al. in four and five dimensions.

  16. The evolution of X-ray clusters in a cold plus hot dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Klypin, Anatoly; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Burns, Jack O.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first self-consistently computed results on the evolution of X-ray properties of galaxy clusters in a cold + hot dark matter (CHDM) model. We have performed a hydrodynamic plus N-body simulation for the COBE-compatible CHDM model with standard mass components: Omega(sub hot) = 0.3, Omega (sub cold) = 0.6 and Omega(sub baryon) = 0.1 (h = 0.5). In contrast with the CDM model, which fails to reproduce the observed temperature distribution function dN/dT (Bryan et al. 1994b), the CHDM model fits the observational dN/dT quite well. Our results on X-ray luminosity are less firm but even more intriguing. We find that the resulting X-ray luminosity functions at redshifts z = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.7 are well fit by observations, where they overlap. The fact that both temperatures and luminosities provide a reasonable fit to the available observational data indicates that, unless we are missing some essential physics, there is neither room nor need for a large fraction of gas in rich clusters: 10% (or less) in baryons is sufficient to explain their X-ray properties. We also see a tight correlation between X-ray luminosity and gas temperature.

  17. Detection of universality of dark matter profile from Subaru weak lensing measurements of 50 massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikura, Hiroko; Takada, Masahiro; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Martino, Rossella; Takahashi, Ryuichi

    2015-12-01

    We develop a novel method of measuring the lensing distortion profiles of clusters by stacking the "scaled" amplitudes of background galaxy ellipticities as a function of the "scaled" centric radius according to the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) prediction of each cluster, based on the assumption that the different clusters in a sample follow the universal NFW profile. First we demonstrate the feasibility of this method using both the analytical NFW model and simulated halos in a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations. We then apply, as a proof of concept, this method to the Subaru weak lensing data and the XMM/Chandra X-ray observables for a sample of 50 massive clusters in the redshift range 0.15 ≤ z ≤ 0.3, where their halo masses differ from each other by up to a factor of 10. To estimate the NFW parameters of each cluster, we use the halo mass proxy relation of X-ray observables, based on either the hydrostatic equilibrium or the gas mass, and then infer the halo concentration from the model scaling relation of halo concentration with halo mass. We evaluate the performance of the NFW scaling analysis by measuring the scatters of 50 cluster lensing profiles relative to the NFW predictions over a range of radii, 0.14 ≤ R/[h-1 Mpc] ≤ 2.8. We found 4-6 σ-level evidence of the universal NFW profile in 50 clusters, for both the X-ray halo mass proxy relations, although the gas mass appears to be a better proxy of the underlying true mass. By comparing the measurements with the simulations of cluster lensing profiles taking into account the statistical errors of intrinsic galaxy shapes in the Subaru data, we argue that additional halo mass errors or intrinsic scatters of σ(M500c)/M500c ˜ 0.2-0.3 could reconcile the difference between measurements and simulations. This method allows us to some extent to preserve characteristics of individual clusters in the statistical weak lensing analysis, thereby yielding a new means of exploiting the underlying genuine

  18. A tale of oblivion: Ida Noddack and the ‘universal abundance’ of matter

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gildo Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    Ida Noddack was a German chemist who in 1925, with her husband Walter Noddack, discovered element 75 (rhenium) and possibly element 43 (technetium). She is also known to have anticipated, by nine years, the possibility of nuclear fission. This article focuses on Ida's hypothesis that all elements are present in any mineral. Ida related the relative abundance of the elements in the Universe to hypothetical properties of the atomic nuclei. This allowed her to speculate about a different Periodic Table in which isotopes might be the cause of unexpected features of periodicity. Ida Noddack faced many professional obstacles because of her scientific nonconformity and gender, the resentment of physicists against intrusion in their field, and the overall difficulty of research under and after the Nazi regime.

  19. The Coyote Universe Extended: Precision Emulation of the Matter Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Katrin; Lawrence, Earl; Kwan, Juliana; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2014-01-01

    Modern sky surveys are returning precision measurements of cosmological statistics such as weak lensing shear correlations, the distribution of galaxies, and cluster abundance. To fully exploit these observations, theorists must provide predictions that are at least as accurate as the measurements, as well as robust estimates of systematic errors that are inherent to the modeling process. In the nonlinear regime of structure formation, this challenge can only be overcome by developing a large-scale, multi-physics simulation capability covering a range of cosmological models and astrophysical processes. As a first step to achieving this goal, we have recently developed a prediction scheme for the matter power spectrum (a so-called emulator), accurate at the 1% level out to k ~ 1 Mpc-1 and z = 1 for wCDM cosmologies based on a set of high-accuracy N-body simulations. It is highly desirable to increase the range in both redshift and wavenumber and to extend the reach in cosmological parameter space. To make progress in this direction, while minimizing computational cost, we present a strategy that maximally reuses the original simulations. We demonstrate improvement over the original spatial dynamic range by an order of magnitude, reaching k ~ 10 h Mpc-1, a four-fold increase in redshift coverage, to z = 4, and now include the Hubble parameter as a new independent variable. To further the range in k and z, a new set of nested simulations run at modest cost is added to the original set. The extension in h is performed by including perturbation theory results within a multi-scale procedure for building the emulator. This economical methodology still gives excellent error control, ~5% near the edges of the domain of applicability of the emulator. A public domain code for the new emulator is released as part of the work presented in this paper.

  20. The coyote universe extended: Precision emulation of the matter power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; Kwan, Juliana; Habib, Salman; Lawrence, Earl; Higdon, David

    2014-01-01

    Modern sky surveys are returning precision measurements of cosmological statistics such as weak lensing shear correlations, the distribution of galaxies, and cluster abundance. To fully exploit these observations, theorists must provide predictions that are at least as accurate as the measurements, as well as robust estimates of systematic errors that are inherent to the modeling process. In the nonlinear regime of structure formation, this challenge can only be overcome by developing a large-scale, multi-physics simulation capability covering a range of cosmological models and astrophysical processes. As a first step to achieving this goal, we have recently developed a prediction scheme for the matter power spectrum (a so-called emulator), accurate at the 1% level out to k ∼ 1 Mpc{sup –1} and z = 1 for wCDM cosmologies based on a set of high-accuracy N-body simulations. It is highly desirable to increase the range in both redshift and wavenumber and to extend the reach in cosmological parameter space. To make progress in this direction, while minimizing computational cost, we present a strategy that maximally reuses the original simulations. We demonstrate improvement over the original spatial dynamic range by an order of magnitude, reaching k ∼ 10 h Mpc{sup –1}, a four-fold increase in redshift coverage, to z = 4, and now include the Hubble parameter as a new independent variable. To further the range in k and z, a new set of nested simulations run at modest cost is added to the original set. The extension in h is performed by including perturbation theory results within a multi-scale procedure for building the emulator. This economical methodology still gives excellent error control, ∼5% near the edges of the domain of applicability of the emulator. A public domain code for the new emulator is released as part of the work presented in this paper.

  1. Rotation of the Universe at different cosmological epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechin, L. M.

    2016-06-01

    A step-by-step foundation for the differential character of the Universe's rotation is presented. First, invoking the concept of spacetime foam with spin, it is reasonable to assume that the very early Universe can be described by the Dirac equation. Second, it is shown using the Ehrenfest theorem that, from a classical point of view, the early Universe can be described by the Papapetrou equations. Third, it is stressed that our Universe can perform only rotational motion. It is shown based on the spin part of the Papapetrou equations that the Universe's rotation depends appreciably on the physical properties of a specific cosmological epoch. The rotational angular velocity is calculated for three basic cosmological epochs: the matter-dominated epoch, the transition period (from domination of matter to domination of vacuum), and the vacuum-dominated epoch.

  2. University Students' Satisfaction with their Academic Studies: Personality and Motivation Matter.

    PubMed

    Wach, F-Sophie; Karbach, Julia; Ruffing, Stephanie; Brünken, Roland; Spinath, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Although there is consensus about the importance of students' satisfaction with their academic studies as one facet of academic success, little is known about the determinants of this significant outcome variable. Past research rarely investigated the predictive power of multiple predictors simultaneously. Hence, we examined how demographic variables, personality, cognitive and achievement-related variables (intelligence, academic achievement), as well as various motivational constructs were associated with three different dimensions of satisfaction (satisfaction with study content, satisfaction with the conditions of the academic program, satisfaction with the ability to cope with academic stress) assessed approximately 2 years apart. Analyzing data of a sample of university students (N = 620; M age = 20.77; SD age = 3.22) using structural equation modeling, our results underline the significance of personality and motivational variables: Neuroticism predicted satisfaction with academic studies, but its relevance varied between outcome dimensions. Regarding the predictive validity of motivational variables, the initial motivation for enrolling in a particular major was correlated with two dimensions of subsequent satisfaction with academic studies. In contrast, the predictive value of cognitive and achievement-related variables was relatively low, with academic achievement only related to satisfaction with the conditions of the academic program after controlling for the prior satisfaction level. PMID:26909049

  3. University Students' Satisfaction with their Academic Studies: Personality and Motivation Matter

    PubMed Central

    Wach, F.-Sophie; Karbach, Julia; Ruffing, Stephanie; Brünken, Roland; Spinath, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is consensus about the importance of students' satisfaction with their academic studies as one facet of academic success, little is known about the determinants of this significant outcome variable. Past research rarely investigated the predictive power of multiple predictors simultaneously. Hence, we examined how demographic variables, personality, cognitive and achievement-related variables (intelligence, academic achievement), as well as various motivational constructs were associated with three different dimensions of satisfaction (satisfaction with study content, satisfaction with the conditions of the academic program, satisfaction with the ability to cope with academic stress) assessed approximately 2 years apart. Analyzing data of a sample of university students (N = 620; Mage = 20.77; SDage = 3.22) using structural equation modeling, our results underline the significance of personality and motivational variables: Neuroticism predicted satisfaction with academic studies, but its relevance varied between outcome dimensions. Regarding the predictive validity of motivational variables, the initial motivation for enrolling in a particular major was correlated with two dimensions of subsequent satisfaction with academic studies. In contrast, the predictive value of cognitive and achievement-related variables was relatively low, with academic achievement only related to satisfaction with the conditions of the academic program after controlling for the prior satisfaction level. PMID:26909049

  4. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia and pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Carll, Alex P; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W; Hazari, Mehdi S; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy H; Cascio, Wayne E; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2015-02-01

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiological events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflammation, oxidative stress, arrhythmia and autonomic nervous system imbalance. Cardiomyopathy results from cardiac injury, is the leading cause of heart failure, and can be induced in heart failure-prone rats through sub-chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO). To test whether cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to inhaled PM2.5 and can elucidate potential mechanisms, we investigated the cardiophysiologic, ventilatory, inflammatory and oxidative effects of a single nose-only inhalation of a metal-rich PM2.5 (580 µg/m(3), 4 h) in ISO-pretreated (35 days × 1.0 mg/kg/day sc) rats. During the 5 days post-treatment, ISO-treated rats had decreased HR and BP and increased pre-ejection period (PEP, an inverse correlate of contractility) relative to saline-treated rats. Before inhalation exposure, ISO-pretreated rats had increased PR and ventricular repolarization time (QT) and heterogeneity (Tp-Te). Relative to clean air, PM2.5 further prolonged PR-interval and decreased systolic BP during inhalation exposure; increased tidal volume, expiratory time, heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of parasympathetic tone and atrioventricular block arrhythmias over the hours post-exposure; increased pulmonary neutrophils, macrophages and total antioxidant status one day post-exposure; and decreased pulmonary glutathione peroxidase 8 weeks after exposure, with all effects occurring exclusively in ISO-pretreated rats but not saline-pretreated rats. Ultimately, our findings indicate that cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to the oxidative, inflammatory, ventilatory, autonomic and arrhythmogenic effects of acute PM2.5 inhalation. PMID:25600220

  5. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, and pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    PubMed Central

    Carll, Alex P.; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy H.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflammation, oxidative stress, arrhythmia, and autonomic nervous system imbalance. Cardiomyopathy results from cardiac injury, is the leading cause of heart failure, and can be induced in heart failure-prone rats through sub-chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO). To test whether cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to inhaled PM2.5 and can elucidate potential mechanisms, we investigated the cardiophysiologic, ventilatory, inflammatory, and oxidative effects of a single nose-only inhalation of a metal-rich PM2.5 (580 μg/m3, 4h) in ISO-pretreated (35 days * 1.0 mg/kg/day sc) rats. During the 5 days post-treatment, ISO-treated rats had decreased HR and BP and increased pre-ejection period (PEP, an inverse correlate of contractility) relative to saline-treated rats. Before inhalation exposure, ISO-pretreated rats had increased PR and ventricular repolarization time (QT) and heterogeneity (Tp-Te). Relative to clean air, PM2.5 further prolonged PR-interval and decreased systolic BP during inhalation exposure; increased tidal volume, expiratory time, heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of parasympathetic tone, and atrioventricular block arrhythmias over the hours post-exposure; increased pulmonary neutrophils, macrophages, and total antioxidant status one day post-exposure; and decreased pulmonary glutathione peroxidase 8 weeks after exposure, with all effects occurring exclusively in ISO-pretreated rats but not saline-pretreated rats. Ultimately, our findings indicate that cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to the oxidative, inflammatory, ventilatory, autonomic, and arrhythmogenic effects of acute PM2.5 inhalation. PMID:25600220

  6. Dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary

    The observational evidence for dark matter in the universe is reviewed. Constraints on the baryon density from primordial nucleosynthesis are presented and compared to the dynamical estimates of the mass on various scales. Baryons can account for the observed luminous mass as well as some, perhaps most, of the 'observed' dark mass. However if, as inflation/naturalness suggest, the total density of the universe is equal to the critical density, then nonbaryonic dark matter is required. The assets and liabilities of, as well as the candidates for, hot and cold dark matter are outlined. At present, there is no completely satisfactory candidate for nonbaryonic dark matter.

  7. A new observation of a cosmic microwave background radiation supports my idea that a balance universe model between stellar matter and dark matter is like Chinese TaiJi Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2014-03-01

    Einstein's equation gives a balance model of the universe. However it is not a steady model. As we know, there is a large amount of dark matter around stars and galaxies. This dark matter structure is very special. A new balance model of the universe, includes the dark matter, needed to be looked for. The stellar matter is a positive of Einstein's model. The dark matter is a negative of Einstein's model by ``mass-energy coordinate'' system because it has a space-time center. http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2010.SES.FC.9, Both of them build up a Dynamic Steady Balance Universal TaiJi Model without cosmological constant. http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2010.DNP.FE.9, So the map of CMB is like the Chinese TaiJi map. And there may be a ``hot spot'' across ``Axis of Evil'' and opposite to the ``cold spot.'' http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2430415, So there is a negative black-body radiation. A positive black-body radiation and a negative black-body radiation also builds up a balance model such as TaiJi Model. http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2012.APR.K1.78, The paper supposes that dark negative heat never spontaneously flows from a hot substance to a cold substance in dark matter system. The negative second law of thermodynamics and the second law of thermodynamics build up a balance model such as TaiJi Model too. AEEA

  8. Inflationary attractor from tachyonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zong-Kuan; Piao, Yun-Song; Cai, Rong-Gen; Zhang, Yuan-Zhong

    2003-08-01

    We study the complete evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe dominated by tachyonic matter. We demonstrate the attractor behavior of tachyonic inflation using the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. We also obtain analytical approximations for the trajectories of the tachyon field in different regions. The numerical calculation shows that an initial nonvanishing momentum does not prevent the onset of inflation. The slow-rolling solution is an attractor.

  9. Cosmological perturbations in theories with non-minimal coupling between curvature and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Frazão, Pedro; Páramos, Jorge E-mail: pedro.frazao@ist.utl.pt

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we examine how the presence of a non-minimal coupling between spacetime curvature and matter affects the evolution of cosmological perturbations on a homogeneous and isotropic Universe, and hence the formation of large-scale structure. This framework places constraints on the terms which arise due to the coupling with matter and, in particular, on the modified growth of matter density perturbations. We derive approximate analytical solutions for the evolution of matter overdensities during the matter dominated era and discuss the compatibility of the obtained results with the hypothesis that the late time acceleration of the Universe is driven by a non-minimal coupling.

  10. X-ray clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamic PPM simulation of the cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Cen, Renyue; Norman, Michael L.; Ostriker, Jermemiah P.; Stone, James M.

    1994-01-01

    A new three-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) is utilized to compute the distribution of hot gas in the standard Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) universe. Utilizing periodic boundary conditions, a box with size 85 h(exp-1) Mpc, having cell size 0.31 h(exp-1) Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3)=10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, Sigma(sub 8)=1.05, Omega(sub b)=0.06, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters, compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. The results, which are compared with those obtained in the preceding paper (Kang et al. 1994a), may be used in conjuction with ROSAT and other observational data sets. Overall, the results of the two computations are qualitatively very similar with regard to the trends of cluster properties, i.e., how the number density, radius, and temeprature depend on luminosity and redshift. The total luminosity from clusters is approximately a factor of 2 higher using the PPM code (as compared to the 'total variation diminishing' (TVD) code used in the previous paper) with the number of bright clusters higher by a similar factor. The primary conclusions of the prior paper, with regard to the power spectrum of the primeval density perturbations, are strengthened: the standard CDM model, normalized to the COBE microwave detection, predicts too many bright X-ray emitting clusters, by a factor probably in excess of 5. The comparison between observations and theoretical predictions for the evolution of cluster properties, luminosity functions, and size and temperature distributions should provide an important discriminator among competing scenarios for the development of structure in the universe.

  11. Universality of dark matter haloes shape over six decades in mass: insights from the Millennium XXL and SBARBINE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamigo, Mario; Despali, Giulia; Limousin, Marceau; Angulo, Raul; Giocoli, Carlo; Soucail, Geneviève

    2015-05-01

    For the last 30 yr many observational and theoretical evidences have shown that galaxy clusters are not spherical objects, and that their shape is much better described by a triaxial geometry. With the advent of multiwavelength data of increasing quality, triaxial investigations of galaxy clusters is gathering a growing interest from the community, especially in the time of `precision cosmology'. In this work, we aim to provide the first statistically significant predictions in the unexplored mass range above 3 × 1014 M⊙h-1, using haloes from two redshift snapshots (z = 0 and z = 1) of the Millennium XXL simulation. The size of this cosmological dark matter-only simulation (4.1 Gpc) allows the formation of a statistically significant number of massive cluster scale haloes (≈500 with M > 2× 1015 M⊙ h-1, and 780 000 with M > 1014 M⊙ h-1). Besides, we aim to extend this investigation to lower masses in order to look for universal predictions across nearly six orders of magnitude in mass, from 1010 to almost 1016 M⊙ h-1. For this purpose we use the SBARBINE simulations, allowing us to model haloes of masses starting from ≈1010 M⊙ h-1. We use an elliptical overdensity method to select haloes and compute the shapes of the unimodal ones (approximately 50 per cent), while we discard the more unrelaxed. The minor to major and intermediate to major axis ratio distributions are found to be well described by simple universal functional forms that do not depend on cosmology or redshift. Our results extend the findings of Jing & Suto to a higher precision and a wider range of mass. This `recipe' is made available to the community in this paper and in a dedicated web page.

  12. Some like it triaxial: the universality of dark matter halo shapes and their evolution along the cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despali, Giulia; Giocoli, Carlo; Tormen, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of dark matter halo shapes, studying how the distributions of ellipticity, prolateness and axial ratios evolve as a function of time and mass. With this purpose in mind, we analysed the results of three cosmological simulations, running an ellipsoidal halo finder to measure triaxial halo shapes. The simulations have different scales, mass limits and cosmological parameters, which allows us to ensure a good resolution and statistics in a wide mass range, and to investigate the dependence of halo properties on the cosmological model. We confirm the tendency of haloes to be prolate at all times, even if they become more triaxial going to higher redshifts. Regarding the dependence on mass, more massive haloes are also less spherical at all redshifts, since they are the most recent forming systems and so still retain memory of their original shape at the moment of collapse. We then propose a rescaling of the shape-mass relations, using the variable ν = δc/σ to represent the mass, which absorbs the dependence on both cosmology and time, allowing us to find universal relations between halo masses and shape parameters (ellipticity, prolateness and the axial ratios) which hold at any redshift. This may be very useful to determine prior distributions of halo shapes for observational studies.

  13. Particle physics in the very early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the very early big bang universe in which elementary particle physics effects may have been dominant are discussed, with attention to the generation of a net baryon number by way of grand unification theory, and emphasis on the possible role of massive neutrinos in increasing current understanding of various cosmological properties and of the constraints placed on neutrino properties by cosmology. It is noted that when grand unification theories are used to describe very early universe interactions, an initially baryon-symmetrical universe can evolve a net baryon excess of 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -11th per photon, given reasonable parameters. If neutrinos have mass, the bulk of the mass of the universe may be in the form of leptons, implying that the form of matter most familiar to physical science may not be the dominant form of matter in the universe.

  14. Dark matter candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of. Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs.

  15. Dark Matters

    ScienceCinema

    Joseph Silk

    2010-01-08

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  16. Dark Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Silk

    2009-09-23

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  17. ETHOS—an effective theory of structure formation: From dark particle physics to the matter distribution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris; Zavala, Jesús; Bringmann, Torsten; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS) that enables cosmological structure formation to be computed in almost any microphysical model of dark matter physics. This framework maps the detailed microphysical theories of particle dark matter interactions into the physical effective parameters that shape the linear matter power spectrum and the self-interaction transfer cross section of nonrelativistic dark matter. These are the input to structure formation simulations, which follow the evolution of the cosmological and galactic dark matter distributions. Models with similar effective parameters in ETHOS but with different dark particle physics would nevertheless result in similar dark matter distributions. We present a general method to map an ultraviolet complete or effective field theory of low-energy dark matter physics into parameters that affect the linear matter power spectrum and carry out this mapping for several representative particle models. We further propose a simple but useful choice for characterizing the dark matter self-interaction transfer cross section that parametrizes self-scattering in structure formation simulations. Taken together, these effective parameters in ETHOS allow the classification of dark matter theories according to their structure formation properties rather than their intrinsic particle properties, paving the way for future simulations to span the space of viable dark matter physics relevant for structure formation.

  18. Imaging the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-07-01

    An international team of cosmologists has released the first detailed images of the universe in its infancy. The images reveal the structure that existed when the universe was a tiny fraction of its current age and 1,000 times smaller and hotter than it is today. Research carried out as part of this project is shedding light on some of cosmology's long-standing mysteries, such as the nature of the matter and energy that dominate intergalactic space and whether space is ''curved'' or ''flat.''(c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  19. Class of solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in a homogeneous and isotropic universe are given by triconfluent Heun functions for the spatially closed, flat, and open geometries of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe filled with different forms of energy. In a matter-dominated universe, we find the polynomial solution and the energy density spectrum. In the cases of radiation-dominated and vacuum universes, there are no polynomial solutions as shown.

  20. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... one of the sex chromosomes, which are the X and Y chromosomes. Dominant inheritance occurs when an ...

  1. The cosmic web of the Local Universe: cosmic variance, matter content and its relation to galaxy morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuza, Sebastián E.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Heß, Steffen; Libeskind, Noam I.; Müller, Volker

    2014-11-01

    We present, for the first time, a Local Universe (LU) characterization using high-precision constrained N-body simulations based on self-consistent phase-space reconstructions of the large-scale structure in the Two-Micron All-Sky Galaxy Redshift Survey. We analyse whether we live in a special cosmic web environment by estimating cosmic variance from a set of unconstrained ΛCDM simulations as a function of distance to random observers. By computing volume and mass filling fractions for voids, sheets, filaments and knots, we find that the LU displays a typical scatter of about 1σ at scales r ≳ 15 h-1 Mpc, in agreement with ΛCDM, converging to a fair unbiased sample when considering spheres of about 60 h-1 Mpc radius. Additionally, we compute the matter density profile of the LU and we have found a reasonable agreement with the estimates of Karachentsev only when considering the contribution of dark haloes. This indicates that observational estimates might be biased towards low-density values. As a first application of our reconstruction, we investigate the likelihood that different galaxy morphological types inhabit certain cosmic web environments. In particular, we find that, irrespective of the method used to define the web, either based on the density or the peculiar velocity field, elliptical galaxies show a clear tendency to preferentially reside in clusters as opposed to voids (up to levels of 5.3σ and 9.8σ, respectively) and conversely for spiral galaxies (up to levels of 5.6σ and 5.4σ, respectively). These findings are compatible with previous works, albeit at higher confidence levels.

  2. When matter matters

    SciTech Connect

    Easson, Damien A.; Sawicki, Ignacy; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: ignacy.sawicki@uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-07-01

    We study a recently proposed scenario for the early universe:Subluminal Galilean Genesis. We prove that without any other matter present in the spatially flat Friedmann universe, the perturbations of the Galileon scalar field propagate with a speed at most equal to the speed of light. This proof applies to all cosmological solutions — to the whole phase space. However, in a more realistic situation, when one includes any matter which is not directly coupled to the Galileon, there always exists a region of phase space where these perturbations propagate superluminally, indeed with arbitrarily high speed. We illustrate our analytic proof with numerical computations. We discuss the implications of this result for the possible UV completion of the model.

  3. Imperfect Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  4. Quirky composite dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Terning, John; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2010-05-01

    We propose a new dark matter candidate, “quirky dark matter,” that is a scalar baryonic bound state of a new non-Abelian force that becomes strong below the electroweak scale. The bound state is made of chiral quirks: new fermions that transform under both the new strong force as well as in a chiral representation of the electroweak group, acquiring mass from the Higgs mechanism. Electric charge neutrality of the lightest baryon requires approximately degenerate quirk masses which also causes the charge radius of the bound state to be negligible. The abundance is determined by an asymmetry that is linked to the baryon and lepton numbers of the universe through electroweak sphalerons. Dark matter elastic scattering with nuclei proceeds through Higgs exchange as well as an electromagnetic polarizability operator which is just now being tested in direct detection experiments. A novel method to search for quirky dark matter is to look for a gamma-ray “dark line” spectroscopic feature in galaxy clusters that result from the quirky Lyman-alpha or quirky hyperfine transitions. Colliders are expected to dominantly produce quirky mesons, not quirky baryons, consequently large missing energy is not the primary collider signal of the physics associated with quirky dark matter.

  5. The Nature of Damped Lyα Systems and Their Hosts in the Standard Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2012-04-01

    Using adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with a physically motivated supernova feedback prescription, we show that the standard cold dark matter model can account for extant observed properties of damped Lyα systems (DLAs). With detailed examination of DLAs identified for each redshift snapshot through ray tracing through the simulation volumes containing thousands of galaxies, we find the following: (1) While DLA hosts roughly trace the overall population of galaxies at all redshifts, they are always gas-rich and have tendencies of being slightly smaller and bluer. (2) The history of DLA evolution is cosmological in nature and reflects primarily the evolution of the underlying cosmic density, galaxy size, and galaxy interactions. With higher density and more interactions at high redshift the size of DLAs is a larger fraction of their virial radius. (3) The variety of DLAs at high redshift is richer with a large contribution coming from galactic aqueducts, created through close galaxy interactions. The portion of gaseous disks of galaxies where most stars reside makes a relatively small contribution to DLA incidence at z = 3-4. (4) The majority of DLAs arise in halos of mass Mh = 1010-1012 M ⊙ at z = 1.6-4, as these galaxies dominate the overall population of galaxies then. At z = 3-4, 20%-30% of DLA hosts are Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), 10%-20% are due to galaxies more massive than LBGs, and 50%-70% are from smaller galaxies. (5) Galactic winds play an indispensable role in shaping the kinematic properties of DLAs. Specifically, the high velocity width DLAs are a mixture of those arising in high-mass, high velocity dispersion halos and those arising in smaller mass systems where cold gas clouds are entrained to high velocities by galactic winds. (6) In agreement with observations, we see a weak but noticeable evolution in DLA metallicity. The metallicity distribution centers at [Z/H] = -1.5 to -1 and spans more than three decades at

  6. Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Cotti, U.; De Leon, C. L.; Raya, A; Villasenor, L.

    2008-07-02

    One of the biggest scientific mysteries of our time resides in the identification of the particles that constitute a large fraction of the mass of our Universe, generically known as dark matter. We review the observations and the experimental data that imply the existence of dark matter. We briefly discuss the properties of the two best dark-matter candidate particles and the experimental techniques presently used to try to discover them. Finally, we mention a proposed project that has recently emerged within the Mexican community to look for dark matter.

  7. Isocurvature cold dark matter fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Bond, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    According to Preskill et al. (1983), the axion field represents a particularly attractive candidate for the dark matter in the universe. In many respects it behaves like other forms of cold dark matter, such as massive gravitinos, photinos, and monopoles. It is, however, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of very low mass, and it is only because of rapid coherent oscillations of the field that it can dominate the mass density of the universe. In the present paper it is assumed that the isocurvature mode is dominant. The linear evolution calculations conducted do not depend upon specific details of particle physics. For this reason, the conducted discussion is applicable to any cold dark matter model with isocurvature perturbations. The results of the study lead to the conclusion that scale-invariant isocurvature perturbations do not seem an attractive possibility for the origin of large-scale structure. The findings strengthen the review that primordial adiabatic perturbations were the dominant fluctuations in the early stages of the Big Bang.

  8. University Handbook. University of Wisconsin, Whitewater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Whitewater.

    The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater's handbook is divided into major sections dealing with: the university; business services; university services; student matters; curricular matters; and personnel matters. Various topics are covered, including: tuition for senior citizens, medical insurance, risk management, degree requirements, student…

  9. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... type of chromosome that is affected (autosomal or sex chromosome). It also depends on whether the trait ...

  10. Dark energy and equation of state oscillations with collisional matter fluid in exponential modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.; Karagiannakis, N.; Park, Miok

    2015-03-01

    We study some aspects of cosmological evolution in a universe described by a viable curvature corrected exponential F (R ) gravity model, in the presence of matter fluids consisting of collisional matter and radiation. Particularly, we express the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations of motion in terms of parameters that are appropriate for describing the dark energy oscillations and compare the dark energy density and the dark energy equation of state parameter corresponding to collisional and noncollisional matter. In addition to these, and owing to the fact that the cosmological evolution of collisional and noncollisional matter universes, when quantified in terms of the Hubble parameter and the effective equation of states parameters, is very much alike, we further scrutinize the cosmological evolution study by extending the analysis to the study of matter perturbations in the matter domination era. We quantify this analysis in terms of the growth factor of matter perturbations, in which case the resulting picture of the cosmological evolution is clear, since collisional and noncollisional universes can be clearly distinguished. Interestingly enough, since it is known that the oscillations of the effective equation of state parameter around the phantom divide are undesirable and unwanted in F (R ) gravities, when these are considered for redshifts near the matter domination era and before, in the curvature corrected exponential model with collisional matter that we study here there exist oscillations that never cross the phantom divide. Therefore, this rather unwanted feature of the effective equation of state parameter is also absent in the collisional matter filled universe.

  11. EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Baushev, A. N.

    2013-07-10

    Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute {approx}12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed ({approx}600 km s{sup -1}), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s{sup -1}), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

  12. Late-time cosmology of a scalar-tensor theory with a universal multiplicative coupling between the scalar field and the matter Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minazzoli, Olivier; Hees, Aurélien

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the late-time cosmological behavior of scalar-tensor theories with a universal multiplicative coupling between the scalar field and the matter Lagrangian in the matter era. This class of theory encompasses the case of the massless string dilaton [see Damour and Polyakov, General Relativity and Gravitation 26, 1171 (1994)] as well as a theory with an intrinsic decoupling mechanism in the solar system [see Minazzoli and Hees, Phys. Rev. D 88, 041504 (2013)]. The cosmological evolution is studied in the general relativity limit justified by solar system constraints on the gravitation theory. The behavior of these cosmological evolutions are then compared to two types of observations: the constraints on temporal variations of the constants of nature and the distance-luminosity measurements. In particular, the nonminimal coupling implies that the distance-luminosity relation is modified compared to general relativity. Theories producing a cosmological behavior in agreement with these observations are identified.

  13. Intrinsic Solar System decoupling of a scalar-tensor theory with a universal coupling between the scalar field and the matter Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minazzoli, Olivier; Hees, Aurélien

    2013-08-01

    In this Communication, we present a class of Brans-Dicke-like theories with a universal coupling between the scalar field and the matter Lagrangian. We show this class of theories naturally exhibits a decoupling mechanism between the scalar field and matter. As a consequence, this coupling leads to almost the same phenomenology as general relativity in the Solar System: the trajectories of massive bodies and the light propagation differ from general relativity only at the second post-Newtonian order. Deviations from general relativity are beyond present detection capabilities. However, this class of theories predicts a deviation of the gravitational redshift at a level detectable by the future ACES and STE/QUEST missions.

  14. Dark energy domination in the local flow of giant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2015-05-01

    A dozen of the most luminous galaxies, at distances of up to 10 Mpc from the Local Group, move away from the group, forming the local expansion flow of giants. We use recent Hubble Space Telescope data on local giants and their numerous fainter companions to study the dynamical structure and evolutionary trends of the flow. An N-body computer model, which reproduces the observed kinematics of the flow, is constructed under the assumption that the flow is embedded in the universal dark energy background. In the model, the motions of the flow members are controlled by their mutual attraction force and the repulsion force produced by the dark energy. It is found that the dark energy repulsion dominates the force field of the flow. Because of this, the flow expands with acceleration. The dark energy domination is enhanced by the environment effect of the low mean matter density on the spatial scale of 50 Mpc in the local Universe. The dark energy domination increases with time and introduces to the flow an asymptotically linear velocity-distance relation with the universal time-rate that depends on the dark energy density only.

  15. Reasoning Using Particulate Nature of Matter: An Example of a Sociochemical Norm in a University-Level Physical Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Nicole; Rasmussen, Chris; Sweeney, George; Wawro, Megan; Towns, Marcy; Cole, Renee

    2013-01-01

    In college level chemistry courses, reasoning using molecular and particulate descriptions of matter becomes central to understanding physical and chemical properties. In this study, we used a qualitative approach to analyzing classroom discourse derived from Toulmin's model of argumentation in order to describe the ways in which students develop…

  16. High-energy cosmic antiparticle excess vs. isotropic gamma-ray background problem in decaying dark matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Belotsky, K. M.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Budaev, R. I.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Kirillov, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Laletin, M. N.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mosichkin, A. F.; Okrugin, A. A.; Rodenko, S. A.; Shitova, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    We are going to show that any conventional decaying dark matter model, providing an explanation of cosmic antiparticle excess observed by PAMELA and AMS-02, inevitably faces the contradiction with isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background, measured by FERMI/LAT.

  17. The distribution of the dark matter in galaxies as the imprint of its Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigerio Martins, Christiane

    2009-03-01

    The standard framework within which cosmological measurements are confronted and interpreted nowadays, called Lambda Cold Dark Matter, presents a Universe dominated by unknown forms of energy and matter. My Thesis is devoted to investigate the distribution of dark matter in galaxies and addresses the fact that the local universe-the small objects that orbit galaxies and the galaxy cores-turns out to be a marvelous laboratory for examining the nature of dark matter and the fundamental physics involved in structure formation and evolution. I develop tests, based on mass modeling of rotation curves, for the validation of dark matter models on galactic scales. These tests have been applied in analyzing the phenomenology of the cusp vs core controversy, and the phenomenon of non-Keplerian rotation curves as modification of the laws of gravity. I further investigate the properties and scaling laws of dark matter halos. My conclusion is that galactic observations provide strong imprints on the nature of dark matter.

  18. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Navarro, J F; Jenkins, A; Vogelsberger, M; Wang, J; Ludlow, A; Helmi, A

    2008-11-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at a level that may soon be observable. Previous work has argued that the annihilation signal will be dominated by emission from very small clumps (perhaps smaller even than the Earth), which would be most easily detected where they cluster together in the dark matter haloes of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we report that such small-scale structure will, in fact, have a negligible impact on dark matter detectability. Rather, the dominant and probably most easily detectable signal will be produced by diffuse dark matter in the main halo of the Milky Way. If the main halo is strongly detected, then small dark matter clumps should also be visible, but may well contain no stars, thereby confirming a key prediction of the cold dark matter model. PMID:18987737

  19. Warm dense matter study and pulsed-power developments for X-pinch equipment in Nagaoka University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Miki, Yasutoshi; Tachinami, Fumitaka; Saito, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Takuya; Anzai, Nobuyuki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore high energy density physics, we have performed WDM experiment by using several pulsed-power devices. To generate well-defined warm dense state for evaluating electrical conductivity and its properties, we have proposed an isochoric heating of foamed metal by using pulsed-power discharge. The proposed technique yields the electrical conductivity of warm dense matter with a well-defined temperature. To observe the warm dense matter, a pulsed-power generator based on a pulse-forming-network (PFN) was studied toward generating an intense point-spot-like X-ray source from X-pinch technique. From comparison of the designing and the actual inductances of the X-pinch system, the actual inductance of X-pinch system is 3.5 times higher than the designing inductance. To reduce the total inductance of X-pinch system, we will modify the gap switch system such as multi spake gap.

  20. Primordial magnetic fields from the post-inflationary universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    We explore cosmological magnetogenesis in the post-inflationary universe, when the inflaton oscillates around its potential minimum and the universe is effectively dominated by cold matter. During this epoch prior to reheating, large-scale magnetic fields can be significantly produced by the cosmological background. By considering magnetogenesis both during and after inflation, we demonstrate that magnetic fields stronger than 10{sup −15} G can be generated on Mpc scales without having strong couplings in the theory, or producing too large electric fields that would dominate the universe.

  1. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-11-01

    We consider the possibility that the Universe is made of a dark fluid described by a quadratic equation of state P =K ρ2 , where ρ is the rest-mass density and K is a constant. The energy density ɛ =ρ c2+K ρ2 is the sum of two terms: a rest-mass term ρ c2 that mimics "dark matter" (P =0 ) and an internal energy term u =K ρ2=P that mimics a "stiff fluid" (P =ɛ ) in which the speed of sound is equal to the speed of light. In the early universe, the internal energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as a stiff fluid (P ˜ɛ , ɛ ∝a-6). In the late universe, the rest-mass energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as pressureless dark matter (P ≃0 , ɛ ∝a-3). We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe undergoing a stiff matter era, a dark matter era, and a dark energy era due to the cosmological constant. This analytical solution generalizes the Einstein-de Sitter solution describing the dark matter era, and the Λ CDM model describing the dark matter era and the dark energy era. Historically, the possibility of a primordial stiff matter era first appeared in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. A primordial stiff matter era also occurs in recent cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the internal energy of the dark fluid mimicking stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular like in the standard big bang theory. It expands from an initial state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the internal energy of the dark fluid is negative (while, of course, its total energy density is positive), so that it mimics anti-stiff matter. This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction with a negative scattering length. In that case, the primordial universe is nonsingular and

  2. Not Merely a Matter of Academics: Student Experiences of a South African University as Study-Abroad Destination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paola, R. J.; Lemmer, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Study abroad programmes attract considerable numbers of American college students; however, very few select an African country as their study-abroad destination. This article explores the experiences of American undergraduates who made the uncommon choice of a South African university as destination for a mid-length immersion type programme. The…

  3. The Fall of the Faculty: The Rise of the All-Administrative University and Why It Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsberg, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, "deanlets"--administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience--are…

  4. Predicting College Math Success: Do High School Performance and Gender Matter? Evidence from Sultan Qaboos University in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, M. Mazharul; Al-Ghassani, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of students of college of Science of Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Calculus I course, and examine the predictive validity of student's high school performance and gender for Calculus I success. The data for the study was extracted from students' database maintained by the Deanship of…

  5. Does Structural Development Matter? The Third Mission through Teaching and R&D at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohtamäki, Vuokko

    2015-01-01

    The latest policy trends of higher education institutions (HEIs) have increasingly highlighted the importance of external stakeholders' expertise and resources. This paper investigated how the third mission through teaching and research and development (R&D) at Finnish universities of applied sciences (UASs) is influenced by the structural…

  6. Baryonic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden-Bell, D. ); Gilmore, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Dark matter, first definitely found in the large clusters of galaxies, is now known to be dominant mass in the outer parts of galaxies. All the mass definitely deduced could be made up of baryons, and this would fit well with the requirements of nucleosynthesis in a big bang of small {Omega}{sub B}. However, if inflation is the explanation of the expansion and large scale homogeneity of the universe and of baryon synthesis, and if the universe did not have an infinite extent at the big bang, then {Omega} should be minutely greater than unity. It is commonly hypothesized that most mass is composed of some unknown, non-baryonic form. This book first discusses the known forms, comets, planets, brown dwarfs, stars, gas, galaxies and Lyman {alpha} clouds in which baryons are known to exist. Limits on the amount of dark matter in baryonic form are discussed in the context of the big bang. Inhomogeneities of the right type alleviate the difficulties associated with {Omega}{sub B} = 1 cosmological nucleosynthesis.

  7. Problems of modern cosmology: how dominant is the vacuum?

    PubMed

    Overduin, J; Priester, W

    2001-06-01

    It would be hard to find a cosmologist today who does not believe that the vast bulk of the Universe (95% or more) is hidden from our eyes. We review the evidence for this remarkable consensus, and for the latest proposal, that the mysterious dark matter consists of as many as four separate ingredients: baryons, massive neutrinos, new "exotic" dark matter particles, and vacuum energy, also known as the cosmological constant (lambda). Of these, only baryons fit within standard theoretical physics; the others, if their existence is confirmed, will mean rewriting textbooks. Fresh experimental evidence has recently appeared for and against all four components, so that the subject is in a state of turmoil and excitement. The past 3 years in particular have seen the fourth (vacuum) component come into new prominence, largely at the expense of the third (exotic dark matter). We conclude our review by exploring the possibility that the energy density of the vacuum is in fact so dominant as to leave little room for significant amounts of exotic dark matter. PMID:11544951

  8. Anisotropic universe with anisotropic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Panda, Sukanta; Sharma, Manabendra; Thakur, Snigdha E-mail: sukanta@iiserb.ac.in E-mail: snigdha@iiserb.ac.in

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the state space of a Bianchi-I universe with anisotropic sources. Here we consider an extended state space which includes null geodesics in this background. The evolution equations for all the state observables are derived. Dynamical systems approach is used to study the evolution of these equations. The asymptotic stable fixed points for all the evolution equations are found. We also check our analytic results with numerical analysis of these dynamical equations. The evolution of the state observables are studied both in cosmic time and using a dimensionless time variable. Then we repeat the same analysis with a more realistic scenario, adding the isotropic (dust like dark) matter and a cosmological constant (dark energy) to our anisotropic sources, to study their co-evolution. The universe now approaches a de Sitter space asymptotically dominated by the cosmological constant. The cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps due to shear are also generated in this scenario, assuming that the universe contains anisotropic matter along with the usual (dark) matter and vacuum (dark) energy since decoupling. We find that they contribute dominantly to the CMB quadrupole. We also constrain the current level of anisotropy and also search for any cosmic preferred axis present in the data. We use the Union 2 Supernovae data to this extent. An anisotropy axis close to the mirror symmetry axis seen in the cosmic microwave background data from Planck probe is found.

  9. Highly dominating, highly authoritarian personalities.

    PubMed

    Altemeyer, Bob

    2004-08-01

    The author considered the small part of the population whose members score highly on both the Social Dominance Orientation scale and the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale. Studies of these High SDO-High RWAs, culled from samples of nearly 4000 Canadian university students and over 2600 of their parents and reported in the present article, reveal that these dominating authoritarians are among the most prejudiced persons in society. Furthermore, they seem to combine the worst elements of each kind of personality, being power-hungry, unsupportive of equality, manipulative, and amoral, as social dominators are in general, while also being religiously ethnocentric and dogmatic, as right-wing authoritarians tend to be. The author suggested that, although they are small in number, such persons can have considerable impact on society because they are well-positioned to become the leaders of prejudiced right-wing political movements. PMID:15279331

  10. PeV-scale dark matter as a thermal relic of a decoupled sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan; Krnjaic, Gordan

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we consider a class of scenarios in which the dark matter is part of a heavy hidden sector that is thermally decoupled from the Standard Model in the early universe. The dark matter freezes-out by annihilating to a lighter, metastable state, whose subsequent abundance can naturally come to dominate the energy density of the universe. When this state decays, it reheats the visible sector and dilutes all relic abundances, thereby allowing the dark matter to be orders of magnitude heavier than the weak scale. For concreteness, we consider a simple realization with a Dirac fermion dark matter candidate coupled to a massive gauge boson that decays to the Standard Model through its kinetic mixing with hypercharge. We identify viable parameter space in which the dark matter can be as heavy as ∼1-100 PeV without being overproduced in the early universe.

  11. Late-time cosmological evolution in f (R ) theories with ordinary and collisional matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.; Karagiannakis, N.

    2015-04-01

    We study the late-time cosmological evolution of f(R) theories of modified gravity, with the matter content of the Universe being that of collisional self-interacting matter. We assume that the Universe is described by a flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric and that it is matter and dark energy dominated. The results of our numerical analysis for a collisional matter f(R) theory are compared with those resulting from pressureless matter f(R) theory and from the Λ CDM model. As we shall demonstrate, the resulting picture can vary from model to model, indicating that the effect of collisional matter in f(R) theories is strongly model dependent. In all studied cases, the effective equation of state parameter does not cross the phantom divide, both in the collisional matter and pressureless matter f(R) theories. Finally, we thoroughly study the effects of collisional matter on one of the f(R) models that is known to provide a unified description of early time inflation and late-time acceleration. The overall picture of the evolution of the Universe is not drastically affected, apart from the matter era, which is further enhanced with an additional matter energy contribution. However, a fully consistent description of the Universe’s evolution requires the introduction of a dark energy compensate in the total energy density, a concept very well known from the literature.

  12. Dynamics in a Maximally Symmetric Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewketu, Asnakew

    2016-03-01

    Our present understanding of the evolution of the universe relies upon the Friedmann- Robertson- Walker cosmological models. This model is so successful that it is now being considered as the Standard Model of Cosmology. So in this work we derive the Fried- mann equations using the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric together with Einstein field equation and then we give a simple method to reduce Friedmann equations to a second order linear differential equation when it is supplemented with a time dependent equation of state. Furthermore, as illustrative examples, we solve this equation for some specific time dependent equation of states. And also by using the Friedmann equations with some time dependent equation of state we try to determine the cosmic scale factor(the rate at which the universe expands) and age of the Friedmann universe, for the matter dominated era, radiation dominated era and for both matter and radiation dominated era by considering different cases. We have finally discussed the observable quantities that can be evidences for the accelerated expansion of the Friedmann universe. I would like to acknowledge Addis Ababa University for its financial and material support to my work on the title mentioned above.

  13. Dark matter and formation of large scale structure in the universe - The test by distribution of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Chu, Y.; Zhu, X.

    1985-05-01

    According to the scenario, developed in the previous paper, on the formation of large scale structure in the universe, it would be expected that: (1) the distribution of quasars should differ from that of galaxies because it has no strong inhomogeneity on the scale of 10-100 Mpc; (2) the distributions of quasars with Z greater than 2 and Z less than 2 should differ from each other because of the absence of large structure in the former but its presence in the latter. Various analyses on quasar distribution are consistent with these predictions. Particularly, the nearest neighbor test for the complete quasar sample given by Savage and Bolton (1979) clearly shows that the distribution of Z greater than 2 quasars is rather homogeneous while the Z less than 2 quasars have a tendency to clustering.

  14. Simulations of Galaxy Formation in a Λ Cold Dark Matter Universe. I. Dynamical and Photometric Properties of a Simulated Disk Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadi, Mario G.; Navarro, Julio F.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Eke, Vincent R.

    2003-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the dynamical and photometric properties of a disk galaxy simulated in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmogony. The galaxy is assembled through a number of high-redshift mergers followed by a period of quiescent accretion after z~1 that lead to the formation of two distinct dynamical components: a spheroid of mostly old stars and a rotationally supported disk of younger stars. The surface brightness profile is very well approximated by the superposition of an R1/4 spheroid and an exponential disk. Each photometric component contributes a similar fraction of the total luminosity of the system, although less than a quarter of the stars form after the last merger episode at z~1. In the optical bands the surface brightness profile is remarkably similar to that of Sab galaxy UGC 615, but the simulated galaxy rotates significantly faster and has a declining rotation curve dominated by the spheroid near the center. The decline in circular velocity is at odds with observation and results from the high concentration of the dark matter and baryonic components, as well as from the relatively high mass-to-light ratio of the stars in the simulation. The simulated galaxy lies ~1 mag off the I-band Tully-Fisher relation of late-type spirals but seems to be in reasonable agreement with Tully-Fisher data on S0 galaxies. In agreement with previous simulation work, the angular momentum of the luminous component is an order of magnitude lower than that of late-type spirals of similar rotation speed. This again reflects the dominance of the slowly rotating, dense spheroidal component, to which most discrepancies with observation may be traced. On its own, the disk component has properties rather similar to those of late-type spirals: its luminosity, its exponential scale length, and its colors are all comparable to those of galaxy disks of similar rotation speed. This suggests that a different form of feedback than adopted here is required to inhibit

  15. General Relativistic Radiation Pressure Supported Stars as Quasar Central Engines in an Universe Which is Recycling Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2011-11-01

    Hoyle & Folwler (1963a,b) suggested that quasars may contain Radiation Pressure Supported Stars (RPSS), which are quasi-Newtonian (surface redshitf z ≪ 1) and supermassive. This proposal however did not work and one of the reasons was that such quasi-Newtonian PRSSs are unstable to gravitational contraction to become extremely general relativistic RPSSs. And since trapped surfaces are not allowed, (Mitra 2009a) these relativistic RPSSs are bound to hover around their instantaneous "Schwarzschild Radius" Rs = 2GM/c2. In view of the fact that they have z ≫ 1, they appear as "Black Holes" (BH) to distant observers. However since, they are always radiating, in a strict sense, they are always contracting. During such extreme compatification, RPSSs are likely to acquire extremely large magnetic field due to magnetic flux freezing, and hence they have strong magnetosphere around them by which they may arrest the accretion disk surrounding them at "Alfven Radius", Ra ≫ Rs. In contrast, for an accreting Schwarzschild black hole, one expects the inner edge of the accretion disk to be at Ri = 3Rs. Consequently, such ultramagnetized RPSSs have been nick named as Magnetospheric Eternally Collapsing Objects" (MECOs). Microlensing studies of several quasar structures have shown that indeed Ri ˜ 35Rs rather that R1 = 3Rs, and which confirms that quasars harbor MECOs rather than true black holes (Schild et al. 2006, 2008, Lovegrove et al. 2011). Further the recent proof that the true BHs have M = 0 confirms that the BH candidates are not true BHs (Mitra 2004a,b; 2009b). Here we highlight the facts (i) outflows from quasars and (ii) their ability to recycle cosmic matter for having new stars and galaxies are best understood by realizing that they contain MECOs rather than true BHs.

  16. The dark matter annihilation boost from low-temperature reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the Universe between inflation and the onset of big bang nucleosynthesis is difficult to probe and largely unconstrained. This ignorance profoundly limits our understanding of dark matter: we cannot calculate its thermal relic abundance without knowing when the Universe became radiation dominated. Fortunately, small-scale density perturbations provide a probe of the early Universe that could break this degeneracy. If dark matter is a thermal relic, density perturbations that enter the horizon during an early matter-dominated era grow linearly with the scale factor prior to reheating. The resulting abundance of substructure boosts the annihilation rate by several orders of magnitude, which can compensate for the smaller annihilation cross sections that are required to generate the observed dark matter density in these scenarios. In particular, thermal relics with masses less than a TeV that thermally and kinetically decouple prior to reheating may already be ruled out by Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Although these constraints are subject to uncertainties regarding the internal structure of the microhalos that form from the enhanced perturbations, they open up the possibility of using gamma-ray observations to learn about the reheating of the Universe.

  17. Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science

    ScienceCinema

    Mary Ann Mason

    2010-09-01

    Mary Ann Mason, Professor of Social Welfare and Law at the University of California, Berkeley, presents "Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science." In her talk, she discusses the difficulties of women who have a career in science or in other male-dominated professions.

  18. Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Ann Mason

    2007-10-30

    Mary Ann Mason, Professor of Social Welfare and Law at the University of California, Berkeley, presents "Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science." In her talk, she discusses the difficulties of women who have a career in science or in other male-dominated professions.

  19. Coupling dark energy to dark matter inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Valerio

    2016-09-01

    We propose that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter inhomogeneities. Through this coupling energy could be transferred to/from the scalar field, which could possibly enter an accelerated regime. Though phenomenological, this scenario is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter inhomogeneities become sufficiently strong. Here we study a possible realization of this idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. In particular, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this model-unlike standard models of cosmic late acceleration-does not suffer from the so-called "coincidence problem" and its related fine tuning of initial conditions.

  20. Assessing Bilingual Dominance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flege, James Emil; Mackay, Ian R. A.; Piske, Thorsten

    2002-01-01

    Used two methods to assess bilingual dominance in four groups of Italian-English bilinguals. Ratios were derived from bilinguals' self-rating of ability to speak and understand Italian compared to English. Dominance in Italian was associated with a relatively high level of performance in Italian (assessed in a translation task) and relatively poor…

  1. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  2. Thermodynamics of apparent horizon and Friedmann equations in big bounce universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Molin; Yang, Yuling; Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study a big bounce universe typified by a non-singular big bounce, as opposed to a singular big bang. This cosmological model can describe radiation dominated early universe and matter dominated late universe in FRW model. The connections between thermodynamics and gravity are observed here. In the early stage of both cold and hot universes, we find there is only one geometry containing a 4D de Sitter universe with a general state parameter. We also find the form of the apparent horizon in the early universe strongly depends on the extra dimension, which suggests that the influence of the extra dimension could in principle be found in the early universe. Moreover, we show that in the late stages of both cold and hot universes, the moment when the apparent horizon begins to bounce keeps essentially in step with the behavior of the cosmological scalar factor.

  3. The evolution of dominance.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, D

    1999-07-01

    The evolution of dominance has been subject to intensive debate since Fisher first argued that modifiers would be selected for if they made wild-type alleles more dominant over mutant alleles. An alternative explanation, put forward by Wright, is that the commonly observed dominance of wild-type alleles is simply a physiological consequence of metabolic pathways. Wright's explanation has gained support over the years, largely ending the debate over the general recessivity of deleterious mutations. Nevertheless there is reason to believe that dominance relationships have been moulded by natural selection to some extent. First, the metabolic pathways are themselves products of evolutionary processes that may have led them to be more stable to perturbations, including mutations. Secondly, theoretical models and empirical experiments suggest that substantial selection for dominance modifiers exists during the spread of adaptive alleles or when a polymorphism is maintained either by overdominant selection or by migration-selection balance. PMID:10447697

  4. From superstrings theory to the dark matter in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh

    1999-10-25

    Starting from the effective action of the low energy limit of superstrings theory, I find an exact solution of the field equations which geodesics behavie exactly as the trajectories of stars arround of a spiral galaxy. Here dark matter is of dilatonic origin. It is remarkable that the energy density of this space-time is the same as the used by astronomers to model galaxy stability. Some remarks about a universe dominated by dilatons are pointed out.

  5. Evolution of perturbations in an inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Will, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of inhomogeneous density perturbations in a model of the very early universe that is dominated for a time by a constant energy density of a false quantum-mechanical vacuum is analyzed. During this period, the universe inflates exponentially and supercools exponentially, until a phase transition back to the true vacuum reheats the matter and radiation. Focus is on the physically measurable, coordinate-independent modes of inhomogeneous perturbations of this model and it is found that all modes either are constant or are exponentially damped during the inflationary era.

  6. Dynamics of dark energy with a coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2008-07-15

    Dark energy and dark matter are the dominant sources in the evolution of the late universe. They are currently only indirectly detected via their gravitational effects, and there could be a coupling between them without violating observational constraints. We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is modeled as exponential quintessence and is coupled to dark matter via simple models of energy exchange. We introduce a new form of dark sector coupling, which leads to a more complicated dynamical phase space and has a better physical motivation than previous mathematically similar couplings.

  7. Flooded Dark Matter and S level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Lisa; Scholtz, Jakub; Unwin, James

    2016-03-01

    Most dark matter models set the dark matter relic density by some interaction with Standard Model particles. Such models generally assume the existence of Standard Model particles early on, with the dark matter relic density a later consequence of those interactions. Perhaps a more compelling assumption is that dark matter is not part of the Standard Model sector and a population of dark matter too is generated at the end of inflation. This democratic assumption about initial conditions does not necessarily provide a natural value for the dark matter relic density, and furthermore superficially leads to too much entropy in the dark sector relative to ordinary matter. We address the latter issue by the late decay of heavy particles produced at early times, thereby associating the dark matter relic density with the lifetime of a long-lived state. This paper investigates what it would take for this scenario to be compatible with observations in what we call Flooded Dark Matter (FDM) models and discusses several interesting consequences. One is that dark matter can be very light and furthermore, light dark matter is in some sense the most natural scenario in FDM as it is compatible with larger couplings of the decaying particle. A related consequence is that the decay of the field with the smallest coupling and hence the longest lifetime dominates the entropy and possibly the matter content of the Universe, a principle we refer to as "Maximum Baroqueness". We also demonstrate that the dark sector should be colder than the ordinary sector, relaxing the most stringent free-streaming constraints on light dark matter candidates. We will discuss the potential implications for the core-cusp problem in a follow-up paper. The FDM framework will furthermore have interesting baryogenesis implications. One possibility is that dark matter is like the baryon asymmetry and both are simultaneously diluted by a late entropy dump. Alternatively, FDM is compatible with an elegant non

  8. Dark matter and cosmological nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    Existing dark matter problems, i.e., dynamics, galaxy formation and inflation, are considered, along with a model which proposes dark baryons as the bulk of missing matter in a fractal universe. It is shown that no combination of dark, nonbaryonic matter can either provide a cosmological density parameter value near unity or, as in the case of high energy neutrinos, allow formation of condensed matter at epochs when quasars already existed. The possibility that correlations among galactic clusters are scale-free is discussed. Such a distribution of matter would yield a fractal of 1.2, close to a one-dimensional universe. Biasing, cosmic superstrings, and percolated explosions and hot dark matter are theoretical approaches that would satisfy the D = 1.2 fractal model of the large-scale structure of the universe and which would also allow sufficient dark matter in halos to close the universe.

  9. Long-lived light mediator to dark matter and primordial small scale spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-05-06

    We calculate the early universe evolution of perturbations in the dark matter energy density in the context of simple dark sector models containing a GeV scale light mediator. We consider the case that the mediator is long-lived, with lifetime up to a second, and before decaying it temporarily dominates the energy density of the universe. We show that for primordial perturbations that enter the horizon around this period, the interplay between linear growth during matter domination and collisional damping can generically lead to a sharp peak in the spectrum of dark matter density perturbation. As a result, the population of the smallest DM halos gets enhanced. Possible implications of this scenario are discussed.

  10. Dark matter as residual of topological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbachoux, Cécile; Kouneiher, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate in this paper the possibilities that the observed cold dark matter density can be generated by decays of a heavy scalar field which dominate the universe at the quantum regime. Indeed, we present two approaches based on an extension of quantum field theory to the case when spacetime topology fluctuates (spacetime foam, at the quantum regime). In this extension the number of bosonic fields becomes a variable and the ground state is characterized by a finite particle number density. In the second approach it is the gauge-group parameters which became dynamical. This is tributary on the Centrally Extended Group and Cohomology.

  11. Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N P; Goldberg, M F; Fishman, G A; Salzano, T

    1984-01-01

    We report the second family recognised to have autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy. The clinical features were (1) autosomal dominant inheritance; (2) peripheral, coarse pigmentary degeneration of the fundus for 360 degrees, with a relatively discrete posterior border in the equatorial region (this finding may be pathognomonic); (3) superficial punctate yellowish-white opacities in the retina; (4) various vascular abnormalities; (5) breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier; (6) retinal neovascularisation; (7) vitreous abnormalities; and (8) choroidal atrophy. Visual reduction was mainly due to macular oedema or vitreous haemorrhage. Images PMID:6689931

  12. Language after dominant hemispherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gott, Piggy S.

    1973-01-01

    Linguistic and related cognitive abilities were investigated two years after dominant left hemispherectomy for cerebral malignancy in a 12 year old female. Auditory comprehension of speech was superior to other modes of language abilities with expressive speech being the least developed. Findings suggested an isolation or non-communication between the systems for speaking and for writing and visual perception. It was concluded that language mechanisms in the right hemisphere were not just at a low level of development of the functions found in the dominant hemisphere but were modified as a result of interference by preexistent spatioperceptual systems. Images PMID:4772723

  13. X-ray clusters in a cold dark matter + lambda universe: A direct, large-scale, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing, hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a cold dark matter (CDM) + lambda model universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85/h Mpc, having cell size 0.31/h Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. We adopt omega = 0.45, lambda = 0.55, h identically equal to H/100 km/s/Mpc = 0.6, and then, from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) and light element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 0.77, omega(sub b) = 0.043. We identify the X-ray emitting clusters in the simulation box, compute the luminosity function at several wavelength bands, the temperature function and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. This open model succeeds in matching local observations of clusters in contrast to the standard omega = 1, CDM model, which fails. It predicts an order of magnitude decline in the number density of bright (h nu = 2-10 keV) clusters from z = 0 to z = 2 in contrast to a slight increase in the number density for standard omega = 1, CDM model. This COBE-normalized CDM + lambda model produces approximately the same number of X-ray clusters having L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 43) erg/s as observed. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters is approximately the observed background which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates that the model is consistent with observations.

  14. Collisional versus Collisionless Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Moore; Gelato; Jenkins; Pearce; Quilis

    2000-05-20

    We compare the structure and substructure of dark matter halos in model universes dominated by collisional, strongly self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) and collisionless, weakly interacting dark matter (CDM). While SIDM virialized halos are more nearly spherical than CDM halos, they can be rotationally flattened by as much as 20% in their inner regions. Substructure halos suffer ram-pressure truncation and drag, which are more rapid and severe than their gravitational counterparts tidal stripping and dynamical friction. Lensing constraints on the size of galactic halos in clusters are a factor of 2 smaller than predicted by gravitational stripping, and the recent detection of tidal streams of stars escaping from the satellite galaxy Carina suggests that its tidal radius is close to its optical radius of a few hundred parsecs-an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by CDM models but consistent with SIDM models. The orbits of SIDM satellites suffer significant velocity bias, sigmaSIDM&solm0;sigmaCDM=0.85, and are more circular than CDM satellites, betaSIDM approximately 0.5, in agreement with the inferred orbits of the Galaxy's satellites. In the limit of a short mean free path, SIDM halos have singular isothermal density profiles; thus, in its simplest incarnation SIDM, is inconsistent with galactic rotation curves. PMID:10828999

  15. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  16. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  17. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-12-05

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  18. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  19. [Dominant, motivation and behavior].

    PubMed

    Batuev, A S

    1982-01-01

    It was shown in experiments on cats with elaborated conditioned running to the left (with fresh food) and right (with salted food) feeding troughs that conditioned signals may change the current behaviour in spite of real unconditioned stimuli. The fresh food signal produces a conditioned "freshening" of the salt meat, which may be regarded as a successful physiological model of gustatory illusions. With a free choice of different salinity of food from different cups of each feeding though, behaviour is corrected by unconditioned factors, i.e. real salinity of food. As a result the thresholds of eating salt food from both feeding troughs are equalized. The facts are discussed in the light of the dominant principle, i.e. that central program which is built on the basis of the dominant motivation, of previous experience and current analysis of surroundings. PMID:7164569

  20. [Dominant Thalamus and Aphasia].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Akiko; Shimomura, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that lesions of the dominant thalamus precipitate language disorders in a similar manner to transcortical aphasias, in a phenomenon known as "thalamic aphasia." In some cases, however, aphasia may not occur or may appear transiently following thalamic lesions. Furthermore, dominant thalamic lesions can produce changes in character, as observed in patients with amnesic disorder. Previous work has explored the utility of thalamic aphasia as a discriminative feature for classification of aphasia. Although the thalamus may be involved in the function of the brainstem reticular activating system and play a role in attentional network and in memory of Papez circuit or Yakovlev circuit, the mechanism by which thalamic lesion leads to the emergence of aphasic disorders is unclear. In this review, we we survey historical and recent literature on thalamic aphasia in an attempt to understand the neural processes affected by thalamic lesions. PMID:26618763

  1. Dark matter and alternative recipes for the missing mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Crescenzo; Jetzer, Philippe; Napolitano, Nicola R.

    2012-03-01

    Within the standard cosmological scenario the Universe is found to be filled by obscure components (dark matter and dark energy) for ~ 95% of its energy budget. In particular, almost all the matter content in the Universe is given by dark matter, which dominates the mass budget and drives the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Unfortunately, dark matter and dark energy have not been detected and no direct or indirected observations have allowed to prove their existence and amount. For this reason, some authors have suggested that a modification of Einstein Relativity or the change of the Newton's dynamics law (within a relativistic and classical framework, respectively) could allow to replace these unobserved components. We will start discussing the role of dark matter in the early-type galaxies, mainly in their central regions, investigating how its content changes as a function of the mass and the size of each galaxy and few considerations about the stellar Initial mass function have been made. In the second part of the paper we have described, as examples, some ways to overcome the dark matter hypothesis, by fitting to the observations the modified dynamics coming out from general relativistic extended theories and the MOdyfled Newtonian dynamics (MOND).

  2. Modified gravity in contemporary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Dolgov, A. D.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomical data in favor of cosmological acceleration and possible explanations of accelerated expansion of the universe are discussed. Main attention is paid to gravity modifications at small curvature which could induce accelerated cosmological expansion. It is shown that gravitating systems with mass density rising with time evolve to a singular state with infinite curvature scalar. The universe evolution during the radiation-dominated epoch is studied in the R 2-extended gravity theory. Particle production rate by the oscillating curvature and the back reaction of particle production on the evolution of R are calculated in one-loop approximation. Possible implications of the model for cosmological creation of non-thermal dark matter are discussed.

  3. Cosmology with Mimetic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: viatcheslav.Mukhanov@lmu.de

    2014-06-01

    We consider minimal extensions of the recently proposed Mimetic Dark Matter and show that by introducing a potential for the mimetic non-dynamical scalar field we can mimic nearly any gravitational properties of the normal matter. In particular, the mimetic matter can provide us with inflaton, quintessence and even can lead to a bouncing nonsingular universe. We also investigate the behaviour of cosmological perturbations due to a mimetic matter. We demonstrate that simple mimetic inflation can produce red-tilted scalar perturbations which are largely enhanced over gravity waves.

  4. Is the Universe logotropic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-07-01

    We consider the possibility that the universe is made of a single dark fluid described by a logotropic equation of state P = A ln( ρ/ρ*, where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρ * is a reference density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ɛ is the sum of two terms: a rest-mass energy term ρ c 2 that mimics dark matter and an internal energy term u( ρ) = - P( ρ) - A that mimics dark energy. This decomposition leads to a natural, and physical, unification of dark matter and dark energy, and elucidates their mysterious nature. In the early universe, the rest-mass energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as pressureless dark matter ( P ≃ 0, ɛ ∝ a -3. In the late universe, the internal energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as dark energy ( P ˜ - ɛ, ɛ ∝ ln a. The logotropic model depends on a single parameter B = A / ρ Λ c 2 (dimensionless logotropic temperature), where ρ Λ = 6.72 × 10-24 g m-3 is the cosmological density. For B = 0, we recover the ΛCDM model with a different justification. For B > 0, we can describe deviations from the ΛCDM model. Using cosmological constraints, we find that 0 ≤ B ≤ 0.09425. We consider the possibility that dark matter halos are described by the same logotropic equation of state. When B > 0, pressure gradients prevent gravitational collapse and provide halo density cores instead of cuspy density profiles, in agreement with the observations. The universal rotation curve of logotropic dark matter halos is consistent with the observational Burkert profile (Burkert, Astrophys. J. 447, L25 (1995)) up to the halo radius. It decreases as r -1 at large distances, similarly to the profile of dark matter halos close to the core radius (Burkert, arXiv:1501.06604). Interestingly, if we assume that all the dark matter halos have the same logotropic temperature B, we find that their surface density Σ 0 = ρ0 r h is constant. This result is in agreement with the observations (Donato et al., Mon

  5. Thermophoretically Dominated Aerosol Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Arias-Zugasti, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation due to size-dependent thermophoresis is presented. This previously overlooked effect is important when local temperature gradients are large, the sol population is composed of particles of much greater thermal conductivity than the carrier gas, with mean diameters much greater than the prevailing gas mean free path, and an adequate “spread” in sizes (as in metallurgical mists or fumes). We illustrate this via a population-balance analysis of the evolution of an initially log-normal distribution when this mechanism dominates ordinary Brownian diffusion.

  6. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  7. How did matter gain the upper hand over antimatter?

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Helen; /SLAC

    2009-01-30

    Antimatter exists! We routinely make it in laboratories. For every familiar particle type we find a matching antiparticle with opposite charge, but exactly the same mass. For example, a positron with positive charge has the same mass as an electron; an antiproton with negative charge has the same mass as a proton. Antimatter occurs naturally all over the universe wherever high-energy particles collide. The laws of physics for antimatter are very, very similar to those for antimatter--so far we know only one tiny difference in them, a detail of the weak interactions of quarks that earned Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa a share of the 2008 Nobel Prize for Physics. Our understanding of the early Universe also tells us that after inflation ended equal amounts of matter and antimatter were produced. Today there's a lot of matter in the universe, but very little antimatter. This leaves a big question for cosmology. How did matter gain the upper hand over antimatter? It's a question at the root of our existence. Without this excess, there would be no stars, no Earth, and no us! When a particle meets its antiparticle, they annihilate each other in a flash of radiation. This process removed all the antimatter and most of the matter as the universe expanded and cooled. All that's left today is the excess amount of matter when destruction began to dominate over production. To get from equality to inequality for matter and antimatter requires a difference in the laws of physics between them and some special situation where it affects the balance between them. But, when we try to use the tiny difference we know about between quark and antiquark weak interactions to generate the imbalance, it doesn't work. We find a way that it can indeed give a small excess of matter over antimatter, but not nearly enough to give us all the matter we see in our universe. We can patch up the theory by adding unknown particles to it to make a scenario that works. Indeed we can do that in

  8. Direct search for dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  9. Dragging force on galaxies due to streaming dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    It has been reported that galaxies in large regions (approx. 10(exp 2) Mpc), including some clusters of galaxies, may be streaming coherently with velocities up to 600 km/sec or more with respect to the rest frame determined by the microwave background radiation. On the other hand, it is suggested that the dominant mass component of the universe is dark matter. Because we can only speculate the motion of dark matter from the galaxy motions, much attention should be paid to the correlation of velocities between the observed galaxies and cold dark matter. So the authors investigated whether such coherent large-scale streaming velocities are due to dark matter or only to baryonic objects which may be formed by piling up of gases due to some explosive events. It seems that, although each galaxy will not follow the motion of dark matter, clusters of galaxies may represent the velocity field of dark matter. The origin of the velocity field of dark matter would be due to the initial adiabatic perturbations and, in fact, the observed peculiar velocities of clusters are within the allowed region constrained from the isotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  10. Evidence for dark matter interactions in cosmological precision data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo; Schmaltz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    We study a two-parameter extension of the cosmological standard model ΛCDM in which cold dark matter interacts with a new form of dark radiation. The two parameters correspond to the energy density in the dark radiation fluid ΔNfluid and the interaction strength between dark matter and dark radiation. The interactions give rise to a very weak ``dark matter drag'' which damps the growth of matter density perturbations throughout radiation domination, allowing to reconcile the tension between predictions of large scale structure from the CMB and direct measurements of σ8. We perform a precision fit to Planck CMB data, BAO, large scale structure, and direct measurements of the expansion rate of the universe today. Our model lowers the χ-squared relative to ΛCDM by about 12, corresponding to a preference for non-zero dark matter drag by more than 3σ. Particle physics models which naturally produce a dark matter drag of the required form include the recently proposed non-Abelian dark matter model in which the dark radiation corresponds to massless dark gluons.

  11. Light domain walls, massive neutrinos and the large scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    1991-01-01

    Domain walls generated through a cosmological phase transition are considered, which interact nongravitationally with light neutrinos. At a redshift z greater than or equal to 10(exp 4), the network grows rapidly and is virtually decoupled from the matter. As the friction with the matter becomes dominant, a comoving network scale close to that of the comoving horizon scale at z of approximately 10(exp 4) gets frozen. During the later phases, the walls produce matter wakes of a thickness d of approximately 10h(exp -1)Mpc, that may become seeds for the formation of the large scale structure observed in the Universe.

  12. Dark matter from Affleck-Dine baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kusenko, Alexander

    1999-07-15

    Fragmentation of the Affleck-Dine condensate into Q-balls could fill the Universe with dark matter either in the form of stable baryonic balls, or LSP produced from the decay of unstable Q-balls. The dark matter and the ordinary matter in the Universe may share the same origin.

  13. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  14. Genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman reveals the dominance of Panton–Valentine leucocidin-negative ST6-IV/t304 clone

    PubMed Central

    Udo, E E; Al-Lawati, B A-H; Al-Muharmi, Z; Thukral, S S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) genotypes circulating at a tertiary hospital in the Sultanate of Oman. A total of 79 MRSA isolates were obtained from different clinical samples and investigated using antibiogram, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec), Spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were susceptible to linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin, tigecycline and mupirocin but were resistant to tetracycline (30.4%), erythromycin (26.6%), clindamycin (24.1%), trimethoprim (19.0%), ciprofloxacin (17.7%), fusidic acid (15.2%) and gentamicin (12.7%). Molecular typing revealed 19 PFGE patterns, 26 Spa types and 21 sequence types. SCCmec-IV (86.0%) was the dominant SCCmec type, followed by SCCmec-V (10.1%). SCCmec-III (2.5%) and SCCmec-II (1.3%) were less common. ST6-IV/t304 (n = 30) and ST1295-IV/t690 (n = 12) were the dominant genotypes followed by ST772-V/t657 (n = 5), ST30-IV/t019/t021 (n = 5), ST22-IV/t852 (n = 4), ST80-IV/t044 (n = 3) and 18 single genotypes that were isolated sporadically. On the basis of SCCmec typing and MLST, 91.2% of the isolates were classified as community-associated MRSA and 8.8% of the isolates (consisting of four ST22-IV/t852, one ST239-III/t632, one ST5-III/t311 and one ST5-II/t003) were classified as healthcare-associated MRSA. The study has revealed the dominance of a Panton–Valentine leucocidin-negative ST6-IV/t304 clone and provided insights into the distribution of antibiotic resistance in MRSA at the tertiary hospital in Oman. It also highlights the importance of surveillance in detecting the emergence of new MRSA clones in a healthcare facility. PMID:25356354

  15. British Universities: Visitor's Jurisdiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar N.

    1993-01-01

    The office and functions of the university visitor in Britain have deep-seated origins in the common law. The visitorial jurisdiction is exclusive in domestic and internal matters. Despite cases brought by disgruntled members of universities, the office of the university visitor was not abolished, and its powers were not eliminated. Analyzes these…

  16. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema

    Brau, James E [University of Oregon

    2014-06-25

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  17. The Mysterious Universe - Exploring Our World with Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2010-11-23

    The universe is dark and mysterious, more so than even Einstein imagined. While modern science has established deep understanding of ordinary matter, unidentified elements ("Dark Matter" and "Dark Energy") dominate the structure of the universe, its behavior and its destiny. What are these curious elements? We are now working on answers to these and other challenging questions posed by the universe with experiments at particle accelerators on Earth. Results of this research may revolutionize our view of nature as dramatically as the advances of Einstein and other quantum pioneers one hundred years ago. Professor Brau will explain for the general audience the mysteries, introduce facilities which explore them experimentally and discuss our current understanding of the underlying science. The presentation is at an introductory level, appropriate for anyone interested in physics and astronomy.

  18. The scale factor in a Universe with dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, M. V.; Sazhina, O. S.

    2016-04-01

    The solution of the Friedmann cosmological equations for the scale factor in a model of the Universe containing matter having the equation of state of dust and dark energy is considered. The equation-of-state parameter of the dark energy is taken to be an arbitrary constant w = -1.006 ± 0.045, whose value is constrained by the current observational limits. An exact solution for the scale factor as a function of physical time and conformal time is obtained. Approximate solutions have been found for the entire admissible conformal time interval with an accuracy better than 1%, which exceeds the accuracy of the determined global parameters of our Universe. This is the first time an exact solution for the scale factor describing the evolution of the Universe in a unified way, beginning with the matter-dominated epoch and ending with the infinitely remote future, has been obtained.

  19. Effect of inhomogeneities on the luminosity distance-redshift relation: Is dark energy necessary in a perturbed universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Barausse, Enrico; Matarrese, Sabino; Riotto, Antonio

    2005-03-15

    The luminosity distance-redshift relation is one of the fundamental tools of modern cosmology. We compute the luminosity distance-redshift relation in a perturbed flat matter-dominated Universe, taking into account the presence of cosmological inhomogeneities up to second order in perturbation theory. Cosmological observations implementing the luminosity distance-redshift relation tell us that the Universe is presently undergoing a phase of accelerated expansion. This seems to call for a mysterious Dark Energy component with negative pressure. Our findings suggest that the need of a Dark Energy fluid may be challenged once a realistic inhomogeneous Universe is considered and that an accelerated expansion may be consistent with a matter-dominated Universe.

  20. A universality of dark-halo surface density for the Milky Way and Andromeda dwarf satellites as a probe of the coldness of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new astrophysical test on the nature of dark matter based on the properties of dark halos associated with dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The method adopts a mean surface density of a dark halo defined within a radius of maximum circular velocity, which is derivable for a wide variety of galaxies with any dark-matter density profiles. We find that even though dark halo density profiles are derived based on the different assumptions for each galaxy sample, this surface density is generally constant across a wide mass range of galaxy. We find that at higher halo-mass scales, this constancy for real galaxies can be naturally reproduced by both cold and warm dark matter (CDM and WDM) models. However, at low-mass scales, for which we have estimated from the Milky Way and Andromeda dwarf satellites, the mean surface density derived from WDM models largely deviates from the observed constancy, whereas CDM models are in reasonable agreement with observations.

  1. Dark Matter Reality Check: Chandra Casts Cloud On Alternative Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    New evidence from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory challenges an alternative theory of gravity that eliminates the need for dark matter. The observation also narrows the field for competing forms of dark matter, the elusive material thought to be the dominant form of matter in the universe. An observation of the galaxy NGC 720 shows it is enveloped in a slightly flattened, or ellipsoidal cloud of hot gas that has an orientation different from that of the optical image of the galaxy. The flattening is too large to be explained by theories in which stars and gas are assumed to contain most of the mass in the galaxy. "The shape and orientation of the hot gas cloud require it to be confined by an egg-shaped dark matter halo," said David Buote of the University of California, Irvine, and lead author of a report on this research in the 2002 September 20 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "This means that dark matter is not just an illusion due to a shortcoming of the standard theory of gravity - it is real." According to the generally accepted standard theory of gravity, the hot X-ray cloud would need an additional source of gravity - a halo of dark matter - to keep the hot gas from expanding away. The mass of dark matter required would be about five to ten times the mass of the stars in the galaxy. If the dark matter tracked the optical light from the stars in the galaxy, the hot X-ray cloud would be more round than it is. The flattened shape of the hot gas cloud requires a flattened dark matter halo. An alternative theory of gravity called MOND, for Modified Newtonian Dynamics, was proposed in 1983 by Mordecai Milgrom of the Weizmann Institute in Israel, and has remained viable over the years. MOND does away with the need for dark matter by modifying the theory where the acceleration produced by gravity is very small, such as the outskirts of galaxies. However, MOND cannot explain the Chandra observation of NGC 720. This is apparently the first dynamical evidence that

  2. Small-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies as probe of the geometry of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We perform detailed calculations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in a cold dark matter (CDM)-dominated open universe with primordial adiabatic density perturbations for a variety of reionization histories. The CMB anisotropies depend primarily on the geometry of the universe, which in a matter-dominated universe is determined by Omega and the optical depth to the surface of last scattering. In particular, the location on the primary Doppler peak depends primarily on Omega and is fairly insensitive to the other unknown parameters, such as Omega(sub b), h, Lambda, and the shape of the power spectrum. Therefore, if the primordial density perturbations are adiabatic, measurements of CMB anisotropies on small scales may be used to determine Omega.

  3. Nonlinear electrodynamics and modification of initial singularities, and dark matter and dark energy affecting structure formation in the early and later universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, A. W.

    2015-07-01

    We find that having the scale factor close to zero due to a given magnetic field value in an early universe magnetic field affects how we would interpret Mukhanov's chapter on “self reproduction” of the universe in in his reference. The stronger an early-universe magnetic field is, the greater the likelihood of production of about 20 new domains of size 1/H, with H the early-universe Hubble constant, per Planck time interval in evolution. We form DM from considerations as to a minimum time step, and then generate DM via axions. Through Ng's quantum infinite statistics, we compare a DM count, giving entropy. The remainder of the document is in terms of DE as well as comparing entropy in galaxies versus entropy in the universe, through a lens of Mistra's quantum theory of the big bang.

  4. Sterile neutrinos as subdominant warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzo, A.; Cumberbatch, D.; Slosar, A.; Silk, J.

    2007-11-15

    In light of recent findings which seem to disfavor a scenario with (warm) dark matter entirely constituted of sterile neutrinos produced via the Dodelson-Widrow mechanism, we investigate the constraints attainable for this mechanism by relaxing the usual hypothesis that the relic neutrino abundance must necessarily account for all of the dark matter. We first study how to reinterpret the limits attainable from x-ray nondetection and Lyman-{alpha} forest measurements in the case that sterile neutrinos constitute only a fraction f{sub s} of the total amount of dark matter. Then, assuming that sterile neutrinos are generated in the early universe solely through the Dodelson-Widrow mechanism, we show how the x-ray and Lyman-{alpha} results jointly constrain the mass-mixing parameters governing their production. Furthermore, we show how the same data allow us to set a robust upper limit f{sub s} < or approx. 0.7 at the 2{sigma} level, rejecting the case of dominant dark matter (f{sub s}=1) at the {approx}3{sigma} level.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of dark matter subhalos and applications to warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Benson, Andrew J.

    2014-09-01

    We describe the methodology to include nonlinear evolution, including tidal effects, in the computation of subhalo distribution properties in both cold (CDM) and warm (WDM) dark matter universes. Using semi-analytic modeling, we include effects from dynamical friction, tidal stripping, and tidal heating, allowing us to dynamically evolve the subhalo distribution. We calibrate our nonlinear evolution scheme to the CDM subhalo mass function in the Aquarius N-body simulation, producing a subhalo mass function within the range of simulations. We find tidal effects to be the dominant mechanism of nonlinear evolution in the subhalo population. Finally, we compute the subhalo mass function for m {sub χ} = 1.5 keV WDM including the effects of nonlinear evolution, and compare radial number densities and mass density profiles of subhalos in CDM and WDM models. We show that all three signatures differ between the two dark matter models, suggesting that probes of substructure may be able to differentiate between them.

  6. Early Universe evolution in presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Gaspar, I.; Pérez Martínez, A.; Piccinelli, G.; Sussman, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    We analyse the evolution of a magnetised Universe in a stage between the leptonic era and the beginning of the radiation-dominated epoch using an anisotropic Bianchi I model. In our description the cosmic fluid is made of primordial radiation, neutrinos, magnetic field, non-interacting already decoupled dark matter (WIMPS), baryons, electrons, and positrons. The interaction of the field with the electron-positron gas is taken into account, resulting in anisotropic equations of state for these constituents. Numerical simulations reveal some differences between the behaviour of magnetised Bianchi I Universes and that of first order perturbations on an FLRW background.

  7. Axions and the evolution of structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Shafi, Q.

    1983-01-01

    A cosmological scenario where axions provide the dark matter in the universe is considered. Fluctuations in the axion-field energy denisty produced by domain walls and strings cause the appearance of 'axion clumps' of masses of order 10 to the 6th solar masses which most likely collapse to black holes by or at the time that the universe becomes axion dominated at T approximately 10 eV. These objects form the building blocks for the clustering hierarchy theory of galaxy and supercluster formation on scales up to about 10 Mpc and 10 to the 15th solar masses.

  8. The evolution of structure in the universe from axions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Shafi, Q.

    1982-01-01

    A scenario where axions provide the dark matter in the universe is considered. Fluctuations in the axion field density produced by domain walls and strings cause the appearance of axion clumps of masses of order 10 to the 6th power solar mass which most likely collapse to black holes by or at the time that the universe becomes axion dominated at T is approximately 10 eV. These objects form the building blocks for a clustering hierarchy theory of galaxy and supercluster formation on scales up to approximately 10 Mpc and approximately 10 to the 15th power solar mass.

  9. Dynamical system analysis for a nonminimal torsion-matter coupled gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carloni, Sante; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Otalora, Giovanni; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we perform a detailed dynamical analysis for the cosmological applications of a nonminimal torsion-matter coupled gravity. Two alternative formalisms are proposed, which enable one to choose between the easier approach for a given problem, and furthermore, we analyze six specific models. In general, we extract fixed points corresponding either to dark-matter-dominated, scaling decelerated solutions, or to dark-energy-dominated accelerated solutions. Additionally, we find that there is a small parameter region in which the model can experience the transition from the matter epoch to the dark-energy era. These features are in agreement with the observed evolution of the Universe, and make the theory a successful candidate for the description of nature.

  10. Complex Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-04-16

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  11. Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  12. Antiproton constraints on dark matter annihilations from internal electroweak bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Vogl, Stefan E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2011-07-01

    If the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion, annihilations into two fermions and one gauge boson could have, for some choices of the parameters of the model, a non-negligible cross-section. Using a toy model of leptophilic dark matter, we calculate the constraints on the annihilation cross-section into two electrons and one weak gauge boson from the PAMELA measurements of the cosmic antiproton-to-proton flux ratio. Furthermore, we calculate the maximal astrophysical boost factor allowed in the Milky Way under the assumption that the leptophilic dark matter particle is the dominant component of dark matter in our Universe. These constraints constitute very conservative estimates on the boost factor for more realistic models where the dark matter particle also couples to quarks and weak gauge bosons, such as the lightest neutralino which we also analyze for some concrete benchmark points. The limits on the astrophysical boost factors presented here could be used to evaluate the prospects to detect a gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilations at currently operating IACTs as well as in the projected CTA.

  13. The hidden universe

    SciTech Connect

    Disney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomer Disney has followed a somewhat different tack than that of most popular books on cosmology by concentrating on the notion of hidden (as in not directly observable by its own radiation) matter in the universe.

  14. The Earth's magnetosphere as a sample of the plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faelthammar, Carl-Gunne

    1986-01-01

    Plasma processes in the Earth's neighborhood determine the environmental conditions under which space-based equipment for science or technology must operate. These processes are peculiar to a state of matter that is rare on Earth but dominates the universe as whole. The physical, and especially the electrodynamic, properties of this state of matter is still far from well understood. By fortunate circumstances, the magnetosphere-ionosphere system of the Earth provides a rich sample of widely different plasma populations, and, even more importantly, it is the site of a remarkable variety of plasma processes. In different combinations such processes must be important throughout the universe, which is overwhelmingly dominated by matter in the plasma state. Therefore, observations and experiments in the near-Earth plasma serve a multitude of purposes. They will not only (1) clarify the dynamics of the space environment but also (2) widen the understanding of matter, (3) form a basis for interpretating remote observations of astrophysical objects, thereby even (4) help to reconstruct events that led to the evolution of the solar system. Last but not least they will (5) provide know-how required for adapting space-based technology to the plasma environment. Such observations and experiments will require a close mutual interplay between science and technology.

  15. The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter and Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2014-06-01

    We develop the effective field theory of cosmological large scale structure. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and integrate out short modes of a dark matter/dark energy dominated universe (LambdaCDM) whose matter is comprised of massive particles as used in cosmological simulations. This establishes a long distance effective fluid, valid for length scales larger than the non-linear scale ~ 10 Mpc, and provides the complete description of large scale structure formation. Extracting the time dependence, we derive recursion relations that encode the perturbative solution. This is exact for the matter dominated era and quite accurate in LambdaCDM also. The effective fluid is characterized by physical parameters, including sound speed and viscosity. These two fluid parameters play a degenerate role with each other and lead to a relative correction from standard perturbation theory of the form ~ 10^{-6}c^2k^2/H^2. Starting from the linear theory, we calculate corrections to cosmological observables, such as the baryon-acoustic-oscillation peak, which we compute semi-analytically at one-loop order. Due to the non-zero fluid parameters, the predictions of the effective field theory agree with observation much more accurately than standard perturbation theory and we explain why. We also discuss corrections from treating dark matter as interacting or wave-like and other issues.

  16. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  17. Resurrecting hot dark matter - Large-scale structure from cosmic strings and massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    These are the results of a numerical simulation of the formation of large-scale structure from cosmic-string loops in a universe dominated by massive neutrinos (hot dark matter). This model has several desirable features. The final matter distribution contains isolated density peaks embedded in a smooth background, producing a natural bias in the distribution of luminous matter. Because baryons can accrete onto the cosmic strings before the neutrinos, the galaxies will have baryon cores and dark neutrino halos. Galaxy formation in this model begins much earlier than in random-phase models. On large scales the distribution of clustered matter visually resembles the CfA survey, with large voids and filaments.

  18. Exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Saraswat, Prashant; Harnik, Roni; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-09-15

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass {approx}few GeV and splittings {approx}5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state downscatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a low-threshold analysis of CDMS-Si and possibly other experiments including CRESST, COUPP, and XENON100.

  19. Comparing Ethical and Epistemic Standards for Investigative Journalists and Equity-Oriented Collaborative Community-Based Researchers: Why Working for a University Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Anne; Glass, Ronald David

    2014-01-01

    Criticisms of IRBs are proliferating. In response, we compare the ethical and epistemic standards of two closely related forms of inquiry, investigative journalism and equity-oriented collaborative community-based research (EOCCBR). We argue that a university affiliation justifies formal ethical review of research and suggest how institutionalized…

  20. A Matter of Diversity, Equity, and Necessity: The Tension between Maryland's Higher Education System and Its Historically Black Colleges and Universities over the Office of Civil Rights Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert T.; Davis, Ryan J.; Gasman, Marybeth

    2011-01-01

    Eighteen years after the Supreme Court rendered its decision in Fordice, many states have complied somewhat or not at all to its mandates. This has been particularly evident in Maryland, where the presidents of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are pressuring the state to fulfill its commitment with the Office of Civil Rights…

  1. Induced Matter Theory of gravity from a Weitzenböck 5D vacuum and pre-big bang collapse of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jesús Martín; Bellini, Mauricio

    2013-02-01

    We extend the Induced Matter Theory of gravity (IMT) to 5D curved spacetimes by using the Weitzenböck representation of connections on a 5D curved spacetime. In this representation the 5D curvature tensor becomes null, so that we can make a static foliation on the extra non-compact coordinate to induce in the Weitzenböck representation the Einstein equations. Once we have done it, we can rewrite the effective 4D Einstein equations in the Levi-Civita representation. This generalization of IMT opens a huge window of possible applications for this theory. A pre-big bang collapsing scenario is explored as an example.

  2. Observable induced gravitational waves from an early matter phase

    SciTech Connect

    Alabidi, Laila; Sasaki, Misao; Kohri, Kazunori; Sendouda, Yuuiti E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-01

    Assuming that inflation is succeeded by a phase of matter domination, which corresponds to a low temperature of reheating T{sub r} < 10{sup 9}GeV, we evaluate the spectra of gravitational waves induced in the post-inflationary universe. We work with models of hilltop-inflation with an enhanced primordial scalar spectrum on small scales, which can potentially lead to the formation of primordial black holes. We find that a lower reheat temperature leads to the production of gravitational waves with energy densities within the ranges of both space and earth based gravitational wave detectors.

  3. No Laughing Matter. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Steve Kolowich's article, "No Laughing Matter" (2010), highlights the disconnect between information found on university and college websites and information relevant to students. Using a carton by Randall Munroe, Kolowich points out that website designers and college marketing officials really do not understand what is important to prospective…

  4. Inflation and shadow matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, L. M.; Guth, A. H.; Spergel, D. N.; Field, G. B.; Press, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    The possible production of shadow matter during the period of cosmic inflation is considered. The superstring theory of Gross et al. (1985), which results in a gauge group E8 x E8, could, at low energies, result in the existence of two sectors: an observed sector associated with all familiar particles and interactions, and a hidden one whose particles couple only through gravitational interactions with ordinary matter. It is demonstrated here that if, in the early universe, an inflationary phase is associated with the breaking of one of the symmetries in the E8 x E8 theory, this strongly constrains the physics of both sectors if shadow matter is to be the missing mass in the universe.

  5. X-ray surveys - Weighting the dark matter haloes of X-ray AGN: towards a physical description of the accretion history of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, Antonis; Mountrichas, G.; Fanidakis, N.; Finoguenov, A.; Aegis Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    The masses of the dark matter haloes in which AGN live is powerful diagnostic of the conditions under which supermassive black holes form and evolve across cosmic time. A new clustering estimation method will be presented which requires spectroscopy only for the AGN and uses photometric redshift probability density functions for galaxies to determine the projected real-space AGN/galaxy cross-correlation function. Our method is superior to traditional AGN clustering estimators (e.g. auto-correlation function) because (i) random errors are significantly suppressed when counting AGN/galaxy pairs, (ii) the impact of sample variance is minimized, and (iii) the requirements for spectroscopy are minimal; only spectroscopic redshift measurements for the AGN are needed. This method is applied to the combined AEGIS, COSMOS and ECDFS fields to infer the bias and dark matter halo mass of moderate luminosity (Lx~10^43 erg/s/cm^2) X-ray AGN at z~1 (total of 400). Predictions from the GALFORM semi-analytic model will be compared to the observations to show that a combination of hot and cold-gas accretion (the latter triggered by disk instabilities in spirals rather than mergers) reproduce well the clustering properties of X-ray AGN over a range of redshifts and luminosities.

  6. We present 'Black Holes Make Stars which Explains the Mystery of the Newly Discovered Phoenix Galaxy while Dark Matter in the Universe is described in our Explanation.'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimorelli, Salvatore; Samuels, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We present an entirely new concept for 'How the universe and its contents might have formed.' We contend the Big Bang (BB) resulted from one (or two) Black Hole(s) (BH) bursting (or colliding), producing an almost infinite number of particles of varying sizes, from the smallest elementary particle to particles large enough to contain the mass of a galaxy. The accepted prevailing theory for stellar evolution is 'sufficiently massive stars are reduced to BH upon their ultimate demise.' We consider larger types of BH originating from the original BB, which are subsequently expanded and modified enough to start significant radiation and burst, which resulting particle eventually result into a Galaxy; and smaller BH which become stars and planets. We theorize the universe was made by a massive BH which had enough mass to produce the contents of our universe. We define and categorize BH by their mass and the spaces which they inhabit. We describe mechanisms for their formation and mechanisms of BH collisions and bursts, inside the universe, linked to formations of galaxies, stars, planets and moons. Our concept could explain the mystery of the newly discovered Phoenix Galaxy, which produces 740 Stars per year, an order of magnitude above expected. We propose that a category-1 (c-1) BH formed the universe, by generating c-2 BH which form galaxies, c-3 BH which form stars, and c-4 BH which form planets and moons. Each sequential category of BH is less dense, and is more expanded and modified; and links the formation of the universe to present day activities and processes observed on earth, especially leading to the formation of the elements on earth. We offer three mechanisms (a, b, & c) for stellar origin, formation and evolution. 'a' is the accepted 'accretion and gravitation process.' 'b' is 'as a star originates as an expanded, modified BH with none or little help from accretion, begins to radiate; and continues to grow into a star. 'c' is a mechanism in which a star

  7. Dark matter annihilation at the galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Tim

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately five times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, efforts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the first multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable effective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing efforts which have successfully detected an excess in gamma-ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is difficult to describe in terms of standard diffuse emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I

  8. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Timothy Ryan

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  9. On finite density effects on cosmic reheating and moduli decay and implications for Dark Matter production

    SciTech Connect

    Drewes, Marco

    2014-11-01

    We study the damping of an oscillating scalar field in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime by perturbative processes, taking into account the back-reaction of the plasma of decay products on the damping rate. The scalar field may be identified with the inflaton, in which case this process resembles the reheating of the universe after inflation. It can also model a modulus that dominates the energy density of the universe at later times. We find that the finite density corrections to the damping rate can have a drastic effect on the thermal history and considerably increase both, the maximal temperature in the early universe and the reheating temperature at the onset of the radiation dominated era. As a result the abundance of some Dark Matter candidates may be considerably larger than previously estimated. We give improved analytic estimates for the maximal and the reheating temperatures and confirm them numerically in a simple model.

  10. Dark Matter and Cosmic Web Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The development of concepts of dark matter and cosmic web are described as paradigm changes in cosmology. As characteristic in paradigm shifts, there is no single discovery; the new concepts were developed step-by-step by many scientists. The book describes the classical cosmological paradigm, elaborated in the first half of the 20th century. Next the book describes problems in the classical picture, and steps to solve the discrepancies, which eventually led to the formation of the modern cosmological paradigm. The new paradigm tells that the Universe is dominated by dark matter and dark energy, that it has the structure in the form of the cosmic web, and that it has evolved through an inflationary initial stage. The story is told from the perspective of one of the participants of events. The book concentrates to the path of the research, difficulties encountered, and discussions in favour or against new concepts. A special flavour gives to the story the description of difficulties of doing revolutionary research in an occupied country behind the Iron Curtain -- as well as convincing scientists in the West -- and the development of Estonia towards a free country. The book is accompanied by a website (http://www.aai.ee/~einasto/DarkMatter) which contains additional material: copies of originals of some crucial papers, astronomical movies, and also movies which show the private life of the author.

  11. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model. PMID:26849584

  12. Tunguska dark matter ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 antitop quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

  13. Particulate Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Technology Laws & Regulations About EPA Contact Us Particulate Matter (PM) You are here: EPA Home Air & Radiation Six Common Pollutants Particulate Matter Announcements March 13, 2013 - An updated “Strategies ...

  14. Reheating effects in the matter power spectrum and implications for substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-10-15

    The thermal and expansion history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis is unknown. We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations through the transition from an early matter era to radiation domination. We treat reheating as the perturbative decay of an oscillating scalar field into relativistic plasma and cold dark matter. After reheating, we find that subhorizon perturbations in the decay-produced dark matter density are significantly enhanced, while subhorizon radiation perturbations are instead suppressed. If dark matter originates in the radiation bath after reheating, this suppression may be the primary cutoff in the matter power spectrum. Conversely, for dark matter produced nonthermally from scalar decay, enhanced perturbations can drive structure formation during the cosmic dark ages and dramatically increase the abundance of compact substructures. For low reheat temperatures, we find that as much as 50% of all dark matter is in microhalos with M > or approx. 0.1M{sub +} at z{approx_equal}100, compared to a fraction of {approx}10{sup -10} in the standard case. In this scenario, ultradense substructures may constitute a large fraction of dark matter in galaxies today.

  15. Universal Semantics in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhenying

    2009-01-01

    What and how we translate are questions often argued about. No matter what kind of answers one may give, priority in translation should be granted to meaning, especially those meanings that exist in all concerned languages. In this paper the author defines them as universal sememes, and the study of them as universal semantics, of which…

  16. Dominance Hierarchies in Leptothorax Ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Blaine J.

    1981-04-01

    The social organization of Leptothorax allardycei is unique among ant species thus far studied. The workers form linear dominance hierarchies characterized by routine displays of dominance, avoidance behavior, and even fighting. The high-ranking ants are favored in liquid food exchange, have greater ovarian development, and produce 20 percent of the eggs.

  17. Dominant Leadership Style in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2006-01-01

    The dominant leadership style is defined by the situation and the kind of organizational environment and climate. This, however, does not sufficiently define the leadership qualities in school organizations. There are other factors which also determine the dominant leadership style, which are the traits and style, teachers commitments, pass out…

  18. On The Origin of Light Dark Matter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Kaplan, Jared; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-04

    TeV-mass dark matter charged under a new GeV-scale gauge force can explain electronic cosmic-ray anomalies. We propose that the CoGeNT and DAMA direct detection experiments are observing scattering of light stable states 'GeV-Matter' that are charged under this force and constitute a small fraction of the dark matter halo. Dark higgsinos in a supersymmetric dark sector are natural candidates for GeV-Matter that scatter off protons with a universal cross-section of 5 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} and can naturally be split by 10-30 keV so that their dominant interaction with protons is down-scattering. As an example, down-scattering of an O(5) GeV dark higgsino can simultaneously explain the spectra observed by both CoGeNT and DAMA. The event rates in these experiments correspond to a GeV-Matter abundance of 0.2-1% of the halo mass density. This abundance can arise directly from thermal freeze-out at weak coupling, or from the late decay of an unstable TeV-scale WIMP. Our proposal can be tested by searches for exotics in the BaBar and Belle datasets.

  19. Asymmetric dark matter annihilation as a test of non-standard cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Rehagen, Thomas E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2013-08-01

    We show that the relic abundance of the minority component of asymmetric dark matter can be very sensitive to the expansion rate of the Universe and the temperature of transition between a non-standard pre-Big Bang Nucleosynthesis cosmological phase and the standard radiation dominated phase, if chemical decoupling happens before this transition. In particular, because the annihilation cross section of asymmetric dark matter is typically larger than that of symmetric dark matter in the standard cosmology, the decrease in relic density of the minority component in non-standard cosmologies with respect to the majority component may be compensated by the increase in annihilation cross section, so that the annihilation rate at present of asymmetric dark matter, contrary to general belief, could be larger than that of symmetric dark matter in the standard cosmology. Thus, if the annihilation cross section of the asymmetric dark matter candidate is known, the annihilation rate at present, if detectable, could be used to test the Universe before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, an epoch from which we do not yet have any data.

  20. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; Consortium, Primate Microbiome; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host–microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important implications for the use of animal models in studies of human sexual and reproductive diseases. PMID:25036926

  1. Solving the Dark Matter Problem

    ScienceCinema

    Baltz, Ted

    2009-09-01

    Cosmological observations have firmly established that the majority of matter in the universe is of an unknown type, called 'dark matter'. A compelling hypothesis is that the dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range around 100 GeV. If the WIMP hypothesis is correct, such particles could be created and studied at accelerators. Furthermore they could be directly detected as the primary component of our galaxy. Solving the dark matter problem requires that the connection be made between the two. We describe some theoretical and experimental avenues that might lead to this connection.

  2. Cosmological moduli and the post-inflationary universe: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Gordon; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2015-06-01

    We critically review the role of cosmological moduli in determining the post-inflationary history of the universe. Moduli are ubiquitous in string and M-theory constructions of beyond the Standard Model physics, where they parametrize the geometry of the compactification manifold. For those with masses determined by supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking this leads to their eventual decay slightly before Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) (without spoiling its predictions). This results in a matter dominated phase shortly after inflation ends, which can influence baryon and dark matter genesis, as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the growth of large-scale structure. Given progress within fundamental theory, and guidance from dark matter and collider experiments, nonthermal histories have emerged as a robust and theoretically well-motivated alternative to a strictly thermal one. We review this approach to the early universe and discuss both the theoretical challenges and the observational implications.

  3. The Formation of Milky Way-mass Disk Galaxies in the First 500 Million Years of a Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yu; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Tenneti, Ananth; Bird, Simeon; Battaglia, Nicholas; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Whether or not among the myriad tiny protogalaxies there exists a population with similarities to present-day galaxies is an open question. We show, using BlueTides, the first hydrodynamic simulation large enough to resolve the relevant scales, that the first massive galaxies to form are predicted to have extensive rotationally supported disks. Although their morphology resembles in some ways Milky Way types seen at much lower redshifts, these high-redshift galaxies are smaller, denser, and richer in gas than their low-redshift counterparts. From a kinematic analysis of a statistical sample of 216 galaxies at redshift z = 8-10, we have found that disk galaxies make up 70% of the population of galaxies with stellar mass {10}10{M}⊙ or greater. Cold dark matter cosmology therefore makes specific predictions for the population of large galaxies 500 million years after the Big Bang. We argue that wide-field satellite telescopes (e.g., WFIRST) will in the near future discover these first massive disk galaxies. The simplicity of their structure and formation history should make new tests of cosmology possible.

  4. Lateral Dominance and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert J.

    1979-01-01

    Theory and research on the relation of lateral dominance to the causation of reading disability are reviewed. Both direct and indirect measures of cerebral hemisphere functioning are considered. (SBH)

  5. Insecticide resistance and dominance levels.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, D; Genissel, A; Raymond, M

    2000-12-01

    Dominance has been assessed in different ways in insecticide resistance studies, based on three phenotypic traits: the insecticide concentration required to give a particular mortality (DLC), mortality at a particular insecticide dose (DML), and fitness in treated areas (DWT). We propose a general formula for estimating dominance on a scale of 0 to 1 (0 = complete recessivity and 1 = complete dominance). DLC, DML, and DWT are not directly related and their values depend on genetic background and environmental conditions. We also show that pest management strategies can have the consequence to increase DWT via the selection of dominance modifiers. Studies on resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins provide the ultimate example of the complexity of the definition of the concept of dominance. Almost all studies have focused on calculation of DLC, which provides little information about the efficiency of pest management programs. For instance, one assumption of the high dose/refuge strategy is that Bacillus thuringiensis resistance must be effectively recessive (i.e., DML must be close to zero). However, DWT, rather than DML, is relevant to the resistance management strategy. Therefore, we strongly suggest that the time has come to focus on fitness dominance levels in the presence and absence of insecticide. PMID:11142285

  6. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Noriya; Yamamoto, Miyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a group setting, individuals' perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems' level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation. PMID:26136644

  7. Who Should Go to University? Justice in University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzee, Ben; Martin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Current debates regarding justice in university admissions most often approach the question of access to university from a technical, policy-focussed perspective. Despite the attention that access to university receives in the press and policy literature, ethical discussion tends to focus on technical matters such as who should pay for university…

  8. Two field matter bounce cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yi-Fu; McDonough, Evan; Duplessis, Francis; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: evanmc@physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-10-01

    We re-examine the non-singular Matter Bounce scenario first developed in [20], which starts with a matter-dominated period of contraction and transitions into an Ekpyrotic phase of contraction. We consider both matter fields, the first of which plays the role of regular matter, and the second of which is responsible for the non-singular bounce. Since the dominant matter field is massive, the induced curvature fluctuations are initially not scale-invariant, whereas the fluctuations of the second scalar field (which are initially entropy fluctuations) are scale-invariant. We study the transfer of the initial entropy perturbations into curvature fluctuations in the matter-dominated phase of contraction and show that the latter become nearly scale invariant on large scales but are blue tilted on small scales. We study the evolution of both curvature and entropy fluctuations through the bounce, and show that both have a scale-invariant spectrum which is blue-tilted on small scales. However, we find that the entropy fluctuations have an amplitude that is much smaller than that of the curvature perturbations, due to gravitational amplification of curvature perturbations during the bounce phase.

  9. Complex Scalar Field Dark Matter and Cosmological B-Modes from Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bohua; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Shapiro, Paul

    2015-04-01

    As an alternative to the WIMP CDM model, we consider dark matter comprised of ultralight bosons, described by a classical complex scalar field, for which particle number per unit comoving volume is conserved. When the homogeneous background universe evolves in the presence of this type of scalar field dark matter (SFDM), the equation of state of SFDM is relativistic at early times, evolving from stiff (p = ρ) to radiationlike (p = ρ / 3), before it becomes nonrelativistic and CDM-like at late times (p = 0). Thus, before the familiar radiation-dominated phase, there is an earlier phase of stiff-matter-domination. The timing of the transition between these phases determined by SFDM model parameters, particle mass m and self-interaction coupling strength λ, is constrained by cosmological observables, particularly Neff, the effective number of neutrino species during BBN, and cosmological tensor fluctuations from inflation, which leave an imprint on CMB B-modes. Primordial tensor modes that reenter the horizon during the stiff phase contribute significantly to the total energy density of the universe as gravitational waves, increasing the expansion rate of the early universe. This effect yields constraints on SFDM model parameters.

  10. Gravitino dark matter from Q-ball decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Ian M.; Kusenko, Alexander

    2009-10-01

    Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, accompanied by the formation and subsequent decay of Q-balls, can generate both the baryon asymmetry of the Universe and dark matter in the form of gravitinos. The gravitinos from Q-ball decay dominate over the thermally produced population if the reheat temperature TR≲107GeV. We show that a gravitino with mass ˜1GeV is consistent with all observational bounds and can explain the baryon-to-dark-matter ratio in the gauge-mediated models of supersymmetry breaking for a wide range of cosmological and Q-ball parameters. Moreover, decaying Q-balls can be the dominant production mechanism for m3/2<1GeV gravitinos if the Q-balls are formed from a (B-L)=0 condensate, which produces no net baryon asymmetry. Gravitinos with masses in the range 50eV≲m3/2≲100keV produced in this way can act as warm dark matter and can have observable imprint on the small-scale structure.

  11. Gravitino dark matter from Q-ball decays

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, Ian M.; Kusenko, Alexander

    2009-10-01

    Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, accompanied by the formation and subsequent decay of Q-balls, can generate both the baryon asymmetry of the Universe and dark matter in the form of gravitinos. The gravitinos from Q-ball decay dominate over the thermally produced population if the reheat temperature T{sub R} < or approx. 10{sup 7} GeV. We show that a gravitino with mass {approx}1 GeV is consistent with all observational bounds and can explain the baryon-to-dark-matter ratio in the gauge-mediated models of supersymmetry breaking for a wide range of cosmological and Q-ball parameters. Moreover, decaying Q-balls can be the dominant production mechanism for m{sub 3/2}<1 GeV gravitinos if the Q-balls are formed from a (B-L)=0 condensate, which produces no net baryon asymmetry. Gravitinos with masses in the range 50 eV < or approx. m{sub 3/2} < or approx. 100 keV produced in this way can act as warm dark matter and can have observable imprint on the small-scale structure.

  12. Observational effects of the early episodically dominating dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Jae-heon; Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the observational consequences of the early episodically dominating dark energy on the evolution of cosmological structures. For this aim, we introduce the minimally coupled scalar-field dark energy model with the Albrecht-Skordis potential, which allows a sudden ephemeral domination of a dark energy component during the radiation or early matter era. The conventional cosmological parameters in the presence of such an early dark energy are constrained with WMAP and Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data including other external data sets. It is shown that in the presence of such an early dark energy, the estimated cosmological parameters can deviate substantially from the currently known Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM )-based parameters, with best-fit values differing by several percent for WMAP and by a percent level for Planck data. For the latter case, only a limited amount of dark energy with episodic nature is allowed since the Planck data strongly favor the Λ CDM model. Compared with the conventional dark energy model, the early dark energy dominating near the radiation-matter equality or at the early matter era results in the shorter cosmic age or the presence of tensor-type perturbation, respectively. Our analysis demonstrates that the alternative cosmological parameter estimation is allowed based on the same observations even in Einstein's gravity.

  13. Using (4+1) Split and Energy Conditions to Study the Induced Matter in 5d Ricci-Flat Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yongli; Liu, Hongya; Xu, Lixin

    We use (4+1) split to derive the 4D induced energy density ρ and pressure p of the 5D Ricci-flat cosmological solutions which are characterized by having a bounce instead of a bang. The solutions contain two arbitrary functions of time t and, therefore, are mathematically rich in giving various cosmological models. By using four known energy conditions (null, weak, strong, and dominant) to pick out and study physically meaningful solutions, we find that the 4D part of the 5D solutions asymptotically approaches to the standard 4D FRW models and the expansion of the universe is decelerating for normal induced matter for which all the four energy conditions are satisfied. We also find that quintessence might be normal or abnormal, depending on the parameter w of the equation of state. If -1 ≤ w < -1/3, the expansion of the universe is accelerating and the quintessence is abnormal because the strong energy condition is violated while other three are satisfied. For phantom, all the four energy conditions are violated. Before the bounce, all the four energy conditions are violated, implying that the cosmic matter before the bounce could be explained as a phantom that has a large negative pressure and makes the universe bouncing. In the early times after the bounce, the dominant energy condition is violated, while the other three are satisfied, and so the cosmic matter could be explained as a super-luminal acoustic matter.

  14. NASA Finds Direct Proof of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    Dark matter and normal matter have been wrenched apart by the tremendous collision of two large clusters of galaxies. The discovery, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, gives direct evidence for the existence of dark matter. "This is the most energetic cosmic event, besides the Big Bang, which we know about," said team member Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. Lensing Illustration Gravitational Lensing Explanation These observations provide the strongest evidence yet that most of the matter in the universe is dark. Despite considerable evidence for dark matter, some scientists have proposed alternative theories for gravity where it is stronger on intergalactic scales than predicted by Newton and Einstein, removing the need for dark matter. However, such theories cannot explain the observed effects of this collision. "A universe that's dominated by dark stuff seems preposterous, so we wanted to test whether there were any basic flaws in our thinking," said Doug Clowe of the University of Arizona at Tucson, and leader of the study. "These results are direct proof that dark matter exists." Animation of Cluster Collision Animation of Cluster Collision In galaxy clusters, the normal matter, like the atoms that make up the stars, planets, and everything on Earth, is primarily in the form of hot gas and stars. The mass of the hot gas between the galaxies is far greater than the mass of the stars in all of the galaxies. This normal matter is bound in the cluster by the gravity of an even greater mass of dark matter. Without dark matter, which is invisible and can only be detected through its gravity, the fast-moving galaxies and the hot gas would quickly fly apart. The team was granted more than 100 hours on the Chandra telescope to observe the galaxy cluster 1E0657-56. The cluster is also known as the bullet cluster, because it contains a spectacular bullet-shaped cloud of hundred

  15. Olivine-dominated asteroids: Mineralogy and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Juan A.; Reddy, Vishnu; Kelley, Michael S.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Lucas, Michael P.; Hardersen, Paul S.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Abell, Paul A.; Corre, Lucille Le

    2014-01-01

    Olivine-dominated asteroids are a rare type of objects formed either in nebular processes or through magmatic differentiation. The analysis of meteorite samples suggest that at least 100 parent bodies in the main belt experienced partial or complete melting and differentiation before being disrupted. However, only a few olivine-dominated asteroids, representative of the mantle of disrupted differentiated bodies, are known to exist. Due to the paucity of these objects in the main belt their origin and evolution have been a matter of great debate over the years. In this work we present a detailed mineralogical analysis of twelve olivine-dominated asteroids. We have obtained near-infrared (NIR) spectra (0.7-2.4 μm) of asteroids (246) Asporina, (289) Nenetta, (446) Aeternitas, (863) Benkoela, (4125) Lew Allen and (4490) Bamberry. Observations were conducted with the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i. This sample was complemented with spectra of six other olivine-dominated asteroids including (354) Eleonora, (984) Gretia, (1951) Lick, (2501) Lohja, (3819) Robinson and (5261) Eureka obtained by previous workers. Within our sample we distinguish two classes, one that we call monomineralic-olivine asteroids, which are those whose spectra only exhibit the 1 μm feature, and another referred to as olivine-rich asteroids, whose spectra exhibit the 1 μm feature and a weak (Band II depth ˜4%) 2 μm feature. For the monomineralic-olivine asteroids the olivine chemistry was found to range from ˜Fo49 to Fo70, consistent with the values measured for brachinites and R chondrites. In the case of the olivine-rich asteroids we determined their olivine and low-Ca pyroxene abundance using a new set of spectral calibrations derived from the analysis of R chondrites spectra. We found that the olivine abundance for these asteroids varies from 0.68 to 0.93, while the fraction of low-Ca pyroxene to total pyroxene ranges from 0.6 to 0.9. A search for dynamical

  16. Front matter.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    "If you build it, they will come." In the past, this seemed to be the dominant paradigm for technology development and implementation in healthcare. This initial paradigm often led to poor user satisfaction and failed implementations of healthcare information technology. In the last few decades, informatics has embraced user-centered design principles to improve both the design and adoption of information and communication technologies. However, frequently the end-user is perceived to only be the clinician. Although the data in healthcare are about and are received from patients, patients are not usually perceived of as end-users of health information or health information technology. In the popular press, we are seeing a grass-roots effort from patients to change their role in their own health management. A change to a more dynamic partnership with clinicians means we need tools that are able to support patients as well as clinicians in this partnership. New online tools and mobile applications are sprouting up to fill the demand, but rigorous evaluation of these tools can be lacking; leading to questionable quality and concerns for patient safety. The informatics field has the expertise to provide critical leadership in this area. The call for this year's conference asked for authors to consider the role and voice of the patient. Patients themselves were invited to contribute papers describing their experiences in healthcare and their use of their own data. The papers here reflect not only the informatics innovations in the field, but also explore how to include the patients when considering design, implementation and long-term adoption of health information systems. We hope that the knowledge shared between ITCH 2015 participants will generate further discussions and collaborations and lead to breakthroughs in delivering effective and inclusive healthcare worldwide. Karen Courtney School of Health Information Science University of Victoria Victoria, British

  17. Mixed axion/neutralino cold dark matter in supersymmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Howard; Lessa, Andre; Rajagopalan, Shibi; Sreethawong, Warintorn E-mail: lessa@nhn.ou.edu E-mail: wstan@nhn.ou.edu

    2011-06-01

    We consider supersymmetric (SUSY) models wherein the strong CP problem is solved by the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) mechanism with a concommitant axion/axino supermultiplet. We examine R-parity conserving models where the neutralino is the lightest SUSY particle, so that a mixture of neutralinos and axions serve as cold dark matter (a Z-tilde {sub 1} CDM). The mixed a Z-tilde {sub 1} CDM scenario can match the measured dark matter abundance for SUSY models which typically give too low a value of the usual thermal neutralino abundance, such as models with wino-like or higgsino-like dark matter. The usual thermal neutralino abundance can be greatly enhanced by the decay of thermally-produced axinos (ã) to neutralinos, followed by neutralino re-annihilation at temperatures much lower than freeze-out. In this case, the relic density is usually neutralino dominated, and goes as ∼ (f{sub a}/N)/m{sub ã}{sup 3/2}. If axino decay occurs before neutralino freeze-out, then instead the neutralino abundance can be augmented by relic axions to match the measured abundance. Entropy production from late-time axino decays can diminish the axion abundance, but ultimately not the neutralino abundance. In a Z-tilde {sub 1} CDM models, it may be possible to detect both a WIMP and an axion as dark matter relics. We also discuss possible modifications of our results due to production and decay of saxions. In the appendices, we present expressions for the Hubble expansion rate and the axion and neutralino relic densities in radiation, matter and decaying-particle dominated universes.

  18. Dominance between booby nestlings involves winner and loser effects.

    PubMed

    Drummond; Canales

    1998-06-01

    Two-chick broods of the blue-footed booby, Sula nebouxii, ordinarily exhibit stable dominance-subordinance, with the senior (first-hatched) chick habitually aggressive and the junior one habitually submissive (Nelson 1978, The Sulidae: Gannets and Boobies. London: Oxford University Press). But are both the subordinate and the dominant chick affected in their agonistic tendencies by early social experience? To answer this, we permanently paired subordinate and dominant chicks, 2-3 weeks old, with singletons (chicks lacking experience with a nestmate) by cross-fostering. During the first 4 h after pairing, subordinate chicks were seven times less aggressive than singletons and twice as likely to be submissive; dominant chicks were six times as aggressive as singletons. Although most subordinates consistently lost agonistic encounters during the first 10 days after pairing, the proportion of dominants that won decreased progressively until, by day 6, only about half of dominant chicks were winning. Early social experience has a strong but reversable training effect on both subordinates and dominants. Training as a subordinate showed more persistent effects than training as a dominant, possibly in part because our testing situation perpetuated subordinate training and counteracted dominant training. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9642010

  19. Cosmic Explosions, Life in the Universe, and the Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piran, Tsvi; Jimenez, Raul; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Simpson, Fergus; Verde, Licia

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are copious sources of gamma rays whose interaction with a planetary atmosphere can pose a threat to complex life. Using recent determinations of their rate and probability of causing massive extinction, we explore what types of universes are most likely to harbor advanced forms of life. We use cosmological N -body simulations to determine at what time and for what value of the cosmological constant (Λ ) the chances of life being unaffected by cosmic explosions are maximized. Life survival to GRBs favors Lambda-dominated universes. Within a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, the likelihood of life survival to GRBs is governed by the value of Λ and the age of the Universe. We find that we seem to live in a favorable point in this parameter space that minimizes the exposure to cosmic explosions, yet maximizes the number of main sequence (hydrogen-burning) stars around which advanced life forms can exist.

  20. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.; Collaboration: ADMX Collaboration; ADMX-HF Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  1. Axion dark matter searches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axionsmore » at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.« less

  2. Dark matter candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The types of particles which may provide the nonluminous mass required by big-bang cosmological models are listed and briefly characterized. The observational evidence for the existence of dark matter (outweighing the luminous component by at least a factor of 10) is reviewed; the theoretical arguments favoring mainly nonbaryonic dark matter are summarized; and particular attention is given to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) remaining as relics from the early universe. The WIMPs are classified as thermal relics (heavy stable neutrinos and lighter neutralinos), asymmetric relics (including baryons), nonthermal relics (superheavy magnetic monopoles, axions, and soliton stars), and truly exotic relics (relativistic debris or vacuum energy). Explanations for the current apparent baryon/exotica ratio of about 0.1 in different theoretical scenarios are considered, and the problems of experimental and/or observational dark-matter detection are examined.

  3. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  4. Social dominance in preschool classrooms.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Anthony D; Roseth, Cary J; Mliner, Shanna; Bohn, Catherine M; Van Ryzin, Mark; Vance, Natalie; Cheatham, Carol L; Tarullo, Amanda

    2007-02-01

    The authors examined preschoolers' aggressive and cooperative behaviors and their associations with social dominance. First and as predicted, directly observed aggressive interactions decreased across the school year, and same-sex aggression occurred more frequently than cross-sex aggression. Next, the authors examined the relation between aggression and reconciliation, cooperation, and social display variables. Teacher ratings of children's aggression related to observed aggression but not to observed "wins" of aggressive bouts. Instead, wins were related to cooperation and display variables. Finally, they examined the relative power of wins and cooperation in predicting 2 measures of social dominance. After age was controlled, wins alone predicted teacher-rated social dominance. Results are discussed in terms of different forms of competition and how school ethos affects these forms. PMID:17324075

  5. The universe could be dark, ma non troppo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portilla, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    We will present new insights into the dark phenomena, i.e., the recent acceleration of the universe linked to a sort of dark energy, and to the unknown dark matter. The study is based only on Einsteins equations without cosmological constant, and on ordinary matter described as point masses. We will be limited, thereby, to the post -recombination epoch. We shall revise the outspread statement that a universe made of colission-less particles is well represented by dust, i.e; by an Einstein-de Sitter universe. Using well known results on the N-body problem expressed as a infinite series, and starting at zero order with the empty Milne universe, we shall get the aforementioned EdS universe at the first order, but at the next one we shall obtain a cosmological model whose energy density could explain the dark phenomena. No exotic dark components are necessary in principle, but we need to know the redshift of formation of the dominant particles in the present epoch, that we identify with the galaxies. Thus, assuming that redshift to be of the order of eleven, we shall get that the time evolution of the acceleration, and the supernovae luminous distance-redshift relation, are indistinguishable from the ones predicted by the ACDM model. However, if there was no realistic evolution model that could justify such an early galaxy formation epoch, then some quantity of dark energy would be necessary, ma non troppo.

  6. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  7. Dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    More than 80 years after its first postulation in modern form, the existence and distribution of dark matter in our Universe is well established. Dark matter is the gravitational glue that holds together galaxies, galaxy clusters and structures on the largest cosmological scales, and an essential component to explain the observed fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background. Yet its existence is inferred indirectly, through its gravitational influence on luminous matter, and its nature is not known. A viable hypothesis is that dark matter is made of new, elementary particles, with allowed masses and interaction strengths spanning a wide range. Two well-motivated classes of candidates are axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and experimental efforts have now reached sensitivities that allow them to test this hypothesis. Axions, produced non-thermally in the early Universe, can be detected by exploiting their predicted couplings to photons and electrons. WIMPs can be detected directly by looking for their collisions with atomic nuclei ultra-low background detectors, or indirectly, through the observation of their annihilation products such as neutrinos, gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons over the astrophysical background. A complementary method is the production of dark matter particles at colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, where they could be observed indirectly via missing transverse energy, or via associated particle production. I will review the main experimental efforts to search for dark matter particles, and the existing constraints on the interaction cross sections. I will also discuss future experiments, their complementarity and their ability to measure the properties of these particles.

  8. Dominant resistance against plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    de Ronde, Dryas; Butterbach, Patrick; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To establish a successful infection plant viruses have to overcome a defense system composed of several layers. This review will overview the various strategies plants employ to combat viral infections with main emphasis on the current status of single dominant resistance (R) genes identified against plant viruses and the corresponding avirulence (Avr) genes identified so far. The most common models to explain the mode of action of dominant R genes will be presented. Finally, in brief the hypersensitive response (HR) and extreme resistance (ER), and the functional and structural similarity of R genes to sensors of innate immunity in mammalian cell systems will be described. PMID:25018765

  9. Domination of black hole accretion in brane cosmology.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, A S

    2003-01-24

    We consider the evolution of primordial black holes formed during the high energy phase of the braneworld scenario. We show that the effect of accretion from the surrounding radiation bath is dominant compared to evaporation for such black holes. This feature lasts till the onset of matter (or black hole) domination of the total energy density which could occur either in the high energy phase or later. We find that the black hole evaporation times could be significantly large even for black holes with small initial mass to survive until several cosmologically interesting eras. PMID:12570481

  10. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  11. Models of universe with a polytropic equation of state: I. The early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2014-02-01

    We construct models of universe with a generalized equation of state having a linear component and a polytropic component. Concerning the linear equation of state , we assume . This equation of state describes radiation ( or pressureless matter (. Concerning the polytropic equation of state , we remain very general allowing the polytropic constant k and the polytropic index n to have arbitrary values. In this paper, we consider positive indices n > 0 . In that case, the polytropic component dominates the linear component in the early universe where the density is high. For , n = 1 and , where g/m3 is the Planck density, we obtain a model of early universe describing the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era. The universe exists at any time in the past and there is no primordial singularity. However, for t < 0 , its size is less than the Planck length m. In this model, the universe undergoes an inflationary expansion with the Planck density g/m3 (vacuum energy) that brings it from the Planck size m at t = 0 to a size m at s (corresponding to about 23.3 Planck times s). For , n = 1 and , we obtain a model of early universe with a new form of primordial singularity: The universe starts at t = 0 with an infinite density and a finite radius a = a 1 . Actually, this universe becomes physical at a time s from which the velocity of sound is less than the speed of light. When , the universe enters in the radiation era and evolves like in the standard model. We describe the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era by analogy with a second-order phase transition where the Planck constant ℏ plays the role of finite-size effects (the standard Big Bang theory is recovered for ℏ = 0.

  12. Constraints on universe models with cosmological constant from cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Naoshi; Gouda, Naoteru; Sasaki, Misao Kyoto Univ., Uji )

    1990-12-01

    Thorough numerical calculations of the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation using the gauge-invariant formalism are carried out for various cosmological models with the cosmological constant. It is shown that a spatially flat cold dark matter-dominated universe of Omega(0) = 0.1 to about 0.4 and H(0) = 50 to about 100 km/s per Mpc with adiabatic perturbations has the possibility of giving the final answer to cosmological puzzles. It is also found that the introduction of the cosmological constant may revive pure baryonic universe models. 33 refs.

  13. Thermodynamics of Interacting Entropy-Corrected Holographic Dark Energy in a Non-Flat FRW Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Sheykhi, Ahmad; Farooq, M. Umar

    An entropy-corrected holographic dark energy (ECHDE) was recently proposed to explain the dark energy-dominated universe with the help of quantum corrections to the entropy-area relation in the setup of loop quantum cosmology. Using this new definition, we investigate its thermodynamical features including entropy and energy conservation. We describe the thermodynamical interpretation of the interaction between ECHDE and dark matter in a non-flat universe. We obtain a relation between the interaction term of the dark components and thermal fluctuation. Our study further generalizes the earlier works86, 87 in this direction.

  14. Dominance and Age in Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsong, David

    2014-01-01

    The present article examines the relationship between age and dominance in bilingual populations. Age in bilingualism is understood as the point in development at which second language (L2) acquisition begins and as the chronological age of users of two languages. Age of acquisition (AoA) is a factor in determining which of a bilingual's two…

  15. The morphology and hydrology of small spring-dominated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Ronald E.; Anderson, Diana E.; Springer, Abraham E.

    2008-12-01

    Small, low order channels located in wet meadows along the Mogollon Rim of northern Arizona that receive the bulk of their flow from spring discharge exhibit a morphology that differs markedly from channels that receive the bulk of their flow from runoff. These small, spring-dominated channels generally have dense vegetation cover, vertical (or near vertical) banks with flat channel beds that are armored with clasts up to 60 mm. Clasts armoring the spring-dominated channels become mobile at 45 to 85% of the bankfull depth. The lack of fine-grained material in the bed of the spring-dominated channels reflects the small drainage size, lack of fine grain input from the spring, and winnowing affect of the consistent discharge. Minor amounts of large woody debris were present in some of the spring-dominated channels, however, unlike previous studies it does not appear to play a role in the spring-dominated channel morphology. Sinuosity values for spring-dominated channels averaged 1.19, while the average sinuosity values for the runoff-dominated channels, 1.08, were significantly lower. Measured width-to-depth ratios averaged 2.4 in the spring-dominated channels, much lower than the average ratio of 11.6 found for the runoff-dominated channels. The standard deviation of width-to-depth ratios was higher for runoff-dominated channels, reflecting a more variable channel profile. A third channel type, here referred to as hybrid channels, receive significant flow from both springs and runoff. These channels have characteristics that fall between spring-dominated and runoff-dominated channels. Elevation, gradient, organic matter content, and sediment grain size distribution of the wet meadows in which the channels are formed do not exhibit significant differences between channel types, suggesting that these factors are not responsible for the observed differences in channel morphologies. The major differences in controls on the channel morphology found between the spring-dominated

  16. The tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sreenath, V.; Sriramkumar, L.

    2015-11-01

    Matter bounces are bouncing scenarios wherein the universe contracts as in a matter dominated phase at early times. Such scenarios are known to lead to a scale invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations, just as de Sitter inflation does. In this work, we examine if the tensor bi-spectrum can discriminate between the inflationary and the bouncing scenarios. Using the Maldacena formalism, we analytically evaluate the tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce for an arbitrary triangular configuration of the wavevectors. We show that, over scales of cosmological interest, the non-Gaussianity parameter hNL that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bi-spectrum is quite small when compared to the corresponding values in de Sitter inflation. During inflation, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations freeze on super-Hubble scales, a behavior that results in the so-called consistency condition relating the tensor bi-spectrum and the power spectrum in the squeezed limit. In contrast, in the bouncing scenarios, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations grow strongly as one approaches the bounce, which suggests that the consistency condition will not be valid in such situations. We explicitly show that the consistency relation is indeed violated in the matter bounce. We discuss the implications of the results.

  17. Moduli induced cogenesis of baryon asymmetry and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Hati, Chandan; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-05-01

    We study a cogenesis mechanism in which the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe and the dark matter abundance can be produced simultaneously at low reheating temperature without violating baryon number in the fundamental interactions. In particular, we consider a model which can be realized in the context of type IIB large volume string compactifications. The matter superfields in this model include additional pairs of color triplet and singlet superfields in addition to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) superfields. Assuming that the mass of the additional singlet fermions is O (GeV) and of the color triplet fermions is O (TeV), we show that the modulus dominantly decays into the additional color triplet superfields. After soft supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, the lightest eigenstate of scalar component of color triplet superfield further decays into fermionic component of singlet superfield and quarks without violating baryon number. Imposing discrete Z2 symmetry, it follows that the singlet fermion will not further decay into the SM particles and therefore it can be considered as a stable asymmetric dark matter (ADM) component. We find that the decay of the lightest eigenstate of scalar component of color triplet superfield gives the observed baryon asymmetry in the visible sector, an asymmetric dark matter component with the right abundance and naturally explains cosmic coincidence.

  18. The tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenath, V.; Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L.

    2016-03-01

    Matter bounces are bouncing scenarios wherein the universe contracts as in a matter dominated phase at early times. Such scenarios are known to lead to a scale invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations, just as de Sitter inflation does. In this work, we examine if the tensor bi-spectrum can discriminate between the inflationary and the bouncing scenarios. Using the Maldacena formalism, we analytically evaluate the tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce for an arbitrary triangular configuration of the wavevectors. We show that, over scales of cosmological interest, the non-Gaussianity parameter hNL that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bi-spectrum is quite small when compared to the corresponding values in de Sitter inflation. During inflation, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations freeze on super-Hubble scales, a behavior that results in the so-called consistency condition relating the tensor bi-spectrum and the power spectrum in the squeezed limit. In contrast, in the bouncing scenarios, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations grow strongly as one approaches the bounce, which suggests that the consistency condition will not be valid in such situations. We explicitly show that the consistency relation is indeed violated in the matter bounce.

  19. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  20. Entropy, matter, and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Prigogine, I; Géhéniau, J

    1986-09-01

    The role of irreversible processes corresponding to creation of matter in general relativity is investigated. The use of Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensors together with conformal (Minkowski) coordinates suggests that this creation took place in the early universe at the stage of the variation of the conformal factor. The entropy production in this creation process is calculated. It is shown that these dissipative processes lead to the possibility of cosmological models that start from empty conditions and gradually build up matter and entropy. Gravitational entropy takes a simple meaning as associated to the entropy that is necessary to produce matter. This leads to an extension of the third law of thermodynamics, as now the zero point of entropy becomes the space-time structure out of which matter is generated. The theory can be put into a convenient form using a supplementary "C" field in Einstein's field equations. The role of the C field is to express the coupling between gravitation and matter leading to irreversible entropy production. PMID:16593747

  1. Entropy, matter, and cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Prigogine, I.; Géhéniau, J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of irreversible processes corresponding to creation of matter in general relativity is investigated. The use of Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensors together with conformal (Minkowski) coordinates suggests that this creation took place in the early universe at the stage of the variation of the conformal factor. The entropy production in this creation process is calculated. It is shown that these dissipative processes lead to the possibility of cosmological models that start from empty conditions and gradually build up matter and entropy. Gravitational entropy takes a simple meaning as associated to the entropy that is necessary to produce matter. This leads to an extension of the third law of thermodynamics, as now the zero point of entropy becomes the space-time structure out of which matter is generated. The theory can be put into a convenient form using a supplementary “C” field in Einstein's field equations. The role of the C field is to express the coupling between gravitation and matter leading to irreversible entropy production. PMID:16593747

  2. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, Nikodem J.

    2011-04-15

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. Spacetime torsion produced by spin generates, in the classical Dirac equation, the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under a charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A classical Dirac spinor and its charge conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly to hidden antimatter which forms dark matter. The conserved total baryon number of the Universe remained zero.

  3. Matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter from torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a simple scenario which explains the observed matter-antimatter imbalance and the origin of dark matter in the Universe. We use the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity which naturally extends general relativity to include the intrinsic spin of matter. Spacetime torsion produced by spin generates, in the classical Dirac equation, the Hehl-Datta term which is cubic in spinor fields. We show that under a charge-conjugation transformation this term changes sign relative to the mass term. A classical Dirac spinor and its charge conjugate therefore satisfy different field equations. Fermions in the presence of torsion have higher energy levels than antifermions, which leads to their decay asymmetry. Such a difference is significant only at extremely high densities that existed in the very early Universe. We propose that this difference caused a mechanism, according to which heavy fermions existing in such a Universe and carrying the baryon number decayed mostly to normal matter, whereas their antiparticles decayed mostly to hidden antimatter which forms dark matter. The conserved total baryon number of the Universe remained zero.

  4. From nature-dominated to human-dominated environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerli, Bruno; Grosjean, Martin; Hofer, Thomas; Núñez, Lautaro; Pfister, Christian

    2000-01-01

    To what extent is it realistic and useful to view human history as a sequence of changes from highly vulnerable societies of hunters and gatherers through periods with less vulnerable, well buffered and highly productive agrarian-urban societies to a world with regions of extreme overpopulation and overuse of life support systems, so that vulnerability to climatic-environmental changes and extreme events is again increasing? This question cannot be fully answered in our present state of knowledge, but at least we can try to illustrate, with three case studies from different continents, time periods and ecosystems, some fundamental changes in the relationship between natural processes and human activities that occur, as we pass from a nature-dominated to a human dominated environment. 1. Early-mid Holocene: Nature dominated environment — human adaptation, mitigation, and migration. In the central Andes, the Holocene climate changed from humid (10,800-8000 BP) to extreme arid (8000-3600 BP) conditions. Over the same period, prehistoric hunting communities adopted a more sedentary pattern of resource use by settling close to the few perennial water bodies, where they began the process of domesticating camelids around 5000 BP and irrigation from about 3100 BP. 2. Historical period: An agrarian society in transition from an "enduring" to an innovative human response. Detailed documentary evidence from Western Europe may be used to reconstruct quite precisely the impacts of climatic variations on agrarian societies. The period considered spans a major transition from an apparently passive response to the vagaries of the environment during the 16th century to an active and innovative attitude from the onset of the agrarian revolution in the late 18th century through to the present day. The associated changes in technology and in agricultural practices helped to create a society better able to survive the impact of climatic extremes. 3. The present day: A human dominated

  5. Regenerating a symmetry in asymmetric dark matter.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Matthew R; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric dark matter theories generically allow for mass terms that lead to particle-antiparticle mixing. Over the age of the Universe, dark matter can thus oscillate from a purely asymmetric configuration into a symmetric mix of particles and antiparticles, allowing for pair-annihilation processes. Additionally, requiring efficient depletion of the primordial thermal (symmetric) component generically entails large annihilation rates. We show that unless some symmetry completely forbids dark matter particle-antiparticle mixing, asymmetric dark matter is effectively ruled out for a large range of masses, for almost any oscillation time scale shorter than the age of the Universe. PMID:22304253

  6. Extensive investigation of the generalized dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Michael; Skordis, Constantinos; Thomas, Dan B.

    2016-08-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model, wherein the dark matter is treated as a pressureless perfect fluid, provides a good fit to galactic and cosmological data. With the advent of precision cosmology, it should be asked whether this simplest model needs to be extended, and whether doing so could improve our understanding of the properties of dark matter. One established parametrization for generalizing the CDM fluid is the generalized dark matter (GDM) model, in which dark matter is an imperfect fluid with pressure and shear viscosity that fulfill certain postulated closure equations. We investigate these closure equations and the three new parametric functions they contain: the background equation of state w , the speed of sound cs2 and the viscosity cvis2. Taking these functions to be constant parameters, we analyze an exact solution of the perturbed Einstein equations in a flat GDM-dominated universe and discuss the main effects of the three parameters on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our analysis suggests that the CMB alone is not able to distinguish between the GDM sound speed and viscosity parameters, but that other observables, such as the matter power spectrum, are required to break this degeneracy. In order to elucidate further the meaning of the GDM closure equations, we also consider other descriptions of imperfect fluids that have a nonperturbative definition and relate these to the GDM model. In particular, we consider scalar fields, an effective field theory (EFT) of fluids, an EFT of large-scale structure, nonequilibrium thermodynamics and tightly coupled fluids. These descriptions could be used to extend the GDM model into the nonlinear regime of structure formation, which is necessary if the wealth of data available on those scales is to be employed in constraining the model. We also derive the initial conditions for adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations in the presence of GDM and standard cosmological fluids and provide the result in a

  7. Origin of ΔNeff as a result of an interaction between dark radiation and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers Bjaelde, Ole; Das, Subinoy; Moss, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and recently from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) have indicated the possible existence of an extra radiation component in addition to the well known three neutrino species predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. In this paper, we explore the possibility of the apparent extra dark radiation being linked directly to the physics of cold dark matter (CDM). In particular, we consider a generic scenario where dark radiation, as a result of an interaction, is produced directly by a fraction of the dark matter density effectively decaying into dark radiation. At an early epoch when the dark matter density is negligible, as an obvious consequence, the density of dark radiation is also very small. As the Universe approaches matter radiation equality, the dark matter density starts to dominate thereby increasing the content of dark radiation and changing the expansion rate of the Universe. As this increase in dark radiation content happens naturally after Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), it can relax the possible tension with lower values of radiation degrees of freedom measured from light element abundances compared to that of the CMB. We numerically confront this scenario with WMAP+ACT and WMAP+SPT data and derive an upper limit on the allowed fraction of dark matter decaying into dark radiation.

  8. soil organic matter fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osat, Maryam; Heidari, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    studies were carried out to illustrate the relationship between clay mineral series and organic matter. According to the results the amount of organic carbon increases by decreasing size fractions and reaches to its maximum in <250μ classes, also 2:1 and expanding clays which have the ability to maintain larger amounts of organic carbon were the dominant clay minerals. Chemical fractionation of soil organic matter to humic acid and fulvic acid shows that there is a better correlation between humic acid contents and soil organic matter (R2 = 0.86) than fulvic acid and organic matter (R2=0.5). The amount of humic and fulvic acids varies in different size fractions and reaches to its minimum in the E fraction in all three stages. The relationships between fulvic and humic acids with organic matter content, demonstrating that at the lower organic matter content, humification is slow, thus humic acid content is rather low than the fulvic acid content. By increasing the organic matter content biological activity increases and followed by humification process proceeds so that the humic acid content locates over the fulvic acid content.

  9. New Solutions for Synchronized Domineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Sahil; Kruskal, Clyde P.

    Cincotti and Iida invented the game of Synchronized Domineering, and analyzed a few special cases. We develop a more general technique of analysis, and obtain results for many more special cases. We obtain complete results for board sizes 3 ×n, 5 ×n, 7 ×n, and 9 ×n (for n large enough) and partial results for board sizes 2×n, 4 ×n, and 6 ×n.

  10. Quantum vacuum and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukovic, Dragan Slavkov

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum was proposed as alternative to the dark matter paradigm. In the present paper we consider four benchmark measurements: the universality of the central surface density of galaxy dark matter haloes, the cored dark matter haloes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the non-existence of dark disks in spiral galaxies and distribution of dark matter after collision of clusters of galaxies (the Bullet cluster is a famous example). Only some of these phenomena (but not all of them) can (in principle) be explained by the dark matter and the theories of modified gravity. However, we argue that the framework of the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum allows the understanding of the totality of these phenomena.

  11. Dark-matter 'paparazzi' exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2008-10-01

    After waiting almost two years for data that may shed light on the mysterious substance that makes up almost a quarter of the universe, some physicists thought a new result on dark matter was just too exciting to keep quiet. So when a member of the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) team recently gave a conference talk, a few audience members could not resist taking photos of the slides. By incorporating their snapshots into papers posted on the arXiv preprint server, these "paparazzi" physicists sparked a debate on both dark matter and datasharing etiquette in a digital world.

  12. Dark Matter Mystery Deepens in Cosmic "Train Wreck"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    Astronomers have discovered a chaotic scene unlike any witnessed before in a cosmic "train wreck" between giant galaxy clusters. NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and optical telescopes revealed a dark matter core that was mostly devoid of galaxies, which may pose problems for current theories of dark matter behavior. "These results challenge our understanding of the way clusters merge," said Dr. Andisheh Mahdavi of the University of Victoria, British Columbia. "Or, they possibly make us even reexamine the nature of dark matter itself." There are three main components to galaxy clusters: individual galaxies composed of billions of stars, hot gas in between the galaxies, and dark matter, a mysterious substance that dominates the cluster mass and can be detected only through its gravitational effects. Illustration of Abell 520 System Illustration of Abell 520 System Optical telescopes can observe the starlight from the individual galaxies, and can infer the location of dark matter by its subtle light-bending effects on distant galaxies. X-ray telescopes like Chandra detect the multimillion-degree gas. A popular theory of dark matter predicts that dark matter and galaxies should stay together, even during a violent collision, as observed in the case of the so-called Bullet Cluster. However, when the Chandra data of the galaxy cluster system known as Abell 520 was mapped along with the optical data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, HI, a puzzling picture emerged. A dark matter core was found, which also contained hot gas but no bright galaxies. "It blew us away that it looks like the galaxies are removed from the densest core of dark matter," said Dr. Hendrik Hoekstra, also of University of Victoria. "This would be the first time we've seen such a thing and could be a huge test of our knowledge of how dark matter behaves." Animation of Galaxy Cluster Animation of Galaxy Cluster In addition to the dark matter core, a

  13. What is a Matter Particle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tsan Ung

    Positive baryon numbers (A>0) and positive lepton numbers (L>0) characterize matter particles while negative baryon numbers and negative lepton numbers characterize antimatter particles. Matter particles and antimatter particles belong to two distinct classes of particles. Matter neutral particles are particles characterized by both zero baryon number and zero lepton number. This third class of particles includes mesons formed by a quark and an antiquark pair (a pair of matter particle and antimatter particle) and bosons which are messengers of known interactions (photons for electromagnetism, W and Z bosons for the weak interaction, gluons for the strong interaction). The antiparticle of a matter particle belongs to the class of antimatter particles, the antiparticle of an antimatter particle belongs to the class of matter particles. The antiparticle of a matter neutral particle belongs to the same class of matter neutral particles. A truly neutral particle is a particle identical with its antiparticle; it belongs necessarily to the class of matter neutral particles. All known interactions of the Standard Model conserve baryon number and lepton number; matter cannot be created or destroyed via a reaction governed by these interactions. Conservation of baryon and lepton number parallels conservation of atoms in chemistry; the number of atoms of a particular species in the reactants must equal the number of those atoms in the products. These laws of conservation valid for interaction involving matter particles are indeed valid for any particles (matter particles characterized by positive numbers, antimatter particles characterized by negative numbers, and matter neutral particles characterized by zero). Interactions within the framework of the Standard Model which conserve both matter and charge at the microscopic level cannot explain the observed asymmetry of our Universe. The strong interaction was introduced to explain the stability of nuclei: there must exist a

  14. A 14.6 Arcsecond Quasar Lens Split by a Massive Dark Matter Halo

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, N; Oguri, M; Pindor, B; Hennawi, J; Chiu, K; Zheng, W; Ichikawa, S; Gregg, M; Becker, R; Suto, Y; Strauss, M; Turner, E; Keeton, C; Annis, J; Castander, F; Eisenstein, D; Frieman, J; Fukugita, M; Gunn, J; Johnston, D; Kent, S; Nichol, R; Richards, G; Rix, H; Sheldon, E; Bahcall, N; Brinkmann, J; Ivezic, Z; Lamb, D; Mckay, T; Schneider, D; York, D

    2003-12-04

    Gravitational lensing is a powerful tool to study the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The cold dark matter model of structure formation predicts the existence of quasars gravitationally lensed by concentrations of dark matter so massive that the quasar images would be split by over 7 inches. However, numerous searches for large-separation lensed quasars have been unsuccessful; all of the roughly 70 lensed quasars known to date, such as Q0957+561, have smaller splittings, and can be explained in terms of galaxy scale concentrations of baryonic matter that have undergone dissipative collapse. Here they report the discovery of the first large-separation lensed quasar, SDSS J1004+4112, with a maximum separation of 14.62 inches; at this separation, the lensing object must be dominated by dark matter. While gravitationally lensed galaxies of even large separation are known, large-separation quasars are more useful cosmological probes because of the simplicity of the resulting lens systems. The discovery in their current quasar sample is fully consistent with the theoretical expectations based on the cold dark matter model.

  15. Why a Confirmation Strategy Dominates Psychological Science.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, David M; Posavac, Steven S; Behrends, Arwen A; Moore, Shannon M; Uchino, Bert N

    2015-01-01

    Our research explored the incidence and appropriateness of the much-maligned confirmatory approach to testing scientific hypotheses. Psychological scientists completed a survey about their research goals and strategies. The most frequently reported goal is to test the non-absolute hypothesis that a particular relation exists in some conditions. As expected, few scientists reported testing universal hypotheses. Most indicated an inclination to use a confirmation strategy to test the non-absolute hypotheses that a particular relation sometimes occurs or sometimes does not occur, and a disconfirmation strategy to test the absolute hypotheses that a particular relation always occurs or never occurs. The confirmatory search that dominates the field was found to be associated with the testing of non-absolute hypotheses. Our analysis indicates that a confirmatory approach is the normatively correct test of the non-absolute hypotheses that are the starting point of most studies. It also suggests that the strategy of falsification that was once proposed by Popper is generally incorrect given the infrequency of tests of universal hypotheses. PMID:26384327

  16. Why a Confirmation Strategy Dominates Psychological Science

    PubMed Central

    Sanbonmatsu, David M.; Posavac, Steven S.; Behrends, Arwen A.; Moore, Shannon M.; Uchino, Bert N.

    2015-01-01

    Our research explored the incidence and appropriateness of the much-maligned confirmatory approach to testing scientific hypotheses. Psychological scientists completed a survey about their research goals and strategies. The most frequently reported goal is to test the non-absolute hypothesis that a particular relation exists in some conditions. As expected, few scientists reported testing universal hypotheses. Most indicated an inclination to use a confirmation strategy to test the non-absolute hypotheses that a particular relation sometimes occurs or sometimes does not occur, and a disconfirmation strategy to test the absolute hypotheses that a particular relation always occurs or never occurs. The confirmatory search that dominates the field was found to be associated with the testing of non-absolute hypotheses. Our analysis indicates that a confirmatory approach is the normatively correct test of the non-absolute hypotheses that are the starting point of most studies. It also suggests that the strategy of falsification that was once proposed by Popper is generally incorrect given the infrequency of tests of universal hypotheses. PMID:26384327

  17. Chandra's Find of Lonely Halo Raises Questions About Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    Dark matter continues to confound astronomers, as NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory demonstrated with the detection of an extensive envelope of dark matter around an isolated elliptical galaxy. This discovery conflicts with optical data that suggest a dearth of dark matter around similar galaxies, and raises questions about how galaxies acquire and keep such dark matter halos. The observed galaxy, known as NGC 4555, is unusual in that it is a fairly large, elliptical galaxy that is not part of a group or cluster of galaxies. In a paper to be published in the November 1, 2004 issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Ewan O'Sullivan of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA and Trevor Ponman of the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, use the Chandra data to show that the galaxy is embedded in a cloud of 10-million-degree-Celsius gas. X-ray/Optical Composite of NGC 4555 X-ray/Optical Composite of NGC 4555 This hot gas cloud has a diameter of about 400,000 light years, about twice that of the visible galaxy. An enormous envelope, or halo, of dark matter is needed to confine the hot cloud to the galaxy. The total mass of the dark matter halo is about ten times the combined mass of the stars in the galaxy, and 300 times the mass of the hot gas cloud. A growing body of evidence indicates that dark matter - which interacts with itself and "normal" matter only through gravity - is the dominant form of matter in the universe. According to the popular "cold dark matter" theory, dark matter consists of mysterious particles left over from the dense early universe that were moving slowly when galaxies and galaxy clusters began to form. "The observed properties of NGC 4555 confirm that elliptical galaxies can posses dark matter halos of their own, regardless of their environment," said O'Sullivan. "This raises an important question: what determines whether elliptical galaxies have dark matter halos?" DSS Optical Image of NGC

  18. Interacting holographic dark energy, cosmic coincidence and the future singularity of the closed FRW universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have considered the closed FRW universe filled with two interacting fluids; dark matter and holographic dark energy components. Under certain conditions, this dark energy model is characterised by a big rip type future singularity and therefore a finite life time of the universe (Cruz et al., 2008). As the universe passes through a significant time when the matter and the dark energy densities are roughly comparable between the matter and the dark energy dominated era. So, we calculated the fraction of total life time of the universe when the universe passes through the coincidental stage for this future singularity by considering 1/ro

  19. An Effective Theory of Dirac Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; /Oregon U.

    2010-06-11

    A stable Dirac fermion with four-fermion interactions to leptons suppressed by a scale {Lambda} {approx} 1 TeV is shown to provide a viable candidate for dark matter. The thermal relic abundance matches cosmology, while nuclear recoil direct detection bounds are automatically avoided in the absence of (large) couplings to quarks. The annihilation cross section in the early Universe is the same as the annihilation in our galactic neighborhood. This allows Dirac fermion dark matter to naturally explain the positron ratio excess observed by PAMELA with a minimal boost factor, given present astrophysical uncertainties. We use the Galprop program for propagation of signal and background; we discuss in detail the uncertainties resulting from the propagation parameters and, more importantly, the injected spectra. Fermi/GLAST has an opportunity to see a feature in the gamma-ray spectrum at the mass of the Dirac fermion. The excess observed by ATIC/PPB-BETS may also be explained with Dirac dark matter that is heavy. A supersymmetric model with a Dirac bino provides a viable UV model of the effective theory. The dominance of the leptonic operators, and thus the observation of an excess in positrons and not in anti-protons, is naturally explained by the large hypercharge and low mass of sleptons as compared with squarks. Minimizing the boost factor implies the right-handed selectron is the lightest slepton, which is characteristic of our model. Selectrons (or sleptons) with mass less than a few hundred GeV are an inescapable consequence awaiting discovery at the LHC.

  20. Complex Scalar Field Dark Matter and its Imprint on the Gravitational Wave Background from Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bohua; Shapiro, Paul; Rindler-Daller, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    We consider an alternative CDM to WIMP dark matter, ultralight bosons (m > ~10-22 eV) of a complex scalar field (SFDM), whose number per unit comoving volume is conserved after particle production during standard reheating (w=0). In a ΛSFDM universe, SFDM starts relativistic, evolving from stiff (w=1) to radiationlike (w=1/3), before becoming nonrelativistic and CDM-like at late times (w=0). Thus, before the familiar radiation-dominated phase, there is an earlier phase of stiff-matter-domination. The transitions between these phases, determined by SFDM particle mass and self-interaction coupling strength, are constrained by cosmological observables, particularly Neff, the effective number of neutrino species during BBN, the redshift of matter-radiation equality, and tensor fluctuations from inflation, which imprint CMB B-modes. Tensor modes that reenter the horizon during or before the stiff phase contribute an energy density as gravitational waves which is amplified by the stiff phase, increasing the expansion rate of the radiation-dominated era. These effects yield constraints on SFDM parameters and make detection of these GWs today possible at high frequencies by laser interferometry, for currently allowed tensor-to-scalar ratio r and reheat temperature.

  1. Thermodynamics of cosmological matter creation.

    PubMed

    Prigogine, I; Geheniau, J; Gunzig, E; Nardone, P

    1988-10-01

    A type of cosmological history that includes large-scale entropy production is proposed. These cosmologies are based on reinterpretation of the matter-energy stress tensor in Einstein's equations. This modifies the usual adiabatic energy conservation laws, thereby including irreversible matter creation. This creation corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the created matter constituents. This point of view results from consideration of the thermodynamics of open systems in the framework of cosmology. It is shown that the second law of thermodynamics requires that space-time transforms into matter, while the inverse transformation is forbidden. It appears that the usual initial singularity associated with the big bang is structurally unstable with respect to irreversible matter creation. The corresponding cosmological history therefore starts from an instability of the vacuum rather than from a singularity. This is exemplified in the framework of a simple phenomenological model that leads to a three-stage cosmology: the first drives the cosmological system from the initial instability to a de Sitter regime, and the last connects with the usual matter-radiation Robertson-Walker universe. Matter as well as entropy creation occurs during the first two stages, while the third involves the traditional cosmological evolution. A remarkable fact is that the de Sitter stage appears to be an attractor independent of the initial fluctuation. This is also the case for all the physical predictions involving the present Robertson-Walker universe. Most results obtained previously, in the framework of quantum field theory, can now be obtained on a macroscopic basis. It is shown that this description leads quite naturally to the introduction of primeval black holes as the intermediate stage between the Minkowski vacuum and the present matter-radiation universe. The instability at the origin of the universe is the result of fluctuations of the

  2. Thermodynamics of cosmological matter creation

    PubMed Central

    Prigogine, I.; Geheniau, J.; Gunzig, E.; Nardone, P.

    1988-01-01

    A type of cosmological history that includes large-scale entropy production is proposed. These cosmologies are based on reinterpretation of the matter-energy stress tensor in Einstein's equations. This modifies the usual adiabatic energy conservation laws, thereby including irreversible matter creation. This creation corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the created matter constituents. This point of view results from consideration of the thermodynamics of open systems in the framework of cosmology. It is shown that the second law of thermodynamics requires that space-time transforms into matter, while the inverse transformation is forbidden. It appears that the usual initial singularity associated with the big bang is structurally unstable with respect to irreversible matter creation. The corresponding cosmological history therefore starts from an instability of the vacuum rather than from a singularity. This is exemplified in the framework of a simple phenomenological model that leads to a three-stage cosmology: the first drives the cosmological system from the initial instability to a de Sitter regime, and the last connects with the usual matter-radiation Robertson-Walker universe. Matter as well as entropy creation occurs during the first two stages, while the third involves the traditional cosmological evolution. A remarkable fact is that the de Sitter stage appears to be an attractor independent of the initial fluctuation. This is also the case for all the physical predictions involving the present Robertson-Walker universe. Most results obtained previously, in the framework of quantum field theory, can now be obtained on a macroscopic basis. It is shown that this description leads quite naturally to the introduction of primeval black holes as the intermediate stage between the Minkowski vacuum and the present matter-radiation universe. The instability at the origin of the universe is the result of fluctuations of the

  3. Mapping the Universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, S. D.

    1999-06-01

    Galaxies congregate into clusters, clusters amass into superclusters and so on - at every observed scale, as astronomers build maps of the sky, they find matter organized into clumps. Yet taken as a whole, the texture of the universe is smooth, in keeping with theory. A new "music of the spheres" may explain how ordered structures emerged from the original smooth chaos.

  4. Universities in Their Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Universities often seem to be far more concerned about their international connections than their local relationships. The local context seems not to matter much either to their jetsetting vice-chancellors or to their lecturers and researchers under pressure to get papers published in obscure journals. That is how it may seem, but it is not…

  5. Antimatter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2011-03-15

    The models leading to a high abundance of antimatter in the universe are discussed. Special attention is payed to the model of antimatter creation in the form of compact stellar-like objects. Such objects can contribute significantly to the cosmological dark matter. Observational signatures of antimatter in the Galaxy are discussed.

  6. The Engaged University: Where Rhetorical Theory Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hikins, James W.; Cherwitz, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    This essay contends that engagement, a productive coupling of the academy's intellectual resources with the enterprise of generating solutions to current real-world challenges, can best flourish when its theoretical foundations rest upon rhetorical perspectivism. We examine the current movement in academe toward engagement and problems attendant…

  7. Good Teaching: What Matters to University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hwee Hoon; Kim, Grace May Lin; Chan, Ling Ling

    2015-01-01

    Institutions assess teaching effectiveness in various ways, such as classroom observation, peer evaluation and self-assessment. In higher education, student feedback continues to be the main teaching evaluation tool. However, most of such forms include characteristics of good teaching that the institutions deem important and may not adequately…

  8. Virtual Universe & Its Interface to Physical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asija, Pal

    2005-04-01

    This paper postulates a virtual universe and compares and contrasts its properties to that of our known physical universe. A particular attention is paid to the interface between the two and challenges for transition from one to the other. Also discussed is the relationship of the virtual universe to such entities and concepts as dark matter, black holes, time travel, speed of light, mass, gravity just to name just a few. The paper also discusses interface between us physical beings and temporary virtual beings and eventually ultra beings. It also tangentially discusses relationship between body, brain, mind of physical beings with that of virtual and ultra beings. The paper also discusses why virtual beings do not have the same limitations and capabilities as we do. The past, present, elsewhere and potential of physical and virtual universes is compared. Finally possible pathways to discovery of TOE (Theory of Everything) is hypothesized.

  9. Dark Energy and the Entropy of the Observable Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, Charles H.; Egan, Chas A.

    2010-06-01

    The initial low entropy of the universe has allowed irreversible processes, such as the reader reading this abstract, to happen in the universe. This initial low entropy is due to a low value for the initial gravitational entropy of the universe. The standard ΛCDM cosmology has a cosmic event horizon and an associated Gibbons-Hawking entropy. We compute the entropy of the universe including the entropy of the current event horizon and the entropy of the matter and photons within the cosmic event horizon. We estimate the entropy of the current cosmic event horizon to be 2.6+/-0.3×10122 k and find it to be ~1019 times larger than the next most dominant contribution, which is from super massive black holes. We plot an entropy budget as a function of time and find that the cosmic event horizon entropy has dominated other sources of entropy since 10-20 seconds after the big bang. See Egan & Lineweaver (2009) for details and discussion.

  10. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  11. The Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    2004-02-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  12. Inflatable dark matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel

    2016-01-22

    Here, we describe a general scenario, dubbed “inflatable dark matter,” in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levelsmore » without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.« less

  13. Effective field theory of dark matter and structure formation: Semianalytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2014-02-01

    Complimenting recent work on the effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures, here we present detailed approximate analytical results and further pedagogical understanding of the method. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and integrate out short modes of a dark matter/dark energy dominated universe (ΛCDM) whose matter is comprised of massive particles as used in cosmological simulations. This establishes a long distance effective fluid, valid for length scales larger than the nonlinear scale ˜10 Mpc, and provides the complete description of large scale structure formation. Extracting the time dependence, we derive recursion relations that encode the perturbative solution. This is exact for the matter dominated era and quite accurate in ΛCDM also. The effective fluid is characterized by physical parameters, including sound speed and viscosity. These two fluid parameters play a degenerate role with each other and lead to a relative correction from standard perturbation theory of the form ˜10-6c2k2/H2. Starting from the linear theory, we calculate corrections to cosmological observables, such as the baryon-acoustic-oscillation peak, which we compute semianalytically at one-loop order. Due to the nonzero fluid parameters, the predictions of the effective field theory agree with observation much more accurately than standard perturbation theory and we explain why. We also discuss corrections from treating dark matter as interacting or wavelike and other issues.

  14. Evolution of domain walls in the early universe. Ph.D. Thesis - Chicago Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, Lawrence

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of domain walls in the early universe is studied via 2-D computer simulation. The walls are initially configured on a triangular lattice and then released from the lattice, their evolution driven by wall curvature and by the universal expansion. The walls attain an average velocity of about 0.3c and their surface area per volume (as measured in comoving coordinates) goes down with a slope of -1 with respect to conformal time, regardless of whether the universe is matter or radiation dominated. The additional influence of vacuum pressure causes the energy density to fall away from this slope and steepen, thus allowing a situation in which domain walls can constitute a significant portion of the energy density of the universe without provoking an unacceptably large perturbation upon the microwave background.

  15. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cary

    2012-01-01

    When the news broke in the "New York Times" in August 2009 that Yale University Press had decided to remove twelve Danish cartoon images of the prophet Mohammed from "The Cartoons That Shook the World," a forthcoming book by Brandeis political scientist Jytte Klausen, the author felt that the American Association of University Professors (AAUP)…

  16. A New Method to Assess Eye Dominance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle-Inclan, Fernando; Blanco, Manuel J.; Soto, David; Leiros, Luz

    2008-01-01

    People usually show a stable preference for one of their eyes when monocular viewing is required ("sighting dominance") or under dichoptic stimulation conditions ("sensory eye-dominance"). Current procedures to assess this "eye dominance" are prone to error. Here we present a new method that provides a continuous measure of eye dominance and…

  17. Current and future searches for dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Recent experimental data confirms that approximately one quarter of the universe consists of cold dark matter. Particle theories provide natural candidates for this dark matter in the form of either Axions or Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). A growing body of experiments is aimed at direct or indirect detection of particle dark matter. I summarize the current status of these experiments and offer projections of their future sensitivity.

  18. Dark matter more mysterious than expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jałocha, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Based on the lecture Dark Matter --- more mysterious than expected}, given by me at the Cosmology School in Kielce on 18 July 2015, I will briefly discuss in this essay the history of dark matter and why this notion is so essential for the contemporary physics. Next, I will present the point of view of the research team I work with, on the presence of nonbaryonic dark matter in the Universe and in spiral galaxies.

  19. ALICE: The Quest for 'Primordial' Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    ALICE - An LHC Ion Collider Experiment - is being prepared to study, in an optimized and dedicated approach, the physics of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The LHC Ion programme is the logical sequel in the quest to study the novel form of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma, the form of matter believed to have existed in our Universe during the first microsecond after the Big Bang. The status of ALICE, its research programme and discovery potential are presented.

  20. TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

  1. Sterile neutrinos as dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.; Widrow, L.M. |

    1993-03-01

    The simplest model that can accommodate a viable nonbaryonic dark matter candidate is the standard electroweak theory with the addition of right-handed or sterile neutrinos. This model has been studied extensively in the context of the hot dark matter scenario. We reexamine this model and find that hot, warm, and cold dark matter are all possibilities. We focus on the case where sterile neutrinos are the dark matter. Since their only direct coupling is to left-handed or active neutrinos, the most efficient production mechanism is via neutrino oscillations. If the production rate is always less than the expansion rate, then these neutrinos will never be in thermal equilibrium. However, they may still play a significant role in the dynamics of the Universe and possibly provide the missing mass necessary for closure. We consider a single generation of neutrino fields ({nu}{sub L}, {nu}{sub R}) with a Dirac mass, {mu}, and a Majorana mass for the right-handed components only, M. For M {much_gt} {mu} we show that the number density of sterile neutrinos is proportional to {mu}{sup 2}/M so that the energy density today is independent of M. However M is crucial in determining the large scale structure of the Universe. In particular, M {approx_equal} 0.1--1.0 key leads to warm dark matter and a structure formation scenario that may have some advantages over both the standard hot and cold dark matter scenarios.

  2. Sterile neutrinos as dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S. ); Widrow, L.M. . Dept. of Physics Toronto Univ., ON . Canadian Inst. for Theoretical Astrophysics)

    1993-03-01

    The simplest model that can accommodate a viable nonbaryonic dark matter candidate is the standard electroweak theory with the addition of right-handed or sterile neutrinos. This model has been studied extensively in the context of the hot dark matter scenario. We reexamine this model and find that hot, warm, and cold dark matter are all possibilities. We focus on the case where sterile neutrinos are the dark matter. Since their only direct coupling is to left-handed or active neutrinos, the most efficient production mechanism is via neutrino oscillations. If the production rate is always less than the expansion rate, then these neutrinos will never be in thermal equilibrium. However, they may still play a significant role in the dynamics of the Universe and possibly provide the missing mass necessary for closure. We consider a single generation of neutrino fields ([nu][sub L], [nu][sub R]) with a Dirac mass, [mu], and a Majorana mass for the right-handed components only, M. For M [much gt] [mu] we show that the number density of sterile neutrinos is proportional to [mu][sup 2]/M so that the energy density today is independent of M. However M is crucial in determining the large scale structure of the Universe. In particular, M [approx equal] 0.1--1.0 key leads to warm dark matter and a structure formation scenario that may have some advantages over both the standard hot and cold dark matter scenarios.

  3. Source Testing for Particulate Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVorkin, Howard

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline covers procedures for the testing of particulate matter. These are: (1) basic requirements, (2) information required, (3) collection of samples, (4) processing of samples, (5)…

  4. Plasma, The Fourth State of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandy, Hassan F.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses plasma as a source of energy through nuclear fission processes, as well as the difficulties encountered in such a process. States that 99 percent of the matter in the universe is plasma, and only 1 percent is the common three states of matter. Describes the fundamental properties of plasma, plasma "pinch, and plasma oscillations. (RR)

  5. Marriage between the baryonic and dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Zurab

    2006-11-01

    The baryonic and dark matter fractions in the universe can be both generated simultaneously and with comparable amounts, if dark matter is constituted by the baryons of the mirror world, a parallel hidden sector with the same microphysics as that of the observable world.

  6. Radiative neutrino mass, dark matter, and leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong; Sarkar, Utpal

    2008-05-15

    We propose an extension of the standard model, in which neutrinos are Dirac particles and their tiny masses originate from a one-loop radiative diagram. The new fields required by the neutrino mass generation also accommodate the explanation for the matter-antimatter asymmetry and dark matter in the Universe.

  7. Changes Matter!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Kimberly; Jensen, Anitra

    2012-01-01

    Being able to distinguish between physical and chemical changes of matter is a foundational chemistry concept that at first seems like a simple elementary concept to teach, but students often have misconceptions that hinder their understanding. These misconceptions are seen among elementary students, but these ideas are perpetuated throughout…

  8. Performance Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Day, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    After being told in an end-of-year job review that performances are not considered valuable research outcomes, the author argues in this essay that performance matters. This essay makes a case for recognizing performance ethnographies as research, pedagogy, and active service and concludes with guidelines for performance ethnographers who are…

  9. Diquark abundance in stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E.; de Freitas Pacheco, J.A.; de Araujo, J.C.N. )

    1992-11-15

    The clustering of quarks into pairs (diquarks) has been suggested recently to play an important role in dense matter and its astrophysical realization in neutron-star cores. We address in this work the features of diquark matter by employing an accurate equation of state valid for the effective {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} diquark theory, and find milder (although non-negligible) effects than in previous calculations. Some considerations on the very presence of a diquark-dominated region immediately above the deconfinement density are also given.

  10. Dark energy domination in the Virgocentric flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The standard ΛCDM cosmological model implies that all celestial bodies are embedded in a perfectly uniform dark energy background, represented by Einstein's cosmological constant, and experience its repulsive antigravity action. Aims: Can dark energy have strong dynamical effects on small cosmic scales as well as globally? Continuing our efforts to clarify this question, we now focus on the Virgo Cluster and the flow of expansion around it. Methods: We interpret the Hubble diagram from a new database of velocities and distances of galaxies in the cluster and its environment, using a nonlinear analytical model, which incorporates the antigravity force in terms of Newtonian mechanics. The key parameter is the zero-gravity radius, the distance at which gravity and antigravity are in balance. Results: 1. The interplay between the gravity of the cluster and the antigravity of the dark energy background determines the kinematical structure of the system and controls its evolution. 2. The gravity dominates the quasi-stationary bound cluster, while the antigravity controls the Virgocentric flow, bringing order and regularity to the flow, which reaches linearity and the global Hubble rate at distances ⪆15 Mpc. 3. The cluster and the flow form a system similar to the Local Group and its outflow. In the velocity-distance diagram, the cluster-flow structure reproduces the group-flow structure with a scaling factor of about 10; the zero-gravity radius for the cluster system is also 10 times larger. Conclusions: The phase and dynamical similarity of the systems on the scales of 1-30 Mpc suggests that a two-component pattern may be universal for groups and clusters: a quasi-stationary bound central component and an expanding outflow around it, caused by the nonlinear gravity-antigravity interplay with the dark energy dominating in the flow component.

  11. Nonsingular models of universes in teleparallel theories.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Jaume; Amoros, Jaume

    2013-02-15

    Different models of universes are considered in the context of teleparallel theories. Assuming that the universe is filled by a fluid with an equation of state P=-ρ-f(ρ), for different teleparallel theories and different equation of state we study its dynamics. Two particular cases are studied in detail: in the first one we consider a function f with two zeros (two de Sitter solutions) that mimics a huge cosmological constant at early times and a pressureless fluid at late times; in the second one, in the context of loop quantum cosmology with a small cosmological constant, we consider a pressureless fluid (P=0⇔f(ρ)=-ρ) which means there are de Sitter and anti-de Sitter solutions. In both cases one obtains a nonsingular universe that at early times is in an inflationary phase; after leaving this phase, it passes trough a matter dominated phase and finally at late times it expands in an accelerated way. PMID:25166366

  12. Is Cold Dark Matter a Vacuum Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlden, Michael A.

    Current theories about the Universe based on an FLRW model conclude that it is composed of ~4% normal matter, ~28 % dark matter and ~68% Dark Energy which is responsible for the well-established accelerated expansion: this model works extremely well. As the Universe expands the density of normal and dark matter decreases while the proportion of Dark Energy increases. This model assumes that the amount of dark matter, whose nature at present is totally unknown, has remained constant. This is a natural assumption if dark matter is a particle of some kind - WIMP, sterile neutrino, lightest supersysmmetric particle or axion, etc. - that must have emerged from the early high temperature phase of the Big Bang. This paper proposes that dark matter is not a particle such as these but a vacuum effect, and that the proportion of dark matter in the Universe is actually increasing with time. The idea that led to this suggestion was that a quantum process (possibly the Higgs mechanism) might operate in the nilpotent vacuum that Rowlands postulates is a dual space to the real space where Standard Model fundamental fermions (and we) reside. This could produce a vacuum quantum state that has mass, which interacts gravitationally, and such states would be `dark matter'. It is proposed that the rate of production of dark matter by this process might depend on local circumstances, such as the density of dark matter and/or normal matter. This proposal makes the testable prediction that the ratio of baryonic to dark matter varies with redshift and offers an explanation, within the framework of Rowlands' ideas, of the coincidence problem - why has cosmic acceleration started in the recent epoch at redshift z ~0.55 when the Dark Energy density first became equal to the matter density?. This process also offers a potential solution to the `missing baryon' problem.

  13. Concentration, ellipsoidal collapse, and the densest dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoli, Chiamaka; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2016-03-01

    The smallest dark matter haloes are the first objects to form in the hierarchical structure formation of cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology and are expected to be the densest and most fundamental building blocks of CDM structures in our Universe. Nevertheless, the physical characteristics of these haloes have stayed illusive, as they remain well beyond the current resolution of N-body simulations (at redshift zero). However, they dominate the predictions (and uncertainty) in expected dark matter annihilation signal, amongst other astrophysical observables. Using the conservation of total energy and the ellipsoidal collapse framework, we can analytically find the mean and scatter of concentration c and 1D velocity dispersion σ1d for haloes of different virial mass M200. Both c and σ _1d/M_{200}^{1/3} are in good agreement with numerical results within the regime probed by simulations - slowly decreasing functions of mass that approach constant values at large masses. In particular, the predictions for the 1D velocity dispersion of cluster mass haloes are surprisingly robust as the inverse heat capacity of cosmological haloes crosses zero at M200 ˜ 1014 M⊙. However, we find that current extrapolations from simulations to smallest CDM haloes dramatically depend on the assumed profile (e.g. NFW versus Einasto) and fitting function, which is why theoretical considerations, such as the one presented here, can significantly constrain the range of feasible predictions.

  14. Bright galaxies, dark matters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, V.

    This book charts two extraordinary journeys: the road to a better understanding of the structure and composition of the universe, and V. Rubin's own pathbreaking career. The scientific papers included here offer an overview of the topic that has been the major focus of her career: the motions of stars within galaxies and the evidence from these motions that most of the matter in the universe is dark. Elsewhere the author examines some of the tools of her trade - from star charts to the Hubble Telescope to some of the observatories where she has worked. The concluding section, "The astronomical life", finds V. Rubin writing candidly about the demands and rewards of her career, offering insightful portraits of colleagues, friends, and other notable women in science.

  15. Emergent Universe with Particle Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Saha, Anirban; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of an emergent universe solution to Einstein's field equations allowing for an irreversible creation of matter at the expense of the gravitational field is shown. With the universe being chosen as spatially flat FRW spacetime together with equation of state proposed in Mukherjee et al. (Class. Quant. Grav. 23, 6927, 2006), the solution exists when the ratio of the phenomenological matter creation rate to the number density times the Hubble parameter is a number β of the order of unity and independent of time. The thermodynamic behaviour is also determined for this solution. Interestingly, we also find that an emergent universe scenario is present with usual equation of state in cosmology when the matter creation rate is chosen to be a constant. More general class of emergent universe solutions are also discussed.

  16. Astrophysical Probes of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profumo, S.

    2013-08-01

    What is the connection between how the dark matter was produced in the early universe and how we can detect it today? Where does the WIMP miracle come from, and is it really a "WIMP" miracle? What brackets the mass range for thermal relics? Where does <συ> come from, and what does it mean? What is the difference between chemical and kinetic decoupling? Why do some people think that dark matter cannot be lighter than 40 GeV? Why is bbar b such a popular annihilation final state? Why is antimatter a good way to look for dark matter? Why should the cosmic-ray positron fraction decline with energy? How do you calculate the flux of neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in a celestial body, and when is it independent of the dark matter pair-annihilation rate? How does dark matter produce photons? -- Read these lecture notes, do the suggested 10 exercises, and you will find answers to all of these questions (and to many more on what You Always Wanted to Know About Dark Matter But Were Afraid to Ask).

  17. Prelude to compressed baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Why study compressed baryonic matter, or more generally strongly interacting matter at high densities and temperatures? Most obviously, because it's an important piece of Nature. The whole universe, in the early moments of the big bang, was filled with the stuff. Today, highly compressed baryonic matter occurs in neutron stars and during crucial moments in the development of supernovae. Also, working to understand compressed baryonic matter gives us new perspectives on ordinary baryonic matter, i.e. the matter in atomic nuclei. But perhaps the best answer is a variation on the one George Mallory gave, when asked why he sought to scale Mount Everest: Because, as a prominent feature in the landscape of physics, it's there. Compressed baryonic matter is a material we can produce in novel, challenging experiments that probe new extremes of temperature and density. On the theoretical side, it is a mathematically well-defined domain with a wealth of novel, challenging problems, as well as wide-ranging connections. Its challenges have already inspired a lot of very clever work, and revealed some wonderful surprises, as documented in this volume.

  18. Mindset matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cato, John

    2011-01-01

    We all love those students who just refuse to quit. At sometime during their lives, they adopted a philosophy that they were going to do the best they could, and they recognized that accomplishing their dreams was simply a matter of doing the necessary work in order to be successful. But we also have had those students who didn't even seem to try, and there was very little we could do to get them going. They coasted along, made poor grades, and always seemed to indicate that they weren't going to try. They were "smart," they never needed to study, and they certainly weren't about to start now no matter what was said to them. Better yet, their struggles weren't their fault, but rather due to "bad teaching." I thought that was just the way it was going to be.

  19. Social dominance and forceful submission fantasies: feminine pathology or power?

    PubMed

    Hawley, Patricia H; Hensley, William A

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses forceful submission fantasies in men and women. Although many approaches implicitly or explicitly cast women's force fantasies in a pathological light, this study seeks to explore the associations of such fantasy to female power. By adopting an evolutionary meta-theoretical perspective (and a resource control theory perspective), it was hypothesized that highly agentic, dominant women prefer forceful submission fantasies (more than subordinate women) as a means to connect them to agentic, dominant men. In addition, it is suggested that dominant women would ascribe a meaning to the object of the fantasy different from that assigned by subordinate women (i.e., "warrior lover" vs. "white knight"). Two studies were conducted with nearly 900 college students (men and women) from a large Midwestern university. Hypotheses were largely supported. Analysis of meaning supports theoretical perspectives proposing that forceful submission reflects desires for sexual power on behalf of the fantasist. Implications for evolutionary approaches to human mate preferences are discussed. PMID:19353371

  20. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  1. Dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. James E.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  2. Mentoring Matters: Rethinking Mentor Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Heather

    2012-01-01

    There is discouraging evidence that many beginning teachers quickly abandon the practices advocated and modeled in their teacher education programs at colleges and universities and regress to imitate the kind of instruction that they experienced themselves as students, or conform to the dominant model in schools where they feel great pressures to…

  3. Hearing on Issues and Matters Pertaining to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Hearing before the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document reports oral and written testimony given for an oversight hearing by witnesses concerning the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965 primarily as it affects Black colleges and universities. Witnesses included college presidents from historically black colleges/universities including Smith University (North Carolina),…

  4. Mapping the Baby Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In June, NASA plans to launch the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) to survey the ancient radiation in unprecedented detail. MAP will map slight temperature fluctuations within the microwave background that vary by only 0.00001 C across a chilly radiation that now averages 2.73 C above absolute zero. The temperature differences today point back to density differences in the fiery baby universe, in which there was a little more matter here and a little less matter there. Areas of slightly enhanced density had stronger gravity than low-density areas. The high-density areas pulled back on the background radiation, making it appear slightly cooler in those directions.

  5. Baryon asymmetry and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolz, M.; Buchmüller, W.; Plümacher, M.

    1998-12-01

    We study the implications of a large baryogenesis temperature, TB=≀(1010 GeV), on the mass spectrum of superparticles in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. Models with a neutralino as lightest superparticle (LSP) are excluded. A consistent picture is obtained with the gravitino as LSP, followed by a higgsino-like neutralino (NSP). Gravitinos with masses from 10 to 100 GeV may be the dominant component of dark matter.

  6. The dark matter content of Local Group dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle; PAndAS Team

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most dark matter dominated objects we have observed in the Universe. By measuring the dynamics of their stellar populations, we can hope to map out the shapes of their central density profiles, and compare these to expectations from simulations. In this poster, we will present the central kinematics of a range of dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way and Andromeda, taken as part of the PAndAS Keck II DEIMOS survey. We will highlight a number of unusual objects, which have either very high mass to light ratios - indicating they may be promising candidates for indirect detection experiments - or those with exceptionally low central densities, whose kinematic profiles suggest that these systems are out of dynamical equilibrium.

  7. Inflatable Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2015-07-30

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUT or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.

  8. Inflatable Dark Matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUTmore » or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.« less

  9. Levitating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  10. Levitating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio E-mail: antonio.padilla@nottingham.ac.uk

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra 'antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < −1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger 'Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  11. Simulating Gravity: Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Jes; Stang, Jared; Anderson, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter makes up most of the matter in the universe but very little of a standard introductory physics curriculum. Here we present our construction and use of a spandex sheet-style gravity simulator to qualitatively demonstrate two aspects of modern physics related to dark matter. First, we describe an activity in which students explore the…

  12. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  13. Personality Dominant Values in Graphic Design Students in Their Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, René Pedroza

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study the personality dominant values in Graphic Design students from the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico. A scale developed by Allport, Vernon and Lindsey called: "Study of values. A scale for the measuring of personality dominant interests" was used. The sample was applied to 124 students,…

  14. On the matter-antimatter asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.

    2015-08-01

    Although the big bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there is evidence that the universe does not contain significant amounts of antimatter. The usual explanations for this matter-antimatter asymmetry involve finding causes for Sakharov’s three conditions to be satisfied. However, if the composite photon theory is correct, antimatter galaxies should appear to us as dark matter, neither emitting light (that we can detect) or reflecting ordinary light. Thus the presence of antimatter galaxies may be harder to detect than previously thought. The large clumps of dark matter that have been observed by weak gravitation lensing could be clusters of antimatter galaxies. “Dark photons,” that are hypothesized to cause self-interactions between dark matter particles, are identified as antiphotons in the composite photon theory. The possibility of a patchwork universe, that had been previously excluded, is also re-examined.

  15. Brane isotropization in an extra-dimensional Tolman-Bondi universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Mimoso, José P.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2012-06-01

    We consider the dynamics of a 3-brane embedded in an extra-dimensional Tolman-Bondi Universe where the origin of space plays a special rôle. The embedding is chosen such that the induced matter distribution on the brane respects the spherical symmetry of matter in the extra-dimensional space. The mirage cosmology on the probe brane is studied, resulting in an inhomogeneous and anisotropic four-dimensional cosmology where the origin of space is also special. We then focus on the spatial geometry around the origin and show that the induced geometry, which is initially inhomogeneous and anisotropic, converges to an isotropic and homogeneous Friedmann-Lemaitre 4d space-time. For instance, when a 3-brane is embedded in a 5d matter-dominated model, the 4d dynamics around the origin converge to a Friedmann-Lemaitre Universe in a radiation-dominated epoch. We analyze this isotropization process and show that it is a late-time attractor.

  16. Might eddies dominate carbon export ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Rixen, M.; Fielding, S.; Mustard, A.; Brown, L.; Sanders, R.

    2003-04-01

    Yes - from a review of recent data sets we present a scale analysis of the potential for globally integrated carbon export, from the surface ocean, due to the vertical transports of mesoscale eddies. Mesoscale eddies are the oceanic equivalent of atmospheric storms, most are a fundamental result of horizontally unstable density gradients on the surface of a rotating sphere (baroclinic instability) and ~ 90% of the oceans energy exchanges take place at this scale. Recent studies from satellite remote sensing and high resolution models show that mesoscale eddies are a ubiquitous feature of the open ocean in both time and space; they are even present in sub-tropical oligotrophic gyres. Individual atmospheric weather systems generally have little ecological impact on terrestrial or marine biological systems. Grass grows and herbivores munch through many cyclone and anticyclone periods. In the open ocean we have a very different picture. The primary producers and herbivores have shorter time scales; time scales that coincide with those of mesoscale eddies. Plankton can have either good or bad weather lifetimes associated with just a single cyclone or anticyclone period. Furthermore, although the spring bloom may be the single largest source of material for the export of carbon from the upper ocean, it is short lived and may not be dominant everywhere in the annual export budget. The magnitude of vertical motion associated with mesoscale eddies is significant on biological timescales both for phytoplankton growth and the development of zooplankton grazing pressure. Critically this motion does not form a closed vertical circulation; baroclinic instability releases potential energy and thus water masses are exchanged both vertically and horizontally across water mass boundaries. Thus mesoscale eddies have been shown to provide a mechanism for export both in the direct transport of biomass downwards out of the surface mixed layer and the fertilisation of an exhausted

  17. 5 CFR 532.305 - Dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dominant industry. 532.305 Section 532... SYSTEMS Determining Rates for Principal Types of Positions § 532.305 Dominant industry. (a)(1) A specialized industry is a “dominant industry” if the number of wage employees in the wage area who are...

  18. Double Minoritisation: Intragroup Domination and Cultural Hegemony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duquette, Georges

    2001-01-01

    Explores language dominance and cultural hegemony within the Franco-Ontarian community in Canada. Looks at within-group dominance, ethnolinguistic vitality, and ethnocultural equity, presenting a complex composite portrait of this minority language community. Suggests it is under the dominating influence of the majority English population, but…

  19. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of.... Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The injured hand, or the most severely injured hand, of...

  20. 38 CFR 4.69 - Dominant hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dominant hand. 4.69... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.69 Dominant hand. Handedness for the purpose of.... Only one hand shall be considered dominant. The injured hand, or the most severely injured hand, of...