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Sample records for matter theories volume

  1. Condensed Matter Theories: Volume 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludeña, Eduardo V.; Bishop, Raymond F.; Iza, Peter

    2011-03-01

    pt. A. Fermi and Bose fluids, exotic systems. Reemergence of the collective mode in [symbol]He and electron layers / H. M. Bohm ... [et al.]. Dissecting and testing collective and topological scenarios for the quantum critical point / J. W. Clark, V. A. Khodel and M. V. Zverev. Helium on nanopatterned surfaces at finite temperature / E. S. Hernandez ... [et al.]. Towards DFT calculations of metal clusters in quantum fluid matrices / S. A. Chin ... [et al.]. Acoustic band gap formation in metamaterials / D. P. Elford ... [et al.]. Dissipative processes in low density strongly interacting 2D electron systems / D. Neilson. Dynamical spatially resolved response function of finite 1-D nano plasmas / T. Raitza, H. Reinholz and G. Ropke. Renormalized bosons and fermions / K. A. Gernoth and M. L. Ristig. Light clusters in nuclear matter / G. Ropke -- pt. B. Quantum magnets, quantum dynamics and phase transitions. Magnetic ordering of antiferromagnets on a spatially anisotropic triangular lattice / R. F. Bishop ... [et al.]. Thermodynamic detection of quantum phase transitions / M. K. G. Kruse ... [et al.]. The SU(2) semi quantum systems dynamics and thermodynamics / C. M. Sarris and A. N. Proto -- pt. C. Physics of nanosystems and nanotechnology. Quasi-one dimensional fluids that exhibit higher dimensional behavior / S. M. Gatica ... [et al.]. Spectral properties of molecular oligomers. A non-Markovian quantum state diffusion approach / J. Roden, W. T. Strunz and A. Eisfeld. Quantum properties in transport through nanoscopic rings: Charge-spin separation and interference effects / K. Hallberg, J. Rincon and S. Ramasesha. Cooperative localization-delocalization in the high T[symbol] cuprates / J. Ranninger. Thermodynamically stable vortex states in superconducting nanowires / W. M. Wu, M. B. Sobnack and F. V. Kusmartsev.pt. D. Quantum information. Quantum information in optical lattices / A. M. Guzman and M. A. Duenas E. -- pt. E. Theory and applications of molecular

  2. Condensed Matter Theories - Volume 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholz, Heidi; Röpke, Gerd; de Llano, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    pt. A. Fermi liquids. Pressure comparison between the spherical cellular model and the Thomas-Fermi model / G.A. Baker, Jr. Pair excitations and vertex corrections in Fermi fluids and the dynamic structure function of two-dimension 3He / H.M. Böhm, H. Godfrin, E. Krotscheck, H.J. Lauter, M. Meschke and M. Panholzer. Condensation of helium in wedges / E.S. Hernádez ... [et al.]. Non-Fermi liquid behavior from the Fermi-liquid approach / V.A. Khodel ... [et al.]. Theory of third sound and stability of thin 3He-4He superfluid films / E. Krotscheck and M.D. Miller. Pairing in asymmetrical Fermi systems / K.F. Quader and R. Liao. Ground-state properties of small 3He drops from quantum Monte Carlo simulations / E. Sola, J. Casulleras and J. Boronat. Ground-state energy and compressibility of a disordered two-dimensional electron gas / Tanatar ... [et al.]. Quasiexcitons in photoluminescence of incompressible quantum liquids / A. Wójs, A.G ladysiewicz and J.J. Quinn -- pt. B. Bose liquids. Quantum Boltzmann liquids / K.A. Gernoth, M L. Ristig and T. Lindenau. Condensate fraction in the dynamic structure function of Bose fluids / M. Saarela, F. Mazzanti and V. Apaja -- pt. C. Strongly-correlated electronic systems. Electron gas in high-field nanoscopic transport: metallic carbon nanotubes / F. Green and D. Neilson. Evolution and destruction of the Kondo effect in a capacitively coupled double dot system / D.E. Logan and M.R. Galpin. The method of increments-a wavefunction-based Ab-Initio correlation method for solids / B. Paulus. Fractionally charged excitations on frustrated lattices / E. Runge, F. Pollmann and P. Fulde. 5f Electrons in actinides: dual nature and photoemission spectra / G. Zwicknagl -- pt. D. Magnetism. Magnetism in disordered two-dimensional Kondo-Necklace / W. Brenig. On the de Haas-can Alphen oscillation in 2D / S. Fujita and D.L. Morabito. Dynamics in one-dimensional spin systems-density matrix reformalization group study / S. Nishimoto and M

  3. Change Matters: Critical Essays on Moving Social Justice Research from Theory to Policy. Critical Qualitative Research. Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. J., Ed.; Kirkland, David E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Change Matters," written by leading scholars committed to social justice in English education, provides researchers, university instructors, and preservice and inservice teachers with a framework that pivots social justice toward policy. The chapters in this volume detail rationales about generating social justice theory in what Freire calls "the…

  4. Electromagnetic Theory 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaviside, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Outline of the electromagnetic connections; 3. The elements of vectorial algebra and analysis; 4. Theory of plane electromagnetic waves; Appendix. Volume 2: Preface; 5. Mathematics and the age of the earth; 6. Pure diffusion of electric displacement; 7. Electromagnetic waves and generalised differentiation; 8. Generalised differentiation and divergent series; Appendix. Volume 3: 9. Waves from moving sources; 10. Waves in the ether.

  5. The Particle Theory of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widick, Paul R.

    1969-01-01

    Described are activities that are designed to help elementary children understand the possibility of the particle theory of matter. Children work with beads, marbles, B-B shot and sand; by mixing these materials and others they are led to see that it is highly possible for the existence of particles which are not visible. (BR)

  6. Volume integral theorem for exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-12-15

    We answer an important question in general relativity about the volume integral theorem for exotic matter by suggesting an exact integral quantifier for matter violating Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC). It is checked against some well-known static, spherically symmetric traversable wormhole solutions of general relativity with a sign reversed kinetic term minimally coupled scalar field. The improved quantifier is consistent with the principle that traversable wormholes can be supported by arbitrarily small quantities of exotic matter.

  7. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  8. Number-theory dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2011-05-01

    We propose that the stability of dark matter is ensured by a discrete subgroup of the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, Z(B-L). We introduce a set of chiral fermions charged under the U(1)B-L in addition to the right-handed neutrinos, and require the anomaly-cancellation conditions associated with the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry. We find that the possible number of fermions and their charges are tightly constrained, and that non-trivial solutions appear when at least five additional chiral fermions are introduced. The Fermat theorem in the number theory plays an important role in this argument. Focusing on one of the solutions, we show that there is indeed a good candidate for dark matter, whose stability is guaranteed by Z(B-L).

  9. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Leckie, Regina L; Weinstein, Andrea M

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we explore the association among physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6 months-1 year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  10. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Leckie, Regina L.; Weinstein, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review we explore the association between physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6-months to 1-year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  11. Theory of dark matter superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel theory of dark matter (DM) superfluidity that matches the successes of the Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM ) model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology on galactic scales. The DM and MOND components have a common origin, representing different phases of a single underlying substance. DM consists of axionlike particles with mass of order eV and strong self-interactions. The condensate has a polytropic equation of state P ˜ρ3 giving rise to a superfluid core within galaxies. Instead of behaving as individual collisionless particles, the DM superfluid is more aptly described as collective excitations. Superfluid phonons, in particular, are assumed to be governed by a MOND-like effective action and mediate a MONDian acceleration between baryonic matter particles. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not); due to the higher velocity dispersion in clusters, and correspondingly higher temperature, the DM in clusters is either in a mixture of superfluid and the normal phase or fully in the normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of observational signatures: an array of low-density vortices in galaxies; merger dynamics that depend on the infall velocity vs phonon sound speed; distinct mass peaks in bulletlike cluster mergers, corresponding to superfluid and normal components; and interference patters in supercritical mergers. Remarkably, the superfluid phonon effective theory is strikingly similar to that of the unitary Fermi gas, which has attracted much excitement in the cold atom community in recent years. The critical temperature for DM superfluidity is of order mK, comparable to known cold atom Bose-Einstein condensates. Identifying a precise cold atom analog would give important insights on the microphysical interactions underlying DM superfluidity

  12. Supersymmetric instanton calculus (gauge theories with matter)

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, A.I.; Zakharov, V.I.; Novikov, V.A.; Shifman, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    We consider instantons in supersymmetric gauge theories with matter. We show that if the vacuum average of the scalar field is different from zero, the number of collective coordinates necessary for describing the matter superfields associated with an instanton changes. We obtain explicit expressions for these superfields. We introduce the concept of an instanton dimension which is invariant with respect to supertransformations.

  13. Scalar-field theory of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerson; Xiong, Chi; Zhao, Xiaofei

    2014-05-01

    We develop a theory of dark matter based on a previously proposed picture, in which a complex vacuum scalar field makes the universe a superfluid, with the energy density of the superfluid giving rise to dark energy, and variations from vacuum density giving rise to dark matter. We formulate a nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation to describe the superfluid, treating galaxies as external sources. We study the response of the superfluid to the galaxies, in particular, the emergence of the dark-matter galactic halo, contortions during galaxy collisions and the creation of vortices due to galactic rotation.

  14. Dense matter theory: A simple classical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savić, P.; Čelebonović, V.

    1994-07-01

    In the sixties, the first author and by P. Savić and R. Kašanin started developing a mean-field theory of dense matter. It is based on the Coulomb interaction, supplemented by a microscopic selection rule and a set of experimentally founded postulates. Applications of the theory range from the calculation of models of planetary internal structure to DAC experiments.

  15. Scalar Dark Matter From Theory Space

    SciTech Connect

    Birkedal-Hansen, Andreas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2003-12-26

    The scalar dark matter candidate in a prototypical theory space little Higgs model is investigated. We review all details of the model pertinent to a relic density calculation. We perform a thermal relic density calculation including couplings to the gauge and Higgs sectors of the model. We find two regions of parameter space that give acceptable dark matter abundances. The first region has a dark matter candidate with a mass {Omicron}(100 GeV), the second region has a candidate with a mass greater than {Omicron}(500 GeV). The dark matter candidate in either region is an admixture of an SU(2) triplet and an SU(2) singlet, thereby constituting a possible WIMP (weakly interacting massive particle).

  16. Mapping gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two important indices widely used to detect neuropathological changes in brain structural magnetic resonance imaging. Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) protocol and surface-based cortical thickness measure, this study comprehensively investigated the regional changes in cortical gray matter volume and cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and fourteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that voxel-based gray matter volume and cortical thickness reductions were highly correlated in the temporal lobe and its medial structure in AD. Moreover significant reduced cortical regions of gray matter volume were obviously more than that of cortical thickness. These findings suggest that gray matter volume and cortical thickness, as two important imaging markers, are effective indices for detecting the neuroanatomical alterations and help us understand the neuropathology from different views in AD.

  17. Dark matter dispersion tensor in perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    We compute the dark matter velocity dispersion tensor up to third order in perturbation theory using the Lagrangian formalism, revealing growing solutions at the third and higher orders. Our results are general and can be used for any other perturbative formalism. As an application, corrections to the matter power spectrum are calculated, and we find that some of them have the same structure as those in the effective field theory of large-scale structure, with "EFT-like" coefficients that grow quadratically with the linear growth function and are further suppressed by powers of the logarithmic linear growth factor f ; other corrections present additional k dependence. Due to the velocity dispersions, there exists a free-streaming scale that suppresses the whole 1-loop power spectrum. Furthermore, we find that as a consequence of the nonlinear evolution, the free-streaming length is shifted towards larger scales, wiping out more structure than that expected in linear theory. Therefore, we argue that the formalism developed here is better suited for a perturbation treatment of warm dark matter or neutrino clustering, where the velocity dispersion effects are well known to be important. We discuss implications related to the nature of dark matter.

  18. a Finite Nucleon Extended Volume Model for Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Alberto S. S.; Vasconcellos, César A. Z.; Coelho, Helio T.

    We investigate the effects of a finite volume extension for nucleons immersed in nuclear matter. We wish in this way to explore the role played by this non-vanishing (but fixed) volume in shaping nuclear matter properties, in contrast with other models of nuclear physics in which nucleons are treated as point-like particles. We introduce a model characterized by an exclusion volume à la Van der Waals, as well as an effective non-relativistic approximation to model meson-exchange interactions between nucleons. The model is consistent with experimental values of saturation density and binding energy of nuclear matter in the domain of typical densities for neutron stars.

  19. Transport in Chern-Simons-matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gur-Ari, Guy; Hartnoll, Sean; Mahajan, Raghu

    2016-07-01

    The frequency-dependent longitudinal and Hall conductivities — σ xx and σ xy — are dimensionless functions of ω/T in 2+1 dimensional CFTs at nonzero temperature. These functions characterize the spectrum of charged excitations of the theory and are basic experimental observables. We compute these conductivities for large N Chern-Simons theory with fermion matter. The computation is exact in the 't Hooft coupling λ at N = ∞. We describe various physical features of the conductivity, including an explicit relation between the weight of the delta function at ω = 0 in σ xx and the existence of infinitely many higher spin conserved currents in the theory. We also compute the conductivities perturbatively in Chern-Simons theory with scalar matter and show that the resulting functions of ω/T agree with the strong coupling fermionic result. This provides a new test of the conjectured 3d bosonization duality. In matching the Hall conductivities we resolve an outstanding puzzle by carefully treating an extra anomaly that arises in the regularization scheme used.

  20. APOL1 renal-risk variants associate with reduced cerebral white matter lesion volume and increased gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Bryan, R Nick; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Ma, Lijun; Rocco, Michael V; Smith, S Carrie; Xu, Jianzhao; Whitlow, Christopher T; Wagner, Benjamin C; Langefeld, Carl D; Hawfield, Amret T; Bates, Jeffrey T; Lerner, Alan J; Raj, Dominic S; Sadaghiani, Mohammad S; Toto, Robert D; Wright, Jackson T; Bowden, Donald W; Williamson, Jeff D; Sink, Kaycee M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-08-01

    To assess apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk-variant effects on the brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cerebral volumes and cognitive function were assessed in 517 African American-Diabetes Heart Study (AA-DHS) Memory IN Diabetes (MIND) and 2568 hypertensive African American Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) participants without diabetes. Within these cohorts, 483 and 197 had cerebral MRI, respectively. AA-DHS participants were characterized as follows: 60.9% female, mean age of 58.6 years, diabetes duration 13.1 years, estimated glomerular filtration rate of 88.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and a median spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 10.0 mg/g. In additive genetic models adjusting for age, sex, ancestry, scanner, intracranial volume, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, statins, nephropathy, smoking, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, APOL1 renal-risk-variants were positively associated with gray matter volume (β = 3.4 × 10(-3)) and negatively associated with white matter lesion volume (β = -0.303) (an indicator of cerebral small vessel disease) and cerebrospinal fluid volume (β= -30707) (all significant), but not with white matter volume or cognitive function. Significant associations corresponding to adjusted effect sizes (β/SE) were observed with gray matter volume (0.16) and white matter lesion volume (-0.208), but not with cerebrospinal fluid volume (-0.251). Meta-analysis results with SPRINT Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND) participants who had cerebral MRI were confirmatory. Thus, APOL1 renal-risk-variants are associated with larger gray matter volume and lower white matter lesion volume suggesting lower intracranial small vessel disease. PMID:27342958

  1. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  2. Astrophysics. Volume 2 - Interstellar matter and galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Richard L.; Deeming, Terry

    The astrophysics of interstellar matter, galaxies, and cosmology is presented in an intermediate-level college textbook. Chapters are devoted to interstellar matter, interstellar dust grains, gaseous nebulae, hydrodynamics, the virial theorem, star formation, supersonic flow and shock waves, diffuse supernova remnants, the expanding universe, galaxies, dynamics of stellar systems, axially symmetric galaxies, spiral structure, and galactic evolution. Diagrams, graphs, photographs, and problems are provided.

  3. Matter, Motion, and Man, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montag, Betty Jo

    Volume Three of the three-volume experimental program in general science attempts to provide preparation for the new approaches in biology, chemistry, and physics and to give those who will not continue in science a realistic way of understanding themselves, the world, and the role of science in society. Chapters on embryology, the body systems,…

  4. Matter, Motion, and Man, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montag, Betty Jo

    Volume Two of the three-volume experimental program in general science attempts to provide preparation for the new approaches in biology, chemistry, and physics and to give those who will not continue in science a realistic way of understanding themselves, the world, and the role of science in society. Chapters on classification, heredity, light,…

  5. Aerobic Fitness is Associated with Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Snook, Erin M.; Motl, Robert W.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gray and white matter have been well documented in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Severity and extent of such brain tissue damage have been associated with cognitive impairment, disease duration and neurological disability, making quantitative indices of tissue damage important markers of disease progression. In this study, we investigated the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and measures of gray matter atrophy and white matter integrity. Employing a voxel-based approach to analyses of gray matter and white matter, we specifically examined whether higher levels of fitness in multiple sclerosis participants were associated with preserved gray matter volume and integrity of white matter. We found a positive association between cardiorespiratory fitness and regional gray matter volumes and higher focal fractional anisotropy values. Statistical mapping revealed that higher levels of fitness were associated with greater gray matter volume in the midline cortical structures including the medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus. Further, we also found increasing levels of fitness were associated with higher fractional anisotropy in the left thalamic radiation and right anterior corona radiata. Both preserved gray matter volume and white-matter tract integrity were associated with better performance on measures of processing speed. Taken together, these results suggest that fitness exerts a prophylactic influence on the cerebral atrophy observed early on preserving neuronal integrity in multiple sclerosis, thereby reducing long-term disability. PMID:19560443

  6. Aerobic fitness is associated with gray matter volume and white matter integrity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Snook, Erin M; Motl, Robert W; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-06-23

    Alterations in gray and white matter have been well documented in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Severity and extent of such brain tissue damage have been associated with cognitive impairment, disease duration and neurological disability, making quantitative indices of tissue damage important markers of disease progression. In this study, we investigated the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and measures of gray matter atrophy and white matter integrity. Employing voxel-based approaches to analysis of gray matter and white matter, we specifically examined whether higher levels of fitness in multiple sclerosis participants were associated with preserved gray matter volume and integrity of white matter. We found a positive association between cardiorespiratory fitness and regional gray matter volumes and higher focal fractional anisotropy values. Statistical mapping revealed that higher levels of fitness were associated with greater gray matter volume in the midline cortical structures including the medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus. Further, we also found that increasing levels of fitness were associated with higher fractional anisotropy in the left thalamic radiation and right anterior corona radiata. Both preserved gray matter volume and white matter tract integrity were associated with better performance on measures of processing speed. Taken together, these results suggest that fitness exerts a prophylactic influence on the structural decline observed early on, preserving neuronal integrity in multiple sclerosis, thereby reducing long-term disability. PMID:19560443

  7. Students' Conceptual Representations of Gas Volume in Relation to Particulate Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Bao-tyan

    Most high school chemistry curricula contain a unit on gas volume and a unit on the particulate nature of matter. The existence and persistence of adolescent preconceptions about the material nature of gases is an important factor to be considered in the teaching of principles or theories related to gases. The purpose of the study reported in this…

  8. Volume Matters: Returning Home After Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Pedro; Leland, Natalie E.; Christian, Thomas J.; Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the effect of the relationship between volume (number of hip fracture admissions during the 12 months before participant’s fracture) and other facility characteristics on outcomes. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING U.S. skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) admitting individuals discharged from the hospital after treatment for hip fracture between 2000 and 2007 (N = 15,439). PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries aged 75 and older admitted to U.S. hospitals for their first hip fracture and discharged to a SNF for postacute care from 2000 to 2007 (N = 512,967). MEASUREMENTS Successful discharge from SNF to community, defined as returning to the community within 30 days of hospital discharge to the SNF and remaining in the community without being institutionalized for at least 30 days, was examined using Medicare administrative data, propensity score matching, and instrumental variables. RESULTS The overall rate of successful discharge to the community was 31%. Of the 15,439 facilities, the facility interquartile range varied from 0% (25th percentile) to 42% (75th percentile). An important determinant of variation in discharge rate was SNF volume of hip fracture admissions. Unadjusted successful discharge from SNF to community was 43.7% in high-volume facilities (>24 admissions/year), versus 18.8% in low-volume facilities (1–6 admissions/year). This facility volume effect persisted after adjusting for participant and facility characteristics associated with outcomes (e.g., adjusted odds ratio = 2.06, 95% confidence interval = 1.91–2.21 for volume of 25 vs 3 admissions per year). CONCLUSION In community-dwelling persons with their first hip fracture, successful return to the community varies substantially according to SNF provider volume and staffing characteristics. PMID:26424223

  9. Effective theories for dark matter nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisano, Junji; Nagai, Ryo; Nagata, Natsumi

    2015-05-01

    We reformulate the calculation of the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections based on the method of effective field theories. We assume that the scatterings are induced by the exchange of colored mediators, and construct the effective theories by integrating out the colored particles. All of the leading order matching conditions as well as the renormalization group equations are presented. We consider a Majorana fermion, and real scalar and vector bosons for the dark matter and show the results for each case. The treatment for the twist-2 operators is discussed in detail, and it is shown that the scale of evaluating their nucleon matrix elements does not have to be the hadronic scale. The effects of the QCD corrections are evaluated on the assumption that the masses of the colored mediators are much heavier than the electroweak scale. Our formulation is systematic and model-independent, and thus suitable to be implemented in numerical packages, such as micrOMEGAs and DarkSUSY.

  10. Cardiorespiratory fitness and brain volume and white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Na; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Sidney, Stephen; Demerath, Ellen; Thomas, William; Bouchard, Claude; He, Ka; Erus, Guray; Battapady, Harsha; Bryan, R. Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that greater cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with lower odds of having unfavorable brain MRI findings. Methods: We studied 565 healthy, middle-aged, black and white men and women in the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study. The fitness measure was symptom-limited maximal treadmill test duration (Maxdur); brain MRI was measured 5 years later. Brain MRI measures were analyzed as means and as proportions below the 15th percentile (above the 85th percentile for white matter abnormal tissue volume). Results: Per 1-minute-higher Maxdur, the odds ratio for having less whole brain volume was 0.85 (p = 0.04) and for having low white matter integrity was 0.80 (p = 0.02), adjusted for age, race, sex, clinic, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, diet, physical activity, education, blood pressure, diabetes, total cholesterol, and lung function (plus intracranial volume for white matter integrity). No significant associations were observed between Maxdur and abnormal tissue volume or blood flow in white matter. Findings were similar for associations with continuous brain MRI measures. Conclusions: Greater physical fitness was associated with more brain volume and greater white matter integrity measured 5 years later in middle-aged adults. PMID:25957331

  11. The Theory of Sound 2 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutt Baron Rayleigh, John William

    2011-08-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Sound due to vibrations; 2. Composition of harmonic motions of like period; 3. Systems with one degree of freedom; 4. Generalized co-ordinates; 5. Cases in which the three functions, T, F, V are simultaneously reducible to sums of squares; 6. Law of extension of a string; 7. Classification of the vibrations of bars; 8. Potential energy of bending; 9. Tension of a membrane; 10. Vibrations of plates. Volume 2: 11. Aerial vibrations; 12. Vibrations in tubes; 13. Aerial vibrations in a rectangular chamber; 14. Arbitrary initial disturbance in an unlimited atmosphere; 15. Secondary waves due to a variation in the medium; 16. Theory of resonators; 17. Applications of Laplace's functions to acoustical problems; 18. Problem of a spherical layer of air; 19. Fluid friction; Appendix.

  12. Dyslexia and Voxel-Based Morphometry: Correlations between Five Behavioural Measures of Dyslexia and Gray and White Matter Volumes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboer, Peter; Scholte, H. Steven; Vorst, Harrie C. M.

    2015-01-01

    In voxel-based morphometry studies of dyslexia, the relation between causal theories of dyslexia and gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations is still under debate. Some alterations are consistently reported, but others failed to reach significance. We investigated GM alterations in a large sample of Dutch students (37 dyslexics…

  13. An Effective Theory of Dirac Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; /Oregon U.

    2010-06-11

    A stable Dirac fermion with four-fermion interactions to leptons suppressed by a scale {Lambda} {approx} 1 TeV is shown to provide a viable candidate for dark matter. The thermal relic abundance matches cosmology, while nuclear recoil direct detection bounds are automatically avoided in the absence of (large) couplings to quarks. The annihilation cross section in the early Universe is the same as the annihilation in our galactic neighborhood. This allows Dirac fermion dark matter to naturally explain the positron ratio excess observed by PAMELA with a minimal boost factor, given present astrophysical uncertainties. We use the Galprop program for propagation of signal and background; we discuss in detail the uncertainties resulting from the propagation parameters and, more importantly, the injected spectra. Fermi/GLAST has an opportunity to see a feature in the gamma-ray spectrum at the mass of the Dirac fermion. The excess observed by ATIC/PPB-BETS may also be explained with Dirac dark matter that is heavy. A supersymmetric model with a Dirac bino provides a viable UV model of the effective theory. The dominance of the leptonic operators, and thus the observation of an excess in positrons and not in anti-protons, is naturally explained by the large hypercharge and low mass of sleptons as compared with squarks. Minimizing the boost factor implies the right-handed selectron is the lightest slepton, which is characteristic of our model. Selectrons (or sleptons) with mass less than a few hundred GeV are an inescapable consequence awaiting discovery at the LHC.

  14. Matter, metaphors, and mechanisms: rethinking cell theories.

    PubMed

    Müller-Strahl, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the logical structure of classical cell theory (CCT) by pointing out that CCT conceives the properties of organic cellular matter as supervenient to successively emerging states of quasi-crystalline atoms. This concept supports the design of a metaphorical space the intelligible components of which display an explanatory structure in accordance with the contemporary complex-systems approach of mechanisms. These findings support the thesis of an explanatory turn within the life-sciences due to a conflict between anti-classificatory (Buffon), analogous (Wolff, Reil, Weber), and causal-mechanical (Kepler) strategies of explanation. The continuous process underlying these diverse discontinuities is taken to be the immanent process of objectifying scientific concepts for the need of explanation. This process repeatedly provides concepts which are identified as nomadic concepts. The meta-analysis of their interactions reveals that concepts of matter are obtained by idealizations which entertain one process with three dimensions: atomization originating from empirical classificatory regularities (classification) and aiming at an explanation of changing phenomena (dynamization). These dimensions are successfully incorporated into the explanatory scheme of CCT. The migrations of a second group of nomadic concepts beyond this historical point of transition are made responsible for blurring the explanatory turn. PMID:25156862

  15. MR volume segmentation of gray matter and white matter using manual thresholding: Dependence on image brightness

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, G.J.; Barta, P.E.; Peng, L.W.; Lee, S.; Brettschneider, P.D.; Shah, A.; Henderer, J.D.; Schlaepfer, T.E.; Pearlson, G.D. Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA )

    1994-02-01

    To describe a quantitative MR imaging segmentation method for determination of the volume of cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter in living human brain, and to determine the method's reliability. We developed a computer method that allows rapid, user-friendly determination of cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter volumes in a reliable manner, both globally and regionally. This method was applied to a large control population (N = 57). Initially, image brightness had a strong correlation with the gray-white ratio (r = .78). Bright images tended to overestimate, dim images to underestimate gray matter volumes. This artifact was corrected for by offsetting each image to an approximately equal brightness. After brightness correction, gray-white ratio was correlated with age (r = -.35). The age-dependent gray-white ratio was similar to that for the same age range in a prior neuropathology report. Interrater reliability was high (.93 intraclass correlation coefficient). The method described here for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volume calculation is reliable and valid. A correction method for an artifact related to image brightness was developed. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients. A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume. Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = –0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001). The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  17. Gray matter alterations and correlation of nutritional intake with the gray matter volume in prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te; Yang, Shwu-Huey

    2016-06-01

    The neurophysiology of prediabetes plays an important role in preventive medicine. The dysregulation of glucose metabolism is likely linked to changes in neuron-related gray matter. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate gray matter alterations in medication-naive prediabetic patients. We expected to find alterations in the gray matter of prediabetic patients.A total of 64 prediabetic patients and 54 controls were enrolled. All subjects received T1 scans using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. Subjects also completed nutritional intake records at the 24-hour and 3-day time points to determine their carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake. We utilized optimized voxel-based morphometry to estimate the gray matter differences between the patients and controls. In addition, the preprandial serum glucose level and the carbohydrate, protein, fat, and total calorie intake levels were tested to determine whether these parameters were correlated with the gray matter volume.Prediabetic patients had lower gray matter volumes than controls in the right anterior cingulate gyrus, right posterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, left super temporal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus (corrected P < 0.05; voxel threshold: 33). Gray matter volume in the right anterior cingulate was also negatively correlated with the preprandial serum glucose level gyrus in a voxel-dependent manner (r = -0.501; 2-tailed P = 0.001).The cingulo-temporal and insula gray matter alterations may be associated with the glucose dysregulation in prediabetic patients. PMID:27336893

  18. Gray Matter Volume Changes in the Apathetic Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hongjie; Onoda, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    This study is to test the hypothesis that apathy in healthy participants is closely related to the prefrontal-basal-ganglia circuit and associated structural changes. We selected 36 healthy aged participants with (n = 18) or without apathy (n = 18) from our database. Participants underwent structural MRI scanning, providing data for voxel-based morphometric analysis to explore gray matter changes associated with apathy. Compared to the non-apathy group, the apathy group showed reduced gray matter volume of the right putamen, whereas volumes of the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left inferior occipital gyrus showed increase. When depression scores were included in a regression model as a covariate, apathetic participants showed decreased gray matter volume in the right precentral gyrus compared to the non-apathetic participants. These findings suggest that apathy is associated with the gray matter volume in the prefrontal-basal-ganglia network, and may have a neuroanatomical basis distinct from depression in healthy elderly. PMID:26082708

  19. [Determination of particulate matter in small volume antibiotic injections].

    PubMed

    Niizeki, M; Tanno, K

    1989-03-01

    Amounts of particulate matter present in 17 small volume antibiotic injections marketed in Japan were determined using light obscuration particle analyzer (HIAC). The vial volume range of each batch of product was 7-20 ml, and each vial contained 1 g as antibiotic potency. In 4 products, contents of particles between 2.5 and 10 microns in diameter were counted 2,000-7,000 per vial, and particles in other products were counted less than 2,000 per vial. Numbers of particles greater than or equal to 10 microns in diameter were much less than the USP XXI criteria for particulate matter in small volume injections. The product of the highest counts for particles between 10 and 25 microns in diameter showed counts amounted to 0.13% of the USP XXI criteria. In the 25-50 microns particulate diameter range, particulate matters were detected only in 2 products, and they were less than 0.2% of the USP XXI criteria. Particles over 50 microns in diameter were not detected in any products. These results showed that 17 small volume antibiotic injections marketed in Japan had good qualities regarding contents of particulate matter. PMID:2746842

  20. Large volumes and spectroscopy of walking theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Debbio, L.; Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Pica, C.; Rago, A.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed investigation of finite-size effects is performed for SU(2) gauge theory with two fermions in the adjoint representation, which previous lattice studies have shown to be inside the conformal window. The system is investigated with different spatial and temporal boundary conditions on lattices of various spatial and temporal extensions, for two values of the bare fermion mass representing a heavy and light fermion regime. Our study shows that the infinite-volume limit of masses and decay constants in the mesonic sector is reached only when the mass of the pseudoscalar particle MPS and the spatial lattice size L satisfy the relation L MPS≥15 . This bound, which is at least a factor of three higher than what is observed in QCD, is a likely consequence of the different spectral signatures of the two theories, with the scalar isosinglet (0++ glueball) being the lightest particle in our model. In addition to stressing the importance of simulating large lattice sizes, our analysis emphasizes the need to understand quantitatively the full spectrum of the theory rather than just the spectrum in the mesonic isotriplet sector. While for the lightest fermion measuring masses from gluonic operators proves to be still challenging, reliable results for glueball states are obtained at the largest fermion mass and, in the mesonic sector, for both fermion masses. As a byproduct of our investigation, we perform a finite-size scaling of the pseudoscalar mass and decay constant. The data presented in this work support the conformal behavior of this theory with an anomalous dimension γ*≃0.37 .

  1. Theory Matters: Representation and Experimentation in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a material enactment of educational theory to explore how we might do educational theory differently by defamiliarising the familiar. Theory is often assumed to be abstract, located solely in the realm of ideas and separate from practice. However, this view of theory emerges from a set of ontological and epistemological…

  2. The NSF Condensed Matter and Materials Theory Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Daryl

    The Condensed Matter and Materials Theory (CMMT) Program in the Division of Materials Research is the home of condensed matter theory at the National Science Foundation. CMMT awards reflect a vibrant community with expanding scientific horizons and opportunities. I will present an overview of the CMMT program. Opportunities for theory and computation to open new directions and stimulate emerging frontiers will be discussed. Engaging research across disciplinary boundaries maintains the vitality of the field, leads to an agile next generation of theoretical and computational condensed matter physicists, and advances understanding of the world on the scale of life.

  3. Extensive Gray Matter Volume Reduction in Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Valerie M; Goldstein, Meghan E; Kydd, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-third of people with schizophrenia are treatment-resistant and some do not achieve remission with clozapine, the gold-standard antipsychotic medication for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. This study compared global and regional brain volumes between treatment-respondent and treatment-resistant patients with schizophrenia, including a group of patients who were clozapine-resistant. Methods: T1-weighted brain MRIs were obtained on a 3T scanner in 20 controls and 52 people with schizophrenia who were selected based on their symptomatic responses to antipsychotic medication: 18 responded well to first-line atypical antipsychotics (FLR), 19 were treatment-resistant but responsive to clozapine monotherapy (TR), and 15 were ultra-treatment-resistant and did not respond to clozapine (UTR). Treatment groups were matched for disease duration and current psychopathology. SIENAX and FSL-VBM were used to investigate differences in the global brain, gray matter (GM), white matter, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid volumes, and regional GM volumes. Results: GM volume was significantly reduced in the TR and UTR groups compared with controls and the FLR group (p < 0.05). GM volume was significantly reduced in TR patients compared with FLRs in the superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri, pre- and post-central gyri, middle and superior frontal gyri, right supramarginal gyrus, and right lateral occipital cortex. UTR patients showed reduced GM compared with FLRs in their right parietal operculum and left cerebellum. No significant volume differences were observed between TR and UTR groups. Conclusions: These differences are unlikely to be solely due to medication effects, and reduced GM volume in treatment-resistant schizophrenia may represent an accelerated disease course or a different underlying pathology. PMID:25716781

  4. Frontal White Matter Volume Is Associated with Brain Enlargement and Higher Structural Connectivity in Anthropoid Primates

    PubMed Central

    Smaers, Jeroen Bert; Schleicher, Axel; Zilles, Karl; Vinicius, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated the importance of the frontal lobe and its ‘executive’ connections to other brain structures as crucial in explaining primate neocortical adaptations. However, a representative sample of volumetric measurements of frontal connective tissue (white matter) has not been available. In this study, we present new volumetric measurements of white and grey matter in the frontal and non-frontal neocortical lobes from 18 anthropoid species. We analyze this data in the context of existing theories of neocortex, frontal lobe and white versus grey matter hyperscaling. Results indicate that the ‘universal scaling law’ of neocortical white to grey matter applies separately for frontal and non-frontal lobes; that hyperscaling of both neocortex and frontal lobe to rest of brain is mainly due to frontal white matter; and that changes in frontal (but not non-frontal) white matter volume are associated with changes in rest of brain and basal ganglia, a group of subcortical nuclei functionally linked to ‘executive control’. Results suggest a central role for frontal white matter in explaining neocortex and frontal lobe hyperscaling, brain size variation and higher neural structural connectivity in anthropoids. PMID:20161758

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy increases temporal gray matter volume and cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Alexander; Demirakca, Traute; Böhringer, Andreas; Clemm von Hohenberg, Christian; Aksay, Suna Su; Bumb, Jan Malte; Kranaster, Laura; Ende, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a treatment of choice for severe and therapy resistant forms of major depressive episodes (MDE). Temporal brain volume alterations in MDE have been described for more than two decades. In our prospective study we aimed to investigate individual pre-post ECT treatment whole brain gray matter (GM) volume changes (quantified with voxel-based morphometry) in a sample of 18 patients with MDE. In addition, we studied the effect of ECT on voxel-based cortical thickness in cortical brain regions. The most prominent longitudinal GM increases (significant at a whole brain corrected level) occurred in temporal lobe regions. Within specific region of interest analyses we detected highly significant increases of GM in the hippocampus and the amygdala and to a lesser extent in the habenula (left p=0.003, right p=0.032). A voxel based cortical thickness analysis revealed an increase in cortical temporal regions (basically temporal pole and insula) further corroborating our cortical voxel-based morphometry results. Neither GM decreases or white matter increases nor correlations of GM changes with basic psychopathological parameters were detected. We corroborate earlier findings of hippocampal and amygdala GM volume increase following an acute ECT series in patients with MDE. Temporal GM volume increase was significant on a whole brain level and further corroborated by a cortical thickness analysis. Our data widely exclude white matter loss as an indirect cause of GM growth. Our data add further evidence to the hypothesis that ECT enables plasticity falsifying older ideas of ECT induced "brain damaging". PMID:26792445

  6. Heavy dark matter annihilation from effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Ovanesyan, Grigory; Slatyer, Tracy R; Stewart, Iain W

    2015-05-29

    We formulate an effective field theory description for SU(2)_{L} triplet fermionic dark matter by combining nonrelativistic dark matter with gauge bosons in the soft-collinear effective theory. For a given dark matter mass, the annihilation cross section to line photons is obtained with 5% precision by simultaneously including Sommerfeld enhancement and the resummation of electroweak Sudakov logarithms at next-to-leading logarithmic order. Using these results, we present more accurate and precise predictions for the gamma-ray line signal from annihilation, updating both existing constraints and the reach of future experiments. PMID:26066425

  7. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl’s gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl’s gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain’s plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  8. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl's gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl's gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain's plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  9. White matter hyperintensity volume and impaired mobility among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Provenzano, Frank A.; Luchsinger, José A.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    Gait speed is associated with multiple adverse outcomes of aging. White matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been associated with gait speed, though few studies have examined changes in gait speed over time in population-based studies comprising participants from diverse cultural backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between a decline in gait speed and total and regional WMH volumes in a community-based study of aging. Participants (n=701) in a community-based study of older adults underwent gait speed measurement via a 4-meter walk test at the time of initial enrollment and MRI at a second time interval (mean 4.7[SD=0.5] years apart). Logistic regression was used to examine the association between large WMH volume and regional WMH volume with gait speed < 0.5 m/s (abnormal speed), and a transition to abnormal gait speed. Analyses were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors. Large WMH volume was associated with a transition to abnormal gait speed between the two visits, but not after adjustment for modifiable vascular disease risk factors. In adjusted models increased frontal lobe WMH volume was not associated with a transition to abnormal gait speed. WMH are associated with slowing of gait over time. Prevention of WMH presents a potential strategy for the prevention of gait speed decline. PMID:23128969

  10. Quantum theory and Aquinas's doctrine on matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Stanley F.

    The Aristotelian conception of the material principle, deepened by Aquinas, is today widely misunderstood and largely alien to modern mathematical physics, despite the latter's preoccupation with matter and the spatiotemporal. The present dissertation seeks to develop a coherent understanding of matter in the Aristotelian-Thomistic sense, and to apply it to some key interpretive issues in quantum physics. I begin with a brief historical analysis of the Aristotelian, Newtonian ("classical"), and modern (quantum) approaches to physics, in order to highlight their commonality as well as their differences. Next, matter---especially prime matter---is investigated, in an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective, under several rationes: as principle of individuation, as principle of extension or spatiality, as principle of corruptibility, as related to essence and existence, and as ground of intelligibility. An attempt is made to order these different rationes according to primordiality. A number of topics concerning the formal structure of hylomorphic being are then addressed: elementarity, virtual presence, the "dispositions of matter," entia vialia, natural minima, atomism, the nature of local motion, the plenum and instantaneous action at a distance---all with a view to their incorporation in a unified account of formed matter at or near the elementary level. Finally I take up several interpretive problems in quantum physics which were introduced early in the dissertation, and show how the material and formal principles expounded in the central chapters can render these problems intelligible. Thus I propose that wave and particle aspects in the quantum realm are related substantially rather than accidentally, and that characteristics of substantial (prime) matter and substantial form are therefore being evidenced directly at this level---in the reversibility of the wave-particle transition, in the spatial and temporal instantaneity of quantum events, and in the probabilism

  11. Quantification of white matter and gray matter volumes from T1 parametric images using fuzzy classifiers.

    PubMed

    Herndon, R C; Lancaster, J L; Toga, A W; Fox, P T

    1996-01-01

    White matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) were accurately measured using a technique based on a single standardized fuzzy classifier (FC) for each tissue. Fuzzy classifier development was based on experts' visual assessments of WM and GM boundaries from a set of T1 parametric MR images. The fuzzy classifier method's accuracy was validated and optimized by a set of T1 phantom images that were based on hand-detailed human brain cryosection images. Nine sets of axial T1 images of varying thickness equally distributed throughout the brain were simulated. All T1 data sets were mapped to the standardized FCs and rapidly segmented into WM and GM voxel fraction images. Resulting volumes revealed that, in most cases, the difference between measured and actual volumes was less than 5%. This was consistent throughout most of the brain, and as expected, the accuracy improved to generally less than 2% for the 1-mm simulated brain slices. PMID:8724407

  12. Gravitational lenses and dark matter - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models are presented for guiding the application of gravitational lenses to probe the characteristics of dark matter in the universe. Analytical techniques are defined for quantifying the mass associated with lensing galaxies (in terms of the image separation), determining the quantity of dark mass of the lensing bodies, and estimating the mass density of the lenses. The possibility that heavy halos are made of low mass stars is considered, along with the swallowing of central images of black holes or cusps in galactic nuclei and the effects produced on a lensed quasar image by nonbaryonic halos. The observable effects of dense groups and clusters and the characteristics of dark matter strings are discussed, and various types of images which are possible due to lensing phenomena and position are described.

  13. Do f(R) theories matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.

    2008-04-15

    We consider a modified action functional with a nonminimum coupling between the scalar curvature and the matter Lagrangian, and study its consequences on stellar equilibrium. Particular attention is paid to the validity of the Newtonian regime, and on the boundary and exterior matching conditions, as well as on the redefinition of the metric components. Comparison with solar observables is achieved through numerical analysis, and constraints on the nonminimum coupling are discussed.

  14. Dark Matter Reality Check: Chandra Casts Cloud On Alternative Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    New evidence from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory challenges an alternative theory of gravity that eliminates the need for dark matter. The observation also narrows the field for competing forms of dark matter, the elusive material thought to be the dominant form of matter in the universe. An observation of the galaxy NGC 720 shows it is enveloped in a slightly flattened, or ellipsoidal cloud of hot gas that has an orientation different from that of the optical image of the galaxy. The flattening is too large to be explained by theories in which stars and gas are assumed to contain most of the mass in the galaxy. "The shape and orientation of the hot gas cloud require it to be confined by an egg-shaped dark matter halo," said David Buote of the University of California, Irvine, and lead author of a report on this research in the 2002 September 20 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "This means that dark matter is not just an illusion due to a shortcoming of the standard theory of gravity - it is real." According to the generally accepted standard theory of gravity, the hot X-ray cloud would need an additional source of gravity - a halo of dark matter - to keep the hot gas from expanding away. The mass of dark matter required would be about five to ten times the mass of the stars in the galaxy. If the dark matter tracked the optical light from the stars in the galaxy, the hot X-ray cloud would be more round than it is. The flattened shape of the hot gas cloud requires a flattened dark matter halo. An alternative theory of gravity called MOND, for Modified Newtonian Dynamics, was proposed in 1983 by Mordecai Milgrom of the Weizmann Institute in Israel, and has remained viable over the years. MOND does away with the need for dark matter by modifying the theory where the acceleration produced by gravity is very small, such as the outskirts of galaxies. However, MOND cannot explain the Chandra observation of NGC 720. This is apparently the first dynamical evidence that

  15. Cosmological evolution in f (R ,T ) theory with collisional matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baffou, E. H.; Houndjo, M. J. S.; Rodrigues, M. E.; Kpadonou, A. V.; Tossa, J.

    2015-10-01

    We study the evolution of the cosmological parameters, namely, the deceleration parameter q (z ) and the parameter of effective equation of state in a Universe containing, besides ordinary matter and dark energy, a self-interacting (collisional) matter, in the generalized f (R ,T ) theory of gravity, where R and T are the curvature scalar and the trace of the energy-momentum tensor, respectively. We use the generalized Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations and the equation of continuity and obtain a differential equation in H (z ) , and we solve it numerically for studying the evolution of the cosmological parameters. Two f (R ,T ) models are considered. The results with collisional matter are compared with the ones of the Λ cold dark matter model, and also with the model where only noncollisional matter exists. The curves show that the models are acceptable because the values found for weff are consistent with observed data.

  16. Comparison of grey matter volume and thickness for analysing cortical changes in chronic schizophrenia: a matter of surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li; Herold, Christina J; Zöllner, Frank; Salat, David H; Lässer, Marc M; Schmid, Lena A; Fellhauer, Iven; Thomann, Philipp A; Essig, Marco; Schad, Lothar R; Erickson, Kirk I; Schröder, Johannes

    2015-02-28

    Grey matter volume and cortical thickness are the two most widely used measures for detecting grey matter morphometric changes in various diseases such as schizophrenia. However, these two measures only share partial overlapping regions in identifying morphometric changes. Few studies have investigated the contributions of the potential factors to the differences of grey matter volume and cortical thickness. To investigate this question, 3T magnetic resonance images from 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 well-matched healthy controls were chosen for analyses. Grey matter volume and cortical thickness were measured by VBM and Freesurfer. Grey matter volume results were then rendered onto the surface template of Freesurfer to compare the differences from cortical thickness in anatomical locations. Discrepancy regions of the grey matter volume and thickness where grey matter volume significantly decreased but without corresponding evidence of cortical thinning involved the rostral middle frontal, precentral, lateral occipital and superior frontal gyri. Subsequent region-of-interest analysis demonstrated that changes in surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature accounted for the discrepancies. Our results suggest that the differences between grey matter volume and thickness could be jointly driven by surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature. PMID:25595222

  17. Dark matter signals at neutrino telescopes in effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-04-29

    We constrain the effective theory of one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions using neutrino telescope observations. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 coupling constants of the theory, exploring interaction operators previously considered in dark matter direct detection only, and using new nuclear response functions recently derived through nuclear structure calculations. We determine for what interactions neutrino telescopes are superior to current direct detection experiments, and show that Hydrogen is not the most important element in the exclusion limit calculation for the majority of the spin-dependent operators.

  18. The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter and Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2014-06-01

    We develop the effective field theory of cosmological large scale structure. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and integrate out short modes of a dark matter/dark energy dominated universe (LambdaCDM) whose matter is comprised of massive particles as used in cosmological simulations. This establishes a long distance effective fluid, valid for length scales larger than the non-linear scale ~ 10 Mpc, and provides the complete description of large scale structure formation. Extracting the time dependence, we derive recursion relations that encode the perturbative solution. This is exact for the matter dominated era and quite accurate in LambdaCDM also. The effective fluid is characterized by physical parameters, including sound speed and viscosity. These two fluid parameters play a degenerate role with each other and lead to a relative correction from standard perturbation theory of the form ~ 10^{-6}c^2k^2/H^2. Starting from the linear theory, we calculate corrections to cosmological observables, such as the baryon-acoustic-oscillation peak, which we compute semi-analytically at one-loop order. Due to the non-zero fluid parameters, the predictions of the effective field theory agree with observation much more accurately than standard perturbation theory and we explain why. We also discuss corrections from treating dark matter as interacting or wave-like and other issues.

  19. MAIL LOG, program theory, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Information relevant to the MAIL LOG program theory is documented. The L-files for mail correspondence, design information release/report, and the drawing/engineering order are given. In addition, sources for miscellaneous external routines and special support routines are documented along with a glossary of terms.

  20. Thermal density functional theory, ensemble density functional theory, and potential functional theory for warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora

    Warm dense matter (WDM) is a high energy phase between solids and plasmas, with characteristics of both. It is present in the centers of giant planets, within the earth's core, and on the path to ignition of inertial confinement fusion. The high temperatures and pressures of warm dense matter lead to complications in its simulation, as both classical and quantum effects must be included. One of the most successful simulation methods is density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD). Despite great success in a diverse array of applications, DFT-MD remains computationally expensive and it neglects the explicit temperature dependence of electron-electron interactions known to exist within exact DFT. Finite-temperature density functional theory (FT DFT) is an extension of the wildly successful ground-state DFT formalism via thermal ensembles, broadening its quantum mechanical treatment of electrons to include systems at non-zero temperatures. Exact mathematical conditions have been used to predict the behavior of approximations in limiting conditions and to connect FT DFT to the ground-state theory. An introduction to FT DFT is given within the context of ensemble DFT and the larger field of DFT is discussed for context. Ensemble DFT is used to describe ensembles of ground-state and excited systems. Exact conditions in ensemble DFT and the performance of approximations depend on ensemble weights. Using an inversion method, exact Kohn-Sham ensemble potentials are found and compared to approximations. The symmetry eigenstate Hartree-exchange approximation is in good agreement with exact calculations because of its inclusion of an ensemble derivative discontinuity. Since ensemble weights in FT DFT are temperature-dependent Fermi weights, this insight may help develop approximations well-suited to both ground-state and FT DFT. A novel, highly efficient approach to free energy calculations, finite-temperature potential functional theory, is derived, which has the

  1. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, Volume XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    This volume contains nine papers on higher education theory and research. They include: (1) "Technology Transfer from Universities" (Irwin Feller); (2) "State Policy and Private Higher Education: Past, Present and Future" (William Zumeta); (3) "Appraising Tinto's Theory of College Student Departure" (John M. Braxton et al.); (4) "A Hierarchical…

  2. Bimetric gravity doubly coupled to matter: theory and cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect

    Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Mota, David F.; Sandstad, Marit E-mail: t.s.koivisto@astro.uio.no E-mail: marit.sandstad@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    A ghost-free theory of gravity with two dynamical metrics both coupled to matter is shown to be consistent and viable. Its cosmological implications are studied, and the models, in particular in the context of partially massless gravity, are found to explain the cosmic acceleration without resorting to dark energy.

  3. Why Theory Matters: An Examination of Contemporary Learning Time Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiacomo, Daniela K.; Prudhomme, Joshua J.; Jones, Hannah R.; Welner, Kevin G.; Kishner, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the contemporary policy reform push to extend and expand learning time in schools. In light of the potential and continued prominence of learning time reforms in today's national educational landscape, this article makes visible the ways in which theory matters for the near- and long-term success of equity-focused educational…

  4. Association of white matter hyperintensities and gray matter volume with cognition in older individuals without cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Arvanitakis, Zoe; Fleischman, Debra A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Leurgans, Sue E; Barnes, Lisa L; Bennett, David A

    2016-05-01

    Both presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and smaller total gray matter volume on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are common findings in old age, and contribute to impaired cognition. We tested whether total WMH volume and gray matter volume had independent associations with cognition in community-dwelling individuals without dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We used data from participants of the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Brain MRI was available in 209 subjects without dementia or MCI (mean age 80; education = 15 years; 74 % women). WMH and gray matter were automatically segmented, and the total WMH and gray matter volumes were measured. Both MRI-derived measures were normalized by the intracranial volume. Cognitive data included composite measures of five different cognitive domains, based on 19 individual tests. Linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, and education, were used to examine the relationship of logarithmically-transformed total WMH volume and of total gray matter volume to cognition. Larger total WMH volumes were associated with lower levels of perceptual speed (p < 0.001), but not with episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, or visuospatial abilities (all p > 0.10). Smaller total gray matter volumes were associated with lower levels of perceptual speed (p = 0.013) and episodic memory (p = 0.001), but not with the other three cognitive domains (all p > 0.14). Larger total WMH volume was correlated with smaller total gray matter volume (p < 0.001). In a model with both MRI-derived measures included, the relation of WMH to perceptual speed remained significant (p < 0.001), while gray matter volumes were no longer related (p = 0.14). This study of older community-dwelling individuals without overt cognitive impairment suggests that the association of larger total WMH volume with lower perceptual speed is independent of total gray matter volume. These results help elucidate the

  5. Millicharged dark matter in quantum gravity and string theory.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo; Ye, Fang

    2013-06-14

    We examine the millicharged dark matter scenario from a string theory perspective. In this scenario, kinetic and mass mixings of the photon with extra U(1) bosons are claimed to give rise to small electric charges, carried by dark matter particles, whose values are determined by continuous parameters of the theory. This seems to contradict folk theorems of quantum gravity that forbid the existence of irrational charges in theories with a single massless gauge field. By considering the underlying structure of the U(1) mass matrix that appears in type II string compactifications, we show that millicharges arise exclusively through kinetic mixing, and require the existence of at least two exactly massless gauge bosons. PMID:25165910

  6. Mass eigenstates in bimetric theory with matter coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-May, Angnis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the ghost-free bimetric action extended by a recently proposed coupling to matter through a composite metric. The equations of motion for this theory are derived using a method which avoids varying the square-root matrix that appears in the matter coupling. We make an ansatz for which the metrics are proportional to each other and find that it can solve the equations provided that one parameter in the action is fixed. In this case, the proportional metrics as well as the effective metric that couples to matter solve Einstein's equations of general relativity including a matter source. Around these backgrounds we derive the quadratic action for perturbations and diagonalize it into generalized mass eigenstates. It turns out that matter only interacts with the massless spin-2 mode whose equation of motion has exactly the form of the linearized Einstein equations, while the field with Fierz-Pauli mass term is completely decoupled. Hence, bimetric theory, with one parameter fixed such that proportional solutions exist, is degenerate with general relativity up to linear order around these backgrounds.

  7. Seesaw theories at LHC and warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-06-24

    Explaining the origin of neutrino masses clearly requires new physics beyond the Standard Model. I focus on the Seesaw paradigm and discuss a few simplest extensions of the SM that give Majorana masses to the active neutrinos. If realized at TeV scale, seesaw theories could manifest themselves in lepton number violating signatures at both low-energy processes and high-energy collider experiments. I summarize the constraints on the seesaw scales using the current LHC data. The left-right symmetric model connects the seesaw mechanism with the origin of parity symmetry breaking, and provides a unified framework for the simplest seesaw types. With new right-handed charged-current interactions, a TeV such model offers a plethora of new particles and exotic signatures at the LHC, and also accommodates a dark matter candidate, the lightest right-handed neutrino. A challenging question is the dark matter relic density which is typically over-produced in the early universe. The late decays of two heavier right-handed neutrinos can produce entropy and dilute the dark matter number. The key observation for this picture to work is the interplay between the freeze temperature of TeV right-handed gauge interaction and the QCD phase transition. The resulting dark matter mass is predicted to be around keV which makes the left-right model also a theory of warm dark matter. I will also comment on the fate of cosmic baryon asymmetry in this scenario.

  8. Seesaw theories at LHC and warm dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-06-01

    Explaining the origin of neutrino masses clearly requires new physics beyond the Standard Model. I focus on the Seesaw paradigm and discuss a few simplest extensions of the SM that give Majorana masses to the active neutrinos. If realized at TeV scale, seesaw theories could manifest themselves in lepton number violating signatures at both low-energy processes and high-energy collider experiments. I summarize the constraints on the seesaw scales using the current LHC data. The left-right symmetric model connects the seesaw mechanism with the origin of parity symmetry breaking, and provides a unified framework for the simplest seesaw types. With new right-handed charged-current interactions, a TeV such model offers a plethora of new particles and exotic signatures at the LHC, and also accommodates a dark matter candidate, the lightest right-handed neutrino. A challenging question is the dark matter relic density which is typically over-produced in the early universe. The late decays of two heavier right-handed neutrinos can produce entropy and dilute the dark matter number. The key observation for this picture to work is the interplay between the freeze temperature of TeV right-handed gauge interaction and the QCD phase transition. The resulting dark matter mass is predicted to be around keV which makes the left-right model also a theory of warm dark matter. I will also comment on the fate of cosmic baryon asymmetry in this scenario.

  9. Large-N volume independence in conformal and confining gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.; /Washington U., Seattle

    2010-08-26

    Consequences of large N volume independence are examined in conformal and confining gauge theories. In the large N limit, gauge theories compactified on R{sup d-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k} are independent of the S{sup 1} radii, provided the theory has unbroken center symmetry. In particular, this implies that a large N gauge theory which, on R{sup d}, flows to an IR fixed point, retains the infinite correlation length and other scale invariant properties of the decompactified theory even when compactified on R{sup d-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k}. In other words, finite volume effects are 1/N suppressed. In lattice formulations of vector-like theories, this implies that numerical studies to determine the boundary between confined and conformal phases may be performed on one-site lattice models. In N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, the center symmetry realization is a matter of choice: the theory on R{sup 4-k} x (S{sup 1}){sup k} has a moduli space which contains points with all possible realizations of center symmetry. Large N QCD with massive adjoint fermions and one or two compactified dimensions has a rich phase structure with an infinite number of phase transitions coalescing in the zero radius limit.

  10. Subcortical Gray Matter Volume Abnormalities in Healthy Bipolar Offspring: Potential Neuroanatomical Risk Marker for Bipolar Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Nau, Sharon; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted to examine the extent to which bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with gray matter volume abnormalities in brain regions in healthy bipolar offspring relative to age-matched controls. Results show increased gray matter volume in the parahippocampus/hippocampus in healthy offspring at genetic risk for BD.

  11. Regional Gray Matter Volume Deficits in Adolescents with First-Episode Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Joost; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Graell, Montserrat; Fraguas, David; Zabala, Arantzazu; Vazquez, Veronica Garcia; Desco, Manuel; Arango, Celso

    2008-01-01

    The regional gray matter volumes of adolescents with first-episode psychosis are compared with those of a control group. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted on 70 patients with early onset FEP and on 51 individuals without FEP. Findings revealed that volume deficits in the left medial frontal gray matter were common in individuals with…

  12. Differential regional gray matter volumes in patients with on-line game addiction and professional gamers

    PubMed Central

    Han, Doug Hyun; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with on-line game addiction (POGA) and professional video game players play video games for extended periods of time, but experience very different consequences for their on-line game play. Brain regions consisting of anterior cingulate, thalamus and occpito-temporal areas may increase the likelihood of becoming a pro-gamer or POGA. Twenty POGA, seventeen pro-gamers, and eighteen healthy comparison subjects (HC) were recruited. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on a 1.5 Tesla Espree MRI scanner (SIEMENS, Erlangen, Germany). Voxel-wise comparisons of gray matter volume were performed between the groups using the two-sample t-test with statistical parametric mapping (SPM5). Compared to HC, the POGA group showed increased impulsiveness and perseverative errors, and volume in left thalamus gray matter, but decreased gray matter volume in both inferior temporal gyri, right middle occipital gyrus, and left inferior occipital gyrus, compared with HC. Pro-gamers showed increased gray matter volume in left cingulate gyrus, but decreased gray matter volume in left middle occipital gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus compared with HC. Additionally, the pro-gamer group showed increased gray matter volume in left cingulate gyrus and decreased left thalamus gray matter volume compared with the POGA group. The current study suggests that increased gray matter volumes of the left cingulate gyrus in pro-gamers and of the left thalamus in POGA may contribute to the different clinical characteristics of pro-gamers and POGA. PMID:22277302

  13. Regional volumes and spatial volumetric distribution of gray matter in the gender dysphoric brain.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Schagen, Sebastian E E; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Veltman, Dick J; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette; Bakker, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The sexual differentiation of the brain is primarily driven by gonadal hormones during fetal development. Leading theories on the etiology of gender dysphoria (GD) involve deviations herein. To examine whether there are signs of a sex-atypical brain development in GD, we quantified regional neural gray matter (GM) volumes in 55 female-to-male and 38 male-to-female adolescents, 44 boys and 52 girls without GD and applied both univariate and multivariate analyses. In girls, more GM volume was observed in the left superior medial frontal cortex, while boys had more volume in the bilateral superior posterior hemispheres of the cerebellum and the hypothalamus. Regarding the GD groups, at whole-brain level they differed only from individuals sharing their gender identity but not from their natal sex. Accordingly, using multivariate pattern recognition analyses, the GD groups could more accurately be automatically discriminated from individuals sharing their gender identity than those sharing their natal sex based on spatially distributed GM patterns. However, region of interest analyses indicated less GM volume in the right cerebellum and more volume in the medial frontal cortex in female-to-males in comparison to girls without GD, while male-to-females had less volume in the bilateral cerebellum and hypothalamus than natal boys. Deviations from the natal sex within sexually dimorphic structures were also observed in the untreated subsamples. Our findings thus indicate that GM distribution and regional volumes in GD adolescents are largely in accordance with their respective natal sex. However, there are subtle deviations from the natal sex in sexually dimorphic structures, which can represent signs of a partial sex-atypical differentiation of the brain. PMID:25720349

  14. Hippocampal gray matter volume in bilateral vestibular failure.

    PubMed

    Göttlich, Martin; Jandl, Nico M; Sprenger, Andreas; Wojak, Jann F; Münte, Thomas F; Krämer, Ulrike M; Helmchen, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Bilateral vestibular failure (BVF) is a severe chronic disorder of the labyrinth or the eighth cranial nerve characterized by unsteadiness of gait and disabling oscillopsia during head movements. According to animal data, vestibular input to the hippocampus is proposed to contribute to spatial memory and spatial navigation. Except for one seminal study showing the association of impaired spatial navigation and hippocampal atrophy, patient data in BVF are lacking. Therefore, we performed a voxel-wise comparison of the hippocampal gray matter volume (GMV) in a clinically representative sample of 27 patients with incomplete BVF and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls to test the hypothesis of hippocampal atrophy in BVF. Although the two groups did not generally differ in their hippocampal GMV, a reduction of GMV in the bilateral hippocampal CA3 region was significantly correlated with increased vestibulopathy-related clinical impairment. We propose that GMV reduction in the hippocampus of BVF patients is related to the severity of vestibular-induced disability which is in line with combined hippocampal atrophy and disorders of spatial navigation in complete vestibular deafferentation due to bilateral nerve section. Clinically, however, the most frequent etiologies of BVF cause incomplete lesions. Accordingly, hippocampus atrophy and deficits in spatial navigation occur possibly less frequently than previously suspected. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1998-2006, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918638

  15. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; et al

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discussmore » the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  16. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  17. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  18. The tunneling universe in scalar tensor theory with matter: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunggeun

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, the wavefunction of the universe with a tunneling boundary condition is considered in the context of the Brans Dicke-type theory with matter. In the \\gamma=0 (matter) case, the action is invariant under the field redefinition which is a sort of generalization of the scale factor duality. The universe undergoes quantum transition from a super-inflationary (pre-big bang) to a deflationary (post-big bang) phase. We calculate the transition rate from the wavefunction by solving the Wheeler DeWitt equation and obtain a non-vanishing value. We learn that for a special value of the Brans Dicke parameter the transition rate grows heavily. From the ten-dimensional string theory point of view this happens when three-dimensional branes (D3-brane) become dominant.

  19. A condensed matter field theory for quantum plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballout, Fouad; Hess, Ortwin

    In recent years plasmonics has advanced to ever decreasing length scales reaching dimensions comparable to the de broglie wavelength of an electron, which has a manifest influence on the plasmon dispersion relation. The associated phenomenology lies beyond the reach of the classical drude free electron theory or its nonlocal extension and adequate models are needed to address the quantum matter aspects of light-matter interaction that are responsible for plasmonicquantum size effects. We present on the basis of the jellium model a quantum field theory of surface-plasmon polaritons in which they emerge as extended objects as a result of an inhomogeneous condensation of bosons around a topological singularity describing the surface. The benefit of this approach lies in relating the electromagnetic fields belonging to such a macroscopic quantum state with the surface topology and nonlocal responsefunction (expressed in terms of the retarded photon self-energy) of the delimited electron gas sustaining that state.

  20. Volume change theory for syringomyelia: A new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Survendra Kumar Rajdeo; Rai, Pooja Survendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The etiopathogenesis of syringomyelia is still an enigma. The authors present a novel theory based on fluid dynamics at the craniovertebral (CV) junction to explain the genesis of syringomyelia (SM). The changes in volume of spinal canal, spinal cord, central canal and spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) in relation to the posterior fossa have been analysed, specifically during postural movements of flexion and extension. The effect of fluctuations in volume of spinal canal and its contents associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics at the CV junction have been postulated to cause the origin and propagation of the syringomyelia. The relevant literature on the subject has been reviewed and the author's theory has been discussed. Conclusion: Volume of spinal canal in flexion is always greater than that in extension. Flexion of spine causes narrowing of the ventral subarachnoid space (SAS) and widening of dorsal SAS while extension causes reverse changes leading to fluid movement in dorsal spinal SAS in flexion and ventral spinal SAS in extension. Cervical and lumbar spinal region with maximum bulk hence maximum area and volume undergo maximum deformation during postural changes. SSS CSF is the difference between the volume of spinal canal and spinal cord, varies in flexion and extension which is compensated by changes in posterior fossa (CSF) volume in normal circumstances. Blocked SAS at foramen magnum donot permit spinal SAS CSF exchange which during postural changes is compensated by cavitatory/cystic (syrinx) change at locations in cervical and lumbar spine with propensity for maximum deformation. Augmentation of posterior fossa volume by decompression helps by normalization of this CSF exchange dynamics but immobilizing the spinal movement theoretically will cease any dynamic volume changes thereby minimizing the destructive influence of the fluid exchange on the cord. Thus, this theory strengthens the rational of treating patients by either

  1. From superstrings theory to the dark matter in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh

    1999-10-25

    Starting from the effective action of the low energy limit of superstrings theory, I find an exact solution of the field equations which geodesics behavie exactly as the trajectories of stars arround of a spiral galaxy. Here dark matter is of dilatonic origin. It is remarkable that the energy density of this space-time is the same as the used by astronomers to model galaxy stability. Some remarks about a universe dominated by dilatons are pointed out.

  2. Black holes with surrounding matter in scalar-tensor theories.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Vitor; Carucci, Isabella P; Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2013-09-13

    We uncover two mechanisms that can render Kerr black holes unstable in scalar-tensor gravity, both associated with the presence of matter in the vicinity of the black hole and the fact that this introduces an effective mass for the scalar. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the structure of spacetime in realistic, astrophysical black holes in scalar-tensor theories. PMID:24074068

  3. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, Volume XVI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    This volume contains essays related to various aspects of higher education, focusing on both educational theory and research. The chapters are: (1) "Apologia pro Vita Mia" (Robert Berdahl); (2) "Varieties of Validity: Quality in Qualitative Research" (Yvonna S. Lincoln); (3) "Academic Freedom and Federal Courts in the 1990s: The Legitimation of…

  4. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume XI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    This volume contains 10 papers on higher education theory and research. "Variation Among Academic Disciplines: Analytical Frameworks and Research" (John M. Braxton and Lowell L. Hargens) reviews work on disciplinary differences and proposed conceptual schemes for explaining these differences. "Public Policy and Public Trust: The Use and Misuse of…

  5. White-matter microstructure and gray-matter volumes in adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Paillère Martinot, M-L; Lemaitre, H; Artiges, E; Miranda, R; Goodman, R; Penttilä, J; Struve, M; Fadai, T; Kappel, V; Poustka, L; Conrod, P; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Büchel, C; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Loth, E; Mann, K; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Schumann, G; Martinot, J-L; L, Reed; S, Williams; A, Lourdusamy; S, Costafreda; A, Cattrell; C, Nymberg; L, Topper; L, Smith; S, Havatzias; K, Stueber; C, Mallik; TK, Clarke; D, Stacey; Wong C, Peng; H, Werts; S, Williams; C, Andrew; S, Desrivieres; S, Zewdie; I, Häke; N, Ivanov; A, Klär; J, Reuter; C, Palafox; C, Hohmann; C, Schilling; K, Lüdemann; A, Romanowski; A, Ströhle; E, Wolff; M, Rapp; R, Brühl; A, Ihlenfeld; B, Walaszek; F, Schubert; C, Connolly; J, Jones; E, Lalor; E, McCabe; A, Ní Shiothcháin; R, Whelan; R, Spanagel; F, Leonardi-Essmann; W, Sommer; S, Vollstaedt-Klein; F, Nees; S, Steiner; M, Buehler; E, Stolzenburg; C, Schmal; F, Schirmbeck; P, Gowland; N, Heym; C, Newman; T, Huebner; S, Ripke; E, Mennigen; K, Muller; V, Ziesch; C, Büchel; U, Bromberg; L, Lueken; J, Yacubian; J, Finsterbusch; N, Bordas; S, de Bournonville; Z, Bricaud; Briand F, Gollier; J, Massicotte; JB, Poline; H, Vulser; Y, Schwartz; C, Lalanne; V, Frouin; B, Thyreau; J, Dalley; A, Mar; N, Subramaniam; D, Theobald; N, Richmond; M, de Rover; A, Molander; E, Jordan; E, Robinson; L, Hipolata; M, Moreno; M, Arroyo; D, Stephens; T, Ripley; H, Crombag; Y, Pena; M, Lathrop; D, Zelenika; S, Heath; D, Lanzerath; B, Heinrichs; T, Spranger; B, Fuchs; C, Speiser; F, Resch; J, Haffner; P, Parzer; R, Brunner; A, Klaassen; I, Klaassen; P, Constant; X, Mignon; T, Thomsen; S, Zysset; A, Vestboe; J, Ireland; J, Rogers

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in white-matter (WM) microstructure, as lower fractional anisotropy (FA), have been reported in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder and in youth at familial risk for bipolarity. We sought to determine whether healthy adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms (SBP) would have early WM microstructural alterations and whether those alterations would be associated with differences in gray-matter (GM) volumes. Forty-two adolescents with three core manic symptoms and no psychiatric diagnosis, and 126 adolescents matched by age and sex, with no psychiatric diagnosis or symptoms, were identified after screening the IMAGEN database of 2223 young adolescents recruited from the general population. After image quality control, voxel-wise statistics were performed on the diffusion parameters using tract-based spatial statistics in 25 SBP adolescents and 77 controls, and on GM and WM images using voxel-based morphometry in 30 SBP adolescents and 106 controls. As compared with healthy controls, adolescents with SBP displayed lower FA values in a number of WM tracts, particularly in the corpus callosum, cingulum, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate fasciculi and corticospinal tracts. Radial diffusivity was mainly higher in posterior parts of bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and right cingulum. As compared with controls, SBP adolescents had lower GM volume in the left anterior cingulate region. This is the first study to investigate WM microstructure and GM morphometric variations in adolescents with SBP. The widespread FA alterations in association and projection tracts, associated with GM changes in regions involved in mood disorders, suggest altered structural connectivity in those adolescents. PMID:23628983

  6. White-matter microstructure and gray-matter volumes in adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms.

    PubMed

    Paillère Martinot, M-L; Lemaitre, H; Artiges, E; Miranda, R; Goodman, R; Penttilä, J; Struve, M; Fadai, T; Kappel, V; Poustka, L; Conrod, P; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Büchel, C; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Loth, E; Mann, K; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Schumann, G; Martinot, J-L

    2014-04-01

    Abnormalities in white-matter (WM) microstructure, as lower fractional anisotropy (FA), have been reported in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder and in youth at familial risk for bipolarity. We sought to determine whether healthy adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms (SBP) would have early WM microstructural alterations and whether those alterations would be associated with differences in gray-matter (GM) volumes. Forty-two adolescents with three core manic symptoms and no psychiatric diagnosis, and 126 adolescents matched by age and sex, with no psychiatric diagnosis or symptoms, were identified after screening the IMAGEN database of 2223 young adolescents recruited from the general population. After image quality control, voxel-wise statistics were performed on the diffusion parameters using tract-based spatial statistics in 25 SBP adolescents and 77 controls, and on GM and WM images using voxel-based morphometry in 30 SBP adolescents and 106 controls. As compared with healthy controls, adolescents with SBP displayed lower FA values in a number of WM tracts, particularly in the corpus callosum, cingulum, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate fasciculi and corticospinal tracts. Radial diffusivity was mainly higher in posterior parts of bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and right cingulum. As compared with controls, SBP adolescents had lower GM volume in the left anterior cingulate region. This is the first study to investigate WM microstructure and GM morphometric variations in adolescents with SBP. The widespread FA alterations in association and projection tracts, associated with GM changes in regions involved in mood disorders, suggest altered structural connectivity in those adolescents. PMID:23628983

  7. Effective field theory of dark matter from membrane inflationary paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we have studied the cosmological and particle physics constraints on dark matter relic abundance from effective field theory of inflation from tensor-to-scalar ratio (r), in case of Randall-Sundrum single membrane (RSII) paradigm. Using semi-analytical approach we establish a direct connection between the dark matter relic abundance (ΩDMh2) and primordial gravity waves (r), which establishes a precise connection between inflation and generation of dark matter within the framework of effective field theory in RSII membrane. Further assuming the UV completeness of the effective field theory perfectly holds good in the prescribed framework, we have explicitly shown that the membrane tension, σ ≤ O(10-9) Mp4, bulk mass scale M5 ≤ O(0.04 - 0.05) Mp, and cosmological constant Λ˜5 ≥ - O(10-15) Mp5, in RSII membrane plays the most significant role to establish the connection between dark matter and inflation, using which we have studied the features of various mediator mass scale suppressed effective field theory "relevant operators" induced from the localized s, t and u channel interactions in RSII membrane. Taking a completely model independent approach, we have studied an exhaustive list of tree-level Feynman diagrams for dark matter annihilation within the prescribed setup and to check the consistency of the obtained results, further we apply the constraints as obtained from recently observed Planck 2015 data and Planck + BICEP2 + Keck Array joint data sets. Using all of these derived results we have shown that to satisfy the bound on, ΩDMh2 = 0.1199 ± 0.0027, as from Planck 2015 data, it is possible to put further stringent constraint on r within, 0.01 ≤ r ≤ 0.12, for thermally averaged annihilation cross-section of dark matter, < σv > ≈ O(10-28 - 10-27) cm3 / s, which are very useful to constrain various membrane inflationary models.

  8. Superconformal Chern-Simons-matter theories in N =4 superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Samsonov, Igor B.

    2015-11-01

    In three dimensions, every known N =4 supermultiplet has an off-shell completion. However, there is no off-shell N =4 formulation for the known extended superconformal Chern-Simons (CS) theories with eight and more supercharges. To achieve a better understanding of this issue, we provide N =4 superfield realizations for the equations of motion which correspond to various N =4 and N =6 superconformal CS theories, including the Gaiotto-Witten theory and the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) theory. These superfield realizations demonstrate that the superconformal CS theories with N ≥4 (except for the Gaiotto-Witten theory) require a reducible long N =4 vector multiplet, from which the standard left and right N =4 vector multiplets are obtained by constraining the field strength to be either self-dual or antiself-dual. Such a long multiplet naturally originates upon reduction of any off-shell N >4 vector multiplet to N =4 superspace. For the long N =4 vector multiplet we develop a prepotential formulation. It makes use of two prepotentials being subject to the constraint which defines the so-called hybrid projective multiplets introduced in the framework of N =4 supergravity-matter systems in arXiv:1101.4013. We also couple N =4 superconformal CS theories to N =4 conformal supergravity.

  9. Structure of matter, radioactivity, and nuclear fission. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes structure of matter (what is matter, forces holding atoms together, visualizing the atom, the chemical elements, atomic symbols, isotopes, radiation from the atom), radioactivity (what holds the nucleus together, can one element change into another element, radiation from the nucleus, half-life, chart of the nuclides), and nuclear fission (nuclear energy release, the fission process, where does fission energy go, radiation and radioactivity resulting from fission).

  10. Altered Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in College Students with Mobile Phone Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongming; Zou, Zhiling; Song, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaodan; Wang, Huijun; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Huang, Xiting

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone dependence (MPD) is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter (WM) integrity [four indices: fractional anisotropy (FA); mean diffusivity (MD); axial diffusivity (AD); and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female) were enrolled and separated into two groups [MPD group, N = 34; control group (CG), N = 34] based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI) scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG), right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG), and bilateral thalamus (Thal). In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of WM integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH). Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with mobile phone overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation to other behavioral and substance addiction disorders. PMID:27199831

  11. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  12. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  13. Towards a quantitative kinetic theory of polar active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, T.

    2014-06-01

    A recent kinetic approach for Vicsek-like models of active particles is reviewed. The theory is based on an exact Chapman- Kolmogorov equation in phase space. It can handle discrete time dynamics and "exotic" multi-particle interactions. A nonlocal mean-field theory for the one-particle distribution function is obtained by assuming molecular chaos. The Boltzmann approach of Bertin, et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 022101 (2006) and J. Phys. A 42, 445001 (2009), is critically assessed and compared to the current approach. In Boltzmann theory, a collision starts when two particles enter each others action spheres and is finished when their distance exceeds the interaction radius. The average duration of such a collision, τ0, is measured for the Vicsek model with continuous time-evolution. If the noise is chosen to be close to the flocking threshold, the average time between collisions is found to be roughly equal to τ0 at low densities. Thus, the continuous-time Vicsek-model near the flocking threshold cannot be accurately described by a Boltzmann equation, even at very small density because collisions take so long that typically other particles join in, rendering Boltzmann's binary collision assumption invalid. Hydrodynamic equations for the phase space approach are derived by means of a Chapman-Enskog expansion. The equations are compared to the Toner-Tu theory of polar active matter. New terms, absent in the Toner-Tu theory, are highlighted. Convergence problems of Chapman-Enskog and similar gradient expansions are discussed.

  14. Jet Definitions in Effective Field Theory and Decaying Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, William Man Yin

    2012-06-01

    In this thesis jet production and cosmological constraints on decaying dark matter are studied. The powerful framework of effective field theory is applied in both cases to further our knowledge of particle physics. We first discuss how to apply the Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) for calculating hadronic jet production rate. By applying SCET power counting, we develop a consistent approach to perform phase space integrations. This approach is then successfully applied to one-loop calculations with regard to a variety of jet algorithms. This allows us to study if the soft contribution can be factorized from the collinear ones. In particular we point out the connection between such factorization and the choice of ultraviolet regulator. We then further our study of the (exclusive) kT and C/A jet algorithms in SCET with the introduction of an additional regulator. Regularizing the virtualities and rapidities of graphs in SCET, we are able to write the next-to-leading-order dijet cross section as the product of separate hard, jet, and soft contributions. We show how to reproduce the Sudakov form factor to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy previously calculated by the coherent branching formalism. Our resummed expression only depends on the renormalization group evolution of the hard function, rather than on that of the hard and jet functions as is usual in SCET. Finally we present a complete analysis of the cosmological constraints on decaying dark matter. For this, we have updated and extended previous analyses to include Lyman-alpha forest, large scale structure, and weak lensing observations. Astrophysical constraints are not considered in this thesis. The bounds on the lifetime of decaying dark matter are dominated by either the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect for the scenario with weak reionization, or CMB polarisation observations when there is significant reionization. For the respective scenarios, the lifetimes for decaying dark matter are

  15. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Katz, S. D.; Lellouch, L.; Portelli, A.; Szabo, K. K.; Toth, B. C.

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  16. Wormholes without exotic matter in Einstein-Cartan theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Galiakhmetov, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study the possible existence of static traversable wormholes without invoking exotic matter in the framework of the Einstein--Cartan theory. A family of exact static, spherically symmetric wormhole solutions with an arbitrary throat radius, with flat or AdS asymptotic behavior, has been obtained with sources in the form of two noninteracting scalar fields with nonzero potentials. Both scalar fields are canonical (that is, satisfy the weak energy condition), one is minimally and the other nonminimally coupled to gravity, and the latter is a source of torsion.

  17. Determination of partial molar volumes from free energy perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-04-01

    Partial molar volume is an important thermodynamic property that gives insights into molecular size and intermolecular interactions in solution. Theoretical frameworks for determining the partial molar volume (V°) of a solvated molecule generally apply Scaled Particle Theory or Kirkwood-Buff theory. With the current abilities to perform long molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, more direct methods are gaining popularity, such as computing V° directly as the difference in computed volume from two simulations, one with a solute present and another without. Thermodynamically, V° can also be determined as the pressure derivative of the free energy of solvation in the limit of infinite dilution. Both approaches are considered herein with the use of free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations to compute the necessary free energies of solvation at elevated pressures. Absolute and relative partial molar volumes are computed for benzene and benzene derivatives using the OPLS-AA force field. The mean unsigned error for all molecules is 2.8 cm(3) mol(-1). The present methodology should find use in many contexts such as the development and testing of force fields for use in computer simulations of organic and biomolecular systems, as a complement to related experimental studies, and to develop a deeper understanding of solute-solvent interactions. PMID:25589343

  18. Matter-enhanced transition probabilities in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Kenzo Tobita, Yutaka

    2014-05-15

    The relativistic quantum field theory is the unique theory that combines the relativity and quantum theory and is invariant under the Poincaré transformation. The ground state, vacuum, is singlet and one particle states are transformed as elements of irreducible representation of the group. The covariant one particles are momentum eigenstates expressed by plane waves and extended in space. Although the S-matrix defined with initial and final states of these states hold the symmetries and are applied to isolated states, out-going states for the amplitude of the event that they are detected at a finite-time interval T in experiments are expressed by microscopic states that they interact with, and are surrounded by matters in detectors and are not plane waves. These matter-induced effects modify the probabilities observed in realistic situations. The transition amplitudes and probabilities of the events are studied with the S-matrix, S[T], that satisfies the boundary condition at T. Using S[T], the finite-size corrections of the form of 1/T are found. The corrections to Fermi’s golden rule become larger than the original values in some situations for light particles. They break Lorentz invariance even in high energy region of short de Broglie wave lengths. -- Highlights: •S-matrix S[T] for the finite-time interval in relativistic field theory. •S[T] satisfies the boundary condition and gives correction of 1/T . •The large corrections for light particles breaks Lorentz invariance. •The corrections have implications to neutrino experiments.

  19. Examining the effect of psychopathic traits on gray matter volume in a community substance abuse sample

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Lora M.; Shane, Matthew S.; Segall, Judith M.; Nyalakanti, Prashanth K.; Stevens, Michael C.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2012-01-01

    Psychopathy is believed to be associated with brain abnormalities in both paralimbic (i.e., orbitofrontal cortex, insula, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, posterior cingulate) and limbic (i.e., amygdala, hippocampus, anterior cingulate) regions. Recent structural imaging studies in both community and prison samples are beginning to support this view. Sixty six participants, recruited from community corrections centers, were administered the Hare Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL R), and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel based morphometry was used to test the hypothesis that psychopathic traits would be associated with gray matter reductions in limbic and paralimbic regions. Effects of lifetime drug and alcohol use on gray matter volume were covaried. Psychopathic traits were negatively associated with gray matter volumes in right insula and right hippocampus. Additionally, psychopathic traits were positively associated with gray matter volumes in bilateral orbital frontal cortex and right anterior cingulate. Exploratory regression analyses indicated that gray matter volumes within right hippocampus and left orbital frontal cortex combined to explain 21.8% of the variance in psychopathy scores. These results support the notion that psychopathic traits are associated with abnormal limbic and paralimbic gray matter volume. Furthermore, gray matter increases in areas shown to be functionally impaired suggests that the structure function relationship may be more nuanced than previously thought. PMID:23217577

  20. Cannabis, Cigarettes, and Their Co-Occurring Use: Disentangling Differences in Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Kanchana; Hager, Nathan; Childress, Anna Rose; Rao, Hengyi; Franklin, Teresa R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Structural magnetic resonance imaging techniques are powerful tools for examining the effects of drug use on the brain. The nicotine and cannabis literature has demonstrated differences between nicotine cigarette smokers and cannabis users compared to controls in brain structure; however, less is known about the effects of co-occurring cannabis and tobacco use. Methods: We used voxel-based morphometry to examine gray matter volume differences between four groups: (1) cannabis-dependent individuals who do not smoke tobacco (Cs); (2) cannabis-dependent individuals who smoke tobacco (CTs); (3) cannabis-naïve, nicotine-dependent individuals who smoke tobacco (Ts); and (4) healthy controls (HCs). We also explored associations between gray matter volume and measures of cannabis and tobacco use. Results: A significant group effect was observed in the left putamen, thalamus, right precentral gyrus, and left cerebellum. Compared to HCs, the Cs, CTs, and Ts exhibited larger gray matter volumes in the left putamen. Cs also had larger gray matter volume than HCs in the right precentral gyrus. Cs and CTs exhibited smaller gray matter volume than HCs in the thalamus, and CTs and Ts had smaller left cerebellar gray matter volume than HCs. Conclusions: This study extends previous research that independently examined the effects of cannabis or tobacco use on brain structure by including an examination of co-occurring cannabis and tobacco use, and provides evidence that cannabis and tobacco exposure are associated with alterations in brain regions associated with addiction. PMID:26045474

  1. Voxel-based morphometry reveals reduced grey matter volume in the temporal cortex of developmental prosopagnosics

    PubMed Central

    Furl, Nicholas; Draganski, Bogdan; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Stevens, John; Tan, Geoffrey Chern-Yee; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Ray J.; Duchaine, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia exhibit severe and lasting difficulties in recognizing faces despite the absence of apparent brain abnormalities. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate whether developmental prosopagnosics show subtle neuroanatomical differences from controls. An analysis based on segmentation of T1-weighted images from 17 developmental prosopagnosics and 18 matched controls revealed that they had reduced grey matter volume in the right anterior inferior temporal lobe and in the superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus bilaterally. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry analysis based on the segmentation of magnetization transfer parameter maps showed that developmental prosopagnosics also had reduced grey matter volume in the right middle fusiform gyrus and the inferior temporal gyrus. Multiple regression analyses relating three distinct behavioural component scores, derived from a principal component analysis, to grey matter volume revealed an association between a component related to facial identity and grey matter volume in the left superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus plus the right middle fusiform gyrus/inferior temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume in the lateral occipital cortex was associated with component scores related to object recognition tasks. Our results demonstrate that developmental prosopagnosics have reduced grey matter volume in several regions known to respond selectively to faces and provide new evidence that integrity of these areas relates to face recognition ability. PMID:19887506

  2. Reduced gray matter volume in psychotic disorder patients with a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Julia M; Williams, Lisa E; Woodward, Neil D; Heckers, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with smaller gray matter volume, similar to the pattern seen in psychotic disorders. We explored the relationship between childhood abuse, psychosis, and brain volume in a group of 60 individuals with a psychotic disorder and 26 healthy control subjects. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to quantify gray and white matter volume and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) to measure childhood abuse. Within the psychotic disorder group, total gray matter volume was inversely correlated with the severity of childhood sexual abuse (r=-.34, p=.008), but not the other types of abuse. When the 24 patients with sexual abuse were compared with demographically matched samples of 23 patients without sexual abuse and 26 control subjects, only patients with a history of sexual abuse had reduced total gray matter volume (t(48)=2.3, p=.03; Cohen's d=.63). Voxel-based analysis revealed a cluster in the prefrontal cortex where volume was negatively correlated with sexual abuse severity. Voxel based comparison of the three matched groups revealed a similar pattern of results, with widespread reductions in psychosis patients with sexual abuse relative to controls that were not found in psychosis patients without sexual abuse. These findings indicate that some of the variance of gray matter volume in psychotic disorders can be explained by a history of sexual abuse. PMID:23178105

  3. Volume changes and brain-behavior relationships in white matter and subcortical gray matter in children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Prapti; Lebel, Catherine; Narr, Katherine L; Mattson, Sarah N; May, Philip A; Adnams, Colleen M; Riley, Edward P; Jones, Kenneth L; Kan, Eric C; Sowell, Elizabeth R

    2015-06-01

    Children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) may have cognitive, behavioral and brain abnormalities. Here, we compare rates of white matter and subcortical gray matter volume change in PAE and control children, and examine relationships between annual volume change and arithmetic ability, behavior, and executive function. Participants (n = 75 PAE/64 control; age: 7.1-15.9 years) each received two structural magnetic resonance scans, ~2 years apart. Assessments included Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), the Child Behavior Checklist and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function. Subcortical white and gray volumes were extracted for each hemisphere. Group volume differences were tested using false discovery rate (q < 0.05). Analyses examined group-by-age interactions and group-score interactions for correlations between change in volume and raw behavioral scores. Results showed that subjects with PAE had smaller volumes than control subjects across the brain. Significant group-score interactions were found in temporal and parietal regions for WISC arithmetic scores and in frontal and parietal regions for behavioral measures. Poorer cognitive/ behavioral outcomes were associated with larger volume increases in PAE, while control subjects generally showed no significant correlations. In contrast with previous results demonstrating different trajectories of cortical volume change in PAE, our results show similar rates of subcortical volume growth in subjects with PAE and control subjects. We also demonstrate abnormal brain-behavior relationships in subjects with PAE, suggesting different use of brain resources. Our results are encouraging in that, due to the stable volume differences, there may be an extended window of opportunity for intervention in children with PAE. PMID:25711175

  4. Hot and dense matter beyond relativistic mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Prakash, Madappa

    2016-05-01

    Properties of hot and dense matter are calculated in the framework of quantum hadrodynamics by including contributions from two-loop (TL) diagrams arising from the exchange of isoscalar and isovector mesons between nucleons. Our extension of mean field theory (MFT) employs the same five density-independent coupling strengths which are calibrated using the empirical properties at the equilibrium density of isospin-symmetric matter. Results of calculations from the MFT and TL approximations are compared for conditions of density, temperature, and proton fraction encountered in the study of core-collapse supernovae, young and old neutron stars, and mergers of compact binary stars. The TL results for the equation of state (EOS) of cold pure neutron matter at sub- and near-nuclear densities agree well with those of modern quantum Monte Carlo and effective field-theoretical approaches. Although the high-density EOS in the TL approximation for cold and β -equilibrated neutron-star matter is substantially softer than its MFT counterpart, it is able to support a 2 M⊙ neutron star required by recent precise determinations. In addition, radii of 1.4 M⊙ stars are smaller by ˜1 km than those obtained in MFT and lie in the range indicated by analysis of astronomical data. In contrast to MFT, the TL results also give a better account of the single-particle or optical potentials extracted from analyses of medium-energy proton-nucleus and heavy-ion experiments. In degenerate conditions, the thermal variables are well reproduced by results of Landau's Fermi-liquid theory in which density-dependent effective masses feature prominently. The ratio of the thermal components of pressure and energy density expressed as Γth=1 +(Pth/ɛth) , often used in astrophysical simulations, exhibits a stronger dependence on density than on proton fraction and temperature in both MFT and TL calculations. The prominent peak of Γth at supranuclear density found in MFT is, however, suppressed in

  5. Elasticity of microscale volumes of viscoelastic soft matter by cavitation rheometry

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovsky, Leonid; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the elastic modulus of soft, viscoelastic liquids with cavitation rheometry is demonstrated for specimens as small as 1 μl by application of elasticity theory and experiments on semi-dilute polymer solutions. Cavitation rheometry is the extraction of the elastic modulus of a material, E, by measuring the pressure necessary to create a cavity within it [J. A. Zimberlin, N. Sanabria-DeLong, G. N. Tew, and A. J. Crosby, Soft Matter 3, 763–767 (2007)]. This paper extends cavitation rheometry in three ways. First, we show that viscoelastic samples can be approximated with the neo-Hookean model provided that the time scale of the cavity formation is measured. Second, we extend the cavitation rheometry method to accommodate cases in which the sample size is no longer large relative to the cavity dimension. Finally, we implement cavitation rheometry to show that the theory accurately measures the elastic modulus of viscoelastic samples with volumes ranging from 4 ml to as low as 1 μl. PMID:25316925

  6. Elasticity of microscale volumes of viscoelastic soft matter by cavitation rheometry.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Leonid; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-09-15

    Measurement of the elastic modulus of soft, viscoelastic liquids with cavitation rheometry is demonstrated for specimens as small as 1 μl by application of elasticity theory and experiments on semi-dilute polymer solutions. Cavitation rheometry is the extraction of the elastic modulus of a material, E, by measuring the pressure necessary to create a cavity within it [J. A. Zimberlin, N. Sanabria-DeLong, G. N. Tew, and A. J. Crosby, Soft Matter 3, 763-767 (2007)]. This paper extends cavitation rheometry in three ways. First, we show that viscoelastic samples can be approximated with the neo-Hookean model provided that the time scale of the cavity formation is measured. Second, we extend the cavitation rheometry method to accommodate cases in which the sample size is no longer large relative to the cavity dimension. Finally, we implement cavitation rheometry to show that the theory accurately measures the elastic modulus of viscoelastic samples with volumes ranging from 4 ml to as low as 1 μl. PMID:25316925

  7. Alterations in white matter volume and integrity in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Ijzerman, Richard G; Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Veltman, Dick J; van Duinkerken, Eelco

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by obesity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Both T2DM and obesity are associated with cerebral complications, including an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, however the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the current study, we aimed to determine the relative contributions of obesity and the presence of T2DM to altered white matter structure. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to measure white matter integrity and volume in obese T2DM patients without micro- or macrovascular complications, age- gender- and BMI-matched normoglycemic obese subjects and age- and gender-matched normoglycemic lean subjects. We found that obese T2DM patients compared with lean subjects had lower axial diffusivity (in the right corticospinal tract, right inferior fronto-occipital tract, right superior longitudinal fasciculus and right forceps major) and reduced white matter volume (in the right inferior parietal lobe and the left external capsule region). In normoglycemic obese compared with lean subjects axial diffusivity as well as white matter volume tended to be reduced, whereas there were no significant differences between normoglycemic obese subjects and T2DM patients. Decreased white matter integrity and volume were univariately related to higher age, being male, higher BMI, HbA1C and fasting glucose and insulin levels. However, multivariate analyses demonstrated that only BMI was independently related to white matter integrity, and age, gender and BMI to white matter volume loss. Our data indicate that obese T2DM patients have reduced white matter integrity and volume, but that this is largely explained by BMI, rather than T2DM per se. PMID:26815786

  8. Female Adolescents with Severe Substance and Conduct Problems Have Substantially Less Brain Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Dalwani, Manish S.; McMahon, Mary Agnes; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Young, Susan E.; Regner, Michael F.; Raymond, Kristen M.; McWilliams, Shannon K.; Banich, Marie T.; Tanabe, Jody L.; Crowley, Thomas J; Sakai, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Structural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated lower regional gray matter volume in adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems. These research studies, including ours, have generally focused on male-only or mixed-sex samples of adolescents with conduct and/or substance problems. Here we compare gray matter volume between female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems and female healthy controls of similar ages. Hypotheses: Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems will show significantly less gray matter volume in frontal regions critical to inhibition (i.e. dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex), conflict processing (i.e., anterior cingulate), valuation of expected outcomes (i.e., medial orbitofrontal cortex) and the dopamine reward system (i.e. striatum). Methods We conducted whole-brain voxel-based morphometric comparison of structural MR images of 22 patients (14-18 years) with severe substance and conduct problems and 21 controls of similar age using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and voxel-based morphometric (VBM8) toolbox. We tested group differences in regional gray matter volume with analyses of covariance, adjusting for age and IQ at p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons at whole-brain cluster-level threshold. Results Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems compared to controls showed significantly less gray matter volume in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, medial orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, bilateral somatosensory cortex, left supramarginal gyrus, and bilateral angular gyrus. Considering the entire brain, patients had 9.5% less overall gray matter volume compared to controls. Conclusions Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems in comparison to similarly aged female healthy controls showed substantially lower gray matter volume in brain regions involved in

  9. Precision Higgs Physics, Effective Field Theory, and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Brian Quinn

    The recent discovery of the Higgs boson calls for detailed studies of its properties. As precision measurements are indirect probes of new physics, the appropriate theoretical framework is effective field theory. In the first part of this thesis, we present a practical three-step procedure of using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on the UV model concerned. We give a detailed explanation for calculating the effective action up to one-loop order in a manifestly gauge covariant fashion. The covariant derivative expansion dramatically simplifies the process of matching a UV model with the SM EFT, and also makes available a universal formalism that is easy to use for a variety of UV models. A few general aspects of renormalization group running effects and choosing operator bases are discussed. Finally, we provide mapping results between the bosonic sector of the SM EFT and a complete set of precision electroweak and Higgs observables to which present and near future experiments are sensitive. With a detailed understanding of how to use the SM EFT, we then turn to applications and study in detail two well-motivated test cases. The first is singlet scalar field that enables the first-order electroweak phase transition for baryogenesis; the second example is due to scalar tops in the MSSM. We find both Higgs and electroweak measurements are sensitive probes of these cases. The second part of this thesis centers around dark matter, and consists of two studies. In the first, we examine the effects of relic dark matter annihilations on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The magnitude of these effects scale simply with the dark matter mass and annihilation cross-section, which we derive. Estimates based on these scaling behaviors indicate that BBN severely constrains hadronic and radiative dark

  10. Effective Field Theories for Hot and Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.

    2010-10-01

    The lecture is divided in two parts. The first one deals with an introduction to the physics of hot, dense many-particle systems in quantum field theory [1, 2]. The basics of the path integral approach to the partition function are explained for the example of chiral quark models. The QCD phase diagram is discussed in the meanfield approximation while QCD bound states in the medium are treated in the rainbow-ladder approximation (Gaussian fluctuations). Special emphasis is devoted to the discussion of the Mott effect, i.e. the transition of bound states to unbound, but resonant scattering states in the continnum under the influence of compression and heating of the system. Three examples are given: (1) the QCD model phase diagram with chiral symmetry ¨ restoration and color superconductivity [3], (2) the Schrodinger equation for heavy-quarkonia [4], and (2) Pions [5] as well as Kaons and D-mesons in the finite-temperature Bethe-Salpeter equation [6]. We discuss recent applications of this quantum field theoretical approach to hot and dense quark matter for a description of anomalous J/ψ supression in heavy-ion collisions [7] and for the structure and cooling of compact stars with quark matter interiors [8]. The second part provides a detailed introduction to the Polyakov-loop Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model [9] for thermodynamics and mesonic correlations [10] in the phase diagram of quark matter. Important relationships of low-energy QCD like the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation are generalized to finite temperatures. The effect of including the coupling to the Polyakov-loop potential on the phase diagram and mesonic correlations is discussed. An outlook is given to effects of nonlocality of the interactions [11] and of mesonic correlations in the medium [12] which go beyond the meanfield description.

  11. Warm dark matter in low scale left-right theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran; Zhang, Yue E-mail: goran@ictp.it

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the viability of having dark matter in the minimal left-right symmetric theory. We find the lightest right-handed neutrino with a mass around keV as the only viable candidate consistent with a TeV scale of left-right symmetry. In order to account for the correct relic density with such low scales, the thermal overproduction of the dark matter in the early universe is compensated by a sufficient late entropy production due to late decay of heavier right-handed neutrinos. We point out that the presence of the right-handed charge-current interactions, operative around the QCD phase transition, has a crucial impact on the amount of dilution, as does the nature of the phase transition itself. A careful numerical study, employing the Boltzmann equations, reveals the existence of a narrow window for the right-handed gauge boson mass, possibly within the reach of LHC (in disagreement with a previous study). We also elaborate on a variety of astrophysical, cosmological and low energy constraints on this scenario.

  12. A dual formulation of supergravity-matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butter, Daniel; Kuzenko, Sergei M.

    2012-01-01

    Generating supersymmetric AdS solutions in non-minimal supergravity in four dimensions is notoriously difficult. Indeed, it is a longstanding lore that such solutions exist only for old minimal supergravity. In this paper, we construct a dual formulation for general N=1 supergravity-matter systems that avoids the problem. In the case of pure supergravity without a cosmological constant, it coincides with the usual non-minimal (n=-1) supergravity, but in the presence of matter (or a cosmological constant) our formulation differs considerably. We also elaborate upon the framework of conformal superspace and the compensator method as applied to our theory. In particular, we show that one can encode the details of the Kähler potential and superpotential entirely within the geometry of superspace so that the general sigma-model action is encoded in a single compact term: the supervolume. Finally, we discuss the issue of supercurrents and propose a general form for the supercurrent in AdS.

  13. Aging and large-scale functional networks: white matter integrity, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, L; Williams, M; Rich, A; Savage, G; Burianová, H

    2015-04-01

    Healthy aging is accompanied by neurobiological changes that affect the brain's functional organization and the individual's cognitive abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of global age-related differences in the cortical white and gray matter on neural activity in three key large-scale networks. We used functional-structural covariance network analysis to assess resting state activity in the default mode network (DMN), the fronto-parietal network (FPN), and the salience network (SN) of young and older adults. We further related this functional activity to measures of cortical thickness and volume derived from structural MRI, as well as to measures of white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], and radial diffusivity [RD]) derived from diffusion-weighted imaging. First, our results show that, in the direct comparison of resting state activity, young but not older adults reliably engage the SN and FPN in addition to the DMN, suggesting that older adults recruit these networks less consistently. Second, our results demonstrate that age-related decline in white matter integrity and gray matter volume is associated with activity in prefrontal nodes of the SN and FPN, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms. We suggest that age-related differences in gray and white matter properties differentially affect the ability of the brain to engage and coordinate large-scale functional networks that are central to efficient cognitive functioning. PMID:25644420

  14. Automated White Matter Total Lesion Volume Segmentation in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maldjian, J.A.; Whitlow, C.T.; Saha, B.N.; Kota, G.; Vandergriff, C.; Davenport, E.M.; Divers, J.; Freedman, B.I.; Bowden, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose WM lesion segmentation is often performed with the use of subjective rating scales because manual methods are laborious and tedious; however, automated methods are now available. We compared the performance of total lesion volume grading computed by use of an automated WM lesion segmentation algorithm with that of subjective rating scales and expert manual segmentation in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods Structural T1 and FLAIR MR imaging data from 50 subjects with diabetes (age, 67.7 ± 7.2 years) and 50 nondiabetic sibling pairs (age, 67.5 ± 9.4 years) were evaluated in an institutional review board–approved study. WM lesion segmentation maps and total lesion volume were generated for each subject by means of the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) Lesion Segmentation Toolbox. Subjective WM lesion grade was determined by means of a 0–9 rating scale by 2 readers. Ground-truth total lesion volume was determined by means of manual segmentation by experienced readers. Correlation analyses compared manual segmentation total lesion volume with automated and subjective evaluation methods. Results Correlation between average lesion segmentation and ground-truth total lesion volume was 0.84. Maximum correlation between the Lesion Segmentation Toolbox and ground-truth total lesion volume (ρ = 0.87) occurred at the segmentation threshold of k = 0.25, whereas maximum correlation between subjective lesion segmentation and the Lesion Segmentation Toolbox (ρ = 0.73) occurred at k = 0.15. The difference between the 2 correlation estimates with ground-truth was not statistically significant. The lower segmentation threshold (0.15 versus 0.25) suggests that subjective raters overestimate WM lesion burden. Conclusions We validate the Lesion Segmentation Toolbox for determining total lesion volume in diabetes-enriched populations and compare it with a common subjective WM lesion rating scale. The Lesion Segmentation

  15. Comparison of gray matter volume and thickness for analysis of cortical changes in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachao; Li, Ziyi; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wang, Zhiqun; Li, Kunchen; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2011-03-01

    Gray matter volume and cortical thickness are two indices of concern in brain structure magnetic resonance imaging research. Gray matter volume reflects mixed-measurement information of cerebral cortex, while cortical thickness reflects only the information of distance between inner surface and outer surface of cerebral cortex. Using Scaled Subprofile Modeling based on Principal Component Analysis (SSM_PCA) and Pearson's Correlation Analysis, this study further provided quantitative comparisons and depicted both global relevance and local relevance to comprehensively investigate morphometrical abnormalities in cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thirteen patients with AD and thirteen age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Results showed that factor scores from the first 8 principal components accounted for ~53.38% of the total variance for gray matter volume, and ~50.18% for cortical thickness. Factor scores from the fifth principal component showed significant correlation. In addition, gray matter voxel-based volume was closely related to cortical thickness alterations in most cortical cortex, especially, in some typical abnormal brain regions such as insula and the parahippocampal gyrus in AD. These findings suggest that these two measurements are effective indices for understanding the neuropathology in AD. Studies using both gray matter volume and cortical thickness can separate the causes of the discrepancy, provide complementary information and carry out a comprehensive description of the morphological changes of brain structure.

  16. Theory of volume transition in polyelectrolyte gels with charge regularization.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Mitra, Mithun K; Muthukumar, M

    2012-04-01

    We present a theory for polyelectrolyte gels that allow the effective charge of the polymer backbone to self-regulate. Using a variational approach, we obtain an expression for the free energy of gels that accounts for the gel elasticity, free energy of mixing, counterion adsorption, local dielectric constant, electrostatic interaction among polymer segments, electrolyte ion correlations, and self-consistent charge regularization on the polymer strands. This free energy is then minimized to predict the behavior of the system as characterized by the gel volume fraction as a function of external variables such as temperature and salt concentration. We present results for the volume transition of polyelectrolyte gels in salt-free solvents, solvents with monovalent salts, and solvents with divalent salts. The results of our theoretical analysis capture the essential features of existing experimental results and also provide predictions for further experimentation. Our analysis highlights the importance of the self-regularization of the effective charge for the volume transition of gels in particular, and for charged polymer systems in general. Our analysis also enables us to identify the dominant free energy contributions for charged polymer networks and provides a framework for further investigation of specific experimental systems. PMID:22482584

  17. Analysis of Cavity Volumes in Proteins Using Percolation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Sheridan; Jacobs, Donald; Farmer, Jenny

    Molecular packing is studied in a diverse set of globular proteins in their native state ranging in size from 34 to 839 residues An new algorithm has been developed that builds upon the classic Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm for site percolation combined with a local connection criterion that classifies empty space within a protein as a cavity when large enough to hold a spherical shaped probe of radius, R, otherwise a microvoid. Although microvoid cannot fit an object (e.g. molecule or ion) that is the size of the probe or larger, total microvoid volume is a major contribution to protein volume. Importantly, the cavity and microvoid classification depends on probe radius. As probe size decreases, less microvoid forms in favor of more cavities. As probe size is varied from large to small, many disconnected cavities merge to form a percolating path. For fixed probe size, microvoid, cavity and solvent accessible boundary volume properties reflect conformational fluctuations. These results are visualized on three-dimensional structures. Analysis of the cluster statistics within the framework of percolation theory suggests interconversion between microvoid and cavity pathways regulate the dynamics of solvent penetration during partial unfolding events important to protein function.

  18. Theory of volume transition in polyelectrolyte gels with charge regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jing; Mitra, Mithun K.; Muthukumar, M.

    2012-04-01

    We present a theory for polyelectrolyte gels that allow the effective charge of the polymer backbone to self-regulate. Using a variational approach, we obtain an expression for the free energy of gels that accounts for the gel elasticity, free energy of mixing, counterion adsorption, local dielectric constant, electrostatic interaction among polymer segments, electrolyte ion correlations, and self-consistent charge regularization on the polymer strands. This free energy is then minimized to predict the behavior of the system as characterized by the gel volume fraction as a function of external variables such as temperature and salt concentration. We present results for the volume transition of polyelectrolyte gels in salt-free solvents, solvents with monovalent salts, and solvents with divalent salts. The results of our theoretical analysis capture the essential features of existing experimental results and also provide predictions for further experimentation. Our analysis highlights the importance of the self-regularization of the effective charge for the volume transition of gels in particular, and for charged polymer systems in general. Our analysis also enables us to identify the dominant free energy contributions for charged polymer networks and provides a framework for further investigation of specific experimental systems.

  19. Breakfast Staple Types Affect Brain Gray Matter Volume and Cognitive Function in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-01-01

    Childhood diet is important for brain development. Furthermore, the quality of breakfast is thought to affect the cognitive functioning of well-nourished children. To analyze the relationship among breakfast staple type, gray matter volume, and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 290 healthy children, we used magnetic resonance images and applied voxel-based morphometry. We divided subjects into rice, bread, and both groups according to their breakfast staple. We showed that the rice group had a significantly larger gray matter ratio (gray matter volume percentage divided by intracranial volume) and significantly larger regional gray matter volumes of several regions, including the left superior temporal gyrus. The bread group had significantly larger regional gray and white matter volumes of several regions, including the right frontoparietal region. The perceptual organization index (POI; IQ subcomponent) of the rice group was significantly higher than that of the bread group. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, intracranial volume, socioeconomic status, average weekly frequency of having breakfast, and number of side dishes eaten for breakfast. Although several factors may have affected the results, one possible mechanism underlying the difference between the bread and the rice groups may be the difference in the glycemic index (GI) of these two substances; foods with a low GI are associated with less blood-glucose fluctuation than are those with a high GI. Our study suggests that breakfast staple type affects brain gray and white matter volumes and cognitive function in healthy children; therefore, a diet of optimal nutrition is important for brain maturation during childhood and adolescence. PMID:21170334

  20. Projective and volume-preserving bundle structures involved in the formulation of A(4) gauge theories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulp, R. O.; Davis, W. R.; Norris, L. K.

    1986-01-01

    The bundle structures required by volume-preserving and related projective properties are developed and discussed in the context ofA(4) gauge theories which may be taken as the proper framework for Poincaré gauge theories. The results of this paper include methods for extending both tensors and connections to a principal fiber bundle havingG1(4,R)xG1(4,R) as its structure group. This bundle structure is shown to be a natural arena for the generalized (±) covariant differentiation utilized by Einstein for his extended gravitational theories involving nonsymmetric connections. In particular, it is shown that this generalized (±) covariant differentiation is actually a special case of ordinary covariant differentiation with respect to a connection on theG1(4,R) xG1(4,R) bundle. These results are discussed in relation to certain properties of generalized gravitational theories based on a nonsymmetric connection which include the metric affine theories of Hehl et al. and the general requirement that it should be possible to formulate well-defined local conservation laws. In terms of the extended bundle structure considered in this paper, it is found that physically distinct particle number type conservation expressions could exist for certain given types of matter currents.

  1. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  2. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-20

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  3. Late-time cosmological evolution in f (R ) theories with ordinary and collisional matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.; Karagiannakis, N.

    2015-04-01

    We study the late-time cosmological evolution of f(R) theories of modified gravity, with the matter content of the Universe being that of collisional self-interacting matter. We assume that the Universe is described by a flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric and that it is matter and dark energy dominated. The results of our numerical analysis for a collisional matter f(R) theory are compared with those resulting from pressureless matter f(R) theory and from the Λ CDM model. As we shall demonstrate, the resulting picture can vary from model to model, indicating that the effect of collisional matter in f(R) theories is strongly model dependent. In all studied cases, the effective equation of state parameter does not cross the phantom divide, both in the collisional matter and pressureless matter f(R) theories. Finally, we thoroughly study the effects of collisional matter on one of the f(R) models that is known to provide a unified description of early time inflation and late-time acceleration. The overall picture of the evolution of the Universe is not drastically affected, apart from the matter era, which is further enhanced with an additional matter energy contribution. However, a fully consistent description of the Universe’s evolution requires the introduction of a dark energy compensate in the total energy density, a concept very well known from the literature.

  4. Identifying the theory of dark matter with direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Gresham, Moira I.; McDermott, Samuel D.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the true theory of dark matter depends crucially on accurately characterizing interactions of dark matter (DM) with other species. In the context of DM direct detection, we present a study of the prospects for correctly identifying the low-energy effective DM-nucleus scattering operators connected to UV-complete models of DM-quark interactions. We take a census of plausible UV-complete interaction models with different low-energy leading-order DM-nuclear responses. For each model (corresponding to different spin-, momentum-, and velocity-dependent responses), we create a large number of realizations of recoil-energy spectra, and use Bayesian methods to investigate the probability that experiments will be able to select the correct scattering model within a broad set of competing scattering hypotheses. We conclude that agnostic analysis of a strong signal (such as Generation-2 would see if cross sections are just below the current limits) seen on xenon and germanium experiments is likely to correctly identify momentum dependence of the dominant response, ruling out models with either "heavy" or "light" mediators, and enabling downselection of allowed models. However, a unique determination of the correct UV completion will critically depend on the availability of measurements from a wider variety of nuclear targets, including iodine or fluorine. We investigate how model-selection prospects depend on the energy window available for the analysis. In addition, we discuss accuracy of the DM particle mass determination under a wide variety of scattering models, and investigate impact of the specific types of particle-physics uncertainties on prospects for model selection.

  5. Identifying the theory of dark matter with direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gluscevic, Vera; Gresham, Moira I.; McDermott, Samuel D.; Peter, Annika H.G.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-12-29

    Identifying the true theory of dark matter depends crucially on accurately characterizing interactions of dark matter (DM) with other species. In the context of DM direct detection, we present a study of the prospects for correctly identifying the low-energy effective DM-nucleus scattering operators connected to UV-complete models of DM-quark interactions. We take a census of plausible UV-complete interaction models with different low-energy leading-order DM-nuclear responses. For each model (corresponding to different spin–, momentum–, and velocity-dependent responses), we create a large number of realizations of recoil-energy spectra, and use Bayesian methods to investigate the probability that experiments will be able to select the correct scattering model within a broad set of competing scattering hypotheses. We conclude that agnostic analysis of a strong signal (such as Generation-2 would see if cross sections are just below the current limits) seen on xenon and germanium experiments is likely to correctly identify momentum dependence of the dominant response, ruling out models with either “heavy” or “light” mediators, and enabling downselection of allowed models. However, a unique determination of the correct UV completion will critically depend on the availability of measurements from a wider variety of nuclear targets, including iodine or fluorine. We investigate how model-selection prospects depend on the energy window available for the analysis. In addition, we discuss accuracy of the DM particle mass determination under a wide variety of scattering models, and investigate impact of the specific types of particle-physics uncertainties on prospects for model selection.

  6. Externalizing personality traits, empathy, and gray matter volume in healthy young drinkers.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Judith; Dzemidzic, Mario; West, John; Oberlin, Brandon G; Eiler, William J A; Saykin, Andrew J; Kareken, David A

    2016-02-28

    Externalizing psychopathology has been linked to prefrontal abnormalities. While clinically diagnosed subjects show altered frontal gray matter, it is unknown if similar deficits relate to externalizing traits in non-clinical populations. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to retrospectively analyze the cerebral gray matter volume of 176 young adult social to heavy drinkers (mean age=24.0±2.9, male=83.5%) from studies of alcoholism risk. We hypothesized that prefrontal gray matter volume and externalizing traits would be correlated. Externalizing personality trait components-Boredom Susceptibility-Impulsivity (BS/IMP) and Empathy/Low Antisocial Behaviors (EMP/LASB)-were tested for correlations with gray matter partial volume estimates (gmPVE). Significantly large clusters (pFWE<0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected) of gmPVE correlated with EMP/LASB in dorsolateral and medial prefrontal regions, and in occipital cortex. BS/IMP did not correlate with gmPVE, but one scale of impulsivity (Eysenck I7) correlated positively with bilateral inferior frontal/orbitofrontal, and anterior insula gmPVE. In this large sample of community-dwelling young adults, antisocial behavior/low empathy corresponded with reduced prefrontal and occipital gray matter, while impulsivity correlated with increased inferior frontal and anterior insula cortical volume. These findings add to a literature indicating that externalizing personality features involve altered frontal architecture. PMID:26778367

  7. Constraints on dark matter protohalos in effective theories and neutrinophilic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2013-09-01

    The mass of primordial dark matter (DM) protohalos remains unknown. However, the missing satellites problem may be an indication that they are quite large. In this paper, we use effective field theory to map constraints on dark matter-SM interactions into limits on the mass of DM protohalos. Given that leptons remain in the thermal bath until late times, we focus on their interactions with DM. To illustrate the method, we use the null results of LEP missing energy searches along with Fermi-LAT searches for DM annihilation in nearby dwarf galaxies, to derive limits on the protohalo mass, ≲ (10-6 to 10-1) M⊙, with the range depending on the DM mass and the operator. Thus, if DM is to remain thermally coupled until late times and account for the missing satellites, charged lepton interactions are insufficient. This motivates neutrinophilic DM, which can have protohalo masses orders of magnitude larger, with constraints arising from Planck, IceCube and unpublished Super-K data. We show that effective neutrinophilic models offer a viable solution to the missing satellites problem for sub-GeV DM masses with larger than WIMP-sized annihilation cross sections.

  8. Dark matter in ghost-free bigravity theory: From a galaxy scale to the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Katsuki; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2014-12-01

    We study the origin of dark matter based on the ghost-free bigravity theory with twin matter fluids. The present cosmic acceleration can be explained by the existence of graviton mass, while dark matter is required in several cosmological situations (the galactic missing mass, the cosmic structure formation and the cosmic microwave background observation). Assuming that the Compton wavelength of the massive graviton is shorter than a galactic scale, we show the bigravity theory can explain dark matter by twin matter fluid as well as the cosmic acceleration by tuning appropriate coupling constants.

  9. Cognitive subtypes of dyslexia are characterized by distinct patterns of grey matter volume.

    PubMed

    Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Gawron, Natalia; Marchewka, Artur; Heim, Stefan; Grabowska, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The variety of different causal theories together with inconsistencies about the anatomical brain markers emphasize the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia. Attempts were made to test on a behavioral level the existence of subtypes of dyslexia showing distinguishable cognitive deficits. Importantly, no research was directly devoted to the investigation of structural brain correlates of these subtypes. Here, for the first time, we applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to study grey matter volume (GMV) differences in a relatively large sample (n = 46) of dyslexic children split into three subtypes based on the cognitive deficits: phonological, rapid naming, magnocellular/dorsal, and auditory attention shifting. VBM revealed GMV clusters specific for each studied group including areas of left inferior frontal gyrus, cerebellum, right putamen, and bilateral parietal cortex. In addition, using discriminant analysis on these clusters 79% of cross-validated cases were correctly re-classified into four groups (controls vs. three subtypes). Current results indicate that dyslexia may result from distinct cognitive impairments characterized by distinguishable anatomical markers. PMID:23775490

  10. Dark matter, lepton and baryon number, and left-right symmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sudhanwa

    2016-05-01

    A lepto-baryonic left-right symmetric theory is considered along with pointing out stable dark matter candidates whose stability is ensured automatically where leptons and baryons are defined as local gauge symmetries. These theories are generally anomalous, and the possible gauge anomaly free solutions for these theories are presented. It is found that the neutral component of fermion triplets can be a viable dark matter candidate originally introduced for gauge anomaly cancellation. The other dark matter possibilities within this lepto-baryonic left-right symmetric theory are also presented.

  11. Abnormal gray matter and white matter volume in 'Internet gaming addicts'.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Dong, Guangheng; Wang, Qiandong; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is usually defined as the inability of an individual to control his/her use of the Internet with serious negative consequences. It is becoming a prevalent mental health concern around the world. To understand whether Internet gaming addiction contributes to cerebral structural changes, the present study examined the brain gray matter density and white matter density changes in participants suffering IGA using voxel-based morphometric analysis. Compared with the healthy controls (N=36, 22.2 ± 3.13 years), IGA participants (N=35, 22.28 ± 2.54 years) showed significant lower gray matter density in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, left cingulate gyrus, insula, right precuneus, and right hippocampus (all p<0.05). IGA participants also showed significant lower white matter density in the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, amygdala, and anterior cingulate than healthy controls (all p<0.05). Previous studies suggest that these brain regions are involved in decision-making, behavioral inhibition and emotional regulation. Current findings might provide insight in understanding the biological underpinnings of IGA. PMID:25260201

  12. Correlation between Gray/White Matter Volume and Cognition in Healthy Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Wu, Kai; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    This study applied volumetric analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images to assess whether correlations exist between global and regional gray/white matter volume and the cognitive functions of semantic memory and short-term memory, which are relatively well preserved with aging, using MR image data from 109…

  13. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR PARTICULATE MATTER, VOLUMES I-III, (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT, 1995)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is no abstract available for these documents.

    If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the Technical Information Staff at the number listed above.

    • Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter, Volume I, Extern...

    • Normal volumes and microstructural integrity of deep gray matter structures in AQP4+ NMOSD

      PubMed Central

      Heine, Josephine; Pache, Florence; Lacheta, Anna; Borisow, Nadja; Kuchling, Joseph; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Ruprecht, Klemens; Brandt, Alexander U.; Paul, Friedemann

      2016-01-01

      Objective: To assess volumes and microstructural integrity of deep gray matter structures in a homogeneous cohort of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 36 aquaporin-4 antibody-positive (AQP4 Ab-positive) Caucasian patients with NMOSD and healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education. Volumetry of deep gray matter structures (DGM; thalamus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens) was performed using 2 independent automated methods. Microstructural integrity was assessed based on diffusion tensor imaging. Results: Both volumetric analysis methods consistently revealed similar volumes of DGM structures in patients and controls without significant group differences. Moreover, no differences in DGM microstructural integrity were observed between groups. Conclusions: Deep gray matter structures are not affected in AQP4 Ab-positive Caucasian patients with NMOSD. NMOSD imaging studies should be interpreted with respect to Ab status, educational background, and ethnicity of included patients. PMID:27144219

    • Automated segmentation and measurement of global white matter lesion volume in patients with multiple sclerosis.

      PubMed

      Alfano, B; Brunetti, A; Larobina, M; Quarantelli, M; Tedeschi, E; Ciarmiello, A; Covelli, E M; Salvatore, M

      2000-12-01

      A fully automated magnetic resonance (MR) segmentation method for identification and volume measurement of demyelinated white matter has been developed. Spin-echo MR brain scans were performed in 38 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and in 46 healthy subjects. Segmentation of normal tissues and white matter lesions (WML) was obtained, based on their relaxation rates and proton density maps. For WML identification, additional criteria included three-dimensional (3D) lesion shape and surrounding tissue composition. Segmented images were generated, and normal brain tissues and WML volumes were obtained. Sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the method were calculated, using the WML identified by two neuroradiologists as the gold standard. The average volume of "abnormal" white matter in normal subjects (false positive) was 0.11 ml (range 0-0.59 ml). In MS patients the average WML volume was 31.0 ml (range 1.1-132.5 ml), with a sensitivity of 87.3%. In the reproducibility study, the mean SD of WML volumes was 2.9 ml. The procedure appears suitable for monitoring disease changes over time. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2000;12:799-807. PMID:11105017

    • Particulate matter test in small volume parenterals: critical aspects in sampling methodology.

      PubMed

      Pavanetto, F; Conti, B; Genta, I; Ponci, R; Montanari, L; Grassi, M

      1989-06-01

      The following critical steps of the particulate matter test sampling methodology for small volume parenteral products (SVPs), conduct by light blockage method, were considered: 1) reliability of the small volume aspirator sampler for different sample volumes; 2) particulate matter distribution inside each ampoule in liquid products (8 liquid SVPs tested); 3) influence of the sample preparation method on the evaluation of the final contamination of the sample. Nine liquid SVPs were tested by preparing samples following the three U.S.P. XXI methods: 1) unit as it is (direct analysis), II) unit diluted, III) sample obtained by combining several units. Particles counts were performed by a HIAC/ROYCO model 3000 counter fitted with a small volume sampler. The validation of the sampler shows that it should be improved. A more accurate and strict validation than the one stated by U.S.P. XXI is suggested. The particulate matter distribution in liquid products is found to be uniform inside the ampoule in the size range greater than or equal to 2 microns-greater than or equal to 10 microns; the analysis can be performed examining only a portion of the whole content. The three sample preparation methods lead to significantly different contamination results. The particulate control test should be conduct by direct analysis, as it is carried out under the same conditions as for product use. The combining method (III) is suggested for products of less than 2 ml volume that cannot be examined by direct analysis. PMID:2803449

    • BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Poisson, Eric

      2008-10-01

      A superficial introduction to gravitational waves can be found in most textbooks on general relativity, but typically, the treatment hardly does justice to a field that has grown tremendously, both in its theoretical and experimental aspects, in the course of the last twenty years. Other than the technical literature, few other sources have been available to the interested reader; exceptions include edited volumes such as [1] and [2], Weber's little book [3] which happily is still in print, and Peter Saulson's text [4] which appears, unfortunately, to be out of print. In addition to these technical references, the story of gravitational waves was famously told by a sociologist of scientific knowledge [5] (focusing mostly on the experimental aspects) and a historian of science [6] (focusing mostly on the theoretical aspects). The book Gravitational Waves, Volume 1, by Michele Maggiore, is a welcome point of departure. This is, as far as I know, the first comprehensive textbook on gravitational waves. It describes the theoretical foundations of the subject, the known (and anticipated) sources, and the principles of detection by resonant masses and laser interferometers. This book is a major accomplishment, and with the promised volume 2 on astrophysical and cosmological aspects of gravitational waves, the community of all scientists interested in this topic will be well served. Part I of the book is devoted to the theoretical aspects of gravitational waves. In chapter 1 the waves are introduced in usual relativist's fashion, in the context of an approximation to general relativity in which they are treated as a small perturbation of the Minkowski metric of flat spacetime. This is an adequate foundation to study how the waves propagate, and how they interact with freely moving masses making up a detector. The waves are presented in the usual traceless-transverse gauge, but the detection aspects are also worked out in the detector's proper rest frame; this dual

    • Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

      2013-12-01

      Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

    • Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents

      PubMed Central

      Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

      2016-01-01

      A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

    • Parental Praise Correlates with Posterior Insular Cortex Gray Matter Volume in Children and Adolescents.

      PubMed

      Matsudaira, Izumi; Yokota, Susumu; Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

      2016-01-01

      A positive parenting style affects psychological and cognitive development in children. Neuroimaging studies revealed that a positive parenting style influenced brain structure in children. Parental praise is a concrete behavior observed in positive parenting. Although previous psychological studies revealed a positive effect of parental praise on children, little is known about the relationship between parental praise and brain structure in children. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the parental attitude towards praising their child and gray matter volume in the children (116 boys and 109 girls; mean age, 10.6 years old). We examined the correlation between regional gray matter volume and parental praise using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, to confirm the positive effects of parental praise, we analyzed the correlation between the frequency of parental praise and personality traits in children. We showed that the parental attitude towards praising their child was significantly and positively correlated with the gray matter volume of the left posterior insular cortex in children. Moreover, we found a significant positive correlation between parental attitude towards praising their child and the personality traits of conscientiousness and openness to experience in the children. Prior studies said that gray matter volume in the posterior insula was correlated with empathy, and the functional connectivity between this area and the amygdala was associated with emotional regulation. Furthermore, the posterior insula relates to auditory function, and therefore, was likely involved in the processing of parental praise. Considering the possibility of experience-dependent plasticity, frequent parental praise would lead to increased posterior insular gray matter volume in children. Our study is the first to elucidate the relationship between a specific

  1. Processing Speed in Normal Aging: Effects of White Matter Hyperintensities and Hippocampal Volume Loss

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Kathryn V.; Kaplan, Richard F.; Springate, Beth; Moscufo, Nicola; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Guttmann, Charles R.G.; Wolfson, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Changes in cognitive functioning are said to be part of normal aging. Quantitative MRI has made it possible to measure structural brain changes during aging which may underlie these decrements which include slowed information processing and memory loss. Much has been written on white matter hyperintensities (WMH), which are associated with cognitive deficits on tasks requiring processing speed and executive functioning, and hippocampal volume loss, which is associated with memory decline. Here we examine volumetric MRI measures of WMH and hippocampal volume loss together in relation to neuropsychological tests considered to be measures of executive functioning and processing speed in 81 non-demented elderly individuals, aged 75-90. Correlational analysis showed that when controlling for age, both greater WMH volume and smaller hippocampal volume were correlated with slower performances on most tests with the exception of a battery of continuous performance tests in which only WMH was correlated with slower reaction time (RT). We then performed a series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine the independent contributions of greater WMH volume and reduced hippocampal volume to executive functioning and processing speed. The results showed that for the four measures requiring executive functioning and speed of processing, WMH volume and hippocampal volume combined predicted between 21.4 and 37% of the explained variance. These results suggest that WM integrity and hippocampal volume influence cognitive decline independently on tasks involving processing speed and executive function independent of age. PMID:23895570

  2. Reheating-volume measure in the string theory landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-12-15

    I recently proposed the ''reheating-volume'' (RV) prescription as a possible solution to the measure problem in ''multiverse'' cosmology. The goal of this work is to extend the RV measure to scenarios involving bubble nucleation, such as the string theory landscape. In the spirit of the RV prescription, I propose to calculate the distribution of observable quantities in a landscape that is conditioned in probability to nucleate a finite total number of bubbles to the future of an initial bubble. A general formula for the relative number of bubbles of different types can be derived. I show that the RV measure is well defined and independent of the choice of the initial bubble type, as long as that type supports further bubble nucleation. Applying the RV measure to a generic landscape, I find that the abundance of Boltzmann brains is always negligibly small compared with the abundance of ordinary observers in the bubbles of the same type. As an illustration, I present explicit results for a toy landscape containing four vacuum states, and for landscapes with a single high-energy vacuum and a large number of low-energy vacua.

  3. The Particulate Theory of Matter for Preservice Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1992-01-01

    Compared the effects of participation in six extra credit activities for teaching the concept of matter on female preservice elementary school teachers (n=9) to a control group (n=8). Pre- and posttests to assess changes in the students' understanding of phenomena associated with matter indicated significant changes in experimental students'…

  4. Theory review on hadrons in strongly interacting matter

    SciTech Connect

    Leupold, Stefan; Mosel, Ulrich

    2010-12-28

    I will review our present understanding of in-medium changes of the properties of hadrons. Results of calculations for cold (nuclear matter) and for hot (heavy-ion collisions) strongly interacting matter will be discussed. The focus will be on hadrons made out of light quarks, in particular vector mesons and their interrelation to baryonic resonances.

  5. A comprehensive assessment of gray and white matter volumes and their relationship to outcome and severity in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mitelman, Serge A.; Brickman, Adam M.; Shihabuddin, Lina; Newmark, Randall E.; Hazlett, Erin A.; Haznedar, M. Mehmet; Buchsbaum, Monte S.

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary data suggest an association of posterior cortical gray matter reduction with poor outcome in schizophrenia. We made a systematic MRI assessment of regional gray and white matter volumes, parcellated into 40 Brodmann’s areas, in 104 patients with schizophrenia (51 with good outcomes, 53 with poor outcomes) and 41 normal comparison subjects, and investigated correlations of regional morphometry with outcome and severity of the illness. Schizophrenia patients displayed differential reductions in frontal and to a lesser degree temporal gray matter volumes in both hemispheres, most pronounced in the frontal pole and lateral temporal cortex. White matter volumes in schizophrenia patients were bilaterally increased, primarily in the frontal, parietal, and isolated temporal regions, with volume reductions confined to anterior cingulate gyrus. In patients with schizophrenia as a group, higher illness severity was associated with reduced temporal gray matter volumes and expanded frontal white matter volumes in both hemispheres. In comparison to good-outcome group, patients with poor outcomes had lower temporal, occipital, and to a lesser degree parietal gray matter volumes in both hemispheres and temporal, parietal, occipital, and posterior cingulate white matter volumes in the right hemisphere. While gray matter deficits in the granular cortex were observed in all schizophrenia patients, agranular cortical deficits in the left hemisphere were peculiar to patients with poor outcomes. These results provide support for frontotemporal gray matter reduction and frontoparietal white matter expansion in schizophrenia. Poor outcome is associated with more posterior distribution (posteriorization) of both gray and white matter changes, and with preferential impairment in the unimodal visual and paralimbic cortical regions. PMID:17587598

  6. Polygenic determinants of white matter volume derived from GWAS lack reproducibility in a replicate sample

    PubMed Central

    Papiol, S; Mitjans, M; Assogna, F; Piras, F; Hammer, C; Caltagirone, C; Arias, B; Ehrenreich, H; Spalletta, G

    2014-01-01

    A recent publication reported an exciting polygenic effect of schizophrenia (SCZ) risk variants, identified by a large genome-wide association study (GWAS), on total brain and white matter volumes in schizophrenic patients and, even more prominently, in healthy subjects. The aim of the present work was to replicate and then potentially extend these findings. According to the original publication, polygenic risk scores—using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information of SCZ GWAS—(polygenic SCZ risk scores; PSS) were calculated in 122 healthy subjects, enrolled in a structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. These scores were computed based on P-values and odds ratios available through the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium. In addition, polygenic white matter scores (PWM) were calculated, using the respective SNP subset in the original publication. None of the polygenic scores, either PSS or PWM, were found to be associated with total brain, white matter or gray matter volume in our replicate sample. Minor differences between the original and the present study that might have contributed to lack of reproducibility (but unlikely explain it fully), are number of subjects, ethnicity, age distribution, array technology, SNP imputation quality and MRI scanner type. In contrast to the original publication, our results do not reveal the slightest signal of association of the described sets of GWAS-identified SCZ risk variants with brain volumes in adults. Caution is indicated in interpreting studies building on polygenic risk scores without replication sample. PMID:24548877

  7. Schizophrenia risk variants modulate white matter volume across the psychosis spectrum: evidence from two independent cohorts.

    PubMed

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Lancaster, Thomas M; Knöchel, Christian; Stäblein, Michael; Storchak, Helena; Reinke, Britta; Jurcoane, Alina; Kniep, Jonathan; Prvulovic, David; Mantripragada, Kiran; Tansey, Katherine E; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Linden, David E J

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic risk scores, based on risk variants identified in genome-wide-association-studies (GWAS), explain a considerable portion of the heritability for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, little is known about the combined effects of these variants, although polygenic neuroimaging has developed into a powerful tool of translational neuroscience. In this study, we used genome wide significant SZ risk variants to test the predictive capacity of the polygenic model and explored potential associations with white matter volume, a key candidate in imaging phenotype for psychotic disorders. By calculating the combined additive schizophrenia risk of seven SNPs (significant hits from a recent schizophrenia GWAS study), we show that increased additive genetic risk for SZ was associated with reduced white matter volume in a group of participants (n = 94) consisting of healthy individuals, SZ first-degree relatives, SZ patients and BD patients. This effect was also seen in a second independent sample of healthy individuals (n = 89). We suggest that a moderate portion of variance (~4%) of white matter volume can be explained by the seven hits from the recent schizophrenia GWAS. These results provide evidence for associations between cumulative genetic risk for schizophrenia and intermediate neuroimaging phenotypes in models of psychosis. Our work contributes to a growing body of literature suggesting that polygenic risk may help to explain white matter alterations associated with familial risk for psychosis. PMID:25844328

  8. Voxel-based morphometry in eating disorders: correlation of psychopathology with grey matter volume.

    PubMed

    Joos, Andreas; Klöppel, Stefan; Hartmann, Armin; Glauche, Volkmar; Tüscher, Oliver; Perlov, Evgeniy; Saum, Barbara; Freyer, Tobias; Zeeck, Almut; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2010-05-30

    Twenty-nine adult female patients with eating disorders (17 with bulimia nervosa, 12 with restrictive anorexia nervosa) were compared with 18 age-matched female healthy controls, using voxel-based morphometry. Restrictive anorexia nervosa patients showed a decrease of grey matter, particularly affecting the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, temporoparietal regions and the precuneus. By contrast, patients with bulimia nervosa did not differ from healthy controls. A positive correlation of "drive for thinness" and grey matter volume of the right inferior parietal lobe was found for both eating disorder groups. The strong reduction of grey matter volume in adult patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa is in line with results of adolescent patients. Contrary to other studies, this first voxel-based morphometry report of bulimic patients did not find any structural abnormalities. The inferior parietal cortex is a critical region for sensory integration of body and spatial perception, and the correlation of "drive for thinness" with grey matter volume of this region points to a neural correlate of this core psychopathological feature of eating disorders. PMID:20400273

  9. Schizophrenia risk variants modulate white matter volume across the psychosis spectrum: Evidence from two independent cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Lancaster, Thomas M.; Knöchel, Christian; Stäblein, Michael; Storchak, Helena; Reinke, Britta; Jurcoane, Alina; Kniep, Jonathan; Prvulovic, David; Mantripragada, Kiran; Tansey, Katherine E.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Linden, David E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic risk scores, based on risk variants identified in genome-wide-association-studies (GWAS), explain a considerable portion of the heritability for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, little is known about the combined effects of these variants, although polygenic neuroimaging has developed into a powerful tool of translational neuroscience. In this study, we used genome wide significant SZ risk variants to test the predictive capacity of the polygenic model and explored potential associations with white matter volume, a key candidate in imaging phenotype for psychotic disorders. By calculating the combined additive schizophrenia risk of seven SNPs (significant hits from a recent schizophrenia GWAS study), we show that increased additive genetic risk for SZ was associated with reduced white matter volume in a group of participants (n = 94) consisting of healthy individuals, SZ first-degree relatives, SZ patients and BD patients. This effect was also seen in a second independent sample of healthy individuals (n = 89). We suggest that a moderate portion of variance (~4%) of white matter volume can be explained by the seven hits from the recent schizophrenia GWAS. These results provide evidence for associations between cumulative genetic risk for schizophrenia and intermediate neuroimaging phenotypes in models of psychosis. Our work contributes to a growing body of literature suggesting that polygenic risk may help to explain white matter alterations associated with familial risk for psychosis. PMID:25844328

  10. REGIONAL WHITE MATTER VOLUME DIFFERENCES IN NONDEMENTED AGING AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Salat, David H.; Greve, Douglas N.; Pacheco, Jennifer L.; Quinn, Brian T.; Helmer, Karl G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that altered cerebral white matter (WM) influences normal aging, and further that WM degeneration may modulate the clinical expression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we conducted a study of differences in WM volume across the adult age span and in AD employing a newly developed, automated method for regional parcellation of the subcortical WM that uses curvature landmarks and gray matter (GM)/WM surface boundary information. This procedure measures the volume of gyral WM, utilizing a distance constraint to limit the measurements from extending into the centrum semiovale. Regional estimates were first established to be reliable across two scan sessions in 20 young healthy individuals. Next, the method was applied to a large clinically-characterized sample of 299 individuals including 73 normal older adults and 91 age-matched participants with very mild to mild AD. The majority of measured regions showed a decline in volume with increasing age, with strong effects found in bilateral fusiform, lateral orbitofrontal, superior frontal, medial orbital frontal, inferior temporal, and middle temporal WM. The association between WM volume and age was quadratic in many regions suggesting that WM volume loss accelerates in advanced aging. A number of WM regions were further reduced in AD with parahippocampal, entorhinal, inferior parietal and rostral middle frontal WM showing the strongest AD-associated reductions. There were minimal sex effects after correction for intracranial volume, and there were associations between ventricular volume and regional WM volumes in the older adults and AD that were not apparent in the younger adults. Certain results, such as the loss of WM in the fusiform region with aging, were unexpected and provide novel insight into patterns of age associated neural and cognitive decline. Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of automated regional WM measures in revealing the distinct patterns of age and AD

  11. Regional brain volumes and cognition in childhood epilepsy: Does size really matter?

    PubMed Central

    Zelko, Frank A.; Pardoe, Heath R.; Blackstone, Sarah R.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Berg, Anne T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have correlated neurocognitive function and regional brain volumes in children with epilepsy. We tested whether brain volume differences between children with and without epilepsy explained differences in neurocognitive function. Methods The study sample included 108 individuals with uncomplicated nonsyndromic epilepsy (NSE) and 36 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Participants received a standardized cognitive battery. Whole brain T1-weighted MRI was obtained and volumes analyzed with FreeSurfer (TM). Key Findings Total brain volume (TBV) was significantly smaller in cases. After adjustment for TBV, cases had significantly larger regional grey matter volumes for total, frontal, parietal, and precentral cortex. Cases had poorer performance on neurocognitive indices of intelligence and variability of sustained attention. In cases, TBV showed small associations with intellectual indices of verbal and perceptual ability, working memory, and overall IQ. In controls, TBV showed medium associations with working memory and variability of sustained attention. In both groups, small associations were seen between some TBV-adjusted regional brain volumes and neurocognitive indices, but not in a consistent pattern. Brain volume differences did not account for cognitive differences between the groups. Significance Patients with uncomplicated NSE have smaller brains than controls but areas of relative grey matter enlargement. That this relative regional enlargement occurs in the context of poorer overall neurocognitive functioning suggests that it is not adaptive. However, the lack of consistent associations between case-control differences in brain volumes and cognitive functioning suggests that brain volumes have limited explanatory value for cognitive functioning in childhood epilepsy. PMID:24630049

  12. Multi-Dimensional Effective Field Theory Analysis for Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Hannah; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Experiments like the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) attempt to find dark matter (non-luminous matter that makes up approximately 80% of the matter in the universe) through direct detection of interactions between dark matter and a target material. The Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach increases the number of considered interactions between dark matter and the normal, target matter from two (spin independent and spin dependent interactions) to eleven operators with four possible interference terms. These additional operators allow for a more complete analysis of complimentary direct dark matter searches; however, the higher dimensional likelihoods necessary to span an increase in operators requires a clever computational tool such as MultiNest. I present here analyses of published and projected data from CDMS (Si and Ge targets) and LUX (liquid Xe target) assuming operator parameter spaces ranging from 3 - 5 dimensions and folding in information on energy-dependent backgrounds when possible.

  13. Genetic schizophrenia risk variants jointly modulate total brain and white matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, AF; Bakker, Steven C.; van Haren, Neeltje E.M.; Derks, Eske M.; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Boos, Heleen B.M.; Cahn, Wiepke; Hulshoff Pol, HE; Ripke, Stephan; Ophoff, Roel A.; Kahn, RS

    2012-01-01

    Background Thousands of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are weakly associated with schizophrenia. It is likely that subsets of disease-associated SNPs are associated with distinct heritable disease-associated phenotypes. Therefore, we examined the shared genetic susceptibility modulating schizophrenia and brain volume. Methods Odds ratios for genome-wide SNP data were calculated in the sample collected by the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium (8,690 schizophrenia patients and 11,831 controls, excluding subjects from the present study). These were used to calculate individual polygenic schizophrenia (“risk”) scores (PSSs) in an independent sample of 152 schizophrenia patients and 142 healthy controls with available structural MRI scans. Results In the entire group, the PSS was significantly associated with total brain volume (R2=0.048, p=1.6×10−4) and white matter volume (R2=0.051, p=8.6×10−5) equally in patients and controls. The number of (independent) SNPs that substantially influenced both disease risk and white matter (n=2,020) was much smaller than the entire set of SNPs that modulated disease status (n=14,751). From the set of 2,020 SNPs, a group of 186 SNPs showed most evidence for association with white matter volume and an explorative functional analysis showed that these SNPs were located in genes with neuronal functions. Conclusions These results indicate that a relatively small subset of schizophrenia genetic risk variants is related to the (normal) development of white matter. This in turn suggests that disruptions in white matter growth increase the susceptibility to develop schizophrenia. PMID:23039932

  14. Directional volume growing for the extraction of white matter tracts from diffusion tensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhof, D.; Hastreiter, P.; Nimsky, C.; Fahlbusch, R.; Greiner, G.

    2005-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging measures diffusion of water in tissue. Within structured tissue, such as neural fiber tracts of the human brain, anisotropic diffusion is observed since the cell membranes of the long cylindric nerves restrict diffusion. Diffusion tensor imaging thus provides information about neural fiber tracts within the human brain which is of major interest for neurosurgery. However, the visualization is a challenging task due to noise and limited resolution of the data. A common visualization strategy of white matter is fiber tracking which utilizes techniques known from flow visualization. The resulting streamlines provide a good impression of the spatial relation of fibers and anatomy. Therefore, they are a valuable supplement for neurosurgical planning. As a drawback, fibers may diverge from the exact path due to numerical inaccuracies during streamline propagation even if higher order integration is used. To overcome this problem, a novel strategy for directional volume growing is presented which enables the extraction of separate tract systems and thus allows to compare and estimate the quality of fiber tracking algorithms. Furthermore, the presented approach is suited to get a more precise representation of the volume encompassing white matter tracts. Thereby, the entire volume potentially containing fibers is provided in contrast to fiber tracking which only shows a more restricted representation of the actual volume of interest. This is of major importance in brain tumor cases where white matter tracts are in the close vicinity of brain tumors. Overall, the presented strategy contributes to make surgical planning safer and more reliable.

  15. Dark matter as a ghost free conformal extension of Einstein theory

    SciTech Connect

    Barvinsky, A.O.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss ghost free models of the recently suggested mimetic dark matter theory. This theory is shown to be a conformal extension of Einstein general relativity. Dark matter originates from gauging out its local Weyl invariance as an extra degree of freedom which describes a potential flow of the pressureless perfect fluid. For a positive energy density of this fluid the theory is free of ghost instabilities, which gives strong preference to stable configurations with a positive scalar curvature and trace of the matter stress tensor. Instabilities caused by caustics of the geodesic flow, inherent in this model, serve as a motivation for an alternative conformal extension of Einstein theory, based on the generalized Proca vector field. A potential part of this field modifies the inflationary stage in cosmology, whereas its rotational part at the post inflationary epoch might simulate rotating flows of dark matter.

  16. The Layzer-Irvine equation in theories with non-minimal coupling between matter and curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, O.; Gomes, C. E-mail: claudio.gomes@fc.up.pt

    2014-09-01

    We derive the Layzer-Irvine equation for alternative gravitational theories with non-minimal coupling between curvature and matter for an homogeneous and isotropic Universe. As an application, we study the case of Abell 586, a relaxed and spherically symmetric galaxy cluster, assuming some matter density profiles.

  17. Synergistic Effects of Age on Patterns of White and Gray Matter Volume across Childhood and Adolescence1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Krongold, Mark; Cooper, Cassandra; Lebel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The human brain develops with a nonlinear contraction of gray matter across late childhood and adolescence with a concomitant increase in white matter volume. Across the adult population, properties of cortical gray matter covary within networks that may represent organizational units for development and degeneration. Although gray matter covariance may be strongest within structurally connected networks, the relationship to volume changes in white matter remains poorly characterized. In the present study we examined age-related trends in white and gray matter volume using T1-weighted MR images from 360 human participants from the NIH MRI study of Normal Brain Development. Images were processed through a voxel-based morphometry pipeline. Linear effects of age on white and gray matter volume were modeled within four age bins, spanning 4-18 years, each including 90 participants (45 male). White and gray matter age-slope maps were separately entered into k-means clustering to identify regions with similar age-related variability across the four age bins. Four white matter clusters were identified, each with a dominant direction of underlying fibers: anterior–posterior, left–right, and two clusters with superior–inferior directions. Corresponding, spatially proximal, gray matter clusters encompassed largely cerebellar, fronto-insular, posterior, and sensorimotor regions, respectively. Pairs of gray and white matter clusters followed parallel slope trajectories, with white matter changes generally positive from 8 years onward (indicating volume increases) and gray matter negative (decreases). As developmental disorders likely target networks rather than individual regions, characterizing typical coordination of white and gray matter development can provide a normative benchmark for understanding atypical development. PMID:26464999

  18. Physical activity and memory functions: are neurotrophins and cerebral gray matter volume the missing link?

    PubMed

    Flöel, A; Ruscheweyh, R; Krüger, K; Willemer, C; Winter, B; Völker, K; Lohmann, H; Zitzmann, M; Mooren, F; Breitenstein, C; Knecht, S

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological studies reveal better cognitive function in physically active individuals. Possible mediators for this effect are neurotrophins, which are up-regulated through physical exercise and induce neuronal growth and synaptogenesis in the animal model. Here we cross-sectionally assessed 75 healthy older individuals for levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and memory encoding, as well as neurotrophin levels and cerebral gray matter volume. We found that physical activity, but not cardiovascular fitness, was associated with better memory encoding after controlling for age, sex, education, depression, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with higher levels of the neurotrophin granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and increased cerebral gray matter volume in prefrontal and cingulate cortex as assessed by magnetic resonance voxel-based morphometry. While mediating factors will need to be further elucidated, these findings indicate that even low-level physical activity exerts beneficial effects on memory functions in older individuals. PMID:19853041

  19. Alcohol exposure in utero is associated with decreased gray matter volume in neonates.

    PubMed

    Donald, Kirsten A; Fouche, J P; Roos, Annerine; Koen, Nastassja; Howells, Fleur M; Riley, Edward P; Woods, Roger P; Zar, Heather J; Narr, Katherine L; Stein, Dan J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have indicated that prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with alterations in the structure of specific brain regions. However, the temporal specificity of such changes and their behavioral consequences are less known. Here we explore the brain structure of infants with in utero exposure to alcohol shortly after birth. T2 structural MRI images were acquired from 28 alcohol-exposed infants and 45 demographically matched healthy controls at 2-4 weeks of age on a 3T Siemens Allegra system as part of large birth cohort study, the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS). Neonatal neurobehavior was assessed at this visit; early developmental outcome assessed on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III at 6 months of age. Volumes of gray matter regions were estimated based on the segmentations of the University of North Carolina neonatal atlas. Significantly decreased total gray matter volume was demonstrated for the alcohol-exposed cohort compared to healthy control infants (p < 0.001). Subcortical gray matter regions that were significantly different between groups after correcting for overall gray matter volume included left hippocampus, bilateral amygdala and left thalamus (p < 0.01). These findings persisted even when correcting for infant age, gender, ethnicity and maternal smoking status. Both early neurobehavioral and developmental adverse outcomes at 6 months across multiple domains were significantly associated with regional volumes primarily in the temporal and frontal lobes in infants with prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure during the prenatal period has potentially enduring neurobiological consequences for exposed children. These findings suggest the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on brain growth is present very early in the first year of life, a period during which the most rapid growth and maturation occurs. PMID:26616173

  20. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence. PMID:26334946

  1. Parahippocampal white matter volume predicts Alzheimer's disease risk in cognitively normal old adults.

    PubMed

    Stoub, Travis R; Detoledo-Morrell, Leyla; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2014-08-01

    An in vivo marker of the underlying pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is atrophy in select brain regions detected with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although gray matter changes have been documented to be predictive of cognitive decline culminating in AD among healthy older adults, very little attention has been given to alterations in white matter as a possible MRI biomarker predictive of AD. In this investigation, we examined parahippocampal white matter (PWM) volume derived from baseline MRI scans in 2 independent samples of 65 cognitively normal older adults, followed longitudinally, to determine if it was predictive of AD risk. The average follow-up period for the 2 samples was 8.5 years. Comparisons between the stable participants (N = 50) and those who declined to AD (N = 15) over time revealed a significant difference in baseline PWM volume (p < 0.001). Furthermore, baseline PWM volume was predictive not only of time to AD (hazard ratio = 3.1, p < 0.05), but also of baseline episodic memory performance (p = 0.041). These results demonstrate that PWM atrophy provides a sensitive MRI biomarker of AD dementia risk among those with normal cognitive function. PMID:24656833

  2. Motor fMRI and cortical grey matter volume in adults born very preterm

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, E.J.; Froudist-Walsh, S.; Neilan, R.; Nam, K.W.; Giampietro, V.; McGuire, P.; Murray, R.M.; Nosarti, C.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of motor planning, initiation and execution in a cohort of young adults (mean age 20 years) who were born very preterm (VPT; <33 weeks of gestation), as these individuals are at increased risk of experiencing neuromotor difficulties compared to controls. A cued motor task was presented to 20 right-handed VPT individuals and 20 controls within a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Whole-brain grey matter volume was also quantified and associations with functional data were examined. Despite comparable task performance, fMRI results showed that the VPT group displayed greater brain activation compared to controls in a region comprising the right cerebellum and the lingual, parahippocampal and middle temporal gyri. The VPT group also displayed decreased grey matter volume in the right superior frontal/premotor cortex and left middle temporal gyri. Grey matter volume in the premotor and middle temporal clusters was significantly negatively correlated with BOLD activation in the cerebellum. Overall, these data suggest that preterm birth is associated with functional neuronal differences that persist into adulthood, which are likely to reflect neural reorganisation following early brain injury. PMID:25016248

  3. Motor fMRI and cortical grey matter volume in adults born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, E J; Froudist-Walsh, S; Neilan, R; Nam, K W; Giampietro, V; McGuire, P; Murray, R M; Nosarti, C

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of motor planning, initiation and execution in a cohort of young adults (mean age 20 years) who were born very preterm (VPT; <33 weeks of gestation), as these individuals are at increased risk of experiencing neuromotor difficulties compared to controls. A cued motor task was presented to 20 right-handed VPT individuals and 20 controls within a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Whole-brain grey matter volume was also quantified and associations with functional data were examined. Despite comparable task performance, fMRI results showed that the VPT group displayed greater brain activation compared to controls in a region comprising the right cerebellum and the lingual, parahippocampal and middle temporal gyri. The VPT group also displayed decreased grey matter volume in the right superior frontal/premotor cortex and left middle temporal gyri. Grey matter volume in the premotor and middle temporal clusters was significantly negatively correlated with BOLD activation in the cerebellum. Overall, these data suggest that preterm birth is associated with functional neuronal differences that persist into adulthood, which are likely to reflect neural reorganisation following early brain injury. PMID:25016248

  4. Insular and Hippocampal Gray Matter Volume Reductions in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kugel, Harald; Krug, Axel; Schöning, Sonja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Uhlmann, Christina; Postert, Christian; Suslow, Thomas; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo; Dannlowski, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is a serious psychiatric illness with a highly variable and heterogeneous clinical course. Due to the lack of consistent data from previous studies, the study of morphometric changes in major depressive disorder is still a major point of research requiring additional studies. The aim of the study presented here was to characterize and quantify regional gray matter abnormalities in a large sample of clinically well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder. Methods For this study one-hundred thirty two patients with major depressive disorder and 132 age- and gender-matched healthy control participants were included, 35 with their first episode and 97 with recurrent depression. To analyse gray matter abnormalities, voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) was employed on T1 weighted MRI data. We performed whole-brain analyses as well as a region-of-interest approach on the hippocampal formation, anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, correlating the number of depressive episodes. Results Compared to healthy control persons, patients showed a strong gray-matter reduction in the right anterior insula. In addition, region-of-interest analyses revealed significant gray-matter reductions in the hippocampal formation. The observed alterations were more severe in patients with recurrent depressive episodes than in patients with a first episode. The number of depressive episodes was negatively correlated with gray-matter volume in the right hippocampus and right amygdala. Conclusions The anterior insula gray matter structure appears to be strongly affected in major depressive disorder and might play an important role in the neurobiology of depression. The hippocampal and amygdala volume loss cumulating with the number of episodes might be explained either by repeated neurotoxic stress or alternatively by higher relapse rates in patients showing hippocampal atrophy. PMID:25051163

  5. Center-stabilized Yang-Mills Theory:Confinement and Large N Volume Independence

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat; Yaffe, Laurence G.; /Washington U., Seattle

    2008-03-21

    We examine a double trace deformation of SU(N) Yang-Mills theory which, for large N and large volume, is equivalent to unmodified Yang-Mills theory up to O(1/N{sup 2}) corrections. In contrast to the unmodified theory, large N volume independence is valid in the deformed theory down to arbitrarily small volumes. The double trace deformation prevents the spontaneous breaking of center symmetry which would otherwise disrupt large N volume independence in small volumes. For small values of N, if the theory is formulated on R{sup 3} x S{sup 1} with a sufficiently small compactification size L, then an analytic treatment of the non-perturbative dynamics of the deformed theory is possible. In this regime, we show that the deformed Yang-Mills theory has a mass gap and exhibits linear confinement. Increasing the circumference L or number of colors N decreases the separation of scales on which the analytic treatment relies. However, there are no order parameters which distinguish the small and large radius regimes. Consequently, for small N the deformed theory provides a novel example of a locally four-dimensional pure gauge theory in which one has analytic control over confinement, while for large N it provides a simple fully reduced model for Yang-Mills theory. The construction is easily generalized to QCD and other QCD-like theories.

  6. Theory of X-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Kathrin

    This thesis presents the theoretical framework required to apply spectrally resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) as a diagnostic method for warm dense matter. In particular, the theory is generalised to allow for the description of systems with multiple ion species where all mutual correlations are taken into account within the new approach. Supplemented with the theory presented, XRTS is now a promising diagnostics for high-energy-density matter containing different chemical elements or mixtures of different materials. The signal measured at XRTS contains the unshifted Rayleigh peak and frequency-shifted features. The first is related to elastic scattering from electrons co-moving with the ions whilst the second occurs due to scattering from free electrons and excitation/ionisation events. The focus of this thesis lies on the elastic scattering feature which requires the ion structure and the electron density around the ion as input for the theoretical modelling. The ion structure is obtained from quantum simulations (DFT-MD) and classical hypernetted-chain (HNC) equations. The analysis of the DTF-MD simulation data reveals that partial ionisation yields strong modifications of the ion-ion interactions. Similar effects are found for the form of the electron screening cloud around an ion. On the basis of the newly developed theory and structural models, multicomponent effects on the XRTS signal are studied. It is shown that the Rayleigh feature is very sensitive to the ratio of the elements in the scattering volume and their mutual correlations. These results indicate that XRTS is well-suited to probe the properties of complex materials and the process of mixing in the WDM regime. The advanced theories are finally applied to experimental spectra. The procedure allows for both extracting the basic plasma parameters and assessing the quality of the theoretical models applied. Comparisons with several experiments demonstrated that the non-collective regime (large

  7. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Theory and research on a variety of topics in higher education are addressed in 13 articles. Titles and authors are as follows: "College Environmental Influences on Learning and Cognitive Development: A Critical Review and Synthesis" (Ernest T. Pascarella); "Learning Theory and Research" (Cameron Fincher); "Methods and Theories of Instruction"…

  8. Consistency relations for spinning matter in gravitational theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, John R.; Smalley, Larry L.

    1986-01-01

    The consistency equations for a charged spinning fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory are examined. The hydrodynamic laws associated with the theory of Ray and Smalley (1982, 1983) and the electromagnetic extension of Amorim (1984, 1985) are studied. The derivation of the consistency equation from the Euler equations for an improved perfect-fluid energy-momentum tensor is described.

  9. Insula white matter volume linked to binge drinking frequency through enhancement motives in treated adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tammy; Clark, Duncan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the insula’s role in the representation of bodily states associated with hedonic (i.e., enhancement motives) and aversive (i.e., craving) aspects of substance use, this longitudinal study examined associations between insula structure (i.e., white and gray matter volume), enhancement motives for alcohol and cannabis use, craving for alcohol and marijuana, and alcohol and cannabis involvement in treated adolescents. Enhancement motives and craving, as conscious representations of bodily states associated with use, were hypothesized as mediators (i.e., linking mechanisms) of the association between insula volume and substance use. Methods Adolescents (age 14–18, N=30) recruited from substance use treatment reported on enhancement motives and obsession/craving for both alcohol and cannabis at baseline (near the start of treatment), and on alcohol and cannabis involvement (e.g., binge drinking, alcohol abuse/dependence symptom count) at baseline and over 1-year follow-up. Insula white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) volumes were determined using FreeSurfer. Results Enhancement motives for drinking served as a link between left insula WM volume and frequency of binge drinking at baseline and 1-year follow-up. This novel finding is consistent with the insula’s role in representing bodily states (e.g., “high” associated with binge drinking) that can motivate drinking behavior. Although right insula WM volume was positively correlated with obsession/craving for alcohol, and obsession/craving was positively correlated with alcohol outcomes, the indirect effect was not significant. Insula WM volume was not associated with cannabis-related variables. Insula GM volume was not associated with enhancement motives, obsession/craving, or alcohol involvement. Conclusions Enhancement motives for alcohol use, but not obsession/craving for alcohol, provided an important link between left insula WM volume and frequency of binge drinking in treated

  10. Prediction of antidepressant treatment response from gray matter volume across diagnostic categories.

    PubMed

    Sämann, Philipp G; Höhn, David; Chechko, Natalya; Kloiber, Stefan; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Holsboer, Florian; Czisch, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Dysfunctional limbic, paralimbic and prefrontal brain circuits represent neural substrates of major depression that are targeted by pharmacotherapy. In a high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study we investigated the potential of variability of the cortex volume to predict the response to antidepressant treatment among patients with major depression. We enrolled 167 patients participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) study and employed voxel based morphometry to investigate covariation of gray matter (GM) maps with changes of depression severity over 5 weeks. Larger left hippocampal and bilateral posterior cingulate GM volumes and lower right temporolateral GM volumes were associated with beneficial treatment response. Subcallosal/orbitofrontal GM volumes were associated with treatment response mainly through gender-by-region interactions. A hippocampal/temporolateral composite marker proved robust in both first episode and recurrent unipolar patients and in bipolar patients. Compared with 92 healthy controls, abnormally low volumes were only detected in the left hippocampal area, particularly in recurrent unipolar patients. These findings indicate that variability of the cortex volume of specific brain areas is associated with different response to antidepressants. In addition, hippocampal findings recursively link together unfavorable treatment response and progressive hippocampal structural changes in recurrent depression. PMID:23920122

  11. Indirect association of DAT1 genotype with executive function through white matter volume in orbitofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tammy; Ferrell, Robert; Clark, Duncan B.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene has been associated with impulsivity and executive functioning. Further, DAT1 has been associated with brain structural characteristics and resting state connectivity. This study tested an indirect effect model in which DAT1 genotype (9-repeat carriers vs. 10-repeat homozygotes) is linked to phenotypes representing impulsivity and executive function (planning behavior) through effects on white matter (WM) volumes in prefrontal cortex (PFC), particularly orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Adolescents (ages 14–18, n=38), were recruited from substance use treatment (n=22) and the community (n=16) to increase phenotype variation. Results indicated that DAT1 10/10 genotype was associated with lower WM volume in the PFC, specifically the left OFC. Further, lower WM volume in the left OFC predicted more difficulties in self-reported planning behavior, but not impulsivity. Indirect effect analysis indicated that lower WM volume in the left OFC mediated the association between DAT1 10/10 genotype and difficulties in planning behavior. Results suggest a brain structural mechanism, involving lower WM volume in the left OFC, as a link in the association between DAT1 genotype and a specific aspect of executive function. Genetic effects on regional WM volume that are linked to behavioral outcomes could ultimately inform the development of tailored interventions that address an individual’s unique risk factors. PMID:25704259

  12. Phase transitions of nuclear matter beyond mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Huu Phat; Nguyen Tuan Anh; Nguyen Van Long; Le Viet Hoa

    2007-10-15

    The Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) effective action approach is applied to study the phase transition of nuclear matter modeled by the four-nucleon interaction. It is shown that in the Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA) a first-order phase transition takes place at low temperature, whereas the phase transition is of second order at higher temperature.

  13. Regional white matter hyperintensity volume, not hippocampal atrophy, predicts incident Alzheimer disease in the community.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M; Provenzano, Frank A; Muraskin, Jordan; Manly, Jennifer J; Blum, Sonja; Apa, Zoltan; Stern, Yaakov; Brown, Truman R; Luchsinger, José A; Mayeux, Richard

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND New-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) is often attributed to degenerative changes in the hippocampus. However, the contribution of regionally distributed small vessel cerebrovascular disease, visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging, remains unclear. OBJECTIVE To determine whether regional WMHs and hippocampal volume predict incident AD in an epidemiological study. DESIGN A longitudinal community-based epidemiological study of older adults from northern Manhattan, New York. SETTING The Washington Heights/Inwood Columbia Aging Project. PARTICIPANTS Between 2005 and 2007, 717 participants without dementia received magnetic resonance imaging scans. A mean (SD) of 40.28 (9.77) months later, 503 returned for follow-up clinical examination and 46 met criteria for incident dementia (45 with AD). Regional WMHs and relative hippocampal volumes were derived. Three Cox proportional hazards models were run to predict incident dementia, controlling for relevant variables. The first included all WMH measurements; the second included relative hippocampal volume; and the third combined the 2 measurements. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Incident AD. RESULTS White matter hyperintensity volume in the parietal lobe predicted time to incident dementia (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.194; P = .03). Relative hippocampal volume did not predict incident dementia when considered alone (HR = 0.419; P = .77) or with the WMH measures included in the model (HR = 0.302; P = .70). Including hippocampal volume in the model did not notably alter the predictive utility of parietal lobe WMHs (HR = 1.197; P = .049). CONCLUSIONS The findings highlight the regional specificity of the association of WMHs with AD. It is not clear whether parietal WMHs solely represent a marker for cerebrovascular burden or point to distinct injury compared with other regions. Future work should elucidate pathogenic mechanisms linking WMHs and AD pathology. PMID:22945686

  14. Prospects for direct detection of dark matter in an effective theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    We perform the first comprehensive analysis of the prospects for direct detection of dark matter with future ton-scale detectors in the general 11-dimensional effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle. The theory includes 8 momentum and velocity dependent dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, besides the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent operators. From a variegated sample of 27 benchmark points selected in the parameter space of the theory, we simulate independent sets of synthetic data for ton-scale Germanium and Xenon detectors. From the synthetic data, we then extract the marginal posterior probability density functions and the profile likelihoods of the model parameters. The associated Bayesian credible regions and frequentist confidence intervals allow us to assess the prospects for direct detection of dark matter at the 27 benchmark points. First, we analyze the data assuming the knowledge of the correct dark matter nucleon-interaction type, as it is commonly done for the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions. Then, we analyze the simulations extracting the dark matter-nucleon interaction type from the data directly, in contrast to standard analyses. This second approach requires an extensive exploration of the full 11-dimensional parameter space of the dark matter-nucleon effective theory. Interestingly, we identify 5 scenarios where the dark matter mass and the dark matter-nucleon interaction type can be reconstructed from the data simultaneously. We stress the importance of extracting the dark matter nucleon-interaction type from the data directly, discussing the main challenges found addressing this complex 11-dimensional problem.

  15. A New Approach for Deep Gray Matter Analysis Using Partial-Volume Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Bonnier, Guillaume; Kober, Tobias; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Krueger, Gunnar; Meuli, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The existence of partial volume effects in brain MR images makes it challenging to understand physio-pathological alterations underlying signal changes due to pathology across groups of healthy subjects and patients. In this study, we implement a new approach to disentangle gray and white matter alterations in the thalamus and the basal ganglia. The proposed method was applied to a cohort of early multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy subjects to evaluate tissue-specific alterations related to diffuse inflammatory or neurodegenerative processes. Method Forty-three relapsing-remitting MS patients and nineteen healthy controls underwent 3T MRI including: (i) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, double inversion recovery, magnetization-prepared gradient echo for lesion count, and (ii) T1 relaxometry. We applied a partial volume estimation algorithm to T1 relaxometry maps to gray and white matter local concentrations as well as T1 values characteristic of gray and white matter in the thalamus and the basal ganglia. Statistical tests were performed to compare groups in terms of both global T1 values, tissue characteristic T1 values, and tissue concentrations. Results Significant increases in global T1 values were observed in the thalamus (p = 0.038) and the putamen (p = 0.026) in RRMS patients compared to HC. In the Thalamus, the T1 increase was associated with a significant increase in gray matter characteristic T1 (p = 0.0016) with no significant effect in white matter. Conclusion The presented methodology provides additional information to standard MR signal averaging approaches that holds promise to identify the presence and nature of diffuse pathology in neuro-inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26845760

  16. Multimodal evidence of regional midcingulate gray matter volume underlying conflict monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Maloney, Thomas; Moeller, Scott J.; Malaker, Pias; Konova, Anna B.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have long implicated the mid-cingulate cortex (MCC) in conflict monitoring, but it is not clear whether its structural integrity (i.e., the gray matter volume) influences its conflict monitoring function. In this multimodal study, we used T1-weighted MRI scans as well as event-related potentials (ERPs) to test whether the MCC gray matter volume is associated with the electrocortical marker (i.e., No-go N200 ERP component) of conflict monitoring in healthy individuals. The specificity of such a relationship in health was determined in two ways: by (A) acquiring the same data from individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD), known to have deficits in executive function including behavioral monitoring; and (B) acquiring the P300 ERP component that is linked with attention allocation and not specifically with conflict monitoring. Twenty-five (39.1 ± 8.4 years; 8 females) healthy individuals and 25 (42.7 ± 5.9 years; 6 females) individuals with CUD underwent a rewarded Go/No-go task during which the ERP data was collected, and they also underwent a structural MRI scan. The whole brain regression analysis showed a significant correlation between MCC structural integrity and the well-known ERP measure of conflict monitoring (N200, but not the P300) in healthy individuals, which was absent in CUD who were characterized by reduced MCC gray matter volume, N200 abnormalities as well as reduced task accuracy. In individuals with CUD instead, the N200 amplitude was associated with drug addiction symptomatology. These results show that the integrity of MCC volume is directly associated with the electrocortical correlates of conflict monitoring in healthy individuals, and such an association breaks down in psychopathologies that impact these brain processes. Taken together, this MCC–N200 association may serve as a biomarker of improved behavioral monitoring processes in diseased populations. PMID:24918068

  17. Dynamic Theory: a new view of space, time, and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.E.

    1980-12-01

    The theory presented represents a different approach toward unification of the various branches of physics. The foundation of the theory rests upon generalizations of the classical laws of thermodynamics, particularly Caratheodory's abstract statement of the second law. These adopted laws are shown to produce, as special cases, current theories such as Einstein's General and Special Relativity, Maxwell's electromagnetism, classical thermodynamics, and quantum principles. In addition to this unification, the theory provides predictions that may be experimentally investigated. Some of the predictions are a limiting rate of mass conversion, reduced pressures in electromagnetically contained plasmas, increased viscous effects in shocked materials, a finite self-energy for a charged particle, and the possible creation of particles with velocities greater than the speed of light. 8 figures.

  18. The effect of lifelong bilingualism on regional grey and white matter volume.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Pangelinan, Melissa M; Bogulski, Cari; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Luk, Gigi; Grady, Cheryl L; Bialystok, Ellen

    2015-07-01

    Lifelong bilingualism is associated with the delayed diagnosis of dementia, suggesting bilingual experience is relevant to brain health in aging. While the effects of bilingualism on cognitive functions across the lifespan are well documented, less is known about the neural substrates underlying differential behaviour. It is clear that bilingualism affects brain regions that mediate language abilities and that these regions are at least partially overlapping with those that exhibit age-related decline. Moreover, the behavioural advantages observed in bilingualism are generally found in executive function performance, suggesting that the frontal lobes may also be sensitive to bilingualism, which exhibit volume reductions with age. The current study investigated structural differences in the brain of lifelong bilingual older adults (n=14, mean age=70.4) compared with older monolinguals (n=14, mean age=70.6). We employed two analytic approaches: 1) we examined global differences in grey and white matter volumes; and, 2) we examined local differences in volume and cortical thickness of specific regions of interest previously implicated in bilingual/monolingual comparisons (temporal pole) or in aging (entorhinal cortex and hippocampus). We expected bilinguals would exhibit greater volume of the frontal lobe and temporal lobe (grey and white matter), given the importance of these regions in executive and language functions, respectively. We further hypothesized that regions in the medial temporal lobe, which demonstrate early changes in aging and exhibit neural pathology in dementia, would be more preserved in the bilingual group. As predicted, bilinguals exhibit greater frontal lobe white matter compared with monolinguals. Moreover, increasing age was related to decreasing temporal pole cortical thickness in the monolingual group, but no such relationship was observed for bilinguals. Finally, Stroop task performance was positively correlated with frontal lobe white

  19. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    This collection of nine papers addresses theory and research in higher education. The papers include: (1) "Student Learning at Metropolitan Universities" (George D. Kuh and others); (2) "Applications of Generalizability Theory in Higher Education Assessment Research" (Gary R. Pike); (3) Policy Models and Policy Instruments in Higher Education: The…

  20. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume XIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.; Tierney, William G., Ed.

    The 11 papers in this collection address research and theory in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Teaching, Learning, and Thinking about Teaching and Learning" (W.J. McKeachie); (2) "Costs and Productivity in Higher Education: Theory, Evidence, and Policy Implications" (Darrell R. Lewis and Halil Dunbar); (3) "Institutional Adaptation:…

  1. New extended standard model, dark matters and relativity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae-Kwang

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional quantized space model is newly introduced as the extended standard model. Four three-dimensional quantized spaces with total 12 dimensions are used to explain the universes including ours. Electric (EC), lepton (LC) and color (CC) charges are defined to be the charges of the x1x2x3, x4x5x6 and x7x8x9 warped spaces, respectively. Then, the lepton is the xi(EC) - xj(LC) correlated state which makes 3x3 = 9 leptons and the quark is the xi(EC) - xj(LC) - xk(CC) correlated state which makes 3x3x3 = 27 quarks. The new three bastons with the xi(EC) state are proposed as the dark matters seen in the x1x2x3 space, too. The matter universe question, three generations of the leptons and quarks, dark matter and dark energy, hadronization, the big bang, quantum entanglement, quantum mechanics and general relativity are briefly discussed in terms of this new model. The details can be found in the article titled as ``journey into the universe; three-dimensional quantized spaces, elementary particles and quantum mechanics at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/J_Hwang2''.

  2. Direct and Indirect Dark Matter Detection in Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Farinaldo

    2013-01-01

    The Dark matter (DM) problem constitutes a key question at the interface among Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology. The observational data which have been accumulated in the last years point to an existence of non baryonic amount of DM. Since the Standard Model (SM) does not provide any candidate for such non-baryonic DM, the evidence of DM is a major indication for new physics beyond the SM. We will study in this work one of the most popular DM candidates, the so called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) from a direct and indirect detection perspective. In order to approach the direct and indirect dection of DM in the context of Particle Physics in a more pedagogic way, we will begin our discussion talking about a minimal extension of the SM. Later we will work on the subject in a 3-3-1 model. Next, we will study the role of WIMPs in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Lastly, we will look for indirect DM signals in the center of our galaxy using the NASA Satellite, called Fermi-LAT. Through a comprehensive analysis of the data events observed by Fermi-LAT and some background models, we will constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section for several annihilation channels and dark matter halo profiles.

  3. Insular Gray Matter Volume and Objective Quality of Life in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Yoshizumi, Miho; Miyata, Jun; Ubukata, Shiho; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sugihara, Genichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life has been recognized as an important outcome for schizophrenia treatment, although the fundamental determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Thirty-three schizophrenia patients and 42 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The Quality of Life Scale was used to measure objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify regional brain alterations that correlate with Quality of Life Scale score in the patient group. Schizophrenia patients showed gray matter reductions in the frontal, temporal, limbic, and subcortical regions. We then performed voxel-based multiple regression analysis in these regions to identify any correlations between regional gray matter volume and Quality of Life Scale scores. We found that among four subcategories of the scale, the Instrumental Role category score correlated with gray matter volume in the right anterior insula in schizophrenia patients. In addition, this correlation was shown to be mediated by negative symptoms. Our findings suggest that the neural basis of objective quality of life might differ topographically from that of subjective QOL in schizophrenia. PMID:26544607

  4. Insular Gray Matter Volume and Objective Quality of Life in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Uwatoko, Teruhisa; Yoshizumi, Miho; Miyata, Jun; Ubukata, Shiho; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kawada, Ryosaku; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Sugihara, Genichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life has been recognized as an important outcome for schizophrenia treatment, although the fundamental determinants are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the association between brain structural abnormalities and objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Thirty-three schizophrenia patients and 42 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The Quality of Life Scale was used to measure objective quality of life in schizophrenia patients. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify regional brain alterations that correlate with Quality of Life Scale score in the patient group. Schizophrenia patients showed gray matter reductions in the frontal, temporal, limbic, and subcortical regions. We then performed voxel-based multiple regression analysis in these regions to identify any correlations between regional gray matter volume and Quality of Life Scale scores. We found that among four subcategories of the scale, the Instrumental Role category score correlated with gray matter volume in the right anterior insula in schizophrenia patients. In addition, this correlation was shown to be mediated by negative symptoms. Our findings suggest that the neural basis of objective quality of life might differ topographically from that of subjective QOL in schizophrenia. PMID:26544607

  5. Association of regional gray matter volumes in the brain with disruptive behavior disorders in male and female children

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Kalina J.; Decety, Jean; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2014-01-01

    Because the disruptive behavior disorders are highly impairing conditions, it is important to determine if structural variations in brain are associated early in life with these problems among children. Structural MRI data were acquired from 111 9–11 year olds (58 girls and 53 boys), 43 who met diagnostic criteria for oppositional defiant disorder and/or conduct disorder and 68 healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry was used to examine associations of behavioral measures with gray matter volumes in whole-brain analyses. Unlike previous studies, variation in gray matter volume was not found to be associated with a disruptive behavior disorder diagnosis in any brain region at p < .05 with FWE correction. Nonetheless, an inverse nonlinear association of the number of conduct disorder (CD) symptoms with gray matter volume along the left superior temporal sulcus was significant in the full sample (p < .05 with FWE correction), with a trend in the right hemisphere (p < 0.001 uncorrected). There also was a trend toward a stronger association of the number of CD symptoms with gray matter volume along the left superior temporal sulcus in girls than boys. The present findings did not replicate previous findings of reduced gray matter volumes in the anterior insula, amygdala, and frontal cortex in youth with CD, but are consistent with previous findings of reduced gray matter volumes in temporal regions, particularly in girls. PMID:25610787

  6. Framing and localization in Chern-Simons theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco S.; Griguolo, Luca; Leoni, Matias; Mauri, Andrea; Penati, Silvia; Seminara, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    Supersymmetric localization provides exact results that should match QFT computations in some regularization scheme. The agreement is particularly subtle in three dimensions where complex answers from localization procedure sometimes arise. We investigate this problem by studying the expectation value of the 1/6 BPS Wilson loop in planar ABJ(M) theory at three loops in perturbation theory. We reproduce the corresponding term in the localization result and argue that it originates entirely from a non-trivial framing of the circular contour. Contrary to pure Chern-Simons theory, we point out that for ABJ(M) the framing phase is a non-trivial function of the couplings and that it potentially receives contributions from vertex-like diagrams. Finally, we briefly discuss the intimate link between the exact framing factor and the Bremsstrahlung function of the 1/2-BPS cusp.

  7. Extreme Deep White Matter Hyperintensity Volumes Are Associated with African American Race

    PubMed Central

    Nyquist, Paul A.; Bilgel, Murat S.; Gottesman, Rebbecca; Yanek, Lisa R.; Moy, Taryn F.; Becker, Lewis C.; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer; Prince, Jerry; Yousem, David M.; Becker, Diane M.; Kral, Brian G.; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2014-01-01

    Background African Americans (AAs) have a higher prevalence of extreme ischemic white matter hyperintesities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) than do European Americans based on the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) score. Ischemic white matter disease, limited to the deep white matter, may be biologically distinct from disease in other regions and may reflect a previously observed trend toward increased risk of subcortical lacunar infarcts in AA. We hypothesized that extreme deep WMH volume (DWMV) or periventricular volume (PV) may also have higher prevalence in AAs. Thus, we studied extreme CHS scores and extreme DWMV and PV in a healthy population enriched for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Methods We imaged the brains of 593 subjects who were first degree relatives of probands with early onset coronary disease prior to 60 years of age. WMHs were manually delineated on 3T cranial MRI by a trained radiology reader the location and volume of lesions were characterized using automated software. DWMV and PV were measured directly with automated software and the CHS score was determined by a Neuro-radiologist. Volumes were characterized as being in the upper 25% versus lower 75% of total lesion volume. Volumes in the upper quartile vs. the remaining were examined for AA versus European American (EA) race using multiple logistic regression (GEE adjusted for family relatedness) and adjusted for major vascular disease risk factors including age ≥ 55 years vs. younger than 55, sex, current smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and LDL>160. Results Participants were 58% women and 37% AA, with a mean age of 51.5±11.0 years (range, 29-74 years). AAs had significantly higher odds of having extreme DWMV (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.9; p=0.0076) independent of age, sex, hypertension, and all other risk factors. AAs also had significantly higher odds of having extreme CHS scores ≥3 (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6; p=0.025). Extreme PV was not significantly

  8. Eshelby inclusions in granular matter: Theory and simulations.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Sean; Crassous, Jérôme; Amon, Axelle

    2016-08-01

    We present a numerical implementation of an active inclusion in a granular material submitted to a biaxial test. We discuss the dependence of the response to this perturbation on two parameters: the intragranular friction coefficient on one hand, and the degree of the loading on the other hand. We compare the numerical results to theoretical predictions taking into account the change of volume of the inclusion as well as the anisotropy of the elastic matrix. PMID:27627380

  9. Impulsivity relates to striatal gray matter volumes in humans: evidence from a delay discounting paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tschernegg, Melanie; Pletzer, Belinda; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Hoffmann, Uta; Kronbichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Time-stable personality traits, such as impulsivity and its relationship with functional and structural brain alterations, have gained much attention in the recent literature. Evidence from functional neuroimaging data implies an association between impulsivity and cortical as well as subcortical areas of the reward system. Discounting future rewards during impulsive decisions can be related to activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and striatum. Cortical structural changes in prefrontal regions have been found for introspective impulsivity measures. The present study focuses on brain regions associated with delay discounting to investigate structural manifestations of trait impulsivity. To test this, seventy subjects underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by a behavioral delay discounting task outside of the scanner to measure impulsivity with questions like: “Would you like to have 3€ immediately or 10€ in 5 days?”. The amount of smaller-but-sooner decisions was calculated and used as a measure of behavioral impulsivity. Furthermore, we estimated subject’s individual delay discounting parameter K reflecting the tendency to discount future rewards. Behaviorally, we found strong evidence in favor of a discounting utility model compared to a standard hyperbolic model of choice valuation. Neuronally, we focused on cortical and subcortical brain structure and investigated the association of behavioral impulsivity with delay discounting tendencies and gray matter volume. Voxel-based morphometric analyses showed positive correlations between delay discounting and gray matter volume in the striatum. Additional analyses using Freesurfer provided evidence for a positive correlation between delay discounting and gray matter volume of the caudate. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence for a structural manifestation of time-stable trait impulsivity in the human brain. PMID:26190993

  10. Gray-white matter and cerebrospinal fluid volume differences in children with Specific Language Impairment and/or Reading Disability.

    PubMed

    Girbau-Massana, Dolors; Garcia-Marti, Gracian; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Schwartz, Richard G

    2014-04-01

    We studied gray-white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alterations that may be critical for language, through an optimized voxel-based morphometry evaluation in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI), compared to Typical Language Development (TLD). Ten children with SLI (8;5-10;9) and 14 children with TLD (8;2-11;8) participated. They received a comprehensive language and reading test battery. We also analyzed a subgroup of six children with SLI+RD (Reading Disability). Brain images from 3-Tesla MRIs were analyzed with intelligence, age, gender, and total intracranial volume as covariates. Children with SLI or SLI+RD exhibited a significant lower overall gray matter volume than children with TLD. Particularly, children with SLI showed a significantly lower volume of gray matter compared to children with TLD in the right postcentral parietal gyrus (BA4), and left and right medial occipital gyri (BA19). The group with SLI also exhibited a significantly greater volume of gray matter in the right superior occipital gyrus (BA19), which may reflect a brain reorganization to compensate for their lower volumes at medial occipital gyri. Children with SLI+RD, compared to children with TLD, showed a significantly lower volume of: (a) gray matter in the right postcentral parietal gyrus; and (b) white matter in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (RILF), which interconnects the temporal and occipital lobes. Children with TLD exhibited a significantly lower CSF volume than children with SLI and children with SLI+RD respectively, who had somewhat smaller volumes of gray matter allowing for more CSF volume. The significant lower gray matter volume at the right postcentral parietal gyrus and greater cerebrospinal fluid volume may prove to be unique markers for SLI. We discuss the association of poor knowledge/visual representations and language input to brain development. Our comorbid study showed that a significant lower volume of white matter in the right

  11. DAMA confronts null searches in the effective theory of dark matter-nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dark matter interpretation of the modulation signal reported by the DAMA experiment from the perspective of effective field theories displaying Galilean invariance. We consider the most general effective coupling leading to the elastic scattering of a dark matter particle with spin 0 or 1/2 off a nucleon, and we analyze the compatibility of the DAMA signal with the null results from other direct detection experiments, as well as with the non-observation of a high energy neutrino flux in the direction of the Sun from dark matter annihilation. To this end, we develop a novel semi-analytical approach for comparing experimental results in the high-dimensional parameter space of the non-relativistic effective theory. Assuming the standard halo model, we find a strong tension between the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal and the null result experiments. We also list possible ways-out of this conclusion.

  12. Astronomical constraints on quantum theories of cold dark matter - II. Supermassive black holes and luminous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivey, S. C.; Musielak, Z. E.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Our previous model of quantum cold dark matter (QCDM) is expanded to include the influence of supermassive black holes located at centres of different galaxies and galactic luminous (baryonic) matter distributions. The inclusion of a black hole to the galactic potential is shown to produce a more concentrated halo with a cuspier core. The addition of a small-scale galactic luminous matter distribution also concentrates the halo, while a large-scale distribution diffuses it; nevertheless, in either case the smooth core of the halo is preserved. Effects caused by including a non-linear scattering term are investigated by solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The obtained results demonstrate that the scattering term produces a rounder and more diffuse density profile. Moreover, adding a sufficiently large black hole in combination with this term results in an even cuspier profile than the black hole alone. As a result of all these additions, our extended QCDM model can be applied to a much larger range of dark matter halo shapes and sizes.

  13. Overlapping decline in orbitofrontal gray matter volume related to cocaine use and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dana G; Jones, P Simon; Williams, Guy B; Bullmore, Edward T; Robbins, Trevor W; Ersche, Karen D

    2015-01-01

    Loss of control over hedonically motivated actions is a defining component of impulse control disorders, such as drug dependence and the proposed 'food addiction' model of obesity. Devolution from goal-directed to compulsively maintained behaviors is partially attributed to abnormalities in the orbitofrontal cortex, an area critical in reward valuation. In the current study, overlapping reductions in orbitofrontal gray matter volume relating to body mass index were seen in healthy control and cocaine-dependent individuals, as well as in relation to duration of cocaine abuse, providing support for a shared neuropathology between the two conditions potentially related to dysfunctional reward-seeking behavior. PMID:23927455

  14. MRI-based correction for PET partial volume effects in the presence of heterogeneity in gray matter radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, C.C.; Zubieta, J.K.; Links, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Quantitation of small structures with PET may be inaccurate due to partial volume averaging of surrounding structures. We have previously described a method of correcting PET data for the effects of partial volume averaging on gray matter quantitation. This method may incompletely correct gray matter structures when local tissue concentrations are highly heterogenous. We present an extension of our previous method that by accounting for gray matter heterogeneity, allows for partial volume correction in small structures that can be delineated on MR images. Spoiled gradient echo MR data were acquired coplanar to the PET imaging plane. For each PET slice, 17 contiguous 1.5 mm-thick MR images were tri-segmented into gray matter, white matter, matter maps were created by and the for gray a second step, the structure of for volume and spill-in from surrounding gray and white matter. PET images simulated from MR data from patients with Alzheimer disease and controls demonstrated full recovery of tracer concentration in the amygdala over a range of contrasts (from that of white matter to 4x gray matter) (error = 0.36{plus_minus}0.29%) and sizes (152-725mm{sup 3}) (error = 0.11{plus_minus}0.17%). The method was validated with sphere phantoms and a 5-compartment brain phantom in actual PET acquisitions. This newly developed and validated MR-based partial volume correction algorithm for PET, accurately derives non-homogeneous gray matter radioactivity concentrations and should improve quantitation of subcortical structures.

  15. How Theory Matters: Formative Assessment Theory and Practices and Their Different Relations to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossouard, Barbara; Pryor, John

    2012-01-01

    The positioning of theory in relation to educational practice has provoked much recent debate, with some arguing that educational theory constrains thinking in education, while others dismiss "theory" out of hand as belonging to the world of the "academic," abstracted from the "realities" of the classroom. This paper views theory as necessarily…

  16. Reading Research: Advances in Theory and Practice. Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besner, D., Ed.; And Others

    Intended to (1) provide new data and reconceptualizations relevant to evolving debates, (2) present summaries of current theoretical positions, and (3) in some cases, to juxtapose radically different opinions in a rapidly growing field, this volume offers a number of views on topics concerning visual word recognition. In chapter 1, Thomas H. Carr…

  17. Many-particle theory of nuclear systems with application to neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakkalakal, D. A.; Yang, C.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning energy-density relation for the normal state of neutron star matter, and the effects of superfluidity and polarization on neutron star matter. Considering constraints on variation, and the theory of quantum fluids, three methods for calculating the energy-density range are presented. The effects of polarization on neutron star structure, and polarization effects on condensation and superfluid-state energy are discussed.

  18. Testing two alternative theories to dark matter with the Milky Way dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. L. C.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Reinisch, G.

    2015-02-01

    Two alternative theories to dark matter are investigated by testing their ability to describe consistently the dynamics of the Milky Way. The first one refers to a modified gravity theory having a running gravitational constant and the second assumes that dark matter halos are constituted by a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). The parameters of each model as well as those characterizing the stellar subsystems of the Galaxy were estimated by fitting the rotation curve of the Milky Way. Then, using these parameters, the vertical acceleration profile at the solar position was computed and compared with observations. The modified gravity theory overestimates the vertical acceleration derived from stellar kinematics while predictions of the BEC halo model are barely consistent with observations. However, a dark matter halo based on a collisionless fluid satisfies our consistency test, being the best model able to describe equally well the rotation curve and the vertical acceleration of the Galaxy.

  19. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volumes III [and] IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Two volumes of a handbook on theory and research in higher education are presented. The 11 papers included in Volume III are as follows: "Qualitative Research Methods in Higher Education" (R. Crowson); "Bricks and Mortar: Architecture and the Study of Higher Education" (J. Thelin and J. Yankovich); "Enrollment Demand Models and Their Policy Uses…

  20. Theory in Bilingual Education: Ethnoperspectives in Bilingual Education Research, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Raymond V., Ed.

    The second of three volumes that present the three basic factors of the bilingual education equation--public policy, theory, and technology--this volume focuses on the theoretical aspects of bilingual education. Papers from the areas of language, culture, neurolinguistics, and pedagogy include: (1) "Ethnic and Linguistic Processes: The Future of…

  1. A white matter lesion-filling approach to improve brain tissue volume measurements

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Lladó, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis white matter (WM) lesions can affect brain tissue volume measurements of voxel-wise segmentation methods if these lesions are included in the segmentation process. Several authors have presented different techniques to improve brain tissue volume estimations by filling WM lesions before segmentation with intensities similar to those of WM. Here, we propose a new method to refill WM lesions, where contrary to similar approaches, lesion voxel intensities are replaced by random values of a normal distribution generated from the mean WM signal intensity of each two-dimensional slice. We test the performance of our method by estimating the deviation in tissue volume between a set of 30 T1-w 1.5 T and 30 T1-w 3 T images of healthy subjects and the same images where: WM lesions have been previously registered and afterwards replaced their voxel intensities to those between gray matter (GM) and WM tissue. Tissue volume is computed independently using FAST and SPM8. When compared with the state-of-the-art methods, on 1.5 T data our method yields the lowest deviation in WM between original and filled images, independently of the segmentation method used. It also performs the lowest differences in GM when FAST is used and equals to the best method when SPM8 is employed. On 3 T data, our method also outperforms the state-of-the-art methods when FAST is used while performs similar to the best method when SPM8 is used. The proposed technique is currently available to researchers as a stand-alone program and as an SPM extension. PMID:25379419

  2. A white matter lesion-filling approach to improve brain tissue volume measurements.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Lladó, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis white matter (WM) lesions can affect brain tissue volume measurements of voxel-wise segmentation methods if these lesions are included in the segmentation process. Several authors have presented different techniques to improve brain tissue volume estimations by filling WM lesions before segmentation with intensities similar to those of WM. Here, we propose a new method to refill WM lesions, where contrary to similar approaches, lesion voxel intensities are replaced by random values of a normal distribution generated from the mean WM signal intensity of each two-dimensional slice. We test the performance of our method by estimating the deviation in tissue volume between a set of 30 T1-w 1.5 T and 30 T1-w 3 T images of healthy subjects and the same images where: WM lesions have been previously registered and afterwards replaced their voxel intensities to those between gray matter (GM) and WM tissue. Tissue volume is computed independently using FAST and SPM8. When compared with the state-of-the-art methods, on 1.5 T data our method yields the lowest deviation in WM between original and filled images, independently of the segmentation method used. It also performs the lowest differences in GM when FAST is used and equals to the best method when SPM8 is employed. On 3 T data, our method also outperforms the state-of-the-art methods when FAST is used while performs similar to the best method when SPM8 is used. The proposed technique is currently available to researchers as a stand-alone program and as an SPM extension. PMID:25379419

  3. Testing spontaneous localization theories with matter-wave interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmrichter, Stefan; Haslinger, Philipp; Arndt, Markus; Hornberger, Klaus

    2011-04-15

    We propose to test the theory of continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) in an all-optical time-domain Talbot-Lau interferometer for clusters with masses exceeding 10{sup 6} amu. By assessing the relevant environmental decoherence mechanisms, as well as the growing size of the particles relative to the grating fringes, we argue that it will be feasible to test the quantum superposition principle in a mass range excluded by recent estimates of the CSL effect.

  4. Gray and white matter volume abnormalities in generalized anxiety disorder by categorical and dimensional characterization.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Kevin; Pine, Daniel S; Muehlhan, Markus; Lueken, Ulrike; Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-12-30

    Increasing efforts have been made to investigate the underlying pathophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but only limited consistent information is available on gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volume changes in affected adults. Additionally, few studies employed dimensional approaches to GAD pathology. This study compares structural brain imaging data from n=19 GAD subjects and n=24 healthy comparison (HC) subjects, all medication-free and matched on age, sex and education. Separate categorical and dimensional models were employed using voxel-based morphometry for GM and WM. Significantly higher GM volumes were found in GAD subjects mainly in basal ganglia structures and less consistently in the superior temporal pole. For WM, GAD subjects showed significantly lower volumes in the dlPFC. Largely consistent findings in dimensional and categorical models point toward these structural alterations being reliable and of importance for GAD. While lower volume in the dlPFC could reflect impaired emotional processing and control over worry in GAD, basal ganglia alterations may be linked to disturbed gain and loss anticipation as implicated in previous functional GAD studies. As perturbations in anticipation processes are central to GAD, these areas may warrant greater attention in future studies. PMID:26490569

  5. Does white matter structure or hippocampal volume mediate associations between cortisol and cognitive ageing?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Simon R.; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Hernández, Maria del C. Valdés; Bastin, Mark E.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels putatively damage specific brain regions, which in turn may accelerate cognitive ageing. However, many studies are cross-sectional or have relatively short follow-up periods, making it difficult to relate GCs directly to changes in cognitive ability with increasing age. Moreover, studies combining endocrine, MRI and cognitive variables are scarce, measurement methods vary considerably, and formal tests of the underlying causal hypothesis (cortisol → brain → cognition) are absent. In this study, 90 men, aged 73 years, provided measures of fluid intelligence, processing speed and memory, diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol and two measures of white matter (WM) structure (WM hyperintensity volume from structural MRI and mean diffusivity averaged across 12 major tracts from diffusion tensor MRI), hippocampal volume, and also cognitive ability at age 11. We tested whether negative relationships between cognitive ageing differences (over more than 60 years) and salivary cortisol were significantly mediated by WM and hippocampal volume. Significant associations between reactive cortisol at 73 and cognitive ageing differences between 11 and 73 (r = −.28 to −.36, p < .05) were partially mediated by both WM structural measures, but not hippocampal volume. Cortisol-WM relationships were modest, as was the degree to which WM structure attenuated cortisol–cognition associations (<15%). These data support the hypothesis that GCs contribute to cognitive ageing differences from childhood to the early 70s, partly via brain WM structure. PMID:26298692

  6. A Voxel Based Morphometry Study of Brain Gray Matter Volumes in Juvenile Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jayarajan, Rajan Nishanth; Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Viswanath, Biju; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Srinath, Shoba; Chandrashekar, C.R.; Janardhan Reddy, Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adult patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have been shown to have gray matter (GM) volume differences from healthy controls in multiple regions – the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial frontal gyri (MFG), striatum, thalamus, and superior parietal lobule. However, there is paucity of data with regard to juvenile OCD. Hence, we examined GM volume differences between juvenile OCD patients and matched healthy controls using voxel based morphometry (VBM) with the above apriori regions of interest. Method: Fifteen right handed juvenile patients with OCD and age- sex- handedness- matched healthy controls were recruited after administering the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-KID and the Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, and scanned using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. VBM methodology was followed. Results: In comparison with healthy controls, patients had significantly smaller GM volumes in left ACC. YBOCS total score (current) showed significant negative correlation with GM volumes in bilateral OFC, and left superior parietal lobule. Conclusion: These findings while reiterating the important role of the orbito-fronto-striatal circuitry, also implicate in the parietal lobe – especially the superior parietal lobule as an important structure involved in the pathogenesis of OCD. PMID:26379719

  7. Chiral gauge theories and a dirac neutrino - Dark matter connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    It is proposed that all light fermionic degrees of freedom, including the Standard Model (SM) fermions and all possible light beyond-the-standard model fields, are chiral with respect to some spontaneously broken abelian gauge symmetry. A new gauge symmetry U(1)ν is required if light fermionic new states are to exist. Anomaly cancellations mandate the existence of several new fields with nontrivial U(1)ν charges. A general technique to write down chiral-fermions-only models that are at least anomaly-free under a U(1) gauge symmetry is described. A concrete example that provides a Dark Matter candidate and leads to parametrically small Dirac neutrino masses is further developed.

  8. Altered Gray Matter Volume and School Age Anxiety in Children Born Late Preterm

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Cynthia E; Barch, Deanna M; Sylvester, Chad M; Pagliaccio, David; Harms, Michael P; Botteron, Kelly N; Luby, Joan L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine if late preterm (LP) children differ from full term (FT) children in volumes of the cortex, hippocampus, corpus callosum, or amygdala and whether these differences are associated with anxiety symptoms at school-age. Study design LP children born between 34 and 36 weeks gestation and FT children born between 39 and 41 weeks gestation from a larger longitudinal cohort had MRI scans at school-age. Brain volumes, cortical surface area and thickness measures were obtained. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview annually beginning at preschool-age and following the MRI. Results LP children (n=21) had a smaller percentage of total, right parietal, and right temporal lobe gray matter volume than FT children (n=87). There were no differences in hippocampal, callosal, or amygdala volumes or cortical thickness. LP children also had a relative decrease in right parietal lobe cortical surface area. LP children had greater anxiety symptoms over all assessments. The relationship between late prematurity and school-age anxiety symptoms was mediated by the relative decrease in right temporal lobe volume. Conclusion LP children, comprising 70% of preterm children, are also at increased risk for altered brain development particularly in the right temporal and parietal cortices. Alterations in the right temporal lobe cortical volume may underlie the increased rate of anxiety symptoms among these LP children. These findings suggest that LP delivery may disrupt temporal and parietal cortical development that persists until school-age with the right temporal lobe conferring risk for elevated anxiety symptoms. PMID:25108541

  9. Transonic Symposium: Theory, Application, and Experiment, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foughner, Jerome T., Jr. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the state of the art in transonic flow disciplines and to glimpse at future directions, NASA-Langley held a Transonic Symposium. Emphasis was placed on steady, three dimensional external, transonic flow and its simulation, both numerically and experimentally. The symposium included technical sessions on wind tunnel and flight experiments; computational fluid dynamic applications; inviscid methods and grid generation; viscous methods and boundary layer stability; and wind tunnel techniques and wall interference. This, being volume 1, is unclassified.

  10. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume XIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    The 10 papers in this handbook consider higher education theory and research. Following an opening essay, "Recollections and Reflections," by C. Robert Pace, which offers reflections on higher education as a field, on its evolution, and it future research needs, papers include: "Reflections on the Study of Effective College Teaching and Student…

  11. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Ten papers on theory and research in higher education have the following titles and authors: "Collegiality: Toward a Clarification of Meaning and Function" (James L. Bess); "Quality by Design: Toward a Framework for Academic Quality Management" (David D. Dill); "Beyond 'the State': Interorganizational Relations and State Apparatuses in…

  12. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Eleven papers on theory and research in higher education have the following titles and authors: "Strategy and Effectiveness in Systems of Higher Education" (Ellen Earle Chaffee); "Responsibilty Without Authority: The Impossible Job of the College President" (Robert Birnbaum); "Trouble in the Land: The Paradigm Revolution in the Academic…

  13. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Ten papers on theory and research in higher education have the following titles and authors: "An Analysis of the Paradigmatic Evolution of U.S. Higher Education and Implications for the Year 2000" (Hasan Simsek and Richard B. Heydinger); "A Motivational Analysis of Academic Life in College" (Martin V. Covington); "The Paradox of Growth in Federal…

  14. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Eleven papers on theory and research in higher education have the following titles and authors: "Perceived Control in College Students: Implications for Instruction in Higher Education" (Raymond P. Perry); "The Changing Locus of Control Over Faculty Research: From Self-Regulation to Dispersed Influence" (Melissa S. Anderson and Karen Seashore…

  15. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Eleven papers on theory and research in higher education have the following titles and authors: "A Paradigm for Research on Higher Education" (William F. Massy); "Minority Student Access to, and Persistence and Performance in College: A Review of the Trends and Research Literature" (Shirley L. Mow and Michael T. Nettles); "Master's Degree Programs…

  16. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Theory and research on the effectiveness of college operations are covered in 12 chapters. Current research on each topic is reviewed, with attention to conceptual and methodological issues, and an agenda for future research is offered. Chapter titles and authors are as follows: "Transformational Leadership in Colleges and Universities" (Kim S.…

  17. Fermion frontiers in vector lattice gauge theories: Proceedings. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The inclusion of fermions into simulations of lattice gauge theories is very difficult both theoretically and numerically. With the presence of Teraflops-scale computers for lattice gauge theory, the authors wanted a forum to discuss new approaches to lattice fermions. The workshop concentrated on approaches which are ripe for study on such large machines. Although lattice chiral fermions are vitally important to understand, there is not technique at hand which is viable on these Teraflops-scale machines for real-world problems. The discussion was therefore focused on recent developments and future prospects for QCD-like theories. For the well-known fermion formulations, the Aoki phase in Wilson fermions, novelties of U{sub A}(1) symmetry and the {eta}{prime} for staggered fermions and new approaches for simulating the determinant for Wilson fermions were discussed. The newer domain-wall fermion formulation was reviewed, with numerical results given by many speakers. The fermion proposal of Friedberg, Lee and Pang was introduced. They also were able to compare and contrast the dependence of QCD and QCD-like SUSY theories on the number of quark flavors. These proceedings consist of several transparencies and a summary page from each speaker. This should serve to outline the major points made in each talk.

  18. Theories on Criminality and Mental Retardation Project CAMIO, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jimmy R.; Friel, Charles M.

    This historical review of theories on criminality and mental retardation is part of Project CAMIO (Correctional Administration and the Mentally Incompetent Offender), a Texas study to determine the incidence of criminal incarceration of the mentally retarded (MR) and to identify laws, procedures, and practices which affect the prosecution and…

  19. Effective field theory of dark matter and structure formation: Semianalytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2014-02-01

    Complimenting recent work on the effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures, here we present detailed approximate analytical results and further pedagogical understanding of the method. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and integrate out short modes of a dark matter/dark energy dominated universe (ΛCDM) whose matter is comprised of massive particles as used in cosmological simulations. This establishes a long distance effective fluid, valid for length scales larger than the nonlinear scale ˜10 Mpc, and provides the complete description of large scale structure formation. Extracting the time dependence, we derive recursion relations that encode the perturbative solution. This is exact for the matter dominated era and quite accurate in ΛCDM also. The effective fluid is characterized by physical parameters, including sound speed and viscosity. These two fluid parameters play a degenerate role with each other and lead to a relative correction from standard perturbation theory of the form ˜10-6c2k2/H2. Starting from the linear theory, we calculate corrections to cosmological observables, such as the baryon-acoustic-oscillation peak, which we compute semianalytically at one-loop order. Due to the nonzero fluid parameters, the predictions of the effective field theory agree with observation much more accurately than standard perturbation theory and we explain why. We also discuss corrections from treating dark matter as interacting or wavelike and other issues.

  20. The Relationship between Processing Speed and Regional White Matter Volume in Healthy Young People

    PubMed Central

    Magistro, Daniele; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nejad, Keyvan Kashkouli; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Processing speed is considered a key cognitive resource and it has a crucial role in all types of cognitive performance. Some researchers have hypothesised the importance of white matter integrity in the brain for processing speed; however, the relationship at the whole-brain level between white matter volume (WMV) and processing speed relevant to the modality or problem used in the task has never been clearly evaluated in healthy people. In this study, we used various tests of processing speed and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses, it is involves a voxel-wise comparison of the local volume of gray and white, to assess the relationship between processing speed and regional WMV (rWMV). We examined the association between processing speed and WMV in 887 healthy young adults (504 men and 383 women; mean age, 20.7 years, SD, 1.85). We performed three different multiple regression analyses: we evaluated rWMV associated with individual differences in the simple processing speed task, word–colour and colour–word tasks (processing speed tasks with words) and the simple arithmetic task, after adjusting for age and sex. The results showed a positive relationship at the whole-brain level between rWMV and processing speed performance. In contrast, the processing speed performance did not correlate with rWMV in any of the regions examined. Our results support the idea that WMV is associated globally with processing speed performance regardless of the type of processing speed task. PMID:26397946

  1. The correlation between gray matter volume and perceived social support: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Che, XianWei; Wei, DongTao; Li, WenFu; Li, HaiJiang; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, QingLin; Liu, YiJun

    2014-01-01

    Social support refers to interpersonal exchanges that include the combinations of aid, affirmation and affection. Perceived social support is a kind of subjective judgment of one's availability of social support. In spite of the importance of perceived social support to health, however, its neural substrate remains unknown. To address this question, voxel-based morphometry was employed to investigate the neural bases of individual differences in responses to the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS) in healthy volunteers (144 men and 203 women; mean age = 19.9; SD = 1.33, age range : 17-27). As a result, multiple regression analysis revealed that the PSSS scores were significantly and positively correlated with gray matter volume in a cluster that mainly included areas in posterior parts of posterior cingulate cortex, bilateral lingual cortex, left occipital lobe and cuneus. Highly-supported individuals had larger gray matter volume in these brain regions, implying a relatively high level of ability to engage in self-referential processes and social cognition. Our results provide a biological basis for exploring perceived social support particularly in relationship to various health parameters and outcomes. PMID:24397344

  2. Fermentation, phlogiston and matter theory: chemistry and natural philosophy in Georg Ernst Stahl's Zymotechnia Fundamentalis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Ming Kevin

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines Georg Ernst Stahl's first book, the Zymotechnia Fundamentalis, in the context of contemporary natural philosophy and the author's career. I argue that the Zymotechnia was a mechanical theory of fermentation written consciously against the influential "fermentational program" of Joan Baptista van Helmont and especially Thomas Willis, Stahl's theory of fermentation introduced his first conception of phlogiston, which was in part a corpuscular transformation of the Paracelsian sulphur principle. Meanwhile some assumptions underlying this theory, such as the composition of matter, the absolute passivity of matter and the "passions" of sulphur, reveal the combined scholastic and mechanistic character of Stahl's natural philosophy. In the conclusion I show that Stahl's theory of fermentation undermined the old fermentational program and paved the way for his dualist vitalism. PMID:12049065

  3. Detecting Boosted Dark Matter from the Sun with Large Volume Neutrino Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Joshua; Cui, Yanou; Zhao, Yue; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2015-04-02

    We study novel scenarios where thermal dark matter (DM) can be efficiently captured in the Sun and annihilate into boosted dark matter. In models with semi-annihilating DM, where DM has a non-minimal stabilization symmetry, or in models with a multi-component DM sector, annihilations of DM can give rise to stable dark sector particles with moderate Lorentz boosts. We investigate both of these possibilities, presenting concrete models as proofs of concept. Both scenarios can yield viable thermal relic DM with masses O(1)-O(100) GeV. Taking advantage of the energetic proton recoils that arise when the boosted DM scatters off matter, we propose a detection strategy which uses large volume terrestrial detectors, such as those designed to detect neutrinos or proton decays. In particular, we propose a search for proton tracks pointing towards the Sun. We focus on signals at Cherenkov-radiation-based detectors such as Super-Kamiokande (SK) and its upgrade Hyper-Kamiokande (HK). We find that with spin-dependent scattering as the dominant DM-nucleus interaction at low energies, boosted DM can leave detectable signals at SK or HK, with sensitivity comparable to DM direct detection experiments while being consistent with current constraints. Our study provides a new search path for DM sectors with non-minimal structure.

  4. Detecting boosted dark matter from the Sun with large volume neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Joshua; Cui, Yanou; Zhao, Yue E-mail: ycui@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2015-02-01

    We study novel scenarios where thermal dark matter (DM) can be efficiently captured in the Sun and annihilate into boosted dark matter. In models with semi-annihilating DM, where DM has a non-minimal stabilization symmetry, or in models with a multi-component DM sector, annihilations of DM can give rise to stable dark sector particles with moderate Lorentz boosts. We investigate both of these possibilities, presenting concrete models as proofs of concept. Both scenarios can yield viable thermal relic DM with masses O(1)-O(100) GeV. Taking advantage of the energetic proton recoils that arise when the boosted DM scatters off matter, we propose a detection strategy which uses large volume terrestrial detectors, such as those designed to detect neutrinos or proton decays. In particular, we propose a search for proton tracks pointing towards the Sun. We focus on signals at Cherenkov-radiation-based detectors such as Super-Kamiokande (SK) and its upgrade Hyper-Kamiokande (HK). We find that with spin-dependent scattering as the dominant DM-nucleus interaction at low energies, boosted DM can leave detectable signals at SK or HK, with sensitivity comparable to DM direct detection experiments while being consistent with current constraints. Our study provides a new search path for DM sectors with non-minimal structure.

  5. SIRU utilization. Volume 1: Theory, development and test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musoff, H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory, development, and test evaluations of the Strapdown Inertial Reference Unit (SIRU) are discussed. The statistical failure detection and isolation, single position calibration, and self alignment techniques are emphasized. Circuit diagrams of the system components are provided. Mathematical models are developed to show the performance characteristics of the subsystems. Specific areas of the utilization program are identified as: (1) error source propagation characteristics and (2) local level navigation performance demonstrations.

  6. Grey Matter Volumes in Children with Conduct Problems and Varying Levels of Callous-Unemotional Traits.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Catherine L; De Brito, Stéphane A; McCrory, Eamon J; Hyde, Zoe H; Lockwood, Patricia L; Cecil, Charlotte A M; Viding, Essi

    2016-05-01

    Genetic, behavioural and functional neuroimaging studies have revealed that different vulnerabilities characterise children with conduct problems and high levels of callous-unemotional traits (CP/HCU) compared with children with conduct problems and low callous-unemotional traits (CP/LCU). We used voxel-based morphometry to study grey matter volume (GMV) in 89 male participants (aged 10-16), 60 of whom exhibited CP. The CP group was subdivided into CP/HCU (n = 29) and CP/LCU (n = 31). Whole-brain and regional GMV were compared across groups (CP vs. typically developing (TD) controls (n = 29); and CP/HCU vs. CP/LCU vs. TD). Whole-brain analyses showed reduced GMV in left middle frontal gyrus in the CP/HCU group compared with TD controls. Region-of-interest analyses showed reduced volume in bilateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the CP group as a whole compared with TD controls. Reduced volume in left OFC was found to be driven by the CP/HCU group only, with significant reductions relative to both TD controls and the CP/LCU group, and no difference between these latter two groups. Within the CP group left OFC volume was significantly predicted by CU traits, but not conduct disorder symptoms. Reduced right anterior cingulate cortex volume was also found in CP/HCU compared with TD controls. Our results support previous findings indicating that GMV differences in brain regions central to decision-making and empathy are implicated in CP. However, they extend these data to suggest that some of these differences might specifically characterise the subgroup with CP/HCU, with GMV reduction in left OFC differentiating children with CP/HCU from those with CP/LCU. PMID:26364620

  7. Effect of Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism on age-related gray matter volume changes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mu-En; Huang, Chu-Chung; Yang, Albert C; Tu, Pei-Chi; Yeh, Heng-Liang; Hong, Chen-Jee; Chen, Jin-Fan; Liou, Ying-Jay; Lin, Ching-Po; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) gene is a major regulator of neural plasticity and cellular resilience. Recently, the Bcl-2 rs956572 single nucleotide polymorphism was proposed to be a functional allelic variant that modulates cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. Our cross-sectional study investigated the genetic effect of this Bcl-2 polymorphism on age-related decreases in gray matter (GM) volume across the adult lifespan. Our sample comprised 330 healthy volunteers (191 male, 139 female) with a mean age of 56.2±22.0 years (range: 21-92). Magnetic resonance imaging and genotyping of the Bcl-2 rs956572 were performed for each participant. The differences in regional GM volumes between G homozygotes and A-allele carriers were tested using optimized voxel-based morphometry. The association between the Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism and age was a predictor of regional GM volumes in the right cerebellum, bilateral lingual gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and right parahippocampal gyrus. We found that the volume of these five regions decreased with increasing age (all P<.001). Moreover, the downward slope was steeper among the Bcl-2 rs956572 A-allele carriers than in the G-homozygous participants. Our data provide convergent evidence for the genetic effect of the Bcl-2 functional allelic variant in brain aging. The rs956572 G-allele, which is associated with significantly higher Bcl-2 protein expression and diminished cellular sensitivity to stress-induced apoptosis, conferred a protective effect against age-related changes in brain GM volume, particularly in the cerebellum. PMID:23437205

  8. Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the development of white matter volume and change in executive function.

    PubMed

    Gautam, P; Nuñez, S C; Narr, K L; Kan, E C; Sowell, E R

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can cause a wide range of deficits in executive function that persist throughout life, but little is known about how changes in brain structure relate to cognition in affected individuals. In the current study, we predicted that the rate of white matter volumetric development would be atypical in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) when compared to typically developing children, and that the rate of change in cognitive function would relate to differential white matter development between groups. Data were available for 103 subjects [49 with FASD, 54 controls, age range 6-17, mean age = 11.83] with 153 total observations. Groups were age-matched. Participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and an executive function (EF) battery. Using white matter volumes measured bilaterally for frontal and parietal regions and the corpus callosum, change was predicted by modeling the effects of age, intracranial volume, sex, and interactions with exposure status and EF measures. While both groups showed regional increases in white matter volumes and improvement in cognitive performance over time, there were significant effects of exposure status on age-related relationships between white matter increases and EF measures. Specifically, individuals with FASD consistently showed a positive relationship between improved cognitive function and increased white matter volume over time, while no such relationships were seen in controls. These novel results relating improved cognitive function with increased white matter volume in FASD suggest that better cognitive outcomes could be possible for FASD subjects through interventions that enhance white matter plasticity. PMID:24918069

  9. Childhood Maltreatment Is Associated with Larger Left Thalamic Gray Matter Volume in Adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Mei; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yan; He, Zhong; Song, Ming; Jiang, Tianzi; Li, Zexuan; Lu, Shaojia; Wu, Weiwei; Su, Linyan; Li, Lingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common anxiety disorder that usually begins in adolescence. Childhood maltreatment is highly prevalent and increases the possibility for developing a variety of mental disorders including anxiety disorders. An earlier age at onset of GAD is significantly related to maltreatment in childhood. Exploring the underpinnings of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and adolescent onset GAD would be helpful in identifying the potential risk markers of this condition. Methods Twenty-six adolescents with GAD and 25 healthy controls participated in this study. A childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) was introduced to assess childhood maltreatment. All subjects underwent high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to investigate gray matter alterations. Results Significantly larger gray matter volumes of the right putamen were observed in GAD patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, a significant diagnosis-by-maltreatment interaction effect for the left thalamic gray matter volume was revealed, as shown by larger volumes of the left thalamic gray matter in GAD patients with childhood maltreatment compared with GAD patients without childhood maltreatment as well as with healthy controls with/without childhood maltreatment. A significant positive association between childhood maltreatment and left thalamic gray matter volume was only seen in GAD patients. Conclusions These findings revealed an increased volume in the subcortical regions in adolescent GAD, and the alterations in the left thalamus might be involved in the association between childhood maltreatment and the occurrence of GAD. PMID:23951265

  10. Cognitive impairment and gray matter volume abnormalities in silent cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Lan; Xiang, Mingqing; Luo, Wei; Huang, Jinbai; Li, Maokun; Xiong, Xunbo; Wang, Hua

    2015-10-21

    To investigate the association between cognitive impairment and gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities in silent cerebral infarction (SCI) patients, the GMV of 62 pairs of patients and well-matched healthy controls was calculated. All participants underwent a P300 test, a Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test. Compared with controls, the patients showed decreased GMV in the left superior frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus; no significantly increasing GMV was found. The volumes of the frontal and temporal lobes were positively correlated with the score of the MoCA scale and P300 amplitudes (r≥0.62, P<0.01). The P300 latency was negatively correlated with the volumes of the frontal lobe, the temporal lobe, and the hippocampus (r≤-0.71, P<0.05). No significant correlations between the GMV of the abnormal brain regions and four clinical characteristics in SCI patients were found, suggesting that cognitive deficiency existed in SCI patients and the reduced GMV might contribute to the pathology of cognitive deficiency in SCI patients. PMID:26313037

  11. Mixing subattolitre volumes in a quantitative and highly parallel manner with soft matter nanofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Sune M.; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves; Hatzakis, Nikos S.; Mortensen, Michael W.; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Handling and mixing ultrasmall volumes of reactants in parallel can increase the throughput and complexity of screening assays while simultaneously reducing reagent consumption. Microfabricated silicon and plastic can provide reliable fluidic devices, but cannot typically handle total volumes smaller than ~1 × 10-12 l. Self-assembled soft matter nanocontainers can in principle significantly improve miniaturization and biocompatibility, but exploiting their full potential is a challenge due to their small dimensions. Here, we show that small unilamellar lipid vesicles can be used to mix volumes as small as 1 × 10-19 l in a reproducible and highly parallelized fashion. The self-enclosed nanoreactors are functionalized with lipids of opposite charge to achieve reliable fusion. Single vesicles encapsulating one set of reactants are immobilized on a glass surface and then fused with diffusing vesicles of opposite charge that carry a complementary set of reactants. We find that ~85% of the ~1 × 106 cm-2 surface-tethered nanoreactors undergo non-deterministic fusion, which is leakage-free in all cases, and the system allows up to three to four consecutive mixing events per nanoreactor.

  12. Probing Wilson loops in N = 4 Chern-Simons-matter theories at weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griguolo, Luca; Leoni, Matias; Mauri, Andrea; Penati, Silvia; Seminara, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    For three-dimensional N = 4 super-Chern-Simons-matter theories associated to necklace quivers U (N0) × U (N1) × ⋯ U (N 2 r - 1), we study at quantum level the two kinds of 1/2 BPS Wilson loop operators recently introduced http://arxiv.org/abs/1507

  13. Testing the Dark Matter Caustic Theory Against Observations in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Julie; Newberg, Heidi J.; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    We test a particular theory of dark matter, in which dark matter axions form ring 'caustics' in the plane of the Milky Way. According to this theory, cold collisionless dark matter particles with angular momentum flow in and out of the Milky Way as it forms. These flows form caustic rings (at the positions of the rings, the density of the flow is infinite) at the locations of closest approach to the Galactic center. We show that the caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that the theory can reasonably match the known Galaxy rotation curve. We explore the effects of the caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption using N-body simulations. Simulations of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy in a caustic halo potential match observations as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center. The source code for calculating the caustic halo acceleration has been made publicly available in the NEMO Stellar Dynamics Toolbox and the Milkyway@home client repository. This research was funded by NSF grant AST 10-09670, the NASA-NY Space Grant, and the American Fellowship from AAUW.

  14. Pion condensation in a relativistic field theory consistent with bulk properties of nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.; Glendenning, N. K.; Gyulassy, M.

    1981-05-01

    Pion condensation is investigated in a self-consistent. relativistic mean field theory that is constrained to reproduce the bulk properties of nuclear matter. This constraint and self-consistency provide stringent constraints on the existence and energy of the condensate.

  15. Testing the Dark Matter Caustic Theory against Observations in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Julie; Newberg, Heidi J.; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M.; Weiss, Jake; Lewis, Kim M.

    2015-09-01

    We test a particular theory of dark matter in which dark matter axions form ring “caustics” in the plane of the Milky Way against actual observations of Milky Way stars. According to this theory, cold, collisionless dark matter particles with angular momentum flow in and out of the Milky Way on sheets. These flows form caustic rings (at the positions of the rings, the density of the flow is formally infinite) at the locations of closest approach to the Galactic center. We show that the caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that the theory can reasonably match the observed rotation curve of the Milky Way. We explore the effects of the caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption using N-body simulations. In particular, simulations of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal disruption in a caustic ring halo potential match observations of the trailing tidal tail as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center; they do not, however, match the leading tidal tail. None of the caustic ring, Navarro–Frenk–White, or triaxial logarithmic halos fit all of the data. The source code for calculating the acceleration due to a caustic ring halo has been made publicly available in the NEMO Stellar Dynamics Toolbox and the Milkyway@home client repository.

  16. Grey matter volume increase following electroconvulsive therapy in patients with late life depression: a longitudinal MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Bouckaert, Filip; De Winter, François-Laurent; Emsell, Louise; Dols, Annemieke; Rhebergen, Didi; Wampers, Martien; Sunaert, Stefan; Stek, Max; Sienaert, Pascal; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence on the mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has grown over the past decades. Recent studies show an ECT-related increase in hippocampal, amygdala and subgenual cortex volume. We examined grey matter volume changes following ECT using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) whole brain analysis in patients with severe late life depression (LLD). Methods Elderly patients with unipolar depression were treated twice weekly with right unilateral ECT until remission on the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was achieved. Cognition (Mini Mental State Examination) and psychomotor changes (CORE Assessment) were monitored at baseline and 1 week after the last session of ECT. We performed 3 T structural MRI at both time points. We used the VBM8 toolbox in SPM8 to study grey matter volume changes. Paired t tests were used to compare pre- and post-ECT grey matter volume (voxel-level family-wise error threshold p < 0.05) and to assess clinical response. Results Twenty-eight patients (mean age 71.9 ± 7.8 yr, 8 men) participated in our study. Patients received a mean of 11.2 ± 4 sessions of ECT. The remission rate was 78.6%. Cognition, psychomotor agitation and psychomotor retardation improved significantly (p < 0.001). Right- hemispheric grey matter volume was increased in the caudate nucleus, medial temporal lobe (including hippocampus and amygdala), insula and posterior superior temporal regions but did not correlate with MADRS score. Grey matter volume increase in the caudate nucleus region correlated significantly with total CORE Assessment score (r = 0.63; p < 0.001). Limitations Not all participants were medication-free. Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with LLD is associated with significant grey matter volume increase, which is most pronounced ipsilateral to the stimulation side. PMID:26395813

  17. Review of progress in the theory of volume production

    SciTech Connect

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1986-10-24

    With the demonstration of large current densities extracted from hydrogen-discharge-type negative ion sources there has been a new emphasis directed toward the further development of these volume-type sources. Along with this emphasis has been a rapid increase in our understanding of the underlying atomic processes that occur in hydrogen-negative-ion discharges, together with a rapid evolution of the geometric configuration of these ion sources. An account of the development of the atomic processes in negative hydrogen discharges has been given in a recent review. Here we shall emphasize these atomic developments as they bear on the tandem high-density ion-source configuration. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Dynamic properties of interfaces in soft matter: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, Leonard M. C.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamic properties of interfaces often play a crucial role in the macroscopic dynamics of multiphase soft condensed matter systems. These properties affect the dynamics of emulsions, of dispersions of vesicles, of biological fluids, of coatings, of free surface flows, of immiscible polymer blends, and of many other complex systems. The study of interfacial dynamic properties, surface rheology, is therefore a relevant discipline for many branches of physics, chemistry, engineering, and life sciences. In the past three to four decades a vast amount of literature has been produced dealing with the rheological properties of interfaces stabilized by low molecular weight surfactants, proteins, (bio)polymers, lipids, colloidal particles, and various mixtures of these surface active components. In this paper recent experiments are reviewed in the field of surface rheology, with particular emphasis on the models used to analyze surface rheological data. Most of the models currently used are straightforward generalizations of models developed for the analysis of rheological data of bulk phases. In general the limits on the validity of these generalizations are not discussed. Not much use is being made of recent advances in nonequilibrium thermodynamic formalisms for multiphase systems, to construct admissible models for the stress-deformation behavior of interfaces. These formalisms are ideally suited to construct thermodynamically admissible constitutive equations for rheological behavior that include the often relevant couplings to other fluxes in the interface (heat and mass), and couplings to the transfer of mass from the bulk phase to the interface. In this review recent advances in the application of classical irreversible thermodynamics, extended irreversible thermodynamics, rational thermodynamics, extended rational thermodynamics, and the general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling formalism to multiphase systems are also discussed

  19. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moran, C.; Tapp, R. J.; Hughes, A. D.; Magnussen, C. G.; Blizzard, L.; Phan, T. G.; Beare, R.; Witt, N.; Venn, A.; Münch, G.; Amaratunge, B. C.; Srikanth, V.

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  20. The Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Cerebral Gray Matter Volume Is Independent of Retinal Vascular Architecture and Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moran, C; Tapp, R J; Hughes, A D; Magnussen, C G; Blizzard, L; Phan, T G; Beare, R; Witt, N; Venn, A; Münch, G; Amaratunge, B C; Srikanth, V

    2016-01-01

    It is uncertain whether small vessel disease underlies the relationship between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and brain atrophy. We aimed to study whether retinal vascular architecture, as a proxy for cerebral small vessel disease, may modify or mediate the associations of T2DM with brain volumes. In this cross-sectional study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans and retinal photographs in 451 people with and without T2DM, we measured brain volumes, geometric measures of retinal vascular architecture, clinical retinopathy, and MRI cerebrovascular lesions. There were 270 people with (mean age 67.3 years) and 181 without T2DM (mean age 72.9 years). T2DM was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.008). T2DM was associated with greater arteriolar diameter (p = 0.03) and optimality ratio (p = 0.04), but these associations were attenuated by adjustments for age and sex. Only optimality ratio was associated with lower gray matter volume (p = 0.03). The inclusion of retinal measures in regression models did not attenuate the association of T2DM with gray matter volume. The association of T2DM with lower gray matter volume was independent of retinal vascular architecture and clinical retinopathy. Retinal vascular measures or retinopathy may not be sufficiently sensitive to confirm a microvascular basis for T2DM-related brain atrophy. PMID:27314049

  1. Effective field theory treatment of the neutrino background in direct dark matter detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Newstead, Jayden L.; Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing a dark matter interaction from an astrophysical neutrino-induced interaction will be major challenge for future direct dark matter searches. In this paper, we consider this issue within nonrelativistic effective field theory (EFT), which provides a well-motivated theoretical framework for determining nuclear responses to dark matter scattering events. We analyze the nuclear energy recoil spectra from the different dark matter-nucleon EFT operators, and compare them to the nuclear recoil energy spectra that are predicted to be induced by astrophysical neutrino sources. We determine that for 11 of the 14 possible operators, the dark matter-induced recoil spectra can be cleanly distinguished from the corresponding neutrino-induced recoil spectra with moderate-size detector technologies that are now being pursued, e.g., these operators would require 0.5 tonne years to be distinguished from the neutrino background for low mass dark matter. Our results imply that in most models detectors with good energy resolution will be able to distinguish a dark matter signal from a neutrino signal, without the need for much larger detectors that must rely on additional information from timing or direction. In addition we calculate up-to-date exclusion limits in the EFT model space using data from the LUX experiment.

  2. Viscous wing theory development. Volume 1: Analysis, method and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, R. R.; Melnik, R. E.; Marconi, F.; Steinhoff, J.

    1986-01-01

    Viscous transonic flows at large Reynolds numbers over 3-D wings were analyzed using a zonal viscid-inviscid interaction approach. A new numerical AFZ scheme was developed in conjunction with the finite volume formulation for the solution of the inviscid full-potential equation. A special far-field asymptotic boundary condition was developed and a second-order artificial viscosity included for an improved inviscid solution methodology. The integral method was used for the laminar/turbulent boundary layer and 3-D viscous wake calculation. The interaction calculation included the coupling conditions of the source flux due to the wing surface boundary layer, the flux jump due to the viscous wake, and the wake curvature effect. A method was also devised incorporating the 2-D trailing edge strong interaction solution for the normal pressure correction near the trailing edge region. A fully automated computer program was developed to perform the proposed method with one scalar version to be used on an IBM-3081 and two vectorized versions on Cray-1 and Cyber-205 computers.

  3. White matter atlas of the human spinal cord with estimation of partial volume effect.

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Benhamou, M; Naaman, C; Rainville, P; Callot, V; Cohen-Adad, J

    2015-10-01

    Template-based analysis has proven to be an efficient, objective and reproducible way of extracting relevant information from multi-parametric MRI data. Using common atlases, it is possible to quantify MRI metrics within specific regions without the need for manual segmentation. This method is therefore free from user-bias and amenable to group studies. While template-based analysis is common procedure for the brain, there is currently no atlas of the white matter (WM) spinal pathways. The goals of this study were: (i) to create an atlas of the white matter tracts compatible with the MNI-Poly-AMU template and (ii) to propose methods to quantify metrics within the atlas that account for partial volume effect. The WM atlas was generated by: (i) digitalizing an existing WM atlas from a well-known source (Gray's Anatomy), (ii) registering this atlas to the MNI-Poly-AMU template at the corresponding slice (C4 vertebral level), (iii) propagating the atlas throughout all slices of the template (C1 to T6) using regularized diffeomorphic transformations and (iv) computing partial volume values for each voxel and each tract. Several approaches were implemented and validated to quantify metrics within the atlas, including weighted-average and Gaussian mixture models. Proof-of-concept application was done in five subjects for quantifying magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in each tract of the atlas. The resulting WM atlas showed consistent topological organization and smooth transitions along the rostro-caudal axis. The median MTR across tracts was 26.2. Significant differences were detected across tracts, vertebral levels and subjects, but not across laterality (right-left). Among the different tested approaches to extract metrics, the maximum a posteriori showed highest performance with respect to noise, inter-tract variability, tract size and partial volume effect. This new WM atlas of the human spinal cord overcomes the biases associated with manual delineation and partial

  4. Gray matter volume differences specific to formal thought disorder in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Horn, Helge; Federspiel, Andrea; Wirth, Miranka; Müller, Thomas J; Wiest, Roland; Walther, Sebastian; Strik, Werner

    2010-05-30

    Formal thought disorder (FTD) is one of the main symptoms of schizophrenia. To date there are no whole brain volumetric studies investigating gray matter (GM) differences specifically associated with FTD. Here, we studied 20 right-handed schizophrenia patients that differed in the severity of formal thought disorder and 20 matched healthy controls, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The severity of FTD was measured with the Scale for the Assessment of Thought, Language, and Communication. The severity was negatively correlated with the GM volume of the left superior temporal sulcus, the left temporal pole, the right middle orbital gyrus and the right cuneus/lingual gyrus. Structural abnormalities specific for FTD were found to be unrelated to GM differences associated with schizophrenia in general. The specific GM abnormalities within the left temporal lobe may help to explain language disturbances included in FTD. PMID:20418073

  5. Enhanced functional connectivity and increased gray matter volume of insula related to action video game playing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Diankun; He, Hui; Liu, Dongbo; Ma, Weiyi; Dong, Li; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that distinct insular subregions are associated with particular neural networks (e.g., attentional and sensorimotor networks). Based on the evidence that playing action video games (AVGs) facilitates attentional and sensorimotor functions, this study examined the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of insular subregions and the functional networks therein that are related to attentional and sensorimotor functions. By comparing AVG experts and amateurs, we found that AVG experts had enhanced functional connectivity and grey matter volume in insular subregions. Furthermore, AVG experts exhibited increased functional connectivity between the attentional and sensorimotor networks, and the experience-related enhancement was predominantly evident in the left insula, an understudied brain area. Thus, AVG playing may enhance functional integration of insular subregions and the pertinent networks therein. PMID:25880157

  6. The impact of CACNA1C allelic variation on regional gray matter volume in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Mo, Yin; Sun, Xuejin; Yu, Hualin; Li, Hao; Wu, Lichuan; Li, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The SNP rs1006737 in CACNA1C gene has been significantly associated with psychiatric disorders (e.g., schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) in European populations. In Han Chinese, rs1006737 is also strongly associated with schizophrenia, although the effects of the psychosis risk SNP on related brain functions and structures in this population remain unclear. Here, we examined the association of rs1006737 with gray matter volume in a sample of 278 healthy Han Chinese. A whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis revealed a significant association in the region around right superior occipital gyrus (family-wise error corrected, P = 0.023). Our data provides initial evidence for the involvement of this psychosis genetic risk locus in brain structure variations in Chinese population, and calls for further investigations. PMID:26756527

  7. Dark matter coupling to electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons: An effective field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    If dark matter is a new species of particle produced in the early universe as a cold thermal relic (a weakly-interacting massive particle-WIMP), its present abundance, its scattering with matter in direct-detection experiments, its present-day annihilation signature in indirect-detection experiments, and its production and detection at colliders, depend crucially on the WIMP coupling to standard-model (SM) particles. It is usually assumed that the WIMP couples to the SM sector through its interactions with quarks and leptons. In this paper we explore the possibility that the WIMP coupling to the SM sector is via electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons. In the absence of an ultraviolet-complete particle-physics model, we employ effective field theory to describe the WIMP-SM coupling. We consider both scalars and Dirac fermions as possible dark-matter candidates. Starting with an exhaustive list of operators up to dimension 8, we present detailed calculation of dark-matter annihilations to all possible final states, including γγ, γZ, γh, ZZ, Zh, W+W-, hh, and ffbar, and demonstrate the correlations among them. We compute the mass scale of the effective field theory necessary to obtain the correct dark-matter mass density, and well as the resulting photon line signals.

  8. Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Schwabe, Bodo

    2015-04-24

    In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne, {sup 23}Na, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 27}Al, {sup 28}Si, {sup 32}S, {sup 40}Ar, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 59}Ni, through numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to the nuclear vector charge gives a larger contribution to the capture rate than the constant spin-dependent interaction commonly included in dark matter searches at neutrino telescopes. Our investigation lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter induced neutrino signals from the Sun. The nuclear response functions obtained in this study are listed in analytic form in an appendix, ready to be used in other projects.

  9. Association of television violence exposure with executive functioning and white matter volume in young adult males.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Tom A; Kronenberger, William G; Wang, Yang; Anderson, Caitlin C; Mathews, Vincent P

    2014-07-01

    Prior research has indicated that self-reported violent media exposure is associated with poorer performance on some neuropsychological tests in adolescents. This study aimed to examine the relationship of executive functioning to violent television viewing in healthy young adult males and examine how brain structure is associated with media exposure measures. Sixty-five healthy adult males (ages 18-29) with minimal video game experience estimated their television viewing habits over the past year and, during the subsequent week, recorded television viewing time and characteristics in a daily media diary. Participants then completed a battery of neuropsychological laboratory tests quantifying executive functions and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Aggregate measures of executive functioning were not associated with measures of overall television viewing (any content type) during the past week or year. However, the amount of television viewing of violent content only, as indicated by both past-year and daily diary measures, was associated with poorer scores on an aggregate score of inhibition, interference control and attention, with no relationship to a composite working memory score. In addition, violent television exposure, as measured with daily media diaries, was associated with reduced frontoparietal white matter volume. Future longitudinal work is necessary to resolve whether individuals with poor executive function and slower white matter growth are more drawn to violent programming, or if extensive media violence exposure modifies cognitive control mechanisms mediated primarily via prefrontal cortex. Impaired inhibitory mechanisms may be related to reported increases in aggression with higher media violence exposure. PMID:24836970

  10. ETHOS—an effective theory of structure formation: From dark particle physics to the matter distribution of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Sigurdson, Kris; Zavala, Jesús; Bringmann, Torsten; Vogelsberger, Mark; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS) that enables cosmological structure formation to be computed in almost any microphysical model of dark matter physics. This framework maps the detailed microphysical theories of particle dark matter interactions into the physical effective parameters that shape the linear matter power spectrum and the self-interaction transfer cross section of nonrelativistic dark matter. These are the input to structure formation simulations, which follow the evolution of the cosmological and galactic dark matter distributions. Models with similar effective parameters in ETHOS but with different dark particle physics would nevertheless result in similar dark matter distributions. We present a general method to map an ultraviolet complete or effective field theory of low-energy dark matter physics into parameters that affect the linear matter power spectrum and carry out this mapping for several representative particle models. We further propose a simple but useful choice for characterizing the dark matter self-interaction transfer cross section that parametrizes self-scattering in structure formation simulations. Taken together, these effective parameters in ETHOS allow the classification of dark matter theories according to their structure formation properties rather than their intrinsic particle properties, paving the way for future simulations to span the space of viable dark matter physics relevant for structure formation.

  11. The D-D¯ mesons matter in Walecka's mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias Freire, M. L.; Rodrigues da Silva, R.

    2010-11-01

    We study the D-D¯ mesons matter in the framework of σ and ω meson exchange model using Walecka's mean field theory. We choose the equal number of D and anti-D meson then we get <ω0> = 0 and the <σ> field exhibits a critical temperature around 1.2 GeV. We investigate effective mass and pressure. We conclude that this matter is a gas and these results are not favorable for the existence of D-D¯ bound state.

  12. Simplified models vs. effective field theory approaches in dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Jacques, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    In this review we discuss and compare the usage of simplified models and Effective Field Theory (EFT) approaches in dark matter searches. We provide a state of the art description on the subject of EFTs and simplified models, especially in the context of collider searches for dark matter, but also with implications for direct and indirect detection searches, with the aim of constituting a common language for future comparisons between different strategies. The material is presented in a form that is as self-contained as possible, so that it may serve as an introductory review for the newcomer as well as a reference guide for the practitioner.

  13. Gray Matter Volume Decreases in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia: A Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Caroline; Schuller, Anne Marie; Paulos, Carlos; Namer, Izzie; Pull, Charles; Danion, Jean Marie; Foucher, Jack René

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aged patients (>50 years old) with residual schizophrenic symptoms differ from young patients. They represent a subpopulation with a more unfavorable Kraepelinian course and have an increased risk (up to 30%) for dementia of unknown origin. However, our current understanding of age-related brain changes in schizophrenia is derived from studies that included less than 17% of patients who were older than 50 years of age. This study investigated the anatomical distribution of gray matter (GM) brain deficits in aged patients with ongoing schizophrenia. Methods: Voxel-based morphometry was applied to 3D-T1 magnetic resonance images obtained from 27 aged patients with schizophrenia (mean age of 60 years) and 40 age-matched normal controls. Results: Older patients with schizophrenia showed a bilateral reduction of GM volume in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex, and in a large posterior region centered on the occipito-temporo-parietal junction. Only the latter region showed accelerated GM volume loss with increasing age. None of these results could be accounted for by institutionalization, antipsychotic medication, or cognitive scores. Conclusions: This study replicated most common findings in patients with schizophrenia with regard to thalamic and frontal GM deficits. However, it uncovered an unexpected large region of GM atrophy in the posterior tertiary cortices. The latter observation may be specific to this aged and chronically symptomatic subpopulation, as atrophy in this region is rarely reported in younger patients and is accelerated with age. PMID:21205677

  14. Anorexia Nervosa during Adolescence Is Associated with Decreased Gray Matter Volume in the Inferior Frontal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Mabe, Hiroyo; Yamada, Eiji; Masuda, Masato; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by the relentless pursuit to lose weight, mostly through self-starvation, and a distorted body image. AN tends to begin during adolescence among women. However, the underlying neural mechanisms related to AN remain unclear. Using voxel-based morphometry based on magnetic resonance imaging scans, we investigated whether the presence of AN was associated with discernible changes in brain morphology. Participants were 20 un-medicated, right-handed patients with early-onset AN and 14 healthy control subjects. Group differences in gray matter volume (GMV) were assessed using high-resolution, T1-weighted, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging datasets (3T Trio scanner; Siemens AG) and analyzed after controlling for age and total GMV, which was decreased in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) (left IFG: FWE corrected, p < 0.05; right IFG: uncorrected, p < 0.05) of patients with AN. The GMV in the bilateral IFG correlated significantly with current age (left IFG: r = -.481, p < .05; right IFG: r = -.601, p < .01) and was limited to the AN group. We speculate that decreased IFG volume might lead to deficits in executive functioning or inhibitory control within neural reward systems. Precocious or unbalanced neurological trimming within this particular region might be an important factor for the pathogenesis of AN onset. PMID:26067825

  15. The correlation between emotional intelligence and gray matter volume in university students.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafei; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Hitchman, Glenn; Liu, Yijun

    2014-11-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated the neurological substrates of emotional intelligence (EI), but none of them have considered the neural correlates of EI that are measured using the Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Scale (SSREIS). This scale was developed based on the EI model of Salovey and Mayer (1990). In the present study, SSREIS was adopted to estimate EI. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate the gray matter volume (GMV) of 328 university students. Results found positive correlations between Monitor of Emotions and VBM measurements in the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. In addition, Utilization of Emotions was positively correlated with the GMV in the parahippocampal gyrus, but was negatively correlated with the VBM measurements in the fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Furthermore, Social Ability had volume correlates in the vermis. These findings indicate that the neural correlates of the EI model, which primarily focuses on the abilities of individuals to appraise and express emotions, can also regulate and utilize emotions to solve problems. PMID:25282329

  16. Use of dynamic theory to describe experimental results from volume holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, R.; Gaylord, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    The general applicability of dynamic theory to the description of the recording and readout characteristics of volume (thick) hologram gratings is indicated. In dynamic theory (as opposed to static theory), the volume nature of the thick holographic grating allows the interference of an incident light beam with its own diffracted beam inside the recording medium. This effect causes the continuous recording of another grating that alters the initial one, producing a resultant grating that is not uniform through the thickness of the recording material and a grating whose writing and reading characteristics may vary dramatically, depending on the recording material and the experimental conditions. A large number of diverse types of writing, reading, and angular-selectivity behavior have been reported. The dynamic theory of thick-hologram writing and reading is shown to predict qualitatively all of these various types of experimental behavior.

  17. An arbitrary grid CFD algorithm for configuration aerodynamics analysis. Volume 1: Theory and validations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Iannelli, G. S.; Manhardt, Paul D.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the user input and output data requirements for the FEMNAS finite element Navier-Stokes code for real-gas simulations of external aerodynamics flowfields. This code was developed for the configuration aerodynamics branch of NASA ARC, under SBIR Phase 2 contract NAS2-124568 by Computational Mechanics Corporation (COMCO). This report is in two volumes. Volume 1 contains the theory for the derived finite element algorithm and describes the test cases used to validate the computer program described in the Volume 2 user guide.

  18. Binary Mutual Diffusion Coefficients of Polymer/Solvent Systems Using Compressible Regular Solutions Theory and Free Volume Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajnezhad, Arsalan; Asef Afshar, Orang; Asgarpour Khansary, Milad; Shirazian, Saeed

    2016-07-01

    The free volume theory has found practical application for prediction of diffusional behavior of polymer/solvent systems. In this paper, reviewing free volume theory, binary mutual diffusion coefficients in some polymer/solvent systems have been systematically presented through chemical thermodynamic modeling in terms of both activity coefficients and fugacity coefficients models. Here chemical thermodynamic model of compressible regular solution (CRS) was used for evaluation of diffusion coefficients calculations as the pure component properties would be required only. Four binary polymeric solutions of cyclohexane/polyisobutylene, n-pentane/polyisobutylene, toluene/polyisobutylene and chloroform/polyisobutylene were considered. The agreement between calculated data and the experimentally collected data was desirable and no considerable error propagation in approximating mutual diffusion coefficients has been observed.

  19. Isotropic non-white matter partial volume effects in constrained spherical deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Roine, Timo; Jeurissen, Ben; Perrone, Daniele; Aelterman, Jan; Leemans, Alexander; Philips, Wilfried; Sijbers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method, which can be used to investigate neural tracts in the white matter (WM) of the brain. Significant partial volume effects (PVEs) are present in the DW signal due to relatively large voxel sizes. These PVEs can be caused by both non-WM tissue, such as gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and by multiple non-parallel WM fiber populations. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) methods have been developed to correctly characterize complex WM fiber configurations, but to date, many of the HARDI methods do not account for non-WM PVEs. In this work, we investigated the isotropic PVEs caused by non-WM tissue in WM voxels on fiber orientations extracted with constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Experiments were performed on simulated and real DW-MRI data. In particular, simulations were performed to demonstrate the effects of varying the diffusion weightings, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), fiber configurations, and tissue fractions. Our results show that the presence of non-WM tissue signal causes a decrease in the precision of the detected fiber orientations and an increase in the detection of false peaks in CSD. We estimated 35–50% of WM voxels to be affected by non-WM PVEs. For HARDI sequences, which typically have a relatively high degree of diffusion weighting, these adverse effects are most pronounced in voxels with GM PVEs. The non-WM PVEs become severe with 50% GM volume for maximum spherical harmonics orders of 8 and below, and already with 25% GM volume for higher orders. In addition, a low diffusion weighting or SNR increases the effects. The non-WM PVEs may cause problems in connectomics, where reliable fiber tracking at the WM–GM interface is especially important. We suggest acquiring data with high diffusion-weighting 2500–3000 s/mm2, reasonable SNR (~30) and using lower SH orders in GM contaminated regions to minimize the non-WM PVEs in

  20. Isotropic non-white matter partial volume effects in constrained spherical deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Roine, Timo; Jeurissen, Ben; Perrone, Daniele; Aelterman, Jan; Leemans, Alexander; Philips, Wilfried; Sijbers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method, which can be used to investigate neural tracts in the white matter (WM) of the brain. Significant partial volume effects (PVEs) are present in the DW signal due to relatively large voxel sizes. These PVEs can be caused by both non-WM tissue, such as gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and by multiple non-parallel WM fiber populations. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) methods have been developed to correctly characterize complex WM fiber configurations, but to date, many of the HARDI methods do not account for non-WM PVEs. In this work, we investigated the isotropic PVEs caused by non-WM tissue in WM voxels on fiber orientations extracted with constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD). Experiments were performed on simulated and real DW-MRI data. In particular, simulations were performed to demonstrate the effects of varying the diffusion weightings, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), fiber configurations, and tissue fractions. Our results show that the presence of non-WM tissue signal causes a decrease in the precision of the detected fiber orientations and an increase in the detection of false peaks in CSD. We estimated 35-50% of WM voxels to be affected by non-WM PVEs. For HARDI sequences, which typically have a relatively high degree of diffusion weighting, these adverse effects are most pronounced in voxels with GM PVEs. The non-WM PVEs become severe with 50% GM volume for maximum spherical harmonics orders of 8 and below, and already with 25% GM volume for higher orders. In addition, a low diffusion weighting or SNR increases the effects. The non-WM PVEs may cause problems in connectomics, where reliable fiber tracking at the WM-GM interface is especially important. We suggest acquiring data with high diffusion-weighting 2500-3000 s/mm(2), reasonable SNR (~30) and using lower SH orders in GM contaminated regions to minimize the non-WM PVEs in CSD

  1. Gray matter volume and executive functioning correlate with time since injury following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Killgore, William D S; Singh, Prabhjyot; Kipman, Maia; Pisner, Derek; Fridman, Andrew; Weber, Mareen

    2016-01-26

    Most people who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) will recover to baseline functioning within a period of several days to weeks. A substantial minority of patients, however, will show persistent symptoms and mild cognitive complaints for much longer. To more clearly delineate how the duration of time since injury (TSI) is associated with neuroplastic cortical volume changes and cognitive recovery, we employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and select neuropsychological measures in a cross-sectional sample of 26 patients with mTBI assessed at either two-weeks, one-month, three-months, six-months, or one-year post injury, and a sample of 12 healthy controls. Longer duration of TSI was associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and right fusiform gyrus, and better neurocognitive performance on measures of visuospatial design fluency and emotional functioning. In particular, volume within the vmPFC was positively correlated with design fluency and negatively correlated with symptoms of anxiety, whereas GMV of the fusiform gyrus was associated with greater design fluency and sustained visual psychomotor vigilance performance. Moreover, the larger GMV seen among the more chronic individuals was significantly greater than healthy controls, suggesting possible enlargement of these regions with time since injury. These findings are interpreted in light of burgeoning evidence suggesting that cortical regions often exhibit structural changes following experience or practice, and suggest that with greater time since an mTBI, the brain displays compensatory remodeling of cortical regions involved in emotional regulation, which may reduce distractibility during attention demanding visuo-motor tasks. PMID:26711488

  2. Gray-Matter Volume, Midbrain Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors and Drug Craving in Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Angelica A.; Kohno, Milky; Robertson, Chelsea L.; Dean, Andy C.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic system plays a critical role in clinical features of addiction. Despite evidence suggesting that midbrain dopamine receptors influence amphetamine-induced dopamine release and that dopamine is involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, associations between dopamine receptors and gray-matter volume have been unexplored in methamphetamine users. Here we used magnetic resonance imaging and [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography, respectively, to measure gray-matter volume (in 58 methamphetamine users) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (binding potential relative to nondisplaceable uptake of the radiotracer, BPnd) (in 31 methamphetamine users and 37 control participants). Relationships between these measures and self-reported drug craving were examined. Although no difference in midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was detected between methamphetamine and control groups, midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was positively correlated with gray-matter volume in the striatum, prefrontal cortex, insula, hippocampus and temporal cortex in methamphetamine users, but not in control participants (group-by-midbrain D2/D3 BPnd interaction, p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). Craving for methamphetamine was negatively associated with gray-matter volume in the insula, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, cerebellum, and thalamus (p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). A relationship between midbrain D2/D3 BPnd and methamphetamine craving was not detected. Lower midbrain D2/D3 BPnd may increase vulnerability to deficits in gray-matter volume in mesocorticolimbic circuitry in methamphetamine users, possibly reflecting greater dopamine-induced toxicity. Identifying factors that influence prefrontal and limbic volume, such as midbrain BPnd, may be important for understanding the basis of drug craving, a key factor in the maintenance of substance use disorders. PMID:25896164

  3. Gray matter blood flow and volume are reduced in association with white matter hyperintensity lesion burden: a cross-sectional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Crane, David E.; Black, Sandra E.; Ganda, Anoop; Mikulis, David J.; Nestor, Sean M.; Donahue, Manus J.; MacIntosh, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with vascular risk factors and age-related cognitive decline. WMH have primarily been associated with global white matter and gray matter (GM) changes and less is known about regional effects in GM. The purpose of this study was to test for an association between WMH and two GM imaging measures: cerebral blood flow (CBF) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-six elderly adults with mild to severe WMH participated in this cross-sectional 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. MRI measures of GM CBF and VBM were derived from arterial spin labeling (ASL) and T1-weighted images, respectively. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were used to quantify the WMH lesion burden (mL). GM CBF and VBM data were used as dependent variables. WMH lesion burden, age and sex were used in a regression model. Visual rating of WMH with the Fazekas method was used to compare the WMH lesion volume regression approach. WMH volume was normally distributed for this group (mean volume of 22.7 mL, range: 2.2–70.6 mL). CBF analysis revealed negative associations between WMH volume and CBF in the left anterior putamen, subcallosal, accumbens, anterior caudate, orbital frontal, anterior insula, and frontal pole (corrected p < 0.05). VBM analysis revealed negative associations between WMH and GM volume in lingual gyrus, intracalcarine, and bilateral hippocampus (corrected p < 0.05). The visual rating scale corroborated the regression findings (corrected p < 0.05). WMH lesion volume was associated with intra-group GM CBF and structural differences in this cohort of WMH adults with mild to severe lesion burden. PMID:26217223

  4. Gray matter blood flow and volume are reduced in association with white matter hyperintensity lesion burden: a cross-sectional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Crane, David E; Black, Sandra E; Ganda, Anoop; Mikulis, David J; Nestor, Sean M; Donahue, Manus J; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with vascular risk factors and age-related cognitive decline. WMH have primarily been associated with global white matter and gray matter (GM) changes and less is known about regional effects in GM. The purpose of this study was to test for an association between WMH and two GM imaging measures: cerebral blood flow (CBF) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-six elderly adults with mild to severe WMH participated in this cross-sectional 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. MRI measures of GM CBF and VBM were derived from arterial spin labeling (ASL) and T1-weighted images, respectively. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were used to quantify the WMH lesion burden (mL). GM CBF and VBM data were used as dependent variables. WMH lesion burden, age and sex were used in a regression model. Visual rating of WMH with the Fazekas method was used to compare the WMH lesion volume regression approach. WMH volume was normally distributed for this group (mean volume of 22.7 mL, range: 2.2-70.6 mL). CBF analysis revealed negative associations between WMH volume and CBF in the left anterior putamen, subcallosal, accumbens, anterior caudate, orbital frontal, anterior insula, and frontal pole (corrected p < 0.05). VBM analysis revealed negative associations between WMH and GM volume in lingual gyrus, intracalcarine, and bilateral hippocampus (corrected p < 0.05). The visual rating scale corroborated the regression findings (corrected p < 0.05). WMH lesion volume was associated with intra-group GM CBF and structural differences in this cohort of WMH adults with mild to severe lesion burden. PMID:26217223

  5. New constraints on dark matter effective theories from standard model loops.

    PubMed

    Crivellin, Andreas; D'Eramo, Francesco; Procura, Massimiliano

    2014-05-16

    We consider an effective field theory for a gauge singlet Dirac dark matter particle interacting with the standard model fields via effective operators suppressed by the scale Λ ≳ 1 TeV. We perform a systematic analysis of the leading loop contributions to spin-independent Dirac dark matter-nucleon scattering using renormalization group evolution between Λ and the low-energy scale probed by direct detection experiments. We find that electroweak interactions induce operator mixings such that operators that are naively velocity suppressed and spin dependent can actually contribute to spin-independent scattering. This allows us to put novel constraints on Wilson coefficients that were so far poorly bounded by direct detection. Constraints from current searches are already significantly stronger than LHC bounds, and will improve in the near future. Interestingly, the loop contribution we find is isospin violating even if the underlying theory is isospin conserving. PMID:24877928

  6. Quasiparticle theory of transport coefficients for hadronic matter at finite temperature and baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, M.; Kapusta, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a flexible quasiparticle theory of transport coefficients of hot hadronic matter at finite baryon density. We begin with a hadronic quasiparticle model which includes a scalar and a vector mean field. Quasiparticle energies and the mean fields depend on temperature and baryon chemical potential. Starting with the quasiparticle dispersion relation, we derive the Boltzmann equation and use the Chapman-Enskog expansion to derive formulas for the shear and bulk viscosities and thermal conductivity. We obtain both relaxation-time approximation formulas and more general integral equations. Throughout the work, we explicitly enforce the Landau-Lifshitz conditions of fit and ensure the theory is thermodynamically self-consistent. The derived formulas should be useful for predicting the transport coefficients of the hadronic phase of matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at other accelerators.

  7. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime and the dark matter problem

    SciTech Connect

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2007-11-14

    Quantum field theory in nonstationary curved Friedmann spacetime leads to the phenomenon of creation of massive particles. The hypothesis that in the end of inflation gravitation creates from vacuum superheavy particles decaying on quarks and leptons leading to the observed baryon charge is investigated. Taking the complex scalar field for these particles in analogy with K{sup 0}-meson theory one obtains two components - the long living and short living ones, so that the long living component after breaking the Grand Unification symmetry has a long life time and is observed today as dark matter. The hypothesis that ultra high energy cosmic rays occur as manifestation of superheavy dark matter is considered and some experimental possibilities of the proposed scheme are analyzed.

  8. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials.

  9. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, P; Destrade, M; Gower, A L

    2016-01-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials. PMID:27113413

  10. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter

    PubMed Central

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials. PMID:27113413

  11. Density-functional-theory calculations of matter in strong magnetic fields. II. Infinite chains and condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Lai Dong

    2006-12-15

    We present calculations of the electronic structure of one-dimensional infinite chains and three-dimensional condensed matter in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10{sup 12} G to 2x10{sup 15} G, appropriate for observed magnetic neutron stars. At these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function appropriate in the strong field regime. The band structures of electrons in different Landau orbitals are computed self-consistently. Numerical results of the ground-state energies and electron work functions are given for one-dimensional chains H{sub {infinity}}, He{sub {infinity}}, C{sub {infinity}}, and Fe{sub {infinity}}. Fitting formulae for the B dependence of the energies are also provided. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon chains are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x10{sup 12} G, carbon infinite chains are very weakly bound relative to individual atoms). Iron chains are significantly bound for B > or approx. 10{sup 14} G and are weakly bound if at all at B < or approx. 10{sup 13} G. We also study the cohesive property of three-dimensional condensed matter of H, He, C, and Fe at zero pressure, constructed from interacting chains in a body-centered tetragonal lattice. Such three-dimensional condensed matter is found to be bound relative to individual atoms, with the cohesive energy increasing rapidly with increasing B.

  12. Nonspecific Effect of Stress on Brain Gray Matter Volume in Drug-naive Female Patients with First Depressive Episode

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Bian, Hai-Man; Gao, Yan-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Lei; Ji, Sheng-Zhang; Yao, Meng-Yuan; Zhai, Ning; Sun, Xin-Hai; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Tian, Hong-Jun; Li, Gong-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to observe the differences in brain gray matter volume in drug-naive female patients after the first episode of major depression with and without stressful life events (SLEs) before the onset of depression. Methods: Forty-three drug-naive female patients voluntarily participated in the present study after the first major depressive episode. The life event scale was used to evaluate the severity of the impact of SLEs during 6 months before the onset of the major depressive episode. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained, and the VBM and SPM8 software process were used to process and analyze the MRI. Results: Compared to that in patients without SLEs, the volume of brain gray matter was lower in the bilateral temporal lobe, right occipital lobe, and right limbic lobe in the SLE group. However, the gray matter volume did not differ significantly between the two groups after the application of false discovery rate (FDR) correction. Conclusions: Although the results of the present study suggest the absence of significant differences in brain gray matter volume between female drug-naive patients after the first episode of major depression with and without SLEs after FDR correction, the study provides useful information for exploring the definitive role of stress in the onset of depression. PMID:26831228

  13. Surface area accounts for the relation of gray matter volume to reading-related skills and history of dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E; Liederman, Jacqueline; Malmberg, Benjamin; McLean, John; Strickland, David; Beauchamp, Michael S

    2010-11-01

    It is unknown whether the abnormalities in brain structure and function observed in dyslexic readers are congenital or arise later in development. Analyzing the 2 components of gray matter volume separately may help in differentiating these possibilities. Gray matter volume is the product of cortical surface area, determined during prenatal brain development, and cortical thickness, determined during postnatal development. For this study, 16 adults with a history of phonological dyslexia and 16 age- and gender-matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive battery of tests of reading-related skills. Cortical surface area and gray matter volume measures of the whole brain, the inferior frontal gyrus, and the fusiform gyrus were similarly related to phonological skills and a history of dyslexia. There was no relationship between cortical thickness and phonological skills or history of dyslexia. Because cortical surface area reflects cortical folding patterns determined prenatally, this suggests that brain differences in dyslexia are rooted in early cortical development and are not due to compensatory changes that occur during postnatal development and would be expected to influence cortical thickness. This study demonstrates the importance of examining the separate components of gray matter volume when studying developmental abnormalities. PMID:20154011

  14. Set-Shifting Ability Is Associated with Gray Matter Volume in Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims An understanding of the association between gray matter volume and executive functioning could provide strategies to reduce dementia risk in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods In a cross-sectional analysis, we assessed executive functioning in 83 older people with MCI using three standard neuropsychological tests: set shifting (difference between Trail Making Test Parts B and A), working memory (difference between Digit Span forward and backward from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV), and selective attention/response inhibition (difference between the second and third conditions of the color- and picture-word Stroop test). Gray matter volume was computed from brain MRIs and SIENAX from FSL software. Results Gray matter volume was significantly associated with set-shifting performance after accounting for age, gender, body mass index, education, and global cognition (standardized β = −0.376, p = 0.001), but not with working memory or selective attention/response inhibition. Conclusion The executive function of set-shifting ability was correlated with gray matter volume in older people with MCI. PMID:26628898

  15. Association between gray matter volume in the caudate nucleus and financial extravagance: findings from voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Nozawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Hanihara, Mayu; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-03-20

    Consumer behavior differs among individuals; one such common individual difference is financial extravagance. Recent research suggests that the activation of the caudate nucleus plays an important role in consumer behavior. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has investigated the specific relationship between the caudate nucleus and consumer financial extravagance. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the association between individual differences in financial extravagance and regional gray matter volume in the caudate nucleus by using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We recruited 776 healthy, right-handed individuals (432 men and 344 women; mean age=20.7 ± 1.8) and used voxel-based morphometry and a financial extravagance questionnaire to determine the association between financial extravagance and gray matter structure in the caudate nucleus. Our measure of financial extravagance was based on the novelty seeking subscales of the Japanese version of the Temperament and Character Inventory. A multiple regression analysis including financial extravagance, age, sex, Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrix score, total intracranial volume, and novelty seeking subscales was conducted to examine what variables were related to regional gray matter volume in the region of interest within the caudate nucleus. A significant positive correlation was found between the obtained financial extravagance score and regional gray matter volume in the caudate nucleus. We found that structural variations in the caudate nucleus contributed to individual differences in financial extravagance. This finding may provide a new neuroscientific approach to understanding individual characteristics of consumers. PMID:24486253

  16. Theories of hydrophobic effects and the description of free volume in complex liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.R.; Garde, S.; Hummer, G.

    1998-12-31

    Recent progress on molecular theories of hydration of nonpolar solutes in liquid aqueous solution has lead to new ways to thinking about the old issue of free volume in liquids. This article surveys the principal new results with particular attention to the context of general issues of packing in liquids.

  17. Neutron-star matter within the energy-density functional theory and neutron-star structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fantina, A. F.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture, we will present some nucleonic equations of state of neutron-star matter calculated within the nuclear energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals developed by the Brussels-Montreal collaboration. These equations of state provide a consistent description of all regions of a neutron star. The global structure of neutron stars predicted by these equations of state will be discussed in connection with recent astrophysical observations.

  18. World-volume effective action of exotic five-brane in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shin; Yata, Masaya

    2016-02-01

    We study the world-volume effective action of an exotic five-brane, known as the M-theory 53-brane (M53-brane) in eleven dimensions. The supermultiplet of the world-volume theory is the {N}=(2, 0) tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The world-volume action contains three Killing vectors {widehat{k}}_{widehat{I}}^M ( Ȋ = 1 , 2 , 3) associated with the U(1)3 isometry. We find the effective T-duality rule for the eleven-dimensional backgrounds that transforms the M5-brane effective action to that of the M53-brane. We also show that our action provides the source term for the M53-brane geometry in eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  19. Arterial input function and gray matter cerebral blood volume measurements in children

    PubMed Central

    Withey, Stephanie B.; Novak, Jan; MacPherson, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate how arterial input functions (AIFs) vary with age in children and compare the use of individual and population AIFs for calculating gray matter CBV values. Quantitative measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV) using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) require measurement of an AIF. AIFs are affected by numerous factors including patient age. Few data presenting AIFs in the pediatric population exists. Materials and Methods Twenty‐two previously treated pediatric brain tumor patients (mean age, 6.3 years; range, 2.0–15.3 years) underwent DSC‐MRI scans on a 3T MRI scanner over 36 visits. AIFs were measured in the middle cerebral artery. A functional form of an adult population AIF was fitted to each AIF to obtain parameters reflecting AIF shape. The relationship between parameters and age was assessed. Correlations between gray matter CBV values calculated using the resulting population and individual patient AIFs were explored. Results There was a large variation in individual patient AIFs but correlations between AIF shape and age were observed. The center (r = 0.596, P < 0.001) and width of the first‐pass peak (r = 0.441, P = 0.007) were found to correlate significantly with age. Intrapatient coefficients of variation were significantly lower than interpatient values for all parameters (P < 0.001). Differences in CBV values calculated with an overall population and age‐specific population AIF compared to those calculated with individual AIFs were 31.3% and 31.0%, respectively. Conclusion Parameters describing AIF shape correlate with patient age in line with expected changes in cardiac output. In pediatric DSC‐MRI studies individual patient AIFs are recommended. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:981–989 PMID:26514288

  20. Head motion during MRI acquisition reduces gray matter volume and thickness estimates.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Martin; Tisdall, M Dylan; Qureshi, Abid; Buckner, Randy L; van der Kouwe, André J W; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-02-15

    Imaging biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data are used to quantify normal development, disease, and the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, motion during image acquisition introduces image artifacts that, in turn, affect derived markers. A systematic effect can be problematic since factors of interest like age, disease, and treatment are often correlated with both a structural change and the amount of head motion in the scanner, confounding the ability to distinguish biology from artifact. Here we evaluate the effect of head motion during image acquisition on morphometric estimates of structures in the human brain using several popular image analysis software packages (FreeSurfer 5.3, VBM8 SPM, and FSL Siena 5.0.7). Within-session repeated T1-weighted MRIs were collected on 12 healthy volunteers while performing different motion tasks, including two still scans. We show that volume and thickness estimates of the cortical gray matter are biased by head motion with an average apparent volume loss of roughly 0.7%/mm/min of subject motion. Effects vary across regions and remain significant after excluding scans that fail a rigorous quality check. In view of these results, the interpretation of reported morphometric effects of movement disorders or other conditions with increased motion tendency may need to be revisited: effects may be overestimated when not controlling for head motion. Furthermore, drug studies with hypnotic, sedative, tranquilizing, or neuromuscular-blocking substances may contain spurious "effects" of reduced atrophy or brain growth simply because they affect motion distinct from true effects of the disease or therapeutic process. PMID:25498430

  1. Reduced visual cortex grey matter volume in children and adolescents with reactive attachment disorder.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Koji; Takiguchi, Shinichiro; Mizushima, Sakae; Fujisawa, Takashi X; Saito, Daisuke N; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment increases the risk for psychiatric disorders throughout childhood and into adulthood. One negative outcome of child maltreatment can be a disorder of emotional functioning, reactive attachment disorder (RAD), where the child displays wary, watchful, and emotionally withdrawn behaviours. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the potential neurobiological consequences of RAD. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether RAD was associated with alterations in grey matter volume (GMV). High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging datasets were obtained for children and adolescents with RAD (n = 21; mean age = 12.76 years) and typically developing (TD) control subjects (n = 22; mean age = 12.95 years). Using a whole-brain voxel-based morphometry approach, structural images were analysed controlling for age, gender, full scale intelligence quotient, and total brain volume. The GMV was significantly reduced by 20.6% in the left primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17) of the RAD group compared to the TD group (p = .038, family-wise error-corrected cluster level). This GMV reduction was related to an internalising problem measure of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. The visual cortex has been viewed as part of the neurocircuit regulating the stress response to emotional visual images. Combined with previous studies of adults with childhood maltreatment, early adverse experience (e.g. sensory deprivation) may affect the development of the primary visual system, reflecting in the size of the visual cortex in children and adolescents with RAD. These visual cortex GMV abnormalities may also be associated with the visual emotion regulation impairments of RAD, leading to an increased risk for later psychopathology. PMID:26288752

  2. Reduced visual cortex grey matter volume in children and adolescents with reactive attachment disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Koji; Takiguchi, Shinichiro; Mizushima, Sakae; Fujisawa, Takashi X.; Saito, Daisuke N.; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment increases the risk for psychiatric disorders throughout childhood and into adulthood. One negative outcome of child maltreatment can be a disorder of emotional functioning, reactive attachment disorder (RAD), where the child displays wary, watchful, and emotionally withdrawn behaviours. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the potential neurobiological consequences of RAD. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether RAD was associated with alterations in grey matter volume (GMV). High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging datasets were obtained for children and adolescents with RAD (n = 21; mean age = 12.76 years) and typically developing (TD) control subjects (n = 22; mean age = 12.95 years). Using a whole-brain voxel-based morphometry approach, structural images were analysed controlling for age, gender, full scale intelligence quotient, and total brain volume. The GMV was significantly reduced by 20.6% in the left primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17) of the RAD group compared to the TD group (p = .038, family-wise error-corrected cluster level). This GMV reduction was related to an internalising problem measure of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. The visual cortex has been viewed as part of the neurocircuit regulating the stress response to emotional visual images. Combined with previous studies of adults with childhood maltreatment, early adverse experience (e.g. sensory deprivation) may affect the development of the primary visual system, reflecting in the size of the visual cortex in children and adolescents with RAD. These visual cortex GMV abnormalities may also be associated with the visual emotion regulation impairments of RAD, leading to an increased risk for later psychopathology. PMID:26288752

  3. Head Motion during MRI Acquisition Reduces Gray Matter Volume and Thickness Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Tisdall, M. Dylan; Qureshi, Abid; Buckner, Randy L.; van der Kouwe, André J. W.; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data are used to quantify normal development, disease, and the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, motion during image acquisition introduces image artifacts that, in turn, affect derived markers. A systematic effect can be problematic since factors of interest like age, disease, and treatment are often correlated with both a structural change and the amount of head motion in the scanner, confounding the ability to distinguish biology from artifact. Here we evaluate the effect of head motion during image acquisition on morphometric estimates of structures in the human brain using several popular image analysis software packages (FreeSurfer 5.3, VBM8 SPM, and FSL Siena 5.0.7). Within-session repeated T1-weighted MRIs were collected on 12 healthy volunteers while performing different motion tasks, including two still scans. We show that volume and thickness estimates of the cortical gray matter are biased by head motion with an average apparent volume loss of roughly 0.7%/mm/min of subject motion. Effects vary across regions and remain significant after excluding scans that fail a rigorous quality check. In view of these results, the interpretation of reported morphometric effects of movement disorders or other conditions with increased motion tendency may need to be revisited: effects may be overestimated when not controlling for head motion. Furthermore, drug studies with hypnotic, sedative, tranquillizing, or neuromuscular-blocking substances may contain spurious “effects” of reduced atrophy or brain growth simply because they affect motion distinct from true effects of the disease or therapeutic process. PMID:25498430

  4. GSK3B and MAPT Polymorphisms Are Associated with Grey Matter and Intracranial Volume in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dobson-Stone, Carol; Polly, Patsie; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S.; Williams, Leanne M.; Gordon, Evian; Schofield, Peter R.; Mather, Karen; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Wen, Wei; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Kwok, John B. J.

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) codes for a protein that plays an integral role in stabilisation of microtubules and axonal transport in neurons. As well as its role in susceptibility to neurodegeneration, previous studies have found an association between the MAPT haplotype and intracranial volume and regional grey matter volumes in healthy adults. The glycogen synthase kinase-3β gene (GSK3B) codes for a serine/threonine kinase that phosphorylates various proteins, including tau, and has also been associated with risk for neurodegenerative disorders and schizophrenia. We examined the effects of MAPT and two functional promoter polymorphisms in GSK3B (rs3755557 and rs334558) on total grey matter and intracranial volume in three independent cohorts totaling 776 neurologically healthy individuals. In vitro analyses revealed a significant effect of rs3755557 on gene expression, and altered binding of at least two transcription factors, Octamer transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) and Pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx-1), to the GSK3B promoter. Meta-analysis across the three cohorts revealed a significant effect of rs3755557 on total grey matter volume (summary B = 0.082, 95% confidence interval = 0.037–0.128) and intracranial volume (summary B = 0.113, 95% confidence interval = 0.082–0.144). No significant effect was observed for MAPT H1/H2 diplotype or GSK3B rs334558 on total grey matter or intracranial volume. Our genetic and biochemical analyses have identified a role for GSK3B in brain development, which could have important aetiological implications for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23951236

  5. New N{>=}4 Superconformal Chern-Simons Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangmin

    2008-11-23

    We present a method of constructing the general N{>=}4 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories and discuss how some of these theories can describe the world-volume theories of M2-branes probing conical singularities.

  6. Interindividual differences in cognitive flexibility: influence of gray matter volume, functional connectivity and trait impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Robert; Cieslik, Edna C.; Rottschy, Claudia; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility, a core aspect of executive functioning, is required for the speeded shifting between different tasks and sets. Using an interindividual differences approach, we examined whether cognitive flexibility, as assessed by the Delis–Kaplan card-sorting test, is associated with gray matter volume (GMV) and functional connectivity (FC) of regions of a core network of multiple cognitive demands as well as with different facets of trait impulsivity. The core multiple-demand network was derived from three large-scale neuroimaging meta-analyses and only included regions that showed consistent associations with sustained attention, working memory as well as inhibitory control. We tested to what extent self-reported impulsivity as well as GMV and resting-state FC in this core network predicted cognitive flexibility independently and incrementally. Our analyses revealed that card-sorting performance correlated positively with GMV of the right anterior insula, FC between bilateral anterior insula and midcingulate cortex/supplementary motor area as well as the impulsivity dimension “Premeditation.” Importantly, GMV, FC and impulsivity together accounted for more variance of card-sorting performance than every parameter alone. Our results therefore indicate that various factors contribute individually to cognitive flexibility, underlining the need to search across multiple modalities when aiming to unveil the mechanisms behind executive functioning. PMID:24878823

  7. The alteration of gray matter volume and cognitive control in adolescents with internet gaming disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmei; Jin, Chenwang; Yuan, Kai; Shakir, Tahir Mehmood; Mao, Cuiping; Niu, Xuan; Niu, Chen; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Internet gaming disorder (IGD) has been investigated by many behavioral and neuroimaging studies, for it has became one of the main behavior disorders among adolescents. However, few studies focused on the relationship between alteration of gray matter volume (GMV) and cognitive control feature in IGD adolescents. Methods: Twenty-eight participants with IAD and twenty-eight healthy age and gender matched controls participated in the study. Brain morphology of adolescents with IGD and healthy controls was investigated using an optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) technique. Cognitive control performances were measured by Stroop task, and correlation analysis was performed between brain structural change and behavioral performance in IGD group. Results: The results showed that GMV of the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), precuneus, supplementary motor area (SMA), superior parietal cortex, left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), left insula, and bilateral cerebellum decreased in the IGD participants compared with healthy controls. Moreover, GMV of the ACC was negatively correlated with the incongruent response errors of Stroop task in IGD group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the alteration of GMV is associated with the performance change of cognitive control in adolescents with IGD, which indicating substantial brain image effects induced by IGD. PMID:25852507

  8. Gray matter volumes in symptomatic and asymptomatic offspring of parents diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hanford, Lindsay C; Hall, Geoffrey B; Minuzzi, Luciano; Sassi, Roberto B

    2016-09-01

    Children of parents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BD), termed high-risk offspring (HRO), are at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders compared to healthy children of healthy parents (HCO). Gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities have been observed in HRO, however, these reports are inconsistent. We posit that this variability may be attributed to differences in methodology among offspring studies; in particular, the presence of psychiatric symptoms in HRO. Here, we directly compared GMVs between symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO, and HCO. High-resolution T1-weighted MR images were collected from 31 HRO (18 symptomatic and 13 asymptomatic) and 20 age- and sex-matched HCO. HRO had at least one parent diagnosed with BD. Symptomatic HRO were defined as having a psychiatric diagnosis other than BD, while asymptomatic HRO were required to be free of any psychiatric diagnosis. Scans were processed using voxel-based morphometry methods and between group analyses were performed in SPM. Compared to HCO, the HRO group showed decreased GMV in the right inferior orbitofrontal, right middle frontal, and bilateral superior and middle temporal regions. Both symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO groups showed decreased GMV in these regions separately when compared to HCO. When comparing symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO, GMVs were comparable in all regions except the lateral occipital cortex. Our study compared symptomatic and asymptomatic HRO directly. In doing so, we provided further support for the presence of discrete GMV deficits in HRO, and confirmed that these deficits are present irrespective of the presence of symptoms in HRO. PMID:26767977

  9. Structural Brain Anomalies and Chronic Pain: A Quantitative Meta-Analysis of Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Rachel F.; Laird, Angela R.; Ramage, Amy E.; Parkinson, Amy L.; Lewis, Jeffrey; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Farrell, Michael J.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Robin, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of chronic pain syndromes and the methods employed to study them make integrating experimental findings challenging. This study performed coordinate-based meta-analyses using voxel-based morphometry imaging results to examine gray matter volume (GMV) differences between chronic pain patients and healthy controls. There were 12 clusters where GMV was decreased in patients compared with controls, including many regions thought to be part of the “pain matrix” of regions involved in pain perception, but also including many other regions that are not commonly regarded as pain-processing areas. The right hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus were the only regions noted to have increased GMV in patients. Functional characterizations were implemented using the BrainMap database to determine which behavioral domains were significantly represented in these regions. The most common behavioral domains associated with these regions were cognitive, affective, and perceptual domains. Because many of these regions are not classically connected with pain and because there was such significance in functionality outside of perception, it is proposed that many of these regions are related to the constellation of comorbidities of chronic pain, such as fatigue and cognitive and emotional impairments. Further research into the mechanisms of GMV changes could provide a perspective on these findings. Perspective Quantitative meta-analyses revealed structural differences between brains of individuals with chronic pain and healthy controls. These differences may be related to comorbidities of chronic pain. PMID:23685185

  10. PREFACE: Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haataja, Mikko; Gránásy, László; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    Herein we provide a brief summary of the background, events and results/outcome of the CECAM workshop 'Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter held in Lausanne between October 21 and October 23 2009, which brought together two largely separately working communities, both of whom employ classical density functional techniques: the soft-matter community and the theoretical materials science community with interests in phase transformations and evolving microstructures in engineering materials. After outlining the motivation for the workshop, we first provide a brief overview of the articles submitted by the invited speakers for this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, followed by a collection of outstanding problems identified and discussed during the workshop. 1. Introduction Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a theoretical framework, which has been extensively employed in the past to study inhomogeneous complex fluids (CF) [1-4] and freezing transitions for simple fluids, amongst other things. Furthermore, classical DFT has been extended to include dynamics of the density field, thereby opening a new avenue to study phase transformation kinetics in colloidal systems via dynamical DFT (DDFT) [5]. While DDFT is highly accurate, the computations are numerically rather demanding, and cannot easily access the mesoscopic temporal and spatial scales where diffusional instabilities lead to complex solidification morphologies. Adaptation of more efficient numerical methods would extend the domain of DDFT towards this regime of particular interest to materials scientists. In recent years, DFT has re-emerged in the form of the so-called 'phase-field crystal' (PFC) method for solid-state systems [6, 7], and it has been successfully employed to study a broad variety of interesting materials phenomena in both atomic and colloidal systems, including elastic and plastic deformations, grain growth, thin film growth, solid

  11. Supersymmetric Wilson loops in N=4 super Chern-Simons-matter theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the supersymmetric Wilson loops in d = 3 N=4 super Chern-Simons-matter theory obtained from non-chiral orbifold of ABJM theory. We work in both Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space, and we construct 1/4 and 1/2 BPS Wilson loops. We also provide a complete proof that the difference between 1/4 and 1/2 Wilson loops is Q-exact with Q being some supercharge that is preserved by both the 1/4 and 1/2 Wilson loops. This plays an important role in applying the localization techniques to compute the vacuum expectation values of Wilson loops. We also study the M-theory dual of the 1/2 BPS circular Wilson loop.

  12. Association of grey matter volume deviation with insight impairment in first-episode affective and non-affective psychosis.

    PubMed

    McFarland, John; Cannon, Dara M; Schmidt, Heike; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hehir, Sarah; Emsell, Louise; Barker, Gareth; McCarthy, Peter; Elliott, Mark A; McDonald, Colm

    2013-03-01

    The neurobiological correlates of impaired insight in psychotic illness remain uncertain and may be confounded by factors such as illness progression and medication use. Our study consisted of two separate experiments. In the first experiment, we examined the association between measures of insight and regional brain volume in thirty-two patients with first-episode psychosis. In the second experiment, we looked at similar associations in thirty individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Detailed measures of symptom awareness and symptom attribution were obtained using the Scale to assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder. MRI scans were acquired and analysed using Statistical Non-Parametric Mapping for voxel-based analyses of grey matter maps. Regression models were used to assess the relationship between insight and grey matter volume in both the first-episode psychosis and the chronic schizophrenia experiments whilst controlling for potential confounds. In first-episode psychosis patients, symptom misattribution was associated with increased grey matter in the right and left caudate, right thalamus, left insula, putamen and cerebellum. In the chronic schizophrenia study, there were no significant associations between regional grey matter volume and measures of insight. These findings suggest that neuroplastic changes within subcortical and frontotemporal regions are associated with impaired insight in individuals during their first episode of psychosis. PMID:22673767

  13. Effective meson masses in nuclear matter based on a cutoff field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Noda, N.; Mitsumori, T.; Koide, K.; Kouno, H.; Hasegawa, A.

    1997-02-01

    Effective masses of {sigma}, {omega}, {pi}, and {rho} mesons in nuclear matter are calculated based on a cutoff field theory. Instead of the traditional density-Feynman representation, we adopt the particle-hole-antiparticle representation for nuclear propagators so that unphysical components are not included in the meson self-energies. For an estimation of the contribution from the divergent particle-antiparticle excitations, i.e., vacuum polarization in nuclear matter, the idea of the renormalization group method is adopted. In this cutoff field theory, all the counterterms are finite and calculated numerically. It is shown that the predicted meson masses converge even if the cutoff {Lambda} is changed as long as {Lambda} is sufficiently large and that the prescription works well also for so-called nonrenormalized mesons such as {pi} and {rho}. According to this method, it is concluded that meson masses in nuclear matter have a weak dependence on the baryon density. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Many-particle theory of nuclear system with application to neutron-star matter and other systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    General problems in nuclear-many-body theory were considered. Superfluid states of neutron star matter and other strongly interacting many-fermion systems were analyzed by using the soft-core potential of Reid. The pion condensation in neutron star matter was also treated.

  15. Three-index symmetric matter representations of SU(2) in F-theory from non-Tate form Weierstrass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevers, Denis; Taylor, Washington

    2016-06-01

    We give an explicit construction of a class of F-theory models with matter in the three-index symmetric (4) representation of SU(2). This matter is realized at codimen-sion two loci in the F-theory base where the divisor carrying the gauge group is singular; the associated Weierstrass model does not have the form associated with a generic SU(2) Tate model. For 6D theories, the matter is localized at a triple point singularity of arithmetic genus g = 3 in the curve supporting the SU(2) group. This is the first explicit realization of matter in F-theory in a representation corresponding to a genus contribution greater than one. The construction is realized by "unHiggsing" a model with a U(1) gauge factor under which there is matter with charge q = 3. The resulting SU(2) models can be further unHiggsed to realize non-Abelian G 2 × SU(2) models with more conventional matter content or SU(2)3 models with trifundamental matter. The U(1) models used as the basis for this construction do not seem to have a Weierstrass realization in the general form found by Morrison-Park, suggesting that a generalization of that form may be needed to incorporate models with arbitrary matter representations and gauge groups localized on singular divisors.

  16. A longitudinal study of age- and gender-related annual rate of volume changes in regional gray matter in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Wu, Kai; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze correlations among the annual rate of gray matter volume change, age, gender, and cerebrovascular risk factors in 381 healthy community-dwelling subjects with a large age range by applying a longitudinal design over 6 years using brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs). Brain MRI data were processed with voxel-based morphometry using a custom template by applying diffeomorphic anatomical registration using the exponentiated lie algebra procedure. The annual rate of regional gray matter volume change showed significant positive correlations with age in several regions, including the bilateral temporal pole, caudate nucleus, ventral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, insula, hippocampus, and temporoparietal cortex, whereas significant negative correlations with age were observed in several regions including the bilateral cingulate gyri and anterior lobe of the cerebellum. Additionally, a significant age-by-gender interaction was found for the annual rate of regional gray matter volume change in the bilateral hippocampus. No significant correlations were observed between the annual rate of regional gray matter volume change and body mass index or systolic blood pressure. A significant positive correlation between the annual rate of gray matter volume change and age indicates that the region shows not linear but accelerated gray matter loss with age. Therefore, evaluating the annual rate of the gray matter volume change with age in healthy subjects is important in understanding how gray matter volume changes with aging in each brain region and in anticipating what cognitive functions are likely to show accelerated decline with aging. PMID:22438299

  17. Larger mid-dorsolateral prefrontal gray matter volume in young binge drinkers revealed by voxel-based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Doallo, Sonia; Cadaveira, Fernando; Corral, Montserrat; Mota, Nayara; López-Caneda, Eduardo; Holguín, Socorro Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking or heavy episodic drinking is a high prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption among young people in several countries. Despite increasing evidence that binge drinking is associated with impairments in executive aspects of working memory (i.e. self-ordered working memory), processes known to depend on the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9), less is known about the impact of binge drinking on prefrontal gray matter integrity. Here, we investigated the effects of binge drinking on gray matter volume of mid- dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in youths. We used voxel-based morphometry on the structural magnetic resonance images of subjects reporting a persistent (at least three years) binge drinking pattern of alcohol use (n = 11; age 22.43 ± 1.03) and control subjects (n = 21; age 22.18 ± 1.08) to measure differences in gray matter volume between both groups. In a region of interest analysis of the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, after co-varying for age and gender, we observed significantly larger gray matter volume in the left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9) in binge drinkers in comparison with control subjects. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume and Self-Ordered Pointing Test (SOPT) total errors score in binge drinkers. The left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume also correlated with the quantity and speed of alcohol intake. These findings indicate that a repeated exposure to alcohol -that does not meet criteria for alcohol dependence- throughout post-adolescent years and young adulthood is linked with structural anomalies in mid-dorsolateral prefrontal regions critically involved in executive aspects of working memory. PMID:24789323

  18. Larger Mid-Dorsolateral Prefrontal Gray Matter Volume in Young Binge Drinkers Revealed by Voxel-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Doallo, Sonia; Cadaveira, Fernando; Corral, Montserrat; Mota, Nayara; López-Caneda, Eduardo; Holguín, Socorro Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking or heavy episodic drinking is a high prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption among young people in several countries. Despite increasing evidence that binge drinking is associated with impairments in executive aspects of working memory (i.e. self-ordered working memory), processes known to depend on the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9), less is known about the impact of binge drinking on prefrontal gray matter integrity. Here, we investigated the effects of binge drinking on gray matter volume of mid- dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in youths. We used voxel-based morphometry on the structural magnetic resonance images of subjects reporting a persistent (at least three years) binge drinking pattern of alcohol use (n = 11; age 22.43±1.03) and control subjects (n = 21; age 22.18±1.08) to measure differences in gray matter volume between both groups. In a region of interest analysis of the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, after co-varying for age and gender, we observed significantly larger gray matter volume in the left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 9) in binge drinkers in comparison with control subjects. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume and Self-Ordered Pointing Test (SOPT) total errors score in binge drinkers. The left mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex volume also correlated with the quantity and speed of alcohol intake. These findings indicate that a repeated exposure to alcohol −that does not meet criteria for alcohol dependence− throughout post-adolescent years and young adulthood is linked with structural anomalies in mid-dorsolateral prefrontal regions critically involved in executive aspects of working memory. PMID:24789323

  19. Decreased bilateral thalamic gray matter volume in first-episode schizophrenia with prominent hallucinatory symptoms: A volumetric MRI study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Xi, Yibin; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Yunchun; Li, Xiangrui; Li, Weiguo; Zhu, Xia; Cui, Long-Biao; Tan, Qingrong; Liu, Wenming; Li, Chen; Miao, Danmin; Yin, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Studies comparing gray matter (GM) volume of schizophrenic patients with or without auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) to that of normal controls remain controversial. This project aims to investigate changes of GM volumes of drug-naïve schizophrenic patients with and without AVHs. Eighteen first episode schizophrenic (FES) patients with AVHs, 18 FES patients without AVHs, and 18 healthy controls were scanned using structural MRI. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was conducted to investigate changes of GM volume among the three groups. Patients with and without AVHs exhibited reduced GM volumes relative to normal controls in the left superior temporal gyrus, frontal regions, cerebellum and caudate. Further analysis of the GM of subcortical structures found that patients with AVHs had reduced thalamic volume than healthy controls. No significant difference was found between patients with and without AVHs. Significant correlation was found between the total scores of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and bilateral thalamic volume. ROC analysis of thalamic volumes of the patients with AVHs and normal controls showed that the area under the curve was 0.698 (P = 0.043). The decreased thalamic volumes might serve as a biomarker for discriminating FES AVHs patients from normals. PMID:26403064

  20. The Indirect Effect of Age Group on Switch Costs via Gray Matter Volume and Task-Related Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Steffener, Jason; Gazes, Yunglin; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging simultaneously affects brain structure, brain function, and cognition. These effects are often investigated in isolation ignoring any relationships between them. It is plausible that age related declines in cognitive performance are the result of age-related structural and functional changes. This straightforward idea is tested in within a conceptual research model of cognitive aging. The current study tested whether age-related declines in task-performance were explained by age-related differences in brain structure and brain function using a task-switching paradigm in 175 participants. Sixty-three young and 112 old participants underwent MRI scanning of brain structure and brain activation. The experimental task was an executive context dual task with switch costs in response time as the behavioral measure. A serial mediation model was applied voxel-wise throughout the brain testing all pathways between age group, gray matter volume, brain activation and increased switch costs, worsening performance. There were widespread age group differences in gray matter volume and brain activation. Switch costs also significantly differed by age group. There were brain regions demonstrating significant indirect effects of age group on switch costs via the pathway through gray matter volume and brain activation. These were in the bilateral precuneus, bilateral parietal cortex, the left precentral gyrus, cerebellum, fusiform, and occipital cortices. There were also significant indirect effects via the brain activation pathway after controlling for gray matter volume. These effects were in the cerebellum, occipital cortex, left precentral gyrus, bilateral supramarginal, bilateral parietal, precuneus, middle cingulate extending to medial superior frontal gyri and the left middle frontal gyri. There were no significant effects through the gray matter volume alone pathway. These results demonstrate that a large proportion of the age group effect on switch costs can

  1. The Indirect Effect of Age Group on Switch Costs via Gray Matter Volume and Task-Related Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Steffener, Jason; Gazes, Yunglin; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging simultaneously affects brain structure, brain function, and cognition. These effects are often investigated in isolation ignoring any relationships between them. It is plausible that age related declines in cognitive performance are the result of age-related structural and functional changes. This straightforward idea is tested in within a conceptual research model of cognitive aging. The current study tested whether age-related declines in task-performance were explained by age-related differences in brain structure and brain function using a task-switching paradigm in 175 participants. Sixty-three young and 112 old participants underwent MRI scanning of brain structure and brain activation. The experimental task was an executive context dual task with switch costs in response time as the behavioral measure. A serial mediation model was applied voxel-wise throughout the brain testing all pathways between age group, gray matter volume, brain activation and increased switch costs, worsening performance. There were widespread age group differences in gray matter volume and brain activation. Switch costs also significantly differed by age group. There were brain regions demonstrating significant indirect effects of age group on switch costs via the pathway through gray matter volume and brain activation. These were in the bilateral precuneus, bilateral parietal cortex, the left precentral gyrus, cerebellum, fusiform, and occipital cortices. There were also significant indirect effects via the brain activation pathway after controlling for gray matter volume. These effects were in the cerebellum, occipital cortex, left precentral gyrus, bilateral supramarginal, bilateral parietal, precuneus, middle cingulate extending to medial superior frontal gyri and the left middle frontal gyri. There were no significant effects through the gray matter volume alone pathway. These results demonstrate that a large proportion of the age group effect on switch costs can

  2. Anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence and large-N volume independence

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Uensal, Mithat

    2010-09-15

    We study the Eguchi-Kawai reduction in the strong-coupling domain of gauge theories via the gravity dual of N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R{sup 3}xS{sup 1}. We show that D-branes geometrize volume independence in the center-symmetric vacuum and give supergravity predictions for the range of validity of reduced large-N models at strong coupling.

  3. Construction and classification of novel BPS Wilson loops in quiver Chern-Simons-matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct and classify novel Drukker-Trancanelli (DT) type BPS Wilson loops along infinite straight lines and circles in N = 2 , 3 quiver superconformal Chern-Simons-matter theories, Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) theory, and N = 4 orbifold ABJM theory. Generally we have four classes of Wilson loops, and all of them preserve the same supersymmetries as the BPS Gaiotto-Yin (GY) type Wilson loops. There are several free complex parameters in the DT type BPS Wilson loops, and for two classes of Wilson loops in ABJM theory and N = 4 orbifold ABJM theory there are supersymmetry enhancements at special values of the parameters. We check that the differences of the DT type and GY type Wilson loops are Q-exact with Q being some supercharges preserved by both the DT type and GY type Wilson loops. The results would be useful to calculate vacuum expectation values of the DT type Wilson loops in matrix models if they are still BPS quantum mechanically.

  4. Regional gray matter volume is associated with empathizing and systemizing in young adults.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Empathizing is defined as the drive to identify the mental states of others for predicting their behavior and responding with an appropriate emotion. Systemizing is defined as the drive to analyze a system in terms of the rules that govern the system in order to predict its behavior. Using voxel-based morphometry and questionnaires in a large sample of normal, right-handed young adults, we investigated the regional gray matter volume (rGMV) correlates of empathizing and systemizing and additionally those of the D score, which is the difference between systemizing and empathizing, to reveal the comprehensive picture of those correlates. Negative rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive rGMV correlates of the D score (formed by the negative correlation between rGMV and empathizing), were found primarily in nodes in the default mode network, mirror neuron system, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex together with other areas. Positive rGMV correlates of systemizing and of the D score (formed by the positive correlation between rGMV and systemizing) were found primarily in nodes in the external attention system, middle cingulate cortex, and other regions. Negative rGMV correlates of systemizing were found in an area close to the left posterior insula and putamen. These findings reconcile some previously inconsistent findings, provide other new findings and suggest that these areas contribute to empathizing-systemizing. Furthermore, the negative/positive rGMV correlates of empathizing and positive/negative rGMV correlates of systemizing overlapped substantially. This may be in line with the notion that empathizing and systemizing compete neurally in the brain. PMID:24409308

  5. Exposure to Parental Verbal Abuse is Associated with Increased Gray Matter Volume in Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Tomoda, Akemi; Sheu, Yi-Shin; Rabi, Keren; Suzuki, Hanako; Navalta, Carryl P.; Polcari, Ann; Teicher, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Exposure to parental verbal aggression (PVA) during childhood increases risk for the development of psychopathology, particularly mood and anxiety disorders. Other forms of childhood abuse have been found to be associated with alterations in brain structure. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether exposure to PVA was associated with discernible effects on brain morphology. Methods Optimized voxel based morphometry was performed on 21 unmedicated, right-handed subjects (18–25 years) with histories of PVA and 19 psychiatrically healthy controls of comparable age and gender. Group differences in gray matter volume (GMV) – covaried by age, gender, parental education, financial stress, and total GMV – were assessed using high-resolution, T1-weighted, volumetric MRI data sets (Siemens 3T trio scanner). Results GMV was increased by 14.1% in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG, BA 22) (P = 0.004, corrected cluster level). GMV in this cluster was associated most strongly with levels of maternal (β = 0.544, P < 0.0001) and paternal (β = 0.300, P < 0.02) verbal aggression and inversely associated with parental education (β = −0.577, P < 0.0001). Conclusion Previous studies have demonstrated an increase in STG GMV in children with abuse histories, and found a reduction in fractional anisotropy in the arcuate fasciculus connecting Wernicke’s and frontal areas in young adults exposed to PVA. These findings and the present results suggest that the development of auditory association cortex involved in language processing may be affected by exposure to early stress and/or emotionally-abusive language. PMID:20483374

  6. Sex-specific Gray Matter Volume Differences in Females with Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tanya M.; Flowers, D. Lynn; Napoliello, Eileen M.; Eden, Guinevere F.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia, characterized by unexpected reading difficulty, is associated with anomalous brain anatomy and function. Previous structural neuroimaging studies have converged in reports of less gray matter volume (GMV) in dyslexics within left hemisphere regions known to subserve language. Due to the higher prevalence of dyslexia in males, these studies are heavily weighted towards males, raising the question whether studies of dyslexia in females only and using the same techniques, would generate the same findings. In a replication study of men we obtained the same findings of less GMV in dyslexics in left middle/inferior temporal gyri and right postcentral/supramarginal gyri as reported in the literature. However, comparisons in women with and without dyslexia did not yield left hemisphere differences and instead we found less GMV in right precuneus and paracentral lobule/medial frontal gyrus. In boys, we found less GMV in left inferior parietal cortex (supramarginal/angular gyri), again consistent with previous work, while in girls differences were within right central sulcus, spanning adjacent gyri, and left primary visual cortex. Our investigation into anatomical variants in dyslexia replicates existing studies in males, but at the same time shows that dyslexia in females is not characterized by involvement of left hemisphere language regions but rather early sensory and motor cortices (i.e. motor and premotor cortex, primary visual cortex). Our findings suggest that models on the brain basis of dyslexia, primarily developed through the study of males, may not be appropriate for females and suggest a need for more sex-specific investigations into dyslexia. PMID:23625146

  7. Theory of magnetohydrodynamic accretion of matter with an ultrahard equation of state onto a black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, S. V.

    2015-06-15

    We consider the magnetohydrodynamic theory of spherically symmetric accretion of a perfect fluid onto a Schwarzschild black hole with an ultrahard equation of state, p = μ ∼ ρ{sup 2}, where p is the pressure, μ is the total energy density, and ρ is the fluid density. An approximate analytical solution is written out. We show that one critical sonic surface that coincides with the black hole event horizon is formed instead of two critical surfaces (fast and slow magnetosonic surfaces) for a degenerate ultrahard equation of state of matter.

  8. The viscosity to entropy ratio: From string theory motivated bounds to warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G.; Libby, S. B.; Silvestrelli, P. L.

    2014-07-04

    Here, we study the ratio of viscosity to entropy density in Yukawa one-component plasmas as a function of coupling parameter at fixed screening, and in realistic warm dense matter models as a function of temperature at fixed density. In these two situations, the ratio is minimized for values of the coupling parameters that depend on screening, and for temperatures that in turn depend on density and material. In this context, we also examine Rosenfeld arguments relating transport coefficients to excess reduced entropy for Yukawa one-component plasmas. For these cases we show that this ratio is always above the lower-bound conjecture derived from string theory ideas.

  9. A Prospective Pilot Investigation of Brain Volume, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Hemorrhagic Lesions after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Michael; Tam, Roger; Hernández-Torres, Enedino; Martin, Nancy; Perera, Warren; Zhao, Yinshan; Shahinfard, Elham; Dadachanji, Shiroy; Taunton, Jack; Li, David K. B.; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the most common neurological disorders. Hemorrhagic lesions and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are radiological features associated with moderate and severe TBI. Brain volume reductions have also been observed during the months following injury. In concussion, no signs of injury are observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which may be a true feature of concussion or merely due to the limited sensitivity of imaging techniques used so far. Moreover, it is not known whether volume reductions are due to the resolution of trauma-related edema or a true volume loss. Forty-five collegiate-level ice hockey players (20 females) and 15 controls (9 females), 40 players underwent 3-T MRI for hemorrhages [multi-echo susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI)], WMH (three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery), and brain volume at the beginning and the end of the hockey season. Concussed athletes underwent additional imaging and neuropsychological testing at 3 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months after injury. At the end of the hockey season, brain volume was reduced compared to controls by 0.32% (p < 0.034) in the whole cohort and by 0.26% (p < 0.09) in the concussed athletes. Two weeks and 2 months after concussion, brain volume was reduced by −0.08% (p = 0.027) and −0.23% (p = 0.035), respectively. In athletes, the WMH were significantly closer to the interface between gray matter and white matter compared to controls. No significant changes in the number of WMH over the duration of the study were found in athletes. No microhemorrhages were detected as a result of concussion or playing a season of ice hockey. We conclude that mild TBI does not lead to transient increases in brain volume and no new microbleeds or WMH are detectable after concussion. Brain volume reductions appear by 2 weeks after concussion and persist until at least 2 months after concussion. Brain volume is reduced

  10. A Prospective Pilot Investigation of Brain Volume, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Hemorrhagic Lesions after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Michael; Tam, Roger; Hernández-Torres, Enedino; Martin, Nancy; Perera, Warren; Zhao, Yinshan; Shahinfard, Elham; Dadachanji, Shiroy; Taunton, Jack; Li, David K B; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the most common neurological disorders. Hemorrhagic lesions and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are radiological features associated with moderate and severe TBI. Brain volume reductions have also been observed during the months following injury. In concussion, no signs of injury are observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which may be a true feature of concussion or merely due to the limited sensitivity of imaging techniques used so far. Moreover, it is not known whether volume reductions are due to the resolution of trauma-related edema or a true volume loss. Forty-five collegiate-level ice hockey players (20 females) and 15 controls (9 females), 40 players underwent 3-T MRI for hemorrhages [multi-echo susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI)], WMH (three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery), and brain volume at the beginning and the end of the hockey season. Concussed athletes underwent additional imaging and neuropsychological testing at 3 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months after injury. At the end of the hockey season, brain volume was reduced compared to controls by 0.32% (p < 0.034) in the whole cohort and by 0.26% (p < 0.09) in the concussed athletes. Two weeks and 2 months after concussion, brain volume was reduced by -0.08% (p = 0.027) and -0.23% (p = 0.035), respectively. In athletes, the WMH were significantly closer to the interface between gray matter and white matter compared to controls. No significant changes in the number of WMH over the duration of the study were found in athletes. No microhemorrhages were detected as a result of concussion or playing a season of ice hockey. We conclude that mild TBI does not lead to transient increases in brain volume and no new microbleeds or WMH are detectable after concussion. Brain volume reductions appear by 2 weeks after concussion and persist until at least 2 months after concussion. Brain volume is reduced between

  11. Changes in regional gray matter volume in women with chronic pelvic pain: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    As-Sanie, Sawsan; Harris, Richard E; Napadow, Vitaly; Kim, Jieun; Neshewat, Gina; Kairys, Anson; Williams, David; Clauw, Daniel J; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a highly prevalent pain condition, estimated to affect 15%-20% of women in the United States. Endometriosis is often associated with CPP, however, other factors, such as preexisting or concomitant changes of the central pain system, might contribute to the development of chronic pain. We applied voxel-based morphometry to determine whether women with CPP with and without endometriosis display changes in brain morphology in regions known to be involved in pain processing. Four subgroups of women participated: 17 with endometriosis and CPP, 15 with endometriosis without CPP, 6 with CPP without endometriosis, and 23 healthy controls. All patients with endometriosis and/or CPP were surgically confirmed. Relative to controls, women with endometriosis-associated CPP displayed decreased gray matter volume in brain regions involved in pain perception, including the left thalamus, left cingulate gyrus, right putamen, and right insula. Women with CPP without endometriosis also showed decreases in gray matter volume in the left thalamus. Such decreases were not observed in patients with endometriosis who had no CPP. We conclude that CPP is associated with changes in regional gray matter volume within the central pain system. Although endometriosis may be an important risk factor for the development of CPP, acting as a cyclic source of peripheral nociceptive input, our data support the notion that changes in the central pain system also play an important role in the development of chronic pain, regardless of the presence of endometriosis. PMID:22387096

  12. Changes in regional gray matter volume in women with chronic pelvic pain - a voxel based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    As-Sanie, Sawsan; Harris, Richard; Napadow, Vitaly; Kim, Jieun; Neshewat, Gina; Kairys, Anson; Williams, David; Clauw, Daniel; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a highly prevalent pain condition, estimated to affect 15-20% of women in the United States. Endometriosis is often associated with CPP, however other factors, such as pre-existing or concomitant changes of the central pain system, might contribute to the development of chronic pain. We applied voxel-based morphometry to determine whether women with CPP with and without endometriosis display changes in brain morphology in regions known to be involved in pain processing.Four subgroups of women participated: 17 with endometriosis and CPP, 15 with endometriosis without CPP, 6 with CPP without endometriosis, as well as 23 healthy controls. All patients with endometriosis and/or CPP were surgically-confirmed. Relative to controls, women with endometriosis-associated CPP displayed decreased gray matter volume in brain regions involved in pain perception including the left thalamus, left cingulategyrus, right putamen, and right insula. Women with CPP without endometriosis also showed decreases in gray matter volume in the left thalamus. Such decreases were not observed in patients with endometriosis that had no CPP. We conclude thatCPP is associated with changes in regional gray matter volume within the central pain system. Although endometriosis may be an important risk factor for the development of CPP, acting as a cyclic source of peripheral nociceptive input, our data support the notion that changes in the central pain system also play an important role in the development of chronic pain, regardless of the presence of endometriosis. PMID:22387096

  13. Field theory for zero sound and ion acoustic wave in astrophysical matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2016-02-01

    We set up a field theory model to describe the longitudinal low-energy modes in high density matter present in white dwarf stars. At the relevant scales, ions—the nuclei of oxygen, carbon, and helium—are treated as heavy pointlike spin-0 charged particles in an effective field theory approach, while the electron dynamics is described by the Dirac Lagrangian at the one-loop level. We show that there always exists a longitudinal gapless mode in the system irrespective of whether the ions are in a plasma, crystal, or quantum liquid state. For certain values of the parameters, the gapless mode can be interpreted as a zero sound mode and, for other values, as an ion acoustic wave; we show that the zero sound and ion acoustic wave are complementary to each other. We discuss possible physical consequences of these modes for properties of white dwarfs.

  14. Dark energy and dark matter from hidden symmetry of gravity model with a non-Riemannian volume form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-10-01

    We show that dark energy and dark matter can be described simultaneously by ordinary Einstein gravity interacting with a single scalar field provided the scalar field Lagrangian couples in a symmetric fashion to two different spacetime volume forms (covariant integration measure densities) on the spacetime manifold - one standard Riemannian given by √{-g} (square root of the determinant of the pertinent Riemannian metric) and another non-Riemannian volume form independent of the Riemannian metric, defined in terms of an auxiliary antisymmetric tensor gauge field of maximal rank. Integration of the equations of motion of the latter auxiliary gauge field produce an a priori arbitrary integration constant that plays the role of a dynamically generated cosmological constant or dark energy. Moreover, the above modified scalar field action turns out to possess a hidden Noether symmetry whose associated conserved current describes a pressureless "dust" fluid which we can identify with the dark matter completely decoupled from the dark energy. The form of both the dark energy and dark matter that results from the above class of models is insensitive to the specific form of the scalar field Lagrangian. By adding an appropriate perturbation, which breaks the above hidden symmetry and along with this couples dark matter and dark energy, we also suggest a way to obtain growing dark energy in the present universe's epoch without evolution pathologies.

  15. Interplay of the sign problem and the infinite volume limit: Gauge theories with a theta term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yiming; Cohen, Thomas; Goldbloom-Helzner, Ari; McPeak, Brian

    2016-06-01

    QCD and related gauge theories have a sign problem when a θ term is included; this complicates the extraction of physical information from Euclidean-space calculations as one would do in lattice studies. The sign problem arises in this system because the partition function for configurations with fixed topological charge Q , ZQ, are summed weighted by exp (i Q θ ) to obtain the partition function for fixed θ , Z (θ ). The sign problem gets exponentially worse numerically as the space-time volume is increased. Here it is shown that, apart from the practical numerical issues associated with large volumes, there are some interesting issues of principle. A key quantity is the energy density as a function of θ , ɛ (θ )=-log (Z (θ ) )/V . This is expected to be well defined in the large four-volume limit. Similarly, one expects the energy density for a fixed topological density ɛ ˜(Q /V )=-log (ZQ )/V to be well defined in the limit of large four volumes. Intuitively, one might expect that if one had the infinite volume expression for ɛ ˜(Q /V ) to arbitrary accuracy, then one could reconstruct ɛ (θ ) by directly summing over the topological sectors of the partition function. We show here that there are circumstances where this is not the case. In particular, this occurs in regions where the curvature of ɛ (θ ) is negative.

  16. PREFACE: Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haataja, Mikko; Gránásy, László; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    Herein we provide a brief summary of the background, events and results/outcome of the CECAM workshop 'Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter held in Lausanne between October 21 and October 23 2009, which brought together two largely separately working communities, both of whom employ classical density functional techniques: the soft-matter community and the theoretical materials science community with interests in phase transformations and evolving microstructures in engineering materials. After outlining the motivation for the workshop, we first provide a brief overview of the articles submitted by the invited speakers for this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, followed by a collection of outstanding problems identified and discussed during the workshop. 1. Introduction Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a theoretical framework, which has been extensively employed in the past to study inhomogeneous complex fluids (CF) [1-4] and freezing transitions for simple fluids, amongst other things. Furthermore, classical DFT has been extended to include dynamics of the density field, thereby opening a new avenue to study phase transformation kinetics in colloidal systems via dynamical DFT (DDFT) [5]. While DDFT is highly accurate, the computations are numerically rather demanding, and cannot easily access the mesoscopic temporal and spatial scales where diffusional instabilities lead to complex solidification morphologies. Adaptation of more efficient numerical methods would extend the domain of DDFT towards this regime of particular interest to materials scientists. In recent years, DFT has re-emerged in the form of the so-called 'phase-field crystal' (PFC) method for solid-state systems [6, 7], and it has been successfully employed to study a broad variety of interesting materials phenomena in both atomic and colloidal systems, including elastic and plastic deformations, grain growth, thin film growth, solid

  17. Lattice gauge theory for condensed matter physics: ferromagnetic superconductivity as its example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2014-09-01

    Recent theoretical studies of various strongly-correlated systems in condensed matter physics reveal that the lattice gauge theory (LGT) developed in high-energy physics is quite a useful tool to understand physics of these systems. Knowledge of LGT is to become a necessary item even for condensed matter physicists. In the first part of this paper, we present a concise review of LGT for the reader who wants to understand its basics for the first time. For illustration, we choose the Abelian Higgs model, a typical and quite useful LGT, which is the lattice version of the Ginzburg-Landau model interacting with a U(1) gauge field (vector potential). In the second part, we present an account of the recent progress in the study of ferromagnetic superconductivity (SC) as an example of application of LGT to topics in condensed matter physics. As the ferromagnetism (FM) and SC are competing orders with each other, large fluctuations are expected to take place and therefore nonperturbative methods are required for theoretical investigation. After we introduce a LGT describing the FMSC, we study its phase diagram and topological excitations (vortices of Cooper pairs) by Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Bino variations: Effective field theory methods for dark matter direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher; Robertson, Denis S.; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-05-01

    We apply effective field theory methods to compute bino-nucleon scattering, in the case where tree-level interactions are suppressed and the leading contribution is at loop order via heavy flavor squarks or sleptons. We find that leading log corrections to fixed-order calculations can increase the bino mass reach of direct detection experiments by a factor of 2 in some models. These effects are particularly large for the bino-sbottom coannihilation region, where bino dark matter as heavy as 5-10 TeV may be detected by near future experiments. For the case of stop- and selectron-loop mediated scattering, an experiment reaching the neutrino background will probe thermal binos as heavy as 500 and 300 GeV, respectively. We present three key examples that illustrate in detail the framework for determining weak scale coefficients, and for mapping onto a low-energy theory at hadronic scales, through a sequence of effective theories and renormalization group evolution. For the case of a squark degenerate with the bino, we extend the framework to include a squark degree of freedom at low energies using heavy particle effective theory, thus accounting for large logarithms through a "heavy-light current." Benchmark predictions for scattering cross sections are evaluated, including complete leading order matching onto quark and gluon operators, and a systematic treatment of perturbative and hadronic uncertainties.

  19. Neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A belief that effort is rewarded can develop incentive, achievement motivation, and self-efficacy. Individuals with such a belief attribute causes of events to themselves, not to external, uncontrollable factors, and are thus said to have an internal locus of control. An internal locus of control is a positive personality trait and has been thoroughly studied in applied psychology, but has not been widely examined in neuroscience. In the present study, correlations between locus of control assessment scores and brain volumes were examined in 777 healthy young adults using magnetic resonance imaging. A whole-brain multiple regression analysis with corrections for the effects of age, gender, and intelligence was conducted. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that gray matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and anterior insula positively correlated with higher scores, which indicate an internal LOC. In addition, white matter volumes in the striatum showed significant correlations with an internal locus of control. These results suggest that cognitive, socioemotional, self-regulatory, and reward systems might be associated with internal control orientation. The finding of greater volumes in several brain regions in individuals with a stronger internal locus of control indicates that there is a neuroanatomical basis for the belief that one's efforts are rewarded. PMID:26123375

  20. Active matter beyond mean-field: Ring-kinetic theory for self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Ihle, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Hanke et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052309 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.052309] showed that mean-field kinetic theory fails to describe collective motion in soft active colloids and that correlations must not be neglected. Correlation effects are also expected to be essential in systems of biofilaments driven by molecular motors and in swarms of midges. To obtain correlations in an active matter system from first principles, we derive a ring-kinetic theory for Vicsek-style models of self-propelled agents from the exact N -particle evolution equation in phase space. The theory goes beyond mean-field and does not rely on Boltzmann's approximation of molecular chaos. It can handle precollisional correlations and cluster formation, which are both important to understand the phase transition to collective motion. We propose a diagrammatic technique to perform a small-density expansion of the collision operator and derive the first two equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. An algorithm is presented that numerically solves the evolution equation for the two-particle correlations on a lattice. Agent-based simulations are performed and informative quantities such as orientational and density correlation functions are compared with those obtained by ring-kinetic theory. Excellent quantitative agreement between simulations and theory is found at not-too-small noises and mean free paths. This shows that there are parameter ranges in Vicsek-like models where the correlated closure of the BBGKY hierarchy gives correct and nontrivial results. We calculate the dependence of the orientational correlations on distance in the disordered phase and find that it seems to be consistent with a power law with an exponent around -1.8 , followed by an exponential decay. General limitations of the kinetic theory and its numerical solution are discussed.

  1. White matter volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia: a VBM-DARTEL study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the white matter (WM) volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia using voxel-based morphometry. A total of 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. MR image data were processed using SPM8 software with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through an exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm. The patients with schizophrenia showed significant decreases (P=0.042) in the WM volumes of the temporal lobe and superior frontal gyrus compared with the healthy controls. The WM volumes of the middle temporal gyrus were negatively correlated with the scores of both the Positive Subscale (Pearson's ρ=-0.68, P=0.001) and the Negative Subscale (ρ=-0.71, P=0.0005) in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. In addition, the scores of the General Psychopathology Subscale were negatively correlated with the WM volumes of the superior frontal gyrus (ρ=-0.68, P=0.0009). This study evaluated the WM volume of patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls using DARTEI-based voxel-based morphometry and also assessed the correlation of the localized WM volume changes with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. These findings will be useful to understand the neuropathology associated with WM abnormality in schizophrenia. PMID:26485094

  2. Association between waist circumference and gray matter volume in 2344 individuals from two adult community-based samples.

    PubMed

    Janowitz, Deborah; Wittfeld, Katharina; Terock, Jan; Freyberger, Harald Jürgen; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Habes, Mohamad; Hosten, Norbert; Friedrich, Nele; Nauck, Matthias; Domanska, Grazyna; Grabe, Hans Jörgen

    2015-11-15

    We analyzed the putative association between abdominal obesity (measured in waist circumference) and gray matter volume (Study of Health in Pomerania: SHIP-2, N=758) adjusted for age and gender by applying volumetric analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with VBM8 to brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We sought replication in a second, independent population sample (SHIP-TREND, N=1586). In a combined analysis (SHIP-2 and SHIP-TREND) we investigated the impact of hypertension, type II diabetes and blood lipids on the association between waist circumference and gray matter. Volumetric analysis revealed a significant inverse association between waist circumference and gray matter volume. VBM in SHIP-2 indicated distinct inverse associations in the following structures for both hemispheres: frontal lobe, temporal lobes, pre- and postcentral gyrus, supplementary motor area, supramarginal gyrus, insula, cingulate gyrus, caudate nucleus, olfactory sulcus, para-/hippocampus, gyrus rectus, amygdala, globus pallidus, putamen, cerebellum, fusiform and lingual gyrus, (pre-) cuneus and thalamus. These areas were replicated in SHIP-TREND. More than 76% of the voxels with significant gray matter volume reduction in SHIP-2 were also distinct in TREND. These brain areas are involved in cognition, attention to interoceptive signals as satiety or reward and control food intake. Due to our cross-sectional design we cannot clarify the causal direction of the association. However, previous studies described an association between subjects with higher waist circumference and future cognitive decline suggesting a progressive brain alteration in obese subjects. Pathomechanisms may involve chronic inflammation, increased oxidative stress or cellular autophagy associated with obesity. PMID:26256530

  3. An improved thermodiffusion model for ternary mixtures using Fujita's free volume theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Alireza; Saghir, M. Ziad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    Thermodiffusion along molecular diffusion is one of the major mechanisms of transport phenomena. They have an important role in displacement of hydrocarbon fluid components in an oil reservoir. Free volume controls the diffusivity of the molecule in diffusion-limited systems. It states that the transfer kinetics of molecules depends greatly on molecular size and shape as well as the concentration. A new proposed model based on Fujita-type model is used to predict the thermodiffusion coefficients in ternary mixtures such as n-dodecane (nC12), n-butane (nC4), methane (C1), n-dodecane (nC12), isobutylbenzene (IBB), tetrahydronaphtalene (THN) and n-octane (C8), n-decane (nC10), 1-methylnaphtalene (MN). The ratio of evaporation energy to activation energy required for estimating the thermodiffusion coefficients is calculated by the available free volume theory. In particular, the combination of available free volume theory and Shukla and Firoozabadi's model is applied to predict the thermodiffusion coefficient. The results show a good performance of the new approach in estimating the thermodiffusion coefficients.

  4. Spatial volume dependence for 2+1 dimensional SU(N) Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Margarita García; González-Arroyo, Antonio; Okawa, Masanori

    2013-09-01

    We study the 2+1 dimensional SU(N) Yang-Mills theory on a finite two-torus with twisted boundary conditions. Our goal is to study the interplay between the rank of the group N , the length of the torus L and the Z N magnetic flux. After presenting the classical and quantum formalism, we analyze the spectrum of the theory using perturbation theory to one-loop and using Monte Carlo techniques on the lattice. In perturbation theory, results to all orders depend on the combination x = λ N L and an angle defined in terms of the magnetic flux (λ is `t Hooft coupling). Thus, fixing the angle, the system exhibits a form of volume independence ( N L dependence). The numerical results interpolate between our perturbative calculations and the confinement regime. They are consistent with x-scaling and provide interesting information about the k-string spectrum and effective string theories. The occurrence of tachyonic instabilities is also analysed. They seem to be avoidable in the large N limit with a suitable scaling of the magnetic flux.

  5. Superspace formulation in a three-algebra approach to D=3, N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Famin; Wu Yongshi

    2010-11-15

    We present a superspace formulation of the D=3, N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons Matter theories, with matter supermultiplets valued in a symplectic 3-algebra. We first construct an N=1 superconformal action and then generalize a method used by Gaitto and Witten to enhance the supersymmetry from N=1 to N=5. By decomposing the N=5 supermultiplets and the symplectic 3-algebra properly and proposing a new superpotential term, we construct the N=4 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories in terms of two sets of generators of a (quaternion) symplectic 3-algebra. The N=4 theories can also be derived by requiring that the supersymmetry transformations are closed on-shell. The relationship between the 3-algebras, Lie superalgebras, Lie algebras, and embedding tensors (proposed in [E. A. Bergshoeff, O. Hohm, D. Roest, H. Samtleben, and E. Sezgin, J. High Energy Phys. 09 (2008) 101.]) is also clarified. The general N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories in terms of ordinary Lie algebras can be re-derived in our 3-algebra approach. All known N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories can be recovered in the present superspace formulation for super-Lie algebra realization of symplectic 3-algebras.

  6. Precise segmentation of multiple organs in CT volumes using learning-based approach and information theory.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Zheng, Yefeng; Birkbeck, Neil; Zhang, Jingdan; Kohlberger, Timo; Tietjen, Christian; Boettger, Thomas; Duncan, James S; Zhou, S Kevin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method by incorporating information theory into the learning-based approach for automatic and accurate pelvic organ segmentation (including the prostate, bladder and rectum). We target 3D CT volumes that are generated using different scanning protocols (e.g., contrast and non-contrast, with and without implant in the prostate, various resolution and position), and the volumes come from largely diverse sources (e.g., diseased in different organs). Three key ingredients are combined to solve this challenging segmentation problem. First, marginal space learning (MSL) is applied to efficiently and effectively localize the multiple organs in the largely diverse CT volumes. Second, learning techniques, steerable features, are applied for robust boundary detection. This enables handling of highly heterogeneous texture pattern. Third, a novel information theoretic scheme is incorporated into the boundary inference process. The incorporation of the Jensen-Shannon divergence further drives the mesh to the best fit of the image, thus improves the segmentation performance. The proposed approach is tested on a challenging dataset containing 188 volumes from diverse sources. Our approach not only produces excellent segmentation accuracy, but also runs about eighty times faster than previous state-of-the-art solutions. The proposed method can be applied to CT images to provide visual guidance to physicians during the computer-aided diagnosis, treatment planning and image-guided radiotherapy to treat cancers in pelvic region. PMID:23286081

  7. World-volume effective theory for higher-dimensional black holes.

    PubMed

    Emparan, Roberto; Harmark, Troels; Niarchos, Vasilis; Obers, Niels A

    2009-05-15

    We argue that the main feature behind novel properties of higher-dimensional black holes, compared to four-dimensional ones, is that their horizons can have two characteristic lengths of very different size. We develop a long-distance world-volume effective theory that captures the black hole dynamics at scales much larger than the short scale. In this limit the black hole is regarded as a blackfold: a black brane (possibly boosted locally) whose world volume spans a curved submanifold of the spacetime. This approach reveals black objects with novel horizon geometries and topologies more complex than the black ring, but more generally it provides a new organizing framework for the dynamics of higher-dimensional black holes. PMID:19518938

  8. Abnormal gray matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity in former heroin-dependent individuals abstinent for multiple years.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lubin; Zou, Feng; Zhai, Tianye; Lei, Yu; Tan, Shuwen; Jin, Xiao; Ye, Enmao; Shao, Yongcong; Yang, Yihong; Yang, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that heroin addiction is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities. However, it is largely unknown whether these characteristics of brain abnormalities would be persistent or restored after long periods of abstinence. Considering the very high rates of relapse, we hypothesized that there may exist some latent neural vulnerabilities in abstinent heroin users. In this study, structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected from 30 former heroin-dependent (FHD) subjects who were drug free for more than 3 years and 30 non-addicted control (CN) volunteers. Voxel-based morphometry was used to identify possible gray matter volume differences between the FHD and CN groups. Alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in FHD were examined using brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Significantly reduced gray matter volume was observed in FHD in an area surrounding the parieto-occipital sulcus, which included the precuneus and cuneus. Functional connectivity analyses revealed that the FHD subjects showed reduced positive correlation within the default mode network and visual network and decreased negative correlation between the default mode network, visual network and task positive network. Moreover, the altered functional connectivity was correlated with self-reported impulsivity scores in the FHD subjects. Our findings suggest that disruption of large-scale brain systems is present in former heroin users even after multi-year abstinence, which could serve as system-level neural underpinnings for behavioral dysfunctions associated with addiction. PMID:25727574

  9. Testing universal relations of neutron stars with a nonlinear matter-gravity coupling theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Y.-H.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T. E-mail: lmlin@phy.cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-02-01

    Due to our ignorance of the equation of state (EOS) beyond nuclear density, there is still no unique theoretical model for neutron stars (NSs). It is therefore surprising that universal EOS-independent relations connecting different physical quantities of NSs can exist. Lau et al. found that the frequency of the f-mode oscillation, the mass, and the moment of inertia are connected by universal relations. More recently, Yagi and Yunes discovered the I-Love-Q universal relations among the mass, the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment. In this paper, we study these universal relations in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. This theory differs from general relativity (GR) significantly only at high densities due to the nonlinear coupling between matter and gravity. It thus provides us an ideal case to test how robust the universal relations of NSs are with respect to the change of the gravity theory. Due to the apparent EOS formulation of EiBI gravity developed recently by Delsate and Steinhoff, we are able to study the universal relations in EiBI gravity using the same techniques as those in GR. We find that the universal relations in EiBI gravity are essentially the same as those in GR. Our work shows that, within the currently viable coupling constant, there exists at least one modified gravity theory that is indistinguishable from GR in view of the unexpected universal relations.

  10. Associative memory in a volume holographic medium: a new approach based on operator theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashaie, Ramin

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we present a new method for holographic implementation of associative memories. In the current approach, the memory capacity is implemented in the form of spatial perturbation of refractive index within the volume of a three dimensional holographic material. We use operator theory to solve the inverse problem and compute a closed-form solution for the spatial distribution of the perturbation considering any arbitrary set of input-output prototype vectors. Simplicity of the hardware is the major advantage of the current method.

  11. The Relationship of Serum Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine – 1 Levels with Gray Matter Volumes in Community-Dwelling Older Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiyang; Wen, Wei; Brown, David A.; Crawford, John; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Smith, Evelyn; Breit, Samuel N.; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Wanlin; Brodaty, Henry; Baune, Bernhard T.; Trollor, Julian N.; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2015-01-01

    Using circulating inflammatory markers and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), recent studies have associated inflammation with brain volumetric measures. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine–1 (MIC-1/GDF15) is a divergent transforming growth factor – beta (TGF-β) superfamily cytokine. To uncover the underlying mechanisms of the previous finding of a negative association between MIC-1/GDF15 serum levels and cognition, the present study aimed to examine the relationship of circulating MIC-1/GDF15 levels with human brain gray matter (GM) volumes, in a community-dwelling sample aged 70–90 years over two years (Wave 1: n = 506, Wave 2: n = 327), of which the age-related brain atrophy had been previously well defined. T1-weighted MRI scans were obtained at both waves and analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library and FreeSurfer. The results showed significantly negative associations between MIC-1/GDF15 serum levels and both subcortical and cortical GM volumes. GM volumes of the whole brain, cortex, temporal lobe, thalamus and accumbens showed significant mediating effects on the associations between MIC-1/GDF15 serum levels and global cognition scores. Increases in MIC-1/GDF15 serum levels were associated with decreases in cortical and subcortical GM volume over two years. In conclusion, MIC-1/GDF15 serum levels were inversely associated with GM volumes both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. PMID:25867953

  12. Cerebral gray matter volume variation in female-to-male transsexuals: a voxel-based morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    Several studies seem to support the hypothesis that brain anatomy is associated with transsexualism. However, these studies were still limited because few neuroanatomical findings have been obtained from female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals. This study compared the cerebral regional volumes of gray matter (GM) between FtM transsexuals and female controls using a voxel-based morphometry. Twelve FtM transsexuals who had undergone sex-reassignment surgery and 15 female controls participated in this study. Both groups were age matched and right-handed, with no history of neurological illness. Fifteen female controls were recruited to determine whether GM volumes in FtM transsexuals more closely resembled individuals who shared their biological sex. MRI data were processed using SPM 8 with the diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL). FtM transsexuals showed significantly larger volumes of the thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, gyrus rectus, head of caudate nucleus, precentral gyrus, and subcallosal area compared with the female controls. However, the female controls showed a significantly larger volume in the superior temporal gyrus including Heschl's gyrus and Rolandic operculum. These findings confirm that the volume difference in brain substructures in FtM transsexuals is likely to be associated with transsexualism and that transsexualism is probably associated with distinct cerebral structures, determining gender identity. PMID:26559725

  13. Progressive Volume Loss and White Matter Degeneration in Cstb-Deficient Mice: A Diffusion Tensor and Longitudinal Volumetry MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, Otto; Laitinen, Teemu; Lehtimäki, Kimmo K.; Tegelberg, Saara; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gröhn, Olli; Kopra, Outi

    2014-01-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg type progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1, OMIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset at the age of 6 to 16 years, incapacitating stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding cystatin B. Previously, widespread white matter changes and atrophy has been detected both in adult EPM1 patients and in 6-month-old cystatin B–deficient mice, a mouse model for the EPM1 disease. In order to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of the brain atrophy and white matter changes in EPM1, we conducted longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging accompanied with tract-based spatial statistics analysis to compare volumetric changes and fractional anisotropy in the brains of 1 to 6 months of age cystatin B–deficient and control mice. The results reveal progressive but non-uniform volume loss of the cystatin B–deficient mouse brains, indicating that different neuronal populations possess distinct sensitivity to the damage caused by cystatin B deficiency. The diffusion tensor imaging data reveal early and progressive white matter alterations in cystatin B–deficient mice affecting all major tracts. The results also indicate that the white matter damage in the cystatin B–deficient brain is most likely secondary to glial activation and neurodegenerative events rather than a primary result of CSTB deficiency. The data also show that diffusion tensor imaging combined with TBSS analysis provides a feasible approach not only to follow white matter damage in neurodegenerative mouse models but also to detect fractional anisotropy changes related to normal white matter maturation and reorganisation. PMID:24603771

  14. Control theory based airfoil design for potential flow and a finite volume discretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, J.; Jameson, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. The goal of our present work is to develop a method which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can be extended to treat three-dimensional problems. Therefore, we have developed a method which can address arbitrary geometric shapes through the use of a finite volume method to discretize the potential flow equation. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented, where both target speed distributions and minimum drag are used as objective functions.

  15. Voxel-based morphometry in opera singers: Increased gray-matter volume in right somatosensory and auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Boris; Veit, Ralf; Moll, Christina Valérie; Gaser, Christian; Birbaumer, Niels; Lotze, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to instrumental musicians, professional singers do not train on a specific instrument but perfect a motor system that has already been extensively trained during speech motor development. Previous functional imaging studies suggest that experience with singing is associated with enhanced somatosensory-based vocal motor control. However, experience-dependent structural plasticity in vocal musicians has rarely been studied. We investigated voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 27 professional classical singers and compared gray matter volume in regions of the "singing-network" to an age-matched group of 28 healthy volunteers with no special singing experience. We found right hemispheric volume increases in professional singers in ventral primary somatosensory cortex (larynx S1) and adjacent rostral supramarginal gyrus (BA40), as well as in secondary somatosensory (S2) and primary auditory cortices (A1). Moreover, we found that earlier commencement with vocal training correlated with increased gray-matter volume in S1. However, in contrast to studies with instrumental musicians, this correlation only emerged in singers who began their formal training after the age of 14years, when speech motor development has reached its first plateau. Structural data thus confirm and extend previous functional reports suggesting a pivotal role of somatosensation in vocal motor control with increased experience in singing. Results furthermore indicate a sensitive period for developing additional vocal skills after speech motor coordination has matured. PMID:27034024

  16. Some considerations concerning volume-modulated arc therapy: a stepping stone towards a general theory.

    PubMed

    Webb, S; McQuaid, D

    2009-07-21

    In this paper it is formally shown that the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) IMRT delivery technique remains valid if the MLC is supported on a 1D moving platform. It is also shown that, in such circumstances, it is always time preferable to deliver overlapping modulating fields as a single swept field rather than as separate fields. The most general formulism is presented and then related to simpler equations in limiting cases. The paper explains in detail how a 'small-arc approximation' can be invoked to relate the 1D linear theory to the MLC-on-moving-platform-(gantry) delivery technique involving rotation therapy and known as volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It is explained how volume-modulated arc therapy delivered with open unmodulated fields and which can deliver conformal dose distributions can be interpreted as an IMRT delivery. The (Elekta adopted) term VMAT will be used in a generic sense to include a similar (Varian) method known as RapidArc. Approximate expressions are derived for the 'amount of modulation' possible in a VMAT delivery. This paper does not discuss the actual VMAT planning but gives an insight at a deep level into VMAT delivery. No universal theory of VMAT is known in the sense that there is no theory that can predict precisely the performance of a VMAT delivery in terms of the free parameters available (variable gantry speed, variable fluence-delivery rate, set of MLC shapes, MLC orientation, number of arcs, coplanarity versus non-coplanarity, etc). This is in stark contrast to the situation with several other IMRT delivery techniques where such theoretical analyses are known. In this paper we do not provide such a theory; the material presented is a stepping stone on the path towards this. PMID:19550005

  17. REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY. HIGH VOLUME FILTER MEASUREMENTS OF SUSPENDED PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten of the 25 stations making up the Regional Air Monitoring System were equipped with dichotomous samplers and high volume filter samplers for aerosol measurements. The high volume samplers collected samples every third day for 24-hour periods (0000-2400). Sample filters were re...

  18. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Gillian E.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Banducci, Sarah E.; Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Sarah A.; Sutton, Brad P.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment. PMID:26915025

  19. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure - A case for a classical theory of dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1989-06-01

    When subject to high pressure, H2 and He-3 are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin, calculations of phase transition and metallization pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallization occurs at p(M) = (3.0 + or - 0.2) Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is (106 + or - 1) Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at p(tr) = (10.0 + or - 0.4) Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed.

  20. Fierz-Pauli equation for massive gravitons from Induced Matter theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Starting with a 5D physical vacuum described by a 5D Ricci-flat background metric, we study the emergence of gravitational waves (GW) from the Induce Matter (IM) theory of gravity. We obtain the equation of motion for GW on a 4D curved spacetime which has the form of a Fierz-Pauli one. In our model the mass of gravitons mg is induced by a static foliation on the noncompact space-like extra dimension and the source-term is originated in the interaction of the GW with the induced connections of the background 5D metric. Here, relies the main difference of this formalism with the original Fierz-Pauli one.

  1. The viscosity to entropy ratio: From string theory motivated bounds to warm dense matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Faussurier, G.; Libby, S. B.; Silvestrelli, P. L.

    2014-07-04

    Here, we study the ratio of viscosity to entropy density in Yukawa one-component plasmas as a function of coupling parameter at fixed screening, and in realistic warm dense matter models as a function of temperature at fixed density. In these two situations, the ratio is minimized for values of the coupling parameters that depend on screening, and for temperatures that in turn depend on density and material. In this context, we also examine Rosenfeld arguments relating transport coefficients to excess reduced entropy for Yukawa one-component plasmas. For these cases we show that this ratio is always above the lower-bound conjecturemore » derived from string theory ideas.« less

  2. Beyond the dark matter effective field theory and a simplified model approach at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, P.; Park, Myeonghun; Park, Wan-Il; Yu, Chaehyun

    2016-05-01

    Direct detection of and LHC search for the singlet fermion dark matter (SFDM) model with Higgs portal interaction are considered in a renormalizable model where the full Standard Model (SM) gauge symmetry is imposed by introducing a singlet scalar messenger. In this model, direct detection is described by an effective operator mq q bar q χ bar χ as usual, but the full amplitude for monojet + E̸T involves two intermediate scalar propagators, which cannot be seen within the effective field theory (EFT) or in the simplified model without the full SM gauge symmetry. We derive the collider bounds from the ATLAS monojet + E̸T as well as the CMS t t bar +E̸T data, finding out that the bounds and the interpretation of the results are completely different from those obtained within the EFT or simplified models. It is pointed out that it is important to respect unitarity, renormalizability and local gauge invariance of the SM.

  3. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  4. A further update on possible crises in nuclear-matter theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, W. H.

    2016-03-01

    The ancient problem of the saturation of symmetric nuclear matter is reviewed with an update on the status of the crises that were identified at an early stage by John Clark. We discuss how the initial problem with variational calculations providing more binding than the two hole-line contribution for the same interaction was overcome by calculations including three hole-line contributions without however reproducing the empirical nuclear saturation properties. It is argued that this remaining problem is still open because many solutions have been proposed or ad hoc adjustments implemented without generating universal agreement on the proper interpretation of the physics. The problem of nuclear saturation therefore persists leading to the necessity of an analysis of the way the nuclear saturation properties are obtained from experimental data. We clarify the role of short-range correlations and review results for nuclear saturation when such ingredients are completely taken into account using the Green’s function method. The role of long-range correlations is then analyzed with special emphasis on the importance of attractive pion-dominated excitation modes which inevitably lead to higher saturation densities than observed. Because such modes have no counterpart in finite nuclear systems, it is therefore argued that they should not be considered when calculating nuclear matter properties. The remaining open question is then whether long-range correlations in finite nuclei which in turn have no counterpart in infinite matter, represent the remaining missing ingredient in this analysis. We also briefly comment on the role of three-body interactions in the context of the dispersive optical model description of experimental data. It is further noted that interactions based on chiral perturbation theory at present do not generate a sufficient number of high-momentum nucleons leading to radii that are too small and substantial overbinding in finite nuclei.

  5. Study on a Unified Model of Dark Matter and Dark Energy from Dbi Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin; Wu, Yabo; Liu, Molin; Li, Tianqiang

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we study a unified model of dark matter and dark energy obtained from Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action in string theory. Two accelerated expansions in universe can be unified in this action. By using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the current observational data to constrain the model parameters in this unified model, where various density parameters as model parameters are included, and their constraint values are: Ω K = -0.0012+0.0037+0.0072-0.0036-0.0071, Ω b = 0.0461+0.0009+0.0017-0.0009-0.0017, Ω f = 0.171+0.108+0.195-0.108-0.160 and Ω 0m = 0.281+0.011+0.020-0.011-0.021. In addition, the Hubble constant and cosmic age are H0 = 70.163+1.029+2.045-1.029-1.988 and Age =13.788+0.160+0.318-0.160-0.312 (Gyr), respectively. According to the constraint results on model parameters we discuss the evolutions of some cosmological quantities in structure formation, such as the density contrast and the growth variable. At last, the evolution of geometrical quantity is studied to distinguish the unified models of dark sectors with the cosmological constant model. It is shown that this unified model of dark matter and dark energy is attractive to interpret the accelerating universe.

  6. S-pairing in neutron matter: I. Correlated basis function theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrocini, Adelchi; Fantoni, Stefano; Illarionov, Alexey Yu.; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2008-05-01

    S-wave pairing in neutron matter is studied within an extension of correlated basis function (CBF) theory to include the strong, short range spatial correlations due to realistic nuclear forces and the pairing correlations of the Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) approach. The correlation operator contains central as well as tensor components. The correlated BCS scheme of [S. Fantoni, Nucl. Phys. A 363 (1981) 381], developed for simple scalar correlations, is generalized to this more realistic case. The energy of the correlated pair condensed phase of neutron matter is evaluated at the two-body order of the cluster expansion, but considering the one-body density and the corresponding energy vertex corrections at the first order of the Power Series expansion. Based on these approximations, we have derived a system of Euler equations for the correlation factors and for the BCS amplitudes, resulting in correlated nonlinear gap equations, formally close to the standard BCS ones. These equations have been solved for the momentum independent part of several realistic potentials (Reid, Argonne v and Argonne v) to stress the role of the tensor correlations and of the many-body effects. Simple Jastrow correlations and/or the lack of the density corrections enhance the gap with respect to uncorrelated BCS, whereas it is reduced according to the strength of the tensor interaction and following the inclusion of many-body contributions.

  7. Voxel Level Survival Analysis of Grey Matter Volume and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment or Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeifman, Lubov E.; Eddy, William F.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Raji, Cyrus; Thompson, Paul M.; Becker, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify, at the voxel level, brain regions associated with the time to develop mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from normal cognition. We analyzed incident MCI (n = 58) or AD (n = 151) in 292 cognitively normal participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study–Cognition Study (mean age = 79.2±3.6 years). We used segmented, modulated grey matter maps from 3D (spoiled gradient echo) MRI scans obtained in 1998/99 (with clinical follow-up through 2012) that were smoothed with a 3-D 4 mm Gaussian filter. We fit approximately 1.92 million voxel-level Cox proportional hazard models to examine the grey matter volume effect on time to event, adjusting for age, sex, and diabetes. We used the significance threshold of p < 0.005 with contiguity threshold of at least 68 voxels (false detection probability <2.5 × 10−8). Areas within the mesial temporal lobe (MTL), anterior temporal lobe, hippocampus, and posterior cingulate gyrus were associated with time to MCI or AD. The presence of white matter lesions (a marker of small vessel disease in the brain) was associated with the volumes of the MTL and precuneus; MRI-identified infarcts also predicted MTL volume. These findings are important because we identified critical brain regions that predict a person’s increased likelihood of developing MCI or AD over a decade prior to the onset of clinical symptoms; these critical brain regions were themselves affected by the presence of vascular disease. PMID:25720412

  8. Evaluation of sampling inhalable PM10 particulate matter (<= 10 μm) using co-located high volume samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajoy, R. R. S.; Dias, J. W. C.; Rego, E. C. P.; Pereira Netto, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the determination of the concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter <= 10 μm (PM10), collected simultaneously by six PM10 high volume samplers from two different manufacturers installed in the same location. Fifteen samples of 24 h were obtained with each equipment at a selected urban area of Rio de Janeiro city. The concentration of PM10 ranged between 10.73 and 54.04 μg m-3. The samplers were considered comparable to each other, as the adopted methodology presented good repeatability.

  9. Final report of the independent counsel for Iran/Contra matters. Volume 2: Indictments, plea agreements, interim reports to the congress, and administrative matters

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.E.

    1993-08-04

    In October and November 1986, two secret U.S. Government operations were publicly exposed, potentially implicating Reagan Administration officials in illegal activities. These operations were the provision of assistance to the military activities of the Nicaraguan contra rebels during an October 1984 to October 1986 prohibition on such aid, and the sale of U.S. arms to Iran in contravention of stated U.S. policy and in possible violation of arms-export controls. In late November 1986, Reagan Administration officials announced that some of the proceeds from the sale of U.S. arms to Iran had been diverted to the contras. As a result, Attorney General Edwin Meese III sought the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate and prosecute possible crimes. Volume II contains indictments, plea agreements, interim reports to Congress and administrative matters from that investigation.

  10. Specific regions display altered grey matter volume in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice: MRI voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazumasu; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kawashima, Ryuta; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE μ Opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice display several behavioural differences from wild-type (WT) littermates including differential responses to nociceptive stimuli. Brain structural changes have been tied to behavioural alterations noted in transgenic mice with targeting of different genes. Hence, we assess the brain structure of MOP-KO mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and histological methods were used to identify structural differences between extensively backcrossed MOP-KO mice and WT mice. KEY RESULTS MOP-KO mice displayed robust increases in regional grey matter volume in olfactory bulb, several hypothalamic nuclei, periaqueductal grey (PAG) and several cerebellar areas, most confirmed by VBM analysis. The largest increases in grey matter volume were detected in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus, ventrolateral PAG (VLPAG) and cerebellar regions including paramedian and cerebellar lobules. Histological analyses confirm several of these results, with increased VLPAG cell numbers and increased thickness of the olfactory bulb granule cell layer and cerebellar molecular and granular cell layers. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MOP deletion causes previously undescribed structural changes in specific brain regions, but not in all regions with high MOP receptor densities (e.g. thalamus, nucleus accumbens) or that exhibit adult neurogenesis (e.g. hippocampus). Volume differences in hypothalamus and PAG may reflect behavioural changes including hyperalgesia. Although the precise relationship between volume change and MOP receptor deletion was not determined from this study alone, these findings suggest that levels of MOP receptor expression may influence a broader range of neural structure and function in humans than previously supposed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity

  11. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  12. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on Gray Matter Volume in Typically Developing Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Fukui, Kento; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Yokota, Susumu; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with psychiatric disorders and regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in adults. However, the relationship between BDNF and rGMV in children has not been clarified. In this 3-year cross-sectional/longitudinal (2 time points) study, we investigated the effects of BDNF genotypes on rGMV in 185 healthy Japanese children aged 5.7–18.4 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We found that the volume of the right cuneus in Met homozygotes (Met/Met) was greater than in Val homozygotes (Val/Val) in both exams, and the left insula and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex volumes were greater in Val homozygotes versus Met homozygotes in Exam l. In addition, Met homozygous subjects exhibited higher processing speed in intelligence indices than Val homozygotes and Val/Met heterozygotes at both time points. Longitudinal analysis showed that the left temporoparietal junction volume of Val/Met heterozygotes increased more substantially over the 3-year study period than in Val homozygotes, and age-related changes were observed for the Val/Met genotype. Our findings suggest that the presence of 2 Met alleles may have a positive effect on rGMV at the developmental stages analyzed in this study. PMID:26830347

  13. Gray matter volume is associated with rate of subsequent skill learning after a long term training intervention.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Baptista, Cassandra; Scholz, Jan; Jenkinson, Mark; Thomas, Adam G; Filippini, Nicola; Smit, Gabrielle; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2014-08-01

    The ability to predict learning performance from brain imaging data has implications for selecting individuals for training or rehabilitation interventions. Here, we used structural MRI to test whether baseline variations in gray matter (GM) volume correlated with subsequent performance after a long-term training of a complex whole-body task. 44 naïve participants were scanned before undertaking daily juggling practice for 6weeks, following either a high intensity or a low intensity training regime. To assess performance across the training period participants' practice sessions were filmed. Greater GM volume in medial occipito-parietal areas at baseline correlated with steeper learning slopes. We also tested whether practice time or performance outcomes modulated the degree of structural brain change detected between the baseline scan and additional scans performed immediately after training and following a further 4weeks without training. Participants with better performance had higher increases in GM volume during the period following training (i.e., between scans 2 and 3) in dorsal parietal cortex and M1. When contrasting brain changes between the practice intensity groups, we did not find any straightforward effects of practice time though practice modulated the relationship between performance and GM volume change in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that practice time and performance modulate the degree of structural brain change evoked by long-term training regimes. PMID:24680712

  14. Gray matter volume is associated with rate of subsequent skill learning after a long term training intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio-Baptista, Cassandra; Scholz, Jan; Jenkinson, Mark; Thomas, Adam G.; Filippini, Nicola; Smit, Gabrielle; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The ability to predict learning performance from brain imaging data has implications for selecting individuals for training or rehabilitation interventions. Here, we used structural MRI to test whether baseline variations in gray matter (GM) volume correlated with subsequent performance after a long-term training of a complex whole-body task. 44 naïve participants were scanned before undertaking daily juggling practice for 6 weeks, following either a high intensity or a low intensity training regime. To assess performance across the training period participants' practice sessions were filmed. Greater GM volume in medial occipito-parietal areas at baseline correlated with steeper learning slopes. We also tested whether practice time or performance outcomes modulated the degree of structural brain change detected between the baseline scan and additional scans performed immediately after training and following a further 4 weeks without training. Participants with better performance had higher increases in GM volume during the period following training (i.e., between scans 2 and 3) in dorsal parietal cortex and M1. When contrasting brain changes between the practice intensity groups, we did not find any straightforward effects of practice time though practice modulated the relationship between performance and GM volume change in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that practice time and performance modulate the degree of structural brain change evoked by long-term training regimes. PMID:24680712

  15. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on Gray Matter Volume in Typically Developing Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Fukui, Kento; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Yokota, Susumu; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-04-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with psychiatric disorders and regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in adults. However, the relationship between BDNF and rGMV in children has not been clarified. In this 3-year cross-sectional/longitudinal (2 time points) study, we investigated the effects of BDNF genotypes on rGMV in 185 healthy Japanese children aged 5.7-18.4 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We found that the volume of the right cuneus in Met homozygotes (Met/Met) was greater than in Val homozygotes (Val/Val) in both exams, and the left insula and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex volumes were greater in Val homozygotes versus Met homozygotes in Exam l. In addition, Met homozygous subjects exhibited higher processing speed in intelligence indices than Val homozygotes and Val/Met heterozygotes at both time points. Longitudinal analysis showed that the left temporoparietal junction volume of Val/Met heterozygotes increased more substantially over the 3-year study period than in Val homozygotes, and age-related changes were observed for the Val/Met genotype. Our findings suggest that the presence of 2 Met alleles may have a positive effect on rGMV at the developmental stages analyzed in this study. PMID:26830347

  16. Effective field theory and keV lines from dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krall, Rebecca; Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas E-mail: mreece@physics.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    We survey operators that can lead to a keV photon line from dark matter decay or annihilation. We are motivated in part by recent claims of an unexplained 3.5 keV line in galaxy clusters and in Andromeda, but our results could apply to any hypothetical line observed in this energy range. We find that given the amount of flux that is observable, explanations in terms of decay are more plausible than annihilation, at least if the annihilation is directly to Standard Model states rather than intermediate particles. The decay case can be explained by a scalar or pseudoscalar field coupling to photons suppressed by a scale not far below the reduced Planck mass, which can be taken as a tantalizing hint of high-scale physics. The scalar case is particularly interesting from the effective field theory viewpoint, and we discuss it at some length. Because of a quartically divergent mass correction, naturalness strongly suggests the theory should be cut off at or below the 1000 TeV scale. The most plausible such natural UV completion would involve supersymmetry. These bottom-up arguments reproduce expectations from top-down considerations of the physics of moduli. A keV line could also arise from the decay of a sterile neutrino, in which case a renormalizable UV completion exists and no direct inference about high-scale physics is possible.

  17. Perturbations of matter fields in the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kouji

    2009-12-01

    To show that the general framework of the second-order gauge-invariant perturbation theory developed by K. Nakamura [Prog. Theor. Phys. 110, 723 (2003)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.110.723; Prog. Theor. Phys. 113, 481 (2005)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.113.481] is applicable to a wide class of cosmological situations, some formulas for the perturbations of the matter fields are summarized within the framework of the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory in a four-dimensional homogeneous isotropic universe, which is developed in Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 17 (2007)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.117.17. We derive the formulas for the perturbations of the energy-momentum tensors and equations of motion for a perfect fluid, an imperfect fluid, and a single scalar field, and show that all equations are derived in terms of gauge-invariant variables without any gauge fixing. Through these formulas, we may say that the decomposition formulas for the perturbations of any tensor field into gauge-invariant and gauge-variant parts, which are proposed in the above papers, are universal.

  18. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part V: perturbation theory applied to dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš; Okumura, Teppei; Desjacques, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations show that redshift space distortions (RSD) introduce strong scale dependence in the power spectra of halos, with ten percent deviations relative to linear theory predictions even on relatively large scales (k < 0.1h/Mpc) and even in the absence of satellites (which induce Fingers-of-God, FoG, effects). If unmodeled these effects prevent one from extracting cosmological information from RSD surveys. In this paper we use Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and Eulerian halo biasing model and apply it to the distribution function approach to RSD, in which RSD is decomposed into several correlators of density weighted velocity moments. We model each of these correlators using PT and compare the results to simulations over a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. We find that with an introduction of a physically motivated halo biasing, and using dark matter power spectra from simulations, we can reproduce the simulation results at a percent level on scales up to k ~ 0.15h/Mpc at z = 0, without the need to have free FoG parameters in the model.

  19. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part V: perturbation theory applied to dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš; Okumura, Teppei; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: Vincent.Desjacques@unige.ch

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations show that redshift space distortions (RSD) introduce strong scale dependence in the power spectra of halos, with ten percent deviations relative to linear theory predictions even on relatively large scales (k < 0.1h/Mpc) and even in the absence of satellites (which induce Fingers-of-God, FoG, effects). If unmodeled these effects prevent one from extracting cosmological information from RSD surveys. In this paper we use Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and Eulerian halo biasing model and apply it to the distribution function approach to RSD, in which RSD is decomposed into several correlators of density weighted velocity moments. We model each of these correlators using PT and compare the results to simulations over a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. We find that with an introduction of a physically motivated halo biasing, and using dark matter power spectra from simulations, we can reproduce the simulation results at a percent level on scales up to k ∼ 0.15h/Mpc at z = 0, without the need to have free FoG parameters in the model.

  20. Effect of Bcl-2 rs956572 SNP on regional gray matter volumes and cognitive function in elderly males without dementia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mu-En; Huang, Chu-Chung; Hwang, Jen-Ping; Yang, Albert C; Tu, Pei-Chi; Yeh, Heng-Liang; Hong, Chen-Jee; Liou, Ying-Jay; Chen, Jin-Fan; Lin, Ching-Po; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2013-04-01

    The Bcl-2 gene is a major regulator of neural plasticity and cellular resilience. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Bcl-2 gene, Bcl-2 rs956572, significantly modulates the expression of Bcl-2 protein and cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. This study investigated the association between the Bcl-2 rs956572 SNP and brain structural abnormalities in non-demented elders, and to test the relationship between neuropsychological performance and regional gray matter (GM) volumes. Our sample comprised 97 non-demented elderly men with a mean age of 80.6 ± 5.6 years (range, 65 to 92 years). Cognitive test results, magnetic resonance imaging, and genotyping of Bcl-2 rs956572 were examined for each subject. The differences in regional GM volumes between G homozygotes and A-allele carriers were tested using optimized voxel-based morphometry. Subjects with G homozygotes exhibited significantly worse performance in the language domain of the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI; p = 0.009). They also showed significantly smaller GM volumes in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) (BA 21), but larger GM volumes in the left precuneus (BA 31), right lingual gyrus (BA 18), and left superior occipital gyrus (BA 19) relative to A-allele carriers (p < 0.001). A trend toward a positive correlation between right MTG GM volumes and the language domain of CASI was also evident (r = 0.181; p = 0.081). The findings suggest that Bcl-2 rs956572 SNP may modulate cognitive function and regional GM volume in non-demented elderly men, and that this polymorphism may affect language performance through its effect on the right MTG. PMID:22198673

  1. Does mode mixing matter in EMD-based highlight volume methods for hydrocarbon detection? Experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Du, Hao-kun; Zhang, Gu-lan; Yao, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-based spectral decomposition methods have been successfully used for hydrocarbon detection. However, mode mixing that occurs during the sifting process of EMD causes the 'true' intrinsic mode function (IMF) to be extracted incorrectly and blurs the physical meaning of the IMF. We address the issue of how the mode mixing influences the EMD-based methods for hydrocarbon detection by introducing mode-mixing elimination methods, specifically ensemble EMD (EEMD) and complete ensemble EMD (CEEMD)-based highlight volumes, as feasible tools that can identify the peak amplitude above average volume and the peak frequency volume. Three schemes, that is, using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are employed in the EMD-, EEMD- and CEEMD-based highlight volume methods. When these methods were applied to seismic data from a tight sandstone gas field in Central Sichuan, China, the results demonstrated that the amplitude anomaly in the peak amplitude above average volume captured by EMD, EEMD and CEEMD combined with Hilbert transforms, whether using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are almost identical to each other. However, clear distinctions can be found in the peak frequency volume when comparing results generated using all IMFs, selected IMFs, or weighted IMFs. If all IMFs are used, the influence of mode mixing on the peak frequency volume is not readily discernable. However, using selected IMFs or a weighted IMFs' scheme affects the peak frequency in relation to the reservoir thickness in the EMD-based method. Significant improvement in the peak frequency volume can be achieved in EEMD-based highlight volumes using selected IMFs. However, if the weighted IMFs' scheme is adopted (i.e., if the undesired IMFs are included with reduced weights rather than excluded from the analysis entirely), the CEEMD-based peak frequency volume provides a more accurate reservoir thickness estimate compared with the other two methods. This

  2. FABRICATION, OPTIMIZATION, AND EVALUATION OF A MASSIVE VOLUME AIR SAMPLER OF SIZED RESPIRABLE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype sampler which collects airborne particulate matter in three stages, 3.5 micrometers, 1.7 micrometers, and below 1.7 micrometers (the cutoffs of which closely fit the ACGIH respirable size curve) was constructed previously. Component failures and operational difficulti...

  3. IMPROVED SOURCE APPORTIONMENT AND SPECIATION OF LOW-VOLUME PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will examine methods with the high sensitivity and low limits of detection needed to analyze a wide range of chemical species in particulate matter collected with personal samplers. Dr. Schauer and colleagues will develop sensitive methods to detect trace meta...

  4. A voxel-based morphometric study of age- and sex-related changes in white matter volume in the normal aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haijing; Wang, Lixin; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Lv, Huandi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To carry out a cross-sectional study of 187 cognitively normal Chinese adults using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approach to delineate age-related changes in the white matter volume of regions of interest in the brain and further analyze their correlation with age. Materials and methods A total of 187 cognitively normal adults were divided into the young, middle, and old age-groups. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with the Achieva 3.0 T system. Structural images were processed using VBM8 and statistical parametric mapping 8. Regions of interest were obtained by WFU PickAtlas, and all realigned images were spatially normalized. Results Females showed significantly greater total white matter volume than males (t=2.36, P=0.0096, false-discovery rate [FDR] corrected). VBM demonstrated statistically significant age-related differences in white matter volume between the young age-group and the middle age-group (P<0.05, FDR corrected) and between the middle age-group and the old age-group (P<0.05, FDR corrected). No interaction was found between age and sex on white matter volume (P<0.05, FDR corrected). Logistic regression analysis revealed nonlinear correlation between total white matter volume and age (R2=0.124, P<0.001). White matter volume gradually increased before 40 years of age, peaked around 50 years of age, and rapidly declined after 60 years of age. Conclusion Significant age-related differences are present in white matter volume across multiple brain regions during aging. The VBM approach may help differentiate underlying normal neurobiological aging changes of specific brain regions from neurodegenerative impairments. PMID:26966366

  5. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S.; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that – at least with respect to language acquisition – early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood. PMID:26106338

  6. Complementary Characteristics of Correlation Patterns in Morphometric Correlation Networks of Cortical Thickness, Surface Area, and Gray Matter Volume.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ju; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric correlation networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume have statistically different structural topology. However, there is no report directly describing their correlation patterns in view of interregional covariance. Here, we examined the characteristics of the correlation patterns in three morphometric networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume using a Venn diagram concept across 314 normal subjects. We found that over 60% of all nonoverlapping correlation patterns emerged with divergent unique patterns, while there were 10% of all common edges in ipsilateral and homotopic regions among the three morphometric correlation networks. It was also found that the network parameters of the three networks were different. Our findings showed that correlation patterns of the network itself can provide complementary information when compared with network properties. We demonstrate that morphometric correlation networks of distinct structural phenotypes have different correlation patterns and different network properties. This finding implies that the topology of each morphometric correlation network may reflect different aspects of each morphometric descriptor. PMID:27226000

  7. Sex differences in socioemotional functioning, attentional bias, and gray matter volume in maltreated children: A multilevel investigation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Philip A; Viding, Essi; Puetz, Vanessa B; Palmer, Amy L; Mechelli, Andrea; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Samuel, Sophie; McCrory, Eamon J

    2015-11-01

    While maltreatment is known to impact social and emotional functioning, threat processing, and neural structure, the potentially dimorphic influence of sex on these outcomes remains relatively understudied. We investigated sex differences across these domains in a large community sample of children aged 10 to 14 years (n = 122) comprising 62 children with verified maltreatment experience and 60 well-matched nonmaltreated peers. The maltreated group relative to the nonmaltreated comparison group exhibited poorer social and emotional functioning (more peer problems and heightened emotional reactivity). Cognitively, they displayed a pattern of attentional avoidance of threat in a visual dot-probe task. Similar patterns were observed in males and females in these domains. Reduced gray matter volume was found to characterize the maltreated group in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobes, and bilateral supramarginal gyrus; sex differences were observed only in the supramarginal gyrus. In addition, a disordinal interaction between maltreatment exposure and sex was found in the postcentral gyrus. Finally, attentional avoidance to threat mediated the relationship between maltreatment and emotional reactivity, and medial orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume mediated the relationship between maltreatment and peer functioning. Similar mediation patterns were observed across sexes. This study highlights the utility of combining multiple levels of analysis when studying the "latent vulnerability" engendered by childhood maltreatment and yields tentative findings regarding a neural basis of sex differences in long-term outcomes for maltreated children. PMID:26535946

  8. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that - at least with respect to language acquisition - early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood. PMID:26106338

  9. Complementary Characteristics of Correlation Patterns in Morphometric Correlation Networks of Cortical Thickness, Surface Area, and Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Ju; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Morphometric correlation networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume have statistically different structural topology. However, there is no report directly describing their correlation patterns in view of interregional covariance. Here, we examined the characteristics of the correlation patterns in three morphometric networks of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter volume using a Venn diagram concept across 314 normal subjects. We found that over 60% of all nonoverlapping correlation patterns emerged with divergent unique patterns, while there were 10% of all common edges in ipsilateral and homotopic regions among the three morphometric correlation networks. It was also found that the network parameters of the three networks were different. Our findings showed that correlation patterns of the network itself can provide complementary information when compared with network properties. We demonstrate that morphometric correlation networks of distinct structural phenotypes have different correlation patterns and different network properties. This finding implies that the topology of each morphometric correlation network may reflect different aspects of each morphometric descriptor. PMID:27226000

  10. Size Matters: Spleen and Lung Volumes Predict Performance in Human Apneic Divers

    PubMed Central

    Schagatay, Erika; Richardson, Matt X.; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    Humans share with seals the ability to contract the spleen and increase circulating hematocrit, which may improve apneic performance by enhancing gas storage. Seals have large spleens and while human spleen size is small in comparison, it shows great individual variation. Unlike many marine mammals, human divers rely to a great extent on lung oxygen stores, but the impact of lung volume on competitive apnea performance has never been determined. We studied if spleen- and lung size correlated with performance in elite apnea divers. Volunteers were 14 male apnea world championship participants, with a mean (SE) of 5.8 (1.2) years of previous apnea training. Spleen volume was calculated from spleen length, width, and thickness measured via ultrasound during rest, and vital capacity via spirometry. Accumulated competition scores from dives of maximal depth, time, and distance were compared to anthropometric measurements and training data. Mean (SE) diving performance was 75 (4) m for constant weight depth, 5 min 53 (39) s for static apnea and 139 (13) m for dynamic apnea distance. Subjects’ mean height was 184 (2) cm, weight 82 (3) kg, vital capacity (VC) 7.3 (0.3) L and spleen volume 336 (32) mL. Spleen volume did not correlate with subject height or weight, but was positively correlated with competition score (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). Total competition score was also positively correlated with VC (r = 0.54; P < 0.05). The three highest scoring divers had the greatest spleen volumes, averaging 538 (53) mL, while the three lowest-scoring divers had a volume of 270 (71) mL (P < 0.01). VC was also greater in the high-scorers, at 7.9 (0.36) L as compared to 6.7 (0.19) L in the low scorers (P < 0.01). Spleen volume was reduced to half after 2 min of apnea in the highest scoring divers, and the estimated resting apnea time gain from the difference between high and low scorers was 15 s for spleen volume and 60 s for VC

  11. Research in the Theory of Condensed Matter and Elementary Particles: Final Report, September 1, 1984 - November 30, 1987

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedan, D.; Kadanoff, L.; Nambu, Y.; Shenker, S.

    1988-04-01

    Progress is reported in the field of condensed matter physics in the area of two-dimensional critical phenomena, specifically results allowing complete classification of all possible two-dimensional critical phenomena in a certain domain. In the field of high energy physics, progress is reported in string and conformal field theory, and supersymmetry.

  12. Nuclear matter properties in the relativistic mean-field theory at finite temperature with interaction between sigma-omega mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-05-21

    We study the nuclear matter properties in the regime of high temperatures using a relativistic mean-field theory. Contrasting with the usual linear Walecka model, we include the sigma-omega meson coupling in order to investigate the role of this interaction in the nucleon effective mass behavior. Some numerical results are presented and discussed.

  13. Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles: Final report, September 1, 1984-November 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Friedan, D.; Kadanoff, L.; Nambu, Y.; Shenker, S.

    1988-04-01

    Progress is reported in the field of condensed matter physics in the area of two-dimensional critical phenomena, specifically results allowing complete classification of all possible two-dimensional critical phenomena in a certain domain. In the field of high energy physics, progress is reported in string and conformal field theory, and supersymmetry.

  14. A Deconstruction Lattice Description of the D1/D5 Brane World-Volume Gauge Theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giedt, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I genermore » alize the deconstruction lattice formulation of Endres and Kaplan to two-dimensional super-QCD with eight supercharges, denoted by (4,4), and bifundamental matter. I specialize to a particularly interesting (4,4) gauge theory, with gauge group U ( N c ) × U ( N f ) , and U ( N f ) being weakly gauged. It describes the infrared limit of the D1/D5 brane system, which has been studied extensively as an example of the AdS 3 /CFT 2 correspondence. The construction here preserves two supercharges exactly and has a lattice structure quite similar to that which has previously appeared in the deconstruction approach, that is, site, link, and diagonal fields with both the Bose and Fermi statistics. I remark on possible applications of the lattice theory that would test the AdS 3 /CFT 2 correspondence, particularly one that would exploit the recent worldsheet instanton analysis of Chen and Tong.« less

  15. The Etiology of Improved Outcomes at High Volume Centers Learning Theory and the Case of Implant Flashing.

    PubMed

    Bookman, Jared; Duffey, Romney; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Iorio, Richard; Bosco, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Increased volume has been shown to be associated with improved outcomes for many orthopaedic procedures. For individual surgeons, the concepts of learning curves and volume effects have been well established in the literature. For institutions, high-volume hospitals have also been shown to have better outcomes for orthopaedic procedures such as total joint replacements. However, exactly how hospital volume mediates this improvement is not well understood. Learning theory states that learning occurs as a result of accumulated experience, not based on time. We compared our institution's curve representing our implant flashing rates to other institutional data sets that exhibit learning and continuous quality improvement, including airline near misses, coal mining accidents, and others. Development of expertise is based on volume and rate of errors, and therefore higher volume is conducive to faster learning. PMID:27281321

  16. Dark matter and halo bispectrum in redshift space: theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Wagner, Christian; Noreña, Jorge; Verde, Licia; Percival, Will

    2014-12-01

    We present a phenomenological modification of the standard perturbation theory prediction for the bispectrum in redshift space that allows us to extend the model to mildly non-linear scales over a wide range of redshifts, z<=1.5. Our model require 18 free parameters that are fitted to N-body simulations using the shapes k2/k1=1, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5. We find that we can describe the bispectrum of dark matter particles with ~5% accuracy for kilesssim0.10 h/Mpc at z=0, for kilesssim0.15 h/Mpc at z=0.5, for kilesssim0.17 h/Mpc at z=1.0 and for kilesssim0.20 h/Mpc at z=1.5. For very squeezed triangles with k1=k2gtrsim0.1 hMpc-1 and k3<=0.02 hMpc-1, however, neither SPT nor the proposed fitting formula are able to describe the measured dark matter bispectrum with this accuracy. We show that the fitting formula is sufficiently general that can be applied to other intermediate shapes such as k2/k1=1.25, 1.75, and 2.25. We also test that the fitting formula is able to describe with similar accuracy the bispectrum of cosmologies with different Ωm, in the range 0.2lesssim Ωm lesssim 0.4, and consequently with different values of the logarithmic grow rate f at z=0, 0.4lesssim f(z=0) lesssim 0.6. We apply this new formula to recover the bias parameters, f and σ8, by combining the redshift space power spectrum monopole and quadrupole with the bispectrum monopole for both dark matter particles and haloes. We find that the combination of these three statistics can break the degeneracy between b1, f and σ8. For dark matter particles the new model can be used to recover f and σ8 with ~1% accuracy. For dark matter haloes we find that f and σ8 present larger systematic shifts, ~10%. The systematic offsets arise because of limitations in the modelling of the interplay between bias and redshift space distortions, and represent a limitation as the statistical errors of forthcoming surveys reach this level. Conveniently, we find that these residual systematics are mitigated for

  17. Dark matter and halo bispectrum in redshift space: theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will; Wagner, Christian; Noreña, Jorge; Verde, Licia E-mail: cwagner@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-01

    We present a phenomenological modification of the standard perturbation theory prediction for the bispectrum in redshift space that allows us to extend the model to mildly non-linear scales over a wide range of redshifts, z≤1.5. Our model require 18 free parameters that are fitted to N-body simulations using the shapes k{sub 2}/k{sub 1}=1, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5. We find that we can describe the bispectrum of dark matter particles with ∼5% accuracy for k{sub i}∼<0.10 h/Mpc at z=0, for k{sub i}∼<0.15 h/Mpc at z=0.5, for k{sub i}∼<0.17 h/Mpc at z=1.0 and for k{sub i}∼<0.20 h/Mpc at z=1.5. For very squeezed triangles with k{sub 1}=k{sub 2}∼>0.1 hMpc{sup -1} and k{sub 3}≤0.02 hMpc{sup -1}, however, neither SPT nor the proposed fitting formula are able to describe the measured dark matter bispectrum with this accuracy. We show that the fitting formula is sufficiently general that can be applied to other intermediate shapes such as k{sub 2}/k{sub 1}=1.25, 1.75, and 2.25. We also test that the fitting formula is able to describe with similar accuracy the bispectrum of cosmologies with different Ω{sub m}, in the range 0.2∼< Ω{sub m} ∼< 0.4, and consequently with different values of the logarithmic grow rate f at z=0, 0.4∼< f(z=0) ∼< 0.6. We apply this new formula to recover the bias parameters, f and σ{sub 8}, by combining the redshift space power spectrum monopole and quadrupole with the bispectrum monopole for both dark matter particles and haloes. We find that the combination of these three statistics can break the degeneracy between b{sub 1}, f and σ{sub 8}. For dark matter particles the new model can be used to recover f and σ{sub 8} with ∼1% accuracy. For dark matter haloes we find that f and σ{sub 8} present larger systematic shifts, ∼10%. The systematic offsets arise because of limitations in the modelling of the interplay between bias and redshift space distortions, and represent a limitation as the statistical errors of

  18. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  19. Extraction of hot QCD matter transport coefficients utilizing microscopic transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Nasser Soliman

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are thought to have produced a state of matter called the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The QGP forms when nuclear matter governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) reaches a temperature and baryochemical potential necessary to achieve the transition of hadrons (bound states of quarks and gluons) to deconfined quarks and gluons. Such conditions have been achieved at RHIC, and the resulting QGP created exhibits properties of a near perfect fluid. In particular, strong evidence shows that the QGP exhibits a very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s, near the lower bound predicted for that quantity by Anti-deSitter space/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) methods of eta/s = ℎ4pkB , where h is Planck's constant and kB is Boltzmann's constant. As the produced matter expands and cools, it evolves through a phase described by a hadron gas with rapidly increasing eta/s. This thesis presents robust calculations of eta/s for hadronic and partonic media as a function of temperature using the Green-Kubo formalism. An analysis is performed for the behavior of eta/s to mimic situations of the hadronic media at RHIC evolving out of chemical equilibrium, and systematic uncertainties are assessed for our method. In addition, preliminary results are presented for the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio zeta/s, whose behavior is not well-known in a relativistic heavy ion collisions. The diffusion coefficient for baryon number is investigated, and an algorithm is presented to improve upon the previous work of investigation of heavy quark diffusion in a thermal QGP. By combining the results of my investigations for eta/s from our microscopic transport models with what is currently known from the experimental results on elliptic flow from RHIC, I find that the trajectory of eta/s in a heavy ion collision has a rich structure, especially near the deconfinement transition temperature Tc. I

  20. Nonlinear diffusion in two-dimensional ordered porous media based on a free volume theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, A.; Gaberscek, M.; Jamnik, J.; Merzel, F.

    2009-12-01

    A continuum nonlinear diffusion model is developed to describe molecular transport in ordered porous media. An existing generic van der Waals equation of state based free volume theory of binary diffusion coefficients is modified and introduced into the two-dimensional diffusion equation. The resulting diffusion equation is solved numerically with the alternating-direction fully implicit method under Neumann boundary conditions. Two types of pore structure symmetries are considered, hexagonal and cubic. The former is modeled as parallel channels while in case of the latter equal-sized channels are placed perpendicularly thus creating an interconnected network. First, general features of transport in both systems are explored, followed by the analysis of the impact of molecular properties on diffusion inside and out of the porous matrix. The influence of pore size on the diffusion-controlled release kinetics is assessed and the findings used to comment recent experimental studies of drug release profiles from ordered mesoporous silicates.

  1. Coupled theory for long range bottom reverberation from seabed volume in-homogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bo; Yang, Shi-e.; Piao, ShengChun

    2012-11-01

    It is well known that in shallow water the performance of active sonar systems is seriously influenced by bottom reverberation, which is simply the sum of scattered sound on the irregular bottom interface or of random in-homogeneities in the sediments. However, in the case of a relatively flat bottom or of bottom with a small grazing angle, the volume scattering in the sediments would play a much more important role. In this paper, the theory of coupled modes is used to model the long range bottom reverberation in shallow water caused by inhomogeneous sediments in the bottom. The distant bottom reverberation level of an impulsive source is derived. This approach, which gives results obeying the principle of reciprocity in all cases, is available for both mono-and bi-static situations.

  2. Mimetic Theory for Cell-Centered Lagrangian Finite Volume Formulation on General Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Shashkov, Mikhail J.; Burton, Donald E.; Christon, Mark A.

    2012-07-19

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving large deformation problems is constructed based on the hypo-elastic model and using the mimetic theory. Rigorous analysis in the context of gas and solid dynamics, and arbitrary polygonal meshes, is presented to demonstrate the ability of cell-centered schemes in mimicking the continuum properties and principles at the discrete level. A new mimetic formulation based gradient evaluation technique and physics-based, frame independent and symmetry preserving slope limiters are proposed. Furthermore, a physically consistent dissipation model is employed which is both robust and inexpensive to implement. The cell-centered scheme along with these additional new features are applied to solve solids undergoing elasto-plastic deformation.

  3. Application of taxonomy theory, Volume 1: Computing a Hopf bifurcation-related segment of the feasibility boundary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaborszky, J.; Venkatasubramanian, V.

    1995-10-01

    Taxonomy Theory is the first precise comprehensive theory for large power system dynamics modeled in any detail. The motivation for this project is to show that it can be used, practically, for analyzing a disturbance that actually occurred on a large system, which affected a sizable portion of the Midwest with supercritical Hopf type oscillations. This event is well documented and studied. The report first summarizes Taxonomy Theory with an engineering flavor. Then various computational approaches are sighted and analyzed for desirability to use with Taxonomy Theory. Then working equations are developed for computing a segment of the feasibility boundary that bounds the region of (operating) parameters throughout which the operating point can be moved without losing stability. Then experimental software incorporating large EPRI software packages PSAPAC is developed. After a summary of the events during the subject disturbance, numerous large scale computations, up to 7600 buses, are reported. These results are reduced into graphical and tabular forms, which then are analyzed and discussed. The report is divided into two volumes. This volume illustrates the use of the Taxonomy Theory for computing the feasibility boundary and presents evidence that the event indeed led to a Hopf type oscillation on the system. Furthermore it proves that the Feasibility Theory can indeed be used for practical computation work with very large systems. Volume 2, a separate volume, will show that the disturbance has led to a supercritical (that is stable oscillation) Hopf bifurcation.

  4. Linear and curvilinear correlations of brain gray matter volume and density with age using voxel-based morphometry with the Akaike information criterion in 291 healthy children.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Thyreau, Benjamin; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Wu, Kai; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-08-01

    We examined linear and curvilinear correlations of gray matter volume and density in cortical and subcortical gray matter with age using magnetic resonance images (MRI) in a large number of healthy children. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region-of-interest (ROI) analyses with the Akaike information criterion (AIC), which was used to determine the best-fit model by selecting which predictor terms should be included. We collected data on brain structural MRI in 291 healthy children aged 5-18 years. Structural MRI data were segmented and normalized using a custom template by applying the diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL) procedure. Next, we analyzed the correlations of gray matter volume and density with age in VBM with AIC by estimating linear, quadratic, and cubic polynomial functions. Several regions such as the prefrontal cortex, the precentral gyrus, and cerebellum showed significant linear or curvilinear correlations between gray matter volume and age on an increasing trajectory, and between gray matter density and age on a decreasing trajectory in VBM and ROI analyses with AIC. Because the trajectory of gray matter volume and density with age suggests the progress of brain maturation, our results may contribute to clarifying brain maturation in healthy children from the viewpoint of brain structure. PMID:22505237

  5. Scalar and tensorial topological matter coupled to (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity: I. Classical theory and global charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. B.; Popescu, Eugeniu M.

    2006-06-01

    We consider the coupling of scalar topological matter to (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity. The matter fields consist of a 0-form scalar field and a 2-form tensor field. We carry out a canonical analysis of the classical theory, investigating its sectors and solutions. We show that the model admits both BTZ-like black-hole solutions and homogeneous/inhomogeneous FRW cosmological solutions.We also investigate the global charges associated with the model and show that the algebra of charges is the extension of the Kac Moody algebra for the field-rigid gauge charges, and the Virasoro algebra for the diffeomorphism charges. Finally, we show that the model can be written as a generalized Chern Simons theory, opening the perspective for its formulation as a generalized higher gauge theory.

  6. Lithium-Induced Gray Matter Volume Increase As a Neural Correlate of Treatment Response in Bipolar Disorder: A Longitudinal Brain Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Lyoo, In Kyoon; Dager, Stephen R; Kim, Jieun E; Yoon, Sujung J; Friedman, Seth D; Dunner, David L; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that lithium may exert neurotrophic effects that counteract pathological processes in the brain of patients with bipolar disorder (BD). To describe and compare the course and magnitude of gray matter volume changes in patients with BD who are treated with lithium or valproic acid (VPA) compared to healthy comparison subjects, and to assess clinical relationships to gray matter volume changes induced by lithium in patients with BD, we conducted longitudinal brain imaging and clinical evaluations of treatment response in 22 mood-stabilizing and antipsychotic medications-naive patients with BD who were randomly assigned to either lithium or VPA treatment after baseline assessment. Fourteen healthy comparison subjects did not take any psychotropic medications during follow-up. Longitudinal data analyses of 93 serial magnetic resonance images revealed lithium-induced increases in gray matter volume, which peaked at week 10–12 and were maintained through 16 weeks of treatment. This increase was associated with positive clinical response. In contrast, VPA-treated patients with BD or healthy comparison subjects did not show gray matter volume changes over time. Results suggest that lithium induces sustained increases in cerebral gray matter volume in patients with BD and that these changes are related to the therapeutic efficacy of lithium. PMID:20357761

  7. Anterior Cingulate Cortex Gray Matter Volume Mediates an Association between 2D:4D Ratio and Trait Aggression in Women but not Men

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Adam X.; Norman, Rachel E.; Radtke, Spenser R.; Carré, Justin M.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates that prenatal testosterone exposure increases aggression, possibly through its effects on the structure and function of neural circuits supporting threat detection and emotion regulation. Here we examined associations between regional gray matter volume, trait aggression, and the ratio of the second and fourth digit of the hand (2D:4D ratio) as a putative index of prenatal testosterone exposure in 464 healthy young adult volunteers. Our analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between 2D:4D ratio and gray matter volume of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), a brain region supporting, emotion regulation, conflict monitoring, and behavioral inhibition. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that reduced (i.e., masculinized) gray matter volume in the dACC mediated the relationship between 2D:4D ratio and aggression in women, but not men. Expanding on this gender-specific mediation, additional analyses demonstrated that the shared variance between 2D:4D ratio, dACC gray matter volume, and aggression in women reflected the tendency to engage in cognitive reappraisal of emotionally provocative stimuli. Our results provide novel evidence that 2D:4D ratio is associated with masculinization of dACC gray matter volume, and that this neural phenotype mediates, in part, the expression of trait aggression in women. PMID:25827959

  8. Normal age-related brain morphometric changes: nonuniformity across cortical thickness, surface area and gray matter volume?

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Herve; Goldman, Aaron L; Sambataro, Fabio; Verchinski, Beth A; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2012-03-01

    Normal aging is accompanied by global as well as regional structural changes. While these age-related changes in gray matter volume have been extensively studied, less has been done using newer morphological indexes, such as cortical thickness and surface area. To this end, we analyzed structural images of 216 healthy volunteers, ranging from 18 to 87 years of age, using a surface-based automated parcellation approach. Linear regressions of age revealed a concomitant global age-related reduction in cortical thickness, surface area and volume. Cortical thickness and volume collectively confirmed the vulnerability of the prefrontal cortex, whereas in other cortical regions, such as in the parietal cortex, thickness was the only measure sensitive to the pronounced age-related atrophy. No cortical regions showed more surface area reduction than the global average. The distinction between these morphological measures may provide valuable information to dissect age-related structural changes of the brain, with each of these indexes probably reflecting specific histological changes occurring during aging. PMID:20739099

  9. Decreased gray matter volume in the left hippocampus and bilateral calcarine cortex in coal mine flood disaster survivors with recent onset PTSD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Tan, Qingrong; Yin, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Huan, Yi; Tang, Lihua; Wang, Huaihai; Xu, Junqing; Li, Lingjiang

    2011-05-31

    Although limbic structure changes have been found in chronic and recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, there are few studies about brain structure changes in recent onset PTSD patients after a single extreme and prolonged trauma. In the current study, 20 coal mine flood disaster survivors underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region of interest (ROI) techniques were used to detect the gray matter and white matter volume changes in 10 survivors with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. The correlation between the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and gray matter density in the ROI was also studied. Compared with survivors without PTSD, survivors with PTSD had significantly decreased gray matter volume and density in left anterior hippocampus, left parahippocampal gyrus, and bilateral calcarine cortex. The CAPS score correlated negatively with the gray matter density in bilateral calcarine cortex and left hippocampus in coal mine disaster survivors. Our study suggests that the gray matter volume and density of limbic structure decreased in recent onset PTSD patients who were exposed to extreme trauma. PTSD symptom severity was associated with gray matter density in calcarine cortex and hippocampus. PMID:21498053

  10. Excluded volume effects in compressed polymer brushes: A density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cangyi; Tang, Ping E-mail: fengqiu@fudan.edu.cn; Qiu, Feng E-mail: fengqiu@fudan.edu.cn; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-03-28

    A classical density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate the behavior of compressed polymer brushes composed of hard-sphere chains. The excluded volume interactions among the chain segments are explicitly treated. Two compression systems are used to study the behavior of brush-wall and brush-brush interactions. For the brush-brush systems, an obvious interpenetration zone has been observed. The extent of the interpenetration depends strongly on the grafting density. Furthermore, the repulsive force between the brush and wall or between the two brushes has been obtained as a function of the compression distance. Compared to the prediction of the analytic self-consistent field theory, such force increases more rapidly in the brush-wall compression with high polymer grafting densities or at higher compressions. In the brush-brush compression system, the interpenetration between the two compressed brushes creates a “softer” interaction. The influence of hard-sphere solvents on the behavior of compressed brushes is also discussed.

  11. Equation of state of imbalanced cold matter from chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignano, Stefano; Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    We study the thermodynamic properties of matter at vanishing temperature for nonextreme values of the isospin chemical potential and of the strange quark chemical potential. From the leading-order pressure obtained by maximizing the static chiral Lagrangian density, we derive a simple expression for the equation of state in the pion condensed phase and in the kaon condensed phase. We find an analytical expression for the maximum of the ratio between the energy density and the Stefan-Boltzmann energy density and for the isospin chemical potential at the peak, both in good agreement with lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics. We speculate on the location of the crossover from the Bose-Einstein condensate state to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state by a simple analysis of the thermodynamic properties of the system. For μI≳2 mπ, the leading-order chiral perturbation theory breaks down; for example, it underestimates the energy density of the system and leads to a wrong asymptotic behavior.

  12. Functional brain networks and white matter underlying theory-of-mind in autism.

    PubMed

    Kana, Rajesh K; Libero, Lauren E; Hu, Christi P; Deshpande, Hrishikesh D; Colburn, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Human beings constantly engage in attributing causal explanations to one's own and to others' actions, and theory-of-mind (ToM) is critical in making such inferences. Although children learn causal attribution early in development, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are known to have impairments in the development of intentional causality. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study investigated the neural correlates of physical and intentional causal attribution in people with ASDs. In the fMRI scanner, 15 adolescents and adults with ASDs and 15 age- and IQ-matched typically developing peers made causal judgments about comic strips presented randomly in an event-related design. All participants showed robust activation in bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus at the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) in response to intentional causality. Participants with ASDs showed lower activation in TPJ, right inferior frontal gyrus and left premotor cortex. Significantly weaker functional connectivity was also found in the ASD group between TPJ and motor areas during intentional causality. DTI data revealed significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in ASD participants in white matter underlying the temporal lobe. In addition to underscoring the role of TPJ in ToM, this study found an interaction between motor simulation and mentalizing systems in intentional causal attribution and its possible discord in autism. PMID:22977198

  13. Cosmological perturbations in theories with non-minimal coupling between curvature and matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Frazão, Pedro; Páramos, Jorge E-mail: pedro.frazao@ist.utl.pt

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we examine how the presence of a non-minimal coupling between spacetime curvature and matter affects the evolution of cosmological perturbations on a homogeneous and isotropic Universe, and hence the formation of large-scale structure. This framework places constraints on the terms which arise due to the coupling with matter and, in particular, on the modified growth of matter density perturbations. We derive approximate analytical solutions for the evolution of matter overdensities during the matter dominated era and discuss the compatibility of the obtained results with the hypothesis that the late time acceleration of the Universe is driven by a non-minimal coupling.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Many-Body Quantum Theory in Condensed Matter Physics—An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, D. E.

    2005-02-01

    This is undoubtedly an ambitious book. It aims to provide a wide ranging, yet self-contained and pedagogical introduction to techniques of quantum many-body theory in condensed matter physics, without losing mathematical `rigor' (which I hope means rigour), and with an eye on physical insight, motivation and application. The authors certainly bring plenty of experience to the task, the book having grown out of their graduate lectures at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen over a five year period, with the feedback and refinement this presumably brings. The book is also of course ambitious in another sense, for it competes in the tight market of general graduate/advanced undergraduate texts on many-particle physics. Prospective punters will thus want reasons to prefer it to, or at least give it space beside, well established texts in the field. Subject-wise, the book is a good mix of the ancient and modern, the standard and less so. Obligatory chapters deal with the formal cornerstones of many-body theory, from second quantization, time-dependence in quantum mechanics and linear response theory, to Green's function and Feynman diagrams. Traditional topics are well covered, including two chapters on the electron gas, chapters on phonons and electron phonon coupling, and a concise account of superconductivity (confined, no doubt judiciously, to the conventional BCS case). Less mandatory, albeit conceptually vital, subjects are also aired. These include a chapter on Fermi liquid theory, from both semi-classical and microscopic perspectives, and a freestanding account of one-dimensional electron gases and Luttinger liquids which, given the enormity of the topic, is about as concise as it could be without sacrificing clarity. Quite naturally, the authors' own interests also influence the choice of material covered. A persistent theme, which brings a healthy topicality to the book, is the area of transport in mesoscopic systems or nanostructures. Two chapters, some

  15. THE QUALITATIVE STATUS OF THE ONKOI IN ASCLEPIADES' THEORY OF MATTER

    PubMed Central

    LEITH, DAVID

    2010-01-01

    The medical and philosophical system of Asclepiades of Bithynia (fl. later second century BC)1 has been the subject of considerable controversy.2 His physical theory of anarmoi onkoi in particular has seen intense debate, and although many of its broader features appear to be fairly well established, many of its most fundamental details remain obscure. Perhaps somewhat paradoxically, some of the most important work carried out on Asclepiades has been explicitly focused instead on Heraclides of Pontus,3 the reconstruction of whose physical theory has often proceeded on the assumption that this was largely replicated by Asclepiades some two centuries later. But to a great extent the Asclepiadean debate has been framed in terms of the question of his intellectual debts to ancient atomism, and Epicureanism in particular, and in this respect the present study will be no different.4 The most recent scholarship has been sharply divided over this question. Vallance has emphasized the principally medical context of Asclepiades' system, and made the case that the frangibility of the onkoi marks such a fundamental divergence from Epicurus' atomism that any influence from Epicurean physics should be rejected, and that we should look instead especially to Erasistratus.5 Casadei, however, following on to a certain extent from the work of Pigeaud, has rightly drawn attention to the tendency in Vallance's exposition to suppress a number of fundamental elements of Asclepiades' doctrine which are undeniably also distinguishing features of Epicurean philosophy.6 The most significant of these include his particulate theory of matter, his antiteleological conception of nature, and his rejection of any theory of qualitative change. But these correspondences would certainly not be sufficient to qualify Asclepiades' system simply as a reproduction of Epicureanism, and there is clear evidence that Asclepiades stood in opposition to Epicurus in certain fundamental respects. In a recent

  16. THE QUALITATIVE STATUS OF THE ONKOI IN ASCLEPIADES' THEORY OF MATTER.

    PubMed

    Leith, David

    2009-07-01

    The medical and philosophical system of Asclepiades of Bithynia (fl. later second century BC)(1) has been the subject of considerable controversy.(2) His physical theory of anarmoi onkoi in particular has seen intense debate, and although many of its broader features appear to be fairly well established, many of its most fundamental details remain obscure. Perhaps somewhat paradoxically, some of the most important work carried out on Asclepiades has been explicitly focused instead on Heraclides of Pontus,(3) the reconstruction of whose physical theory has often proceeded on the assumption that this was largely replicated by Asclepiades some two centuries later. But to a great extent the Asclepiadean debate has been framed in terms of the question of his intellectual debts to ancient atomism, and Epicureanism in particular, and in this respect the present study will be no different.(4) The most recent scholarship has been sharply divided over this question. Vallance has emphasized the principally medical context of Asclepiades' system, and made the case that the frangibility of the onkoi marks such a fundamental divergence from Epicurus' atomism that any influence from Epicurean physics should be rejected, and that we should look instead especially to Erasistratus.(5) Casadei, however, following on to a certain extent from the work of Pigeaud, has rightly drawn attention to the tendency in Vallance's exposition to suppress a number of fundamental elements of Asclepiades' doctrine which are undeniably also distinguishing features of Epicurean philosophy.(6) The most significant of these include his particulate theory of matter, his antiteleological conception of nature, and his rejection of any theory of qualitative change. But these correspondences would certainly not be sufficient to qualify Asclepiades' system simply as a reproduction of Epicureanism, and there is clear evidence that Asclepiades stood in opposition to Epicurus in certain fundamental respects. In a

  17. Translating Theory into Practice: Implications of Japanese Management Theory for Student Personnel Administrators. NASPA Monograph Series Volume 3. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, William L.; And Others

    Japanese management theory was studied to identify specific models for consideration by student personnel administrators. The report is organized into three sections: major components of Japanese management theory, potential implications for student personnel administration, and three models, based on components of Japanese management theory, for…

  18. Intracapsular hip pressures in a porcine model: does position and volume matter?

    PubMed

    Hosalkar, Harish S; Varley, Eric S; Glaser, Diana A; Farnsworth, Christine L; Wenger, Dennis R

    2011-09-01

    This study outlines a relationship between joint volume, positioning, and intracapsular pressure in a healthy hip. After measuring the native intracapsular pressure in 12 porcine specimens, each joint was injected with radio-opaque-colored saline as pressures were measured. At 20 mmHg, the hip was placed in its position of ease and then in differing positions while pressures were recorded. Position significantly altered pressures, with the lowest values in neutral and the highest in hyperextension (P<0.001). Extreme hip positions may be detrimental because of high pressures created within the joint, possibly explaining complications associated with some hip diagnostic and treatment methods. PMID:21606854

  19. Cerebellar gray matter and lobular volumes correlate with core autism symptoms.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Crocetti, Deana; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Neuroanatomical differences in the cerebellum are among the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but little is known about the relationship between cerebellar dysfunction and core ASD symptoms. The newly-emerging existence of cerebellar sensorimotor and cognitive subregions provides a new framework for interpreting the functional significance of cerebellar findings in ASD. Here we use two complementary analyses - whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the SUIT cerebellar atlas - to investigate cerebellar regional gray matter (GM) and volumetric lobular measurements in 35 children with ASD and 35 typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10.4 ± 1.6 years; range 8-13 years). To examine the relationships between cerebellar structure and core ASD symptoms, correlations were calculated between scores on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) and the VBM and volumetric data. Both VBM and the SUIT analyses revealed reduced GM in ASD children in cerebellar lobule VII (Crus I/II). The degree of regional and lobular gray matter reductions in different cerebellar subregions correlated with the severity of symptoms in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Structural differences and behavioral correlations converged on right cerebellar Crus I/II, a region which shows structural and functional connectivity with fronto-parietal and default mode networks. These results emphasize the importance of the location within the cerebellum to the potential functional impact of structural differences in ASD, and suggest that GM differences in cerebellar right Crus I/II are associated with the core ASD profile. PMID:25844317

  20. Higher body mass index in older adults is associated with lower gray matter volume: implications for memory performance.

    PubMed

    Kharabian Masouleh, Shahrzad; Arélin, Katrin; Horstmann, Annette; Lampe, Leonie; Kipping, Judy A; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Schroeter, Matthias L; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Witte, Anja Veronica

    2016-04-01

    Midlife obesity has been associated with increased dementia risk, yet reports on brain structure and function are mixed. We therefore assessed the effects of body mass index (BMI) on gray matter volume (GMV) and cognition in a well-characterized sample of community-dwelled older adults. GMV was measured using 3T-neuroimaging in 617 participants (258 women, 60-80 years, BMI 17-41 kg/m(2)). In addition, cognitive performance and various confounders including hypertension, diabetes, and apolipoprotein E genotype were assessed. A higher BMI correlated significantly with lower GMV in multiple brain regions, including (pre)frontal, temporal, insular and occipital cortex, thalamus, putamen, amygdala, and cerebellum, even after adjusting for confounders. In addition, lower GMV in prefrontal and thalamic areas partially mediated negative effects of (1) higher BMI and (2) higher age on memory performance. We here showed that a higher BMI in older adults is associated with widespread gray matter alterations, irrespective of obesity-related comorbidities and other confounders. Our results further indicate that a higher BMI induces structural alterations that translate into subtle impairments in memory performance in aging. PMID:26973099

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Many-Body Quantum Theory in Condensed Matter Physics—An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, D. E.

    2005-02-01

    This is undoubtedly an ambitious book. It aims to provide a wide ranging, yet self-contained and pedagogical introduction to techniques of quantum many-body theory in condensed matter physics, without losing mathematical `rigor' (which I hope means rigour), and with an eye on physical insight, motivation and application. The authors certainly bring plenty of experience to the task, the book having grown out of their graduate lectures at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen over a five year period, with the feedback and refinement this presumably brings. The book is also of course ambitious in another sense, for it competes in the tight market of general graduate/advanced undergraduate texts on many-particle physics. Prospective punters will thus want reasons to prefer it to, or at least give it space beside, well established texts in the field. Subject-wise, the book is a good mix of the ancient and modern, the standard and less so. Obligatory chapters deal with the formal cornerstones of many-body theory, from second quantization, time-dependence in quantum mechanics and linear response theory, to Green's function and Feynman diagrams. Traditional topics are well covered, including two chapters on the electron gas, chapters on phonons and electron phonon coupling, and a concise account of superconductivity (confined, no doubt judiciously, to the conventional BCS case). Less mandatory, albeit conceptually vital, subjects are also aired. These include a chapter on Fermi liquid theory, from both semi-classical and microscopic perspectives, and a freestanding account of one-dimensional electron gases and Luttinger liquids which, given the enormity of the topic, is about as concise as it could be without sacrificing clarity. Quite naturally, the authors' own interests also influence the choice of material covered. A persistent theme, which brings a healthy topicality to the book, is the area of transport in mesoscopic systems or nanostructures. Two chapters, some

  2. Airway hyperresponsiveness with chest strapping: A matter of heterogeneity or reduced lung volume?

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale P; Bruni, Giulia Innocenti; Scano, Giorgio; Crimi, Claudia; Biasco, Luigi; Coletta, Giuseppe; Cornara, Giuseppe; Torchio, Roberto; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele L

    2009-03-31

    Chest wall strapping has been recently shown to be associated with an increase in airway responsiveness to methacholine. To investigate whether this is the result of the decreased lung volume or an increased heterogeneity due to chest wall distortion, ten healthy volunteers underwent a methacholine challenge at control conditions and after selective strapping of the rib cage, the abdomen or the whole chest wall resulting in similar decrements of functional residual capacity and total lung capacity but causing different distribution of the bronchoconstrictor. Methacholine during strapping reduced forced expiratory flow, dynamic compliance, and reactance at 5Hz and increased pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5Hz that were significantly greater than at control and associated with a blunted bronchodilator effect of the deep breath. However, no significant differences were observed between selective and total chest wall strapping, suggesting that the major mechanism for increasing airway responsiveness with chest wall strapping is the breathing at low lung volume rather than regional heterogeneities. PMID:19429518

  3. Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles. (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The proposed research is concerned with problems occupying the common ground between quantum field theory and statistical mechanics. The topics under investigation include: superconformal field theory in two dimensions, its relationship to two dimensional critical phenomena and its applications in string theory; the covariant formulation of the superstring theory; formation of large-scale structures and spatial chaos in dynamical systems; fermion-boson mass relations in BCS type theories; and properties of quantum field theories defined over galois fields. 37 refs.

  4. Regional white matter volume and the relation with attentional functioning in survivors of malignant pediatric brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.; White, Holly A.; Wilkinson, Gina M.; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative assessment of MR examinations in 37 survivors of childhood cancer treated with central nervous system prophylaxis revealed that normal appearing white matter (NAWM) volume is associated with attention-related problems, localized specifically in the right prefrontal region. T1-, T2-, and PD-weighted images were segmented and divided into pre-frontal, frontal, parietal/temporal, and parietal/occipital regions for each hemisphere. These eight regions were analyzed in five slices centered at the level of the basal ganglia. The patient's age at diagnosis and time elapsed from diagnosis were used as covariates in the regressions. Attentional measures showed significant deficiency when compared to age and gender normative values. Total, frontal and/or prefrontal NAWM volumes from the range of slices examined were significantly associated with 5 of the 8 attentional measures. The frontal/prefrontal region of the brain is associated with executive functioning tasks and could potentially be spared as much as possible during therapy planning. The results of the present study further support the contention that NAWM is an important substrate for treatment-induced neurocognitive problems among survivors of malignant brain tumors of childhood.

  5. A microgenetic study of learning about the molecular theory of matter and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Clark Allen

    This paper reports the results of an experimental microgenetic study of children learning complex knowledge from text and experiments. The study had two goals. The first was to investigate fine-grained, moment-to-moment changes in knowledge as middle-school students learned about molecules and chemical reactions over thirteen sessions. The second was to investigate the effects of two instructional treatments, one using implicit textbook explanations and one using explicit explanations developed according to a theory of how scientific knowledge is structured. In the study, 61 sixth- and seventh-graders worked one on one with undergraduate instructors in eleven sessions of about 50 to 80 minutes. The instructors guided the students in conducting experiments and thinking out loud about texts. Topics studied included molecules, states of matter, chemical reactions, and heat transfer. A dense array of questions provided a detailed picture of children's moment-to-moment and day-to-day changes in knowledge. Three results chapters address students' preinstructional knowledge, the effects of the experimental treatment at posttest, and five detailed case studies of students' step-by-step knowledge change over eleven sessions. The chapter on preinstructional knowledge discussed three aspects of global knowledge change: conceptual change, coherence, and entrenchment. Notably, this chapter provides systematic evidence that children's knowledge was fragmented and that consistency with general unifying principles did not guarantee a highly coherent body of knowledge. The experimental manipulation revealed a strong advantage for explicit explanations over implicit textbook explanations. Multiple explicit explanations (e.g., highly explicit explanations of three or four chemical reactions) appeared to be necessary for students to master key concepts. Microgenetic analyses of five cases addressed eight empirical issues that should be addressed by any theory of knowledge acquisition

  6. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions. Part IV: perturbation theory applied to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš; Baldauf, Tobias; McDonald, Patrick; Okumura, Teppei E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: teppei@ewha.ac.kr

    2012-11-01

    We develop a perturbative approach to redshift space distortions (RSD) using the phase space distribution function approach and apply it to the dark matter redshift space power spectrum and its moments. RSD can be written as a sum over density weighted velocity moments correlators, with the lowest order being density, momentum density and stress energy density. We use standard and extended perturbation theory (PT) to determine their auto and cross correlators, comparing them to N-body simulations. We show which of the terms can be modeled well with the standard PT and which need additional terms that include higher order corrections which cannot be modeled in PT. Most of these additional terms are related to the small scale velocity dispersion effects, the so called finger of god (FoG) effects, which affect some, but not all, of the terms in this expansion, and which can be approximately modeled using a simple physically motivated ansatz such as the halo model. We point out that there are several velocity dispersions that enter into the detailed RSD analysis with very different amplitudes, which can be approximately predicted by the halo model. In contrast to previous models our approach systematically includes all of the terms at a given order in PT and provides a physical interpretation for the small scale dispersion values. We investigate RSD power spectrum as a function of μ, the cosine of the angle between the Fourier mode and line of sight, focusing on the lowest order powers of μ and multipole moments which dominate the observable RSD power spectrum. Overall we find considerable success in modeling many, but not all, of the terms in this expansion. This is similar to the situation in real space, but predicting power spectrum in redshift space is more difficult because of the explicit influence of small scale dispersion type effects in RSD, which extend to very large scales.

  7. Altered activation of innate immunity associates with white matter volume and diffusion in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Teemu; Mantere, Outi; Raij, Tuukka T; Kieseppä, Tuula; Laitinen, Hanna; Leiviskä, Jaana; Torniainen, Minna; Tuominen, Lauri; Vaarala, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2015-01-01

    First-episode psychosis (FEP) is associated with inflammatory and brain structural changes, but few studies have investigated whether systemic inflammation associates with brain structural changes in FEP. Thirty-seven FEP patients (median 27 days on antipsychotic medication), and 19 matched controls were recruited. Serum levels of 38 chemokines and cytokines, and cardiovascular risk markers were measured at baseline and 2 months later. We collected T1- and diffusion-weighted MRIs with a 3 T scanner from the patients at baseline. We analyzed the association of psychosis-related inflammatory markers with gray and white matter (WM) volume using voxel-based morphometry and WM diffusion using tract-based spatial statistics with whole-brain and region-of-interest (ROI) analyses. FEP patients had higher CCL22 and lower TGFα, CXCL1, CCL7, IFN-α2 and ApoA-I than controls. CCL22 decreased significantly between baseline and 2 months in patients but was still higher than in controls. The association between inflammatory markers and FEP remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, smoking and BMI. We did not observe a correlation of inflammatory markers with any symptoms or duration of antipsychotic treatment. Baseline CCL22 levels correlated negatively with WM volume and positively with mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity bilaterally in the frontal lobes in ROI analyses. Decreased serum level of ApoA-I was associated with smaller volume of the medial temporal WM. In whole-brain analyses, CCL22 correlated positively with mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity, and CXCL1 associated negatively with fractional anisotropy and positively with mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity in several brain regions. This is the first report to demonstrate an association between circulating chemokine levels and WM in FEP patients. Interestingly, CCL22 has been previously implicated in autoimmune diseases associated with WM pathology. The results suggest that an altered activation

  8. Asymmetry of cerebral gray and white matter and structural volumes in relation to sex hormones and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-01-01

    Whilst many studies show sex differences in cerebral asymmetry, their mechanisms are still unknown. This report describes the potential impact of sex hormones and sex chromosomes by comparing MR data from 39 male and 47 female controls and 33 men with an extra X-chromosome (47,XXY). Methods: Regional asymmetry in gray and white matter volumes (GMV and WMV) was calculated using voxel based moprhometry (SPM5), by contrasting the unflipped and flipped individual GMV and WMV images. In addition, structural volumes were calculated for the thalamus, caudate, putamen, amygdala, and hippocampus, using the FreeSurfer software. Effects of plasma testosterone and estrogen on the GMV and WMV, as well on the right/left ratios of the subcortical volumes were tested by multi-regression analysis. Results: All three groups showed a leftward asymmetry in the motor cortex and the planum temporale, and a rightward asymmetry of the middle occipital cortex. Both asymmetries were more pronounced in 46,XY males than 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and were positively correlated with testosterone levels. There was also a rightward asymmetry of the vermis and leftward GMV asymmetry in the cerebellar hemispheres in all groups. Notably, cerebellar asymmetries were larger in 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, but were not related to sex hormone levels. No asymmetry differences between 46,XX females and 47,XXY males, and no overall effects of brain size were detected. Conclusion: The asymmetry in the planum temporale area and the occipital cortex seem related to processes associated with testosterone, whereas the observed cerebellar asymmetries suggest a link with X-chromosome escapee genes. Sex differences in cerebral asymmetry are moderated by sex hormones and X-chromosome genes, in a regionally differentiated manner. PMID:25505869

  9. A transmit/receive volume strip array and its mode mixing theory in MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ray F; Xue, Rong

    2007-11-01

    MRI is increasingly moving towards higher magnetic field, prompting the need for multi-port transmit/receive RF coil arrays to overcome high-frequency limitations such as penetration depth and dielectric resonance effects. In this work, an arbitrary n-element transmit/receive volume strip array (VSA) and an associated mixing mode theory are described to understand the behavior of a multiple-port cyclic symmetrical VSA in both the physical port space and the complementary mode space; the relations between the two spaces are explicitly formulated. The advantage of mode-space analysis is that an arbitrary n x n impedance matrix which describes any VSA in port space can be diagonalized to a diagonal n x n matrix; thus an analytical solution of Kirchhoff's laws for the VSA becomes manageable when n is large. Based on such an analytical solution, we can (a) generate excitation profile of any desired mixed mode during transmission by manipulating external power sources without the need of physically tuning VSA to the mixed mode; (b) identify the sensitivity profiles of the complementary mode distributions during reception, which were unknown in quadrature and decoupled coils. Many predictions are rigidly verified by extensive test measurements from network analyzer and by MR imaging experiments. PMID:17499953

  10. High density matter in AGS, SPS and RHIC collisions: Proceedings. Volume 9

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This 1-day workshop focused on phenomenological models regarding the specific question of the maximum energy density achievable in collisions at AGS, SPS and RHIC. The idea was to have 30-minute (or less) presentations of each model--but not the model as a whole, rather then that strongly narrowed to the above physics question. The key topics addressed were: (1) to estimate the energy density in heavy-ion collisions within a model, and to discuss its physical implications; (2) to suggest experimental observables that may confirm the correctness of a model approach--with respect to the energy density estimate; (3) to compare with existing data from AGS and SPS heavy-ion collisions, and to give predictions for the future RHIC experiments. G. Ogilvie started up the workshop with a critical summary of experimental manifestations of high-density matter at the AGS, and gave a personal outlook on RHIC physics. R. Mattiello talked about his newly developed hadron cascade model for applications to AGS and SPS collisions. Next, D. Kharzeev gave a nice introduction of the Glauber approach to high-energy collisions and illustrated the predictive power of this approach in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the SPS. It followed S. Vance with a presentation of the baryon-junction model to explain the observed baryon stopping phenomenon in collisions of heavy nuclei. S. Bass continued with a broad perspective of the UrQMD model, and provided insight into the details of the microscopic dynamical features of nuclear collisions at high energy. J. Sandweiss and J. Kapusta addressed the interesting aspect of photon production in peripherical nuclear collisions due to intense electromagnetic bremstrahlung by the highly charged, fast moving ions. Finally, H. Sorge closed up the one-day workshop with a presentation of his recent work with the RQMD model. This report consists of a summary and vugraphs of the presentations.

  11. Many-particle theory of nuclear systems with application to neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakkalakal, D. A.; Yang, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The energy-density relation was calculated for pure neutron matter in the density range relevant for neutron stars, using four different hard-core potentials. Calculations are also presented of the properties of the superfluid state of the neutron component, along with the superconducting state of the proton component and the effects of polarization in neutron star matter.

  12. Broken-symmetry-adapted Green function theory of condensed matter systems: Towards a vector spin-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, A. K.; Mochena, Mogus

    2000-12-01

    The group-theory framework developed by Fukutome for a systematic analysis of the various broken-symmetry types of Hartree-Fock solution exhibiting spin structures is here extended to the general many-body context using spinor Green function formalism for describing magnetic systems. Consequences of this theory are discussed for examining the magnetism of itinerant electrons in nanometric systems of current interest as well as bulk systems where a vector spin-density form is required, by specializing our work to spin-density-functional formalism. We also formulate the linear-response theory for such a system and compare and contrast our results with the recent results obtained for localized electron systems. The various phenomenological treatments of itinerant magnetic systems are here unified in this group-theoretical description. We apply this theory to the one-band Hubbard model to illustrate the usefulness of this approach.

  13. Volume of white matter hyperintensities is an independent predictor of intelligence quotient and processing speed in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van der Land, Veronica; Hijmans, Channa T; de Ruiter, Marieke; Mutsaerts, Henri J M M; Cnossen, Marjon H; Engelen, Marc; Majoie, Charles B L M; Nederveen, Aart J; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease can be complicated by cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), which are associated with diminished neurocognitive functioning. The influence of the total volume of WMHs on the degree of neurocognitive dysfunction has not yet been characterized. In our study of 38 patients (mean age 12·5 years) we demonstrated that a higher volume of WMHs was associated with lower full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ), verbal IQ, Processing Speed Index and more fatigue. Our results suggest that volume of WMHs is an additional parameter to take into account when planning individual diagnostic and treatment options. PMID:25303108

  14. Gray Matter Volume in Adolescent Anxiety: An Impact of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val[superscript 66]Met Polymorphism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Sven C.; Aouidad, Aveline; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Minimal research links anxiety disorders in adolescents to regional gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities and their modulation by genetic factors. Prior research suggests that a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) Val[superscript 66]Met polymorphism may modulate such brain morphometry profiles. Method: Using voxel-based…

  15. HPA-axis function and grey matter volume reductions: imaging the diathesis-stress model in individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Valli, I; Crossley, N A; Day, F; Stone, J; Tognin, S; Mondelli, V; Howes, O; Valmaggia, L; Pariante, C; McGuire, P

    2016-01-01

    The onset of psychosis is thought to involve interactions between environmental stressors and the brain, with cortisol as a putative mediator. We examined the relationship between the cortisol stress response and brain structure in subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Waking salivary cortisol was measured in 22 individuals at UHR for psychosis and 17 healthy controls. Grey matter volume was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. The relationship between the stress response and grey matter volume was investigated using voxel-based analyses. Our predictions of the topography of cortisol action as a structural brain modulator were informed by measures of brain glucocorticoid and mineralcorticoid receptor distribution obtained from the multimodal neuroanatomical and genetic Allen Brain Atlas. Across all subjects, reduced responsivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was correlated with smaller grey matter volumes in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex and in the hippocampus. This relationship was particularly marked in the UHR subjects in the right prefrontal, left parahippocampal/fusiform and parietal cortices. The subgroup that subsequently developed psychosis showed a significant blunting of HPA stress response, observed at trend level also in the whole UHR sample. Altered responses to stress in people at high risk of psychosis are related to reductions in grey matter volume in areas implicated in the vulnerability to psychotic disorders. These areas may represent the neural components of a stress vulnerability model. PMID:27138796

  16. Gray matter myelination of 1555 human brains using partial volume corrected MRI images

    PubMed Central

    Shafee, Rebecca; Buckner, Randy L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The myelin content of the cortex changes over the human lifetime and aberrant cortical myelination is associated with diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential in differentiating between myeloarchitectonically distinct cortical regions in vivo. Here we introduce a new algorithm for correcting partial volume effects present in mm-scale MRI images which was used to investigate the myelination pattern of the cerebral cortex in 1555 clinically normal subjects using the ratio of T1-weighted (T1w) and T2-weighted (T2w) MRI images. A significant linear cross-sectional age increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin was detected across an 18 to 35 year age span (highest value of ~ 1%/year compared to mean T1w/T2w myelin value at 18 years). The cortex was divided at mid-thickness and the value of T1w/T2w myelin calculated for the inner and the outer layers separately. The increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin occurs predominantly in the inner layer for most cortical regions. The ratio of the inner and outer layer T1w/T12w myelin was further validated using high-resolution in vivo MRI scans and also a high-resolution MRI scan of a postmortem brain. Additionally, the relationships between cortical thickness, curvature and T1w/T2w estimated myelin were found to be significant, although the relationships varied across the cortex. We discuss these observations as well as limitations of using the T1w/T2w ratio as an estimate of cortical myelin. PMID:25449739

  17. Gray matter myelination of 1555 human brains using partial volume corrected MRI images.

    PubMed

    Shafee, Rebecca; Buckner, Randy L; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-01-15

    The myelin content of the cortex changes over the human lifetime and aberrant cortical myelination is associated with diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential in differentiating between myeloarchitectonically distinct cortical regions in vivo. Here we introduce a new algorithm for correcting partial volume effects present in mm-scale MRI images which was used to investigate the myelination pattern of the cerebral cortex in 1555 clinically normal subjects using the ratio of T1-weighted (T1w) and T2-weighted (T2w) MRI images. A significant linear cross-sectional age increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin was detected across an 18 to 35 year age span (highest value of ~ 1%/year compared to mean T1w/T2w myelin value at 18 years). The cortex was divided at mid-thickness and the value of T1w/T2w myelin calculated for the inner and outer layers separately. The increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin occurs predominantly in the inner layer for most cortical regions. The ratio of the inner and outer layer T1w/T2w myelin was further validated using high-resolution in vivo MRI scans and also a high-resolution MRI scan of a postmortem brain. Additionally, the relationships between cortical thickness, curvature and T1w/T2w estimated myelin were found to be significant, although the relationships varied across the cortex. We discuss these observations as well as limitations of using the T1w/T2w ratio as an estimate of cortical myelin. PMID:25449739

  18. Species, Diaspore Volume and Body Mass Matter in Gastropod Seed Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Türke, Manfred; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Seed dispersal of ant-dispersed plants (myrmecochores) is a well studied ecosystem function. Recently, slugs have been found to act as seed dispersers of myrmecochores. The aim of our study was to (1) further generalize the finding that gastropods feed on seeds of myrmecochores and hence may act as seed dispersers, (2) to test whether gastropod body mass and the volume of diaspores have an influence on the seed dispersal potential. Methodology and Principal Findings We assessed the seed dispersal potential of four slug and snail species with a set of seven myrmecochorous plant species from seven different plant families common to Central European beech forests. Diaspores differed in shape and size. Gastropods differed in their readiness to feed on diaspores and in the proportion of seeds that were swallowed as a whole, and this readiness generally decreased with increasing diaspore size. Smaller Arionid slugs (58 mm body length; mean) mostly fed on the elaiosome but also swallowed small diaspores and therefore not only act as elaiosome consumers, a nutrient rich appendage on myrmecochorous diaspores, but may also disperse seeds. Large Arionid slugs (>100 mm body length) swallowed diaspores of all sizes. Diaspores swallowed by gastropods were defecated without damage. Within-species variability in body size also affect seed dispersal potential, as larger individuals of the red slug (Arion rufus) swallowed more diaspores of wood anemone (Anemone nemorosa) than smaller ones. Conclusions and Significance Our results help to generalize the finding that gastropods consume and potentially disperse seeds of myrmecochores. The dispersal potential of gastropods is strongly influenced by diaspore size in relation to gastropod size. PMID:23844239

  19. Toward accurate modelling of the non-linear matter bispectrum: standard perturbation theory and transients from initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullagh, Nuala; Jeong, Donghui; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modelling of non-linearities in the galaxy bispectrum, the Fourier transform of the galaxy three-point correlation function, is essential to fully exploit it as a cosmological probe. In this paper, we present numerical and theoretical challenges in modelling the non-linear bispectrum. First, we test the robustness of the matter bispectrum measured from N-body simulations using different initial conditions generators. We run a suite of N-body simulations using the Zel'dovich approximation and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) at different starting redshifts, and find that transients from initial decaying modes systematically reduce the non-linearities in the matter bispectrum. To achieve 1 per cent accuracy in the matter bispectrum at z ≤ 3 on scales k < 1 h Mpc-1, 2LPT initial conditions generator with initial redshift z ≳ 100 is required. We then compare various analytical formulas and empirical fitting functions for modelling the non-linear matter bispectrum, and discuss the regimes for which each is valid. We find that the next-to-leading order (one-loop) correction from standard perturbation theory matches with N-body results on quasi-linear scales for z ≥ 1. We find that the fitting formula in Gil-Marín et al. accurately predicts the matter bispectrum for z ≤ 1 on a wide range of scales, but at higher redshifts, the fitting formula given in Scoccimarro & Couchman gives the best agreement with measurements from N-body simulations.

  20. Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 1: Basic theories of rotor aerodynamics with application to helicopters. [momentum, vortices, and potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, W. Z.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of rotary-wing aircraft in general is defined. The energy effectiveness of helicopters is compared with that of other static thrust generators in hover, as well as with various air and ground vehicles in forward translation. The most important aspects of rotor-blade dynamics and rotor control are reviewed. The simple physicomathematical model of the rotor offered by the momentum theory is introduced and its usefulness and limitations are assessed. The combined blade-element and momentum theory approach, which provides greater accuracy in performance predictions, is described as well as the vortex theory which models a rotor blade by means of a vortex filament or vorticity surface. The application of the velocity and acceleration potential theory to the determination of flow fields around three dimensional, non-rotating bodies as well as to rotor aerodynamic problems is described. Airfoil sections suitable for rotors are also considered.

  1. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  2. ZNF804A variants confer risk for heroin addiction and affect decision making and gray matter volume in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhao, Li-Yan; Wang, Gui-Bin; Yue, Wei-Hua; He, Yong; Shu, Ni; Lin, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Fan; Li, Jia-Li; Chen, Na; Wang, Hui-Min; Kosten, Thomas R; Feng, Jia-Jia; Wang, Jun; Tang, Yu-De; Liu, Shu-Xue; Deng, Gui-Fa; Diao, Gan-Huan; Tan, Yun-Long; Han, Hong-Bin; Lin, Lu; Shi, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction shares common neurobiological pathways and risk genes with other psychiatric diseases, including psychosis. One of the commonly identified risk genes associated with broad psychosis has been ZNF804A. We sought to test whether psychosis risk variants in ZNF804A increase the risk of heroin addiction by modulating neurocognitive performance and gray matter volume (GMV) in heroin addiction. Using case-control genetic analysis, we compared the distribution of ZNF804A variants (genotype and haplotype) in 1035 heroin abusers and 2887 healthy subjects. We also compared neurocognitive performance (impulsivity, global cognitive ability and decision-making ability) in 224 subjects and GMV in 154 subjects based on the ZNF804A variants. We found significant differences in the distribution of ZNF804A intronic variants (rs1344706 and rs7597593) allele and haplotype frequencies between the heroin and control groups. Decision-making impairment was worse in heroin abusers who carried the ZNF804A risk allele and haplotype. Subjects who carried more risk alleles and haplotypes of ZNF804A had greater GMV in the bilateral insular cortex, right temporal cortex and superior parietal cortex. The interaction between heroin addiction and ZNF804A variants affected GMV in the left sensorimotor cortex. Our findings revealed several ZNF804A variants that were significantly associated with the risk of heroin addiction, and these variants affected decision making and GMV in heroin abusers compared with controls. The precise neural mechanisms that underlie these associations are unknown, which requires future investigations of the effects of ZNF804A on both dopamine neurotransmission and the relative increases in the volume of various brain areas. PMID:25708696

  3. Contributions of organic and inorganic matter to sediment volume and accretion in tidal wetlands at steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, James T.; Barber, Donald C.; Callaway, John C.; Chambers, Randy; Hagen, Scott C.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Johnson, Beverly J.; Megonigal, Patrick; Neubauer, Scott C.; Troxler, Tiffany; Wigand, Cathleen

    2016-04-01

    A mixing model derived from first principles describes the bulk density (BD) of intertidal wetland sediments as a function of loss on ignition (LOI). The model assumes that the bulk volume of sediment equates to the sum of self-packing volumes of organic and mineral components or BD = 1/[LOI/k1 + (1-LOI)/k2], where k1 and k2 are the self-packing densities of the pure organic and inorganic components, respectively. The model explained 78% of the variability in total BD when fitted to 5075 measurements drawn from 33 wetlands distributed around the conterminous United States. The values of k1 and k2 were estimated to be 0.085 ± 0.0007 g cm-3 and 1.99 ± 0.028 g cm-3, respectively. Based on the fitted organic density (k1) and constrained by primary production, the model suggests that the maximum steady state accretion arising from the sequestration of refractory organic matter is ≤ 0.3 cm yr-1. Thus, tidal peatlands are unlikely to indefinitely survive a higher rate of sea-level rise in the absence of a significant source of mineral sediment. Application of k2 to a mineral sediment load typical of East and eastern Gulf Coast estuaries gives a vertical accretion rate from inorganic sediment of 0.2 cm yr-1. Total steady state accretion is the sum of the parts and therefore should not be greater than 0.5 cm yr-1 under the assumptions of the model. Accretion rates could deviate from this value depending on variation in plant productivity, root:shoot ratio, suspended sediment concentration, sediment-capture efficiency, and episodic events.

  4. Bootstrapping Processes in the Development of Students' Commonsense Matter Theories: Using Analogical Mappings, Thought Experiments, and Learning to Measure to Promote Conceptual Restructuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores whether the development of students' understanding of matter as something that occupies space and has weight involves conceptual change and restructuring rather than only simple belief revision. Based on an analysis of how the concepts in students' initial matter theory (henceforth MT1) may differ from the concepts in the…

  5. Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

    2014-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans. PMID:25072322

  6. A constant-volume rapid exhaust dilution system for motor vehicle particulate matter number and mass measurements.

    PubMed

    Maricq, M Matti; Chase, Richard E; Xu, Ning; Podsiadlik, Diane H

    2003-10-01

    An improved version of the constant volume sampling (CVS) methodology that overcomes a number of obstacles that exist with the current CVS dilution tunnel system used in most diesel and gasoline vehicle emissions test facilities is presented. The key feature of the new sampling system is the introduction of dilution air immediately at the vehicle tailpipe. In the present implementation, this is done concentrically through a cylindrical air filter. Elimination of the transfer hose conventionally used to connect the tailpipe to the dilution tunnel significantly reduces the hydrocarbon and particulate matter (PM) storage release artifacts that can lead to wildly incorrect particle number counts and to erroneous filter-collected PM mass. It provides accurate representations of particle size distributions for diesel vehicles by avoiding the particle coagulation that occurs in the transfer hose. Furthermore, it removes the variable delay time that otherwise exists between the time that emissions exit the tailpipe and when they are detected in the dilution tunnel. The performance of the improved CVS system is examined with respect to diesel, gasoline, and compressed natural gas vehicles. PMID:14604329

  7. Gray matter volume alterations in first-episode drug-naïve patients with deficit and nondeficit schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Deng, Wei; Li, Mingli; He, Zongling; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Chaohua; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wanjun; Li, Yinfei; Jiang, Lijun; Gong, Qiyong; Hu, Xun; Zhang, Nanyin; Li, Tao

    2015-11-30

    Different patterns of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities have been reported between chronic patients with deficit schizophrenia (DS), relative to nondeficit schizophrenia (NDS) patients. However, it is not clear whether these differences are characteristic to the pathophysiology of DS or due to the effects of medications or illness durations. To address this issue, GMV in 88 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia (44 DS and 44 NDS), 67 of their first-degree relatives and 84 healthy controls were assessed using voxel- based morphometry (VBM) and compared between groups. Correlations between GMV and clinical symptoms in patients were also assessed. Compared to controls, DS patients displayed more severe GMV reduction in the cerebellar culmen than NDS patients. GMV reduction in culmen was also observed in the first-degree relatives of DS (but not NDS) patients, suggesting possible different genetic risk in DS and NDS. The left insula was significantly smaller in DS patients than both NDS patients and controls, and smaller GMV of this region was associated with more severe negative symptoms in patients. Our results collectively indicate that DS might represent a distinct subtype of schizophrenia from NDS and the GMV change in left insula may be a morphological signature of DS. PMID:26409573

  8. Gray Matter Volume Alterations in First-episode Drug-naïve Patients with Deficit and Nondeficit Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingli; He, Zongling; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Chaohua; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiang; Guo, Wanjun; Li, Yinfei; Jiang, Lijun; Gong, Qiyong; Hu, Xun; Zhang, Nanyin; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Different patterns of gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities have been reported between chronic patients with deficit schizophrenia (DS), relative to nondeficit schizophrenia (NDS) patients. However, it is not clear whether these differences are characteristic to the pathophysiology of DS or due to the effects of medications or illness durations. To address this issue, GMV in 88 first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia (44 DS and 44 NDS), 67 of their first-degree relatives and 84 healthy controls were assessed using voxel- based morphometry (VBM) and compared between groups. Correlations between GMV and clinical symptoms in patients were also assessed. Compared to controls, DS patients displayed more severe GMV reduction in the cerebellar culmen than NDS patients. GMV reduction in culmen was also observed in the first-degree relatives of DS (but not NDS) patients, suggesting possible different genetic risk in DS and NDS. The left insula was significantly smaller in DS patients than both NDS patients and controls, and smaller GMV of this region was associated with more severe negative symptoms in patients. Our results collectively indicate that DS might represent a distinct subtype of schizophrenia from NDS and the GMV change in left insula may be a morphological signature of DS. PMID:26409573

  9. SPAR thermal analysis processors reference manual, system level 16. Volume 1: Program executive. Volume 2: Theory. Volume 3: Demonstration problems. Volume 4: Experimental thermal element capability. Volume 5: Programmer reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, M. B.; Moore, R. A.; Whetstone, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    User instructions are given for performing linear and nonlinear steady state and transient thermal analyses with SPAR thermal analysis processors TGEO, SSTA, and TRTA. It is assumed that the user is familiar with basic SPAR operations and basic heat transfer theory.

  10. Comparison of positron emission tomography, cognition, and brain volume in Alzheimer's disease with and without severe abnormalities of white matter.

    PubMed Central

    DeCarli, C; Grady, C L; Clark, C M; Katz, D A; Brady, D R; Murphy, D G; Haxby, J V; Salerno, J A; Gillette, J A; Gonzalez-Aviles, A; Rapoport, S I

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine cerebral metabolism, cognitive performance, and brain volumes in healthy controls and two groups of patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, one group with severe abnormalities of white matter (DAT+) and the other group with none, or minimal abnormalities (DAT-). METHODS--Neuropsychological tests, CT, MRI, quantitative MRI, and PET studies were carried out to allow comparison between the DAT+ and DAT- groups and the healthy controls. RESULTS--Compared with the healthy controls, both demented groups had significantly reduced global and regional cerebral metabolism, significant brain atrophy, and significantly lower scores on neuropsychological testing. The DAT- patient group showed a pattern of parietal-temporal cerebral metabolic reductions and neuropsychological performance deficits typical of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, metabolism in the association neocortex (AD ratio) and measures of neuropsychological task performance were significantly correlated in the DAT- patient group. Comparison of DAT+ with DAT- patients showed a significantly higher ratio of parietal to whole brain glucose utilisation for the DAT+ group. Moreover, when comparing group z score differences from the healthy controls, the DAT+ group had, on average, smaller differences from controls in the frontal, parietal, and temporal regions than did the DAT- group. Discriminant analysis using metabolic ratios of the frontal, parietal, and temporal regions showed cerebral metabolic patterns to be significantly different among the DAT+, the DAT-, and the healthy controls. These differences were due primarily to relatively higher frontal, parietal, and temporal metabolic ratios in the DAT+ group which resulted in discriminant scores for the DAT+ group between the healthy controls and the DAT- group. Group mean scores on tests of neuropsychological performance were not significantly different between the DAT- and DAT+ patients. By contrast with the DAT- group, however, no

  11. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ-, Σ0, Σ+, Λ, Ξ-, Ξ0) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, ɸ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ- experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  12. A high-speed and small-volume IR zoom lens using root-exchange theory and DOE element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Sun, Xing; Zhang, Xin-de; Li, Rong-gang

    2013-09-01

    The high-speed and small-volume mid-wave IR zoom lens capable of 16× magnification using a 320×256 IR FPA detector has been described. The system magnification can be continuously adjusted by simply moving two lens groups, which uses the root-exchange theory. The object-image exchange theory and root-exchange theory are presented. The structure using root-exchange theory can get large zoom ratio with simple volume and the smooth zoom curve. Mechanically compensated IR zoom lens design has these questions: firstly, big volume caused by complex optical structure; secondly, limited IR material and obvious focus shift with temperature change. The zoom lens using mechanically compensated method has solved all the questions that existed in traditional system. The system also contains much less optical material and has a very simple structure by using DOE elements. The element of first moving group and the second element of the second moving group are both DOE. As the DOE has minus Abb number, which is opposite of refractive materials, it can minimize the higher order chromatic aberration. Based on the characteristics, the chromatic aberration was balanced. Research on the thermal analysis and compensation is considered. The passive athermalization is made by DOE elements. DOE elements make the zoom lens maintain its performance when it is operating between -20°C and 60°C.The results show the high magnification zoom lens design performance, with small volume and light weight. The aberration of the system were well corrected and diffraction limited performance was achieved in required temperature range.

  13. (Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles. ) Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Progress is summarized in these areas: a new formulation of two dimensional critical phenomena and string theory, supersymmetric critical phenomena and string compactification, conformal field theory on orbifolds, Gaussian models with twisted boundary conditions, modular invariance and supersymmetric critical phenomena, critical indices, conformal invariance, and current algebra, renormalization group fixed points and the string equation of motion, fermionic string field theory, N = 2 super Riemann surfaces, the spinor field in covariant superstring theory, covariant quantization of superstrings, models of aggregation, and quasi-supersymmetry in the BCS mechanism. Further work is proposed in the areas of two dimensional critical phenomena, two dimensional conformal field theory and string theory, the physics of computation, models of aggregation, and the many vortex Aharonov-Bohm problem. 57 refs. (LEW)

  14. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: One dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Tongchuan Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-11-28

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a “mushroom” regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ{sup 1/3} scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ{sup 1/3}. In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ{sup 1/3}. We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results.

  15. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: One dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-11-01

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a "mushroom" regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ1/3 scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ1/3. In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ1/3. We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results.

  16. Mind-Sets Matter: A Meta-Analytic Review of Implicit Theories and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Jeni L.; O'Boyle, Ernest H.; VanEpps, Eric M.; Pollack, Jeffrey M.; Finkel, Eli J.

    2013-01-01

    This review builds on self-control theory (Carver & Scheier, 1998) to develop a theoretical framework for investigating associations of implicit theories with self-regulation. This framework conceptualizes self-regulation in terms of 3 crucial processes: goal setting, goal operating, and goal monitoring. In this meta-analysis, we included articles…

  17. Mind-sets matter: a meta-analytic review of implicit theories and self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Burnette, Jeni L; O'Boyle, Ernest H; VanEpps, Eric M; Pollack, Jeffrey M; Finkel, Eli J

    2013-05-01

    This review builds on self-control theory (Carver & Scheier, 1998) to develop a theoretical framework for investigating associations of implicit theories with self-regulation. This framework conceptualizes self-regulation in terms of 3 crucial processes: goal setting, goal operating, and goal monitoring. In this meta-analysis, we included articles that reported a quantifiable assessment of implicit theories and at least 1 self-regulatory process or outcome. With a random effects approach used, meta-analytic results (total unique N = 28,217; k = 113) across diverse achievement domains (68% academic) and populations (age range = 5-42; 10 different nationalities; 58% from United States; 44% female) demonstrated that implicit theories predict distinct self-regulatory processes, which, in turn, predict goal achievement. Incremental theories, which, in contrast to entity theories, are characterized by the belief that human attributes are malleable rather than fixed, significantly predicted goal setting (performance goals, r = -.151; learning goals, r = .187), goal operating (helpless-oriented strategies, r = -.238; mastery-oriented strategies, r = .227), and goal monitoring (negative emotions, r = -.233; expectations, r = .157). The effects for goal setting and goal operating were stronger in the presence (vs. absence) of ego threats such as failure feedback. Discussion emphasizes how the present theoretical analysis merges an implicit theory perspective with self-control theory to advance scholarship and unlock major new directions for basic and applied research. PMID:22866678

  18. Life Goals Matter to Happiness: A Revision of Set-Point Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headey, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the long-running German Socio-Economic Panel Survey (SOEP), this paper provides evidence that life goals matter substantially to subjective well-being (SWB). Non-zero sum goals, which include commitment to family, friends and social and political involvement, promote life satisfaction. Zero sum goals, including commitment to career…

  19. Burning odor-elicited anxiety in OEF/OIF combat veterans: Inverse relationship to gray matter volume in olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Bernadette M; McConnell, Patrick A; Froeliger, Brett; Leslie, Kimberly; Uhde, Thomas W

    2015-11-01

    Despite the anatomical overlap between the brain's fear/threat and olfactory systems, a very limited number of investigations have considered the role of odors and the central olfactory system in the pathophysiology of PTSD. The goal of the present study was to assess structural differences in primary and secondary olfactory cortex between combat veterans with and without PTSD (CV + PTSD, CV-PTSD, respectively). An additional goal was to determine the relationship between gray matter volume (GMV) in olfactory cortex and the distressing properties of burning-related odors. A region of interest voxel-based morphometric (VBM) approach was used to measure GMV in olfactory cortex in a well-characterized group of CV + PTSD (n = 20) and CV-PTSD (n = 25). Prior to the MRI exam, combat-related (i.e., burning rubber) and control odors were systematically sampled and rated according to their potential for eliciting PTSD symptoms. Results showed that CV + PTSD exhibited significantly reduced GMV in anterior piriform (primary olfactory) and orbitofrontal (secondary olfactory) cortices compared to CV-PTSD (both p < .01). For the entire group, GMV in bilateral anterior piriform cortex was inversely related to burning rubber odor-elicited memories of trauma (p < .05). GMV in orbitofrontal cortex was inversely related to both clinical and laboratory measures of PTSD symptoms (all p < .05). In addition to replicating an established inverse relationship between GMV in anxiety-associated brain structures and PTSD symptomatology, the present study extends those findings by being the first report of volumetric decreases in olfactory cortex that are inversely related to odor-elicited PTSD symptoms. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed. PMID:26424424

  20. Reduced Visual Cortex Gray Matter Volume and Thickness in Young Adults Who Witnessed Domestic Violence during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18–25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11–13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  1. White matter integrity, hippocampal volume, and cognitive performance of a world-famous nonagenarian track-and-field athlete.

    PubMed

    Burzynska, A Z; Wong, C N; Chaddock-Heyman, L; Olson, E A; Gothe, N P; Knecht, A; Voss, M W; McAuley, E; Kramer, A F

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with successful brain and cognitive aging. However, little is known about the effects of PA, CRF, and exercise on the brain in the oldest-old. Here we examined white matter (WM) integrity, measured as fractional anisotropy (FA) and WM hyperintensity (WMH) burden, and hippocampal (HIPP) volume of Olga Kotelko (1919-2014). Olga began training for competitions at age of 77 and as of June 2014 held over 30 world records in her age category in track-and-field. We found that Olga's WMH burden was larger and the HIPP was smaller than in the reference sample (58 healthy low-active women 60-78 years old), and her FA was consistently lower in the regions overlapping with WMH. Olga's FA in many normal-appearing WM regions, however, did not differ or was greater than in the reference sample. In particular, FA in her genu corpus callosum was higher than any FA value observed in the reference sample. We speculate that her relatively high FA may be related to both successful aging and the beneficial effects of exercise in old age. In addition, Olga had lower scores on memory, reasoning and speed tasks than the younger reference sample, but outperformed typical adults of age 90-95 on speed and memory. Together, our findings open the possibility of old-age benefits of increasing PA on WM microstructure and cognition despite age-related increase in WMH burden and HIPP shrinkage, and add to the still scarce neuroimaging data of the healthy oldest-old (>90 years) adults. PMID:26237526

  2. Voxel-based meta-analysis of gray matter volume reductions associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaqian; Yang, Jing; Hu, Xinyu; Shang, Huifang

    2016-06-01

    Brain gray matter volume (GMV) reduction has been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) and in PD patients with dementia (PDD) with cumulative evidence using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). However, the findings of these studies have not been entirely concordant. Whole-brain VBM studies comparing PD-MCI with PD patients without cognitive impairment (PD-NCI) and comparing PDD with PD patients without dementia (PDND) were systematically searched in PubMed and EMBASE databases from January 1995 to December 2015. Coordinates with significant differences were extracted from each cluster. Meta-analysis was performed using AES-SDM to quantitatively evaluate the GMV changes. Five studies comparing 92 PD-MCI with 192 PD-NCI patients were included in the PD-MCI vs. PD-NCI meta-analysis. Ten studies with 168 PDD and 233 PDND patients were included in the PDD vs. PDND meta-analysis. Compared with PD-NCI, GMV reductions were observed in left superior temporal lobe, left insula and left superior frontal lobe in PD-MCI patients. Significant GMV reduction were found in bilateral superior temporal lobe extending to hippocampus, and left superior frontal lobe in PDD patients comparing with PDND. Meta-regression of PDD studies showed that disease duration was negatively correlated with GMV in the left superior frontal lobe. GMV reductions in the frontal-limbic-temporal regions were main features of cognitive decline in PD. Unilateral-to-bilateral development of GMV reduction in the frontal-limbic-temporal regions is a possible indicator for PD-MCI to PDD progression, whereas significant hippocampal GMV reduction may not be a marker for early cognitive decline in PD. PMID:27113603

  3. Reduced visual cortex gray matter volume and thickness in young adults who witnessed domestic violence during childhood.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18-25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11-13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  4. Emergence of Supersymmetry, Gauge Theory and String in Condensed Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik

    2012-11-01

    The lecture note consists of four parts. In the first part, we review a 2+1 dimensional lattice model which realizes emergent supersymmetry at a quantum critical point. The second part is devoted to a phenomenon called fractionalization where gauge boson and fractionalized particles emerge as low energy excitations as a result of strong interactions between gauge neutral particles. In the third part, we discuss about stability and low energy effective theory of a critical spin liquid state where stringy excitations emerge in a large N limit. In the last part, we discuss about an attempt to come up with a prescription to derive holographic theory for general quantum field theory.

  5. Alabama Children: A Matter of Commitment and Priority. Special Report to Governor Fob James and the Alabama Legislature. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Bobbie H.

    This report in two volumes is the product of a year-long needs assessment undertaken by the Governor of Alabama's Commission for the Alabama Year of the Child. Volume I, which contains an overview and recommendations to the governor and the legislature, includes position papers and letters from the commission and interested citizens. These…

  6. Relapse of prostate cancer from the viewpoint of total gland volume kinetics theory

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    In many cases of prostate cancer, changes of prostate volume were measured very frequently after castration by means of transrectal ultrasound. For short-term observations, a factor called as “reduction time (tau [τ]),” which means the time required for the volume of “effective portion” (volume responded to castration) to be reduced to one-tenth of its original value, correlated very well with patients’ prognosis. For long-term observations for relapse, changes of prostate volume could be divided clearly into two types, namely, “metastatic progressive type” with metastasis without volume increase and “local progressive type” with remarkable volume increase without metastasis. “τ” in the “local progressive type” was far shorter than that in the “metastatic progressive type.” Much longer survival was obtained when the patient belonged to the “local progressive type,” than to the “metastatic progressive type.” Thus, “τ” was the most important and the most reliable factor to predict the prognosis. Based upon these observations, a schematic analysis of prostate cancer relapse was shown. PMID:26178392

  7. Chiral symmetry and effective field theories for hadronic, nuclear and stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jeremy W.; Rho, Mannque; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Chiral symmetry, first entering in nuclear physics in the 1970s for which Gerry Brown played a seminal role, has led to a stunningly successful framework for describing strongly-correlated nuclear dynamics both in finite and infinite systems. We review how the early, germinal idea conceived with the soft-pion theorems in the pre-QCD era has evolved into a highly predictive theoretical framework for nuclear physics, aptly assessed by Steven Weinberg: "it (chiral effective field theory) allows one to show in a fairly convincing way that what they (nuclear physicists) have been doing all along... is the correct first step in a consistent approximation scheme". Our review recounts both how the theory presently fares in confronting Nature and how one can understand its extremely intricate workings in terms of the multifaceted aspects of chiral symmetry, namely, chiral perturbation theory, skyrmions, Landau Fermi-liquid theory, the Cheshire cat phenomenon, and hidden local and mended symmetries.

  8. Dark matter in galaxies according to the tensor-four-scalars theory

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Guenter

    2011-10-15

    Massive gravity previously constructed as the spin-2 quantum gauge theory leads in the mass-zero limit to a modification of general relativity. As a relic from the massive theory, a vector field v{sup {lambda}} survives which couples to the metric only. However, the coupling does not involve covariant derivatives so that v{sup {lambda}} must be considered as four scalar fields. We analyze the static, spherically symmetric solutions of this theory. From the corresponding geodesics, we find the circular velocity profile. By interpreting this as coming from a dark density profile, the theory predicts a flat density core for r{yields}0. But the circular velocity profile is not universal.

  9. Theoretical Perspectives on School Crime. Volume I, Chapter I: An Aesthetic Theory of School Vandalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Vernon L.; Greenberger, David B.

    One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter presents an aesthetic theory of vandalism and reports nine original empirical studies that are relevant to the theory. It is proposed that the act of destroying an object is enjoyable because it is, in effect, an aesthetic experience. The essay is divided into…

  10. A Matter of Principle: The Principles of Quantum Theory, Dirac's Equation, and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2015-10-01

    This article is concerned with the role of fundamental principles in theoretical physics, especially quantum theory. The fundamental principles of relativity will be addressed as well, in view of their role in quantum electrodynamics and quantum field theory, specifically Dirac's work, which, in particular Dirac's derivation of his relativistic equation of the electron from the principles of relativity and quantum theory, is the main focus of this article. I shall also consider Heisenberg's earlier work leading him to the discovery of quantum mechanics, which inspired Dirac's work. I argue that Heisenberg's and Dirac's work was guided by their adherence to and their confidence in the fundamental principles of quantum theory. The final section of the article discusses the recent work by D'Ariano and coworkers on the principles of quantum information theory, which extend quantum theory and its principles in a new direction. This extension enabled them to offer a new derivation of Dirac's equations from these principles alone, without using the principles of relativity.

  11. John Dewey on theory of learning and inquiry: The scientific method and subject matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Nien

    This study examines the educational debate between Dewey and some of his critics on the merits of learning the scientific method. Four of Dewey's critics---Hutchins, Hirsch, Hirst, and Scheffler criticize Dewey for over-emphasizing the importance of the scientific method and under-emphasizing the importance of subject matter in education. This dissertation argues that these critics misunderstand Dewey's use of the scientific method and its importance in education. It argues that Dewey conceives of the scientific method in two different ways: first as an attitude and second as a tool. It also argues that, by failing to understand this critical distinction, these critics misunderstand the role of the scientific method in education. The dissertation concludes by showing that, educationally, Dewey's ideas of the scientific method have different meanings in different context. It analyzes the scientific method as empirical method, critical thinking, cooperative learning, and creative thinking, and shows the place of subject matter in each of them.

  12. Diphoton and diboson excesses in a left-right symmetric theory of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility that the recently reported diphoton excess at ATLAS and CMS can be accommodated within a minimal extension of a left-right symmetric model. Our setup is able to simultaneously explain the Run 2 diphoton and Run 1 diboson excesses, while providing a standard thermal freeze-out of weak-scale dark matter. In this scenario, the 750 GeV neutral right-handed Higgs triplet is responsible for the diphoton excess. Interactions of this state with the neutral and charged components of dark matter multiplets provide the dominant mechanisms for production and decay. A striking signature of this model is the additional presence of missing energy in the diphoton channel.

  13. The QCD vacuum, hadrons and superdense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.

    1986-01-01

    This is probably the only textbook available that gathers QCD, many-body theory and phase transitions in one volume. The presentation is pedagogical and readable. Contents: The QCD Vacuum: Introduction; QCD on the Lattice Topological Effects in Gauges Theories. Correlation Functions and Microscopic Excitations: Introduction; Operator Product Expansion; The Sum Rules beyond OPE; Nonpower Contributions to Correlators and Instantons; Hadronic Spectroscopy on the Lattice. Dense Matter: Hadronic Matter; Asymptotically Dense Quark-Gluon Plasma; Instantons in Matter; Lattice Calculations at Finite Temperature; Phase Transitions; Macroscopic Excitations and Experiments: General Properties of High Energy Collisions; ''Barometers'', ''Thermometers'', Interferometric ''Microscope''; Experimental Perspectives.

  14. Analytical theory of neutrino oscillations in matter with C P violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mikkel B.; Henley, Ernest M.; Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2015-04-01

    We develop an exact analytical formulation of neutrino oscillations in matter within the framework of the standard neutrino model assuming three Dirac neutrinos. Our Hamiltonian formulation, which includes C P violation, leads to expressions for the partial oscillation probabilities that are linear combinations of spherical Bessel functions in the eigenvalue differences. The coefficients of these Bessel functions are polynomials in the neutrino CKM matrix elements, the neutrino mass differences squared, the strength of the neutrino interaction with matter, and the neutrino mass eigenvalues in matter. We give exact closed-form expressions for all partial oscillation probabilities in terms of these basic quantities. Adopting the standard neutrino model, we then examine how the exact expressions for the partial oscillation probabilities might simplify by expanding in one of the small parameters α and sin θ13 of this model. We show explicitly that for small α and sin θ13 , there are branch points in the analytic structure of the eigenvalues that lead to singular behavior of expansions near the solar and atmospheric resonances. We present numerical calculations that indicate how to use the small-parameter expansions in practice.

  15. A matter of timing: developmental theories of romantic involvement and psychosocial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Furman, Wyndol; Collibee, Charlene

    2014-11-01

    The present study compared two theories of the association between romantic involvement and adjustment: a social timetable theory and a developmental task theory. We examined seven waves of longitudinal data on a community based sample of 200 participants (Wave 1 mean age = 15 years, 10 months). In each wave, multiple measures of substance use, externalizing symptoms, and internalizing symptoms were gathered, typically from multiple reporters. Multilevel modeling revealed that greater levels of romantic involvement in adolescence were associated with higher levels of substance use and externalizing symptoms but became associated with lower levels in adulthood. Having a romantic partner was associated with greater levels of substance use, externalizing symptoms, and internalizing symptoms in adolescence but was associated with lower levels in young adulthood. The findings were not consistent with a social timetable theory, which predicts that nonnormative involvement is associated with poor adjustment. Instead, the findings are consistent with a developmental task theory, which predicts that precocious romantic involvement undermines development and adaptation, but when romantic involvement becomes a salient developmental task in adulthood, it is associated with positive adjustment. Discussion focuses on the processes that may underlie the changing nature of the association between romantic involvement and adjustment. PMID:24703413

  16. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 6: Design module theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backman, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The automated design theory underlying the operation of the ATLAS Design Module is decribed. The methods, applications and limitations associated with the fully stressed design, the thermal fully stressed design and a regional optimization algorithm are presented. A discussion of the convergence characteristics of the fully stressed design is also included. Derivations and concepts specific to the ATLAS design theory are shown, while conventional terminology and established methods are identified by references.

  17. Gauge groups and matter fields on some models of F-theory without section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2016-03-01

    We investigate F-theory on an elliptic Calabi-Yau 4-fold without a section to the fibration. To construct an elliptic Calabi-Yau 4-fold without a section, we introduce families of elliptic K3 surfaces which do not admit a section. A product K3 × K3, with one of the K3's chosen from these families of elliptic K3 surfaces without a section, realises an elliptic Calabi-Yau 4-fold without a section. We then compactify F-theory on such K3 × K3's.

  18. Fast Computation of Solvation Free Energies with Molecular Density Functional Theory: Thermodynamic-Ensemble Partial Molar Volume Corrections.

    PubMed

    Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr P; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Molecular density functional theory (MDFT) offers an efficient implicit-solvent method to estimate molecule solvation free-energies, whereas conserving a fully molecular representation of the solvent. Even within a second-order approximation for the free-energy functional, the so-called homogeneous reference fluid approximation, we show that the hydration free-energies computed for a data set of 500 organic compounds are of similar quality as those obtained from molecular dynamics free-energy perturbation simulations, with a computer cost reduced by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This requires to introduce the proper partial volume correction to transform the results from the grand canonical to the isobaric-isotherm ensemble that is pertinent to experiments. We show that this correction can be extended to 3D-RISM calculations, giving a sound theoretical justification to empirical partial molar volume corrections that have been proposed recently. PMID:26273876

  19. Finite-temperature exchange-correlation theory for dense, partially ionized matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A B

    2006-12-21

    The importance of exchange-correlation in dense, partially-ionized matter at elevated temperatures is demonstrated using ab initio theoretical methods. Good agreement with the Kohn-Sham exchange model, as extended to finite temperatures by Gupta and Rajagopal, is obtained for the Be Hugoniot at maximum compression. Exchange correlation is achieved by calculating the quantum average of the electron-electron interaction using the spectral solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, which is a superposition of eigenfunctions. The quantum average of the electron-electron interaction has strong temporal fluctuations about a stationary time average. The eigenfunctions calculated in the temporally fluctuating potential are sensibly stationary.

  20. Cosmology from induced matter model applied to 5D f( R, T) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, P. H. R. S.

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that the universe is undergoing a phase of accelerated expansion. Plenty of models have already been created with the purpose of describing what causes this non-expected cosmic feature. Among them, one could quote the extradimensional and the f( R, T) gravity models. In this work, in the scope of unifying Kaluza-Klein extradimensional model with f( R, T) gravity, cosmological solutions for density and pressure of the universe are obtained from the induced matter model application. Particular solutions for vacuum quantum energy and radiation are also shown.

  1. Theory of neutrino emission from nucleon-hyperon matter in neutron stars: angular integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, A. D.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Haensel, P.

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of thermal evolution of neutron stars with hyperon cores require neutrino emissivities for many neutrino reactions involving strongly degenerate particles (nucleons, hyperons, electrons, muons). We calculate the angular integrals In (over orientations of momenta of n degenerate particles) for major neutrino reactions with n=3, 4, 5 at all possible combinations of particle Fermi momenta. The integrals In are necessary ingredients for constructing a uniform database of neutrino emissivities in dense nucleon-hyperon matter. The results can also be used in many problems of physical kinetics of strongly degenerate systems.

  2. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-17

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ{sup −}, Σ{sup 0}, Σ{sup +}, Λ, Ξ{sup −}, Ξ{sup 0}) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, Φ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ{sup −} experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  3. Late-time cosmology of a scalar-tensor theory with a universal multiplicative coupling between the scalar field and the matter Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minazzoli, Olivier; Hees, Aurélien

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the late-time cosmological behavior of scalar-tensor theories with a universal multiplicative coupling between the scalar field and the matter Lagrangian in the matter era. This class of theory encompasses the case of the massless string dilaton [see Damour and Polyakov, General Relativity and Gravitation 26, 1171 (1994)] as well as a theory with an intrinsic decoupling mechanism in the solar system [see Minazzoli and Hees, Phys. Rev. D 88, 041504 (2013)]. The cosmological evolution is studied in the general relativity limit justified by solar system constraints on the gravitation theory. The behavior of these cosmological evolutions are then compared to two types of observations: the constraints on temporal variations of the constants of nature and the distance-luminosity measurements. In particular, the nonminimal coupling implies that the distance-luminosity relation is modified compared to general relativity. Theories producing a cosmological behavior in agreement with these observations are identified.

  4. Non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the non-Gaussian contribution to the covariance of the matter power spectrum at one-loop order in standard perturbation theory (SPT), using the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structure (LSS). The complete one-loop contributions are evaluated for the first time, including the leading EFT corrections that involve seven independent operators, of which four appear in the power spectrum and bispectrum. We compare the non-Gaussian part of the one-loop covariance computed with both SPT and EFT of LSS to two separate simulations. In one simulation, we find that the one-loop prediction from SPT reproduces the simulation well to ki+kj˜0.25 h /Mpc , while in the other simulation we find a substantial improvement of EFT of LSS (with one free parameter) over SPT, more than doubling the range of k where the theory accurately reproduces the simulation. The disagreement between these two simulations points to unaccounted for systematics, highlighting the need for improved numerical and analytic understanding of the covariance.

  5. Holographic renormalization group flows in N =3 Chern-Simons-Matter theory from N =3 4D gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karndumri, Parinya

    2016-08-01

    We study various supersymmetric renormalization group (RG) flows of N =3 Chern-Simons-Matter theory in three dimensions by using four-dimensional N =3 gauged supergravity coupled to eight vector multiplets with S O (3 )×S U (3 ) gauge group. The AdS4 critical point preserving the full S O (3 )×S U (3 ) provides a gravity dual of N =3 superconformal field theory with flavor symmetry S U (3 ). We study the scalar potential and identify a new supersymmetric AdS4 critical point preserving the full N =3 supersymmetry and unbroken S O (3 )×U (1 ) symmetry. An analytic RG flow solution interpolating between S O (3 )×S U (3 ) and S O (3 )×U (1 ) critical points is explicitly given. We then investigate possible RG flows from these AdS4 critical points to nonconformal field theories in the IR. All of the singularities appearing in the IR turn out to be physically acceptable. Furthermore, we look for supersymmetric solutions of the form AdS2×Σ2 with Σ2 being a two-sphere or a two-dimensional hyperbolic space and find a number of AdS2 geometries preserving four supercharges with S O (2 )×S O (2 )×S O (2 ) and S O (2 )×S O (2 ) symmetries.

  6. Does School Board Turnover Matter? Revisiting Critical Variables in the Dissatisfaction Theory of American Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsbury, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    The frequent turnover of school board members in the US represents a concern for many educational practitioners who worry about the discontinuity of leadership, leading to negative impacts on students and staff. School board member turnover is also a key variable in studies of democratic theories of public school governance. Using descriptive and…

  7. Using Multiple Representations to Promote Grade 11 Students' Scientific Understanding of the Particle Theory of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adadan, Emine

    2013-01-01

    This study explored two groups of Grade 11 (age 16-17) students' conceptual understandings about aspects of particle theory before, immediately after, and 3 months after instruction with multiple representations (IMR) and instruction with verbal representations (IVR). Data sources included open-ended questionnaires, interviews, and student…

  8. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences: A Case of Missing Cognitive Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allix, Nicholas M.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that although Gardner's conception of human cognition, characterized by a set of multiple and distinct cognitive capabilities, is an advance over the narrow conception of IQ, it runs into fundamental difficulties of a methodological kind and is based on a discredited empiricist theory of knowledge which work with artificial neural networks…

  9. A Test and Extension of Objectification Theory as It Predicts Disordered Eating: Does Women's Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustus-Horvath, Casey L.; Tylka, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    When predicting disordered eating, models incorporating several of objectification theory's (B. L. Fredrickson & T. A. Roberts, 1997) core constructs (i.e., sexual objectification, self-objectification, body shame, poor interoceptive awareness) have been empirically supported with women of traditional undergraduate age who are consistent in age…

  10. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Health Assistant. Volume 2, Units 5-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This volume consists of three units of a basic core curriculum that is intended for all health workers. Covered in the units are the following topics: (1) the body's need for food, the effect of food on the body, the five food groups, the six nutrients, and therapeutic diets; (2) general principles of asepsis, specific methods of maintaining…

  11. Readings in Educational Media Theory and Research; Volume III. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, William H.

    This compilation of readings in educational media and research makes accessible published and unpublished documents relevant to designers and users of educational media. Volume III includes part 6, "Learner Characteristics," and part 7, the "Conditions of Media Use.""Learner Characteristics" relates the nature of human aptitude to instructional…

  12. Understanding College and University Organization: Theories for Effective Policy and Practice. Two Volume Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, James L.; Dee, Jay R.

    2007-01-01

    This two-volume work is intended to help readers develop powerful new ways of thinking about organizational principles, and apply them to policy-making and management in colleges and universities. The book is written with two audiences in mind: administrative and faculty leaders in institutions of higher learning, and students (both doctoral and…

  13. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Health Assistant. Volume I, Units 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This volume consists of the first four units of a basic core curriculum that is intended for all health workers. The units deal with the following topics: (1) the health care facility, the long-term care facility, the health team, and the nursing team; (2) verbal and nonverbal communication, written communication, human behavior, ethical behavior,…

  14. Improved longitudinal [(18)F]-AV45 amyloid PET by white matter reference and VOI-based partial volume effect correction.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Matthias; Högenauer, Marcus; Delker, Andreas; Sauerbeck, Julia; Bartenstein, Peter; Seibyl, John; Rominger, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid positron-emission-tomography (PET) offers an important research and diagnostic tool for investigating Alzheimer's disease (AD). The majority of amyloid PET studies have used the cerebellum as a reference region, and clinical studies have not accounted for atrophy-based partial volume effects (PVE). Longitudinal studies using cerebellum as reference tissue have revealed only small mean increases and high inter-subject variability in amyloid binding. We aimed to test the effects of different reference regions and PVE-correction (PVEC) on the discriminatory power and longitudinal performance of amyloid PET. We analyzed [(18)F]-AV45 PET and T1-weighted MRI data of 962 subjects at baseline and two-year follow-up data of 258 subjects. Cortical composite volume-of-interest (VOI) values (COMP) for tracer uptake were generated using either full brain atlas VOIs, gray matter segmented VOIs or gray matter segmented VOIs after VOI-based PVEC. Standard-uptake-value ratios (SUVR) were calculated by scaling the COMP values to uptake in cerebellum (SUVRCBL), brainstem (SUVRBST) or white matter (SUVRWM). Mean SUV, SUVR, and changes after PVEC were compared at baseline between diagnostic groups of healthy controls (HC; N=316), mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=483) and AD (N=163). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were calculated for the discriminations between HC, MCI and AD, and expressed as area under the curve (AUC). Finally, the longitudinal [(18)F]-AV45-PET data were used to analyze the impact of quantitation procedures on apparent changes in amyloid load over time. Reference region SUV was most constant between diagnosis groups for the white matter. PVEC led to decreases of COMP-SUV in HC (-18%) and MCI (-10%), but increases in AD (+7%). Highest AUCs were found when using PVEC with white matter scaling for the contrast between HC/AD (0.907) or with brainstem scaling for the contrast between HC/MCI (0.658). Longitudinal increases were greatest in all diagnosis

  15. Habitual 'sleep credit' is associated with greater grey matter volume of the medial prefrontal cortex, higher emotional intelligence and better mental health.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mareen; Webb, Christian A; Deldonno, Sophie R; Kipman, Maia; Schwab, Zachary J; Weiner, Melissa R; Killgore, William D S

    2013-10-01

    In modern society, people often fail to obtain the amount of sleep that experts recommend for good health and performance. Insufficient sleep can lead to degraded cognitive performance and alterations in emotional functioning. However, most people also acknowledge that on a regular basis they obtain more sleep than they subjectively perceive they need at a minimum to stave off performance decrements, a construct we describe as subjective 'sleep credit'. Few people would contest the notion that getting more sleep is better, but data on both behavioural and neuroanatomical correlates of 'sleep credit' are surprisingly limited. We conducted a voxel-based morphometric study to assess cerebral grey matter correlates of habitually sleeping more than one's subjective requirements. We further tested whether these structural correlates are associated with perceived emotional intelligence and indices of psychopathology while controlling for age, gender, and total intracranial volume. In a sample of 55 healthy adults aged 18-45 years (28 males, 27 females), whole-brain multiple regression showed that habitual subjective 'sleep credit' was correlated positively with grey matter volume within regions of the left medial prefrontal cortex and right orbitofrontal gyrus. Volumes were extracted and regressed against self-report emotion and psychopathology indices. Only grey matter volume of the medial prefrontal cortex cluster correlated with greater emotional intelligence and lower scores on several indices of psychopathology. Findings converge with previous evidence of the role of the medial prefrontal cortex in the relationship between sleep and emotional functioning, and suggest that behaviour and brain structure vary with habitual 'sleep credit'. PMID:23593990

  16. Towards a realization of the condensed-matter-gravity correspondence in string theory via consistent Abelian truncation of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Asadig; Murugan, Jeff; Nastase, Horatiu

    2012-11-01

    We present an embedding of the three-dimensional relativistic Landau-Ginzburg model for condensed matter systems in an N = 6, U(N) × U(N) Chern-Simons-matter theory [the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model] by consistently truncating the latter to an Abelian effective field theory encoding the collective dynamics of O(N) of the O(N(2)) modes. In fact, depending on the vacuum expectation value on one of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena scalars, a mass deformation parameter μ and the Chern-Simons level number k, our Abelianization prescription allows us to interpolate between the Abelian Higgs model with its usual multivortex solutions and a Ø(4) theory. We sketch a simple condensed matter model that reproduces all the salient features of the Abelianization. In this context, the Abelianization can be interpreted as giving a dimensional reduction from four dimensions. PMID:23215268

  17. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 1: Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Methodology recommended to evaluate aeroacoustic related problems is provided, and approaches to their solutions are suggested without extensive tables, nomographs, and derivations. Orientation is toward flight vehicles and emphasis is on underlying physical concepts. Theoretical, experimental, and applied aspects are covered, including the main formulations and comparisons of theory and experiment. The topics covered include: propeller and propfan noise, rotor noise, turbomachinery noise, jet noise classical theory and experiments, noise from turbulent shear flows, jet noise generated by large-scale coherent motion, airframe noise, propulsive lift noise, combustion and core noise, and sonic booms.

  18. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 2: Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Flight vehicles and the underlying concepts of noise generation, noise propagation, noise prediction, and noise control are studied. This volume includes those chapters that relate to flight vehicle noise control and operations: human response to aircraft noise; atmospheric propagation; theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation; design and performance of duct acoustic treatment; jet noise suppression; interior noise; flyover noise measurement and prediction; and quiet aircraft design and operational characteristics.

  19. Constraints on cold dark matter theories from observations of massive x-ray-luminous clusters of galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, G. A.; Gioia, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of a gravitational lensing survey of distant, X-ray selected Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) clusters of galaxies, we have studied six X-ray-luminous (L(sub x) greater than 5 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) clusters at redshifts exceeding z = 0.5. All of these clusters are apparently massive. In addition to their high X-ray luminosity, two of the clusters at z approximately 0.6 exhibit gravitationally lensed arcs. Furthermore, the highest redshift cluster in our sample, MS 1054-0321 at z = 0.826, is both extremely X-ray luminous (L(sub 0.3-3.5keV)=9.3 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) and exceedingly rich with an optical richness comparable to an Abell Richness Class 4 cluster. In this Letter, we discuss the cosmological implications of the very existence of these clusters for hierarchical structure formation theories such as standard Omega = 1 CDM (cold dark matter), hybrid Omega = 1 C + HDM (hot dark matter), and flat, low-density Lambda + CDM models.

  20. Temperament: Theory and Practice. Brunner/Mazel Basic Principles into Practice Series, Volume 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chess, Stella; Thomas, Alexander

    This book outlines the basic tenets and applications of the theory of temperament based on the findings of the New York Longitudinal Study begun in 1956. It describes the concept and definition of temperament, reviews studies that support and expand on the definition, and explores temperament and its impact across various practice settings and…

  1. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  2. RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON GAUGE-INVARIANT VARIABLES IN GAUGE THEORIES, VOLUME 20

    SciTech Connect

    VAN BAAL,P.; ORLAND,P.; PISARSKI,R.

    2000-06-01

    This four-day workshop focused on the wide variety of approaches to the non-perturbative physics of QCD. The main topic was the formulation of non-Abelian gauge theory in orbit space, but some other ideas were discussed, in particular the possible extension of the Maldacena conjecture to nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The idea was to involve most of the participants in general discussions on the problem. Panel discussions were organized to further encourage debate and understanding. Most of the talks roughly fell into three categories: (1) Variational methods in field theory; (2) Anti-de Sitter space ideas; (3) The fundamental domain, gauge fixing, Gribov copies and topological objects (both in the continuum and on a lattice). In particular some remarkable progress in three-dimensional gauge theories was presented, from the analytic side by V.P. Nair and mostly from the numerical side by O. Philipsen. This work may ultimately have important implications for RHIC experiments on the high-temperature quark-gluon plasma.

  3. Teaching Together, Learning Together. Counterpoints, Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education Volume 294

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael, Ed.; Tobin, Kenneth, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Coteaching and cogenerative dialoguing are ways of learning to teach that truly bridge the gap between theory and praxis, as new teachers learn to teach alongside peers and more experienced teachers. These practices are also means of overcoming teacher isolation and burnout. Through cogenerative dialogue sessions, new and experienced teachers,…

  4. Transformative Leadership: A Reader. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 409

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Carolyn M., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This important, timely, and thought-provoking reader is a collection of original chapters by authors from five different countries, each of whom explores a facet of transformative leadership. Transformative leadership is fundamentally a critical approach to leadership that goes well beyond the tenets of most current leadership theories to focus on…

  5. High and low volume sampling of particulate matter at sites with different traffic profiles in the Netherlands and Germany: Results from the HEPMEAP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Nicole A. H.; Meliefste, Kees; Fuchs, Oliver; Weiland, Stephan K.; Cassee, Flemming; Brunekreef, Bert; Sandstrom, Thomas

    Within the EU project "Health Effects of Particles from Motor Engine Exhaust and Ambient Pollution" (HEPMEAP), ambient particulate matter (PM) was collected at sites, with varying traffic density and sources of PM emissions, in the Netherlands and Munich, Germany. In the Netherlands, measurements were conducted close to four schools which had participated 4 years earlier in a study on respiratory health of children attending schools near motorways. In Munich, measurements were conducted at a high traffic inner city and a suburban background (low traffic) site. Measurements were spaced over a period of approximately 1 year. Collection of PM was conducted using both high volume and low volume impaction methods. In addition to PM mass, PM-absorbance ('soot') and NO 2 were measured as indicators of fossil fuel combustion. PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations calculated from the high volume collections were highly correlated with PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations measured simultaneously by low volume samplers ( R2 0.87-0.94). Both high and low volume measurements showed little difference in semi annual average PM mass concentrations between sites within each country, with PM concentrations at the highest exposed sites being only about 10-30% higher compared to the lowest exposed sites. Contrasts for PM-absorbance and NO 2 were significantly higher than for PM mass (70-90% in the Netherlands and 90-167% in Germany). This demonstrates a higher impact of traffic on these components compared to PM mass.

  6. Contributions of organic and inorganic matter to sediment volume and accretion in tidal wetlands at steady state

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mixing model derived from first principles describes the bulk density (BD) of intertidal wetland sediments as a function of loss on ignition (LOI). The model assumes the bulk volume of sediment equates to the sum of self-packing volumes of organic and mineral components or BD =...

  7. Constraints on dark matter particles from theory, galaxy observations, and N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H. J.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-02-01

    Mass bounds on dark matter (DM) candidates are obtained for particles that decouple in or out of equilibrium while ultrarelativistic with arbitrary isotropic and homogeneous distribution functions. A coarse grained Liouville invariant primordial phase-space density D is introduced which depends solely on the distribution function at decoupling. The density D is explicitly computed and combined with recent photometric and kinematic data on dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies in the Milky Way (dShps) and the observed DM density today yielding upper and lower bounds on the mass, primordial phase-space densities, and velocity dispersion of the DM candidates. Combining these constraints with recent results from N-body simulations yields estimates for the mass of the DM particles in the range of a few keV. We establish in this way a direct connection between the microphysics of decoupling in or out of equilibrium and the constraints that the particles must fulfill to be suitable DM candidates. If chemical freeze-out occurs before thermal decoupling, light bosonic particles can Bose condense. We study such Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a dark matter candidate. It is shown that, depending on the relation between the critical (Tc) and decoupling (Td) temperatures, a BEC light relic could act as cold DM but the decoupling scale must be higher than the electroweak scale. The condensate hastens the onset of the nonrelativistic regime and tightens the upper bound on the particle’s mass. A nonequilibrium scenario which describes particle production and partial thermalization, sterile neutrinos produced out of equilibrium, and other DM models is analyzed in detail and the respective bounds on mass, primordial phase-space density, and velocity dispersion are obtained. Thermal relics with m˜fewkeV that decouple when ultrarelativistic and sterile neutrinos produced resonantly or nonresonantly lead to a primordial phase-space density compatible with cored dShps and disfavor

  8. MAIL LOG, program theory, volume 1. [Scout project automatic data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    The program theory used to obtain the software package, MAIL LOG, developed for the Scout Project Automatic Data System, SPADS, is described. The program is written in FORTRAN for the PRIME 300 computer system. The MAIL LOG data base consists of three main subfiles: (1) incoming and outgoing mail correspondence; (2) design information releases and reports; and (3) drawings and engineering orders. All subroutine descriptions, flowcharts, and MAIL LOG outputs are given and the data base design is described.

  9. Baryon number in warped grand unified theories: model building and (dark matter related) phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Servant, Géraldine

    2005-02-01

    In the past year, a new non-supersymmetric framework for electroweak symmetry breaking (with or without Higgs) involving SU(2)L × SU(2)R × U(1)B-L in higher dimensional warped geometry has been suggested. In this work, we embed this gauge structure into a GUT such as SO(10) or Pati Salam. We showed recently (in hep-ph/0403143) that in a warped GUT, a stable Kaluza Klein fermion can arise as a consequence of imposing proton stability. Here, we specify a complete realistic model where this particle is a weakly interacting right-handed neutrino, and present a detailed study of this new dark matter candidate, providing relic density and detection predictions. We discuss phenomenological aspects associated with the existence of other light ({\\lesssim }\\mathrm {TeV} ) KK fermions (related to the neutrino), whose lightness is a direct consequence of the top quark's heaviness. The AdS/CFT interpretation of this construction is also presented. Most of our qualitative results do not depend on the nature of the breaking of the electroweak symmetry provided that it happens near the TeV brane.

  10. Reduced gray matter volume in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex and thalamus as a function of mild depressive symptoms: a voxel-based morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, C. A.; Weber, M.; Mundy, E. A.; Killgore, W. D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies investigating structural brain abnormalities in depression have typically employed a categorical rather than dimensional approach to depression [i.e. comparing subjects with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-defined major depressive disorder (MDD) v. healthy controls]. The National Institute of Mental Health, through their Research Domain Criteria initiative, has encouraged a dimensional approach to the study of psychopathology as opposed to an over-reliance on categorical (e.g. DSM-based) diagnostic approaches. Moreover, subthreshold levels of depressive symptoms (i.e. severity levels below DSM criteria) have been found to be associated with a range of negative outcomes, yet have been relatively neglected in neuroimaging research. Method To examine the extent to which depressive symptoms – even at subclinical levels – are linearly related to gray matter volume reductions in theoretically important brain regions, we employed whole-brain voxel-based morphometry in a sample of 54 participants. Results The severity of mild depressive symptoms, even in a subclinical population, was associated with reduced gray matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, thalamus, superior temporal gyrus/temporal pole and superior frontal gyrus. A conjunction analysis revealed concordance across two separate measures of depression. Conclusions Reduced gray matter volume in theoretically important brain regions can be observed even in a sample that does not meet DSM criteria for MDD, but who nevertheless report relatively elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight the need for additional research using dimensional conceptual and analytic approaches, as well as further investigation of subclinical populations. PMID:25066703

  11. A general multiblock Euler code for propulsion integration. Volume 1: Theory document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. C.; Su, T. Y.; Kao, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    A general multiblock Euler solver was developed for the analysis of flow fields over geometrically complex configurations either in free air or in a wind tunnel. In this approach, the external space around a complex configuration was divided into a number of topologically simple blocks, so that surface-fitted grids and an efficient flow solution algorithm could be easily applied in each block. The computational grid in each block is generated using a combination of algebraic and elliptic methods. A grid generation/flow solver interface program was developed to facilitate the establishment of block-to-block relations and the boundary conditions for each block. The flow solver utilizes a finite volume formulation and an explicit time stepping scheme to solve the Euler equations. A multiblock version of the multigrid method was developed to accelerate the convergence of the calculations. The generality of the method was demonstrated through the analysis of two complex configurations at various flow conditions. Results were compared to available test data. Two accompanying volumes, user manuals for the preparation of multi-block grids (vol. 2) and for the Euler flow solver (vol. 3), provide information on input data format and program execution.

  12. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise an d unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 2: Documentation for computer code CUP2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A two dimensional linear aeroacoustic theory for rotor/stator interaction with unsteady coupling was derived and explored in Volume 1 of this report. Computer program CUP2D has been written in FORTRAN embodying the theoretical equations. This volume (Volume 2) describes the structure of the code, installation and running, preparation of the input file, and interpretation of the output. A sample case is provided with printouts of the input and output. The source code is included with comments linking it closely to the theoretical equations in Volume 1.

  13. The association of white matter volume in psychotic disorders with genotypic variation in NRG1, MOG and CNP: a voxel-based analysis in affected individuals and their unaffected relatives.

    PubMed

    Cannon, D M; Walshe, M; Dempster, E; Collier, D A; Marshall, N; Bramon, E; Murray, R M; McDonald, C

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the role of variation in putative psychosis genes coding for elements of the white matter system by examining the contribution of genotypic variation in three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) neuregulin 1 (NRG1) SNP8NRG221533, myelin oligodendrocytes glycoprotein (MOG) rs2857766 and CNP (rs2070106) and one haplotype HAP(ICE) (deCODE) to white matter volume in patients with psychotic disorder and their unaffected relatives. Structural magnetic resonance imaging and blood samples for genotyping were collected on 189 participants including patients with schizophrenia (SZ) or bipolar I disorder (BDI), unaffected first-degree relatives of these patients and healthy volunteers. The association of genotypic variation with white matter volume was assessed using voxel-based morphometry in SPM5. The NRG1 SNP and the HAP(ICE) haplotype were associated with abnormal white matter volume in the BDI group in the fornix, cingulum and parahippocampal gyrus circuit. In SZ the NRG1 SNP risk allele was associated with lower white matter volume in the uncinate fasciculus (UF), right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the anterior limb of the internal capsule. Healthy G-homozygotes of the MOG SNP had greater white matter volume in areas of the brainstem and cerebellum; this relationship was absent in those with a psychotic disorder and the unaffected relatives groups. The CNP SNP did not contribute to white matter volume variation in the diagnostic groups studied. Variation in the genes coding for structural and protective components of myelin are implicated in abnormal white matter volume in the emotion circuitry of the cingulum, fornix, parahippocampal gyrus and UF in psychotic disorders. PMID:23032943

  14. Multi-instanton calculus in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theory. II. Coupling to matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, Nicholas; Khoze, Valentin V.; Mattis, Michael P.

    1996-12-01

    We further discuss the N=2 superinstantons in SU(2) gauge theory, obtained from the general self-dual solutions of topological charge n constructed by Atiyah, Drinfeld, Hitchin, and Manin (ADHM). We realize the N=2 supersymmetry algebra as actions on the superinstanton moduli. This allows us to recast in concise superfield notation our previously obtained expression for the exact classical interaction between n ADHM superinstantons mediated by the adjoint Higgs bosons, and, moreover, to incorporate NF flavors of hypermultiplets. We perform explicit one- and two-instanton checks of the Seiberg-Witten prepotentials for all NF and arbitrary hypermultiplet masses. Our results for the low-energy couplings are all in precise agreement with the predictions of Seiberg and Witten except for NF=4, where we find a finite renormalization of the coupling which is absent in the proposed solution.

  15. A profusion of 1/2 BPS Wilson loops in {N}=4 Chern-Simons-matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Michael; Drukker, Nadav; Trancanelli, Diego

    2015-10-01

    We initiate the study of 1/2 BPS Wilson loops in N=4 Chern-Simons-matter theories in three dimensions. We consider a circular or linear quiver with Chern-Simons levels k, - k and 0, and focus on loops preserving one of the two SU(2) subgroups of the R-symmetry. In the cases with no vanishing Chern-Simons levels, we find a pair of Wilson loops for each pair of adjacent nodes on the quiver connected by a hypermultiplet (nodes connected by twisted hypermultiplets have Wilson loops preserving another set of supercharges). We expect this classical pairwise degeneracy to be lifted by quantum corrections. In the case with nodes with vanishing Chern-Simons terms connected by twisted hypermultiplets, we find that the usual 1 /4 BPS Wilson loops are automatically enlarged to 1 /2 BPS, as happens also in 3-dimensional Yang-Mills theory. When the nodes with vanishing Chern-Simons levels are connected by untwisted hypermultiplets, we do not find any Wilson loops coupling to those nodes which are classically invariant. Rather, we find several loops whose supersymmetry variation, while non zero, vanishes in any correlation function, so is weakly zero. We expect only one linear combination of those Wilson loops to remain BPS when quantum corrections are included. We analyze the M-theory duals of those Wilson loops and comment on their degeneracy. We also show that these Wilson loops are cohomologically equivalent to certain 1 /4 BPS Wilson loops whose expectation value can be evaluated by the appropriate localized matrix model.

  16. Oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with reduced volumes of hippocampus and subcortical gray matter in chronically HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Brooks I.; LiButti, Daniel E.; Umaki, Tracie M.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Chow, Dominic C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional relationships were examined between regional brain volumes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 47 HIV patients [mean age 51 years; 81% with HIV RNA ≤50 copies/mL] on combination antiretroviral therapy. The gene-specific DNA damage and repair assay measured mtDNA 8-oxo-dG break frequency. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 3 T. Higher mtDNA 8-oxo-dG was associated with lateral ventricular enlargement and with decreased volumes of hippocampus, pallidum, and total subcortical gray matter, suggesting the involvement of systemic mitochondrial-specific oxidative stress in chronic HIV-related structural brain changes and cognitive difficulties. Clarification of the mechanism may provide potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26923169

  17. Advanced cleanup device performance design report (Task 4. 3). Volume A. Cyclone theory and data correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The 100-year-old cyclone is perhaps the best known and least expensive method of gas particulate cleaning. The theory and practice of cyclone operation has been extensively documented. The body of experience indicates that small cyclones operated at high swirl velocity give better separative efficiency although consideration must also be given to coarse particle bouncing and limitations associated with system pressure losses and cyclone erosion. Hence, multicyclones (i.e., many small cyclones operating in parallel), and staging have been employed in situations where unusually clean gas is mandated. Despite the extensive body of literature on the subject, predicting the performance of cyclones in actual service remains an art. The inadequacies in the existing cyclone theories quickly became evident in the course of several experimental programs at GE using various cyclone designs. The most significant finding of this work has been the observation that electrostatic forces could enhance, or, in fact, dominate the separation process. Cyclone separative efficiencies, with natural electrostatic effects present, were found to be independent of flowrate or even to improve at low flowrates, completely contrary to any of the existing cyclone literature. By implication, it is also possible that such electrostatic forces could influence cyclone scaling so that large cyclones employed in the cleanup train may not suffer the performance degradation compared to small cyclones, as projected from conventional inertial theory. Much of the GE work has therefore been oriented toward understanding and augmenting these electrostatic effects. This report is a collection of the most significant papers and memos on cyclone performance generated during the past three years by General Electric under the CFCC program.

  18. Quantitation of regional cerebral blood flow corrected for partial volume effect using O-15 water and PET: I. Theory, error analysis, and stereologic comparison.

    PubMed

    Iida, H; Law, I; Pakkenberg, B; Krarup-Hansen, A; Eberl, S; Holm, S; Hansen, A K; Gundersen, H J; Thomsen, C; Svarer, C; Ring, P; Friberg, L; Paulson, O B

    2000-08-01

    Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) can cause significant underestimation in the observed regional radioactivity concentration (so-called partial volume effect or PVE) resulting in systematic errors in estimating quantitative physiologic parameters. The authors have formulated four mathematical models that describe the dynamic behavior of a freely diffusible tracer (H215O) in a region of interest (ROI) incorporating estimates of regional tissue flow that are independent of PVE. The current study was intended to evaluate the feasibility of these models and to establish a methodology to accurately quantify regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) corrected for PVE in cortical gray matter regions. Five monkeys were studied with PET after IV H2(15)O two times (n = 3) or three times (n = 2) in a row. Two ROIs were drawn on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and projected onto the PET images in which regional CBF values and the water perfusable tissue fraction for the cortical gray matter tissue (hence the volume of gray matter) were estimated. After the PET study, the animals were killed and stereologic analysis was performed to assess the gray matter mass in the corresponding ROIs. Reproducibility of the estimated parameters and sensitivity to various error sources were also evaluated. All models tested in the current study yielded PVE-corrected regional CBF values (approximately 0.8 mL x min(-1) x g(-1) for models with a term for gray matter tissue and 0.5 mL x min(-1) x g(-1) for models with a term for a mixture of gray matter and white matter tissues). These values were greater than those obtained from ROIs tracing the gray matter cortex using conventional H2(15)O autoradiography (approximately 0.40 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)). Among the four models, configurations that included two parallel tissue compartments demonstrated better results with regards to the agreement of tissue time-activity curve and the Akaike's Information Criteria

  19. Regional gray matter volume and anxiety-related traits interact to predict somatic complaints in a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dongtao; Du, Xue; Li, Wenfu; Chen, Qunlin; Li, Haijiang; Hao, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Hitchman, Glenn; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic complaints can be important features of an individual's expression of anxiety. Anxiety-related traits are also risk factors for somatic symptoms. However, it is not known which neuroanatomical mechanisms may be responsible for this relationship. In this study, our first step was to use voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approaches to investigate the neuroanatomical basis underlying somatic complaints in a large sample of healthy subjects. We found a significant positive correlation between somatic complaints and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) volume adjacent to the entorhinal cortex. Further analysis revealed that the interaction between PHG volume/entorhinal cortex and neuroticism-anxiety (N-Anx) predicted somatic complaints. Specifically, somatic complaints were associated with higher N-Anx for individuals with increased PHG volume. These findings suggest that increased PHG volume and higher trait anxiety can predict vulnerability to somatic complaints in the general population. PMID:24622213

  20. Regional gray matter volume and anxiety-related traits interact to predict somatic complaints in a non-clinical sample

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dongtao; Du, Xue; Li, Wenfu; Chen, Qunlin; Li, Haijiang; Hao, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Hitchman, Glenn; Zhang, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Somatic complaints can be important features of an individual’s expression of anxiety. Anxiety-related traits are also risk factors for somatic symptoms. However, it is not known which neuroanatomical mechanisms may be responsible for this relationship. In this study, our first step was to use voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approaches to investigate the neuroanatomical basis underlying somatic complaints in a large sample of healthy subjects. We found a significant positive correlation between somatic complaints and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) volume adjacent to the entorhinal cortex. Further analysis revealed that the interaction between PHG volume/entorhinal cortex and neuroticism-anxiety (N-Anx) predicted somatic complaints. Specifically, somatic complaints were associated with higher N-Anx for individuals with increased PHG volume. These findings suggest that increased PHG volume and higher trait anxiety can predict vulnerability to somatic complaints in the general population. PMID:24622213