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Sample records for mature biofilm lifestyle

  1. Involvement in Denitrification is Beneficial to the Biofilm Lifestyle of Comamonas testosteroni: A Mechanistic Study and Its Environmental Implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao; Shukal, Sudha; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cao, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Comamonas is one of the most abundant microorganisms in biofilm communities driving wastewater treatment. Little has been known about the role of this group of organisms and their biofilm mode of life. In this study, using Comamonas testosteroni as a model organism, we demonstrated the involvement of Comamonas biofilms in denitrification under bulk aerobic conditions and elucidated the influence of nitrate respiration on its biofilm lifestyle. Our results showed that C. testosteroni could use nitrate as the sole electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Under bulk aerobic condition, biofilms of C. testosteroni were capable of reducing nitrate, and intriguingly, nitrate reduction significantly enhanced viability of the biofilm-cells and reduced cell detachment from the biofilms. Nitrate respiration was further shown to play an essential role in maintaining high cell viability in the biofilms. RNA-seq analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a higher level of bis(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) in cells respiring on nitrate than those grown aerobically (1.3 × 10(-4) fmol/cell vs 7.9 × 10(-6) fmol/cell; P < 0.01). C-di-GMP is one universal signaling molecule that regulates the biofilm mode of life, and a higher c-di-GMP concentration reduces cell detachment from biofilms. Taking these factors together, this study reveals that nitrate reduction occurs in mature biofilms of C. testosteroni under bulk aerobic conditions, and the respiratory reduction of nitrate is beneficial to the biofilm lifestyle by providing more metabolic energy to maintain high viability and a higher level of c-di-GMP to reduce cell detachment. PMID:26327221

  2. Bordetella biofilms: a lifestyle leading to persistent infections.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Natalia; Dubey, Purnima; Arnal, Laura; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Deora, Rajendar

    2016-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica and B. pertussis are Gram-negative bacteria that cause respiratory diseases in animals and humans. The current incidence of whooping cough or pertussis caused by B. pertussis has reached levels not observed since the 1950s. Although pertussis is traditionally known as an acute childhood disease, it has recently resurged in vaccinated adolescents and adults. These individuals often become silent carriers, facilitating bacterial circulation and transmission. Similarly, vaccinated and non-vaccinated animals continue to be carriers of B. bronchiseptica and shed bacteria resulting in disease outbreaks. The persistence mechanisms of these bacteria remain poorly characterized. It has been proposed that adoption of a biofilm lifestyle allows persistent colonization of the mammalian respiratory tract. The history of Bordetella biofilm research is only a decade long and there is no single review article that has exclusively focused on this area. We systematically discuss the role of Bordetella factors in biofilm development in vitro and in the mouse respiratory tract. We further outline the implications of biofilms to bacterial persistence and transmission in humans and for the design of new acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:26586694

  3. Dual lifestyle of Porphyromonas gingivalis in biofilm and gingival cells.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Akito; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kuboniwa, Masae; Amano, Atsuo

    2016-05-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of marginal periodontitis, and recent findings have consolidated its role as an important and unique pathogen. This bacterium has a unique dual lifestyle in periodontal sites including subgingival dental plaque (biofilm) and gingival cells, as it has been clearly shown that P. gingivalis is able to exert virulence using completely different tactics in each environment. Inter-bacterial cross-feeding enhances the virulence of periodontal microflora, and such metabolic and adhesive interplay creates a supportive environment for P. gingivalis and other species. Human oral epithelial cells harbor a large intracellular bacterial load, resembling the polymicrobial nature of periodontal biofilm. P. gingivalis can enter gingival epithelial cells and pass through the epithelial barrier into deeper tissues. Subsequently, from its intracellular position, the pathogen exploits cellular recycling pathways to exit invaded cells, by which it is able to control its population in infected tissues, allowing for persistent infection in gingival tissues. Here, we outline the dual lifestyle of P. gingivalis in subgingival areas and its effects on the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:26456558

  4. Ecological changes in oral microcosm biofilm during maturation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Seok; Kang, Si-Mook; Lee, Eun-Song; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Bo-Ra; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ecological changes in the biofilm at different stages of maturation using 16S rDNA gene amplicon sequencing and to identify correlations between red/green (R/G) fluorescence ratio and ecological changes. An oral microcosm biofilm was initiated from the saliva of a single donor and grown anaerobically for up to 10 days in basal medium mucin. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence analysis was shown that the R/G ratio of the biofilm increased consistently, but the slope rapidly decreased after six days. The bacterial compositions of 10 species also consistently changed over time. However, there was no significant correlation between each bacteria and red fluorescence. The monitoring of the maturation process of oral microcosm biofilm over 10 days revealed that the R/G ratio and the bacterial composition within biofilm consistently changed. Therefore, the R/G fluorescence ratio of biofilm may be related with its ecological change rather than specific bacteria PMID:26950795

  5. Dispersed cells represent a distinct stage in the transition from bacterial biofilm to planktonic lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Chua, Song Lin; Liu, Yang; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chen, Yicai; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Tan, Bryan Giin Chyuan; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria assume distinct lifestyles during the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Increased levels of the intracellular messenger c-di-GMP determine the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth, while a reduction causes biofilm dispersal. It is generally assumed that cells dispersed from biofilms immediately go into the planktonic growth phase. Here we use single-nucleotide resolution transcriptomic analysis to show that the physiology of dispersed cells from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is highly different from those of planktonic and biofilm cells. In dispersed cells, the expression of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY and RsmZ is downregulated, whereas secretion genes are induced. Dispersed cells are highly virulent against macrophages and Caenorhabditis elegans compared with planktonic cells. In addition, they are highly sensitive towards iron stress, and the combination of a biofilm-dispersing agent, an iron chelator and tobramycin efficiently reduces the survival of the dispersed cells. PMID:25042103

  6. Marine bacterial isolates inhibit biofilm formation and disrupt mature biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Nithya, Chari; Begum, Mansur Farzana; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2010-09-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, biofilms cause 65% of infections in developed countries. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm cause life threatening infections in cystic fibrosis infection and they are 1,000 times more tolerant to antibiotic than the planktonic cells. As quorum sensing, hydrophobicity index and extracellular polysaccharide play a crucial role in biofilm formation, extracts from 46 marine bacterial isolates were screened against these factors in P. aeruginosa. Eleven extracts showed antibiofilm activity. Extracts of S6-01 (Bacillus indicus = MTCC 5559) and S6-15 (Bacillus pumilus = MTCC 5560) inhibited the formation of PAO1 biofilm up to 95% in their Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration(BIC) of 50 and 60 microg/ml and 85% and 64% in the subinhibitory concentrations (1/4 and 1/8 of the BIC, respectively). Furthermore, the mature biofilm was disrupted to 70-74% in their BIC. The antibiofilm compound from S6-15 was partially purified using solvent extraction followed by TLC and silica column and further characterized by IR analysis. Current study for the first time reveals the antibiofilm and antiquorum-sensing activity of B. pumilus, B. indicus, Bacillus arsenicus, Halobacillus trueperi, Ferrimonas balearica, and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus from marine habitat. PMID:20665017

  7. Inhibitory activity of thymol on native and mature Gardnerella vaginalis biofilms: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most frequent diagnosis made in women with lower genital tract symptoms. It has recently been observed that 90 % of subjects with BV show the growth of bacteria in the form of biofilms as against only 10% without BV, and that Gardnerella vaginalis was the predominant species. The propensity of G. vaginalis to form biofilm is clinically relevant because this form of growth allows it to tolerate higher concentrations of certain antibiotics, thus increasing the possibilty of recurrent BV even after apparently curative therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether thymol (CAS 89-83-8), a molecule present in thyme essential oil, that is credited with having a series of pharmacological properties including antimicrobial and antifungal effects, can interfere with newly formed and mature G. vaginalis biofilms. The ability of G. vaginalis ATCC 49145 and two G. vaginalis strains isolated from human BV to form biofilm in flat-bottomed 96-well microtitre plates was verified, and the effects of thymol concentrations ranging from 1 to 1/16 MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) on preformed and mature biofilms was investigated by means of spectrophotometric analysis, Nomarski interference contrast microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy with live-dead cell visualisation (SYTO 9 and propidium iodide). Native biofilm was inhibited by concentrations ranging from 1 MIC to 1/8 MIC (32.77% +/- 2.37 to 11.39% +/- 1.46), and mature biofilm was inhibited by concentrations ranging from 1 MIC to 1/4 MIC (26.18% +/- 1.36 to 13.20% +/- 1.44). Nomarski interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy visually confirmed these findings. As biofilm is a multi-factorial phenomenon, the multiple mechanisms of thymol may act on different steps in the evolution of mature biofilm. PMID:21175040

  8. Resistance to benzalkonium chloride, peracetic acid and nisin during formation of mature biofilms by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Saá Ibusquiza, P; Herrera, J J R; Cabo, M L

    2011-05-01

    Increase of resistance to the application of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), peracetic acid (PA) and nisin during biofilm formation at 25 °C by three strains of Listeria monocytogenes (CECT 911, CECT 4032, CECT 5873 and BAC-adapted CECT 5873) in different scenarios was compared. For this purpose, resistance after 4 and 11-days of biofilm formation was quantified in terms of lethal dose 90% values (LD(90)), determined according with a dose-response logistic mathematical model. Microscopic analyses after 4 and 11-days of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation were also carried out. Results demonstrated a relation between the microscopic structure and the resistance to the assayed biocides in matured biofilms. The worst cases being biofilms formed by the strain 4032 (in both stainless steel and polypropylene), which showed a complex "cloud-type" structure that correlates with the highest resistance of this strain against the three biocides during biofilm maturation. However, that increase in resistance and complexity appeared not to be dependent on initial bacterial adherence, thus indicating mature biofilms rather than planctonic cells or early-stage biofilms must be considered when disinfection protocols have to be optimized. PA seemed to be the most effective of the three disinfectants used for biofilms. We hypothesized both its high oxidizing capacity and low molecular size could suppose an advantage for its penetration inside the biofilm. We also demonstrated that organic material counteract with the biocides, thus indicating the importance of improving cleaning protocols. Finally, by comparing strains 5873 and 5873 adapted to BAC, several adaptative cross-responses between BAC and nisin or peracetic acid were identified. PMID:21356446

  9. Growth and Detachment of Cell Clusters from Mature Mixed-Species Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stoodley, Paul; Wilson, Suzanne; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Boyle, John D.; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M.; Costerton, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Detachment from biofilms is an important consideration in the dissemination of infection and the contamination of industrial systems but is the least-studied biofilm process. By using digital time-lapse microscopy and biofilm flow cells, we visualized localized growth and detachment of discrete cell clusters in mature mixed-species biofilms growing under steady conditions in turbulent flow in situ. The detaching biomass ranged from single cells to an aggregate with a diameter of approximately 500 μm. Direct evidence of local cell cluster detachment from the biofilms was supported by microscopic examination of filtered effluent. Single cells and small clusters detached more frequently, but larger aggregates contained a disproportionately high fraction of total detached biomass. These results have significance in the establishment of an infectious dose and public health risk assessment. PMID:11722913

  10. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Qu, Yue; Harrison, Paul F; Lo, Tricia L; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R; Beilharz, Traude H; Traven, Ana

    2015-10-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  11. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R.; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  12. Antimicrobial dressing efficacy against mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm on porcine skin explants.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Priscilla L; Yang, Qingping; Davis, Stephen; Sampson, Edith M; Azeke, John I; Hamad, Afifa; Schultz, Gregory S

    2015-08-01

    An ex vivo porcine skin explant biofilm model that preserves key properties of biofilm attached to skin at different levels of maturity (0-3 days) was used to assess the efficacy of commercially available antimicrobial dressings and topical treatments. Assays were also performed on the subpopulation of antibiotic tolerant biofilm generated by 24 hours of pre-treatment with gentamicin (120× minimal inhibitory concentration) prior to agent exposure. Five types of antimicrobial agents (iodine, silver, polyhexamethylene biguanide, honey and ethanol) and four types of moisture dressings (cotton gauze, sodium carboxymethylcellulose fibre, calcium alginate fibre and cadexomer beads) were assessed. Time-release silver gel and cadexomer iodine dressings were the most effective in reducing mature biofilm [between 5 and 7 logarithmic (log) of 7-log total], whereas all other dressing formulations reduced biofilm between 0·3 and 2 log in 24 or 72 hours with a single exposure. Similar results were found after 24-hour exposure to silver release dressings using an in vivo pig burn wound model, demonstrating correlation between the ex vivo and in vivo models. Results of this study indicate that commonly used microbicidal wound dressings vary widely in their ability to kill mature biofilm and the efficacy is influenced by time of exposure, number of applications, moisture level and agent formulation (sustained release). PMID:24028432

  13. Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Enables Mature Biofilm Formation on Abiotic Surfaces by Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    PubMed Central

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; de Baura, Válter Antonio; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele

    2014-01-01

    H. seropedicae associates endophytically and epiphytically with important poaceous crops and is capable of promoting their growth. The molecular mechanisms involved in plant colonization by this microrganism are not fully understood. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are usually necessary for bacterial attachment to solid surfaces, to other bacteria, and to form biofilms. The role of H. seropedicae SmR1 exopolysaccharide in biofilm formation on both inert and plant substrates was assessed by characterization of a mutant in the espB gene which codes for a glucosyltransferase. The mutant strain was severely affected in EPS production and biofilm formation on glass wool. In contrast, the plant colonization capacity of the mutant strain was not altered when compared to the parental strain. The requirement of EPS for biofilm formation on inert surface was reinforced by the induction of eps genes in biofilms grown on glass and polypropylene. On the other hand, a strong repression of eps genes was observed in H. seropedicae cells adhered to maize roots. Our data suggest that H. seropedicae EPS is a structural component of mature biofilms, but this development stage of biofilm is not achieved during plant colonization. PMID:25310013

  14. Development of a novel ex vivo porcine skin explant model for the assessment of mature bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Phillips, Priscilla L; Sampson, Edith M; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Jin, Shouguang; Antonelli, Patrick; Schultz, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been proposed to be a major factor contributing to the failure of chronic wounds to heal because of their increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents and the prolonged inflammation they cause. Phenotypic characteristics of bacterial biofilms vary depending on the substratum to which they attach, the nutritional environment, and the microorganisms within the biofilm community. To develop an ex vivo biofilm model that more closely mimics biofilms in chronic skin wounds, we developed an optimal procedure to grow mature biofilms on a central partial-thickness wound in 12-mm porcine skin explants. Chlorine gas produced optimal sterilization of explants while preserving histological properties of the epidermis and dermis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus developed mature biofilms after 3 days that had dramatically increased tolerance to gentamicin and oxacillin (∼100× and 8,000× minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively) and to sodium hypochlorite (0.6% active chlorine). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy verified extensive exopolymeric biofilm structures on the explants. Despite a significant delay, a ΔlasI quorum-sensing mutant of P. aeruginosa developed biofilm as antibiotic-tolerant as wild-type after 3 days. This ex vivo model simulates growth of biofilms on skin wounds and provides an accurate model to assess effects of antimicrobial agents on mature biofilms. PMID:23927831

  15. Outer membrane protein OmpQ of Bordetella bronchiseptica is required for mature biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Natalia; Villalba, María Inés; Parisi, Gustavo; Arnal, Laura; Serra, Diego Omar; Aguilar, Mario; Yantorno, Osvaldo

    2016-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica, an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of colonizing the respiratory tract of diverse animals and chronically persists inside the hosts by forming biofilm. Most known virulence factors in Bordetella species are regulated by the BvgAS two-component transduction system. The Bvg-activated proteins play a critical role during host infection. OmpQ is an outer membrane porin protein which is expressed under BvgAS control. Here, we studied the contribution of OmpQ to the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica. We found that the lack of expression of OmpQ did not affect the growth kinetics and final biomass of B. bronchiseptica under planktonic growth conditions. The ΔompQ mutant strain displayed no differences in attachment level and in early steps of biofilm formation. However, deletion of the ompQ gene attenuated the ability of B. bronchiseptica to form a mature biofilm. Analysis of ompQ gene expression during the biofilm formation process by B. bronchiseptica showed a dynamic expression pattern, with an increase of biofilm culture at 48 h. Moreover, we demonstrated that the addition of serum anti-OmpQ had the potential to reduce the biofilm biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we showed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, evidence of the contribution of OmpQ to a process of importance for B. bronchiseptica pathobiology. Our results indicate that OmpQ plays a role during the biofilm development process, particularly at later stages of development, and that this porin could be a potential target for strategies of biofilm formation inhibition. PMID:26673448

  16. Activity of daptomycin- and vancomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone microparticles against mature staphylococcal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Inês Santos; Bettencourt, Ana F; Gonçalves, Lídia MD; Kasper, Stefanie; Bétrisey, Bertrand; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette; Trampuz, Andrej; Almeida, António J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop novel daptomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) microparticles with enhanced antibiofilm activity against mature biofilms of clinically relevant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Daptomycin was encapsulated into PCL microparticles by a double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. For comparison purposes, formulations containing vancomycin were also prepared. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, thermal behavior, and in vitro release were assessed. All formulations exhibited a spherical morphology, micrometer size, and negative surface charge. From a very early time stage, the released concentrations of daptomycin and vancomycin were higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration and continued so up to 72 hours. Daptomycin presented a sustained release profile with increasing concentrations of the drug being released up to 72 hours, whereas the release of vancomycin stabilized at 24 hours. The antibacterial activity of the microparticles was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry against planktonic and sessile MRSA and S. epidermidis. Regarding planktonic bacteria, daptomycin-loaded PCL microparticles presented the highest antibacterial activity against both strains. Isothermal microcalorimetry also revealed that lower concentrations of daptomycin-loaded microparticles were required to completely inhibit the recovery of mature MRSA and S. epidermidis biofilms. Further characterization of the effect of daptomycin-loaded PCL microparticles on mature biofilms was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed an important reduction in MRSA biofilm, whereas S. epidermidis biofilms, although inhibited, were not eradicated. In addition, an important attachment of the microparticles to MRSA and S. epidermidis biofilms was

  17. Activity of daptomycin- and vancomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone microparticles against mature staphylococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Inês Santos; Bettencourt, Ana F; Gonçalves, Lídia M D; Kasper, Stefanie; Bétrisey, Bertrand; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette; Trampuz, Andrej; Almeida, António J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop novel daptomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) microparticles with enhanced antibiofilm activity against mature biofilms of clinically relevant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Daptomycin was encapsulated into PCL microparticles by a double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. For comparison purposes, formulations containing vancomycin were also prepared. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, thermal behavior, and in vitro release were assessed. All formulations exhibited a spherical morphology, micrometer size, and negative surface charge. From a very early time stage, the released concentrations of daptomycin and vancomycin were higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration and continued so up to 72 hours. Daptomycin presented a sustained release profile with increasing concentrations of the drug being released up to 72 hours, whereas the release of vancomycin stabilized at 24 hours. The antibacterial activity of the microparticles was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry against planktonic and sessile MRSA and S. epidermidis. Regarding planktonic bacteria, daptomycin-loaded PCL microparticles presented the highest antibacterial activity against both strains. Isothermal microcalorimetry also revealed that lower concentrations of daptomycin-loaded microparticles were required to completely inhibit the recovery of mature MRSA and S. epidermidis biofilms. Further characterization of the effect of daptomycin-loaded PCL microparticles on mature biofilms was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed an important reduction in MRSA biofilm, whereas S. epidermidis biofilms, although inhibited, were not eradicated. In addition, an important attachment of the microparticles to MRSA and S. epidermidis biofilms was

  18. The horizontally-acquired response regulator SsrB drives a Salmonella lifestyle switch by relieving biofilm silencing

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Stuti K; Winardhi, Ricksen S; Periasamy, Saravanan; Dykas, Michal M; Jie, Yan; Kenney, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy by which bacterial pathogens reside in humans is by shifting from a virulent lifestyle, (systemic infection), to a dormant carrier state. Two major serovars of Salmonella enterica, Typhi and Typhimurium, have evolved a two-component regulatory system to exist inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles in the macrophage, as well as to persist as asymptomatic biofilms in the gallbladder. Here we present evidence that SsrB, a transcriptional regulator encoded on the SPI-2 pathogenicity-island, determines the switch between these two lifestyles by controlling ancestral and horizontally-acquired genes. In the acidic macrophage vacuole, the kinase SsrA phosphorylates SsrB, and SsrB~P relieves silencing of virulence genes and activates their transcription. In the absence of SsrA, unphosphorylated SsrB directs transcription of factors required for biofilm formation specifically by activating csgD (agfD), the master biofilm regulator by disrupting the silenced, H-NS-bound promoter. Anti-silencing mechanisms thus control the switch between opposing lifestyles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10747.001 PMID:26880544

  19. The horizontally-acquired response regulator SsrB drives a Salmonella lifestyle switch by relieving biofilm silencing.

    PubMed

    Desai, Stuti K; Winardhi, Ricksen S; Periasamy, Saravanan; Dykas, Michal M; Jie, Yan; Kenney, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy by which bacterial pathogens reside in humans is by shifting from a virulent lifestyle, (systemic infection), to a dormant carrier state. Two major serovars of Salmonella enterica, Typhi and Typhimurium, have evolved a two-component regulatory system to exist inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles in the macrophage, as well as to persist as asymptomatic biofilms in the gallbladder. Here we present evidence that SsrB, a transcriptional regulator encoded on the SPI-2 pathogenicity-island, determines the switch between these two lifestyles by controlling ancestral and horizontally-acquired genes. In the acidic macrophage vacuole, the kinase SsrA phosphorylates SsrB, and SsrB~P relieves silencing of virulence genes and activates their transcription. In the absence of SsrA, unphosphorylated SsrB directs transcription of factors required for biofilm formation specifically by activating csgD (agfD), the master biofilm regulator by disrupting the silenced, H-NS-bound promoter. Anti-silencing mechanisms thus control the switch between opposing lifestyles. PMID:26880544

  20. The Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri flagellum is required for mature biofilm and canker development.

    PubMed

    Malamud, Florencia; Torres, Pablo S; Roeschlin, Roxana; Rigano, Luciano A; Enrique, Ramón; Bonomi, Hernán R; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, María Rosa; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2011-03-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is the causative agent of citrus canker. This bacterium develops a characteristic biofilm on both biotic and abiotic surfaces. To evaluate the participation of the single flagellum of Xac in biofilm formation, mutants in the fliC (flagellin) and the flgE (hook) genes were generated. Swimming motility, assessed on 0.25 % agar plates, was markedly reduced in fliC and flgE mutants. However, the fliC and flgE mutants exhibited a flagellar-independent surface translocation on 0.5 % agar plates. Mutation of either the rpfF or the rpfC gene, which both encode proteins involved in cell-cell signalling mediated by diffusible signal factor (DSF), led to a reduction in both flagellar-dependent and flagellar-independent surface translocation, indicating a regulatory role for DSF in both types of motility. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms produced in static culture demonstrated that the flagellum is also involved in the formation of mushroom-shaped structures and water channels, and in the dispersion of biofilms. The presence of the flagellum was required for mature biofilm development on lemon leaf surfaces. The absence of flagellin produced a slight reduction in Xac pathogenicity and this reduction was more severe when the complete flagellum structure was absent. PMID:21109564

  1. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the 'holy grail' in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters. PMID:27582732

  2. Development of an intracanal mature Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its susceptibility to some antimicrobial intracanal medications; an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Shehab El-Din Mohamed; El-Hady, Soha A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a mature biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis inside the root canal system and to test its susceptibility to some antimicrobial medications in vitro. Methods: Single rooted premolars were mechanically enlarged, sterilized, and then infected with a clinical isolate of E. faecalis. Biofilm formation and maturation was monitored using SEM. Biofilm bacteria were exposed to Amoxicillin+clavulanate, Ciprofloxacin, Clindamycin, Doxycycline, and calcium hydroxide as intracanal medications for 1 week. Finally bacterial samples were collected, and colony-forming units were enumerated. Results: SEM examination confirmed the formation of a mature biofilm at the end of the incubation period. All the chemotherapeutic agents used were significantly better than Calcium hydroxide in elimination of biofilm bacteria. The antimicrobial effect of Amoxicillin + clavulanate, Ciprofloxacin and Clindamycin was significantly better than Doxycycline (P=.05). However the difference in the antimicrobial effectiveness among them was statistically non-significant (P=.05). Conclusions: The method used for bacterial biofilm development and maturation is reliable and can be used to assess the anti bacterial potential of endodontic materials. Also, the local application of antibacterial agents can be beneficial in resistant cases of apical periodontitis but only after careful culture and sensitivity testing to choose the appropriate agent for the existing flora. PMID:22229006

  3. Listeria monocytogenes Impact on Mature or Old Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilms During Growth at 4 and 20°C

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Carmen H.; Orgaz, Belen; SanJose, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Changes in spatial organization, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), viable cell content, biovolume, and substratum surface coverage of the biofilms formed on glass by Pseudomonas fluorescens resulting from co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes, were examined. Two strains of L. monocytogenes, two culture temperatures and two biofilm developmental stages were investigated. Both L. monocytogenes strains, a persistently sampled isolate (collected repeatedly along 3 years from a meat factory) and Scott A, induced shrinkage in matrix volume, both at 20°C and 4°C, in mature or old biofilms, without loss of P. fluorescens cell count per surface unit. The nearly homogeneous pattern of surface coverage shown by mono-species P. fluorescens biofilms, turned into more irregular layouts in co-culture with L. monocytogenes. The upper layer of both mono and dual-species biofilms turned to predominantly consist of matrix, with plenty of viable cells underneath, in old biofilms cultured at 20°C, but not in those grown at 4°C. Between 15 and 56% of the substratum area was covered by biofilm, the extent depending on temperature, time and L. monocytogenes strain. Real biofilms in food-related surfaces may thus be very heterogeneous regarding their superficial components, i.e., those more accessible to disinfectants. It is therefore a hygienic challenge to choose an adequate agent to disrupt them. PMID:26913024

  4. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the ‘holy grail’ in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters. PMID:27582732

  5. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris Grown in Planktonic Culture and Mature Biofilm on a Steel Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Nie, Lei; Scholten, Johannes C.

    2007-08-01

    The build-up of biofilms of sulphate -reducing bacteria (SRB) on metals surfaces may lead to severe corrosion of iron. To understand the processes at molecular level, in this study, a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray was used to examine differential expression patterns between planktonic populations and mature biofilm of model SRB species Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Statistical analysis revealed that 472 genes were differentially expressed (1.5 fold or more with a p value less than 0.025) when comparing biofilm to planktonic cells. Among the differentially expressed genes were several that corresponded to biofilm formation genes identified in many aerobic bacterial biofilms (i.e., Pseudomonas species and Escherichia coli), such as down-regulation of genes encoding flagellin, flagellar motor switch protein and chemotaxis proteins involved in cell motility and induction of genes encoding sugar transferase and glycogen synthase involved in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. In addition, D. vulgaris biofilm-bound cells exhibited decreased transcription of genes involved in protein synthesis, energy metabolism and sulfate reduction, as well as genes involved in general stress responses. These findings were all consistent with early suggestion that the average physiology of biofilm cells were similar to planktonic cells of stationary phases. Most notably, up-regulation of large number of outer membrane proteins was observed in D. vulgaris biofilm. Although their function is still unknown, the higher expression of these genes in D. vulgaris biofilm could implicate important roles formation and maintenance of multi-cellular consortium on metal surface. The study provided insights into the metabolic networks associated with D. vulgaris biofilm formation and maintenance on an iron surface.

  6. The role of the globin-coupled sensor YddV in a mature E. coli biofilm population.

    PubMed

    Donné, Joke; Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2016-07-01

    Biofilm-associated infections are hard to treat because of their high antibiotic resistance and the presence of a very persistent subpopulation of bacteria. The second messenger molecule cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays a very important role in this biofilm physiology. Here, we evaluated the role of YddV, an enzyme with a c-di-GMP synthesis function, in the formation and maturation of Escherichia coli biofilms. Our results suggest that YddV stimulates biofilm growth via its role in the production of c-di-GMP and this likely by influencing the production of matrix (e.g. poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA)). However, lowering the YddV expression did not alter the biofilm formation since there was no significant difference between the biofilm phenotypes of WT E. coli and YddV-knockout bacteria. Additionally, YddV expression had no significant influence on the amount of persister cells within the biofilm population, questioning the use of YddV as therapeutic target. PMID:27083533

  7. Interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a glass surface - A combined experimental and cohesive zone modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Safari, Ashkan; Tukovic, Zeljko; Cardiff, Philip; Walter, Maik; Casey, Eoin; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2016-02-01

    A good understanding of the mechanical stability of biofilms is essential for biofouling management, particularly when mechanical forces are used. Previous biofilm studies lack a damage-based theoretical model to describe the biofilm separation from a surface. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interfacial separation of a mature biofilm from a rigid glass substrate using a combined experimental and numerical modelling approach. In the current work, the biofilm-glass interfacial separation process was investigated under tensile and shear stresses at the macroscale level, known as modes I and II failure mechanisms respectively. The numerical simulations were performed using a Finite Volume (FV)-based simulation package (OpenFOAM®) to predict the separation initiation using the cohesive zone model (CZM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based retraction curve was used to obtain the separation properties between the biofilm and glass colloid at microscale level, where the CZM parameters were estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. In this study CZM is introduced as a reliable method for the investigation of interfacial separation between a biofilm and rigid substrate, in which a high local stress at the interface edge acts as an ultimate stress at the crack tip.This study demonstrated that the total interfacial failure energy measured at the macroscale, was significantly higher than the pure interfacial separation energy obtained by AFM at the microscale, indicating a highly ductile deformation behaviour within the bulk biofilm matrix. The results of this study can significantly contribute to the understanding of biofilm detachments. PMID:26474034

  8. Role of initial contamination levels, biofilm maturity and presence of salt and fat on desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hingston, Patricia A; Stea, Emma C; Knøchel, Susanne; Hansen, Truelstrup

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of initial contamination levels, biofilm maturity and presence of salt and fatty food soils on desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel (SS) coupons. L. monocytogenes cultures grown (at 15 °C for 48 h) in Tryptic Soy Broth with 1% glucose (TSB-glu) containing either 0.5 or 5% (w/v) NaCl were re-suspended in TSB-glu containing either 0.5 or 5% NaCl and used to contaminate SS coupons at levels of 3.5, 5.5, and 7.5 log CFU/cm². Desiccation (at 15 °C for 20 days, 43% RH) commenced immediately (non-biofilm) or following biofilm formation (at 15 °C for 48 h, 100% RH). To study the impact of food lipids, non-biofilm L. monocytogenes cells were suspended in TSB-glu containing either canola oil (5-10%) or lard (20-60%) and desiccated as above on SS coupons. Following desiccation for 20 days, survivors decreased by 1.4-3.7 log CFU/cm² for non-biofilm L. monocytogenes cells. The contamination level had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on survival kinetics. SEM micrographs showed mature biofilms on coupons initially contaminated with 5.5 and 7.5 log CFU/cm². Mature biofilm cells were significantly (p < 0.05) more desiccation resistant than cells in immature biofilms formed by the lowest contamination level. Besides biofilm maturity/formation, previous osmoadaptation, exposure to lard (20-60%) or salt (5%) during desiccation significantly (p < 0.05) increased the bacterium's survival. In conclusion, L. monocytogenes desiccation survival can be greatly reduced by preventing presence of mature biofilms and salty or fatty soils on food contact surfaces. PMID:23764219

  9. Mature Biofilm Degradation by Potential Probiotics: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans versus Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Okinaga, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The biofilm degradation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is essential as a complete periodontal disease therapy, and here we show the effects of potential probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus spp. for the biofilm of several serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Eight of the 13 species showed the competent biofilm degradation of ≥ 90% reduction in biofilm values in A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) as well as four of the seven species for the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMZ 534 (serotype e). In contrast, the probiotic bacteria did not have a big impact for the degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) biofilm. The dispersed A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 cells through the biofilm detachment were still viable and plausible factors for the biofilm degradation were not due to the lactic acid and low pH conditions. The three enzymes, protease, lipase, and amylase may be responsible for the biofilm degradation; in particular, lipase was the most effective enzyme for the biofilm degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 along with the protease activity which should be also important for the other serotypes. Remarkable lipase enzyme activities were detected from some of the potential probiotics and a supporting result using a lipase inhibitor presented corroborating evidence that lipase activity is one of the contributing factors for biofilm degradation outside of the protease which is also another possible factor for the biofilm of the other serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. On the other hand, the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) was not powerfully degraded by the lipase enzyme because the lipase inhibitor was slightly functional for only two of potential probiotics. PMID:27438340

  10. Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the virulence and pathogenesis of Francisella spp. has significantly advanced in recent years, including a new understanding that this organism can form biofilms. What is known so far about Francisella spp. biofilms is summarized here and future research questions are suggested. The molecular basis of biofilm production has begun to be studied, especially the role of extracellular carbohydrates and capsule, quorum sensing and two-component signaling systems. Further work has explored the contribution of amoebae, pili, outer-membrane vesicles, chitinases, and small molecules such as c-di-GMP to Francisella spp. biofilm formation. A role for Francisella spp. biofilm in feeding mosquito larvae has been suggested. As no strong role in virulence has been found yet, Francisella spp. biofilm formation is most likely a key mechanism for environmental survival and persistence. The significance and importance of Francisella spp.’s biofilm phenotype as a critical aspect of its microbial physiology is being developed. Areas for further studies include the potential role of Francisella spp. biofilms in the infection of mammalian hosts and virulence regulation. PMID:24225421

  11. Biofilm and planktonic lifestyles differently support the resistance of the desert cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis under space and Martian simulations.

    PubMed

    Baqué, Mickael; Scalzi, Giuliano; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Billi, Daniela

    2013-10-01

    When Chroococcidiopsis sp. strain CCMEE 057 from the Sinai Desert and strain CCMEE 029 from the Negev Desert were exposed to space and Martian simulations in the dried status as biofilms or multilayered planktonic samples, the biofilms exhibited an enhanced rate of survival. Compared to strain CCMEE 029, biofilms of strain CCME 057 better tolerated UV polychromatic radiation (5 × 10(5) kJ/m(2) attenuated with a 0.1% neutral density filter) combined with space vacuum or Martian atmosphere of 780 Pa. CCMEE 029, on the other hand, failed to survive UV polychromatic doses higher than 1.5 × 10(3) kJ/m(2). The induced damage to genomic DNA, plasma membranes and photosynthetic apparatus was quantified and visualized by means of PCR-based assays and CLSM imaging. Planktonic samples of both strains accumulated a higher amount of damage than did the biofilms after exposure to each simulation; CLSM imaging showed that photosynthetic pigment bleaching, DNA fragmentation and damaged plasma membranes occurred in the top 3-4 cell layers of both biofilms and of multilayered planktonic samples. Differences in the EPS composition were revealed by molecular probe staining as contributing to the enhanced endurance of biofilms compared to that of planktonic samples. Our results suggest that compared to strain CCMEE 029, biofilms of strain CCMEE 057 might better tolerate 1 year's exposure in space during the next EXPOSE-R2 mission. PMID:23955666

  12. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Effects of Different Concentrations of Triple Antibiotic Paste on Mature Biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Frough Reyhani, Mohammad; Rahimi, Saeed; Fathi, Zahra; Shakouie, Sahar; Salem Milani, Amin; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad Hossein; Shokri, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Triple antibiotic paste (TAP) is widely used in endodontics for root canal disinfection, particularly in regenerative procedures. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of different concentrations of TAP at 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-week intervals on mature Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. Materials and methods. A total of 287 extracted one-rooted human central incisors were infected with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 after removing the crown and preparation. The root canal space was filled with one of the 0.01-, 0.1-, 1-, 10-, 100-, and 1000-mg/mL concentrations of TAP or normal saline (control). The root canal dentin was sampled after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The dentinal shavings were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar plates after serial dilutions. The classic colony-forming unit (CFU) counting technique was used to determine remaining bacterial counts. Data were analyzed by using the two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests and one-way ANOVA (P<0.05). Results. TAP completely eliminated E. faecalis biofilms at all the intervals at concentrations of 1000, 100, and 10 mg/mL, whereas 1-, 0.1-, and 0.01-mg/mL TAP resulted in significant reduction of CFU means compared with the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the four time intervals. Conclusion. Use of lower concentrations of TAP at short term could eradicate E. faecalis biofilm and decrease high-concentration side effects. PMID:26697145

  13. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Effects of Different Concentrations of Triple Antibiotic Paste on Mature Biofilm of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Frough Reyhani, Mohammad; Rahimi, Saeed; Fathi, Zahra; Shakouie, Sahar; Salem Milani, Amin; Soroush Barhaghi, Mohammad Hossein; Shokri, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Triple antibiotic paste (TAP) is widely used in endodontics for root canal disinfection, particularly in regenerative procedures. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of different concentrations of TAP at 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-week intervals on mature Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. Materials and methods. A total of 287 extracted one-rooted human central incisors were infected with E. faecalis ATCC 29212 after removing the crown and preparation. The root canal space was filled with one of the 0.01-, 0.1-, 1-, 10-, 100-, and 1000-mg/mL concentrations of TAP or normal saline (control). The root canal dentin was sampled after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The dentinal shavings were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar plates after serial dilutions. The classic colony-forming unit (CFU) counting technique was used to determine remaining bacterial counts. Data were analyzed by using the two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests and one-way ANOVA (P<0.05). Results. TAP completely eliminated E. faecalis biofilms at all the intervals at concentrations of 1000, 100, and 10 mg/mL, whereas 1-, 0.1-, and 0.01-mg/mL TAP resulted in significant reduction of CFU means compared with the control group. There were no statistically significant differences between the four time intervals. Conclusion. Use of lower concentrations of TAP at short term could eradicate E. faecalis biofilm and decrease high-concentration side effects. PMID:26697145

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Blue Light against Nosocomial Wound Pathogens Growing Planktonically and as Mature Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Thwaite, Joanne E.; Burt, Rebecca; Laws, Thomas R.; Raguse, Marina; Moeller, Ralf; Webber, Mark A.; Oppenheim, Beryl A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The blue wavelengths within the visible light spectrum are intrinisically antimicrobial and can photodynamically inactivate the cells of a wide spectrum of bacteria (Gram positive and negative) and fungi. Furthermore, blue light is equally effective against both drug-sensitive and -resistant members of target species and is less detrimental to mammalian cells than is UV radiation. Blue light is currently used for treating acnes vulgaris and Helicobacter pylori infections; the utility for decontamination and treatment of wound infections is in its infancy. Furthermore, limited studies have been performed on bacterial biofilms, the key growth mode of bacteria involved in clinical infections. Here we report the findings of a multicenter in vitro study performed to assess the antimicrobial activity of 400-nm blue light against bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm growth modes. Blue light was tested against a panel of 34 bacterial isolates (clinical and type strains) comprising Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterobacter cloacae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. All planktonic-phase bacteria were susceptible to blue light treatment, with the majority (71%) demonstrating a ≥5-log10 decrease in viability after 15 to 30 min of exposure (54 J/cm2 to 108 J/cm2). Bacterial biofilms were also highly susceptible to blue light, with significant reduction in seeding observed for all isolates at all levels of exposure. These results warrant further investigation of blue light as a novel decontamination strategy for the nosocomial environment, as well as additional wider decontamination applications. IMPORTANCE Blue light shows great promise as a novel decontamination strategy for the nosocomial environment, as well as additional wider decontamination applications (e.g., wound closure during surgery). This warrants further

  15. New insights into the lifestyle of the cold-loving SM1 euryarchaeon: natural growth as a monospecies biofilm in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Ruth; Moissl, Christine; Amann, Thomas; Rudolph, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In the surface waters of sulfidic springs near Regensburg, Bavaria, Germany, the SM1 euryarchaeon, together with filamentous bacteria, forms the recently described unique string-of-pearls community. In addition to naturally occurring string-of-pearls communities, the growth of these communities was also observed on polyethylene nets provided as an artificial attachment material in the streamlets of springs. In order to learn more about the distribution and origin of the SM1 euryarchaeon and its possible occurrence in the subsurface, polyethylene nets were incubated as deeply as possible in different spring holes. After a short residence time, slime-like, milky drops, almost completely composed of SM1 euryarchaeon, were attached to the nets, indicating that this organism grows independent of a partner in deeper earth layers. A newly designed in situ biofilm trapping system allowed the quantitative harvesting of organisms exhibiting this newly discovered lifestyle of the SM1 euryarchaeon for detailed biological studies. The discovery of naturally occurring archaeal biofilms extends our knowledge of the biology and ecological significance of archaea in their environments. PMID:16391042

  16. Arginine Deiminase in Staphylococcus epidermidis Functions To Augment Biofilm Maturation through pH Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, J. K.; Thomas, V. C.; Olson, M. E.; Chaudhari, S. S.; Nuxoll, A. S.; Schaeffer, C. R.; Lindgren, K. E.; Jones, J.; Zimmerman, M. C.; Dunman, P. M.; Bayles, K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Allelic replacement mutants were constructed within arginine deiminase (arcA1 and arcA2) to assess the function of the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway in organic acid resistance and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis 1457. A growth-dependent acidification assay (pH ∼5.0 to ∼5.2) determined that strain 1457 devoid of arginine deiminase activity (1457 ΔADI) was significantly less viable than the wild type following depletion of glucose and in the presence of arginine. However, no difference in viability was noted for individual 1457 ΔarcA1 (native) or ΔarcA2 (arginine catabolic mobile element [ACME]-derived) mutants, suggesting that the native and ACME-derived ADIs are compensatory in S. epidermidis. Furthermore, flow cytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy results suggested that organic acid stress resulted in oxidative stress that could be partially rescued by the iron chelator dipyridyl. Collectively, these results suggest that formation of hydroxyl radicals is partially responsible for cell death via organic acid stress and that ADI-derived ammonia functions to counteract this acid stress. Finally, static biofilm assays determined that viability, ammonia synthesis, and pH were reduced in strain 1457 ΔADI following 120 h of growth in comparison to strain 1457 and the arcA1 and arcA2 single mutants. It is hypothesized that ammonia synthesis via the ADI pathway is important to reduce pH stress in specific microniches that contain high concentrations of organic acids. PMID:24727224

  17. Efficacy of ciprofloxacin-clarithromycin combination against drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mature biofilm using in vitro experimental model.

    PubMed

    Elkhatib, Walid; Noreddin, Ayman

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients and eradication of its biofilm represents a substantial problem clinically. In this study, biofilm of a cystic fibrosis strain P. aeruginosa PACI22 was established and confocal laser scanning microscopy was utilized for biofilm visualization. A quantitative time-kill biofilm model was implemented in vitro to assess the biocidal effect of ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and their combination at concentration levels ranged from 0.5× to 64× minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBIC) against the biofilm and the mean log bacterial densities (Log CFU/ml) retrieved from the biofilm were monitored by frequent sampling at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hr throughout the experiment. The results revealed that none of the tested antibiotics alone could completely eradicate the biofilm-ensconced bacteria at 0.5-64× MBIC values after 24 hr of treatment. Conversely, ciprofloxacin-clarithromycin combination at 32-64× MBIC entirely exterminated the biofilm. Furthermore, a substantial in vitro synergism between ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin against the biofilm was experimentally verified. This promising synergism affords scientific rationale for further in vivo investigations to evaluate the therapeutic potential of this combination for treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:25050970

  18. Bacillus cereus Biofilms-Same, Only Different.

    PubMed

    Majed, Racha; Faille, Christine; Kallassy, Mireille; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus displays a high diversity of lifestyles and ecological niches and include beneficial as well as pathogenic strains. These strains are widespread in the environment, are found on inert as well as on living surfaces and contaminate persistently the production lines of the food industry. Biofilms are suspected to play a key role in this ubiquitous distribution and in this persistency. Indeed, B. cereus produces a variety of biofilms which differ in their architecture and mechanism of formation, possibly reflecting an adaptation to various environments. Depending on the strain, B. cereus has the ability to grow as immersed or floating biofilms, and to secrete within the biofilm a vast array of metabolites, surfactants, bacteriocins, enzymes, and toxins, all compounds susceptible to act on the biofilm itself and/or on its environment. Within the biofilm, B. cereus exists in different physiological states and is able to generate highly resistant and adhesive spores, which themselves will increase the resistance of the bacterium to antimicrobials or to cleaning procedures. Current researches show that, despite similarities with the regulation processes and effector molecules involved in the initiation and maturation of the extensively studied Bacillus subtilis biofilm, important differences exists between the two species. The present review summarizes the up to date knowledge on biofilms produced by B. cereus and by two closely related pathogens, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis. Economic issues caused by B. cereus biofilms and management strategies implemented to control these biofilms are included in this review, which also discuss the ecological and functional roles of biofilms in the lifecycle of these bacterial species and explore future developments in this important research area. PMID:27458448

  19. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation, and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins, and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches, and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24724055

  20. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  1. Characterisation of two quorum sensing systems in the endophytic Serratia plymuthica strain G3: differential control of motility and biofilm formation according to life-style

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    AHL-independent. In addition, QS in G3 positively regulated antifungal activity, production of exoenzymes, but negatively regulated production of indol-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is in agreement with previous reports in strain HRO-C48. However, in contrast to HRO-C48, swimming motility was not controlled by AHL-mediated QS. Conclusions This is the first report of the characterisation of two AHL-based quorum sensing systems in the same isolate of the genus Serratia. Our results show that the QS network is involved in the global regulation of biocontrol-related traits in the endophytic strain G3. However, although free-living and endophytic S. plymuthica share some conservation on QS phenotypic regulation, the control of motility and biofilm formation seems to be strain-specific and possible linked to the life-style of this organism. PMID:21284858

  2. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

  3. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2015-06-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  4. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  5. Vaccines Directed Against Microorganisms or Their Products Present During Biofilm Lifestyle: Can We Make a Translation as a Broad Biological Model to Tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Valdez, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a global public health problem. In recent years, experimental evidence suggesting the relevance of in vitro pellicle (a type of biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface) production as a phenotype mimicking aspects found by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex bacteria during in vivo infection has started to accumulate. There are still opportunities for better diagnostic tools, therapeutic molecules as well as new vaccine candidates to assist in TB control programs worldwide and particularly in less developed nations. Regarding vaccines, despite the availability of a live, attenuated strain (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) since almost a century ago, its variable efficacy and lack of protection against pulmonary and latent disease has prompted basic and applied research leading to preclinical and clinical evaluation of up to 15 new candidates. In this work, I present examples of vaccines based on whole cells grown as biofilms, or specific proteins expressed under such condition, and the effect they have shown in relevant animal models or directly in the natural host. I also discuss why it might be worthwhile to explore these approaches, for constructing and developing new vaccine candidates for testing their efficacy against TB. PMID:26834732

  6. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  7. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  8. Analysis of Structure and Composition of Bacterial Core Communities in Mature Drinking Water Biofilms and Bulk Water of a Citywide Network in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Karsten; Kahlisch, Leila; Brettar, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial core communities of bulk water and corresponding biofilms of a more than 20-year-old drinking water network were compared using 16S rRNA single-strand confirmation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints based on extracted DNA and RNA. The structure and composition of the bacterial core community in the bulk water was highly similar (>70%) across the city of Braunschweig, Germany, whereas all biofilm samples contained a unique community with no overlapping phylotypes from bulk water. Biofilm samples consisted mainly of Alphaproteobacteria (26% of all phylotypes), Gammaproteobacteria (11%), candidate division TM6 (11%), Chlamydiales (9%), and Betaproteobacteria (9%). The bulk water community consisted primarily of Bacteroidetes (25%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (16%), and Alphaproteobacteria (11%). All biofilm communities showed higher relative abundances of single phylotypes and a reduced richness compared to bulk water. Only biofilm communities sampled at nearby sampling points showed similar communities irrespective of support materials. In all of our bulk water studies, the community composition determined from 16S rRNA was completely different from the 16S rRNA gene-based community composition, whereas in biofilms both molecular fractions resulted in community compositions that were similar to each other. We hypothesize that a higher fraction of active bacterial phylotypes and a better protection from oxidative stress in drinking water biofilms are responsible for this higher similarity. PMID:22389373

  9. Biofilm formation by haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Fröls, Sabrina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based live-cell adhesion assay was used to examine biofilm formation by 20 different haloarchaea, including species of Halobacterium, Haloferax and Halorubrum, as well as novel natural isolates from an Antarctic salt lake. Thirteen of the 20 tested strains significantly adhered (P-value  < 0.05) to a plastic surface. Examination of adherent cell layers on glass surfaces by differential interference contrast, fluorescence and confocal microscopy showed two types of biofilm structures. Carpet-like, multi-layered biofilms containing micro- and macrocolonies (up to 50 μm in height) were formed by strains of Halobacterium salinarum and the Antarctic isolate t-ADL strain DL24. The second type of biofilm, characterized by large aggregates of cells adhering to surfaces, was formed by Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757T and Halorubrum lacusprofundi DL28. Staining of the biofilms formed by the strongly adhesive haloarchaeal strains revealed the presence of extracellular polymers, such as eDNA and glycoconjugates, substances previously shown to stabilize bacterial biofilms. For Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T and Hfx. volcanii DSM 3757T , cells adhered within 1 day of culture and remained viable for at least 2 months in mature biofilms. Adherent cells of Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T showed several types of cellular appendages that could be involved in the initial attachment. Our results show that biofilm formation occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of haloarchaeal species. PMID:23057712

  10. Biofilms: an emergent form of bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Steinberg, Peter; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2016-08-11

    Bacterial biofilms are formed by communities that are embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Importantly, bacteria in biofilms exhibit a set of 'emergent properties' that differ substantially from free-living bacterial cells. In this Review, we consider the fundamental role of the biofilm matrix in establishing the emergent properties of biofilms, describing how the characteristic features of biofilms - such as social cooperation, resource capture and enhanced survival of exposure to antimicrobials - all rely on the structural and functional properties of the matrix. Finally, we highlight the value of an ecological perspective in the study of the emergent properties of biofilms, which enables an appreciation of the ecological success of biofilms as habitat formers and, more generally, as a bacterial lifestyle. PMID:27510863

  11. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P.; Cleary, Ian A.; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C.albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance. PMID:20012895

  12. In vitro activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lifestyles under conditions relevant to pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis, and relationship with SmeDEF multidrug efflux pump expression.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; Verginelli, Fabio; Bonaventura, Giovanni Di

    2016-07-01

    The activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cells and the role played by the multidrug efflux pump SmeDEF were evaluated under conditions relevant to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. MIC, MBC and MBEC of levofloxacin were assessed, against five CF strains, under 'standard' (CLSI-recommended) and 'CF-like' (pH 6.8, 5% CO2, in a synthetic CF sputum) conditions. Levofloxacin was tested against biofilms at concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μg mL(-1)) corresponding to achievable serum levels and sputum levels by aerosolisation. smeD expression was evaluated, under both conditions, in planktonic and biofilm cells by RT-PCR. The bactericidal effect of levofloxacin was decreased, in three out of five strains tested, under 'CF-like' conditions (MBC: 2-4 vs 8-16 μg mL(-1), under 'standard' and 'CF-like' conditions, respectively). Biofilm was intrinsically resistant to levofloxacin, regardless of conditions tested (MBECs ≥ 100 μg mL(-1) for all strains). Only under 'CF-like' conditions, smeD expression increased during planktonic-to-biofilm transition, and in biofilm cells compared to stationary planktonic cells. Our findings confirmed that S. maltophilia biofilm is intrinsically resistant to therapeutic concentrations of levofloxacin. Under conditions relevant to CF, smeD overexpression could contribute to levofloxacin resistance. Further studies are warranted to define the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:27242375

  13. The Challenging World of Biofilm Physiology.

    PubMed

    Donné, Joke; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of death among children. At least 65% of all infections are caused by the biofilm mode of bacterial growth. Bacteria colonise surfaces and grow as multicellular biofilm communities surrounded by a polymeric matrix as a common survival strategy. These sessile communities endow bacteria with high tolerance to antimicrobial agents and hence cause persistent and chronic bacterial infections, such as dental caries, periodontitis, otitis media, cystic fibrosis and pneumonia. The highly complex nature and the rapid adaptability of the biofilm population impede our understanding of the process of biofilm formation, but an important role for oxygen-binding proteins herein is clear. Much research on this bacterial lifestyle is already performed, from genome/proteome analysis to in vivo antibiotic susceptibility testing, but without significant progress in biofilm treatment or eradication. This review will present the multiple challenges of biofilm research and discuss possibilities to cross these barriers in future experimental studies. PMID:26616519

  14. Permeabilizing biofilms

    DOEpatents

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  15. Lifestyle Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, Hashem; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa; Waly, Mostafa I.; Musaiger, Abdulrahman

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the lifestyle habits—physical activity (PA), eating habits (EH), and sleep duration (SD)—of Omani adolescents, and to examine gender differences in such variables. Methods: 802 Omani adolescents (442 females and 360 males), aged 15–18 years were randomly recruited. Anthropometric indices, PA level, and EH and SD were evaluated by the Arab Teenage Lifestyle questionnaire. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire for dietary assessment was also administered. Results: The results showed that although the study subjects had a sedentary lifestyle (lack of PA, average of 6.7 hours sleep, and consumption of high calorie foods), they maintained a normal body mass (less than 25 Kg/m2). Males were more than twice as active as females. With respect to EH, there were few gender differences, except in dairy and meat consumption where 62.5% and 55.5% of males consumed more than 3 servings, respectively, compared to 18.78 % and 35.2% of females, respectively. In addition, waist/height ratio, height, reasons for being active, energy drinks, potato consumption, eating sweets, vigorous PA and breakfast EHs were statistically significant independent predictors for BMI, P <0.05 for both males and females. Conclusion: This study revealed a high prevalence of sedentary behaviors and a low level of physical activity, especially among females. Unhealthy dietary habits were also widely found among both genders. There is an urgent need for more research as well as a national policy promoting active living and healthy eating and discouraging sedentary behaviour among Omani adolescents. PMID:24273660

  16. Commonly used disinfectants fail to eradicate Salmonella enterica biofilms from food contact surface materials.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, M; Morris, D; De Lappe, N; O'Connor, J; Lalor, P; Dockery, P; Cormican, M

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellosis is the second most common cause of food-borne illness worldwide. Contamination of surfaces in food processing environments may result in biofilm formation with a risk of food contamination. Effective decontamination of biofilm-contaminated surfaces is challenging. Using the CDC biofilm reactor, the activities of sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, and benzalkonium chloride were examined against an early (48-h) and relatively mature (168-h) Salmonella biofilm. All 3 agents result in reduction in viable counts of Salmonella; however, only sodium hydroxide resulted in eradication of the early biofilm. None of the agents achieved eradication of mature biofilm, even at the 90-min contact time. Studies of activity of chemical disinfection against biofilm should include assessment of activity against mature biofilm. The difficulty of eradication of established Salmonella biofilm serves to emphasize the priority of preventing access of Salmonella to postcook areas of food production facilities. PMID:24362427

  17. Commonly Used Disinfectants Fail To Eradicate Salmonella enterica Biofilms from Food Contact Surface Materials

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D.; De Lappe, N.; O'Connor, J.; Lalor, P.; Dockery, P.; Cormican, M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is the second most common cause of food-borne illness worldwide. Contamination of surfaces in food processing environments may result in biofilm formation with a risk of food contamination. Effective decontamination of biofilm-contaminated surfaces is challenging. Using the CDC biofilm reactor, the activities of sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, and benzalkonium chloride were examined against an early (48-h) and relatively mature (168-h) Salmonella biofilm. All 3 agents result in reduction in viable counts of Salmonella; however, only sodium hydroxide resulted in eradication of the early biofilm. None of the agents achieved eradication of mature biofilm, even at the 90-min contact time. Studies of activity of chemical disinfection against biofilm should include assessment of activity against mature biofilm. The difficulty of eradication of established Salmonella biofilm serves to emphasize the priority of preventing access of Salmonella to postcook areas of food production facilities. PMID:24362427

  18. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  19. Focus on the physics of biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Stocker, Roman; Rusconi, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are the smallest and most abundant form of life. They have traditionally been considered as primarily planktonic organisms, swimming or floating in a liquid medium, and this view has shaped many of the approaches to microbial processes, including for example the design of most antibiotics. However, over the last few decades it has become clear that many bacteria often adopt a sessile, surface-associated lifestyle, forming complex multicellular communities called biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are found in a vast range of environments and have major consequences on human health and industrial processes, from biofouling of surfaces to the spread of diseases. Although the study of biofilms has been biologists’ territory for a long time, a multitude of phenomena in the formation and development of biofilms hinges on physical processes. We are pleased to present a collection of research papers that discuss some of the latest developments in many of the areas to which physicists can contribute a deeper understanding of biofilms, both experimentally and theoretically. The topics covered range from the influence of physical environmental parameters on cell attachment and subsequent biofilm growth, to the use of local probes and imaging techniques to investigate biofilm structure, to the development of biofilms in complex environments and the modeling of colony morphogenesis. The results presented contribute to addressing some of the major challenges in microbiology today, including the prevention of surface contamination, the optimization of biofilm disruption methods and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments.

  20. L-Tryptophan prevents Escherichia coli biofilm formation and triggers biofilm degradation.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Junji; Furukawa, Soichi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2012-03-23

    The effect of deletion of trp operon and tna operon on the Escherichia coli biofilm formation was investigated in order to elucidate the role of L-tryptophan metabolism in biofilm formation. trp operon deletion mutants ΔtrpC, ΔtrpD and ΔtrpE deficient in L-tryptophan biosynthesis showed higher biofilm formation. In addition, ΔtnaC with increased L-tryptophan degradation activity showed higher biofilm formation. On the contrary, ΔtnaA deletion mutant which lost L-tryptophan degradation activity showed low biofilm formation. From these results, it was suggested that decrease of intracellular L-tryptophan level induced biofilm formation and increase of L-tryptophan repressed biofilm formation. So the effect of the addition of L-tryptophan to the medium on the E. coli biofilm formation was investigated. L-Tryptophan addition at starting culture decreased biofilm formation and furthermore L-tryptophan addition after 16 h culture induced the degradation of preformed biofilm. From the above results, it was suggested that maintenance of high intracellular L-tryptophan concentration prevents E. coli biofilm formation and elevation of intracellular L-tryptophan concentration triggers degradation of matured biofilm. PMID:22386992

  1. Global Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Karen E.; Dunman, Paul M.; McAleese, Fionnuala; Macapagal, Daphne; Murphy, Ellen; Projan, Steven J.; Blevins, Jon S.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mutation of the staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA) in a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus (UAMS-1) results in an impaired capacity to form a biofilm in vitro (K. E. Beenken, J. S. Blevins, and M. S. Smeltzer, Infect. Immun. 71:4206-4211, 2003). In this report, we used a murine model of catheter-based biofilm formation to demonstrate that a UAMS-1 sarA mutant also has a reduced capacity to form a biofilm in vivo. Surprisingly, mutation of the UAMS-1 ica locus had little impact on biofilm formation in vitro or in vivo. In an effort to identify additional loci that might be relevant to biofilm formation and/or the adaptive response required for persistence of S. aureus within a biofilm, we isolated total cellular RNA from UAMS-1 harvested from a biofilm grown in a flow cell and compared the transcriptional profile of this RNA to RNA isolated from both exponential- and stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Comparisons were done using a custom-made Affymetrix GeneChip representing the genomic complement of six strains of S. aureus (COL, N315, Mu50, NCTC 8325, EMRSA-16 [strain 252], and MSSA-476). The results confirm that the sessile lifestyle associated with persistence within a biofilm is distinct by comparison to the lifestyles of both the exponential and postexponential phases of planktonic culture. Indeed, we identified 48 genes in which expression was induced at least twofold in biofilms over expression under both planktonic conditions. Similarly, we identified 84 genes in which expression was repressed by a factor of at least 2 compared to expression under both planktonic conditions. A primary theme that emerged from the analysis of these genes is that persistence within a biofilm requires an adaptive response that limits the deleterious effects of the reduced pH associated with anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:15231800

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Displays Multiple Phenotypes during Development as a Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Karin; Camper, Anne K.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Costerton, J. William; Davies, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Complementary approaches were employed to characterize transitional episodes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development using direct observation and whole-cell protein analysis. Microscopy and in situ reporter gene analysis were used to directly observe changes in biofilm physiology and to act as signposts to standardize protein collection for two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and protein identification in chemostat and continuous-culture biofilm-grown populations. Using these approaches, we characterized five stages of biofilm development: (i) reversible attachment, (ii) irreversible attachment, (iii) maturation-1, (iv) maturation-2, and (v) dispersion. Biofilm cells were shown to change regulation of motility, alginate production, and quorum sensing during the process of development. The average difference in detectable protein regulation between each of the five stages of development was 35% (approximately 525 proteins). When planktonic cells were compared with maturation-2 stage biofilm cells, more than 800 proteins were shown to have a sixfold or greater change in expression level (over 50% of the proteome). This difference was higher than when planktonic P. aeruginosa were compared with planktonic cultures of Pseudomonas putida. Las quorum sensing was shown to play no role in early biofilm development but was important in later stages. Biofilm cells in the dispersion stage were more similar to planktonic bacteria than to maturation-2 stage bacteria. These results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa displays multiple phenotypes during biofilm development and that knowledge of stage-specific physiology may be important in detecting and controlling biofilm growth. PMID:11807075

  3. Dental diagnostics: molecular analysis of oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hiyari, Sarah; Bennett, Katie M

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilms are complex, multi-species bacterial communities that colonize the mouth in the form of plaque and are known to cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Biofilms are unique from planktonic bacteria in that they are mutualistic communities with a 3-dimensional structure and complex nutritional and communication pathways. The homeostasis within the biofilm colony can be disrupted, causing a shift in the bacterial composition of the colony and resulting in proliferation of pathogenic species. Because of this dynamic lifestyle, traditional microbiological techniques are inadequate for the study of biofilms. Many of the bacteria present in the oral cavity are viable but not culturable, which severely limits laboratory analysis. However, with the advent of new molecular techniques, the microbial makeup of oral biofilms can be better identified. Some of these techniques include DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and pyrosequencing. This review provides an overview of biofilm formation and examines the major molecular techniques currently used in oral biofilm analysis. Future applications of the molecular analysis of oral biofilms in the diagnosis and treatment of caries and periodontal disease are also discussed. PMID:22309866

  4. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  5. Fungal Biofilms: In Vivo Models for Discovery of Anti-Biofilm Drugs.

    PubMed

    Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R

    2015-06-01

    During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate, and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections: oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to the development of new strategies for the eradication of fungal biofilm infections. PMID:26397003

  6. Fungal Biofilms: In vivo models for discovery of anti-biofilm drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Andes, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections, oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to development of new strategies for eradication of fungal biofilm infections. PMID:26397003

  7. Prevention of Biofilm Formation and Removal of Existing Biofilms by Extracellular DNases of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Helen L.; Reuter, Mark; Hanman, Kate; Betts, Roy P.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The fastidious nature of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contrasts with its ability to survive in the food chain. The formation of biofilms, or the integration into existing biofilms by C. jejuni, is thought to contribute to food chain survival. As extracellular DNA (eDNA) has previously been proposed to play a role in C. jejuni biofilms, we have investigated the role of extracellular DNases (eDNases) produced by C. jejuni in biofilm formation. A search of 2791 C. jejuni genomes highlighted that almost half of C. jejuni genomes contains at least one eDNase gene, but only a minority of isolates contains two or three of these eDNase genes, such as C. jejuni strain RM1221 which contains the cje0256, cje0566 and cje1441 eDNase genes. Strain RM1221 did not form biofilms, whereas the eDNase-negative strains NCTC 11168 and 81116 did. Incubation of pre-formed biofilms of NCTC 11168 with live C. jejuni RM1221 or with spent medium from a RM1221 culture resulted in removal of the biofilm. Inactivation of the cje1441 eDNase gene in strain RM1221 restored biofilm formation, and made the mutant unable to degrade biofilms of strain NCTC 11168. Finally, C. jejuni strain RM1221 was able to degrade genomic DNA from C. jejuni NCTC 11168, 81116 and RM1221, whereas strain NCTC 11168 and the RM1221 cje1441 mutant were unable to do so. This was mirrored by an absence of eDNA in overnight cultures of C. jejuni RM1221. This suggests that the activity of eDNases in C. jejuni affects biofilm formation and is not conducive to a biofilm lifestyle. These eDNases do however have a potential role in controlling biofilm formation by C. jejuni strains in food chain relevant environments. PMID:25803828

  8. Effect of Biofilm Formation by Oenococcus oeni on Malolactic Fermentation and the Release of Aromatic Compounds in Wine.

    PubMed

    Bastard, Alexandre; Coelho, Christian; Briandet, Romain; Canette, Alexis; Gougeon, Régis; Alexandre, Hervé; Guzzo, Jean; Weidmann, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation (MLF). The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine's organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol) The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i) increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii) functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance. As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones, and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during MLF and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol, and eugenol in particular. This work showed that O

  9. Effect of Biofilm Formation by Oenococcus oeni on Malolactic Fermentation and the Release of Aromatic Compounds in Wine

    PubMed Central

    Bastard, Alexandre; Coelho, Christian; Briandet, Romain; Canette, Alexis; Gougeon, Régis; Alexandre, Hervé; Guzzo, Jean; Weidmann, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation (MLF). The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine’s organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol) The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i) increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii) functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance. As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones, and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during MLF and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol, and eugenol in particular. This work showed that O

  10. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  11. Anti-biofilm Activity as a Health Issue.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Sylvie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Souweine, Bertrand; Forestier, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health). Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients' organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections. PMID:27199924

  12. Anti-biofilm Activity as a Health Issue

    PubMed Central

    Miquel, Sylvie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Souweine, Bertrand; Forestier, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health). Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients’ organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections. PMID:27199924

  13. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  14. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Acharya, Rajesh K; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  15. In Vitro Models for Candida Biofilm Development.

    PubMed

    Krom, Bastiaan P; Willems, Hubertine M E

    2016-01-01

    Development of Candida spp. biofilms on medical devices such as catheters and voice prosthesis has been recognized as an increasing clinical problem. Different in vitro models are presented with increasing complexity. Each model system can be utilized for analysis of new active compounds to prevent or treat Candida biofilms as well as to study molecular processes involved in biofilm formation. Susceptibility studies of clinical isolates are generally performed in a simple 96-well model system similar to the CLSI standard. In the present chapter, optimized conditions that promote biofilm formation within individual wells of microtiter plates are described. In addition, the method has proven useful in preparing C. albicans biofilms for investigation by a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques. A more realistic and more complex biofilm system is presented by the Amsterdam Active Attachment (AAA) model. In this 24-well model all crucial steps of biofilm formation: adhesion, proliferation, and maturation, can be simulated on various surfaces, while still allowing a medium throughput approach. This model has been applied to study susceptibility, complex molecular mechanisms as well as interspecies (Candida-bacterium) interactions. Finally, a realistic microfluidics channel system is presented to follow dynamic processes in biofilm formation. In this Bioflux-based system, molecular mechanisms as well as dynamic processes can be studied at a high time-resolution. PMID:26519068

  16. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Lucy; Breidenstein, Elena B.M.; Elliott, Melissa; Reffuveille, Fany; Speert, David P.; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L.; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive) resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients. PMID:26221537

  17. Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

  18. [Lifestyle drugs in medicine].

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Seikowski, Kurt; Hermes, Barbara; Gieler, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Lifestyle drugs have become an important new group of medications, which are taken by healthy people to increase the individual well-being and quality of life. Nootropics, psychopharmaceuticals, hormones and "ecodrugs" are today the main groups. The wish for eternal youth, beauty and potency is central, and lifestyle medications are also requested to influence cosmetic findings, which are usually simply a result of the natural aging process. Lifestyle drugs seem to be harmless, but the physician must pay attention to possible abuse, side effects, risks and complications. Additionally, however, lifestyle drugs are also frequently used by patients suffering from emotional disorders such as somatoform disorders. Medicalization of physiological life is then expected to solve psychosocial problems, but without success. The use of lifestyle medications in somatoform disorders is contraindicated and psychotherapy or psychopharmacological treatment come first. With this overview article, we would like to make an update of new lifestyle drugs. PMID:18330527

  19. [Lifestyle diseases in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Harth, W; Hillert, A

    2007-10-01

    Psychosocial disorders and lifestyle trends have become more important in dermatology. Lifestyle diseases are a biopsychosocial phenomenon that can only be diagnosed and treated by paying attention to the quickly changing sociocultural aspects. The naming and popularization of the particular lifestyle diseases takes place by the media, but there is only an imprecise medical classification of these phenomena. This article gives an overview of the current situation and medical conditions of lifestyle diseases and try to assign them to an established psychosomatic diagnosis, based on the clinical symptomatic. Most often somatoform disorders, somatization disorders with a repeated presentation of physical symptoms which cannot be medically objectified or depressive disturbances are found. PMID:17701144

  20. Garcinia xanthochymus Benzophenones Promote Hyphal Apoptosis and Potentiate Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Desmond N; Yang, Lin; Wu, ShiBiao; Kennelly, Edward J; Lipke, Peter N

    2015-10-01

    Xanthochymol and garcinol, isoprenylated benzophenones purified from Garcinia xanthochymus fruits, showed multiple activities against Candida albicans biofilms. Both compounds effectively prevented emergence of fungal germ tubes and were also cytostatic, with MICs of 1 to 3 μM. The compounds therefore inhibited development of hyphae and subsequent biofilm maturation. Xanthochymol treatment of developing and mature biofilms induced cell death. In early biofilm development, killing had the characteristics of apoptosis, including externalization of phosphatidyl serine and DNA fragmentation, as evidenced by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence. These activities resulted in failure of biofilm maturation and hyphal death in mature biofilms. In mature biofilms, xanthochymol and garcinol caused the death of biofilm hyphae, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30 to 50 μM. Additionally, xanthochymol-mediated killing was complementary with fluconazole against mature biofilms, reducing the fluconazole EC50 from >1,024 μg/ml to 13 μg/ml. Therefore, xanthochymol has potential as an adjuvant for antifungal treatments as well as in studies of fungal apoptosis. PMID:26195512

  1. Garcinia xanthochymus Benzophenones Promote Hyphal Apoptosis and Potentiate Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Desmond N.; Yang, Lin; Wu, ShiBiao; Kennelly, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthochymol and garcinol, isoprenylated benzophenones purified from Garcinia xanthochymus fruits, showed multiple activities against Candida albicans biofilms. Both compounds effectively prevented emergence of fungal germ tubes and were also cytostatic, with MICs of 1 to 3 μM. The compounds therefore inhibited development of hyphae and subsequent biofilm maturation. Xanthochymol treatment of developing and mature biofilms induced cell death. In early biofilm development, killing had the characteristics of apoptosis, including externalization of phosphatidyl serine and DNA fragmentation, as evidenced by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence. These activities resulted in failure of biofilm maturation and hyphal death in mature biofilms. In mature biofilms, xanthochymol and garcinol caused the death of biofilm hyphae, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30 to 50 μM. Additionally, xanthochymol-mediated killing was complementary with fluconazole against mature biofilms, reducing the fluconazole EC50 from >1,024 μg/ml to 13 μg/ml. Therefore, xanthochymol has potential as an adjuvant for antifungal treatments as well as in studies of fungal apoptosis. PMID:26195512

  2. Ultrastructural morphologic changes in mycobacterial biofilm in different extreme condition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Sachan, Tarun Kumar; Sharma, Pragya; Rawat, Krishna Dutta

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphologic and ultrastructural features of biofilms of slow and fast-growing mycobacteria in different stress conditions, presence and absence of oleic acid albumin dextrose catalase (OADC) enrichment and at different temperatures: 30, 37 and 42 °C. Four hundred mycobacterial isolates were taken. The biomass of each biofilm was quantified using a modified microtiter plate assay method. Isolates were divided into those that formed fully established biofilms, moderately attached biofilms and weakly adherent biofilms by comparison with a known biofilm-forming strain. The large quantity of biofilm was produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis at temperature 37 and 42 °C as compared to 30 °C. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. avium developed large amount of biofilm at 30 °C as compared to 37 and 42 °C. Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed strong biofilm at 37 °C and no biofilm at 30 and 42 °C in Sauton's media. The selected non-tuberculous mycobacteria and H37Rv developed strong biofilm in the presence of OADC enrichment in Sauton's medium. Microscopic examination of biofilms by scanning electron microscopy revealed that poorly adherent biofilm formers failed to colonize the entire surface of the microtiter well. While moderately adherent biofilm formers grew in uniform monolayers but failed to develop a mature three-dimensional structure. SEM analysis of an isolate representative of the group formed fully established biofilms with a textured, multi-layered, three-dimensional structure. PMID:25192360

  3. Lifestyle and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

  4. Use of In-Biofilm Expression Technology To Identify Genes Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development†

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Antonio; Gallant, Claude V.; Jarvi, Keith; Burrows, Lori L.

    2003-01-01

    Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms form complex three-dimensional architecture and are tolerant of antibiotics and other antimicrobial compounds. In this work, an in vivo expression technology system, originally designed to study virulence-associated genes in complex mammalian environments, was used to identify genes up-regulated in P. aeruginosa grown to a mature (5-day) biofilm. Five unique cloned promoters unable to promote in vitro growth in the absence of purines after recovery from the biofilm environment were identified. The open reading frames downstream of the cloned promoter regions were identified, and knockout mutants were generated. Insertional mutation of PA5065, a homologue of Escherichia coli ubiB, was lethal, while inactivation of PA0240 (a porin homologue), PA3710 (a putative alcohol dehydrogenase), and PA3782 (a homologue of the Streptomyces griseus developmental regulator adpA) had no effect on planktonic growth but caused defects in biofilm formation in static and flowing systems. In competition experiments, mutants demonstrated reduced fitness compared with the parent strain, comprising less than 0.0001% of total biofilm cells after 5 days. Therefore, using in-biofilm expression technology, we have identified novel genes that do not affect planktonic growth but are important for biofilm formation, development, and fitness. PMID:12700249

  5. Establishment of a multi-species biofilm model and metatranscriptomic analysis of biofilm and planktonic cell communities.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuya; Yamamoto, Nao; Kino, Yuta; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Kamei, Shota; Mori, Hiroshi; Kurokawa, Ken; Nakashima, Nobutaka

    2016-08-01

    We collected several biofilm samples from Japanese rivers and established a reproducible multi-species biofilm model that can be analyzed in laboratories. Bacterial abundance at the generic level was highly similar between the planktonic and biofilm communities, whereas comparative metatranscriptomic analysis revealed many upregulated and downregulated genes in the biofilm. Many genes involved in iron-sulfur metabolism, stress response, and cell envelope function were upregulated; biofilm formation is mediated by an iron-dependent signaling mechanism and the signal is relayed to stress-responsive and cell envelope function genes. Flagella-related gene expression was regulated depending upon the growth phase, indicating different roles of flagella during the adherence, maturation, and dispersal steps of biofilm formation. Downregulation of DNA repair genes was observed, indicating that spontaneous mutation frequency would be elevated within the biofilm and that the biofilm is a cradle for generating novel genetic traits. Although the significance remains unclear, genes for rRNA methyltransferase, chromosome partitioning, aminoacyl-tRNA synthase, and cysteine, methionine, leucine, thiamine, nucleotide, and fatty acid metabolism were found to be differentially regulated. These results indicate that planktonic and biofilm communities are in different dynamic states. Studies on biofilm and sessile cells, which have received less attention, are important for understanding microbial ecology and for designing tailor-made anti-biofilm drugs. PMID:27102130

  6. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62–82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8–31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:24702817

  7. Novel strategies against Candida biofilms: interest of synthetic compounds.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Marion; Imbert, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A biofilm is a consortium of microbial cells that are attached to a substratum or an interface. It should be considered a reservoir that may induce serious infections. Indeed, Candidaspp. biofilms may be involved in the persistence or worsening of some chronic inflammatory diseases as well as in systemic infections, which may lead to high morbidity and mortality rates. New strategies are currently being explored, utilizing several synthetic compounds to prevent or fight these Candida biofilms. This article focuses on active synthetic compounds classified with regards to their modes of action: inhibition of early adherence phase, inhibition or control of biofilm maturation and finally elimination of already formed biofilms. Some of them show promise in fighting biofilm. PMID:26673571

  8. Destruction of single-species biofilms of Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae by dextranase, lactoferrin, and lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activity of dextranase, lactoferrin, lysozyme, and nisin against biofilms composed of either Klebsiella pneumonia or Escherichia coli was examined using the MBEC Assay™. Mature biofilms were treated and then sonicated to remove the adherent biofilm. This material was quantified using a lumines...

  9. [Biofilm Formation by the Nonflagellated flhB1 Mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    PubMed

    Shelud'ko, A V; Filip'echeva, Yu A; Shumiliva, E M; Khlebtsov, B N; Burov, A M; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with mixed flagellation are able to form biofilms on various surfaces. A nonflagellated mutant of this strain with inactivated chromosomal copy of the flhB gene (flhB1) was shown to exhibit specific traits at the later stages of biofilm formation on a hydrophilic (glass) surface. Mature biofilms of the flhB1::Omegon-Km mutant Sp245.1063 were considerably thinner than those of the parent strain Sp245. The biofilms of the mutant were more susceptible to the forces of hydrodynamic shear. A. brasilense Sp245 cells in biofilms were not found to possess lateral flagella. Cells with polar flagella were, however, revealed by atomic force microscopy of mature native biofilms of strain Sp245. Preservation of a polar flagellum (probably nonmotile) on the cells of A. brasilense Sp245 may enhance the biofilm stability. PMID:26263623

  10. Epigenetics and lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Alegría-Torres, Jorge Alejandro; Baccarelli, Andrea; Bollati, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    The concept of “lifestyle” includes different factors such as nutrition, behavior, stress, physical activity, working habits, smoking and alcohol consumption. Increasing evidence shows that environmental and lifestyle factors may influence epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA expression. Several lifestyle factors have been identified that might modify epigenetic patterns, such as diet, obesity, physical activity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, environmental pollutants, psychological stress, and working on night shifts. Most studies conducted so far have been centered on DNA methylation, whereas only a few investigations have studied lifestyle factors in relation to histone modifications and miRNAs. Here, we review current evidence indicating that lifestyle factors might affect human health via epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:22122337

  11. Lifestyle Medicine Education

    PubMed Central

    Pojednic, Rachele M.; Phillips, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    The actual causes of premature adult deaths, the preponderance of noncommunicable chronic diseases, and their associated costs are related to unhealthy behaviors, such as poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and tobacco use. Although recommended as the first line of prevention and management, providers often do not provide behavioral change counseling in their care. Medical education in lifestyle medicine is, therefore, proposed as a necessary intervention to allow all health providers to learn how to effectively and efficiently counsel their patients toward adopting and sustaining healthier behaviors. Lifestyle medicine curricula, including exercise, nutrition, behavioral change, and self-care, have recently evolved in all levels of medical education, together with implementation initiatives like Exercise is Medicine and the Lifestyle Medicine Education (LMEd) Collaborative. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing literature and to provide knowledge and tools to deans, administrators, faculty members, and students interested in pursuing lifestyle medicine training or establishing and improving an LMEd program within their institution. PMID:26413038

  12. Biofilm Growth and Detachment of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Meyenhofer, Markus F.; Fine, Daniel H.

    2003-01-01

    The gram-negative, oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated as the causative agent of several forms of periodontal disease in humans. When cultured in broth, fresh clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans form tenacious biofilms on surfaces such as glass, plastic, and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, a property that probably plays an important role in the ability of this bacterium to colonize the oral cavity and cause disease. We examined the morphology of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm colonies grown on glass slides and in polystyrene petri dishes by using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans developed asymmetric, lobed biofilm colonies that displayed complex architectural features, including a layer of densely packed cells on the outside of the colony and nonaggregated cells and large, transparent cavities on the inside of the colony. Mature biofilm colonies released single cells or small clusters of cells into the medium. These released cells adhered to the surface of the culture vessel and formed new colonies, enabling the biofilm to spread. We isolated three transposon insertion mutants which produced biofilm colonies that lacked internal, nonaggregated cells and were unable to release cells into the medium. All three transposon insertions mapped to genes required for the synthesis of the O polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharide. Plasmids carrying the complementary wild-type genes restored the ability of mutant strains to synthesize O-PS and release cells into the medium. Our findings suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm growth and detachment are discrete processes and that biofilm cell detachment evidently involves the formation of nonaggregated cells inside the biofilm colony that are destined for release from the colony. PMID:12562811

  13. Lifestyle medicine for depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression appears to have increased over the past three decades. While this may be an artefact of diagnostic practices, it is likely that there are factors about modernity that are contributing to this rise. There is now compelling evidence that a range of lifestyle factors are involved in the pathogenesis of depression. Many of these factors can potentially be modified, yet they receive little consideration in the contemporary treatment of depression, where medication and psychological intervention remain the first line treatments. “Lifestyle Medicine” provides a nexus between public health promotion and clinical treatments, involving the application of environmental, behavioural, and psychological principles to enhance physical and mental wellbeing. This may also provide opportunities for general health promotion and potential prevention of depression. In this paper we provide a narrative discussion of the major components of Lifestyle Medicine, consisting of the evidence-based adoption of physical activity or exercise, dietary modification, adequate relaxation/sleep and social interaction, use of mindfulness-based meditation techniques, and the reduction of recreational substances such as nicotine, drugs, and alcohol. We also discuss other potential lifestyle factors that have a more nascent evidence base, such as environmental issues (e.g. urbanisation, and exposure to air, water, noise, and chemical pollution), and the increasing human interface with technology. Clinical considerations are also outlined. While data supports that some of these individual elements are modifiers of overall mental health, and in many cases depression, rigorous research needs to address the long-term application of Lifestyle Medicine for depression prevention and management. Critically, studies exploring lifestyle modification involving multiple lifestyle elements are needed. While the judicious use of medication and psychological techniques are still

  14. Sensitization of Candida albicans biofilms to fluconazole by terpenoids of plant origin.

    PubMed

    Doke, Sonali Kashinath; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Dhawale, Shashikant; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Infections associated with the biofilms of Candida albicans are a challenge to antifungal treatment. Combinatorial therapy involving plant molecules with antifungal drugs would be an effective complementary approach against drug-resistant Candida biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three bioactive terpenoids (carvacrol, eugenol and thymol) in combination with fluconazole against planktonic cells, biofilm development and mature biofilms of C. albicans. Activities of the selected molecules were tested using a microplate-based methodology, while their combinations with fluconazole were performed in a checkerboard format. Biofilms were quantitated by XTT-metabolic assay and confirmed by microscopic observations. Combinations of carvacrol and eugenol with fluconazole were found synergistic against planktonic growth of C. albicans, while that of thymol with fluconazole did not have any interaction. Biofilm development and mature biofilms were highly resistant to fluconazole, but susceptible to three terpenoids. Sensitization of cells by sub-inhibitory concentrations of carvacrol and eugenol resulted in prevention of biofilm formation at low fluconazole concentrations, i.e. 0.032 and 0.002 mg ml(-1), respectively. Addition of thymol could not potentiate activity of fluconazole against biofilm formation by C. albicans. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICI) for carvacrol-fluconazole and eugenol-fluconazole combinations for biofilm formation were 0.311 and 0.25, respectively. The FICI value of 1.003 indicated a status of indifference for the combination of thymol and fluconazole against biofilm formation. Eugenol and thymol combinations with fluconazole did not have useful interaction against mature biofilms of C. albicans, but the presence of 0.5 mg ml(-1) of carvacrol caused inhibition of mature biofilms at a significantly low concentration (i.e. 0.032 mg ml(-1)) of fluconazole. The study indicated that carvacrol and eugenol

  15. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could: 1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, 2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, 3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and 4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  16. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  17. In situ non-destructive measurement of biofilm thickness and topology in an interferometric optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Curtis; Suter, Jonathan D; Bonheyo, George; Addleman, Raymond Shane

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous and impact the environment, human health, dental hygiene, and a wide range of industrial processes. Biofilms are difficult to characterize when fully hydrated, especially in a non-destructive manner, because of their soft structure and water-like bulk properties. Herein a method of measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms of using white light interferometry is described. Using this technique, surface morphology, surface roughness, and biofilm thickness were measured over time without while the biofilm continued to grow. The thickness and surface topology of a P. putida biofilm were monitored growing from initial colonization to a mature biofilm. Measured thickness followed expected trends for bacterial growth. Surface roughness also increased over time and was a leading indicator of biofilm growth. PMID:26992071

  18. Active laser tweezers microrheometry of microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, N.; Slapar, V.; Boric, M.; Stopar, D.; Babič, D.; Poberaj, I.

    2010-08-01

    Microbial biofilms are present on biotic and abiotic surfaces and have a significant impact on many fields in industry, health care and technology. Thus, a better understanding of processes that lead to development of biofilms and their chemical and mechanical properties is needed. In the following paper we report the results of active laser tweezers microrheology study of optically inhomogeneous extracellular matrix secreted by Visbrio sp. bacteria. One particle and two particle active microrheology were used in experiments. Both methods exhibited high enough sensitivity to detect viscosity changes at early stages of bacterial growth. We also showed that both methods can be used in mature samples where optical inhomogeneity becomes significant.

  19. Lifestyles of plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roossinck, Marilyn J.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of well-characterized eukaryotic viruses are those that cause acute or chronic infections in humans and domestic plants and animals. However, asymptomatic persistent viruses have been described in animals, and are thought to be sources for emerging acute viruses. Although not previously described in these terms, there are also many viruses of plants that maintain a persistent lifestyle. They have been largely ignored because they do not generally cause disease. The persistent viruses in plants belong to the family Partitiviridae or the genus Endornavirus. These groups also have members that infect fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the partitivirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes suggests that these viruses have been transmitted between plants and fungi. Additional families of viruses traditionally thought to be fungal viruses are also found frequently in plants, and may represent a similar scenario of persistent lifestyles, and some acute or chronic viruses of crop plants may maintain a persistent lifestyle in wild plants. Persistent, chronic and acute lifestyles of plant viruses are contrasted from both a functional and evolutionary perspective, and the potential role of these lifestyles in host evolution is discussed. PMID:20478885

  20. Lifestyle modifications for GDM.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Atul; Ahuja, Kamlesh

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide more so in Southeast Asian countries like India and Pakistan. 1 GDM is associated with various adverse foetal and maternal effects. The management of GDM aims at reducing blood glucose to reduce maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Various studies have shown that lifestyle modifications are an important tool for reducing blood glucose levels in patients with GDM. Lifestyle modifications consist of dietary modifications and daily physical activity. Dietary modifications aim to achieve glycaemic control by providing adequate calories to the mother and foetus. Exercise is an obvious adjunct to dietary modifications for management of GDM. Therefore the purpose of this review is to summarize the benefits of lifestyle interventions in patients with GDM. PMID:27582149

  1. Health lifestyles in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Mollborn, Stefanie; James-Hawkins, Laurie; Lawrence, Elizabeth; Fomby, Paula

    2014-12-01

    This study integrates two important developments, the concept of health lifestyles (which has focused on adults and adolescents) and the increased attention to early childhood. We introduce the concept of children's health lifestyles, identifying differences from adult health lifestyles and articulating intergenerational transmission and socialization processes shaping children's health lifestyles. Using the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007; N ≈ 6,150), latent class analyses identify predominant health lifestyles among U.S. preschoolers. Five distinct empirical patterns representing health lifestyles emerge, two capturing low and medium levels of overall risk across domains and three capturing domain-specific risks. Social background predicts children's health lifestyles, but lower household resources often explain these relationships. Across kindergarten measures of cognition, behavior, and health, preschool health lifestyles predict children's development even after controlling for social disadvantage and concurrent household resources. Further research on health lifestyles throughout childhood is warranted. PMID:25413801

  2. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  3. Lifestyle, Nutrition and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Louis R.; Kang, Jae Hee

    2009-01-01

    The only proven strategy to prevent primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the use of ocular hypotensive therapy among people diagnosed with ocular hypertension. In this review, various modifiable lifestyle factors, such as exercise, diet and cigarette smoking, that may influence intraocular pressure and that have been studied in relation to the risk of developing POAG are discussed. Epidemiologic studies on lifestyle factors are few, and the current evidence suggests that there are no environmental factors that are clearly associated with POAG; however, a few factors merit further study. This review also outlines future directions for research into the primary prevention of POAG. PMID:19680048

  4. Three-Dimensional Stratification of Bacterial Biofilm Populations in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for Nitritation-Anammox

    PubMed Central

    Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers. PMID:24481066

  5. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda

  6. Bacterial Biofilms: Development, Dispersal, and Therapeutic Strategies in the Dawn of the Postantibiotic Era

    PubMed Central

    Kostakioti, Maria; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation constitutes an alternative lifestyle in which microorganisms adopt a multicellular behavior that facilitates and/or prolongs survival in diverse environmental niches. Biofilms form on biotic and abiotic surfaces both in the environment and in the healthcare setting. In hospital wards, the formation of biofilms on vents and medical equipment enables pathogens to persist as reservoirs that can readily spread to patients. Inside the host, biofilms allow pathogens to subvert innate immune defenses and are thus associated with long-term persistence. Here we provide a general review of the steps leading to biofilm formation on surfaces and within eukaryotic cells, highlighting several medically important pathogens, and discuss recent advances on novel strategies aimed at biofilm prevention and/or dissolution. PMID:23545571

  7. Child Lifestyles Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özpolat, Ahmet Ragip

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain the effectiveness of parental attitudes, socio-economic status and gender in determining the predictors of child lifestyles. The study group consists of three hundred and fifty (350) eighth grade students studying in the province of Erzincan during the 2012-2013 academic year; the students are selected by…

  8. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    and industrial settings. One of the defining features of a biofilm is its extracellular matrix. The matrix has a heterogeneous structure and is formed from a secretion of various biopolymers, including proteins, extracellular DNA, and polysaccharides. It is generally known to interact with biofilm cells, thus affecting cell physiology and cell-cell communication. Despite the fact that the matrix may comprise up to 90% of the biofilm dry weight, how the matrix properties affect biofilm structure, maturation, and interspecies interactions remain largely unexplored. This study reveals that bacteria can use specific extracellular polymers to modulate the physical properties of their microenvironment. This in turn impacts biofilm structure, differentiation, and interspecies interactions. PMID:25096883

  9. Biofilms: A microbial home

    PubMed Central

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  10. Pherotype Influences Biofilm Growth and Recombination in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Carrolo, Margarida; Pinto, Francisco Rodrigues; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário

    2014-01-01

    In Streptococcus pneumoniae the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), encoded by the comC gene, controls competence development and influences biofilm growth. We explored the influence of pherotype, defined by the two major comC allelic variants (comC1 and comC2), on biofilm development and recombination efficiency. Among isolates recovered from human infections those presenting comC1 show a higher capacity to form in vitro biofilms. The influence of pherotype on biofilm growth was confirmed by experiments with isogenic strains differing in their comC alleles. Biofilm architecture evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that strains carrying comC1 form biofilms that are denser and thicker than those carrying the comC2 allele. Isogenic strains carrying the comC1 allele yielded more transformants than those carrying the comC2 allele in both planktonic and biofilm growth. Transformation assays with comC knockout strains show that ComD1 needs lower doses of the signaling peptide to reach the same biological outcomes. In contrast to mixed planktonic growth, within mixed biofilms inter-pherotype genetic exchange is less frequent than that occurring between bacteria of the same pherotype. Since biofilms are a major bacterial lifestyle, these observations may explain the genetic differentiation between populations with different pherotypes reported previously. Considering that biofilms have been associated with colonization our results suggest that strains carrying the comC1 allele may be more transmissible and more efficient at persisting in carriage. Both effects may help explain the higher prevalence of the comC1 allele in the pneumococcal population. PMID:24646937

  11. Nanocapsules with glycerol monolaurate: Effects on Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Leonardo Quintana Soares; Santos, Cayane Genro; Vaucher, Rodrigo de Almeida; Raffin, Renata Platcheck; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans does not only occur in the free living planktonic form but also grows in surface-attached biofilm communities. Moreover, these biofilms appear to be the most common lifestyle and are involved in the majority of human Candida infections. Nanoparticles can be used as an alternative to conventional antimicrobial agents and can also act as carriers for antibiotics and other drugs. In view of this, the aim of the study was develop, characterize and verify the anti-biofilm potential of GML Nanocapsules against C. albicans. The GML Nanocapsules showed mean diameter of 193.2 nm, polydispersion index of 0.044, zeta potential of -23.3 mV and pH 6.32. The microdilution assay showed MIC of 15.5 μg mL(-1) to GML Nanocapsules and 31.25 μg mL(-1) to GML. The anti-biofilm assay showed the significantly reduction of biomass of C. albicans biofilm treated with GML Nanocapsules while the GML does not exhibit effect. The kinetic assay demonstrated that at 48 h, the GML Nanocapsules reduce 94% of formed biofilm. The positive results suggest the promisor alternative for this public health problem that is biofilm infections. PMID:27241236

  12. Molecular mechanisms involved in Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Biofilms are the predominant lifestyle of bacteria in natural environments, and they severely impact our societies in many different fashions. Therefore, biofilm formation is a topic of growing interest in microbiology, and different bacterial models are currently studied to better understand the molecular strategies that bacteria undergo to build biofilms. Among those, biofilms of the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus subtilis are commonly used for this purpose. Bacillus subtilis biofilms show remarkable architectural features that are a consequence of sophisticated programs of cellular specialization and cell-cell communication within the community. Many laboratories are trying to unravel the biological role of the morphological features of biofilms, as well as exploring the molecular basis underlying cellular differentiation. In this review, we present a general perspective of the current state of knowledge of biofilm formation in B. subtilis. In particular, a special emphasis is placed on summarizing the most recent discoveries in the field and integrating them into the general view of these truly sophisticated microbial communities. PMID:24909922

  13. Absolute Quantitation of Bacterial Biofilm Adhesion and Viscoelasticity by Microbead Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Peter C.Y.; Dutcher, John R.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the most prevalent mode of bacterial growth in nature. Adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play important roles at different stages of biofilm development. Following irreversible attachment of bacterial cells onto a surface, a biofilm can grow in which its matrix viscoelasticity helps to maintain structural integrity, determine stress resistance, and control ease of dispersion. In this study, a novel application of force spectroscopy was developed to characterize the surface adhesion and viscoelasticity of bacterial cells in biofilms. By performing microbead force spectroscopy with a closed-loop atomic force microscope, we accurately quantified these properties over a defined contact area. Using the model gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we observed that the adhesive and viscoelastic properties of an isogenic lipopolysaccharide mutant wapR biofilm were significantly different from those measured for the wild-type strain PAO1 biofilm. Moreover, biofilm maturation in either strain also led to prominent changes in adhesion and viscoelasticity. To minimize variability in force measurements resulting from experimental parameter changes, we developed standardized conditions for microbead force spectroscopy to enable meaningful comparison of data obtained in different experiments. Force plots measured under standard conditions showed that the adhesive pressures of PAO1 and wapR early biofilms were 34 ± 15 Pa and 332 ± 47 Pa, respectively, whereas those of PAO1 and wapR mature biofilms were 19 ± 7 Pa and 80 ± 22 Pa, respectively. Fitting of creep data to a Voigt Standard Linear Solid viscoelasticity model revealed that the instantaneous and delayed elastic moduli in P. aeruginosa were drastically reduced by lipopolysaccharide deficiency and biofilm maturation, whereas viscosity was decreased only for biofilm maturation. In conclusion, we have introduced a direct biophysical method for simultaneously quantifying

  14. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  15. Biofilm-Related Infections: Bridging the Gap between Clinical Management and Fundamental Aspects of Recalcitrance toward Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lebeaux, David; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Surface-associated microbial communities, called biofilms, are present in all environments. Although biofilms play an important positive role in a variety of ecosystems, they also have many negative effects, including biofilm-related infections in medical settings. The ability of pathogenic biofilms to survive in the presence of high concentrations of antibiotics is called “recalcitrance” and is a characteristic property of the biofilm lifestyle, leading to treatment failure and infection recurrence. This review presents our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of biofilm recalcitrance toward antibiotics and describes how recent progress has improved our capacity to design original and efficient strategies to prevent or eradicate biofilm-related infections. PMID:25184564

  16. Characterization of structures in biofilms formed by a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from soil

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microbial biofilms represent an incompletely understood, but fundamental mode of bacterial growth. These sessile communities typically consist of stratified, morphologically-distinct layers of extracellular material, where numerous metabolic processes occur simultaneously in close proximity. Limited reports on environmental isolates have revealed highly ordered, three-dimensional organization of the extracellular matrix, which may hold important implications for biofilm physiology in vivo. Results A Pseudomonas spp. isolated from a natural soil environment produced flocculent, nonmucoidal biofilms in vitro with unique structural features. These mature biofilms were made up of numerous viable bacteria, even after extended culture, and contained up to 50% of proteins and accumulated 3% (by dry weight) calcium, suggesting an important role for the divalent metal in biofilm formation. Ultrastructurally, the mature biofilms contained structural motifs consisting of dense, fibrillary clusters, nanofibers, and ordered, honeycomb-like chambers enveloped in thin sheets. Conclusion Mature biofilms contained living bacteria and were structurally, chemically, and physiologically heterogeneous. The principal architectural elements observed by electron microscopy may represent useful morphological clues for identifying bacterial biofilms in vivo. The complexity and reproducibility of the structural motifs observed in bacterial biofilms appear to be the result of organized assembly, suggesting that this environmental isolate may possess ecological advantages in its natural habitat. PMID:19460161

  17. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  18. The Formation of Biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Review of the Natural and Synthetic Compounds Interfering with Control Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium responsible for both acute and chronic infections. Beyond its natural resistance to many drugs, its ability to form biofilm, a complex biological system, renders ineffective the clearance by immune defense systems and antibiotherapy. The objective of this report is to provide an overview (i) on P. aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle cycle, (ii) on the main key actors relevant in the regulation of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa including QS systems, GacS/GacA and RetS/LadS two-component systems and C-di-GMP-dependent polysaccharides biosynthesis, and (iii) finally on reported natural and synthetic products that interfere with control mechanisms of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa without affecting directly bacterial viability. Concluding remarks focus on perspectives to consider biofilm lifestyle as a target for eradication of resistant infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25866808

  19. On growth and form of Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dervaux, Julien; Magniez, Juan Carmelo; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-12-01

    A general feature of mature biofilms is their highly heterogeneous architecture that partitions the microbial city into sectors with specific micro-environments. To understand how this heterogeneity arises, we have investigated the formation of a microbial community of the model organism Bacillus subtilis. We first show that the growth of macroscopic colonies is inhibited by the accumulation of ammoniacal by-products. By constraining biofilms to grow approximately as two-dimensional layers, we then find that the bacteria which differentiate to produce extracellular polymeric substances form tightly packed bacterial chains. In addition to the process of cellular chaining, the biomass stickiness also strongly hinders the reorganization of cells within the biofilm. Based on these observations, we then write a biomechanical model for the growth of the biofilm where the cell density is constant and the physical mechanism responsible for the spreading of the biomass is the pressure generated by the division of the bacteria. Besides reproducing the velocity field of the biomass across the biofilm, the model predicts that, although bacteria divide everywhere in the biofilm, fluctuations in the growth rates of the bacteria lead to a coarsening of the growing bacterial layer. This process of kinetic roughening ultimately leads to the formation of a rough biofilm surface exhibiting self-similar properties. Experimental measurements of the biofilm texture confirm these predictions. PMID:25485075

  20. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1) Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2) intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3) associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4) a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not. PMID:26371010

  1. On growth and form of Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dervaux, Julien; Magniez, Juan Carmelo; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-01-01

    A general feature of mature biofilms is their highly heterogeneous architecture that partitions the microbial city into sectors with specific micro-environments. To understand how this heterogeneity arises, we have investigated the formation of a microbial community of the model organism Bacillus subtilis. We first show that the growth of macroscopic colonies is inhibited by the accumulation of ammoniacal by-products. By constraining biofilms to grow approximately as two-dimensional layers, we then find that the bacteria which differentiate to produce extracellular polymeric substances form tightly packed bacterial chains. In addition to the process of cellular chaining, the biomass stickiness also strongly hinders the reorganization of cells within the biofilm. Based on these observations, we then write a biomechanical model for the growth of the biofilm where the cell density is constant and the physical mechanism responsible for the spreading of the biomass is the pressure generated by the division of the bacteria. Besides reproducing the velocity field of the biomass across the biofilm, the model predicts that, although bacteria divide everywhere in the biofilm, fluctuations in the growth rates of the bacteria lead to a coarsening of the growing bacterial layer. This process of kinetic roughening ultimately leads to the formation of a rough biofilm surface exhibiting self-similar properties. Experimental measurements of the biofilm texture confirm these predictions. PMID:25485075

  2. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1) Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2) intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3) associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4) a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not. PMID:26371010

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis isolates of similar RAPD genotype exhibit diversity in biofilm forming ability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered to grow in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic lung infections. Bacterial cell motility is one of the main factors that have been connected with P. aeruginosa adherence to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this investigation, we employed molecular and microscopic methods to determine the presence or absence of motility in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, and statistically correlated this with their biofilm forming ability in vitro. Results Our investigations revealed a wide diversity in the production, architecture and control of biofilm formation. Of 96 isolates, 49% possessed swimming motility, 27% twitching and 52% swarming motility, while 47% were non-motile. Microtitre plate assays for biofilm formation showed a range of biofilm formation ability from biofilm deficient phenotypes to those that formed very thick biofilms. A comparison of the motility and adherence properties of individual strains demonstrated that the presence of swimming and twitching motility positively affected biofilm biomass. Crucially, however, motility was not an absolute requirement for biofilm formation, as 30 non-motile isolates actually formed thick biofilms, and three motile isolates that had both flagella and type IV pili attached only weakly. In addition, CLSM analysis showed that biofilm-forming strains of P. aeruginosa were in fact capable of entrapping non-biofilm forming strains, such that these 'non-biofilm forming' cells could be observed as part of the mature biofilm architecture. Conclusions Clinical isolates that do not produce biofilms in the laboratory must have the ability to survive in the patient lung. We propose that a synergy exists between isolates in vivo, which allows "non biofilm-forming" isolates to be incorporated into the biofilm. Therefore, there is the potential for strains that are apparently non-biofilm forming in vitro to participate in biofilm-mediated pathogenesis in the CF lung. PMID:20141637

  4. [Stroke - lifestyle and environment].

    PubMed

    Gerischer, L M; Flöel, A; Endres, M

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modifications and environmental factors are important for stroke prevention and rehabilitation after stroke. The individual stroke risk may be modified by factors like physical activity, body weight and nutrition, special dietary supplements such as vitamins, smoking, consumption of tea, coffee and alcohol, psychological factors and by keeping a pet. The focus of this article lies on measures for stroke prevention. For certain topics, it also comments on factors that are important during rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:26105161

  5. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chusri, S.; Sompetch, K.; Mukdee, S.; Jansrisewangwong, S.; Srichai, T.; Maneenoon, K.; Limsuwan, S.; Voravuthikunchai, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E) could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63–5 μg/mL) could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL) and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL) for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:22919409

  6. Biofilm Formation by the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: Development and Parameters Affecting Surface Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is a bacterial fish pathogen that affects many freshwater species worldwide. The natural reservoir of this pathogen is unknown, but its resilience in closed aquaculture systems posits biofilm as the source of contagion for farmed fish. The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the dynamics of biofilm formation and morphology under static and flow conditions and (ii) to evaluate the effects of temperature, pH, salinity, hardness, and carbohydrates on biofilm formation. Nineteen F. columnare strains, including representatives of all of the defined genetic groups (genomovars), were compared in this study. The structure of biofilm was characterized by light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. F. columnare was able to attach to and colonize inert surfaces by producing biofilm. Surface colonization started within 6 h postinoculation, and microcolonies were observed within 24 h. Extracellular polysaccharide substances and water channels were observed in mature biofilms (24 to 48 h). A similar time course was observed when F. columnare formed biofilm in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions. The virulence potential of biofilm was confirmed by cutaneous inoculation of channel catfish fingerlings with mature biofilm. Several physicochemical parameters modulate attachment to surfaces, with the largest influence being exerted by hardness, salinity, and the presence of mannose. Maintenance of hardness and salinity values within certain ranges could prevent biofilm formation by F. columnare in aquaculture systems. PMID:23851087

  7. Metabolism of mineral-sorbed organic matter and microbial lifestyles in fluvial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Niederdorfer, Robert; Gernand, Anna; Veuger, Bart; Prommer, Judith; Mooshammer, Maria; Wanek, Wolfgang; Battin, Tom J.

    2016-02-01

    In fluvial ecosystems mineral erosion, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fluxes are linked via organomineral complexation, where dissolved organic molecules bind to mineral surfaces. Biofilms and suspended aggregates represent major aquatic microbial lifestyles whose relative importance changes predictably through fluvial networks. We tested how organomineral sorption affects aquatic microbial metabolism, using organomineral particles containing a mix of 13C, 15N-labeled amino acids. We traced 13C and 15N retention within biofilm and suspended aggregate biomass and its mineralization. Organomineral complexation restricted C and N retention within biofilms and aggregates and also their mineralization. This reduced the efficiency with which biofilms mineralize C and N by 30% and 6%. By contrast, organominerals reduced the C and N mineralization efficiency of suspended aggregates by 41% and 93%. Our findings show how organomineral complexation affects microbial C:N stoichiometry, potentially altering the biogeochemical fate of C and N within fluvial ecosystems.

  8. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are able to incorporate and enhance a pre-formed Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Castro, Joana; Machado, Daniela; Cerca, Nuno

    2016-04-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis is the most frequent microorganism found in bacterial vaginosis (BV), while Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis are amongst the most frequent pathogens found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). This study aimed to evaluate possible interactions between UTIs pathogens and G. vaginalis using an in vitro dual-species biofilm model. Our results showed that dual-species biofilms reached significantly higher bacterial concentration than monospecies biofilms. Moreover, visualization of dual-populations species in the biofilms, using the epifluorescence microscopy, revealed that all of the urogenital pathogens coexisted with G. vaginalis. In conclusion, our work demonstrates that uropathogens can incorporate into mature BV biofilms. PMID:26782142

  9. A method for growing a biofilm under low shear at the air-liquid interface using the drip flow biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Goeres, Darla M; Hamilton, Martin A; Beck, Nicholas A; Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli; Hilyard, Jackie D; Loetterle, Linda R; Lorenz, Lindsey A; Walker, Diane K; Stewart, Philip S

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes how to grow a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm under low fluid shear close to the air-liquid interface using the drip flow reactor (DFR). The DFR can model environments such as food-processing conveyor belts, catheters, lungs with cystic fibrosis and the oral cavity. The biofilm is established by operating the reactor in batch mode for 6 h. A mature biofilm forms as the reactor operates for an additional 48 h with a continuous flow of nutrients. During continuous flow, the biofilm experiences a low shear as the media drips onto a surface set at a 10 degrees angle. At the end of 54 h, biofilm accumulation is quantified by removing coupons from the reactor channels, rinsing the coupons to remove planktonic cells, scraping the biofilm from the coupon surface, disaggregating the clumps, then diluting and plating for viable cell enumeration. The entire procedure takes 13 h of active time that is distributed over 5 d. PMID:19528953

  10. Detection and quantification of bacterial biofilms combining high-frequency acoustic microscopy and targeted lipid microparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immuno-compromised patients such as those undergoing cancer chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections leading to biofilm matrix formation. This surrounding biofilm matrix acts as a diffusion barrier that binds up antibiotics and antibodies, promoting resistance to treatment. Developing non-invasive imaging methods that detect biofilm matrix in the clinic are needed. The use of ultrasound in conjunction with targeted ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) may provide detection of early stage biofilm matrix formation and facilitate optimal treatment. Results Ligand-targeted UCAs were investigated as a novel method for pre-clinical non-invasive molecular imaging of early and late stage biofilms. These agents were used to target, image and detect Staphylococcus aureus biofilm matrix in vitro. Binding efficacy was assessed on biofilm matrices with respect to their increasing biomass ranging from 3.126 × 103 ± 427 UCAs per mm2 of biofilm surface area within 12 h to 21.985 × 103 ± 855 per mm2 of biofilm matrix surface area at 96 h. High-frequency acoustic microscopy was used to ultrasonically detect targeted UCAs bound to a biofilm matrix and to assess biofilm matrix mechanoelastic physical properties. Acoustic impedance data demonstrated that biofilm matrices exhibit impedance values (1.9 MRayl) close to human tissue (1.35 - 1.85 MRayl for soft tissues). Moreover, the acoustic signature of mature biofilm matrices were evaluated in terms of integrated backscatter (0.0278 - 0.0848 mm-1 × sr-1) and acoustic attenuation (3.9 Np/mm for bound UCAs; 6.58 Np/mm for biofilm alone). Conclusions Early diagnosis of biofilm matrix formation is a challenge in treating cancer patients with infection-associated biofilms. We report for the first time a combined optical and acoustic evaluation of infectious biofilm matrices. We demonstrate that acoustic impedance of biofilms is similar to the impedance of human tissues, making in vivo imaging and detection of biofilm

  11. The role of bacterial biofilms in chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Acute infections caused by pathogenic bacteria have been studied extensively for well over 100 years. These infections killed millions of people in previous centuries, but they have been combated effectively by the development of modern vaccines, antibiotics and infection control measures. Most research into bacterial pathogenesis has focused on acute infections, but these diseases have now been supplemented by a new category of chronic infections caused by bacteria growing in slime-enclosed aggregates known as biofilms. Biofilm infections, such as pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic wounds, chronic otitis media and implant- and catheter-associated infections, affect millions of people in the developed world each year and many deaths occur as a consequence. In general, bacteria have two life forms during growth and proliferation. In one form, the bacteria exist as single, independent cells (planktonic) whereas in the other form, bacteria are organized into sessile aggregates. The latter form is commonly referred to as the biofilm growth phenotype. Acute infections are assumed to involve planktonic bacteria, which are generally treatable with antibiotics, although successful treatment depends on accurate and fast diagnosis. However, in cases where the bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often turns out to be untreatable and will develop into a chronic state. The important hallmarks of chronic biofilm-based infections are extreme resistance to antibiotics and many other conventional antimicrobial agents, and an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. In this thesis, I will assemble the current knowledge on biofilms with an emphasis on chronic infections, guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of these infections, before relating this to my previous research into the area of biofilms. I will present evidence to support a view that the biofilm lifestyle dominates chronic bacterial infections, where bacterial

  12. Biofilm activity and sludge characteristics affected by exogenous N-acyl homoserine lactones in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huizhi; He, Junguo; Liu, Jian; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    This study verified the effect of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) concentrations on mature biofilm systems. Three concentrations of an AHL mixture were used in the batch test. Introducing of 5nM AHLs significantly increased biofilm activity and increased sludge characteristics, which resulted in better pollutant removal performance, whereas exogenous 50nM and 500nM AHLs limited pollutant removal, especially COD and nitrogen removal. To further identify how exogenous signal molecular affects biofilm system nitrogen removal, analyzing of nitrifying bacteria through real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that these additional signal molecules affect nitrifying to total bacteria ratio. In addition, the running state of the system was stable during 15days of operation without an AHL dose, which suggests that the changes in the system due to AHL are irreversible. PMID:27030953

  13. Induction of Multidrug Resistance Mechanism in Escherichia coli Biofilms by Interplay between Tetracycline and Ampicillin Resistance Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    May, Thithiwat; Ito, Akinobu; Okabe, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms gain resistance to various antimicrobial agents, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes is thought to contribute to a biofilm-mediated antibiotic resistance. Here we showed the interplay between the tetracycline resistance efflux pump TetA(C) and the ampicillin resistance gene (blaTEM-1) in biofilms of Escherichia coli harboring pBR322 in the presence of the mixture of ampicillin and tetracycline. E. coli in the biofilms could obtain the high-level resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, penicillin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol during biofilm development and maturation as a result of the interplay between the marker genes on the plasmids, the increase of plasmid copy number, and consequently the induction of the efflux systems on the bacterial chromosome, especially the EmrY/K and EvgA/S pumps. In addition, we characterized the overexpression of the TetA(C) pump that contributed to osmotic stress response and was involved in the induction of capsular colanic acid production, promoting formation of mature biofilms. However, this investigated phenomenon was highly dependent on the addition of the subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotic mixture, and the biofilm resistance behavior was limited to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, marker genes on plasmids played an important role in both resistance of biofilm cells to antibiotics and in formation of mature biofilms, as they could trigger specific chromosomal resistance mechanisms to confer a high-level resistance during biofilm formation. PMID:19721076

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: Carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. Results The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function), energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545) were also detected in the extracellular fraction from

  15. Lifestyle and diet.

    PubMed

    Opie, Lionel H

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is widespread interest in many different diets. The best-known diets include the New Atkins diet in the USA, the Dukan diet in France, and in South Africa the Noakes diet. Two different approaches have emerged, one focusing on a life-long healthy lifestyle and the other emphasising weight loss. These are in fact complementary aims, as will be reviewed and reconciled. Furthermore, besides the dietary approach, there is a valid case for added drug therapy for selected lipid disorders with the use statins. In addition, new drugs are emerging that in the future might eventually considerably reduce the negative health impact of coronary artery disease. PMID:25629717

  16. Lifestyle and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun; Prince, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with a number of lifestyle factors, including nutritional factors such as intake of calcium, protein, dairy food, fruits and vegetables and vitamin D status, and behavioural factors such as physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption. Ensuring adequate calcium intake and vitamin D status and having regular weight-bearing physical activity throughout life are important for bone health and the prevention of osteoporosis and related fractures. Studies have shown that smoking and excessive alcohol intake have adverse effects on bone health and increase the risk of fracture. There is evidence suggesting that adequate protein intake and higher intake of fruits and vegetables are beneficial to bone health. PMID:25416958

  17. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria. PMID:27116468

  18. Modelling biofilm-induced formation damage and biocide treatment in subsurface geosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ezeuko, C C; Sen, A; Gates, I D

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm growth in subsurface porous media, and its treatment with biocides (antimicrobial agents), involves a complex interaction of biogeochemical processes which provide non-trivial mathematical modelling challenges. Although there are literature reports of mathematical models to evaluate biofilm tolerance to biocides, none of these models have investigated biocide treatment of biofilms growing in interconnected porous media with flow. In this paper, we present a numerical investigation using a pore network model of biofilm growth, formation damage and biocide treatment. The model includes three phases (aqueous, adsorbed biofilm, and solid matrix), a single growth-limiting nutrient and a single biocide dissolved in the water. Biofilm is assumed to contain a single species of microbe, in which each cell can be a viable persister, a viable non-persister, or non-viable (dead). Persisters describe small subpopulation of cells which are tolerant to biocide treatment. Biofilm tolerance to biocide treatment is regulated by persister cells and includes ‘innate’ and ‘biocide-induced’ factors. Simulations demonstrate that biofilm tolerance to biocides can increase with biofilm maturity, and that biocide treatment alone does not reverse biofilm-induced formation damage. Also, a successful application of biological permeability conformance treatment involving geologic layers with flow communication is more complicated than simply engineering the attachment of biofilm-forming cells at desired sites. PMID:23164434

  19. Bioinspired, dynamic, structured surfaces for biofilm prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Alexander K.

    Bacteria primarily exist in robust, surface-associated communities known as biofilms, ubiquitous in both natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms resist a wide range of biocidal treatments and pose persistent pathogenic threats. Treatment of adherent biofilm is difficult, costly, and, in medical systems such as catheters, frequently impossible. Adding to the challenge, we have discovered that biofilm can be both impenetrable to vapors and extremely nonwetting, repelling even low surface tension commercial antimicrobials. Our study shows multiple contributing factors, including biochemical components and multiscale reentrant topography. Reliant on surface chemistry, conventional strategies for preventing biofilm only transiently affect attachment and/or are environmentally toxic. In this work, we look to Nature's antifouling solutions, such as the dynamic spiny skin of the echinoderm, and we develop a versatile surface nanofabrication platform. Our benchtop approach unites soft lithography, electrodeposition, mold deformation, and material selection to enable many degrees of freedom—material, geometric, mechanical, dynamic—that can be programmed starting from a single master structure. The mechanical properties of the bio-inspired nanostructures, verified by AFM, are precisely and rationally tunable. We examine how synthetic dynamic nanostructured surfaces control the attachment of pathogenic biofilms. The parameters governing long-range patterning of bacteria on high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanoarrays are combinatorially elucidated, and we discover that sufficiently low effective stiffness of these HAR arrays mechanoselectively inhibits ˜40% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm attachment. Inspired by the active echinoderm skin, we design and fabricate externally actuated dynamic elastomer surfaces with active surface microtopography. We extract from a large parameter space the critical topographic length scales and actuation time scales for achieving

  20. Shifts in microbial community structure and function in light- and dark-grown biofilms driven by warming.

    PubMed

    Romaní, Anna M; Borrego, Carles M; Díaz-Villanueva, Verónica; Freixa, Anna; Gich, Frederic; Ylla, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Biofilms are dynamic players in biogeochemical cycling in running waters and are subjected to environmental stressors like those provoked by climate change. We investigated whether a 2°C increase in flowing water would affect prokaryotic community composition and heterotrophic metabolic activities of biofilms grown under light or dark conditions. Neither light nor temperature treatments were relevant for selecting a specific bacterial community at initial phases (7-day-old biofilms), but both variables affected the composition and function of mature biofilms (28-day-old). In dark-grown biofilms, changes in the prokaryotic community composition due to warming were mainly related to rotifer grazing, but no significant changes were observed in functional fingerprints. In light-grown biofilms, warming also affected protozoan densities, but its effect on prokaryotic density and composition was less evident. In contrast, heterotrophic metabolic activities in light-grown biofilms under warming showed a decrease in the functional diversity towards a specialized use of several carbohydrates. Results suggest that prokaryotes are functionally redundant in dark biofilms but functionally plastic in light biofilms. The more complex and self-serving light-grown biofilm determines a more buffered response to temperature than dark-grown biofilms. Despite the moderate increase in temperature of only 2°C, warming conditions drive significant changes in freshwater biofilms, which responded by finely tuning a complex network of interactions among microbial populations within the biofilm matrix. PMID:24552130

  1. Effect of Fluoride and Chlorhexidine Digluconate Mouthrinses on Plaque Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Per; Twetman, Svante; Kinnby, Bertil; Svensäter, Gunnel; Davies, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    Objective : To develop a model in which to investigate the architecture of plaque biofilms formed on enamel surfaces in vivo and to compare the effects of anti-microbial agents of relevance for caries on biofilm vitality. Materials and Methodology : Enamel discs mounted on healing abutments in the pre-molar region were worn by three subjects for 7 days. Control discs were removed before subjects rinsed with 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) or 0.2% sodium fluoride (NaF) for 1 minute. Biofilms were stained with Baclight Live/Dead and z-stacks of images created using confocal scanning laser micoscopy. The levels of vital and dead/damaged bacteria in the biofilms, assessed as the proportion of green and red pixels respectively, were analysed using ImageTrak® software. Results : The subjects showed individual differences in biofilm architecture. The thickness of the biofilms varied from 28-96µm although cell density was always the greatest in the middle layers. In control biofilms, the overall levels of vitality were high (71-98%) especially in the area closest to the enamel interface. Rinsing with either CHX or NaF caused a similar reduction in overall vitality. CHX exerted an effect throughout the biofilm, particularly on the surface of cell clusters whereas NaF caused cell damage/death mainly in the middle to lower biofilm layers. Conclusion : We describe a model that allows the formation of mature, undisturbed oral biofilms on human enamel surfaces in vivo and show that CHX and NaF have a similar effect on overall vitality but differ in their sites of action. PMID:25870718

  2. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  3. [Biofilms and public health].

    PubMed

    Choisy, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Micro-organisms do not always exist in planctonic forms (single cells or small groups). To survive, especially in limiting media, they may adhere to inert or living surfaces. This enables them to multiply within a community protected by an extracellular matrix, thus forming a biofilm which protects them from antimicrobials. Biofilms have many potential consequences for public health. Some are positive, such as the commensal biofilms that protect against pathogenic bacteria, while environmental biofilms may be a source of outbreaks of respiratory or gastrointestinal diseases or infections associated with implanted medical devices. Respiratory tract infection can be caused by aerosols of fragmented biofilms growing in warm humid conditions (air cooling towers, hot springs, showers, etc.). Digestive tract infection can arise from biofilms formed during food manufacturing or packaging processes. Colonized implanted medical devices can lead to sepsis. This article examines the role of central venous catheters, taking into account the surgical site. In vivo studies show that the source of catheter infection may be exogenous or endogenous, while in vitro studies of biofilms show that ablation of the device is the best solution. Prevention is difficult, as biofilm formation is multifactorial. Physical and biological knowledge of biofilms may help to limit their formation and growth. PMID:22375373

  4. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extracellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multicellular behavior. PMID:26377849

  5. Lifestyle and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2010-11-01

    The main behavioural and environmental risk factors for cancer mortality in the world are related to diet and physical inactivity, use of addictive substances, sexual and reproductive health, exposure to air pollution and use of contaminated needles. The population attributable fraction for all cancer sites worldwide considering the joint effect of these factors is about 35% (34 % for low-and middle-income countries and 37% for high-income countries). Seventy-one percent(71%) of lung cancer deaths are caused by tobacco use (lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death globally). The combined effects of tobacco use, low fruit and vegetable intake, urban air pollution, and indoor smoke from household use of solid fuels cause 76% of lung cancer deaths. Exposure to these behavioural and environmental factors is preventable; modifications in lifestyle could have a large impact in reducing the cancer burden worldwide (WHO, 2009). The evidence of association between lifestyle factors and cancer, as well as the main international recommendations for prevention are briefly reviewed and commented upon here. PMID:21139406

  6. Nickel Promotes Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli K-12 Strains That Produce Curli▿

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Claire; Briandet, Romain; Jubelin, Gregory; Lejeune, Philippe; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Rodrigue, Agnès; Dorel, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    The survival of bacteria exposed to toxic compounds is a multifactorial phenomenon, involving well-known molecular mechanisms of resistance but also less-well-understood mechanisms of tolerance that need to be clarified. In particular, the contribution of biofilm formation to survival in the presence of toxic compounds, such as nickel, was investigated in this study. We found that a subinhibitory concentration of nickel leads Escherichia coli bacteria to change their lifestyle, developing biofilm structures rather than growing as free-floating cells. Interestingly, whereas nickel and magnesium both alter the global cell surface charge, only nickel promotes biofilm formation in our system. Genetic evidence indicates that biofilm formation induced by nickel is mediated by the transcriptional induction of the adhesive curli-encoding genes. Biofilm formation induced by nickel does not rely on efflux mechanisms using the RcnA pump, as these require a higher concentration of nickel to be activated. Our results demonstrate that the nickel-induced biofilm formation in E. coli is an adaptational process, occurring through a transcriptional effect on genes coding for adherence structures. The biofilm lifestyle is obviously a selective advantage in the presence of nickel, but the means by which it improves bacterial survival needs to be investigated. PMID:19168650

  7. Antimicrobial Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (VIS + wIRA) Alters In Situ Oral Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmad, A.; Bucher, M.; Anderson, A. C.; Tennert, C.; Hellwig, E.; Wittmer, A.; Vach, K.; Karygianni, L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing attention has been paid to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in dentistry. Changing the microbial composition of initial and mature oral biofilm by aPDT using visible light plus water-filtered infrared-A wavelengths (VIS + wIRA) has not yet been investigated. Moreover, most aPDT studies have been conducted on planktonic bacterial cultures. Therefore, in the present clinical study we cultivated initial and mature oral biofilms in six healthy volunteers for 2 hours or 3 days, respectively. The biofilms were treated with aPDT using VIS+wIRA (200 mW cm-2), toluidine blue (TB) and chlorine e6 (Ce6) for 5 minutes. Chlorhexidine treated biofilm samples served as positive controls, while untreated biofilms served as negative controls. After aPDT treatment the colony forming units (CFU) of the biofilm samples were quantified, and the surviving bacteria were isolated in pure cultures and identified using MALDI-TOF, biochemical tests and 16S rDNA-sequencing. aPDT killed more than 99.9% of the initial viable bacterial count and 95% of the mature oral biofilm in situ, independent of the photosensitizer. The number of surviving bacterial species was highly reduced to 6 (TB) and 4 (Ce6) in the treated initial oral biofilm compared to the 20 different species of the untreated biofilm. The proportions of surviving bacterial species were also changed after TB- and Ce6-mediated aPDT of the mature oral biofilm, resulting in a shift in the microbial composition of the treated biofilm compared to that of the control biofilm. In conclusion, aPDT using VIS + wIRA showed a remarkable potential to eradicate both initial and mature oral biofilms, and also to markedly alter the remaining biofilm. This encourages the clinical use of aPDT with VIS + wIRA for the treatment of periimplantitis and periodontitis. PMID:26162100

  8. Antimicrobial Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (VIS + wIRA) Alters In Situ Oral Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, A; Bucher, M; Anderson, A C; Tennert, C; Hellwig, E; Wittmer, A; Vach, K; Karygianni, L

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing attention has been paid to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in dentistry. Changing the microbial composition of initial and mature oral biofilm by aPDT using visible light plus water-filtered infrared-A wavelengths (VIS + wIRA) has not yet been investigated. Moreover, most aPDT studies have been conducted on planktonic bacterial cultures. Therefore, in the present clinical study we cultivated initial and mature oral biofilms in six healthy volunteers for 2 hours or 3 days, respectively. The biofilms were treated with aPDT using VIS+wIRA (200 mW cm(-2)), toluidine blue (TB) and chlorine e6 (Ce6) for 5 minutes. Chlorhexidine treated biofilm samples served as positive controls, while untreated biofilms served as negative controls. After aPDT treatment the colony forming units (CFU) of the biofilm samples were quantified, and the surviving bacteria were isolated in pure cultures and identified using MALDI-TOF, biochemical tests and 16S rDNA-sequencing. aPDT killed more than 99.9% of the initial viable bacterial count and 95% of the mature oral biofilm in situ, independent of the photosensitizer. The number of surviving bacterial species was highly reduced to 6 (TB) and 4 (Ce6) in the treated initial oral biofilm compared to the 20 different species of the untreated biofilm. The proportions of surviving bacterial species were also changed after TB- and Ce6-mediated aPDT of the mature oral biofilm, resulting in a shift in the microbial composition of the treated biofilm compared to that of the control biofilm. In conclusion, aPDT using VIS + wIRA showed a remarkable potential to eradicate both initial and mature oral biofilms, and also to markedly alter the remaining biofilm. This encourages the clinical use of aPDT with VIS + wIRA for the treatment of periimplantitis and periodontitis. PMID:26162100

  9. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health. PMID:25176247

  10. In vitro characterization of Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes biofilms.

    PubMed

    Costa-Orlandi, C B; Sardi, J C O; Santos, C T; Fusco-Almeida, A M; Mendes-Giannini, M J S

    2014-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi responsible for a disease known as dermatophytosis. Biofilms are sessile microbial communities surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with increased resistance to antimicrobial agents and host defenses. This paper describes, for the first time, the characteristics of Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes biofilms. Biofilm formation was analyzed by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as well as by staining with crystal violet and safranin. Metabolic activity was determined using the XTT reduction assay. Both species were able to form mature biofilms in 72 h. T. rubrum biofilm produced more biomass and EPS and was denser than T. mentagrophytes biofilm. The SEM results demonstrated a coordinated network of hyphae in all directions, embedded within EPS in some areas. Research and characterization of biofilms formed by dermatophytes may contribute to the search of new drugs for the treatment of these mycoses and might inform future revisions with respect to the dose and duration of treatment of currently available antifungals. PMID:24856309

  11. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  12. Mechanical properties of the superficial biofilm layer determine the architecture of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; Liang, Yang; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-29

    Cells in biofilms sense and interact with their environment through the extracellular matrix. The physicochemical properties of the matrix, particularly at the biofilm-environment interface, determine how cells respond to changing conditions. In this study we describe the application of atomic force microscopy and confocal imaging to probe in situ the mechanical properties of these interfacial regions and to elucidate how key matrix components can contribute to the physical sensing by the cells. We describe how the Young's modulus of microcolonies differs according to the size and morphology of microcolonies, as well as the flow rate. The Young's modulus increased as a function of microcolony diameter, which was correlated with the production of the polysaccharide Psl at later stages of maturation for hemispherical or mushroom shaped microcolonies. The Young's modulus of the periphery of the biofilm colony was however independent of the hydrodynamic shear. The morphology of the microcolonies also influenced interfacial or peripheral stiffness. Microcolonies with a diffuse morphology had a lower Young's modulus than isolated, circular ones and this phenomenon was due to a deficiency of Psl. In this way, changes in the specific polysaccharide components imbue the biofilm with distinct physical properties that may modulate the way in which bacteria perceive or respond to their environment. Further, the physical properties of the polysaccharides are closely linked to the specific architectures formed by the developing biofilm. PMID:27273453

  13. In-situ biofilm characterization in membrane systems using Optical Coherence Tomography: formation, structure, detachment and impact of flux change.

    PubMed

    Dreszer, C; Wexler, A D; Drusová, S; Overdijk, T; Zwijnenburg, A; Flemming, H-C; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-12-15

    Biofouling causes performance loss in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operation for process and drinking water production. The development of biofilm formation, structure and detachment was studied in-situ, non-destructively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in direct relation with the hydraulic biofilm resistance and membrane performance parameters: transmembrane pressure drop (TMP) and feed-channel pressure drop (FCP). The objective was to evaluate the suitability of OCT for biofouling studies, applying a membrane biofouling test cell operated at constant crossflow velocity (0.1 m s(-1)) and permeate flux (20 L m(-2)h(-1)). In time, the biofilm thickness on the membrane increased continuously causing a decline in membrane performance. Local biofilm detachment was observed at the biofilm-membrane interface. A mature biofilm was subjected to permeate flux variation (20 to 60 to 20 L m(-2)h(-1)). An increase in permeate flux caused a decrease in biofilm thickness and an increase in biofilm resistance, indicating biofilm compaction. Restoring the original permeate flux did not completely restore the original biofilm parameters: After elevated flux operation the biofilm thickness was reduced to 75% and the hydraulic resistance increased to 116% of the original values. Therefore, after a temporarily permeate flux increase the impact of the biofilm on membrane performance was stronger. OCT imaging of the biofilm with increased permeate flux revealed that the biofilm became compacted, lost internal voids, and became more dense. Therefore, membrane performance losses were not only related to biofilm thickness but also to the internal biofilm structure, e.g. caused by changes in pressure. Optical Coherence Tomography proved to be a suitable tool for quantitative in-situ biofilm thickness and morphology studies which can be carried out non-destructively and in real-time in transparent membrane biofouling monitors. PMID:25282092

  14. Synergistic activity between an antimicrobial polyacrylamide and daptomycin versus Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Siala, Wafi; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Taresco, Vincenzo; Piozzi, Antonella; Francolini, Iolanda

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance of bacteria growing in biofilms compared to their planktonic counterparts enhances the difficulty to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. In the last decade, combination antibiotic therapy has emerged as an attractive strategy for treating biofilm infections, even if in most of tolerant biofilms the optimal combinations are still unknown. In this study, an antimicrobial cationic polyacrylamide was used in combination with daptomycin or moxifloxacin against mature biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates to examine a possible improvement of the antibiofilm activity of the two antibiotics. The polymer did not have an effect on moxifloxacin but significantly increased the antibiofilm efficacy of daptomycin. These findings are presumably related to the different mechanism of action of the two drugs. In summary, our data highlighted the ability of polycations to increase daptomycin antibiofilm activity providing a potential strategy to eradicate biofilms in industrial or medical settings. PMID:27154750

  15. Bacterial Adhesion: Seen Any Good Biofilms Lately?

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, W. Michael

    2002-01-01

    The process of surface adhesion and biofilm development is a survival strategy employed by virtually all bacteria and refined over millions of years. This process is designed to anchor microorganisms in a nutritionally advantageous environment and to permit their escape to greener pastures when essential growth factors have been exhausted. Bacterial attachment to a surface can be divided into several distinct phases, including primary and reversible adhesion, secondary and irreversible adhesion, and biofilm formation. Each of these phases is ultimately controlled by the expression of one or more gene products. Ultrastructurally, the mature bacterial biofilm resembles an underwater coral reef containing pyramidal or mushroom-shaped microcolonies of organisms embedded within an extracellular glycocalyx, with channels and cavities to allow the exchange of nutrients and waste. The biofilm protects its inhabitants from predators, dehydration, biocides, and other environmental extremes while regulating population growth and diversity through primitive cell signals. From a physiological standpoint, surface-bound bacteria behave quite differently from their planktonic counterparts. Recognizing that bacteria naturally occur as surface-bound and often polymicrobic communities, the practice of performing antimicrobial susceptibility tests using pure cultures and in a planktonic growth mode should be questioned. That this model does not reflect conditions found in nature might help explain the difficulties encountered in the management and treatment of biomedical implant infections. PMID:11932228

  16. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  17. The Advent of Lifestyle Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Byung-Il; Kong, In Deok

    2013-01-01

    The fact that lifestyle is closely associated with the pathogenesis of chronic diseases has been known for more than three decades. Smoking may cause lung cancer, and a lifestyle of fast food consumption and little exercise can cause metabolic diseases. The importance of lifestyle changes in terms of a new medical paradigm to solve chronic diseases is becoming popular in modern times. Lifestyle medicine is a medicine based on personal lifestyle. To apply it to patients and ordinary people, physicians have to cooperate with experts in many fields such as nutrition, exercise, psychology, etc. In addition, patients must be partners in the treatment rather than passive recipients. The advent of lifestyle medicine has been caused by changes in disease patterns. In the past, acute diseases like infectious disease were prevalent; however, in the late 20th century, chronic diseases such as metabolic diseases, cancers, neurological disease, etc. increased in occurrence. As lifestyle is closely related with these diseases, the attitudes toward medicine need to be changed. Recently, the concept of “Lifestyle Medicine” was proposed, and we predict it will be an important field in future medicine. PMID:26064831

  18. Building Wellness Lifestyles: Counselor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Larry; Ketcham, Michael

    A camp program is described which reflects the Young Men's Christian Association's traditional commitment to the development of the whole person, introducing the development of a "wellness" lifestyle. A wellness lifestyle is described as one that involves living fully and abundantly while recognizing and assuming responsibility for one's own…

  19. Teaching Aerobic Lifestyles: New Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; Iammarino, Nicholas K.

    1982-01-01

    New approaches to teaching aerobic life-styles in secondary schools are suggested, focusing on three components: (1) the psychological benefits of aerobic activity; (2) alternative aerobic programs at nonschool locations; and (3) the development of an aerobics curriculum to help maintain an active life-style after graduation. (JN)

  20. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  1. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli. PMID:27555592

  2. Patterns of virulence gene expression differ between biofilm and tissue communities of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Caparon, Michael G

    2005-09-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to form biofilm-like bacterial communities during infection of soft tissue has suggested that the capacity to produce biofilm may be important for pathogenesis. To examine this relationship, a panel of mutants was evaluated for their ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces in several assays. Several established virulence factors were crucial for biofilm formation, including the M protein, required for initial cell-surface interactions, and the hyaluronic acid capsule, required for subsequent maturation into a three-dimensional structure. Mutants lacking the transcription regulators Mga and CovR (CsrR) also failed to form biofilm. Comparison of transcriptional profiles revealed differential regulation of approximately 25% of the genome upon adaptation to biofilm. During infection of zebrafish, several virulence factors (notably cysteine protease and streptokinase) were regulated in a biofilm-like manner. However, the overall profile of virulence factor expression indicated that tissue communities have a pattern of gene expression different from biofilm. Taken together, these data show that while biofilm and tissue communities have many characteristics in common, that biofilm reproduces only a subset of the myriad cues used by tissue communities for regulation of virulence. PMID:16135223

  3. Architectural transitions in Vibrio cholerae biofilms at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Knut; Dunkel, Jörn; Nadell, Carey D; van Teeffelen, Sven; Grnja, Ivan; Wingreen, Ned S; Stone, Howard A; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial species colonize surfaces and form dense 3D structures, known as biofilms, which are highly tolerant to antibiotics and constitute one of the major forms of bacterial biomass on Earth. Bacterial biofilms display remarkable changes during their development from initial attachment to maturity, yet the cellular architecture that gives rise to collective biofilm morphology during growth is largely unknown. Here, we use high-resolution optical microscopy to image all individual cells in Vibrio cholerae biofilms at different stages of development, including colonies that range in size from 2 to 4,500 cells. From these data, we extracted the precise 3D cellular arrangements, cell shapes, sizes, and global morphological features during biofilm growth on submerged glass substrates under flow. We discovered several critical transitions of the internal and external biofilm architectures that separate the major phases of V. cholerae biofilm growth. Optical imaging of biofilms with single-cell resolution provides a new window into biofilm formation that will prove invaluable to understanding the mechanics underlying biofilm development. PMID:26933214

  4. Studying the effect of alginate overproduction on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeesun; Cui, Yidan; Oh, Yoo Jin; Park, Ja Ryeong; Jo, William; Cho, You-Hee; Park, Sungsu

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most important pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and forms biofilms in the lung. P. aeruginosa strains isolated from the lungs of the patients have a mucoid phenotype overproducing alginate. The phenotype forms highly structured biofilms which are more resistant to antibiotics than biofilms formed by its nonmucoid phenotype. Conversion to the alginate-overproducing phenotype occurs through a mutation in rpoN gene in the strains. The biofilms formed by the alginate-overproducing phenotype are highly sticky, but their stickiness has not been measured. Herein, the stickiness of biofilms formed by the rpoN mutant was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the biofilms formed by the slowly-growing rpoN mutant were more structured than those formed by the wild-type strain. AFM analysis indicated that the biofilms formed by the rpoN mutant were stickier than those formed by the wild type strain during the attachment and establishment stages, but the difference in stickiness was greatly reduced during the maturation stage possibly due to the cytosolic contents released from dead cells in the biofilms formed by the wild type. These results suggest that the alginate overproduction greatly affects the physical properties (topography and stickiness) of P. aeruginosa biofilms as well as the physiological properties (cell death and growth) of the bacterial cells inside the biofilms. PMID:22121590

  5. Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial growth exhibited a one-peak maximum with a long tail, corresponding to the highest biofilm development. This peak was not observed for the non-biofilm-forming strain, demonstrating that the intensity of the electrical activity was not linearly related to the bacterial density, but was instead correlated with biofilm formation. Results obtained indicate that the analysis of the spatio-temporal electrical activity of bacteria during biofilm formation can open a new frontier in the study of the emergence of collective microbial behaviour. PMID:25392401

  6. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

    PubMed Central

    Ali Mohammed, Marwan Mansoor; Nerland, Audun H.; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Bakken, Vidar

    2013-01-01

    Background Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM), often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) and proteinase K. Methods F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA) was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions. PMID:23372876

  7. The effects of different seeding ratios on nitrification performance and biofilm formation in marine recirculating aquaculture system biofilter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songming; Shen, Jiazheng; Ruan, Yunjie; Guo, Xishan; Ye, Zhangying; Deng, Yale; Shi, Mingming

    2016-07-01

    Rapid start-up of biofilter is essential for intensive marine recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) production. This study evaluated the nitrifying biofilm formation using mature biofilm as an inoculum to accelerate the process in RAS practice. The effects of inoculation ratios (0-15 %) on the reactor performance and biofilm structure were investigated. Complete nitrification was achieved rapidly in reactors with inoculated mature biofilm (even in 32 days when 15 % seeding ratio was applied). However, the growth of target biofilm on blank carrier was affected by the mature biofilm inoculated through substrate competition. The analysis of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and nitrification rates confirmed the divergence of biofilm cultivation among reactors. Besides, three N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) were found in the process, which might regulate the activities of biofilm. Multivariate analysis based on non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) also indicated the great roles of AHLs and substrate supply which might fundamentally determine varied cultivation performance on target biofilm. PMID:27068911

  8. Effects of environmental parameters on the dual-species biofilms formed by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Ralstonia insidiosa, a strong biofilm producer isolated from a fresh-cut produce processing plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nancy T; Nou, Xiangwu; Bauchan, Gary R; Murphy, Charles; Lefcourt, Alan M; Shelton, Daniel R; Lo, Y Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria resident to food processing facilities are a food safety concern due to the potential of biofilms to harbor foodborne bacterial pathogens. When cultured together, Ralstonia insidiosa, a strong biofilm former frequently isolated from produce processing environments, has been shown to promote the incorporation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into dual-species biofilms. In this study, interactions between E. coli O157:H7 and R. insidiosa were examined under different incubating conditions. Under static culture conditions, the incorporation of E. coli O157:H7 into biofilms with R. insidiosa was not significantly affected by either low incubating temperature (10°C) or by limited nutrient availability. Greater enhancement of E. coli O157:H7 incorporation in dual-species biofilms was observed by using a continuous culture system with limited nutrient availability. Under the continuous culture conditions used in this study, E coli O157:H7 cells showed a strong tendency of colocalizing with R. insidiosa on a glass surface at the early stage of biofilm formation. As the biofilms matured, E coli O157:H7 cells were mostly found at the bottom layer of the dual-species biofilms, suggesting an effective protection by R. insidiosa in the mature biofilms. PMID:25581186

  9. Changes in tolerance to herbicide toxicity throughout development stages of phototrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Paule, A; Roubeix, V; Lauga, B; Duran, R; Delmas, F; Paul, E; Rols, J L

    2013-11-15

    Ecotoxicological experiments have been performed in laboratory-scale microcosms to investigate the sensitivity of phototrophic biofilm communities to the alachlor herbicide, in relation to the stages of phototrophic biofilm maturation (age of the phototrophic biofilms) and physical structure (intact biofilm versus recolonization). The phototrophic biofilms were initially cultivated on artificial supports in a prototype rotating annular bioreactor (RAB) with Taylor-Couette type flow under constant operating conditions. Biofilms were collected after 1.6 and 4.4 weeks of culture providing biofilms with different maturation levels, and then exposed to nominal initial alachlor concentration of 10 μg L(-1) in either intact or recolonized biofilms for 15 days in microcosms (mean time-weighted average concentration - TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)). At the end of the exposure period, alachlor effects were monitored by a combination of biomass descriptors (ash-free dry mass - AFDM, chlorophyll a), structural molecular fingerprinting (T-RFLP), carbon utilization spectra (Biolog) and diatom species composition. We found significant effects that in terms of AFDM, alachlor inhibited growth of the intact phototrophic biofilms. No effect of alachlor was observed on diatom composition or functional and structural properties of the bacterial community regardless of whether they were intact or recolonized. The intact three-dimensional structure of the biofilm did not appear to confer protection from the effects of alachlor. Bacterial community structure and biomass level of 4.4 weeks - intact phototrophic biofilms were significantly influenced by the biofilm maturation processes rather than alachlor exposure. The diatom communities which were largely composed of mobile and colonizer life-form populations were not affected by alachlor. This study showed that the effect of alachlor (at initial concentration of 10 μg L(-1) or mean TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)) is mainly limited to

  10. Differences in the sensitivity of benthic microalgae to Zn and Cd regarding biofilm development and exposure history

    SciTech Connect

    Ivorra, N.; Bremer, S.; Guasch, H.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2000-05-01

    Microbenthic biofilms are consortia of autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms imbedded in a matrix of polymers and particles. As biofilms develop, internal cycling of materials might predominate, and dependence on external conditions is reduced. The mature biofilm structure may act as a barrier against deleterious effects of metals on microphytobenthos. To validate this hypothesis, biofilms from two lowland streams near the Dutch-Belgian border, the extremely Zn- and Cd-polluted Eindergatloop and the relatively clean Keersop in the River Dommel subsystem, were collected after 2 weeks (young) and 6 weeks (old) of colonization. Young and old biofilms from both sites were subsequently exposed in the laboratory to Zn and Cd concentrations mimicking that of the heavily polluted stream for a period of 2 weeks. Diatom composition, chlorophyll a, total carbohydrates. Zn and Cd concentrations, minimal chlorophyll fluorescence, and photon yield demonstrated more pronounced metal effects on the young than on the old reference biofilms. In contrast, colonization time had less effect on the overall response of the extremely polluted biofilms. Therefore, biofilms in an early colonization stage are more vulnerable than mature biofilms to metal exposure, and exposure history determines the response of biofilms to metals.

  11. Role of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in biofilm formation and regulation of CPS production by quorum-sensing in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jo; Kim, Jeong-A; Hwang, Won; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides, such as lipopolysaccharide and loosely associated exopolysaccharides, are essential for Vibrio vulnificus to form biofilms. The role of another major component of the V. vulnificus extracellular matrix, capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which contributes to colony opacity, has been characterized in biofilm formation. A CPS-deficient mutant, whose wbpP gene encoding UDP-GlcNAc C4-epimerase was knocked out, formed significantly more biofilm than wild type, due to increased hydrophobicity of the cell surface, adherence to abiotic surfaces and cell aggregation. To elucidate the direct effect of CPS on biofilm structure, extracted CPS and a CPS-degrading enzyme, α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, were added in biofilm assays, resulting in reduction and increment of biofilm sizes respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that CPS play a critical role in determining biofilm size by restricting continual growth of mature biofilms. Since CPS is required after maturation, CPS biosynthesis should be controlled in a cell density-dependent manner, e.g. by quorum-sensing (QS) regulation. Analysing transcription of the CPS gene cluster revealed that it was activated by SmcR, a QS master regulator, via binding to the upstream region of the cluster. Therefore, CPS was produced when biofilm cell density reached high enough to turn on QS regulation and limited biofilms to appropriate sizes. PMID:24102883

  12. The cabABC Operon Essential for Biofilm and Rugose Colony Development in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hwan; Jo, Youmi; Jang, Song Yee; Kwon, Haenaem; Irie, Yasuhiko; Parsek, Matthew R; Kim, Myung Hee; Choi, Sang Ho

    2015-09-01

    A transcriptome analysis identified Vibrio vulnificus cabABC genes which were preferentially expressed in biofilms. The cabABC genes were transcribed as a single operon. The cabA gene was induced by elevated 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) and encoded a calcium-binding protein CabA. Comparison of the biofilms produced by the cabA mutant and its parent strain JN111 in microtiter plates using crystal-violet staining demonstrated that CabA contributed to biofilm formation in a calcium-dependent manner under elevated c-di-GMP conditions. Genetic and biochemical analyses revealed that CabA was secreted to the cell exterior through functional CabB and CabC, distributed throughout the biofilm matrix, and produced as the biofilm matured. These results, together with the observation that CabA also contributes to the development of rugose colony morphology, indicated that CabA is a matrix-associated protein required for maturation, rather than adhesion involved in the initial attachment, of biofilms. Microscopic comparison of the structure of biofilms produced by JN111 and the cabA mutant demonstrated that CabA is an extracellular matrix component essential for the development of the mature biofilm structures in flow cells and on oyster shells. Exogenously providing purified CabA restored the biofilm- and rugose colony-forming abilities of the cabA mutant when calcium was available. Circular dichroism and size exclusion analyses revealed that calcium binding induces CabA conformational changes which may lead to multimerization. Extracellular complementation experiments revealed that CabA can assemble a functional matrix only when exopolysaccharides coexist. Consequently, the combined results suggested that CabA is a structural protein of the extracellular matrix and multimerizes to a conformation functional in building robust biofilms, which may render V. vulnificus to survive in hostile environments and reach a concentrated infective dose. PMID:26406498

  13. The cabABC Operon Essential for Biofilm and Rugose Colony Development in Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hwan; Jo, Youmi; Jang, Song Yee; Kwon, Haenaem; Irie, Yasuhiko; Parsek, Matthew R.; Kim, Myung Hee; Choi, Sang Ho

    2015-01-01

    A transcriptome analysis identified Vibrio vulnificus cabABC genes which were preferentially expressed in biofilms. The cabABC genes were transcribed as a single operon. The cabA gene was induced by elevated 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) and encoded a calcium-binding protein CabA. Comparison of the biofilms produced by the cabA mutant and its parent strain JN111 in microtiter plates using crystal-violet staining demonstrated that CabA contributed to biofilm formation in a calcium-dependent manner under elevated c-di-GMP conditions. Genetic and biochemical analyses revealed that CabA was secreted to the cell exterior through functional CabB and CabC, distributed throughout the biofilm matrix, and produced as the biofilm matured. These results, together with the observation that CabA also contributes to the development of rugose colony morphology, indicated that CabA is a matrix-associated protein required for maturation, rather than adhesion involved in the initial attachment, of biofilms. Microscopic comparison of the structure of biofilms produced by JN111 and the cabA mutant demonstrated that CabA is an extracellular matrix component essential for the development of the mature biofilm structures in flow cells and on oyster shells. Exogenously providing purified CabA restored the biofilm- and rugose colony-forming abilities of the cabA mutant when calcium was available. Circular dichroism and size exclusion analyses revealed that calcium binding induces CabA conformational changes which may lead to multimerization. Extracellular complementation experiments revealed that CabA can assemble a functional matrix only when exopolysaccharides coexist. Consequently, the combined results suggested that CabA is a structural protein of the extracellular matrix and multimerizes to a conformation functional in building robust biofilms, which may render V. vulnificus to survive in hostile environments and reach a concentrated infective dose. PMID:26406498

  14. Effects of Green Tea Compound Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Infection and Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Vidigal, Pedrina G.; Müsken, Mathias; Becker, Katrin A.; Häussler, Susanne; Wingender, Jost; Steinmann, Eike; Kehrmann, Jan; Gulbins, Erich; Buer, Jan; Rath, Peter Michael; Steinmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro and in vivo activities of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), a green tea component, against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Sm) isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In vitro effects of EGCg and the antibiotic colistin (COL) on growth inhibition, survival, and also against young and mature biofilms of S. maltophilia were determined. Qualitative and quantitative changes on the biofilms were assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Further, in vivo effects of nebulized EGCg in C57BL/6 and Cftr mutant mice during acute Sm lung infection were evaluated. Subinhibitory concentrations of EGCg significantly reduced not only biofilm formation, but also the quantity of viable cells in young and mature biofilms. CLSM showed that EGCg-exposed biofilms exhibited either a change in total biofilm biovolume or an increase of the fraction of dead cells contained within the biofilm in a dose depended manner. Sm infected wild-type and Cftr mutant mice treated with 1,024 mg/L EGCg by inhalation exhibited significantly lower bacterial counts than those undergoing no treatment or treated with COL. EGCg displayed promising inhibitory and anti-biofilm properties against CF Sm isolates in vitro and significantly reduced Sm bacterial counts in an acute infection model with wild type and CF mice. This natural compound may represent a novel therapeutic agent against Sm infection in CF. PMID:24690894

  15. Effects of green tea compound epigallocatechin-3-gallate against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, Pedrina G; Müsken, Mathias; Becker, Katrin A; Häussler, Susanne; Wingender, Jost; Steinmann, Eike; Kehrmann, Jan; Gulbins, Erich; Buer, Jan; Rath, Peter Michael; Steinmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro and in vivo activities of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), a green tea component, against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (Sm) isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In vitro effects of EGCg and the antibiotic colistin (COL) on growth inhibition, survival, and also against young and mature biofilms of S. maltophilia were determined. Qualitative and quantitative changes on the biofilms were assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Further, in vivo effects of nebulized EGCg in C57BL/6 and Cftr mutant mice during acute Sm lung infection were evaluated. Subinhibitory concentrations of EGCg significantly reduced not only biofilm formation, but also the quantity of viable cells in young and mature biofilms. CLSM showed that EGCg-exposed biofilms exhibited either a change in total biofilm biovolume or an increase of the fraction of dead cells contained within the biofilm in a dose depended manner. Sm infected wild-type and Cftr mutant mice treated with 1,024 mg/L EGCg by inhalation exhibited significantly lower bacterial counts than those undergoing no treatment or treated with COL. EGCg displayed promising inhibitory and anti-biofilm properties against CF Sm isolates in vitro and significantly reduced Sm bacterial counts in an acute infection model with wild type and CF mice. This natural compound may represent a novel therapeutic agent against Sm infection in CF. PMID:24690894

  16. Systematic Exploration of Natural and Synthetic Flavonoids for the Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Manner, Suvi; Skogman, Malena; Goeres, Darla; Vuorela, Pia; Fallarero, Adyary

    2013-01-01

    When single-cell (or suspended) bacteria switch into the biofilm lifestyle, they become less susceptible to antimicrobials, imposing the need for anti-biofilms research. Flavonoids are among the most extensively studied natural compounds with an unprecedented amount of bioactivity claims. Most studies focus on the antibacterial effects against suspended cells; fewer reports have researched their anti-biofilm properties. Here, a high throughput phenotypic platform was utilized to screen for the inhibitory activity of 500 flavonoids, including natural and synthetic derivatives, against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Since discrepancies among results from earlier antibacterial studies on flavonoids had been noted, the current study aimed to minimize sources of variations. After the first screen, flavonoids were classified as inactive (443), moderately active (47) or highly active (10). Further, exclusion criteria combining bioactivity and selectivity identified two synthetic flavans as the most promising. The body of data reported here serves three main purposes. First, it offers an improved methodological workflow for anti-biofilm screens of chemical libraries taking into account the (many times ignored) connections between anti-biofilm and antibacterial properties. This is particularly relevant for the study of flavonoids and other natural products. Second, it provides a large and freely available anti-biofilm bioactivity dataset that expands the knowledge on flavonoids and paves the way for future structure-activity relationship studies and structural optimizations. Finally, it identifies two new flavans that can successfully act on biofilms, as well as on suspended bacteria and represent more feasible antibacterial candidates. PMID:24071942

  17. Personalized Lifestyle Medicine: Relevance for Nutrition and Lifestyle Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Minich, Deanna M.; Bland, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Public health recommendations for lifestyle modification, including diet and physical activity, have been widely disseminated for the prevention and treatment of disease. These guidelines are intended for the overall population without significant consideration for the individual with respect to one's genes and environment. Personalized lifestyle medicine is a newly developed term that refers to an approach to medicine in which an individual's health metrics from point-of-care diagnostics are used to develop lifestyle medicine-oriented therapeutic strategies for improving individual health outcomes in managing chronic disease. Examples of the application of personalized lifestyle medicine to patient care include the identification of genetic variants through laboratory tests and/or functional biomarkers for the purpose of designing patient-specific prescriptions for diet, exercise, stress, and environment. Personalized lifestyle medicine can provide solutions to chronic health problems by harnessing innovative and evolving technologies based on recent discoveries in genomics, epigenetics, systems biology, life and behavioral sciences, and diagnostics and clinical medicine. A comprehensive, personalized approach to medicine is required to promote the safety of therapeutics and reduce the cost of chronic disease. Personalized lifestyle medicine may provide a novel means of addressing a patient's health by empowering them with information they need to regain control of their health. PMID:23878520

  18. Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Results Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two different approaches: (1) A short-reads, high-coverage approach by Illumina sequencing to characterize the gene activity repertoire of the microbial community during biofilm development; (2) A long-reads, lower-coverage approach by pyrosequencing to determine the taxonomic identity of the active microbiome before and after a meal ingestion. The high-coverage approach allowed us to analyze over 398 million reads, revealing that microbial communities are individual-specific and no bacterial species was detected as key player at any time during biofilm formation. We could identify some gene expression patterns characteristic for early and mature oral biofilms. The transcriptomic profile of several adhesion genes was confirmed through qPCR by measuring expression of fimbriae-associated genes. In addition to the specific set of gene functions overexpressed in early and mature oral biofilms, as detected through the short-reads dataset, the long-reads approach detected specific changes when comparing the metatranscriptome of the same individual before and after a meal, which can narrow down the list of organisms responsible for acid production and therefore potentially involved in dental caries. Conclusions The bacteria changing activity during biofilm formation and after meal ingestion were person-specific. Interestingly, some individuals showed extreme homeostasis with virtually no changes in the active bacterial population after food ingestion, suggesting the presence of a microbial

  19. Application of Dynamic Speckle Techniques in Monitoring Biofilms Drying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enes, Adilson M.; Júnior, Roberto A. Braga; Dal Fabbro, Inácio M.; da Silva, Washington A.; Pereira, Joelma

    2008-04-01

    Horticultural crops exhibit losses far greater than grains in Brazil which are associated to inappropriate maturation, mechanical bruising, infestation by microorganisms, wilting, etc. Appropriate packing prevents excessive mass loss associated to transpiration as well as to respiration, by controlling gas exchanging with outside environment. Common packing materials are identified as plastic films, waxes and biofilms. Although research developed with edible films and biopolymers has increased during last years to attend the food industry demands, avoiding environmental problems, little efforts have been reported on biofilm physical properties investigations. These properties, as drying time and biofilm interactions with environment are considered of basic importance. This research work aimed to contribute to development of a methodology to evaluate yucca (Maniot vulgaris) based biofilms drying time supported by a biospeckle technique. Biospeckle is a phenomenon generated by a laser beam scattered on a dynamic active surface, producing a time varying pattern which is proportional to the surface activity level. By capturing and processing the biospeckle image it is possible to attribute a numerical quantity to the surface bioactivity. Materials exhibiting high moisture content will also show high activity, which will support the drying time determination. Tests were set by placing biofilm samples on polyetilen plates and further submitted to laser exposition at four hours interval to capture the pattern images, generating the Intensities Dispersion Modulus. Results indicates that proposed methodology is applicable in determining biofilm drying time as well as vapor losses to environment.

  20. Anti-biofilm properties of the antimicrobial peptide temporin 1Tb and its ability, in combination with EDTA, to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on silicone catheters.

    PubMed

    Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Grassi, Lucia; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Bombardelli, Silvia; Medici, Chiara; Brancatisano, Franca Lisa; Esin, Semih; Batoni, Giovanna

    2016-08-01

    In search of new antimicrobials with anti-biofilm potential, in the present study activity of the frog-skin derived antimicrobial peptide temporin 1Tb (TB) against Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms was investigated. A striking ability of TB to kill both forming and mature S. epidermidis biofilms was observed, especially when the peptide was combined with cysteine or EDTA, respectively. Kinetics studies demonstrated that the combination TB/EDTA was active against mature biofilms already after 2-4-h exposure. A double 4-h exposure of biofilms to TB/EDTA further increased the therapeutic potential of the same combination. Of note, TB/EDTA was able to eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms formed in vitro on silicone catheters. At eradicating concentrations, TB/EDTA did not cause hemolysis of human erythrocytes. The results shed light on the anti-biofilm properties of TB and suggest a possible application of the peptide in the lock therapy of catheters infected with S. epidermidis. PMID:27351824

  1. A Combined Pharmacodynamic Quantitative and Qualitative Model Reveals the Potent Activity of Daptomycin and Delafloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Julia; Siala, Wafi; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are associated with persistence of Staphylococcus aureus infections and therapeutic failures. Our aim was to set up a pharmacodynamic model comparing antibiotic activities against biofilms and examining in parallel their effects on viability and biofilm mass. Biofilms of S. aureus ATCC 25923 (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus [MSSA]) or ATCC 33591 (methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]) were obtained by culture in 96-well plates for 6 h/24 h. Antibiotic activities were assessed after 24/48 h of exposure to concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 512 times the MIC. Biofilm mass and bacterial viability were quantified using crystal violet and the redox indicator resazurin. Biofilms stained with Live/Dead probes were observed by using confocal microscopy. Concentration-effect curves fitted sigmoidal regressions, with a 50% reduction toward both matrix and viability obtained at sub-MIC or low multiples of MICs against young biofilms for all antibiotics tested. Against mature biofilms, maximal efficacies and potencies were reduced, with none of the antibiotics being able to completely destroy the matrix. Delafloxacin and daptomycin were the most potent, reducing viability by more than 50% at clinically achievable concentrations against both strains, as well as reducing biofilm depth, as observed in confocal microscopy. Rifampin, tigecycline, and moxifloxacin were effective against mature MRSA biofilms, while oxacillin demonstrated activity against MSSA. Fusidic acid, vancomycin, and linezolid were less potent overall. Antibiotic activity depends on biofilm maturity and bacterial strain. The pharmacodynamic model developed allows ranking of antibiotics with respect to efficacy and potency at clinically achievable concentrations and highlights the potential utility of daptomycin and delafloxacin for the treatment of biofilm-related infections. PMID:23571532

  2. "Fitness Freaks": A Healthier Lifestyle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balding, John

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which the lifestyles of young people are affected by health and fitness considerations. An analysis of data from 3253 Health Related Behavior Questionnaires, completed by fourth-year secondary school pupils is presented. (IAH)

  3. Liquid Flow in Biofilm Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stoodley, Paul; deBeer, Dirk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    1994-01-01

    A model biofilm consisting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was developed to study the relationships between structural heterogeneity and hydrodynamics. Local fluid velocity in the biofilm system was measured by a noninvasive method of particle image velocimetry, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Velocity profiles were measured in conduit and porous medium reactors in the presence and absence of biofilm. Liquid flow was observed within biofilm channels; simultaneous imaging of the biofilm allowed the liquid velocity to be related to the physical structure of the biofilm. Images PMID:16349345

  4. Single particle tracking reveals spatial and dynamic organization of the Escherichia coli biofilm matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjiniuk, Alona; Billings, Nicole; Nance, Elizabeth; Hanes, Justin; Ribbeck, Katharina; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2014-08-01

    Biofilms are communities of surface-adherent bacteria surrounded by secreted polymers known as the extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilms are harmful in many industries, and thus it is of great interest to understand their mechanical properties and structure to determine ways to destabilize them. By performing single particle tracking with beads of varying surface functionalization it was found that charge interactions play a key role in mediating mobility within biofilms. With a combination of single particle tracking and microrheological concepts, it was found that Escherichia coli biofilms display height dependent charge density that evolves over time. Statistical analyses of bead trajectories and confocal microscopy showed inter-connecting micron scale channels that penetrate throughout the biofilm, which may be important for nutrient transfer through the system. This methodology provides significant insight into a particular biofilm system and can be applied to many others to provide comparisons of biofilm structure. The elucidation of structure provides evidence for the permeability of biofilms to microscale objects, and the ability of a biofilm to mature and change properties over time.

  5. Invasibility of resident biofilms by allochthonous communities in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Micol; Bernet, Nicolas; Harmand, Jérôme; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Milferstedt, Kim

    2015-09-15

    Invasion of non-native species can drastically affect the community composition and diversity of engineered and natural ecosystems, biofilms included. In this study, a molecular community fingerprinting method was used to monitor the putative establishment and colonization of allochthonous consortia in resident multi-species biofilms. To do this, biofilms inoculated with tap water or activated sludge were grown for 10 days in bubble column reactors W1 and W2, and S, respectively, before being exposed to non-native microbial consortia. These consortia consisted of fresh activated sludge suspensions for the biofilms inoculated with tap water (reactors W1 and W2) and of transplanted mature tap water biofilm for the activated sludge biofilm (reactor S). The introduction of virgin, unoccupied coupons into W1 and W2 enabled us to additionally investigate the competition for new resources (space) among the resident biofilm and the allochthonous consortia. CE-SSCP revealed that after the invasion event changes were mostly observed in the abundance of the dominant species in the native biofilms rather than their composition. This suggests that the resident communities within a bioreactor immediately outcompete the allochthonous microbes and shape the microbial community assemblage on both new coupons and already colonized surfaces for the short term. However, with time, latent members of the allochthonous community might grow up affecting the diversity and composition of the original biofilms. PMID:26072021

  6. Inhibition of Vibrio biofilm formation by a marine actinomycete strain A66.

    PubMed

    You, JianLan; Xue, XiaoLi; Cao, LiXiang; Lu, Xin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, LiXin; Zhou, ShiNing

    2007-10-01

    China remains by far the largest aquaculture producer in the world. However, biofilms formed by pathogenic Vibrio strains pose serious problems to marine aquaculture. To provide a strategy for biofilm prevention, control, and eradication, extracts from 88 marine actinomycetes were screened. Thirty-five inhibited the biofilm formation of Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio anguillarum at a concentration of 2.5% (v/v). Thirty-three of the actinomycete extracts dispersed the mature biofilm. Six extracts inhibited the quorum-sensing system of V. harveyi by attenuating the signal molecules N-acylated homoserine lactones' activity. Strain A66, which was identified as Streptomyces albus, both attenuated the biofilms and inhibited their quorum-sensing system. It is suggested that strain A66 is a promising candidate to be used in future marine aquaculture. PMID:17624525

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Ciprofloxacin-Nitroxide Conjugates as Anti-Biofilm Agents.

    PubMed

    Verderosa, Anthony D; Mansour, Sarah C; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Fairfull-Smith, Kathryn E

    2016-01-01

    As bacterial biofilms are often refractory to conventional antimicrobials, the need for alternative and/or novel strategies for the treatment of biofilm related infections has become of paramount importance. Herein, we report the synthesis of novel hybrid molecules comprised of two different hindered nitroxides linked to the piperazinyl secondary amine of ciprofloxacin via a tertiary amine linker achieved utilising reductive amination. The corresponding methoxyamine derivatives were prepared alongside their radical-containing counterparts as controls. Subsequent biological evaluation of the hybrid compounds on preformed P. aeruginosa flow cell biofilms divulged significant dispersal and eradication abilities for ciprofloxacin-nitroxide hybrid compound 10 (up to 95% eradication of mature biofilms at 40 μM). Importantly, these hybrids represent the first dual-action antimicrobial-nitroxide agents, which harness the dispersal properties of the nitroxide moiety to circumvent the well-known resistance of biofilms to treatment with antimicrobial agents. PMID:27355936

  8. Investigations into Monochloramine Biofilm Penetration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed by direct b...

  9. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  10. Miltefosine is effective against Candida albicans and Fusarium oxysporum nail biofilms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Machado Vila, Taissa Vieira; Sousa Quintanilha, Natália; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-11-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal nail infection that represents ∼50 % of all nail disease cases worldwide. Clinical treatment with standard antifungals frequently requires long-term systemic therapy to avoid chronic disease. Onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophyte moulds, such as Fusarium spp., and yeasts, such as Candida spp., is particularly difficult to treat, possibly due to the formation of drug-resistant fungal biofilms on affected areas. Here, we show that the alkylphospholipid miltefosine, used clinically against leishmaniasis and cutaneous breast metastases, has potent activity against biofilms of Fusarium oxysporum and Candida albicans formed on human nail fragments in vitro. Miltefosine activity was compared with that of commercially available antifungals in the treatment of biofilms at two distinct developmental phases: formation and maturation (pre-formed biofilms). Drug activity towards biofilms formed on nail fragments and on microplate surfaces (microdilution assays) was evaluated using XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assays, and drug effects on fingernail biofilms were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For F. oxysporum, miltefosine at 8 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 93%, whilst 256 μg ml- 1 reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed nail biofilms by 93%. Treatment with miltefosine at 1000 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 89% and reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed C. albicans biofilms by 99%. SEM analyses of biofilms formed on fingernail fragments showed a clear reduction in biofilm biomass after miltefosine treatment, in agreement with XTT results. Our results show that miltefosine has potential as a therapeutic agent against onychomycosis and should be considered for in vivo efficacy studies, especially in topical formulations for refractory disease treatment. PMID:26404553

  11. Pentacyclic triterpenes combined with ciprofloxacin help to eradicate the biofilm formed in vitro by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wojnicz, Dorota; Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota; Kicia, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Ciprofloxacin is commonly used in clinical practice for the treatment of recurrent urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli. However, very often these recurrent infections are due to a failure in a complete eradication of the microorganisms colonizing the urinary tract, especially in catheterized patients. To enhance the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against biofilm-forming uropathogenic E. coli (UPECs), we examined its effect in combination with two pentacyclic triterpenes – asiatic and ursolic acids. Methods: The anti-biofilm activity of ciprofloxacin and pentacyclic triterpenes - asiatic acid (AA) and ursolic acid (UA), as well as their synergistic effect were tested on two types of surfaces - polystyrene microtiter plates and silicone catheters. It was investigated using the time-killing and biofilm assays. Results: Anti-biofilm activity of ciprofloxacin was not observed on microtiter plates or on the catheters. Ciprofloxacin combined with ursolic acid inhibited the biofilm formation on microtitre plates. This mixture, however, did not express such a strong activity against the synthesis of biofilm on the surface of catheters. Ciprofloxacin combined with asiatic acid had very weak inhibiting effect on the synthesis of biofilm mass on microtitre plates as well as on the catheters. Despite this, both mixtures – ciprofloxacin and asiatic acid, as well as ciprofloxacin and ursolic acid, exhibited strong and significant impact on the eradication of mature biofilm (P < 0.05). Interpretation & conclusions: Although ciprofloxacin is recommended in the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by UPECs, but its efficacy is arguable. Subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin did not inhibit the formation of biofilm. Pentacyclic triterpenes used in combination with ciprofloxacin enhanced its anti-biofilm effectiveness. However, this anti-biofilm activity was found to depend on the type of surface on which biofilm was

  12. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  13. Telomeres, lifestyle, cancer, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Masood A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review There has been growing evidence that lifestyle factors may affect the health and lifespan of an individual by affecting telomere length. The purpose of this review was to highlight the importance of telomeres in human health and aging and to summarize possible lifestyle factors that may affect health and longevity by altering the rate of telomere shortening. Recent findings Recent studies indicate that telomere length, which can be affected by various lifestyle factors, can affect the pace of aging and onset of age-associated diseases. Summary Telomere length shortens with age. Progressive shortening of telomeres leads to senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of somatic cells, affecting the health and lifespan of an individual. Shorter telomeres have been associated with increased incidence of diseases and poor survival. The rate of telomere shortening can be either increased or decreased by specific lifestyle factors. Better choice of diet and activities has great potential to reduce the rate of telomere shortening or at least prevent excessive telomere attrition, leading to delayed onset of age-associated diseases and increased lifespan. This review highlights the role of telomeres in aging and describes the lifestyle factors which may affect telomeres, human health, and aging. PMID:21102320

  14. Pronounced Metabolic Changes in Adaptation to Biofilm Growth by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Raymond N.; Skipp, Paul; Jefferies, Johanna; Clarke, Stuart C.; Faust, Saul N.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae accounts for a significant global burden of morbidity and mortality and biofilm development is increasingly recognised as important for colonization and infection. Analysis of protein expression patterns during biofilm development may therefore provide valuable insights to the understanding of pneumococcal persistence strategies and to improve vaccines. iTRAQ (isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification), a high-throughput gel-free proteomic approach which allows high resolution quantitative comparisons of protein profiles between multiple phenotypes, was used to interrogate planktonic and biofilm growth in a clinical serotype 14 strain. Comparative analyses of protein expression between log-phase planktonic and 1-day and 7-day biofilm cultures representing nascent and late phase biofilm growth were carried out. Overall, 244 proteins were identified, of which >80% were differentially expressed during biofilm development. Quantitatively and qualitatively, metabolic regulation appeared to play a central role in the adaptation from the planktonic to biofilm phenotype. Pneumococci adapted to biofilm growth by decreasing enzymes involved in the glycolytic pathway, as well as proteins involved in translation, transcription, and virulence. In contrast, proteins with a role in pyruvate, carbohydrate, and arginine metabolism were significantly increased during biofilm development. Downregulation of glycolytic and translational proteins suggests that pneumococcus adopts a covert phenotype whilst adapting to an adherent lifestyle, while utilization of alternative metabolic pathways highlights the resourcefulness of pneumococcus to facilitate survival in diverse environmental conditions. These metabolic proteins, conserved across both the planktonic and biofilm phenotypes, may also represent target candidates for future vaccine development and treatment strategies. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001182. PMID

  15. The effect of carbon subsidies on marine planktonic niche partitioning and recruitment during biofilm assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Hall, Edward K.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of resource availability on planktonic and biofilm microbial community membership is poorly understood. Heterotrophic bacteria derive some to all of their organic carbon (C) from photoautotrophs while simultaneously competing with photoautotrophs for inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus (P) or nitrogen (N). Therefore, C inputs have the potential to shift the competitive balance of aquatic microbial communities by increasing the resource space available to heterotrophs (more C) while decreasing the resource space available to photoautotrophs (less mineral nutrients due to increased competition from heterotrophs). To test how resource dynamics affect membership of planktonic communities and assembly of biofilm communities we amended a series of flow-through mesocosms with C to alter the availability of C among treatments. Each mesocosm was fed with unfiltered seawater and incubated with sterilized microscope slides as surfaces for biofilm formation. The highest C treatment had the highest planktonic heterotroph abundance, lowest planktonic photoautotroph abundance, and highest biofilm biomass. We surveyed bacterial 16S rRNA genes and plastid 23S rRNA genes to characterize biofilm and planktonic community membership and structure. Regardless of resource additions, biofilm communities had higher alpha diversity than planktonic communities in all mesocosms. Heterotrophic plankton communities were distinct from heterotrophic biofilm communities in all but the highest C treatment where heterotrophic plankton and biofilm communities resembled each other after 17 days. Unlike the heterotrophs, photoautotrophic plankton communities were different than photoautotrophic biofilm communities in composition in all treatments including the highest C treatment. Our results suggest that although resource amendments affect community membership and structure, microbial lifestyle (biofilm vs. planktonic) has a stronger influence on community composition. PMID:26236289

  16. A 3D numerical study of antimicrobial persistence in heterogeneous multi-species biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    We develop a 3D hydrodynamic model to investigate the mechanism of antimicrobial persistence in a multi-species oral biofilm and its recovery after being treated by bisbiguanide chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX). In addition to the hydrodynamic transport in the spatially heterogeneous biofilm, the model also includes mechanisms of solvent-biomass interaction, bacterial phenotype conversion, and bacteria-drug interaction. A numerical solver for the model is developed using a second order numerical scheme in 3D space and time and implemented on GPUs for high-performance computing. The model is calibrated against a set of experimental data obtained using confocal laser scan microscopy (CLSM) on multi-species oral biofilms, where a quantitative agreement is reached. Our numerical results reveal that quorum sensing molecules and growth factors in this model are instrumental in biofilm formation and recovery after the antimicrobial treatment. In particular, we show that (i) young biofilms are more susceptible to the antimicrobial treatment than the mature ones, (ii) this phenomenon is strongly correlated with volume fractions of the persister and EPS in the biofilm being treated. This suggests that antimicrobial treatment should be best administered to biofilms earlier before they mature to produce a thick protective EPS layer. In addition, the numerical study also indicates that an antimicrobial effect can be achieved should a proper mechanism be devised to minimize the conversion of susceptible bacteria to persisters during and even after the treatment. PMID:26739374

  17. Secret lifestyles of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Hui, Sun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Asiegbu, Frederick O.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has a long history as an excellent model for genetic, cellular, and biochemical research. Although this fungus is known as a saprotroph, it normally appears on burned vegetations or trees after forest fires. However, due to a lack of experimental evidence, the nature of its association with living plants remains enigmatic. Here we report that Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a host plant for N. crassa. The endophytic lifestyle of N. crassa was found in its interaction with Scots pine. Moreover, the fungus can switch to a pathogenic state when its balanced interaction with the host is disrupted. Our data reveal previously unknown lifestyles of N. crassa, which are likely controlled by both environmental and host factors. Switching among the endophytic, pathogenic, and saprotrophic lifestyles confers upon fungi phenotypic plasticity in adapting to changing environments and drives the evolution of fungi and associated plants. PMID:24875794

  18. Secret lifestyles of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Hui, Sun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Asiegbu, Frederick O; Valkonen, Jari P T; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has a long history as an excellent model for genetic, cellular, and biochemical research. Although this fungus is known as a saprotroph, it normally appears on burned vegetations or trees after forest fires. However, due to a lack of experimental evidence, the nature of its association with living plants remains enigmatic. Here we report that Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a host plant for N. crassa. The endophytic lifestyle of N. crassa was found in its interaction with Scots pine. Moreover, the fungus can switch to a pathogenic state when its balanced interaction with the host is disrupted. Our data reveal previously unknown lifestyles of N. crassa, which are likely controlled by both environmental and host factors. Switching among the endophytic, pathogenic, and saprotrophic lifestyles confers upon fungi phenotypic plasticity in adapting to changing environments and drives the evolution of fungi and associated plants. PMID:24875794

  19. Migraine and lifestyle in childhood.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Gerardo; Villani, Veronica; d'Onofrio, Florindo; Russo, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequently reported somatic complaints in childhood, with a negative impact on health-related quality of life. The incidence of migraine in childhood has substantially increased over the past 30 years, probably due to both increased awareness of the disease and lifestyle changes in this age group. Indeed, several conditions have been identified as risk factors for migraine in childhood. Amongst these, dysfunctional family situation, the regular consumption of alcohol, caffeine ingestion, low level of physical activity, physical or emotional abuse, bullying by peers, unfair treatment in school and insufficient leisure time seem to play a critical role. Nevertheless, there are only few studies about the association between migraine and lifestyle in childhood, due to previous observations specifically focused on "headache" in children. In this brief review, we will concentrate upon recent studies aimed to explore migraine and lifestyle risk factors in childhood. PMID:26017522

  20. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS), encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic determinants and

  1. Biofilm in endodontics: A review.

    PubMed

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms' formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  2. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  3. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range.

    PubMed

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  4. A three-phase in-vitro system for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion and biofilm formation upon hydrogel contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly associated with contact lens (CL) -related eye infections, for which bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation upon hydrogel CLs is a specific risk factor. Whilst P. aeruginosa has been widely used as a model organism for initial biofilm formation on CLs, in-vitro models that closely reproduce in-vivo conditions have rarely been presented. Results In the current investigation, a novel in-vitro biofilm model for studying the adherence of P. aeruginosa to hydrogel CLs was established. Nutritional and interfacial conditions similar to those in the eye of a CL wearer were created through the involvement of a solid:liquid and a solid:air interface, shear forces and a complex artificial tear fluid. Bioburdens varied depending on the CL material and biofilm maturation occurred after 72 h incubation. Whilst a range of biofilm morphologies were visualised including dispersed and adherent bacterial cells, aggregates and colonies embedded in extracellular polymer substances (EPS), EPS fibres, mushroom-like formations, and crystalline structures, a compact and heterogeneous biofilm morphology predominated on all CL materials. Conclusions In order to better understand the process of biofilm formation on CLs and to test the efficacy of CL care solutions, representative in-vitro biofilm models are required. Here, we present a three-phase biofilm model that simulates the environment in the eye of a CL wearer and thus generates biofilms which resemble those commonly observed in-situ. PMID:21062489

  5. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  6. Candida tropicalis from veterinary and human sources shows similar in vitro hemolytic activity, antifungal biofilm susceptibility and pathogenesis against Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales de; Evangelista, Antônio José de Jesus; Serpa, Rosana; Silva, Aline Lobão da; Aguiar, Felipe Rodrigues Magalhães de; Pereira, Vandbergue Santos; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro Aquino; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2016-08-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemolytic activity and biofilm antifungal susceptibility of veterinary and human Candida tropicalis strains, as well as their pathogenesis against Caenorhabditis elegans. Twenty veterinary isolates and 20 human clinical isolates of C. tropicalis were used. The strains were evaluated for their hemolytic activity and biofilm production. Biofilm susceptibility to itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin was assessed using broth microdilution assay. The in vivo evaluation of strain pathogenicity was investigated using the nematode C. elegans. Hemolytic factor was observed in 95% of the strains and 97.5% of the isolates showed ability to form biofilm. Caspofungin and amphotericin B showed better results than azole antifungals against mature biofilms. Paradoxical effect on mature biofilm metabolic activity was observed at elevated concentrations of caspofungin (8-64μg/mL). Azole antifungals were not able to inhibit mature C. tropicalis biofilms, even at the higher tested concentrations. High mortality rates of C. elegans were observed when the worms were exposed to with C. tropicalis strains, reaching up to 96%, 96h after exposure of the worms to C. tropicalis strains. These results reinforce the high pathogenicity of C. tropicalis from veterinary and human sources and show the effectiveness of caspofungin and amphotericin B against mature biofilms of this species. PMID:27527785

  7. BV and non-BV associated Gardnerella vaginalis establish similar synergistic interactions with other BV-associated microorganisms in dual-species biofilms.

    PubMed

    Castro, Joana; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Dual-species biofilm formation between Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from women with or without bacterial vaginosis (BV) and other 24 BV-associated microorganisms support that the key difference in virulence potential between BV-negative and BV-positive G. vaginalis strains seems not to be related with biofilm maturation. PMID:26505928

  8. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  9. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  10. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  11. Biofilms: Microbial Life on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down- regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. An established biofilm structure comprises microbial cells and EPS, has a defined architecture, and provides an optimal environment for the exchange of genetic material between cells. Cells may also communicate via quorum sensing, which may in turn affect biofilm processes such as detachment. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and importance in a variety of device-related infections. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management. PMID:12194761

  12. Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the basis of many persistent diseases. The persistence of these infections is primarily attributed to the increased antibiotic resistance exhibited by the cells within the biofilms. This resistance is multifactorial; there are multiple mechanisms of resistance that act together in order to provide an increased overall level of resistance to the biofilm. These mechanisms are based on the function of wild-type genes and are not the result of mutations. This article reviews the known mechanisms of resistance, including the ability of the biofilm matrix to prevent antibiotics from reaching the cells and the function of individual genes that are preferentially expressed in biofilms. Evidence suggests that these mechanisms have been developed as a general stress response of biofilms that enables the cells in the biofilm to respond to all of the changes in the environment that they may encounter. PMID:22953707

  13. [Biofilms, tolerance and antimicrobial resistance].

    PubMed

    Bahar, Gül

    2002-01-01

    Virtually every surface examined in natural, industrial and pathogenic ecosystems are colonized by biofilms consisting of adherent populations of microorganisms surrounded with a glycocalyx matrix. The development of biofilms has important economic and medical consequences. The development and use of a broad range of medical devices made us recognize a variety of infections caused by microorganisms that were regarded previously as harmless. Infections caused by biofilms are difficult to eradicate with antimicrobial treatment, and in-vitro susceptibility tests show significant resistance of biofilm cells to be killed. Advances in our understanding of biofilm formation can assist in the development of novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by biofilms. In this review article, structures, general properties and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of biofilms were discussed under the light of recent literature. PMID:12838670

  14. Peace Lifestyle and Peace Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judd

    Peace lifestyles are possible in social environments that endorse peace activism. This discussion of community change processes provides an outline of mechanisms needed for successful community activism working at the cultural level. The Community Peace Cultures Program (CPCP) is an approach to building supportive environments for peace…

  15. Lifestyle Improvement Program for Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Ralph

    The Wayne State College Lifestyle Improvement Program for Seniors, based on the wellness concept, is designed to facilitate social interaction and health through physical activities. It is adaptable to a variety of individual needs and preferences, including exercises for cardiac rehabilitation patients. Any person over 50 can participate at no…

  16. Outdoor Play: Combating Sedentary Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thigpen, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly sedentary lifestyles are contributing to overweight and other health concerns as children spend less and less time outside engaged in active play. Outdoor play provides important opportunities to explore the natural world, interact with peers, engage in vigorous physical activity, and learn about our environment. However, outdoor…

  17. Biofilm formation of Salmonella serotypes in simulated meat processing environments and its relationship to cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huhu; Ding, Shijie; Dong, Yang; Ye, Keping; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-10-01

    Salmonella attached to meat contact surfaces encountered in meat processing facilities may serve as a source of cross-contamination. In this study, the influence of serotypes and media on biofilm formation of Salmonella was investigated in a simulated meat processing environment, and the relationships between biofilm formation and cell characteristics were also determined. All six serotypes (Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg, Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Indiana, Salmonella Infantis, and Salmonella Typhimurium) can readily form biofilms on stainless steel surfaces, and the amounts of biofilms were significantly influenced by the serotypes, incubation media, and incubation time used in this study. Significant differences in cell surface hydrophobicity, autoaggregation, motility, and growth kinetic parameters were observed between individual serotypes tested. Except for growth kinetic parameters, the cell characteristics were correlated with the ability of biofilm formation incubated in tryptic soy broth, whereas no correlation with biofilm formation incubated in meat thawing-loss broth (an actual meat substrate) was found. Salmonella grown in meat thawing-loss broth showed a "cloud-shaped" morphology in the mature biofilm, whereas when grown in tryptic soy broth it had a "reticulum-shaped" appearance. Our study provides some practical information to understand the process of biofilm formation on meat processing contact surfaces. PMID:24112581

  18. Microbial biofilms are able to destroy hydroxyapatite in the absence of host immunity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Junka, Adam Feliks; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Smutnicka, Danuta; Kos, Marcin; Smolina, Iryna; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward; Turniak, Michal; Sedghizadeh, Parish P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction It is widely thought that inflammation and osteoclastogenesis result in hydroxyapatite (HA) resorption and sequestra formation during osseous infections, and microbial biofilm pathogens induce the inflammatory destruction of HA. We hypothesized that biofilms associated with infectious bone disease can directly resorb HA in the absence of host inflammation or osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, we developed an in vitro model to test this hypothesis. Materials and Methods Customized HA discs were manufactured as a substrate for growing clinically relevant biofilm pathogens. Single-species biofilms of S.mutans, S.aureus, P.aeruginosa and C.albicans, and mixed-species biofilms of C.albicans + S.mutans were incubated on HA discs for 72 hours to grow mature biofilms. Three different non-biofilm control groups were also established for testing. HA discs were then evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy, micro-CT metrotomography, x-ray spectroscopy and confocal microscopy with planimetric analysis. Additionally, quantitative cultures and pH assessment were performed. ANOVA was used to test for significance between treatment and control groups. Results All investigated biofilms were able to cause significant (P<0.05) and morphologically characteristic alterations in HA structure as compared to controls. The highest number of alterations observed was caused by mixed biofilms of C.albicans + S.mutans. S. mutans biofilm incubated in medium with additional sucrose content was the most detrimental to HA surfaces among single-species biofilms. Conclusion These findings suggest that direct microbial resorption of bone is possible in addition to immune-mediated destruction, which has important translational implications for the pathogenesis of chronic bone infections and for targeted antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:25544303

  19. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  20. Lifestyle Changes After Laryngeal or Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer affect your emotional health? Lifestyle changes after laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer You can’ ... people want to know if there are specific lifestyle changes they can make to reduce their risk ...

  1. Medication or Lifestyle for Pre-Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... is possible. By committing to and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, some people are able to reverse their pre- ... can avoid many diabetes complications by adopting a healthy lifestyle. How much can be avoided usually depends on ...

  2. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Stewart, Philip S.; Hozalski, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacterial biofilms appear to be designed to withstand extreme forces rather than typical or average loads. In scenarios requiring the removal or control of unwanted biofilms, this emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for structurally weakening the biofilms in conjunction with bacterial inactivation. PMID:26819559

  3. The role of iron in Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilm formation: the exochelin siderophore is essential in limiting iron conditions for biofilm formation but not for planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Anil; Hatfull, Graham F

    2007-01-01

    Many species of mycobacteria form structured biofilm communities at liquid–air interfaces and on solid surfaces. Full development of Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilms requires addition of supplemental iron above 1 μM ferrous sulphate, although addition of iron is not needed for planktonic growth. Microarray analysis of the M. smegmatis transcriptome shows that iron-responsive genes – especially those involved in siderophore synthesis and iron uptake – are strongly induced during biofilm formation reflecting a response to iron deprivation, even when 2 μM iron is present. The acquisition of iron under these conditions is specifically dependent on the exochelin synthesis and uptake pathways, and the strong defect of an iron–exochelin uptake mutant suggests a regulatory role of iron in the transition to biofilm growth. In contrast, although the expression of mycobactin and iron ABC transport operons is highly upregulated during biofilm formation, mutants in these systems form normal biofilms in low-iron (2 μM) conditions. A close correlation between iron availability and matrix-associated fatty acids implies a possible metabolic role in the late stages of biofilm maturation, in addition to the early regulatory role. M. smegmatis surface motility is similarly dependent on iron availability, requiring both supplemental iron and the exochelin pathway to acquire it. PMID:17854402

  4. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  5. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  6. The protein tyrosine kinases EpsB and PtkA differentially affect biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Gerwig, Jan; Kiley, Taryn B.; Gunka, Katrin; Stanley-Wall, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to choose between motile and sessile lifestyles. The sessile way of life, also referred to as biofilm, depends on the formation of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and some extracellular proteins. Moreover, a significant proportion of cells in a biofilm form spores. The first two genes of the 15-gene operon for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, epsA and epsB, encode a putative transmembrane modulator protein and a putative protein tyrosine kinase, respectively, with similarity to the TkmA/PtkA modulator/kinase couple. Here we show that the putative kinase EpsB is required for the formation of structured biofilms. However, an epsB mutant is still able to form biofilms. As shown previously, a ptkA mutant is also partially defective in biofilm formation, but this defect is related to spore formation in the biofilm. The absence of both kinases resulted in a complete loss of biofilm formation. Thus, EpsB and PtkA fulfil complementary functions in biofilm formation. The activity of bacterial protein tyrosine kinases depends on their interaction with modulator proteins. Our results demonstrate the specific interaction between the putative kinase EpsB and its modulator protein EpsA and suggest that EpsB activity is stimulated by its modulator EpsA. PMID:24493247

  7. The protein tyrosine kinases EpsB and PtkA differentially affect biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, Jan; Kiley, Taryn B; Gunka, Katrin; Stanley-Wall, Nicola; Stülke, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to choose between motile and sessile lifestyles. The sessile way of life, also referred to as biofilm, depends on the formation of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and some extracellular proteins. Moreover, a significant proportion of cells in a biofilm form spores. The first two genes of the 15-gene operon for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, epsA and epsB, encode a putative transmembrane modulator protein and a putative protein tyrosine kinase, respectively, with similarity to the TkmA/PtkA modulator/kinase couple. Here we show that the putative kinase EpsB is required for the formation of structured biofilms. However, an epsB mutant is still able to form biofilms. As shown previously, a ptkA mutant is also partially defective in biofilm formation, but this defect is related to spore formation in the biofilm. The absence of both kinases resulted in a complete loss of biofilm formation. Thus, EpsB and PtkA fulfil complementary functions in biofilm formation. The activity of bacterial protein tyrosine kinases depends on their interaction with modulator proteins. Our results demonstrate the specific interaction between the putative kinase EpsB and its modulator protein EpsA and suggest that EpsB activity is stimulated by its modulator EpsA. PMID:24493247

  8. Phenylpropanoids of plant origin as inhibitors of biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Raut, Jayant Shankar; Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2014-09-01

    Biofilm-related infections of Candida albicans are a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, especially those with immunocompromised status. Options of the antifungal drugs available for successful treatment of drug-resistant biofilms are very few, and as such, new strategies need to be explored against them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenylpropanoids of plant origin against planktonic cells, important virulence factors, and biofilm forms of C. albicans. Standard susceptibility testing protocol was used to evaluate the activities of 13 phenylpropanoids against planktonic growth. Their effects on adhesion and yeast-to-hyphae morphogenesis were studied in microplate-based methodologies. An in vitro biofilm model analyzed the phenylpropanoid-mediated prevention of biofilm development and mature biofilms using XTT-metabolic assay, crystal violet assay, and light microscopy. Six molecules exhibited fungistatic activity at ≤0.5 mg/ml, of which four were fungicidal at low concentrations. Seven phenylpropanoids inhibited yeast-to-hyphae transition at low concentrations (0.031-0.5 mg/ml), whereas adhesion to the solid substrate was prevented in the range of 0.5-2 mg/ml. Treatment with ≤0.5 mg/ml concentrations of at least six small molecules resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of biofilm formation by C. albicans. Mature biofilms that are highly resistant to antifungal drugs were susceptible to low concentrations of 4 of the 13 molecules. This study revealed phenylpropanoids of plant origin as promising candidates to devise preventive strategies against drug-resistant biofilms of C. albicans. PMID:24851813

  9. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Petrus L. B.; Carvalho, Letícia T.; Paschoal, Marco A. B.; de Sousa, Eduardo M.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; da Silva, Marcos A. dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  10. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Petrus L B; Carvalho, Letícia T; Paschoal, Marco A B; de Sousa, Eduardo M; Moffa, Eduardo B; da Silva, Marcos A Dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  11. Streptococcus thermophilus Biofilm Formation: A Remnant Trait of Ancestral Commensal Life?

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Céline; Renault, Pierre; Briandet, Romain; Guédon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have a long history of use in food production and preservation. Their adaptation to food environments has profoundly modified their features, mainly through genomic flux. Streptococcus thermophilus, one of the most frequent starter culture organisms consumed daily by humans emerged recently from a commensal ancestor. As such, it is a useful model for genomic studies of bacterial domestication processes. Many streptococcal species form biofilms, a key feature of the major lifestyle of these bacteria in nature. However, few descriptions of S. thermophilus biofilms have been reported. An analysis of the ability of a representative collection of natural isolates to form biofilms revealed that S. thermophilus was a poor biofilm producer and that this characteristic was associated with an inability to attach firmly to surfaces. The identification of three biofilm-associated genes in the strain producing the most biofilms shed light on the reasons for the rarity of this trait in this species. These genes encode proteins involved in crucial stages of biofilm formation and are heterogeneously distributed between strains. One of the biofilm genes appears to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. The other two are located in loci presenting features of reductive evolution, and are absent from most of the strains analyzed. Their orthologs in commensal bacteria are involved in adhesion to host cells, suggesting that they are remnants of ancestral functions. The biofilm phenotype appears to be a commensal trait that has been lost during the genetic domestication of S. thermophilus, consistent with its adaptation to the milk environment and the selection of starter strains for dairy fermentations. PMID:26035177

  12. Host contributions to construction of three device-associated Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nett, Jeniel E; Zarnowski, Robert; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Brooks, Erin G; Bernhardt, Jörg; Marchillo, Karen; Mosher, Deane F; Andes, David R

    2015-12-01

    Among the most fascinating virulence attributes of Candida is the ability to transition to a biofilm lifestyle. As a biofilm, Candida cells adhere to a surface, such as a vascular catheter, and become encased in an extracellular matrix. During this mode of growth, Candida resists the normal immune response, often causing devastating disease. Based on scanning electron microscopy images, we hypothesized that host cells and proteins become incorporated into clinical biofilms. As a means to gain an understanding of these host-biofilm interactions, we explored biofilm-associated host components by using microscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Here we characterize the host proteins associated with several in vivo rat Candida albicans biofilms, including those from vascular catheter, denture, and urinary catheter models as well as uninfected devices. A conserved group of 14 host proteins were found to be more abundant during infection at each of the niches. The host proteins were leukocyte and erythrocyte associated and included proteins involved in inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, myeloperoxidase, and alarmin S100-A9. A group of 59 proteins were associated with both infected and uninfected devices, and these included matricellular and inflammatory proteins. In addition, site-specific proteins were identified, such as amylase in association with the denture device. Cellular analysis revealed neutrophils as the predominant leukocytes associating with biofilms. These experiments demonstrate that host cells and proteins are key components of in vivo Candida biofilms, likely with one subset associating with the device and another being recruited by the proliferating biofilm. PMID:26371129

  13. Host Contributions to Construction of Three Device-Associated Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Zarnowski, Robert; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Brooks, Erin G.; Bernhardt, Jörg; Marchillo, Karen; Mosher, Deane F.

    2015-01-01

    Among the most fascinating virulence attributes of Candida is the ability to transition to a biofilm lifestyle. As a biofilm, Candida cells adhere to a surface, such as a vascular catheter, and become encased in an extracellular matrix. During this mode of growth, Candida resists the normal immune response, often causing devastating disease. Based on scanning electron microscopy images, we hypothesized that host cells and proteins become incorporated into clinical biofilms. As a means to gain an understanding of these host-biofilm interactions, we explored biofilm-associated host components by using microscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Here we characterize the host proteins associated with several in vivo rat Candida albicans biofilms, including those from vascular catheter, denture, and urinary catheter models as well as uninfected devices. A conserved group of 14 host proteins were found to be more abundant during infection at each of the niches. The host proteins were leukocyte and erythrocyte associated and included proteins involved in inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, myeloperoxidase, and alarmin S100-A9. A group of 59 proteins were associated with both infected and uninfected devices, and these included matricellular and inflammatory proteins. In addition, site-specific proteins were identified, such as amylase in association with the denture device. Cellular analysis revealed neutrophils as the predominant leukocytes associating with biofilms. These experiments demonstrate that host cells and proteins are key components of in vivo Candida biofilms, likely with one subset associating with the device and another being recruited by the proliferating biofilm. PMID:26371129

  14. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  15. Biofilm Formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, L. L.; Edwards, J. L.; Shao, J.; Rabinak, C.; Entz, D.; Apicella, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in continuous-flow chambers to determine whether Neisseria gonorrhoeae could form a biofilm. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae formed a biofilm with or without the addition of 10 μM sodium nitrite to the perfusion medium. Microscopic analysis of a 4-day growth of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 revealed evidence of a biofilm with organisms embedded in matrix, which was interlaced with water channels. N. gonorrhoeae strains MS11 and FA1090 were found to also form biofilms under the same growth conditions. Cryofield emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that organisms were embedded in a continuous matrix with membranous structures spanning the biofilm. These studies also demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae has the capability to form a matrix in the presence and absence of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac). Studies with monoclonal antibody 6B4 and the lectins soy bean agglutinin and Maackia amurensis indicated that the predominate terminal sugars in the biofilm matrix formed a lactosamine when the biofilm was grown in the absence of CMP-Neu5Ac and sialyllactosamine in the presence of CMP-Neu5Ac. N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 formed a biofilm on primary urethral epithelial cells and cervical cells in culture without loss of viability of the epithelial cell layer. Our studies demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae can form biofilms in continuous-flow chambers and on living cells. Studies of these biofilms may have implications for understanding asymptomatic gonococcal infection. PMID:15784536

  16. Effect of ciprofloxacin and N-acetylcysteine on bacterial adherence and biofilm formation on ureteral stent surfaces.

    PubMed

    El-Feky, Mohamed A; El-Rehewy, Mostafa S; Hassan, Mona A; Abolella, Hassan A; Abd El-Baky, Rehab M; Gad, Gamal F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ciprofloxacin (CIP), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) alone and in combination on biofilm production and pre-formed mature biofilms on ureteral stent surfaces. Two strains each of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebseilla pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus vulgaris, recently isolated from patients undergoing ureteral stent removal and shown to be capable of biofilm production, were used in this study. The inhibitory effects of ciprofloxacin, N-acetylcysteine and ciprofloxacin/N-acetylcysteine combination were determined by static adherence assay. Ciprofloxacin (MIC and 2 MIC) and N-acetylcysteine (2 and 4 mg/ml) inhibited biofilm production by > or = 60% in all tested microorganisms. Disruption of pre-formed biofilms of all tested microorganisms was found to be > or = 78% in the presence of ciprofloxacin (MIC and 2 MIC) and > or = 62% in the presence of N-acetylcysteine (2 and 4 mg/ml), compared to controls. Ciprofloxacin/N-acetylcysteine showed the highest inhibitory effect on biofilm production (94-100%) and the highest disruptive effect on the pre-formed biofilms (86-100%) in comparison to controls. N-acetylcysteine was found to increase the therapeutic efficacy of ciprofloxacin by degrading the extracellular polysaccharide matrix of biofilms. These data are statistically significant. The inhibitory effects of ciprofloxacin and N-acetylcysteine on biofilm production were also verified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). In conclusion, Ciprofloxacin/N-acetylcysteine combinations have the highest inhibitory effect on biofilm production and the highest ability to eradicate pre-formed mature biofilms. PMID:19899620

  17. Focusing on Environmental Biofilms With Variable-Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, L.; Wolfaardt, G. M.; Du Plessis, K.

    2006-12-01

    Since the term biofilm has been coined almost 30 years ago, visualization has formed an integral part of investigations on microbial attachment. Electron microscopic (EM) biofilm studies, however, have been limited by the hydrated extracellular matrix which loses structural integrity with conventional preparative techniques, and under required high-vacuum conditions, resulting in a loss of information on spatial relationships and distribution of biofilm microbes. Recent advances in EM technology enable the application of Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy (VP SEM) to biofilms, allowing low vacuum and hydrated chamber atmosphere during visualization. Environmental biofilm samples can be viewed in situ, unfixed and fully hydrated, with application of gold-sputter-coating only, to increase image resolution. As the impact of microbial biofilms can be both hazardous and beneficial to man and his environment, recognition of biofilms as a natural form of microbial existence is needed to fully assess the potential role of microbial communities on technology. The integration of multiple techniques to elucidate biofilm processes has become imperative for unraveling complex phenotypic adaptations of this microbial lifestyle. We applied VP SEM as integrative technique with traditional and novel analytical techniques to (1)localize lignocellulosic microbial consortia applied for producing alternative bio-energy sources in the mining wastewater industry, (2) characterize and visualize wetland microbial communities in the treatment of winery wastewater, and (3)determine the impact of recombinant technology on yeast biofilm behavior. Visualization of microbial attachment to a lignocellulose substrate, and degradation of exposed plant tissue, gave insight into fiber degradation and volatile fatty acid production for biological sulphate removal from mining wastewater. Also, the 3D-architecture of complex biofilms developing in constructed wetlands was correlated with

  18. Lifestyle Change: A Critical Look

    PubMed Central

    Elford, R.W.; Yeo, M.A.; Hougesen, B.; Todd, V.

    1989-01-01

    Many relationships between behaviour and disease are now recognized by both health care professionals and the public. In lifestyle counselling, caregivers help patients to change their unhealthy habits. The primary care office seems an ideal setting for implementing behaviour change strategies, but studies suggest that physicians only sporadically elicit behavioural risk factors and infrequently counsel patients to modify risky behaviours. Physicians have been introduced to the goals of clinical prevention, but with the limited application of clinical prevention research to practical office approaches, they often lack the necessary knowledge and skills to achieve them. The individual intervention and group program strategies described in this paper have been adapted to the primary care setting, and we hope they will help family physicians to play an effective role in lifestyle change.

  19. Lifestyle, pregnancy and epigenetic effects.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing evidences link maternal lifestyle and prenatal factors with serious health consequences and diseases later in life. Extensive epidemiological studies have identified a number of factors such as diet, stress, gestational diabetes, exposure to tobacco and alcohol during gestation as influencing normal fetal development. In light of recent discoveries, epigenetic mechanisms such as alteration of DNA methylation, chromatin modifications and modulation of gene expression during gestation are believed to possibly account for various types of plasticity such as neural tube defects, autism spectrum disorder, congenital heart defects, oral clefts, allergies and cancer. The purpose of this article is to review a number of published studies to fill the gap in our understanding of how maternal lifestyle and intrauterine environment influence molecular modifications in the offspring, with an emphasis on epigenetic alterations. To support these associations, we highlighted laboratory studies of rodents and epidemiological studies of human based on sampling population cohorts. PMID:25687469

  20. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  1. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae genes expression in biofilms cultured under static conditions and in a drip-flow apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the Gram-negative bacterium responsible for porcine pleuropneumonia. This respiratory infection is highly contagious and characterized by high morbidity and mortality. The objectives of our study were to study the transcriptome of A. pleuropneumoniae biofilms at different stages and to develop a protocol to grow an A. pleuropneumoniae biofilm in a drip-flow apparatus. This biofilm reactor is a system with an air-liquid interface modeling lung-like environment. Bacteria attached to a surface (biofilm) and free floating bacteria (plankton) were harvested for RNA isolation. Labelled cDNA was hybridized to a microarray to compare the expression profiles of planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Results It was observed that 47 genes were differentially expressed (22 up, 25 down) in a 4 h-static growing/maturing biofilm and 117 genes were differentially expressed (49 up, 68 down) in a 6h-static dispersing biofilm. The transcriptomes of a 4 h biofilm and a 6 h biofilm were also compared and 456 genes (235 up, 221 down) were identified as differently expressed. Among the genes identified in the 4 h vs 6h biofilm experiment, several regulators of stress response were down-regulated and energy metabolism associated genes were up-regulated. Biofilm bacteria cultured using the drip-flow apparatus differentially expressed 161 genes (68 up, 93 down) compared to the effluent bacteria. Cross-referencing of differentially transcribed genes in the different assays revealed that drip-flow biofilms shared few differentially expressed genes with static biofilms (4 h or 6 h) but shared several differentially expressed genes with natural or experimental infections in pigs. Conclusion The formation of a static biofilm by A. pleuropneumoniae strain S4074 is a rapid process and transcriptional analysis indicated that dispersal observed at 6 h is driven by nutritional stresses. Furthermore, A. pleuropneumoniae can form a biofilm under low

  2. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  3. Electrochemical biofilm control: a review.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are: (1) to present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control; (2) to establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it; (3) to discuss current proposed mechanisms; and (4) to introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing datasets across the literature and generating comparable datasets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use. PMID:26592420

  4. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Michael J; Chang, Connie; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Bothner, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  5. Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. The increasing use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts to manage intracranial hypertension associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis highlights the importance of investigating the biofilm-forming properties of this organism. Like other microbe-forming biofilms, C. neoformans biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter discusses the recent advances in the understanding of cryptococcal biofilms, including the role of its polysaccharide capsule in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We describe novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of cryptococcal colonization of medical prosthetic devices. Finally, we provide fresh thoughts on the diverse but interesting directions of research in this field that may result in new insights into C. neoformans biology. PMID:26185073

  6. Influence of volatile organic compounds emitted by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains on Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Lipasova, Valentina; Popova, Alexandra; Koksharova, Olga; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Szegedi, Erno; Chernin, Leonid; Khmel, Inessa

    2016-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions, including plant pathogenicity. In this work, we investigated the action of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by rhizospheric strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, Pseudomonas fluorescens B-4117, Serratia plymuthica IC1270, as well as Serratia proteamaculans strain 94, isolated from spoiled meat, on biofilms formation by three strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens which are causative agents of crown-gall disease in a wide range of plants. In dual culture assays, the pool of volatiles emitted by the tested Pseudomonas and Serratia strains suppressed the formation of biofilms of A. tumefaciens strains grown on polycarbonate membrane filters and killed Agrobacterium cells in mature biofilms. The individual VOCs produced by the tested Pseudomonas strains, that is, ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) produced by Serratia strains, were shown to kill A. tumefaciens cells in mature biofilms and suppress their formation. The data obtained in this study suggest an additional potential of some ketones and DMDS as protectors of plants against A. tumefaciens strains, whose virulence is associated with the formation of biofilms on the infected plants. PMID:27214244

  7. Interception of Small Particles by Flocculent Structures, Sessile Ciliates, and the Basic Layer of a Wastewater Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Heinrich; Letsiou, Ioanna; Feuchtinger, Anette; Beisker, Wolfgang; Mannweiler, Ernst; Hutzler, Peter; Arnz, Patrik

    2001-01-01

    We investigated attachment processes of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles (diameter = 1 μm) to mature biofilms grown on clay marbles in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor. During a treatment cycle with filtered wastewater containing different fluorescent beads, the progression of particle density in various biofilm compartments (carrier biofilm, basic biofilm layer, biofilm flocs, and sessile ciliates) was determined by flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and automated image analysis. Particles were almost completely removed from wastewater by typical processes of particle retention: up to 58% of particles attached to clay marbles, up to 15% were associated with suspended flocs, and up to 10% were ingested by sessile ciliates. Ingestion of particles by ciliates was exceptionally high immediately after wastewater addition (1,200 particles grazer−1 h−1) and continued until approximately 14% of the water had been cleared by ciliate filter feeding. Most probably, ciliate bioturbation increases particle sorption to the basic biofilm. Backwashing of the reactor detached pieces of biofilm and thus released approximately 50% of the particles into rinsing water. Clay marbles in the upper part of the reactor were more efficiently abraded than in the lower part. No indications for selective attachment of the applied hydrophobic and hydrophilic beads were found. As a consequence of interception patterns, organisms at elevated biofilm structures are probably major profiteers of wastewater particles; among them, ciliates may be of major importance because of their highly active digestive food vacuoles. PMID:11526035

  8. Role of Tec1 in the Development, Architecture, and Integrity of Sexual Biofilms of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Karla J.; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Pujol, Claude; Park, Yang-Nim

    2015-01-01

    MTL-homozygous (a/a or α/α) white cells form a complex sexual biofilm that exhibits the same architecture as that of MTL-heterozygous (a/α) pathogenic biofilms. However, the former is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, while the latter is regulated by the Ras1/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway. We previously demonstrated that in the formation of an MTL-homozygous, mature (48 h) sexual biofilm in RPMI 1640 medium, the MAP kinase pathway targets Tec1 rather than Cph1, the latter of which is the target of the same pathway, but for the opaque cell mating response. Here we continued our analysis of the role of Tec1 by comparing the effects of deleting TEC1 on initial adhesion to silicone elastomer, high-resolution confocal microscopy assessments of the stages and cellular phenotypes during the 48 h of biofilm development, human white cell penetration, and biofilm fragility. We show that although Tec1 plays only a minor role in initial adhesion to the silicone elastomer, it does play a major role in the growth of the basal yeast cell polylayer, vertical extension of hyphae and matrix deposition in the upper portion of the biofilm, final biofilm thickness, penetrability of human white blood cells, and final biofilm integrity (i.e., resistance to fluid flow). These results provide a more detailed description of normal biofilm development and architecture and confirm the central role played by the transcription factor Tec1 in the biofilm model employed here. PMID:25556183

  9. Effects of Current Velocity on the Nascent Architecture of Stream Microbial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Battin, Tom J.; Kaplan, Louis A.; Newbold, J. Denis; Cheng, Xianhao; Hansen, Claude

    2003-01-01

    Current velocity affected the architecture and dynamics of natural, multiphyla, and cross-trophic level biofilms from a forested piedmont stream. We monitored the development and activity of biofilms in streamside flumes operated under two flow regimes (slow [0.065 m s−1] and fast [0.23 m s−1]) by combined confocal laser scanning microscopy with cryosectioning to observe biofilm structure and composition. Biofilm growth started as bacterial microcolonies embedded in extracellular polymeric substances and transformed into ripple-like structures and ultimately conspicuous quasihexagonal networks. These structures were particularly pronounced in biofilms grown under slow current velocities and were characterized by the prominence of pennate diatoms oriented along their long axes to form the hexagons. Microstructural heterogeneity was dynamic, and biofilms that developed under slower velocities were thicker and had larger surface sinuosity and higher areal densities than their counterparts exposed to higher velocities. Surface sinuosity and biofilm fragmentation increased with thickness, and these changes likely reduced resistance to the mass transfer of solutes from the water column into the biofilms. Nevertheless, estimates of dissolved organic carbon uptake and microbial growth suggested that internal cycling of carbon was more important in thick biofilms grown in slow flow conditions. High-pressure liquid chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection analyses of exopolysaccharides documented a temporal shift in monosaccharide composition as the glucose levels decreased and the levels of rhamnose, galactose, mannose, xylose, and arabinose increased. We attribute this change in chemical composition to the accumulation of diatoms and increased incorporation of detrital particles in mature biofilms. PMID:12957933

  10. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation. PMID:26758863

  11. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission. PMID:27129226

  12. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Martina; Filloux, Alain

    2016-06-10

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission. PMID:27129226

  13. Dynamic behavior of biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, R.M. ); Donaldson, T.L. )

    1986-01-01

    Biological fixed films, or biofilms, are composed of a dense cluster of cells bound to one another or a support surface by the glycocalyx, a cell-secreted carbohydrate matrix. A key advantage of fixed films over other types of immobilized-cell systems is that the immobilization occurs naturally, and hence does not require the additional materials and labor for cell entrapment within gels or covalent bonding to supports. Applications of microbial film fermenters have included animal-cell culture, bacterial leaching of ores, waste treatment, and the production of vinegar, ethanol, critic acid, and beer. Analysis of the unsteady-state behavior of biofilms can provide insight into basic scientific phenomena such as intracellular metabolic regulation patterns.

  14. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus fermentum on microbial growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Rybalchenko, Oxana V; Bondarenko, Viktor M; Orlova, Olga G; Markov, Alexander G; Amasheh, S

    2015-10-01

    Beneficial effects of Lactobacilli have been reported, and lactic bacteria are employed for conservation of foods. Therefore, the effects of a Lactobacillus fermentum strain were analyzed regarding inhibitory effects on staphylococci, Candida albicans and enterotoxigenic enterobacteria by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM of bacterial biofilms was performed using cocultures of bacteriocin-producing L. fermentum 97 with different enterotoxigenic strains: Staphylococcus epidermidis expressing the ica gene responsible for biofilm formation, Staphylococcus aureus producing enterotoxin type A, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloaceae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis producing thermolabile and thermostable enterotoxins determined by elt or est genes, and Candida albicans. L. fermentum 97 changed morphological features and suppressed biofilm formation of staphylococci, enterotoxigenic enterobacteria and Candida albicans; a marked transition to resting states, a degradation of the cell walls and cytoplasm, and a disruption of mature bacterial biofilms were observed, the latter indicating efficiency even in the phase of higher cell density. PMID:26267163

  15. Lysogenic conversion and phage resistance development in phage exposed Escherichia coli biofilms.

    PubMed

    Moons, Pieter; Faster, David; Aertsen, Abram

    2013-01-01

    In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B) or an obligatory lytic phage (T7), after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations. PMID:23344561

  16. Contribution of Erwinia amylovora exopolysaccharides amylovoran and levan to biofilm formation: implications in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Koczan, Jessica M; McGrath, Molly J; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2009-11-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a highly virulent, necrogenic, vascular pathogen of rosaceous species that produces the exopolysaccharide amylovoran, a known pathogenicity factor, and levan, a virulence factor. An in vitro crystal violet staining and a bright-field microscopy method were used to demonstrate that E. amylovora is capable of forming a biofilm on solid surfaces. Amylovoran and levan production deletion mutants were used to determine that amylovoran was required for biofilm formation and that levan contributed to biofilm formation. In vitro flow cell and confocal microscopy were used to further reveal the architectural detail of a mature biofilm and differences in biofilm formation between E. amylovora wild-type (WT), Deltaams, and Deltalsc mutant cells labeled with green fluorescent protein or yellow fluorescent protein. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of E. amylovora WT cells following experimental inoculation in apple indicated that extensive biofilm formation occurs in xylem vessels. However, Deltaams mutant cells were nonpathogenic and died rapidly following inoculation, and Deltalsc mutant cells were not detected in xylem vessels and were reduced in movement into apple shoots. These results demonstrate that biofilm formation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of E. amylovora. PMID:19821727

  17. Methods for microscopic characterization of oral biofilms: analysis of colonization, microstructure, and molecular transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Singleton, S; Treloar, R; Warren, P; Watson, G K; Hodgson, R; Allison, C

    1997-04-01

    Assessment of the role of biofilm microstructure in biofilm-specific activities requires non-destructive measurement techniques for parameterization of structural characteristics in parallel with relevant biochemical and physiological data. This paper briefly reviews some current methods for biofilm structural analysis, with emphasis on new developments in optical imaging and mathematical modeling methods. Fluorescence imaging studies of bacterial colonization events occurring on exposed model tooth surfaces indicated that bacterial adhesion to sessile organisms was of central importance to the early colonization process and that this occurred in a non-random manner. Structural studies of mature biofilms by confocal microscopy demonstrated the spatial distribution of individual species using fluorescent antibodies. Biofilms grown under different physiological conditions exhibited differences in structure, and methods were developed for parameterizing the spatial orientations of the bacteria. Diffusive processes within biofilm microstructures were studied using a random walk model in both 2-D and 3-D. Modeling of convective flow within biofilm microstructures was achieved by application of lattice Boltzmann methodology. PMID:9524450

  18. Terpenoids of plant origin inhibit morphogenesis, adhesion, and biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Raut, Jayant S; Shinde, Ravikumar B; Chauhan, Nitin M; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections caused by Candida albicans and associated drug resistant micro-organisms are serious problems for immunocompromised populations. Molecules which can prevent or remove biofilms are needed. Twenty-eight terpenoids of plant origin were analysed for their activity against growth, virulence attributes, and biofilms of C. albicans. Eighteen molecules exhibited minimum inhibitory concentrations of <2 mg ml(-1) for planktonic growth. Selected molecules inhibited yeast to hyphal dimorphism at low concentrations (0.031-0.5 mg ml(-1)), while adhesion to a solid surface was prevented at 0.5-2 mg ml(-1). Treatment with 14 terpenoids resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of biofilm formation, and of these, linalool, nerol, isopulegol, menthol, carvone, α-thujone, and farnesol exhibited biofilm-specific activity. Eight terpenoids were identified as inhibitors of mature biofilms. This study demonstrated the antibiofilm potential of terpenoids, which need to be further explored as therapeutic strategy against biofilm associated infections of C. albicans. PMID:23216018

  19. A Multinuclear Metal Complex Based DNase-Mimetic Artificial Enzyme: Matrix Cleavage for Combating Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Ji, Haiwei; Liu, Chaoqun; Bing, Wei; Wang, Zhenzhen; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-08-26

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an essential structural component during biofilm formation, including initial bacterial adhesion, subsequent development, and final maturation. Herein, the construction of a DNase-mimetic artificial enzyme (DMAE) for anti-biofilm applications is described. By confining passivated gold nanoparticles with multiple cerium(IV) complexes on the surface of colloidal magnetic Fe3 O4  /SiO2 core/shell particles, a robust and recoverable artificial enzyme with DNase-like activity was obtained, which exhibited high cleavage ability towards both model substrates and eDNA. Compared to the high environmental sensitivity of natural DNase in anti-biofilm applications, DMAE exhibited a much better operational stability and easier recoverability. When DMAE was coated on substratum surfaces, biofilm formation was inhibited for prolonged periods of time, and the DMAE excelled in the dispersion of established biofilms of various ages. Finally, the presence of DMAE remarkably potentiated the efficiency of traditional antibiotics to kill biofilm-encased bacteria and eradiate biofilms. PMID:27484616

  20. Transcriptional response to fluconazole and amphotericin B in Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nailis, Heleen; Vandenbosch, Davy; Deforce, Dieter; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with persistent Candida albicans infections. Treatment of these infections is difficult, since sessile C. albicans cells show increased resistance towards antifungal agents. The molecular mechanisms behind biofilm resistance in C. albicans are not yet understood. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional response in young and mature in vitro-grown biofilms after a short and longer exposure time to high doses of fluconazole or amphotericin B. Treatment of biofilms with high doses of antifungal agents resulted in a drug-specific transcriptional response. Exposure of biofilms to fluconazole induced upregulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG1, ERG3, ERG11 and ERG25). Treatment of biofilms with amphotericin B resulted in an overexpression of KRE1 and SKN1, two genes encoding proteins involved in beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis. Our data indicate that sessile C. albicans cells show controlled regulation of gene expression, as they quickly mount a drug-specific transcriptional response in the presence of high doses of antifungal agents. These transcriptional changes suggest upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis (fluconazole) and upregulation of beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis (amphotericin B) in sessile C. albicans cells that might contribute to a resistant biofilm phenotype. PMID:20170727

  1. Induced biofilm cultivation enhances riboflavin production by an intertidally derived Candida famata.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayani; Thawrani, Dheeraj; Banerjee, Priyam; Gachhui, Ratan; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the investigation was to ascertain if surface attachment of Candida famata and aeration enhanced riboflavin production. A newly designed polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) conico-cylindrical flask (CCF) holding eight equidistantly spaced rectangular strips mounted radially on a circular disk allowed comparison of riboflavin production between CCFs with hydrophobic surface (PMMA-CCF), hydrophilic glass surface (GS-CCF), and 500-ml Erlenmeyer flask (EF). Riboflavin production (mg/l) increased from 12.79 to 289.96, from 54.44 to 238.14, and from 36.98 to 158.71 in the GS-CCF, EF, and PMMA-CCF, respectively, when C. famata was grown as biofilm-induced cultures in contrast to traditional planktonic culture. Production was correlated with biofilm formation and planktonic growth was suppressed in cultivations that allowed higher biofilm formation. Enhanced aeration increased riboflavin production in hydrophilic vessels. Temporal pattern of biofilm progression based on two-channel fluorescence detection of extracellular polymeric substances and whole cells in a confocal laser scanning microscope followed by application of PHLIP and ImageJ volume viewer software demonstrated early maturity of a well-developed, stable biofilm on glass in contrast to PMMA surface. A strong correlation between hydrophilic reactor surface, aeration, biofilm formation, and riboflavin production was established in C. famata. Biofilm culture is a new-found means to improve riboflavin production by C. famata. PMID:22434353

  2. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Nobrega, Marcelo M.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  3. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  4. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively. PMID:25990377

  5. Exploring Mechanisms of Biofilm Removal

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Karan; Khashai, Fatemeh; Forghany, Ali; Krasieva, Tatiana; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel anti-plaque formulation on oral biofilm removal. Specific aim was to elucidate the role of 2 potentially complementary mechanisms on dental biofilm removal using EPIEN Dental Debriding Solution (EDDS) like desiccating action leading to denaturation and destabilization of plaque and mechanical removal of destabilized plaque through forceful rinsing action Materials and Methods 25 extracted teeth, after routine debriding and cleaning, underwent standard biofilm incubation model over 4 days. Then samples were randomly divided into 5 groups of 5 teeth each, treated and stained with GUM®Red-Cote® plaque disclosing solution and imaged. Samples were subsequently treated with HYBENX® Oral Decontaminant. Group 1 samples were treated with a standardized “static” water dip exposure following biofilm incubation. Samples in Group 2 were given a standardized “dynamic” exposure to a dental high pressure air/water syringe for 20 s. Group 3 samples were exposed to a standardized “static” application of test agent (30 s dip rinse) followed by a standardized “static” water rinse (30 s dip rinse). Samples in Group 4 were given both the standardized “static” application of test formulation followed by the standardized “dynamic” exposure to a dental high pressure air/water syringe. Finally, samples in Group 5 were treated with a standardized “dynamic” application of test agent (20 s high pressure syringe at 10 ml/s) followed by the standardized “dynamic” exposure to a dental high pressure air/water syringe. Results The MPM images demonstrated that the water dip treatment resulted in the persistence of an almost continuous thick layer of biofilm coverage on the tooth surface. Similarly, test agent dip treatment followed by water dip only removed a few patches of biofilm, with the majority of the tooth surface remaining covered by an otherwise continuous layer of biofilm. Samples

  6. Evaluation of adhesive and anti-adhesive properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and their inhibition by herbal plants

    PubMed Central

    Zameer, Farhan; MS, Rukmangada; Chauhan, Jyoti Bala; Khanum, Shaukath Ara; Kumar, Pramod; Devi, Aishwarya Tripurasundari; MN, Nagendra Prasad; BL, Dhananjaya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Adhesion and colonization are prerequisites for the establishment of bacterial pathogenesis. The biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed on adhesive surfaces like dialysis membrane, stainless steel, glass and polystyrene. Materials and Methods: Microtiter plate biofilm assay was performed to assess the effect of nutrient medium and growth parameters of P. aeruginosa. Further, its growth on adhesive surfaces namely hydrophilic (dialysis membrane) and hydrophobic (polystyrene plate, square glass and stainless steel coupon) was assessed. The exopolysaccharide (EPS) was quantified using ruthenium red microplate assay and microscopic analysis was used to observe P. aeruginosa biofilm architecture. The anti-biofilm activity of herbal extracts on mature P. aeruginosa was performed. Results: The formation of large scale biofilms on dialysis membrane for 72 h was proved to be the best surface. In microscopic studies, very few exopolysaccaride fibrils, indicating a rather loose matrix was observed at 48 h. Further, thick exopolysaccaride, indicated higher adhesive properties at 72 h which is evident from ruthenium red staining. Among the plant extract used, Justicia wynaadensis leaf and Aristolochia indica (Eswari) root extract showed significant reduction of anti-biofilm activity of 0.178 OD and 0.192 OD in inhibiting mature biofilms at 0.225 OD respectively, suggesting the possible use of these extracts as efficient anti-adhesive and biofilm-disrupting agents with potential applications in controlling biofilms on surfaces. Conclusion: Our study facilitates better understanding in the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms on different food processing and clinical surfaces ultimately taking care of food safety and hygiene. PMID:27307976

  7. Infiltration of Matrix-Non-producers Weakens the Salmonella Biofilm and Impairs Its Antimicrobial Tolerance and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Srinandan, Chakravarthy S.; Elango, Monalisha; Gnanadhas, Divya P.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms display a collective lifestyle, wherein the cells secrete extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that helps in adhesion, aggregation, stability, and to protect the bacteria from antimicrobials. We asked whether the EPS could act as a public good for the biofilm and observed that infiltration of cells that do not produce matrix components weakened the biofilm of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. EPS production was costly for the producing cells, as indicated by a significant reduction in the fitness of wild type (WT) cells during competitive planktonic growth relative to the non-producers. Infiltration frequency of non-producers in the biofilm showed a concomitant decrease in overall productivity. It was apparent in the confocal images that the non-producing cells benefit from the EPS produced by the Wild Type (WT) to stay in the biofilm. The biofilm containing non-producing cells were more significantly susceptible to sodium hypochlorite and ciprofloxacin treatment than the WT biofilm. Biofilm infiltrated with non-producers delayed the pathogenesis, as tested in a murine model. The cell types were spatially assorted, with non-producers being edged out in the biofilm. However, cellulose was found to act as a barrier to keep the non-producers away from the WT microcolony. Our results show that the infiltration of non-cooperating cell types can substantially weaken the biofilm making it vulnerable to antibacterials and delay their pathogenesis. Cellulose, a component of EPS, was shown to play a pivotal role of acting as the main public good, and to edge-out the non-producers away from the cooperating microcolony. PMID:26779121

  8. Lifestyles of Adult Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habsi, Azza; Kilani, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the lifestyles of adult Omani women with regards to physical activity (PA) levels and sedentary behaviour (SB). Methods: The study was carried out between May and June 2013 and included a total of 277 healthy women aged 18–48 years from five governorates in Oman. Total, moderate and vigorous PA levels and walking were self-reported by participants using the short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. SB (total sitting time and different types of sitting time) was self-reported using the Domain-Specific Sitting Time Questionnaire on both working and non-working days. PA levels and SB were also objectively measured among 86 of the participants using an accelerometer. Results: The self-reported median ± interquartile range (IQR) total PA was 1,516 ± 3,392 metabolic equivalent of task minutes/week. The self-reported median ± IQR total sitting time was 433 ± 323 minutes/day and 470 ± 423 minutes/day for working and non-working days, respectively. Sitting at work on working days and sitting during leisure activities on non-working days formed the greatest proportion of total sitting time. Overall, accelerometer results indicated that participants spent 62% of their time involved in SB, 35% in light PA and only 3% in moderate to vigorous PA. Conclusion: Sedentary lifestyles were common among the adult Omani women studied. Lack of PA and increased SB is known to increase the risk of metabolic syndrome and obesity. The use of accelerometers to monitor PA and SB among different groups in Oman is highly recommended in order to accurately assess the lifestyle risks of this population. PMID:26052460

  9. Interactions in Bacterial Biofilm Development: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve

    2012-01-01

    A community-based life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. These cellular accretions or biofilms are initiated upon recognition of solid phases by cell surface exposed adhesive moieties. Further cell-cell interactions, cell signalling and bacterial replication leads to the establishment of dense populations encapsulated in a mainly self-produced extracellular matrix; this comprises a complex mixture of macromolecules. These fascinating architectures protect the inhabitants from radiation damage, dehydration, pH fluctuations and antimicrobial compounds. As such they can cause bacterial persistence in disease and problems in industrial applications. In this review we discuss the current understandings of these initial biofilm-forming processes based on structural data. We also briefly describe latter biofilm maturation and dispersal events, which although lack high-resolution insights, are the present focus for many structural biologists working in this field. Finally we give an overview of modern techniques aimed at preventing and disrupting problem biofilms. PMID:23305361

  10. Anorexia Nervosa: A Lifestyle Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves

    1983-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a real lifestyle disorder. The apparent increase in frequency has been linked to the change of position of women in society. If families have an important role to play in the maintenance of the drama, they also hold the key to its resolution. The family physician in early contact with the anorectic patient is in an important position to involve the family in therapy and maximize the chances of recovery. The steps required are reframing, preparing the family involved for family therapy, exploring the benefits of change, and follow up. Imagesp555-a PMID:21283351

  11. The small regulatory RNA molecule MicA is involved in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background LuxS is the synthase enzyme of the quorum sensing signal AI-2. In Salmonella Typhimurium, it was previously shown that a luxS deletion mutant is impaired in biofilm formation. However, this phenotype could not be complemented by extracellular addition of quorum sensing signal molecules. Results Analysis of additional S. Typhimurium luxS mutants indicated that the LuxS enzyme itself is not a prerequisite for a wild type mature biofilm. However, in close proximity of the luxS coding sequence, a small RNA molecule, MicA, is encoded on the opposite DNA strand. Interference with the MicA expression level showed that a balanced MicA level is essential for mature Salmonella biofilm formation. Several MicA targets known to date have previously been reported to be implicated in biofilm formation in Salmonella or in other bacterial species. Additionally, we showed by RT-qPCR analysis that MicA levels are indeed altered in some luxS mutants, corresponding to their biofilm formation phenotype. Conclusions We show that the S. Typhimurium biofilm formation phenotype of a luxS mutant in which the complete coding region is deleted, is dependent on the sRNA molecule MicA, encoded in the luxS adjacent genomic region, rather than on LuxS itself. Future studies are required to fully elucidate the role of MicA in Salmonella biofilm formation. PMID:21044338

  12. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    PubMed Central

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  13. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations.

    PubMed

    Steenackers, Hans P; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-05-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  14. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Biofilm-grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline-binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  15. In situ biofilm coupon device

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent M.; Truex, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  16. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  17. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  18. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  19. Genetic control of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Krystyna I; Grudniak, Anna M; Rudnicka, Zofia; Markowska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    Nearly all bacterial species, including pathogens, have the ability to form biofilms. Biofilms are defined as structured ecosystems in which microbes are attached to surfaces and embedded in a matrix composed of polysaccharides, eDNA, and proteins, and their development is a multistep process. Bacterial biofilms constitute a large medical problem due to their extremely high resistance to various types of therapeutics, including conventional antibiotics. Several environmental and genetic signals control every step of biofilm development and dispersal. From among the latter, quorum sensing, cyclic diguanosine-5'-monophosphate, and small RNAs are considered as the main regulators. The present review describes the control role of these three regulators in the life cycles of biofilms built by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Vibrio cholerae. The interconnections between their activities are shown. Compounds and strategies which target the activity of these regulators, mainly quorum sensing inhibitors, and their potential role in therapy are also assessed. PMID:26294280

  20. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria. PMID:21778817

  1. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free-floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria. PMID:21778817

  2. Genetic dissection of mycobacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Anil K; Jacobs, William R; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the biological principles of mycobacterial tolerance to antibiotics is crucial for developing shorter anti-tuberculosis regimens. Various in vitro approaches have been developed to identify the conditions that promote mycobacterial persistence against antibiotics. In our laboratories, we have developed a detergent-free in vitro growth model, in which mycobacteria spontaneously grow at the air-medium interface as self-organized multicellular structures, called biofilms. Mycobacterial biofilms harbor a subpopulation of drug tolerant persisters at a greater frequency than their planktonic counterpart. Importantly, development of these structures is genetically programmed, and defective biofilms of isogenic mutants harbor fewer persisters. Thus, genetic analysis of mycobacterial biofilms in vitro could potentially be a powerful tool to unravel the biology of drug tolerance in mycobacteria. In this chapter we describe a method for screening biofilm-defective mutants of mycobacteria in a 96-well format, which readily yields a clonally pure mutant for further studies. PMID:25779318

  3. Lifestyle and testicular dysfunction: a brief update.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Desai, Nisarg R; Ruffoli, Riccardo; Carpi, Angelo

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and defective spermatogenesis is increasing probably due to environmental and lifestyle-related factors. The aim of this review is to briefly describe and comment on the principal lifestyle factors. The recent findings that the electromagnetic waves following the use of the cell phone and the prolonged exposure to the noise stress cause relevant testicular dysfunction in man or animals reinforce the hypothesis of the importance of lifestyle-related factors. PMID:18771892

  4. Biofilm spatial organization by the emerging pathogen Campylobacter jejuni: comparison between NCTC 11168 and 81-176 strains under microaerobic and oxygen-enriched conditions

    PubMed Central

    Turonova, Hana; Briandet, Romain; Rodrigues, Ramila; Hernould, Mathieu; Hayek, Nabil; Stintzi, Alain; Pazlarova, Jarmila; Tresse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    During the last years, Campylobacter has emerged as the leading cause of bacterial foodborne infections in developed countries. Described as an obligate microaerophile, Campylobacter has puzzled scientists by surviving a wide range of environmental oxidative stresses on foods farm to retail, and thereafter intestinal transit and oxidative damage from macrophages to cause human infection. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to explore the biofilm development of two well-described Campylobacter jejuni strains (NCTC 11168 and 81-176) prior to or during cultivation under oxygen-enriched conditions. Quantitative and qualitative appraisal indicated that C. jejuni formed finger-like biofilm structures with an open ultrastructure for 81-176 and a multilayer-like structure for NCTC 11168 under microaerobic conditions (MAC). The presence of motile cells within the biofilm confirmed the maturation of the C. jejuni 81-176 biofilm. Acclimation of cells to oxygen-enriched conditions led to significant enhancement of biofilm formation during the early stages of the process. Exposure to these conditions during biofilm cultivation induced an even greater biofilm development for both strains, indicating that oxygen demand for biofilm formation is higher than for planktonic growth counterparts. Overexpression of cosR in the poorer biofilm-forming strain, NCTC 11168, enhanced biofilm development dramatically by promoting an open ultrastructure similar to that observed for 81-176. Consequently, the regulator CosR is likely to be a key protein in the maturation of C. jejuni biofilm, although it is not linked to oxygen stimulation. These unexpected data advocate challenging studies by reconsidering the paradigm of fastidious requirements for C. jejuni growth when various subpopulations (from quiescent to motile cells) coexist in biofilms. These findings constitute a clear example of a survival strategy used by this emerging human pathogen. PMID:26217332

  5. Surgery, drugs, lifestyle, and hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Dalessandri, K M; Organ, C H

    1995-04-01

    Heart disease is the number-one cause of death in the United States, and more money is spent on its treatment each year than for any other condition. Both epidemiologic and experimental data clearly show that elevated plasma cholesterol levels increase the risk of death from coronary heart disease. Genetic insufficiencies can cause high blood cholesterol, but most people with high cholesterol do not have genetic abnormalities; rather, they have lifestyles that include high-fat diets and little exercise. Cholesterol can be managed aggressively with coronary artery bypass surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, partial ileal bypass, and even liver transplant. Antihyperlipidemic drugs include bile-acid-binding resins, nicotinic acid, fibric acid derivatives, hydroxymethyglutaryl coenzyme A-reductase inhibitors, and the antioxidant probucol. Strict programs of low-fat diets and exercise are also effective for reducing cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, and preventing heart disease without the side effects associated with surgery and drug therapy. Such lifestyle changes are critical to reducing the incidence of heart disease in this country. PMID:7694974

  6. Cone Early Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop cone early maturity is thought to be caused by diffuse infections of cone, just prior to harvest, by Podosphaera macularis. The disease is best managed by limiting the amount of leaf infection by P. macularis prior to bloom. The yield and quality reductions associated with Hop cone early matur...

  7. Residence in biofilms allows Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria to evade the antimicrobial activities of neutrophil-like dHL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark P; Caraher, Emma

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) persist in the airways of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) despite the continuous recruitment of neutrophils. Most members of Bcc are multidrug resistant and can form biofilms. As such, we sought to investigate whether biofilm formation plays a role in protecting Bcc bacteria from neutrophils. Using the neutrophil-like, differentiated cell line, dHL60, we have shown for the first time that Bcc biofilms are enhanced in the presence of these cells. Biofilm biomass was greater following culture in the presence of dHL60 cells than in their absence, likely the result of incorporating dHL60 cellular debris into the biofilm. Moreover, we have demonstrated that mature biofilms (cultured for up to 72 h) induced necrosis in the cells. Established biofilms also acted as a barrier to the migration of the cells and masked the bacteria from being recognized by the cells; dHL60 cells expressed less IL-8 mRNA and secreted significantly less IL-8 when cultured in the presence of biofilms, with respect to planktonic bacteria. Our findings provide evidence that biofilm formation can, at least partly, enable the persistence of Bcc bacteria in the CF airway and emphasize a requirement for anti-biofilm therapeutics. PMID:26371179

  8. Spatial Patterns of Carbonate Biomineralization in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobao; Chopp, David L.; Russin, William A.; Brannon, Paul T.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbially catalyzed precipitation of carbonate minerals is an important process in diverse biological, geological, and engineered systems. However, the processes that regulate carbonate biomineralization and their impacts on biofilms are largely unexplored, mainly because of the inability of current methods to directly observe biomineralization within biofilms. Here, we present a method for in situ, real-time imaging of biomineralization in biofilms and use it to show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms produce morphologically distinct carbonate deposits that substantially modify biofilm structures. The patterns of carbonate biomineralization produced in situ were substantially different from those caused by accumulation of particles produced by abiotic precipitation. Contrary to the common expectation that mineral precipitation should occur at the biofilm surface, we found that biomineralization started at the base of the biofilm. The carbonate deposits grew over time, detaching biofilm-resident cells and deforming the biofilm morphology. These findings indicate that biomineralization is a general regulator of biofilm architecture and properties. PMID:26276112

  9. Spatial patterns of carbonate biomineralization in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobao; Chopp, David L; Russin, William A; Brannon, Paul T; Parsek, Matthew R; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-11-01

    Microbially catalyzed precipitation of carbonate minerals is an important process in diverse biological, geological, and engineered systems. However, the processes that regulate carbonate biomineralization and their impacts on biofilms are largely unexplored, mainly because of the inability of current methods to directly observe biomineralization within biofilms. Here, we present a method for in situ, real-time imaging of biomineralization in biofilms and use it to show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms produce morphologically distinct carbonate deposits that substantially modify biofilm structures. The patterns of carbonate biomineralization produced in situ were substantially different from those caused by accumulation of particles produced by abiotic precipitation. Contrary to the common expectation that mineral precipitation should occur at the biofilm surface, we found that biomineralization started at the base of the biofilm. The carbonate deposits grew over time, detaching biofilm-resident cells and deforming the biofilm morphology. These findings indicate that biomineralization is a general regulator of biofilm architecture and properties. PMID:26276112

  10. Isolation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Biofilms of the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Jachlewski, Silke; Jachlewski, Witold D.; Linne, Uwe; Bräsen, Christopher; Wingender, Jost; Siebers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78°C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER) extraction, and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether, or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability, and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundreds of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25–116 kDa and pI values of 5–8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse enzyme classes, such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases, and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms. PMID:26380258

  11. Anti-Biofilm Activity: A Function of Klebsiella pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos Goncalves, Marina; Delattre, Cédric; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Elboutachfaiti, Redouan; Wadouachi, Anne; Badel, Stéphanie; Bernardi, Thierry; Michaud, Philippe; Forestier, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Competition and cooperation phenomena occur within highly interactive biofilm communities and several non-biocides molecules produced by microorganisms have been described as impairing biofilm formation. In this study, we investigated the anti-biofilm capacities of an ubiquitous and biofilm producing bacterium, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Cell-free supernatant from K. pneumoniae planktonic cultures showed anti-biofilm effects on most Gram positive bacteria tested but also encompassed some Gram negative bacilli. The anti-biofilm non-bactericidal activity was further investigated on Staphylococcus epidermidis, by determining the biofilm biomass, microscopic observations and agglutination measurement through a magnetic bead-mediated agglutination test. Cell-free extracts from K. pneumoniae biofilm (supernatant and acellular matrix) also showed an influence, although to a lesser extend. Chemical analyses indicated that the active molecule was a high molecular weight polysaccharide composed of five monosaccharides: galactose, glucose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid and glucosamine and the main following sugar linkage residues [→2)-α-l-Rhap-(1→]; [→4)-α-l-Rhap-(1→]; [α-d-Galp-(1→]; [→2,3)-α-d-Galp-(1→]; [→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→] and, [→4)-β-d-GlcAp-(1→]. Characterization of this molecule indicated that this component was more likely capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and precoating of abiotic surfaces with CPS extracts from different serotypes impaired the bacteria-surface interactions. Thus the CPS of Klebsiella would exhibit a pleiotropic activity during biofilm formation, both stimulating the initial adhesion and maturation steps as previously described, but also repelling potential competitors. PMID:24932475

  12. The diguanylate cyclase GcbA facilitates Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm dispersion by activating BdlA.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga E; Cherny, Kathryn E; Sauer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm dispersion is a highly regulated process that allows biofilm bacteria to respond to changing environmental conditions and to disseminate to new locations. The dispersion of biofilms formed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known to require a number of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-degrading phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and the chemosensory protein BdlA, with BdlA playing a pivotal role in regulating PDE activity and enabling dispersion in response to a wide array of cues. BdlA is activated during biofilm growth via posttranslational modifications and nonprocessive cleavage in a manner that is dependent on elevated c-di-GMP levels. Here, we provide evidence that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) GcbA contributes to the regulation of BdlA cleavage shortly after initial cellular attachment to surfaces and, thus, plays an essential role in allowing biofilm cells to disperse in response to increasing concentrations of a variety of substances, including carbohydrates, heavy metals, and nitric oxide. DGC activity of GcbA was required for its function, as a catalytically inactive variant could not rescue impaired BdlA processing or the dispersion-deficient phenotype of gcbA mutant biofilms to wild-type levels. While modulating BdlA cleavage during biofilm growth, GcbA itself was found to be subject to c-di-GMP-dependent and growth-mode-specific regulation. GcbA production was suppressed in mature wild-type biofilms and could be induced by reducing c-di-GMP levels via overexpression of genes encoding PDEs. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that the regulatory functions of c-di-GMP-synthesizing DGCs expand beyond surface attachment and biofilm formation and illustrate a novel role for DGCs in the regulation of the reverse sessile-motile transition of dispersion. PMID:25331436

  13. Isolation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Biofilms of the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Jachlewski, Silke; Jachlewski, Witold D; Linne, Uwe; Bräsen, Christopher; Wingender, Jost; Siebers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78°C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER) extraction, and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether, or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability, and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundreds of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25-116 kDa and pI values of 5-8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse enzyme classes, such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases, and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms. PMID:26380258

  14. The Diguanylate Cyclase GcbA Facilitates Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Dispersion by Activating BdlA

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Olga E.; Cherny, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm dispersion is a highly regulated process that allows biofilm bacteria to respond to changing environmental conditions and to disseminate to new locations. The dispersion of biofilms formed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known to require a number of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-degrading phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and the chemosensory protein BdlA, with BdlA playing a pivotal role in regulating PDE activity and enabling dispersion in response to a wide array of cues. BdlA is activated during biofilm growth via posttranslational modifications and nonprocessive cleavage in a manner that is dependent on elevated c-di-GMP levels. Here, we provide evidence that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) GcbA contributes to the regulation of BdlA cleavage shortly after initial cellular attachment to surfaces and, thus, plays an essential role in allowing biofilm cells to disperse in response to increasing concentrations of a variety of substances, including carbohydrates, heavy metals, and nitric oxide. DGC activity of GcbA was required for its function, as a catalytically inactive variant could not rescue impaired BdlA processing or the dispersion-deficient phenotype of gcbA mutant biofilms to wild-type levels. While modulating BdlA cleavage during biofilm growth, GcbA itself was found to be subject to c-di-GMP-dependent and growth-mode-specific regulation. GcbA production was suppressed in mature wild-type biofilms and could be induced by reducing c-di-GMP levels via overexpression of genes encoding PDEs. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that the regulatory functions of c-di-GMP-synthesizing DGCs expand beyond surface attachment and biofilm formation and illustrate a novel role for DGCs in the regulation of the reverse sessile-motile transition of dispersion. PMID:25331436

  15. Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Application to Nitrifying Biofilm: Comparison of Biofilm Penetration, Activity, and Viability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable and effective biofilm control maintains public health. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. ...

  16. Posttranslational modification and sequence variation of redox-active proteins correlate with biofilm life cycle in natural microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Steven; Erickson, Brian K; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing proteins recovered from natural microbial communities affords the opportunity to correlate protein expression and modification with environmental factors, including species composition and successional stage. Proteogenomic and biochemical studies of pellicle biofilms from subsurface acid mine drainage streams have shown abundant cytochromes from the dominant organism, Leptospirillum Group II. These cytochromes are proposed to be key proteins in aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, the dominant mode of cellular energy generation by the biofilms. In this study, we determined that posttranslational modification and expression of amino-acid sequence variants change as a function of biofilm maturation. For Cytochrome579 (Cyt579), the most abundant cytochrome in the biofilms, late developmental-stage biofilms differed from early-stage biofilms in N-terminal truncations and decreased redox potentials. Expression of sequence variants of two monoheme c-type cytochromes also depended on biofilm development. For Cyt572, an abundant membrane-bound cytochrome, the expression of multiple sequence variants was observed in both early and late developmental-stage biofilms; however, redox potentials of Cyt572 from these different sources did not vary significantly. These cytochrome analyses show a complex response of the Leptospirillum Group II electron transport chain to growth within a microbial community and illustrate the power of multiple proteomics techniques to define biochemistry in natural systems.

  17. The intraoral device of overlaid disk-holding splints as a new in situ oral biofilm model

    PubMed Central

    Prada-López, Isabel; Quintas, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To design a device that allows the formation of in situ oral biofilm with similar characteristics to those from the dental plaque, overcoming the limitations of previous devices. Study Design: The Intraoral Device of Overlaid Disk-holding Splints (IDODS) was designed and manufactured. To test its validity, five healthy adult volunteers wore them for two and four days allowing the biofilm to grow without any type of distortion. After each period, the thickness, vitality and structure of the formed biofilm were measured with a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) in combination with a dual fluorescence solution. All volunteers filled out a Likert-type questionnaire to evaluate the device. Results: Mean bacterial vitality in the 2- and 4-day biofilms was 71% and 63%, respectively. Mean thicknesses were 21 µm and 28 µm, respectively. There was predominance in the open and heterogeneous structure whose complexity was ascending as the biofilm matured. The results obtained from the questionnaire were 2/5 in the influence in aesthetics, 3.4/5 in comfort, and 5/5 in ease of maintaining oral hygiene and withdrawal from the oral cavity. Conclusions: A biofilm with optimum characteristics was obtained by IDODS. Its use is associated with good aesthetic and comfort results and is absent of functional limitations, allowing optimal oral hygiene without altering the structure of the in situ oral biofilm. Key words:Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope, fluorochromes, in situ, intraoral device, oral biofilm. PMID:25810823

  18. Probiotic lactobacilli inhibit early stages of Candida albicans biofilm development by reducing their growth, cell adhesion, and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor Haruo; Wang, Yi; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus species on different phases of Candida albicans biofilm development. Quantification of biofilm growth and ultrastructural analyses were performed on C. albicans biofilms treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus planktonic cell suspensions as well as their supernatants. Planktonic lactobacilli induced a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the number of biofilm cells (25.5-61.8 %) depending on the probiotic strain and the biofilm phase. L. rhamnosus supernatants had no significant effect on the mature biofilm (p > 0.05), but significantly reduced the early stages of Candida biofilm formation (p < 0.01). Microscopic analyses revealed that L. rhamnosus suspensions reduced Candida hyphal differentiation, leading to a predominance of budding growth. All lactobacilli negatively impacted C. albicans yeast-to-hyphae differentiation and biofilm formation. The inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus on C. albicans entailed both cell-cell interactions and secretion of exometabolites that may impact on pathogenic attributes associated with C. albicans colonization on host surfaces and yeast filamentation. This study clarifies, for the first time, the mechanics of how Lactobacillus species may antagonize C. albicans host colonization. Our data elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms that define the probiotic candicidal activity of lactobacilli, thus supporting their utility as an adjunctive therapeutic mode against mucosal candidal infections. PMID:27087525

  19. Control of Candida albicans metabolism and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines.

    PubMed

    Morales, Diana K; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E P; Jacobs, Nicholas J; Hogan, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentrations of any of three different phenazines (pyocyanin, phenazine methosulfate, and phenazine-1-carboxylate) allowed growth but affected the development of C. albicans wrinkled colony biofilms and inhibited the fungal yeast-to-filament transition. Phenazines impaired C. albicans growth on nonfermentable carbon sources and led to increased production of fermentation products (ethanol, glycerol, and acetate) in glucose-containing medium, leading us to propose that phenazines specifically inhibited respiration. Methylene blue, another inhibitor of respiration, also prevented the formation of structured colony biofilms. The inhibition of filamentation and colony wrinkling was not solely due to lowered extracellular pH induced by fermentation. Compared to smooth, unstructured colonies, wrinkled colony biofilms had higher oxygen concentrations within the colony, and wrinkled regions of these colonies had higher levels of respiration. Together, our data suggest that the structure of the fungal biofilm promotes access to oxygen and enhances respiratory metabolism and that the perturbation of respiration by bacterial molecules such as phenazines or compounds with similar activities disrupts these pathways. These findings may suggest new ways to limit fungal biofilms in the context of disease. IMPORTANCE Many of the infections caused by Candida albicans, a major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, involve both morphological transitions and the formation of surface-associated biofilms. Through the

  20. In vitro Comparison of Anti-Biofilm Effects against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Imipenem, Colistin, Tigecycline, Rifampicin and Combinations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as one of the most important nosocomial pathogens. In addition to the diverse resistance mechanisms, some A. baumannii strains are known to have biofilm-producing capacity, thereby decreasing antibiotic effectiveness. Materials and Methods This study was designed to assess biofilm-producing capacity of three different MDR A. baumannii strains with diverse resistance mechanisms (OXA-51, IMP-1 and VIM-2 type β-lactamases), and intended to compare the effect of each antibiotic regimen (rifampicin, colistin, imipenem, tigecycline, rifampicin-imipenem and rifampicin-colistin) on mature A. baumannii biofilms using in vitro polystyrene plate biofilm assay. Results Among three MDR A. baumannii strains, only VIM-2 strain produced strong biofilm compared to the controls (optical density, 8.04 ± 2.16 vs. 0.49 ± 0.26). Regarding VIM-2 strains, none of imipenem, colistin and rifampicin reduced biofilm formation alone at MIC of each antibiotic agent (inhibition of biofilm synthesis, less than 30%). In comparison, tigecyclin (0.76 ± 0.23), imipenem-rifampicin (1.07 ± 0.31) and colistin-rifampicin (1.47 ± 0.54) showed a significant inhibition of biofilm synthesis compared to the positive controls at 48 hours after incubation (P<0.01). Tigecycline inhibited biofilm formation even at the one fourth level of MIC (1.17 ± 0.21). Likewise, both imipenem and colistin were also effective even with the reduced concentrations when those were combined with rifampicin. Such biofilm-inhibiting effects with those antibiotic regimens sustained up to 96 hours after incubation. Conclusion Tigecycline, imipenem-rifampicin and colistin-rifampicin would be effective for the prevention or reduction of biofilm formation caused by A. baumannii strains. PMID:25844260

  1. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm‐grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline‐binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  2. Biofilm formation by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Stark, R M; Gerwig, G J; Pitman, R S; Potts, L F; Williams, N A; Greenman, J; Weinzweig, I P; Hirst, T R; Millar, M R

    1999-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori NCTC 11637 produces a water-insoluble biofilm when grown under defined conditions with a high carbon:nitrogen ratio in continuous culture and in 10% strength Brucella broth supplemented with 3 g l-1 glucose. Biofilm accumulated at the air/liquid interface of the culture. Light microscopy of frozen sections of the biofilm material showed few bacterial cells in the mass of the biofilm. The material stained with periodic acid Schiff's reagent. Fucose, glucose, galactose, and glycero-manno-heptose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid were identified in partially purified and in crude material, using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The sugar composition strongly indicates the presence of a polysaccharide as a component of the biofilm material. Antibodies (IgG) to partially purified material were found in both sero-positive and sero-negative individuals. Treatment of the biofilm material with periodic acid reduced or abolished immunoreactivity. Treatment with 5 mol l-1 urea at 100 degrees C and with phenol did not remove antigenic recognition by patient sera. The production of a water-insoluble biofilm by H. pylori may be important in enhancing resistance to host defence factors and antibiotics, and in microenvironmental pH homeostasis facilitating the growth and survival of H. pylori in vivo. PMID:10063642

  3. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development. PMID:27139354

  4. In Lactobacillus pentosus, the olive brine adaptation genes are required for biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Perpetuini, G; Pham-Hoang, B N; Scornec, H; Tofalo, R; Schirone, M; Suzzi, G; Cavin, J F; Waché, Y; Corsetti, A; Licandro-Seraut, H

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus pentosus is one of the few lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species capable of surviving in olive brine, and thus desirable during table olive fermentation. We have recently generated mutants of the efficient strain L. pentosus C11 by transposon mutagenesis and identified five mutants unable to survive and adapt to olive brine conditions. Since biofilm formation represents one of the main bacterial strategy to survive in stressful environments, in this study, the capacity of adhesion and formation of biofilm on olive skin was investigated for this strain and five derivative mutants which are interrupted in metabolic genes (enoA1 and gpi), and in genes of unknown function ("oba" genes). Confocal microscopy together with bacteria count revealed that the sessile state represented the prevailing L. pentosus C11 life-style during table olive fermentation. The characterization of cell surface properties showed that mutants present less hydrophobic and basic properties than the wild type (WT). In fact, their ability to adhere to both abiotic (polystyrene plates) and biotic (olive skin) surfaces was lower than that of the WT. Confocal microscopy revealed that mutants adhered sparsely to the olive skin instead of building a thin, multilayer biofilm. Moreover, RT-qPCR showed that the three genes enoA1, gpi and obaC were upregulated in the olive biofilm compared to the planktonic state. Thus enoA1, gpi and "oba" genes are necessary in L. pentosus to form an organized biofilm on the olive skin. PMID:26447789

  5. Activity of Tobramycin against Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Grown as Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sarah; Beaudoin, Trevor; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Caraher, Emma; Zlosnik, James E. A.; Speert, David P.; LiPuma, John J.; Tullis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infection with Burkholderia cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is associated with more-rapid lung function decline and earlier death than in CF patients without this infection. In this study, we used confocal microscopy to visualize the effects of various concentrations of tobramycin, achievable with systemic and aerosolized drug administration, on mature B. cepacia complex biofilms, both in the presence and absence of CF sputum. After 24 h of growth, biofilm thickness was significantly reduced by exposure to 2,000 μg/ml of tobramycin for Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis; 200 μg/ml of tobramycin was sufficient to reduce the thickness of Burkholderia dolosa biofilm. With a more mature 48-h biofilm, significant reductions in thickness were seen with tobramycin at concentrations of ≥100 μg/ml for all Burkholderia species. In addition, an increased ratio of dead to live cells was observed in comparison to control with tobramycin concentrations of ≥200 μg/ml for B. cepacia and B. dolosa (24 h) and ≥100 μg/ml for Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. dolosa (48 h). Although sputum significantly increased biofilm thickness, tobramycin concentrations of 1,000 μg/ml were still able to significantly reduce biofilm thickness of all B. cepacia complex species with the exception of B. vietnamiensis. In the presence of sputum, 1,000 μg/ml of tobramycin significantly increased the dead-to-live ratio only for B. multivorans compared to control. In summary, although killing is attenuated, high-dose tobramycin can effectively decrease the thickness of B. cepacia complex biofilms, even in the presence of sputum, suggesting a possible role as a suppressive therapy in CF. PMID:26503664

  6. Data Product Maturity

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-25

    ... document, maturity levels are provided separately for each scientific data set (SDS) included with the data files. The data product ... indiscriminate use of these data products as the basis for research findings, journal publications, and/or presentations.   ...

  7. The ``Swiss cheese'' instability of bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria often adhere to surfaces, where they develop polymer-encased communities (biofilms) that display dramatic resistance to antibiotic treatment. A better understanding of cell detachment from biofilms may lead to novel strategies for biofilm disruption. Here we describe a new detachment mode, whereby a biofilm develops a nearly regular array of ~50-100 μm holes. Using surface-treated microfluidic devices, we create biofilms of controlled shape and size. After the passage of an air plug, the break-up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a ``Swiss cheese'' pattern is left in the residual biofilm. Fluorescent staining of the polymeric matrix (EPS) reveals that resistance to cell dislodgement correlates with local biofilm age, early settlers having had more time to hunker down. Because few survivors suffice to regrow a biofilm, these results point at the importance of considering microscale heterogeneity in assessing the effectiveness of biofilm removal strategies.

  8. Impact of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength.

    PubMed

    Paramonova, E; Kalmykowa, O J; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Sharma, P K

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical removal of oral biofilms is ubiquitously accepted as the best way to prevent caries and periodontal diseases. Removal effectiveness strongly depends on biofilm strength. To investigate the influence of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength, we grew single- and multi-species biofilms of Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii TV14-J1, and full dental plaque at shear rates ranging from 0.1 to 50 1/sec and measured their compressive strength. Subsequently, biofilm architecture was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Multi-species biofilms were stronger than single-species biofilms, with strength values ranging from 6 to 51 Pa and from 5 to 17 Pa, respectively. In response to increased hydrodynamic shear, biofilm strength decreased, and architecture changed from uniform carpet-like to more "fluffy" with higher thickness. S. oralis biofilms grown under variable shear of 7 and 50 1/sec possessed properties intermediate of those measured at the respective single shears. PMID:19783800

  9. Uranium removal and microbial community in a H2-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Cornette de Saint Cyr, Louis; Zevin, Alexander S; Carey, Sara E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for its capacity to reduce and remove hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from water. After a startup period that allowed slow-growing U(VI) reducers to form biofilms, the MBfR successfully achieved and maintained 94-95% U(VI) removal over 8 months when the U surface loading was 6-11 e(-) mEq/m(2)-day. The MBfR biofilm was capable of self-recovery after a disturbance due to oxygen exposure. Nanocrystalline UO2 aggregates and amorphous U precipitates were associated with vegetative cells and apparently mature spores that accumulated in the biofilm matrix. Despite inoculation with a concentrated suspension of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, this bacterium was not present in the U(VI)-reducing biofilm. Instead, the most abundant group in the biofilm community contained U(VI) reducers in the Rhodocyclaceae family when U(VI) was the only electron acceptor. When sulfate was present, the community dramatically shifted to the Clostridiaceae family, which included spores that were potentially involved in U(VI) reduction. PMID:25073000

  10. Control of bacterial biofilm growth on surfaces by nanostructural mechanics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, A. K.; Hochbaum, A. I.; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-associated communities of bacteria, called biofilms, pervade natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms are resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial treatments and therefore pose persistent pathogenic threats. The use of surface chemistry to inhibit biofilm growth has been found to only transiently affect initial attachment. In this work, we investigate the tunable effects of physical surface properties, including high-aspect-ratio (HAR) surface nanostructure arrays recently reported to induce long-range spontaneous spatial patterning of bacteria on the surface. The functional parameters and length scale regimes that control such artificial patterning for the rod-shaped pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa are elucidated through a combinatorial approach. We further report a crossover regime of biofilm growth on a HAR nanostructured surface versus the nanostructure effective stiffness. When the 'softness' of the hair-like nanoarray is increased beyond a threshold value, biofilm growth is inhibited as compared to a flat control surface. This result is consistent with the mechanoselective adhesion of bacteria to surfaces. Therefore by combining nanoarray-induced bacterial patterning and modulating the effective stiffness of the nanoarray—thus mimicking an extremely compliant flat surface—bacterial mechanoselective adhesion can be exploited to control and inhibit biofilm growth.

  11. Bidirectional microbial electron transfer: Switching an acetate oxidizing biofilm to nitrate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Pous, Narcís; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Fiset, Erika; Bañeras, Lluis; Trably, Eric; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bernet, Nicolas; Puig, Sebastià

    2016-01-15

    Up to date a few electroactive bacteria embedded in biofilms are described to catalyze both anodic and cathodic reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (i.e. bidirectional electron transfer). How these bacteria transfer electrons to or from the electrode is still uncertain. In this study the extracellular electron transfer mechanism of bacteria within an electroactive biofilm was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). First, a mature anodic electroactive biofilm was developed from an activated sludge sample (inoculum), acetate as electron donor and a poised electrode (+397mV vs. SHE). Later, this biofilm was "switched" to biocathodic conditions by feeding it with a medium containing nitrates and poising the electrode at -303mV vs. SHE. The electrochemical characterization indicated that both, acetate oxidation and nitrate reduction took place at a similar formal potential of -175±05 and -175±34mV vs. SHE, respectively. The biofilm was predominantly composed by Geobacter sp. at both experimental conditions. Taken together, the results indicated that both processes could be catalyzed by using the same electron conduit, and most likely by the same bacterial consortium. Hence, this study suggests that electroactive bacteria within biofilms could use the same electron transfer conduit for catalyzing anodic and cathodic reactions. PMID:26339932

  12. In Vivo Inhibitory Effect on the Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans by Liverwort Derived Riccardin D

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Ma, Yukui; Zhang, Li; Guo, Feng; Ren, Lei; Yang, Rui; Li, Ying; Lou, Hongxiang

    2012-01-01

    Riccardin D, a macrocyclic bisbibenzyl isolated from Chinese liverwort Dumortiera hirsute, has been proved to have inhibitory effect on biofilms formation of Candida albicans in in vitro study. Our present study aims to investigate the in vivo effect and mechanisms of riccardin D against C. albicans biofilms when used alone or in combination with clinical using antifungal agent fluconazole. XTT reduction assay revealed riccardin D had both prophylactic and therapeutic effect against C. albicans biofilms formation in a dose-dependent manner when using a central venous catheter related infective animal model. Scanning electron microscope and laser confocal scanning microscope showed that the morphology of biofilms was altered remarkably after riccardin D treatment, especially hypha growth inhibition. To uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms, quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed to observe the variation of related genes. The downregulation of hypha-specific genes such as ALS1, ALS3, ECE1, EFG1, HWP1 and CDC35 following riccardin D treatment suggested riccardin D inhibited the Ras-cAMP-Efg pathway to retard the hypha formation, then leading to the defect of biofilms maturation. Moreover, riccardin D displayed an increased antifungal activity when administered in combination with fluconazole. Our study provides a potential clinical application to eliminate the biofilms of relevant pathogens. PMID:22545115

  13. The Antibacterial Activity of Acetic Acid against Biofilm-Producing Pathogens of Relevance to Burns Patients

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Fenella D.; Rauf, Maryam; Moiemen, Naiem S.; Bamford, Amy; Wearn, Christopher M.; Fraise, Adam P.; Lund, Peter A.; Oppenheim, Beryl A.; Webber, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Localised infections, and burn wound sepsis are key concerns in the treatment of burns patients, and prevention of colonisation largely relies on biocides. Acetic acid has been shown to have good antibacterial activity against various planktonic organisms, however data is limited on efficacy, and few studies have been performed on biofilms. Objectives We sought to investigate the antibacterial activity of acetic acid against important burn wound colonising organisms growing planktonically and as biofilms. Methods Laboratory experiments were performed to test the ability of acetic acid to inhibit growth of pathogens, inhibit the formation of biofilms, and eradicate pre-formed biofilms. Results Twenty-nine isolates of common wound-infecting pathogens were tested. Acetic acid was antibacterial against planktonic growth, with an minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.16–0.31% for all isolates, and was also able to prevent formation of biofilms (at 0.31%). Eradication of mature biofilms was observed for all isolates after three hours of exposure. Conclusions This study provides evidence that acetic acid can inhibit growth of key burn wound pathogens when used at very dilute concentrations. Owing to current concerns of the reducing efficacy of systemic antibiotics, this novel biocide application offers great promise as a cheap and effective measure to treat infections in burns patients. PMID:26352256

  14. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential. PMID:24031469

  15. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential. PMID:24031469

  16. msaABCR operon positively regulates biofilm development by repressing proteases and autolysis in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sahukhal, Gyan S.; Batte, Justin L.; Elasri, Mohamed O.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-acquired infections. One of the most important aspects of staphylococcal infections is biofilm development within the host, which renders the bacterium resistant to the host's immune response and antimicrobial agents. Biofilm development is very complex and involves several regulators that ensure cell survival on surfaces within the extracellular polymeric matrix. Previously, we identified the msaABCR operon as an additional positive regulator of biofilm formation. In this study, we define the regulatory pathway by which msaABCR controls biofilm formation. We demonstrate that the msaABCR operon is a negative regulator of proteases. The control of protease production mediates the processing of the major autolysin, Atl, and thus regulates the rate of autolysis. In the absence of the msaABCR operon, Atl is processed by proteases at a high rate, leading to increased cell death and a defect in biofilm maturation. We conclude that the msaABCR operon plays a key role in maintaining the balance between autolysis and growth within the staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:25724778

  17. Impact of Desulfovibrio alaskensis biofilms on corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Wikieł, Agata J; Datsenko, Iaryna; Vera, Mario; Sand, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Sulfate reducing prokaryotes are associated with the steel deterioration. They build heterogeneous biofilms, capable of accelerating corrosion processes. In this study metabolic activity and the biofilm development of Desulfovibrio alaskensis were correlated to electrochemical response of carbon steel surface. In the exponential growth phase sulfide concentration reached its maximum of about 10mM. This phenomenon was responsible for the parallel increase in the corrosion potential (Ecorr) up to -720mV (vs. SCE). Subsequently, during the intensive biofilm formation and development another Ecorr peak (-710mV vs. SCE) occurred. Decrease in Ecorr was registered during the biofilm maturation and kept stable, being 20mV lower than in the control. While carbon steel was protected from the microbial attachment and exposed to metabolic products, only one potential maximum (-730mV vs. SCE) was recorded. Here Ecorr variations coincided with sulfide concentration changes and kept at 120mV lower vs. the control. Weight loss examinations revealed corrosion rates, which did not exceed 0.05mm/y. Confocal microscopy suggested the importance of extracellular proteins in the biofilm formation. Above 150 proteins were detected in the EPS matrix. Surface effects of biofilm and metabolic products were visualised, revealing the role of attached microorganisms in the localised corrosion. PMID:24238898

  18. Statins and Antimicrobial Effects: Simvastatin as a Potential Drug against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Gilson Cesar; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; de Andrade, Eduardo Dias

    2015-01-01

    Statins are important lipid-lowering agents with other pleiotropic effects. Several studies have explored a possible protective effect of statins to reduce the morbidity and mortality of many infectious diseases. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main pathogens implicated in nosocomial infections; its ability to form biofilms makes treatment difficult. The present study observed the MIC of atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin against S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Simvastatin was the only agent with activity against clinical isolates and reference strains of methicilin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Thus, the effects of simvastatin on the growth, viability and biofilm formation of S. aureus were tested. In addition, a possible synergistic effect between simvastatin and vancomycin was evaluated. Simvastatin’s MIC was 15.65 µg/mL for S. aureus 29213 and 31.25 µg/mL for the other strains of S. aureus. The effect of simvastatin was bactericidal at 4xMIC and bacteriostatic at the MIC concentration. No synergistic effect was found between simvastatin and vancomycin. However, the results obtained against S. aureus biofilms showed that, in addition to inhibiting adhesion and biofilm formation at concentrations from 1/16xMIC to 4xMIC, simvastatin was also able to act against mature biofilms, reducing cell viability and extra-polysaccharide production. In conclusion, simvastatin showed pronounced antimicrobial activity against S. aureus biofilms, reducing their formation and viability. PMID:26020797

  19. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Dental Unit Biofilms and Treatment Water Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Ming; Svoboda, Kathy K.H.; Giletto, Anthony; Seibert, Jeff; Puttaiah, Raghunath

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To study effects of various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on mature waterline biofilms and in controlling planktonic (free-floating) organisms in simulated dental treatment water systems; and to study in vitro the effects of 2%, 3%, and 7% hydrogen peroxide on the removal of mature biofilms and inorganic compounds in dental waterlines. Methods: Four units of an automated dental unit water system simulation device was used for 12 weeks. All units were initially cleaned to control biofilms and inorganic deposits. H2O2 at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3% was used weekly for periodic cleaning in three treatment group units (units 1, 2 & 3), with 0.05%, 0.15% and 0.25% H2O2 in municipal water used as irrigant respectively. The control unit (unit 4) did not have weekly cleanings and used municipal water as irrigant. Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to study deposits on lines, and weekly heterotrophic plate counts done to study effluent water contamination. A 24 hour in vitro challenge test with 7%, 3% and 2% H2O2 on mature biofilms was conducted using harvested waterlines to study biofilm and inorganic deposit removal. Results: Heterotrophic plate counts of effluent water showed that the control unit reached contamination levels in excess of 400,000 CFU/mL while all treatment units showed contamination levels <500 CFU/mL through most of the 12 weeks. All treatment units showed varying levels of biofilm and inorganic deposit control in this short 12 week study. The in vitro challenge test showed although there was biofilm control, there was no eradication even when 7% H2O2 was used for 24 hours. Conclusions: 2% H2O2 used as a periodic cleaner, and diluted to 0.05% in municipal water for irrigation was beneficial in controlling biofilm and planktonic contamination in dental unit water systems. However, to remove well established biofilms, it may take more than 2 months when initial and multiple periodic cleanings

  20. Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157467.html Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics: Report Germ forms slimy layer that makes it ... bacteria that causes Lyme disease protects itself from antibiotics by forming a slime-like layer called a ...

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of Infectious Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Head, David

    2016-01-01

    The removal of infectious biofilms from tissues or implanted devices and their transmission through fluid transport systems depends in part of the mechanical properties of their polymeric matrix. Linking the various physical and chemical microscopic interactions to macroscopic deformation and failure modes promises to unveil design principles for novel therapeutic strategies targeting biofilm eradication, and provide a predictive capability to accelerate the development of devices, water lines, etc, that minimise microbial dispersal. Here, our current understanding of biofilm mechanics is appraised from the perspective of biophysics , with an emphasis on constitutive modelling that has been highly successful in soft matter. Fitting rheometric data to viscoelastic models has quantified linear and nonlinear stress relaxation mechanisms, how they vary between species and environments, and how candidate chemical treatments alter the mechanical response. The rich interplay between growth, mechanics and hydrodynamics is just becoming amenable to computational modelling and promises to provide unprecedented characterisation of infectious biofilms in their native state. PMID:27193540

  2. Bacterial resistance in biofilm-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Perumal, Govindaraj; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are structured groups of different bacterial species that are responsible for most chronic and recurrent infections. Biofilm-related infections reoccur in approximately 65-80% of cases. Bacteria associated with the biofilm are highly resistant to antibiotics. Knowledge of biofilm formation, its propagation and the resistance associated with it is scant and a multidisciplinary approach is followed to understand the science and develop strategies to address this problem. This article discusses the role of various biochemical factors, molecular mechanisms and altered host environment causes associated with bacterial resistance in biofilm. It also reveals the target sites and different multidisciplinary strategies adapted for destroying or preventing the formation of biofilms. PMID:26517598

  3. Bacterial Biofilms as Complex Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlamakis, Hera

    2010-03-01

    Many microbial populations form surface-associated multicellular communities known as biofilms. These multicellular communities are encased in a self-produced extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides and proteins. Division of labor is a key feature of these communities and different cells serve distinct functions. We have found that in biofilms of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, different cell types including matrix-producing and sporulating cells coexist and localize to distinct regions within the structured community. We were interested in understanding how these different cell types arise. Using fluorescence reporters under the control of promoters that are specific for distinct cell types we were able to follow the dynamics of differentiation throughout biofilm development. We found that a series of extracellular signals leads to differentiation of distinct cell types during biofilm formation. In addition, we found that extracellular matrix functions as a differentiation signal for timely sporulation within a biofilm and mutants unable to produce matrix were delayed in sporulation. Our results indicate that within a biofilm, cell-cell signaling is directional in that one cell type produces a signal that is sensed by another distinct cell type. Furthermore, once differentiated, cells become resistant to the action of other signaling molecules making it possible to maintain distinct cell populations over prolonged periods.

  4. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  5. Exopolysaccharides produced by Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases modulate the establishment of microcolonies within multispecies biofilms.

    PubMed

    Koo, H; Xiao, J; Klein, M I; Jeon, J G

    2010-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key contributor to the formation of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) matrix in dental biofilms. The exopolysaccharides, which are mostly glucans synthesized by streptococcal glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), provide binding sites that promote accumulation of microorganisms on the tooth surface and further establishment of pathogenic biofilms. This study explored (i) the role of S. mutans Gtfs in the development of the EPS matrix and microcolonies in biofilms, (ii) the influence of exopolysaccharides on formation of microcolonies, and (iii) establishment of S. mutans in a multispecies biofilm in vitro using a novel fluorescence labeling technique. Our data show that the ability of S. mutans strains defective in the gtfB gene or the gtfB and gtfC genes to form microcolonies on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surfaces was markedly disrupted. However, deletion of both gtfB (associated with insoluble glucan synthesis) and gtfC (associated with insoluble and soluble glucan synthesis) is required for the maximum reduction in EPS matrix and biofilm formation. S. mutans grown with sucrose in the presence of Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces naeslundii steadily formed exopolysaccharides, which allowed the initial clustering of bacterial cells and further development into highly structured microcolonies. Concomitantly, S. mutans became the major species in the mature biofilm. Neither the EPS matrix nor microcolonies were formed in the presence of glucose in the multispecies biofilm. Our data show that GtfB and GtfC are essential for establishment of the EPS matrix, but GtfB appears to be responsible for formation of microcolonies by S. mutans; these Gtf-mediated processes may enhance the competitiveness of S. mutans in the multispecies environment in biofilms on tooth surfaces. PMID:20233920

  6. Characterization of the algC Gene Expression Pattern in the Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii AIIMS 7 and Correlation with Biofilm Development on Abiotic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Praveen K.; Iyer, Pavithra S.; Barage, Sagar H.; Sonawane, Kailas D.; Chopade, Balu A.

    2014-01-01

    Relative quantification of algC gene expression was evaluated in the multidrug resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii AIIMS 7 biofilm (3 to 96 h, on polystyrene surface) compared to the planktonic counterparts. Comparison revealed differential algC expression pattern with maximum 81.59-fold increase in biofilm cells versus 3.24-fold in planktonic cells (P < 0.05). Expression levels strongly correlated with specific biofilm stages (scale of 3 to 96 h), coinciding maximum at initial surface attachment stage (9 h) and biofilm maturation stage (48 h). Cloning, heterologous expression, and bioinformatics analyses indicated algC gene product as the bifunctional enzyme phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM) of ∼53 kDa size, which augmented biofilms significantly in algC clones compared to controls (lacking algC gene), further localized by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, molecular dynamics analysis on the three-dimensional structure of PMM/PGM (simulated up to 10 ns) revealed enzyme structure as stable and similar to that in P. aeruginosa (synthesis of alginate and lipopolysaccharide core) and involved in constitution of biofilm EPS (extracellular polymeric substances). Our observation on differential expression pattern of algC having strong correlation with important biofilm stages, scanning electron-microscopic evidence of biofilm augmentation taken together with predictive enzyme functions via molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, proposes a new basis of A. baumannii AIIMS 7 biofilm development on inanimate surfaces. PMID:25544957

  7. Obesity: dietary and lifestyle management.

    PubMed

    Vesely, Jennifer M; DeMattia, Laure G

    2014-10-01

    Lifestyle modifications should be recommended for every patient dealing with overweight or obesity. Behavior modification is the cornerstone of management. Motivational interviewing, goal setting, and self-monitoring are three techniques with proven efficacy for weight reduction. Because an energy deficit is required to promote weight loss, goal setting should be focused on achieving an overall caloric reduction. No single diet has proven to be superior to others overall in terms of weight loss outcomes. However, a low-carbohydrate (ie, ketogenic) diet has been shown to reduce insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and may be considered for this subgroup of patients. There continue to be conflicting views regarding the superiority of low glycemic index foods for weight loss. Exercise alone has not been shown to produce substantial weight loss, but it is helpful during the weight loss phase to preserve lean muscle mass, and it has a role in weight maintenance. Though sleep deprivation has been implicated in weight gain, the effect of improving sleep quality/duration on reducing excess weight has yet to be studied adequately. PMID:25325916

  8. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Moser, Claus; Wang, Heng-Zhuang; Høiby, Niels; Song, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the difficulties for the clinical treatment of biofilm infections. Clinical and laboratory investigations demonstrated a perspicuous correlation between biofilm infection and medical foreign bodies or indwelling devices. Clinical observations and experimental studies indicated clearly that antibiotic treatment alone is in most cases insufficient to eradicate biofilm infections. Therefore, to effectively treat biofilm infections with currently available antibiotics and evaluate the outcomes become important and urgent for clinicians. The review summarizes the latest progress in treatment of clinical biofilm infections and scientific investigations, discusses the diagnosis and treatment of different biofilm infections and introduces the promising laboratory progress, which may contribute to prevention or cure of biofilm infections. We conclude that, an efficient treatment of biofilm infections needs a well-established multidisciplinary collaboration, which includes removal of the infected foreign bodies, selection of biofilm-active, sensitive and well-penetrating antibiotics, systemic or topical antibiotic administration in high dosage and combinations, and administration of anti-quorum sensing or biofilm dispersal agents. PMID:25504208

  9. Doubt, Struggle and Growth: A Profile of the Mature Woman in the Student Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Carey D.; Blank, Thomas O.

    This study was conducted to develop a profile of the mature woman who seeks a postsecondary education, to ascertain the personal and social reasons that influence an adult woman to return to school, and to describe the interpersonal adjustments that accompany this change in life-style. Data were collected via a 50-item fixed-response questionnaire…

  10. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  11. D-amino acids trigger biofilm disassembly.

    PubMed

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. In our studies outlined here, we found that, before biofilm disassembly, Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofilms in the presence of D-amino acids contained alterations in a protein (YqxM) required for the formation and anchoring of the fibers to the cell. D-amino acids also prevented biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-amino acids are produced by many bacteria and, thus, may be a widespread signal for biofilm disassembly. PMID:20431016

  12. Investigating Biofilm Recalcitrance In Pipe Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, S.; Stewart, P. S.; Hozalski, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    It is challenging to remove biofilms from pipe walls owing to their recalcitrant nature. Several physiological explanations resulting from the community existence of microbes have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of biofilms. Herein a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported. While optimal efficiency argument suggests that bacterial biofilms would be just strong enough to withstand the surrounding shear forces, our experimental findings reveal the biofilms to be at least 330 to 55000 times stronger. Additionally, Monte-Carlo simulations for biofilm detachment in drinking water systems were performed, which show that the existing flow velocities are insufficient for significant biofilm removal and warrant alternative detachment strategies. This emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for biofilm weakening (and subsequent detachment) in conjunction with or as an alternative to bacterial inactivation.

  13. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  14. Development and Validation of a Chemostat Gut Model To Study Both Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth of Clostridium difficile and Human Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Grace S.; Chilton, Caroline H.; Todhunter, Sharie L.; Nicholson, Scott; Freeman, Jane; Baines, Simon D.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract harbours a complex microbial community which exist in planktonic and sessile form. The degree to which composition and function of faecal and mucosal microbiota differ remains unclear. We describe the development and characterisation of an in vitro human gut model, which can be used to facilitate the formation and longitudinal analysis of mature mixed species biofilms. This enables the investigation of the role of biofilms in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). A well established and validated human gut model of simulated CDI was adapted to incorporate glass rods that create a solid-gaseous-liquid interface for biofilm formation. The continuous chemostat model was inoculated with a pooled human faecal emulsion and controlled to mimic colonic conditions in vivo. Planktonic and sessile bacterial populations were enumerated for up to 46 days. Biofilm consistently formed macroscopic structures on all glass rods over extended periods of time, providing a framework to sample and analyse biofilm structures independently. Whilst variation in biofilm biomass is evident between rods, populations of sessile bacterial groups (log10 cfu/g of biofilm) remain relatively consistent between rods at each sampling point. All bacterial groups enumerated within the planktonic communities were also present within biofilm structures. The planktonic mode of growth of C. difficile and gut microbiota closely reflected observations within the original gut model. However, distinct differences were observed in the behaviour of sessile and planktonic C. difficile populations, with C. difficile spores preferentially persisting within biofilm structures. The redesigned biofilm chemostat model has been validated for reproducible and consistent formation of mixed species intestinal biofilms. This model can be utilised for the analysis of sessile mixed species communities longitudinally, potentially providing information of the role of biofilms in CDI. PMID

  15. Synergistic effect using vermiculite as media with a bacterial biofilm of Arthrobacter sp. for biodegradation of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhi-Dan; Wu, Wei-Min; Ren, Nan-Qi; Gao, Da-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Vermiculite is one of matrix material used for constructed wetland (CW) for the treatment of municipal wastewater. Arthrobacter sp. strain C21 (CGMCC No. 7671), isolated from a constructed wetland receiving municipal wastewater, forms biofilm on the surface of vermiculite. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a typical phthalate pollutant in environment, can be degraded by the biofilm of strain C21 formed on vermiculite. Results of laboratory studies indicated that DEHP was removed from aqueous phase via biodegradation, adsorption by vermiculite, and adsorption by biofilm biomass. Synergistic effect of these three reactions enhanced the overall DEHP removal efficiency. During a batch incubation test with vermiculite and the cell suspension, bacterial adhesion to the media surface occurred within 5h and the phthalate esters (PEs) removal was due to both biodegradation and vermiculite adsorption. As the biofilm developed on surface of vermiculite (5-36 h), biodegradation became the predominance for PEs removal. As mature biofilm was formed (36-54 h), the adsorption of PEs by biofilm biomass became a main driving force for the removal of PEs from aqueous phase. The content of extracellular polymers (EPS) of the biofilm and DEHP removal performance showed a significant positive correlation (rp>0.86). PMID:26547620

  16. Comparison of Switching and Biofilm Formation between MTL-Homozygous Strains of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Claude; Daniels, Karla J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related species that share the same main developmental programs. In C. albicans, it has been demonstrated that the biofilms formed by strains heterozygous and homozygous at the mating type locus (MTL) differ functionally, but studies rarely identify the MTL configuration. This becomes a particular problem in studies of C. dubliniensis, given that one-third of natural strains are MTL homozygous. For that reason, we have analyzed MTL-homozygous strains of C. dubliniensis for their capacity to switch from white to opaque, the stability of the opaque phenotype, CO2 induction of switching, pheromone induction of adhesion, the effects of minority opaque cells on biofilm thickness and dry weight, and biofilm architecture in comparison with C. albicans. Our results reveal that C. dubliniensis strains switch to opaque at lower average frequencies, exhibit a far lower level of opaque phase stability, are not stimulated to switch by high CO2, exhibit more variability in biofilm architecture, and most notably, form mature biofilms composed predominately of pseudohyphae rather than true hyphae. Therefore, while several traits of MTL-homozygous strains of C. dubliniensis appear to be degenerating or have been lost, others, most notably several related to biofilm formation, have been conserved. Within this context, the possibility is considered that C. dubliniensis is transitioning from a hypha-dominated to a pseudohypha-dominated biofilm and that aspects of C. dubliniensis colonization may provide insights into the selective pressures that are involved. PMID:26432632

  17. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing kids to lots of allergens, ... rest of the population -- much lower rates of asthma. "We found Amish children had extremely low levels ...

  18. Prevention of Dementia: Focus on Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, Maria Cristina; Nelles, Gereon; Pientka, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize current knowledge on the possible advantages of lifestyle interventions, with particular attention to physical fitness, cognitive activity, leisure and social activity as well as nutrition. There is a large amount of published papers providing partial evidence and asserting the need for immediate, appropriate preventive lifestyle measures against dementia and AD development. Nevertheless, there are currently great difficulties in drafting effective guidelines in this field. This depends mainly upon lack of randomized controlled trials assessing benefits versus risks of particular lifestyle interventions strategies. However, due to the rapid increase of dementia burden, lifestyle factors and their amelioration should be already made part of decision making in light of their health-maintaining effects while awaiting for results of well-designed large prospective cohort studies in dementia. PMID:20721289

  19. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm

  20. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iraola, Gregorio; Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula; Naya, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm growth

  1. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  2. HEALTH AND LIFESTYLE: A SAUDI PROFILE

    PubMed Central

    AI-Shahri, Mohammad Z.

    1996-01-01

    The negative effects on health by behavior such as cigarette smoking, lack of physical exercise, non-control of body weight and non-use of seat belts were empirically documented. Available findings of the various studies on lifestyle of the Saudi Arabian community were not encouraging. If the general health status of the Saudi population is to be improved, an enforcement of healthy lifestyles must be considered. PMID:23008551

  3. Effects of vancomycin, daptomycin, and tigecycline on coagulase-negative staphylococcus biofilm and bacterial viability within biofilm: an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Barcin; Gunay, Necati; Ertugrul, Bulent M; Sakarya, Serhan

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria may hide in a hydrated polysaccharide matrix known as a biofilm. The structure of the bacterial biofilm renders phagocytosis difficult and increases antibiotic resistance. We hypothesized that repeated doses of antibiotics have an effect on bacteria within the biofilm and that it could inhibit or eradicate biofilm formation. Two clinical biofilm-positive coagulase-negative staphylococcus isolates were evaluated. The effects of antibiotics on preformed and nascent biofilm and on bacterial eradication within the biofilm were determined using different doses of vancomycin, daptomycin, and tigecycline for different durations in an in vitro biofilm model. Vancomycin neither penetrated the biofilm nor had any microbicidal effect on bacteria within the biofilm. Daptomycin had a microbicidal effect on bacteria within the biofilm but had no effect on biofilm inhibition and eradication (independent from dose and treatment time). Tigecycline inhibited and eradicated biofilm formation and had a microbicidal effect on bacteria within the biofilm. In conclusion, (i) biofilm formation appeared to be a major barrier to vancomycin activity, (ii) daptomycin had an antimicrobial effect on the bacteria within the biofilm but not on the biofilm burden, and (iii) tigecycline had effects both on bacteria within the biofilm and on biofilm burden. Thus, both tigecycline and daptomycin might be promising candidates for the treatment of biofilm infections. PMID:27295353

  4. Biofilms and biofilm reactors. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the formation and characterization of biofilms. Biofilms occur in fermentation, wastewater treatment, packed-bed reactors, fluidized-bed reactors, medical prostheses, fouling, biomass reactors, waste supply systems, and other aquatic systems. Topics include microorganism makeup of biofilms, controlling biofilm formation, biological and chemical properties, model studies, kinetic studies, and biofilm identification and detection. (Contains a minimum of 209 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Nitrogen mass balances for pilot-scale biofilm stabilization ponds under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Babu, M A; van der Steen, N P; Hooijmans, C M; Gijzen, H J

    2011-02-01

    Nitrogen removal in biofilm waste stabilization ponds were modeled using nitrogen mass balance equations. Four pilot-scale biofilm maturation ponds were constructed in Uganda. Pond 1 was control; the others had 15 baffles in each of them. Two loading conditions were investigated (period 1, 18.2g and period 2, 26.8 g NH(4)-Nd(-1)). Total nitrogen and TKN mass balances were made. Bulk water and biofilm nitrification rates were determined and used in the TKN mass balance. Results for total nitrogen mass balance showed that for both periods, denitrification was the major removal mechanism. Nitrogen uptake by algae was more important during period 1 than in period 2. The TKN mass balance predicted well effluent TKN for period 2 than period 1. This could be due to fluctuations in algae density and ammonia uptake during period 1, no conclusions on reliability of mass balance model in period 1 was made. PMID:21183339

  6. Effect of ferrocene-substituted porphyrin RL-91 on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Rainer; Vojnovic, Sandra; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Jux, Norbert; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Vasiljevic, Branka; Stankovic, Nada

    2014-08-01

    Ferrocene-substituted porphyrin RL-91 exhibits antifungal activity against opportune human pathogen Candida albicans. RL-91 efficiently inhibits growth of both planktonic C. albicans cells and cells within biofilms without photoactivation. The minimal inhibitory concentration for plankton form (PMIC) was established to be 100 μg/mL and the same concentration killed 80% of sessile cells in the mature biofilm (SMIC80). Furthermore PMIC of RL-91 efficiently prevents C. albicans biofilm formation. RL-91 is cytotoxic for human fibroblasts in vitro in concentration of 10 μg/mL, however it does not cause hemolysis in concentrations of up to 50 μg/mL. These findings open possibility for application of RL-91 as an antifungal agent for external antibiofilm treatment of medical devices as well as a scaffold for further development of porphyrin based systemic antifungals. PMID:24929472

  7. Novel Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Photoinactivation of In Situ Oral Biofilms by Visible Light plus Water-Filtered Infrared A.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, L; Ruf, S; Follo, M; Hellwig, E; Bucher, M; Anderson, A C; Vach, K; Al-Ahmad, A

    2014-12-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has gained increased attention as an alternative treatment approach in various medical fields. However, the effect of APDT using visible light plus water-filtered infrared A (VIS + wIRA) on oral biofilms remains unexplored. For this purpose, initial and mature oral biofilms were obtained in situ; six healthy subjects wore individual upper jaw acrylic devices with bovine enamel slabs attached to their proximal sites for 2 h or 3 days. The biofilms were incubated with 100 μg ml(-1) toluidine blue O (TB) or chlorin e6 (Ce6) and irradiated with VIS + wIRA with an energy density of 200 mW cm(-2) for 5 min. After cultivation, the CFU of half of the treated biofilm samples were quantified, whereas following live/dead staining, the other half of the samples were monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). TB- and Ce6-mediated APDT yielded a significant decrease of up to 3.8 and 5.7 log10 CFU for initial and mature oral biofilms, respectively. Quantification of the stained photoinactivated microorganisms confirmed these results. Overall, CLSM revealed the diffusion of the tested photosensitizers into the deepest biofilm layers after exposure to APDT. In particular, Ce6-aided APDT presented elevated permeability and higher effectiveness in eradicating 89.62% of biofilm bacteria compared to TB-aided APDT (82.25%) after 3 days. In conclusion, antimicrobial photoinactivation using VIS + wIRA proved highly potent in eradicating oral biofilms. Since APDT excludes the development of microbial resistance, it could supplement the pharmaceutical treatment of periodontitis or peri-implantitis. PMID:25239897

  8. Novel Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Photoinactivation of In Situ Oral Biofilms by Visible Light plus Water-Filtered Infrared A

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, S.; Follo, M.; Hellwig, E.; Bucher, M.; Anderson, A. C.; Vach, K.; Al-Ahmad, A.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has gained increased attention as an alternative treatment approach in various medical fields. However, the effect of APDT using visible light plus water-filtered infrared A (VIS + wIRA) on oral biofilms remains unexplored. For this purpose, initial and mature oral biofilms were obtained in situ; six healthy subjects wore individual upper jaw acrylic devices with bovine enamel slabs attached to their proximal sites for 2 h or 3 days. The biofilms were incubated with 100 μg ml−1 toluidine blue O (TB) or chlorin e6 (Ce6) and irradiated with VIS + wIRA with an energy density of 200 mW cm−2 for 5 min. After cultivation, the CFU of half of the treated biofilm samples were quantified, whereas following live/dead staining, the other half of the samples were monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). TB- and Ce6-mediated APDT yielded a significant decrease of up to 3.8 and 5.7 log10 CFU for initial and mature oral biofilms, respectively. Quantification of the stained photoinactivated microorganisms confirmed these results. Overall, CLSM revealed the diffusion of the tested photosensitizers into the deepest biofilm layers after exposure to APDT. In particular, Ce6-aided APDT presented elevated permeability and higher effectiveness in eradicating 89.62% of biofilm bacteria compared to TB-aided APDT (82.25%) after 3 days. In conclusion, antimicrobial photoinactivation using VIS + wIRA proved highly potent in eradicating oral biofilms. Since APDT excludes the development of microbial resistance, it could supplement the pharmaceutical treatment of periodontitis or peri-implantitis. PMID:25239897

  9. Rationing organs using psychosocial and lifestyle criteria.

    PubMed

    Corley, M C; Westerberg, N; Elswick, R K; Connell, D; Neil, J; Sneed, G; Witcher, V

    1998-08-01

    The role of patient psychosocial and lifestyle characteristics in decisions about the allocation of scarce health care resources has not been examined. In this national survey using the Criteria for Selection of Transplant Recipient (CSTR) Scale, organ transplant coordinators (N = 559) identified the psychosocial and lifestyle criteria they believe should be considered in patient selection/rejection for organ transplant. Using factor analysis to reduce the data, six factors were identified: current lifestyle/psychiatric problems, family/socioeconomic issues, habits, controlled lifestyle/psychiatric issues, cost, and stigmatized conditions. Patients who were in prison for a serious crime, used cocaine, had AIDS, or were HIV positive (criteria making up the Stigma factor), were more likely to be labeled for exclusion from transplant than those with other psychosocial/lifestyle characteristics. When transplant coordinators perceived that patients' psychosocial and lifestyle problems were under control or corrected, they were more likely to consider them for a transplant. For all but the cost factor, criteria were most stringent for heart transplants. Although over 90% of the coordinators assessed patients and participated in patient selection for transplant, master's prepared nurses were more likely than nurses with other educational preparation to be involved in organ recipient selection. These findings can serve as a prototype for how decisions are made for allocating other scarce health care resources. PMID:9679809

  10. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  11. BIOFILM IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION FOR ASSESSING STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, Ryan; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    The structure of biofilms can be numerically quantified from microscopy images using structural parameters. These parameters are used in biofilm image analysis to compare biofilms, to monitor temporal variation in biofilm structure, to quantify the effects of antibiotics on biofilm structure and to determine the effects of environmental conditions on biofilm structure. It is often hypothesized that biofilms with similar structural parameter values will have similar structures; however, this hypothesis has never been tested. The main goal was to test the hypothesis that the commonly used structural parameters can characterize the differences or similarities between biofilm structures. To achieve this goal 1) biofilm image reconstruction was developed as a new tool for assessing structural parameters, 2) independent reconstructions using the same starting structural parameters were tested to see how they differed from each other, 3) the effect of the original image parameter values on reconstruction success was evaluated and 4) the effect of the number and type of the parameters on reconstruction success was evaluated. It was found that two biofilms characterized by identical commonly used structural parameter values may look different, that the number and size of clusters in the original biofilm image affect image reconstruction success and that, in general, a small set of arbitrarily selected parameters may not reveal relevant differences between biofilm structures. PMID:21280029

  12. Natural biofilm formation with Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Portier, Emilie; Héchard, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation could be studied in various conditions. Most of the studies with Legionella pneumophila used monospecies biofilm in culture media. In some cases, it is important to study bacteria in conditions more close to environmental conditions. In this paper, we describe protocols to produce natural biofilms from river water that were spiked with L. pneumophila. PMID:23150397

  13. Disruption of urogenital biofilms by lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Amy; Dell, Melissa; Zellar, Michelle P; Cribby, Sarah; Martz, Sarah; Hong, Emilio; Fu, Jennifer; Abbas, Ahmed; Dang, Thien; Miller, Wayne; Reid, Gregor

    2011-08-01

    The process that changes a relatively sparse vaginal microbiota of healthy women into a dense biofilm of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria is poorly understood. Likewise, the reverse step whereby an aberrant biofilm is displaced and returns to a healthy lactobacilli dominated microbiota is unclear. In order to study these phenomena, in vitro experiments were performed to examine the structure of biofilms associated with aerobic vaginosis, urinary tract infections, and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Uropathogenic Escherichia coli were able to form relatively thin biofilms within five days (6 μm height), while Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis formed thicker biofilms 12 μm in height within two days. Challenge of E. coli biofilms with lactobacilli did not result in pathogen displacement. However, the resulting thicker lactobacilli infused biofilms, caused significant E. coli killing. E. coli biofilms challenged with secreted products of L. rhamnosus GR-1 caused a marked decrease in cell density, and increased cell death. Similarly challenge of BV biofilms with lactobacilli infiltrated BV biofilms and caused bacterial cell death. Metronidazole produced holes in the biofilm but did not eradicate the organisms. The findings provide some evidence of how lactobacilli probiotics might interfere with an aberrant vaginal microbiota, and strengthen the position that combining probiotics with antimicrobials could better eradicate pathogenic biofilms. PMID:21497071

  14. Boundaries for Biofilm Formation: Humidity and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Else, Terry Ann; Pantle, Curtis R.; Amy, Penny S.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental conditions which define boundaries for biofilm production could provide useful ecological information for biofilm models. A practical use of defined conditions could be applied to the high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Data for temperature and humidity conditions indicate that decreases in relative humidity or increased temperature severely affect biofilm formation on three candidate canister metals. PMID:12902302

  15. Jealousy and Moral Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; Deuger, Donna J.

    Jealousy may be perceived as either good or bad depending upon the moral maturity of the individual. To investigate this conclusion, a study was conducted testing two hypothesis: a positive relationship exists between conventional moral reasoning (reference to norms and laws) and the endorsement and level of jealousy; and a negative relationship…

  16. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms.

    PubMed

    Davit, Y; Byrne, H; Osborne, J; Pitt-Francis, J; Gavaghan, D; Quintard, M

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. PMID:23410370

  17. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espeso, D. R.; Carpio, A.; Einarsson, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste, and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Föppl-Von Kármán equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to reproduce wrinkled structures often formed by biofilms on air-agar interfaces, as well as spatial distributions of differentiated cells commonly observed with B. subtilis.

  18. Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Millhouse, Emma; Culshaw, Shauna; Edwards, Christine A; Ramage, Gordon; Combet, Emilie

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 μg mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 μg mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 μg mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 μg mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal

  19. Biofilm growth on rugose surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D.; Einarsson, B.; Carpio, A.

    2012-12-01

    A stochastic model is used to assess the effect of external parameters on the development of submerged biofilms on smooth and rough surfaces. The model includes basic cellular mechanisms, such as division and spreading, together with an elementary description of the interaction with the surrounding flow and probabilistic rules for extracellular polymeric substance matrix generation, cell decay, and adhesion. Insight into the interplay of competing mechanisms such as the flow or the nutrient concentration change is gained. Erosion and growth processes combined produce biofilm structures moving downstream. A rich variety of patterns are generated: shrinking biofilms, patches, ripplelike structures traveling downstream, fingers, mounds, streamerlike patterns, flat layers, and porous and dendritic structures. The observed regimes depend on the carbon source and the type of bacteria.

  20. Sustained Release of a Novel Anti-Quorum-Sensing Agent against Oral Fungal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Shenderovich, Julia; Al-Quntar, Abed Al Aziz; Friedman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) has recently been identified as a potential anti-quorum-sensing/antibiofilm agent against bacteria and fungi. Based on these results, we investigated the possibility of incorporating S-8 in a sustained-release membrane (SRM) to increase its pharmaceutical potential against Candida albicans biofilm. We demonstrated that SRM containing S-8 inhibits fungal biofilm formation in a time-dependent manner for 72 h, due to prolonged release of S-8. Moreover, the SRM effectively delivered the agent in its active form to locations outside the membrane reservoir. In addition, eradication of mature biofilm by the SRM containing S-8 was also significant. Of note, S-8-containing SRM affected the characteristics of mature C. albicans biofilm, such as thickness, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, and morphogenesis of fungal cells. The concept of using an antibiofilm agent with no antifungal activity incorporated into a sustained-release delivery system is new in medicine and dentistry. This concept of an SRM containing a quorum-sensing quencher with an antibiofilm effect could pave the way for combating oral fungal infectious diseases. PMID:25645835

  1. Metagenomic sequencing of marine periphyton: taxonomic and functional insights into biofilm communities

    PubMed Central

    Sanli, Kemal; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Kristiansson, Erik; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Blanck, Hans; Eriksson, Karl M.

    2015-01-01

    Periphyton communities are complex phototrophic, multispecies biofilms that develop on surfaces in aquatic environments. These communities harbor a large diversity of organisms comprising viruses, bacteria, algae, fungi, protozoans, and metazoans. However, thus far the total biodiversity of periphyton has not been described. In this study, we use metagenomics to characterize periphyton communities from the marine environment of the Swedish west coast. Although we found approximately ten times more eukaryotic rRNA marker gene sequences compared to prokaryotic, the whole metagenome-based similarity searches showed that bacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in these biofilms. We show that marine periphyton encompass a range of heterotrophic and phototrophic organisms. Heterotrophic bacteria, including the majority of proteobacterial clades and Bacteroidetes, and eukaryotic macro-invertebrates were found to dominate periphyton. The phototrophic groups comprise Cyanobacteria and the alpha-proteobacterial genus Roseobacter, followed by different micro- and macro-algae. We also assess the metabolic pathways that predispose these communities to an attached lifestyle. Functional indicators of the biofilm form of life in periphyton involve genes coding for enzymes that catalyze the production and degradation of extracellular polymeric substances, mainly in the form of complex sugars such as starch and glycogen-like meshes together with chitin. Genes for 278 different transporter proteins were detected in the metagenome, constituting the most abundant protein complexes. Finally, genes encoding enzymes that participate in anaerobic pathways, such as denitrification and methanogenesis, were detected suggesting the presence of anaerobic or low-oxygen micro-zones within the biofilms. PMID:26579098

  2. Metagenomic sequencing of marine periphyton: taxonomic and functional insights into biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Kemal; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Nilsson, R Henrik; Kristiansson, Erik; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Blanck, Hans; Eriksson, Karl M

    2015-01-01

    Periphyton communities are complex phototrophic, multispecies biofilms that develop on surfaces in aquatic environments. These communities harbor a large diversity of organisms comprising viruses, bacteria, algae, fungi, protozoans, and metazoans. However, thus far the total biodiversity of periphyton has not been described. In this study, we use metagenomics to characterize periphyton communities from the marine environment of the Swedish west coast. Although we found approximately ten times more eukaryotic rRNA marker gene sequences compared to prokaryotic, the whole metagenome-based similarity searches showed that bacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in these biofilms. We show that marine periphyton encompass a range of heterotrophic and phototrophic organisms. Heterotrophic bacteria, including the majority of proteobacterial clades and Bacteroidetes, and eukaryotic macro-invertebrates were found to dominate periphyton. The phototrophic groups comprise Cyanobacteria and the alpha-proteobacterial genus Roseobacter, followed by different micro- and macro-algae. We also assess the metabolic pathways that predispose these communities to an attached lifestyle. Functional indicators of the biofilm form of life in periphyton involve genes coding for enzymes that catalyze the production and degradation of extracellular polymeric substances, mainly in the form of complex sugars such as starch and glycogen-like meshes together with chitin. Genes for 278 different transporter proteins were detected in the metagenome, constituting the most abundant protein complexes. Finally, genes encoding enzymes that participate in anaerobic pathways, such as denitrification and methanogenesis, were detected suggesting the presence of anaerobic or low-oxygen micro-zones within the biofilms. PMID:26579098

  3. BolA Is a Transcriptional Switch That Turns Off Motility and Turns On Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Dressaire, Clémentine; Moreira, Ricardo Neves; Barahona, Susana; Alves de Matos, António Pedro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria are extremely versatile organisms that rapidly adapt to changing environments. When bacterial cells switch from planktonic growth to biofilm, flagellum formation is turned off and the production of fimbriae and extracellular polysaccharides is switched on. BolA is present in most Gram-negative bacteria, and homologues can be found from proteobacteria to eukaryotes. Here, we show that BolA is a new bacterial transcription factor that modulates the switch from a planktonic to a sessile lifestyle. It negatively modulates flagellar biosynthesis and swimming capacity in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, BolA overexpression favors biofilm formation, involving the production of fimbria-like adhesins and curli. Our results also demonstrate that BolA is a protein with high affinity to DNA and is able to regulate many genes on a genome-wide scale. Moreover, we show that the most significant targets of this protein involve a complex network of genes encoding proteins related to biofilm development. Herein, we propose that BolA is a motile/adhesive transcriptional switch, specifically involved in the transition between the planktonic and the attachment stage of biofilm formation. PMID:25691594

  4. Genetic programming of catalytic Pseudomonas putida biofilms for boosting biodegradation of haloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Ilaria; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Nikel, Pablo I

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms outperform planktonic counterparts in whole-cell biocatalysis. The transition between planktonic and biofilm lifestyles of the platform strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is ruled by a regulatory network controlling the levels of the trigger signal cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). This circumstance was exploited for designing a genetic device that over-runs the synthesis or degradation of c-di-GMP--thus making P. putida to form biofilms at user's will. For this purpose, the transcription of either yedQ (diguanylate cyclase) or yhjH (c-di-GMP phoshodiesterase) from Escherichia coli was artificially placed under the tight control of a cyclohexanone-responsive expression system. The resulting strain was subsequently endowed with a synthetic operon and tested for 1-chlorobutane biodegradation. Upon addition of cyclohexanone to the culture medium, the thereby designed P. putida cells formed biofilms displaying high dehalogenase activity. These results show that the morphologies and physical forms of whole-cell biocatalysts can be genetically programmed while purposely designing their biochemical activity. PMID:26620533

  5. Structural basis of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation: mechanisms and molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Henning; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a usually harmless commensal bacterium highly abundant on the human skin. Under defined predisposing conditions, most importantly implantation of a medical device, S. epidermidis, however, can switch from a colonizing to an invasive life style. The emergence of S. epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen is closely linked to the biofilm forming capability of the species. During the past decades, tremendous advance regarding our understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to surface colonization has been made, and detailed information is available for several factors active during the primary attachment, accumulative or dispersal phase of biofilm formation. A picture evolved in which distinct factors, though appearing to be redundantly organized, take over specific and exclusive functions during biofilm development. In this review, these mechanisms are described in molecular detail, with a highlight on recent insights into multi-functional S. epidermidis cell surface proteins contributing to surface adherence and intercellular adhesion. The integration of distinct biofilm-promoting factors into regulatory networks is summarized, with an emphasis on mechanism that could allow S. epidermidis to flexibly adapt to changing environmental conditions present during colonizing or invasive life-styles. PMID:25741476

  6. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  7. Evaluating Preschool Children Knowledge about Healthy Lifestyle: Preliminary Examination of the Healthy Lifestyle Evaluation Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis; Konstantinidou, Elisavet; Tsigilis, Nikolaos; Zachopoulou, Evridiki; Tsangaridou, Niki; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to evaluate the knowledge of preschool children about healthy lifestyle behavior. The innovation was that the instrument was designed to get direct evidence about healthy lifestyle from children aged 4-6 years old. Usually, children knowledge is estimated indirectly (parents, teachers), but the…

  8. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES.

    PubMed

    Renslow, Rs; Babauta, Jt; Majors, Pd; Beyenal, H

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (D(e)) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ D(e) measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional D(e) heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (D(rs)) depth profiles. We found that 1) D(rs) decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) D(rs) at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average D(e) and D(rs) profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms-the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the D(e) values. Density, reflected by D(e), plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

  9. Microsensors and microscale gradients in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Babauta, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the limiting factors and mechanisms of biofilm processes requires the direct measurement of microscale gradients using the appropriate tools. Microscale measurements can provide mechanistic information that cannot be obtained from bulk-scale measurements. Among the most used and trusted tools in microscale biofilm research are microsensors. The goal of this chapter is to introduce microsensor technology along with several examples to illustrate microscale processes in biofilms that are usually absent in bulk. We define a microsensor for biofilm research as a needle-type sensor with tip diameter of a few microns and a length up to several hundred microns. Microsensors can be used noninvasively to monitor in situ biofilm processes. Both optical and electrochemical microsensors can be used for biofilm applications. Because of newly discovered biofilm processes, the design and use of microsensors require customization and carefully designed experiments. In this chapter we present several examples describing the use of microsensors (1) in environmental biofilms, (2) in medical biofilms, and (3) in biofilms for energy and bioproducts. Microsensors can be the most useful if the measured profiles are integrated into the study of overall biofilm processes. PMID:24008918

  10. Intra- and inter-species interactions within biofilms of important foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Heir, Even; Desvaux, Mickaël; Hébraud, Michel; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John; Kačániová, Miroslava; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Ölmez, Hülya; Simões, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A community-based sessile life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. Under such conditions, cell-to-cell interactions are inevitable and ultimately lead to the establishment of dense, complex and highly structured biofilm populations encapsulated in a self-produced extracellular matrix and capable of coordinated and collective behavior. Remarkably, in food processing environments, a variety of different bacteria may attach to surfaces, survive, grow, and form biofilms. Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus are important bacterial pathogens commonly implicated in outbreaks of foodborne diseases, while all are known to be able to create biofilms on both abiotic and biotic surfaces. Particularly challenging is the attempt to understand the complexity of inter-bacterial interactions that can be encountered in such unwanted consortia, such as competitive and cooperative ones, together with their impact on the final outcome of these communities (e.g., maturation, physiology, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, dispersal). In this review, up-to-date data on both the intra- and inter-species interactions encountered in biofilms of these pathogens are presented. A better understanding of these interactions, both at molecular and biophysical levels, could lead to novel intervention strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilm formation in food processing environments and thus improve food safety. PMID:26347727

  11. Efficacy of Combined Vancomycin and Fosfomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Biofilms In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Han-Bo; Chen, Qian; Liu, Hua; Tang, Xun; Jin, Tao; Zhu, Chong-Tao; Li, Fu-Bing; Sun, Lin-Hui; Xu, Xin-Ming; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a life-threatening condition, and formation of biofilms can lead to treatment failure in a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the in vivo bactericidal effects of a combination of vancomycin (VAN) and fosfomycin (FOS) against MRSA in a rat carboxymethyl cellulose-pouch biofilm model. The results of the time-kill assay showed that the combination therapy was capable of killing at low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) (½× MIC VAN +1× MIC FOS and 1× MIC VAN + 1× MIC FOS). In the in vivo study, a synergistically bactericidal effect was observed when using the combination therapy on MRSA embedded in the mature biofilm model. In comparison with the untreated control group and the groups receiving either VAN or FOS alone, the rats treated with combination therapy had lower MRSA colony counts in exudates from the pouch, lower white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in peripheral blood. Furthermore, histological analysis of the pouch wall indicated combination therapy resulted in disappearance of biofilm-like structures, marked decrease in necrosis, and formation of granular tissue. In conclusion, the combination of VAN with FOS had a synergistic bactericidal effect on chronic MRSA infection embedded in biofilm, providing an alternative approach to treating this condition. PMID:25551618

  12. Intra- and inter-species interactions within biofilms of important foodborne bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Heir, Even; Desvaux, Mickaël; Hébraud, Michel; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John; Kačániová, Miroslava; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Ölmez, Hülya; Simões, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A community-based sessile life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. Under such conditions, cell-to-cell interactions are inevitable and ultimately lead to the establishment of dense, complex and highly structured biofilm populations encapsulated in a self-produced extracellular matrix and capable of coordinated and collective behavior. Remarkably, in food processing environments, a variety of different bacteria may attach to surfaces, survive, grow, and form biofilms. Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus are important bacterial pathogens commonly implicated in outbreaks of foodborne diseases, while all are known to be able to create biofilms on both abiotic and biotic surfaces. Particularly challenging is the attempt to understand the complexity of inter-bacterial interactions that can be encountered in such unwanted consortia, such as competitive and cooperative ones, together with their impact on the final outcome of these communities (e.g., maturation, physiology, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, dispersal). In this review, up-to-date data on both the intra- and inter-species interactions encountered in biofilms of these pathogens are presented. A better understanding of these interactions, both at molecular and biophysical levels, could lead to novel intervention strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilm formation in food processing environments and thus improve food safety. PMID:26347727

  13. EDTA as a potential agent preventing formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm on polichloride vinyl biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Juda, Marek; Paprota, Katarzyna; Jałoza, Dariusz; Malm, Anna; Rybojad, Paweł; Goździuk, Kazimierz

    2008-01-01

    Polichloride vinyl (PCV) is a widely used thermoplastic polymer, also in the production of medical devices. In the present study we assess the influence of EDTA in vitro on the biofilm structure formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates on PCV biomaterials (Nelaton and Thorax catheters). The 6 strains of S. epidermidis were isolated from nasopharynx of hospitalised patients. It was found that all isolates were able to form the biofilm on both PCV biomaterials, irrespective of adhesion properties (cell surface properties, ability to slime production, minimal time needed for adhesion). The EDTA showed bacteriostatic effect against planktonic cells of the isolates (MIC = 0.25-0.5 mmol/l; MBC = 10.0- >25.0 mmol/l; MBC/MIC = 20, 30, 40, >50). The adhesion process and also formation of the biofilm was inhibited by EDTA at concentrations 1.0-2.0 mmol/l (2-8 x MIC). The eradication of the mature biofilm was achieved at 2.0-4.0 mmol/l EDTA (4-8 x MIC ) for two strains, while for the other four isolates, concentration of EDTA needed for eradication effect was >32 mmol/l (> 128 x MIC ). Data obtained in this paper suggest that EDTA may be regarded as a useful agent preventing formation of the S. epidermidis biofilm on PCV biomaterials. PMID:19118444

  14. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyraki, A.; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne; Bjarnsholt, T.; Bjørndal, L.; Petersen, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose was ramped from 72J/m2 to 10000J/m2. It was shown that UVB irradiation was more effective than UVC irradiation in inactivating P. aeruginosa biofilms. No colony forming units (CFU) were observed for the UVB treated biofilms when the dose was 10000 J/m2 (CFU in control sample: 7.5 x 104). UVB irradiation at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals.

  15. Effects of Nicotine on Streptococcus gordonii Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Cell Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, M; Ye, M; Yang, K; Xu, X; Gregory, R L

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a commensal species of human oral flora. It initiates dental biofilm formation and provides binding sites for later colonizers to attach to and generate mature biofilm. Smoking is the second highest risk factor for periodontal disease, and cigarette smoke extract has been reported to facilitate Porphyromonas gingivalis-S. gordonii dual-species biofilm formation. Our hypothesis is that nicotine, one of the most important and active components of tobacco, stimulates S. gordonii multiplication and aggregation. In the present study, S. gordonii planktonic cell growth (kinetic absorbance and CFU), biofilm formation (crystal violet stain and confocal laser scanning microscopy [CLSM]), aggregation with/without sucrose, and 11 genes that encode binding proteins or regulators of gene expression were investigated. Results demonstrated planktonic cell growth was stimulated by 1 to 4 mg/ml nicotine treatment. Biofilm formation was increased at 0.5 to 4 mg/ml nicotine. CLSM indicated bacterial cell mass was increased by 2 and 4 mg/ml nicotine, but biofilm extracellular polysaccharide was not significantly affected by nicotine. Cell aggregation was upregulated by 4, 8, and 16 mg/ml nicotine with sucrose and by 16 mg/ml nicotine without sucrose. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR indicated S. gordonii abpA, scaA, ccpA, and srtA were upregulated in planktonic cells by 2 mg/ml nicotine. In conclusion, nicotine stimulates S. gordonii planktonic cell growth, biofilm formation, aggregation, and gene expression of binding proteins. Those effects may promote later pathogen attachment to tooth surfaces, the accumulation of tooth calculus, and the development of periodontal disease in cigarette smokers. PMID:25217021

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Pterostilbene against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Dong; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Gan-Hai; Zou, Yong; Huang, Tong-Kun; Yan, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Pterostilbene (PTE) is a stilbene-derived phytoalexin that originates from several natural plant sources. In this study, we evaluated the activity of PTE against Candida albicans biofilms and explored the underlying mechanisms. In 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assays, biofilm biomass measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we found that ≤16 μg/ml PTE had a significant effect against C. albicans biofilms in vitro, while it had no fungicidal effect on planktonic C. albicans cells, which suggested a unique antibiofilm effect of PTE. Then we found that PTE could inhibit biofilm formation and destroy the maintenance of mature biofilms. At 4 μg/ml, PTE decreased cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and suppressed hyphal formation. Gene expression microarrays and real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that exposure of C. albicans to 16 μg/ml PTE altered the expression of genes that function in morphological transition, ergosterol biosynthesis, oxidoreductase activity, and cell surface and protein unfolding processes (heat shock proteins). Filamentation-related genes, especially those regulated by the Ras/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway, including ECE1, ALS3, HWP1, HGC1, and RAS1 itself, were downregulated upon PTE treatment, indicating that the antibiofilm effect of PTE was related to the Ras/cAMP pathway. Then, we found that the addition of exogenous cAMP reverted the PTE-induced filamentous growth defect. Finally, with a rat central venous catheter infection model, we confirmed the in vivo activity of PTE against C. albicans biofilms. Collectively, PTE had strong activities against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo, and these activities were associated with the Ras/cAMP pathway. PMID:24514088

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) contribute to S. aureus orthopedic biofilm infection

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Cortney E.; Vidlak, Debbie; Scherr, Tyler D.; Kozel, Jessica A.; Holzapfel, Melissa; Muirhead, David E.; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature monocytes and granulocytes that are potent inhibitors of T cell activation. A role for MDSCs in bacterial infections has only recently emerged and nothing is known about MDSC function in the context of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection. Since S. aureus biofilms are capable of subverting immune-mediated clearance, we examined whether MDSCs could play a role in this process. CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs represented the main cellular infiltrate during S. aureus orthopedic biofilm infection, accounting for over 75% of the CD45+ population. Biofilm-associated MDSCs inhibited T cell proliferation and cytokine production, which correlated with a paucity of T cell infiltrates at the infection site. Analysis of FACS-purified MDSCs recovered from S. aureus biofilms revealed increased Arg-1, iNOS, and IL-10 expression, key mediators of MDSC suppressive activity. Targeted depletion of MDSCs and neutrophils using the mAb 1A8 (anti-Ly6G) improved bacterial clearance by enhancing the intrinsic pro-inflammatory attributes of infiltrating monocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, the ability of monocytes/macrophages to promote biofilm clearance in the absence of MDSC action was revealed with RB6-C85 (anti-Gr-1 or anti-Ly6G/Ly6C) administration, which resulted in significantly increased S. aureus burdens both locally and in the periphery, since effector Ly-6C monocytes and by extension, mature macrophages, were also depleted. Collectively, these results are the first to demonstrate that MDSCs are key contributors to the chronicity of S. aureus biofilm infection, as their immunosuppressive function prevents monocyte/macrophage proinflammatory activity, which facilitates biofilm persistence. PMID:24646737

  18. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, C; Falholt, P; Gram, L

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove the biofilm from the substrata. A complex mixture of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes was able to remove bacterial biofilm from steel and polypropylene substrata but did not have a significant bactericidal activity. Combining oxidoreductases with polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes resulted in bactericidal activity as well as removal of the biofilm. PMID:9293025

  19. Lifestyle and Depression among Hong Kong Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Teris; Yip, Paul S.F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent longitudinal data suggest a close association between depression and lifestyle. Little work to date has estimated the prevalence of depression in the nursing workforce in China, nor considered what lifestyle factors might be correlated with it—a gap filled by the present study. The study’s web-based cross-sectional survey solicited data from qualified nurses aged between 21 and 65 registered with the Hong Kong Nursing Council. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 was used to measure 850 nurses for depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress; a generalized linear regression model examined associations between lifestyle factors and depression. Mean depression symptom scores show a downward linear trend for male and female participants. Gender and age, however, did not emerge as significant predictors of depression. Three lifestyles factors (sleep, entertainment and hobbies) showed a significant association with depression. Nurses should make therapeutic lifestyle changes to improve their work-life balance and safeguard their functioning at work and personal well-being. PMID:26784216

  20. Gut Microbiota and Lifestyle Interventions in NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Houghton, David; Stewart, Christopher J; Day, Christopher P; Trenell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The human digestive system harbors a diverse and complex community of microorganisms that work in a symbiotic fashion with the host, contributing to metabolism, immune response and intestinal architecture. However, disruption of a stable and diverse community, termed "dysbiosis", has been shown to have a profound impact upon health and disease. Emerging data demonstrate dysbiosis of the gut microbiota to be linked with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the exact mechanism(s) remain unknown, inflammation, damage to the intestinal membrane, and translocation of bacteria have all been suggested. Lifestyle intervention is undoubtedly effective at improving NAFLD, however, not all patients respond to these in the same manner. Furthermore, studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions on the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients are lacking. A deeper understanding of how different aspects of lifestyle (diet/nutrition/exercise) affect the host-microbiome interaction may allow for a more tailored approach to lifestyle intervention. With gut microbiota representing a key element of personalized medicine and nutrition, we review the effects of lifestyle interventions (diet and physical activity/exercise) on gut microbiota and how this impacts upon NAFLD prognosis. PMID:27023533

  1. Gut Microbiota and Lifestyle Interventions in NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David; Stewart, Christopher J.; Day, Christopher P.; Trenell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The human digestive system harbors a diverse and complex community of microorganisms that work in a symbiotic fashion with the host, contributing to metabolism, immune response and intestinal architecture. However, disruption of a stable and diverse community, termed “dysbiosis”, has been shown to have a profound impact upon health and disease. Emerging data demonstrate dysbiosis of the gut microbiota to be linked with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the exact mechanism(s) remain unknown, inflammation, damage to the intestinal membrane, and translocation of bacteria have all been suggested. Lifestyle intervention is undoubtedly effective at improving NAFLD, however, not all patients respond to these in the same manner. Furthermore, studies investigating the effects of lifestyle interventions on the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients are lacking. A deeper understanding of how different aspects of lifestyle (diet/nutrition/exercise) affect the host–microbiome interaction may allow for a more tailored approach to lifestyle intervention. With gut microbiota representing a key element of personalized medicine and nutrition, we review the effects of lifestyle interventions (diet and physical activity/exercise) on gut microbiota and how this impacts upon NAFLD prognosis. PMID:27023533

  2. Biofilm monitoring using complex permittivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; McGrath, Lucas K.; Dolan, Patricia L.; Yelton, William Graham

    2008-10-01

    There is strong interest in the detection and monitoring of bio-fouling. Bio-fouling problems are common in numerous water treatments systems, medical and dental apparatus and food processing equipment. Current bio-fouling control protocols are time consuming and costly. New early detection techniques to monitor bio-forming contaminates are means to enhanced efficiency. Understanding the unique dielectric properties of biofilm development, colony forming bacteria and nutrient background will provide a basis to the effectiveness of controlling or preventing biofilm growth. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements provide values of complex permittivity, {var_epsilon}*, of biofilm formation by applying a weak alternating electric field at various frequencies. The dielectric characteristic of the biofilm, {var_epsilon}{prime}, is the real component of {var_epsilon}* and measures the biofilm's unique ability to store energy. Graphically observed dependencies of {var_epsilon}{prime} to frequency indicate dielectric relaxation or dielectric dispersion behaviors that mark the particular stage of progression during the development of biofilms. In contrast, any frequency dependency of the imaginary component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime} the loss factor, is expressed as dielectric losses from the biofilm due to dipole relaxation. The tangent angle of these two component vectors is the ratio of the imaginary component to the real component, {var_epsilon}{double_prime}/{var_epsilon}{prime} and is referred to as the loss angle tangent (tan {delta}) or dielectric loss. Changes in tan {delta} are characteristic of changes in dielectric losses during various developmental stages of the films. Permittivity scans in the above figure are of biofilm growth from P. Fluorescens (10e7 CFU's at the start). Three trends are apparent from these scans, the first being a small drop in the imaginary permittivity over a 7 hours period, best seen in the Cole-Cole plot (a). The second trend is

  3. Rapid Identification of Bacterial Biofilms and Biofilm Wound Models Using a Multichannel Nanosensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model. PMID:25454256

  4. Proteome changes in the initial bacterial colonist during ecological succession in an acid mine drainage biofilm community

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Ryan; Dill, Brian; Pan, Chongle; Belnap, Christopher P.; Thomas, Brian; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2011-01-01

    Proteomes of acid mine drainage biofilms at different stages of ecological succession were examined to understand microbial responses to changing community membership. We evaluated the degree of reproducibility of the community proteomes between samples of the same growth stage and found stable and predictable protein abundance patterns across time and sampling space, allowing for a set of 50 classifier proteins to be identified for use in predicting growth stages of undefined communities. Additionally, physiological changes in the dominant species, Leptospirillum Group II, were analysed as biofilms mature. During early growth stages, this population responds to abiotic stresses related to growth on the acid mine drainage solution. Enzymes involved in protein synthesis, cell division and utilization of 1- and 2-carbon compounds were more abundant in early growth stages, suggesting rapid growth and a reorganization of metabolism during biofilm initiation. As biofilms thicken and diversify, external stresses arise from competition for dwindling resources, which may inhibit cell division of Leptospirillum Group II through the SOS response. This population also represses translation and synthesizes more complex carbohydrates and amino acids in mature biofilms. These findings provide unprecedented insight into the physiological changes that may result from competitive interactions within communities in natural environments.

  5. Water-Limiting Conditions Alter the Structure and Biofilm-Forming Ability of Bacterial Multispecies Communities in the Alfalfa Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Bogino, Pablo; Abod, Ayelén; Nievas, Fiorela; Giordano, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria) is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect). The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA) for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices. PMID:24223979

  6. Ritucharya: Answer to the lifestyle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Jayesh; Chaudhari, S.; Sarkar, Prasanta K.

    2011-01-01

    Ritu, the season, classified by different features expresses different effects on the body as well as the environment. Ayurveda has depicted various rules and regimens (Charya), regarding diet and behavior to acclimatize seasonal enforcement easily without altering body homeostasis. The prime principle of Ayurvedic system of medicine is preventive aspect, can be achieved by the change in diet and practices in response to change in climatic condition. This is a very important aspect of preventive medicine as mentioned in Ayurvedic texts. Lifestyle disorders are very common in the present era, basically originating from lack of following seasonal regimens due to lack of concentration in seasonal characteristics. A firm scientific analysis is the base, which holds true even on date. In this review article, various regimens in diet and lifestyle as mentioned in the classics of Ayurveda and their importance on lifestyle disorders has been discussed. PMID:22661838

  7. Can lifestyle modification affect men's erectile function?

    PubMed

    Hehemann, Marah C; Kashanian, James A

    2016-04-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  8. Education, Health, and the Default American Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Mirowsky, John; Ross, Catherine E

    2015-09-01

    Education has a large and increasing impact on health in America. This paper examines one reason why. Education gives individuals the ability to override the default American lifestyle. The default lifestyle has three elements: displacing human energy with mechanical energy, displacing household food production with industrial food production, and displacing health maintenance with medical dependency. Too little physical activity and too much food produce imperceptibly accumulating pathologies. The medical industry looks for products and services that promise to soften the consequences but do not eliminate the underlying pathologies. This "secondary prevention" creates pharmacologic accumulation: prolonging the use of medications, layering them, and accruing their side effects and interactions. Staying healthy depends on recognizing the risks of the default lifestyle. Overriding it requires insight, knowledge, critical analysis, long-range strategic thinking, personal agency, and self-direction. Education develops that ability directly and indirectly, by way of creative work and a sense of controlling one's own life. PMID:26272989

  9. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins. PMID:18727911

  10. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial activity that leads to the formation of biofilms on process equipment can accelerate corrosion, reduce heat transfer rates, and generally decrease process efficiencies. Additional concerns arise in the food and pharma industries where product quality and safety are a high priority. Pharmac...

  11. The effect of antifungal combination on transcripts of a subset of drug-resistance genes in clinical isolates of Candida species induced biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nermin H; Melake, Nahla A; Somily, Ali M; Zakaria, Azza S; Baddour, Manal M; Mahmoud, Amany Z

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with increased Candida resistance toward antifungal agents. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess the incidence of biofilm formation among Candida isolates and to investigate the effect of high doses of fluconazole {FLC}, voriconazole {VOC} and amphotericin B {AMB}, singly and in combination on mature biofilms. Moreover, it aimed to assess the expression of selected genes (CDR1, KRE1 and SKN1) responsible for Candida biofilm resistance. The study included 49 patients; samples were collected from the King Khalid Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Isolates were prepared for biofilm formation and quantification using 0.4% (w/v) crystal violet. Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) were conducted by the broth microdilution method. Biofilm eradication was evaluated using counting, XTT stain intensity and observed under the inverted microscope. Selected genes were evaluated in Candida biofilms under the effect of antifungal exposure using QPCR. The major isolates were Candida albicans (65.3%) followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. 77.6% of the strains were biofilm formers. AMB showed susceptibility in 87.8% of isolates, followed by VOC (77.6%) and FLC (67.3%). MIC50 and MIC90 were (0.03, 0.125), (0.5, 8), (2, >128) μg/ml for AMB, VOC and FLC, respectively. 34.7% and 18.4% of the isolates were antagonistic to AMB/FLC and AMB/VOC, respectively. Mature biofilms of ten selected isolates were found resistant to FLC (1000 μg/ml). VOR and AMB concentration required to inhibit biofilm formation was 16-250 fold higher than the MIC for planktonic cells. Isolates showed significant reduction with antifungal combination when compared with the untreated controls (p value ⩽ 0.01), or using fluconazole alone (p value ⩽ 0.05). High doses of the antifungals were employed to assess the effect on the persisters' selected gene expression. Marked over expression of SKN1 and to a

  12. Lifestyle in Iranian Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Robabeh; Janbabai, Ghasem; Nikkhah, Attieh

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the most commonly diagnosed cancers is breast cancer that leads to mortality and morbidity among Iranian women. Behavioural risk factors, such as common lifestyle patterns are often associated with risk of breast cancer incidence. Aim This study aimed to investigate lifestyle of breast cancer patients admitted to Cancer Research Center of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using convenient sampling method. Sample size consisted of 150 cancer patients, and data collection tool included a researcher-made questionnaire on dimensions of lifestyle containing four dimensions of self-care, exercise and physical activity, diet and coping with stress. Maximum score in different dimensions, based on 100% of marks earned, was evaluated in three categories of undesirable, relatively desirable and desirable. Data were analysed with SPSS-19 software using descriptive statistics (relative and absolute frequencies, mean and standard deviation). Results In total of 150 women, the mean age of patients was 51.9 ± 1.04 (27-78). The majority of participants were married, housewives, with high school education. Among the four parts of healthy lifestyle, desirable level of physical activity and exercise had the least participants, and in the dimensions of physical activity and exercise, the lowest level related to walking, followed by daily exercise. Most of the participants had undesirable level of self-care and lowest frequency related to mammography after 40-year-old, followed by annual check-up and Pap-smear. With regard to nutrition, most of them were at desirable level. Conclusion The results indicated undesirable levels in two lifestyle dimensions (self-care and physical activity and exercise) in the majority of participants for a year before contracting breast cancer. Primary prevention programs should be implemented with a comprehensive approach, thus, effective strategies are

  13. Dietary and lifestyle factors of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Unhee; Song, Min-Ae

    2012-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking, physical activity, and body weight management, are known to constitute the majority of cancer causes. Epigenetics has been widely proposed as a main mechanism that mediates the reversible effects of dietary and lifestyle factors on carcinogenesis. This chapter reviews human studies on potential dietary and lifestyle determinants of DNA methylation. Apart from a few prospective investigations and interventions of limited size and duration, evidence mostly comes from cross-sectional observational studies and supports some associations. Studies to date suggest that certain dietary components may alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation levels in systemic and target tissues, affecting genomic stability and transcription of tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Most data and supportive evidence exist for folate, a key nutritional factor in one-carbon metabolism that supplies the methyl units for DNA methylation. Other candidate bioactive food components include alcohol and other key nutritional factors of one-carbon metabolism, polyphenols and flavonoids in green tea, phytoestrogen, and lycopene. Some data also support a link of DNA methylation with physical activity and energy balance. Effects of dietary and lifestyle exposures on DNA methylation may be additionally modified by common genetic variants, environmental carcinogens, and infectious agents, an aspect that remains largely unexplored. In addition, growing literature supports that the environmental conditions during critical developmental stages may influence later risk of metabolic disorders in part through persistent programming of DNA methylation. Further research of these modifiable determinants of DNA methylation will improve our understanding of cancer etiology and may present certain DNA methylation markers as attractive surrogate endpoints for prevention research. Considering the plasticity of epigenetic marks and correlated nature of lifestyle factors, more

  14. Vocational Maturity and Self Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Hans

    The relationship between separate dimensions of vocational maturity and different self-concept and identity variables were examined. Subjects were Dutch students, age 14-18 years. The vocational maturity dimensions were measured by Dutch adaptations of American vocational maturity scales. Instruments for self-concept and identity measurement were…

  15. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  16. Survivorship: Healthy Lifestyles, Version 2.2014

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, with attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding physical activity in survivors, including assessment for the risk of exercise-induced adverse events, exercise prescriptions, guidance for resistance training, and considerations for specific populations (eg, survivors with lymphedema, ostomies, peripheral neuropathy). In addition, strategies to encourage health behavioral change in survivors are discussed. PMID:25190692

  17. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence. PMID:26609568

  18. Cellulose production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae: a compromise between epiphytic and pathogenic lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Arrebola, Eva; Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Genome sequencing and annotation have revealed a putative cellulose biosynthetic operon in the strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, the causal agent of bacterial apical necrosis. Bioinformatics analyses and experimental methods were used to confirm the functionality of the cellulose biosynthetic operon. In addition, the results showed the contribution of the cellulose operon to important aspects of P. syringae pv. syringae biology, such as the formation of biofilms and adhesion to the leaf surface of mango, suggesting that this operon increases epiphytic fitness. However, based on the incidence and severity of the symptoms observed in tomato leaflets, cellulose expression reduces virulence, as cellulose-deficient mutants increased the area of necrosis, whereas the cellulose-overproducing strain decreased the area of necrosis compared with the wild type. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the epiphytic and pathogenic stages of the P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 lifestyle are intimately affected by cellulose production. PMID:26109133

  19. Increased Transfer of a Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Escherichia coli Biofilms at the Air-Liquid Interface ▿

    PubMed Central

    Król, Jaroslaw E.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Rogers, Linda M.; Beyenal, Haluk; Krone, Stephen M.; Top, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    Although biofilms represent a common bacterial lifestyle in clinically and environmentally important habitats, there is scant information on the extent of gene transfer in these spatially structured populations. The objective of this study was to gain insight into factors that affect transfer of the promiscuous multidrug resistance plasmid pB10 in Escherichia coli biofilms. Biofilms were grown in different experimental settings, and plasmid transfer was monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy and plate counting. In closed flow cells, plasmid transfer in surface-attached submerged biofilms was negligible. In contrast, a high plasmid transfer efficiency was observed in a biofilm floating at the air-liquid interface in an open flow cell with low flow rates. A vertical flow cell and a batch culture biofilm reactor were then used to detect plasmid transfer at different depths away from the air-liquid interface. Extensive plasmid transfer occurred only in a narrow zone near that interface. The much lower transfer frequencies in the lower zones coincided with rapidly decreasing oxygen concentrations. However, when an E. coli csrA mutant was used as the recipient, a thick biofilm was obtained at all depths, and plasmid transfer occurred at similar frequencies throughout. These results and data from separate aerobic and anaerobic matings suggest that oxygen can affect IncP-1 plasmid transfer efficiency, not only directly but also indirectly, through influencing population densities and therefore colocalization of donors and recipients. In conclusion, the air-liquid interface can be a hot spot for plasmid-mediated gene transfer due to high densities of juxtaposed donor and recipient cells. PMID:21642400

  20. Stage of Change and Motivation to a Healthier Lifestyle before and after an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Livia, Buratta; Elisa, Reginato; Claudia, Ranucci; Roberto, Pippi; Cristina, Aiello; Emilia, Sbroma Tomaro; Chiara, Perrone; Alberto, Tirimagni; Angelo, Russo; Pierpaolo, De Feo; Claudia, Mazzeschi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Lifestyle modification programs are different but typically include both nutritional aspects and physical activity as main domains with different behavioral and/or psychological strategies designed to affect change. A fundamental role in modifying unhealthy habits is played by personal motivation for change. The present study sought to investigate, in a group of 100 overweight/obese outpatients with and/or without TMD2, treatment seeking, the effect of an intensive lifestyle program on medical measures and motivational profile for physical activity (PA) and healthy nutrition (NUTR). Method. Subjects participated in an intensive multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention at C.U.R.I.A.MO. Before and after the intervention, patients received a comprehensive evaluation of their clinical, anthropometric, and metabolic states and motivation to lifestyle changes. Results. Data showed differences before and after intervention in both medical and motivational measures. Before the intervention patients reported to be ready, open, and determined to change and gave importance to healthy habits. After the intervention patients continued to be determined but increased the actions toward the change showing a higher degree of maintenance and of acquisition of habits especially in the physical domain of the new lifestyle. Conclusion. Data support the notion that the motivation should be followed during all the lifestyle interventions to support the change on both domains of the lifestyle program. PMID:27239339

  1. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  2. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

  3. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

  4. The clinical impact of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Song, Zhi-jun; Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria survive in nature by forming biofilms on surfaces and probably most, if not all, bacteria (and fungi) are capable of forming biofilms. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and extracellular DNA. Bacterial biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectant chemicals and to phagocytosis and other components of the innate and adaptive inflammatory defense system of the body. It is known, for example, that persistence of staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients are caused by biofilm growing mucoid strains. Gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and the bacterial cells located in nutrient poor areas have decreased metabolic activity and increased doubling times. These more or less dormant cells are therefore responsible for some of the tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations. Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of molecules, which activates certain genes responsible for production of virulence factors and, to some extent, biofilm structure. This phenomenon is called quorum sensing and depends upon the concentration of the quorum sensing molecules in a certain niche, which depends on the number of the bacteria. Biofilms can be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis or early aggressive antibiotic therapy and they can be treated by chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy. Promising strategies may include the use of compounds which can dissolve the biofilm matrix and quorum sensing inhibitors, which increases biofilm susceptibility to antibiotics and phagocytosis. PMID:21485309

  5. Staphopains Modulate Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mootz, Joe M.; Malone, Cheryl L.; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a known cause of chronic biofilm infections that can reside on medical implants or host tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated an important role for proteinaceous material in the biofilm structure. The S. aureus genome encodes many secreted proteases, and there is growing evidence that these enzymes have self-cleavage properties that alter biofilm integrity. However, the specific contribution of each protease and mechanism of biofilm modulation is not clear. To address this issue, we utilized a sigma factor B (ΔsigB) mutant where protease activity results in a biofilm-negative phenotype, thereby creating a condition where the protease(s) responsible for the phenotype could be identified. Using a plasma-coated microtiter assay, biofilm formation was restored to the ΔsigB mutant through the addition of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 or by using Staphostatin inhibitors that specifically target the extracellular cysteine proteases SspB and ScpA (called Staphopains). Through construction of gene deletion mutants, we determined that an sspB scpA double mutant restored ΔsigB biofilm formation, and this recovery could be replicated in plasma-coated flow cell biofilms. Staphopain levels were also found to be decreased under biofilm-forming conditions, possibly allowing biofilm establishment. The treatment of S. aureus biofilms with purified SspB or ScpA enzyme inhibited their formation, and ScpA was also able to disperse an established biofilm. The antibiofilm properties of ScpA were conserved across S. aureus strain lineages. These findings suggest an underappreciated role of the SspB and ScpA cysteine proteases in modulating S. aureus biofilm architecture. PMID:23798534

  6. Hyaluronan Modulation Impacts Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection.

    PubMed

    Ibberson, Carolyn B; Parlet, Corey P; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Crosby, Heidi A; Meyerholz, David K; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of chronic biofilm infections. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a large glycosaminoglycan abundant in mammalian tissues that has been shown to enhance biofilm formation in multiple Gram-positive pathogens. We observed that HA accumulated in an S. aureus biofilm infection using a murine implant-associated infection model and that HA levels increased in a mutant strain lacking hyaluronidase (HysA). S. aureus secretes HysA in order to cleave HA during infection. Through in vitro biofilm studies with HA, the hysA mutant was found to accumulate increased biofilm biomass compared to the wild type, and confocal microscopy showed that HA is incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Exogenous addition of purified HysA enzyme dispersed HA-containing biofilms, while catalytically inactive enzyme had no impact. Additionally, induction of hysA expression prevented biofilm formation and also dispersed an established biofilm in the presence of HA. These observations were corroborated in the implant model, where there was decreased dissemination from an hysA mutant biofilm infection compared to the S. aureus wild type. Histopathology demonstrated that infection with an hysA mutant caused significantly reduced distribution of tissue inflammation compared to wild-type infection. To extend these studies, the impact of HA and S. aureus HysA on biofilm-like aggregates found in joint infections was examined. We found that HA contributes to the formation of synovial fluid aggregates, and HysA can disrupt aggregate formation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that HA is a relevant component of the S. aureus biofilm matrix and HysA is important for dissemination from a biofilm infection. PMID:27068096

  7. dsrAB-based analysis of sulphate-reducing bacteria in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important members of the sulphur cycle in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigate the diversity and activity of SRB within the developing and established biofilm of two moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater in New Zealand. The larger of the two WWTPs (Moa Point) generates high levels of sulphide relative to the smaller Karori plant. Clone libraries of the dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase (dsrAB) genes and quantitative real-time PCR targeting dsrA transcripts were used to compare SRB communities between the two WWTPs. Desulfobulbus (35-53 % of total SRB sequences) and genera belonging to the family Desulfobacteraceae (27-41 %) dominated the SRB fraction of the developing biofilm on deployed plastic carriers at both sites, whereas Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium were exclusively found at Moa Point. In contrast, the established biofilms from resident MBBR carriers were largely dominated by Desulfomonile tiedjei-like organisms (58-100 % of SRB sequences). The relative transcript abundance of dsrA genes (signifying active SRBs) increased with biofilm weight yet remained low overall, even in the mature biofilm stage. Our results indicate that although SRB are both present and active in the microbial community at both MBBR study sites, differences in the availability of sulphate may be contributing to the observed differences in sulphide production at these two plants. PMID:24788329

  8. Pel is a cationic exopolysaccharide that cross-links extracellular DNA in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Laura K.; Storek, Kelly M.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Coulon, Charlène; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Sadovskaya, Irina; Secor, Patrick R.; Tseng, Boo Shan; Scian, Michele; Filloux, Alain; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Howell, P. Lynne; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a complex, ordered process. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Psl and Pel exopolysaccharides and extracellular DNA (eDNA) serve as structural components of the biofilm matrix. Despite intensive study, Pel’s chemical structure and spatial localization within mature biofilms remain unknown. Using specialized carbohydrate chemical analyses, we unexpectedly found that Pel is a positively charged exopolysaccharide composed of partially acetylated 1→4 glycosidic linkages of N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Guided by the knowledge of Pel’s sugar composition, we developed a tool for the direct visualization of Pel in biofilms by combining Pel-specific Wisteria floribunda lectin staining with confocal microscopy. The results indicate that Pel cross-links eDNA in the biofilm stalk via ionic interactions. Our data demonstrate that the cationic charge of Pel is distinct from that of other known P. aeruginosa exopolysaccharides and is instrumental in its ability to interact with other key biofilm matrix components. PMID:26311845

  9. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    PubMed

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems. PMID:27318448

  10. Deviant Lifestyles and Violent Victimization at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nofziger, Stacey

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how the lifestyles of juveniles influence violent victimization at school. Using data from the National Survey of Adolescents, this study demonstrates that both indirect victimization, through witnessing violence, and sexual and physical assaults of students are pervasive problems at schools. Although a number of individual and…

  11. Improving Your Lifestyle. From Theory to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Sally Sue

    1987-01-01

    This pamphlet for adult educators contains information on integrating material on health and life-style into the adult basic education classroom. Ten steps are summarized for discussion in the class by adults: proper exercise, good diet, weight control, avoiding cigarettes, sensible drinking habits, taking drugs, handling stress, safety…

  12. Demographic and Lifestyle Variables Associated with Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Sheri L.; Lokken, Kristine; Pilcher, Kenneth; Boeka, Abbe

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Overweight and obesity rates are associated with chronic diseases and higher rates of disability and continue to rise in the United States and worldwide. The purpose of this study was to build on past research and further investigate demographic and lifestyle variables associated with increased body mass index (BMI: kg/m[squared]).…

  13. Promoting Healthy Lifestyles with Schoolwide Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virgilio, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Schoolwide events to promote healthy lifestyles include fitness field day; family-fitness night; geography run; school health fair; morning and evening stretches and workouts; Jump Rope for Heart, Hoops for Heart, and Step for Heart; All Children Exercising Simultaneously; holiday classics; neighborhood fitness trail; morning and evening workouts;…

  14. Using Genograms Creatively to Promote Healthy Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casado-Kehoe, Montserrat; Kehoe, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Family therapists have used genograms as an assessment tool for years to examine the interactions and relationships of family members across generations. This article discusses how a therapist can use a genogram creatively to help clients examine the impact of family relationships on healthy and unhealthy lifestyle patterns and how those…

  15. Institutionalization of a Multidisciplinary Healthy Lifestyles Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookins-Fisher, Jodi; O'Boyle, Irene; Ivanitskaya, Lana

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of health education is to positively influence the health behavior of individuals and communities, as well as living and working conditions that affect health. The goal of a Healthy Lifestyles course that is offered to undergraduate students enrolled in a university general education program (e.g., liberal arts education, core…

  16. Lifestyle Interventions: Reasons for Therapeutic Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baydala, Angelina M.; Hiebert, Bryan; Malec, Carol A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews studies that indicate lifestyle education and exercise programs improve quality of life, health, and wellness. States that mixed results seem to indicate that something other than physical fitness is significantly contributing to improved psychosocial functioning. Postulates that cognitive factors such as improved self-confidence and…

  17. Promoting Active Lifestyles--A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Deb; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a series of articles that address the theme of promoting active lifestyles through education. Some topics are facilities and equipment, how fear plays a part in limiting participation in physical activity, working with disabled as well as aging persons, the use of water activities, and instructor accountability. (GLR)

  18. Mechanisms of biofilm resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Mah, T F; O'Toole, G A

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms attached to a surface. It has become clear that biofilm-grown cells express properties distinct from planktonic cells, one of which is an increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. Recent work has indicated that slow growth and/or induction of an rpoS-mediated stress response could contribute to biocide resistance. The physical and/or chemical structure of exopolysaccharides or other aspects of biofilm architecture could also confer resistance by exclusion of biocides from the bacterial community. Finally, biofilm-grown bacteria might develop a biofilm-specific biocide-resistant phenotype. Owing to the heterogeneous nature of the biofilm, it is likely that there are multiple resistance mechanisms at work within a single community. Recent research has begun to shed light on how and why surface-attached microbial communities develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. PMID:11166241

  19. Sub-Optimal Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianyan; Duperthuy, Marylise; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm is an emerging clinical problem recognized in the treatment of infectious diseases within the last two decades. The appearance of microbial biofilm in clinical settings is steadily increasing due to several reasons including the increased use of quality of life-improving artificial devices. In contrast to infections caused by planktonic bacteria that respond relatively well to standard antibiotic therapy, biofilm-forming bacteria tend to cause chronic infections whereby infections persist despite seemingly adequate antibiotic therapy. This review briefly describes the responses of biofilm matrix components and biofilm-associated bacteria towards sub-lethal concentrations of antimicrobial agents, which may include the generation of genetic and phenotypic variabilities. Clinical implications of bacterial biofilms in relation to antibiotic treatments are also discussed. PMID:27338489

  20. Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Fila, Grzegorz; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses. PMID:23509680

  1. Development of a simplified biofilm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sushovan; Mazumder, Debabrata

    2015-11-01

    A simplified approach for analyzing the biofilm process in deriving an easy model has been presented. This simplified biofilm model formulated correlations between substrate concentration in the influent/effluent and at biofilm-liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness. The model essentially considered the external mass transport according to Fick's Law, steady state substrate as well as biomass balance for attached growth microorganisms. In substrate utilization, Monod growth kinetics has been followed incorporating relevant boundary conditions at the liquid-biofilm interface and at the attachment surface. The numerical solution of equations was accomplished using Runge-Kutta method and accordingly an integrated computer program was developed. The model has been successfully applied in a distinct set of trials with varying range of representative input variables. The model performance was compared with available existing methods and it was found an easy, accurate method that can be used for process design of biofilm reactor.

  2. Biofilm Inhibitors that Target Amyloid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Diego; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacteria establish stable communities, known as biofilms, that are resistant to antimicrobials. Biofilm robustness is due to the presence of an extracellular matrix, which for several species - among them Bacillus subtilis - includes amyloid-like protein fibers. In this work, we show that B. subtilis biofilms can be a simple and reliable tool for screening of molecules with anti-amyloid activity. We identified two molecules, AA-861 and parthenolide, which efficiently inhibited biofilms by preventing the formation of amyloid-like fibers. We found that parthenolide also disrupted pre-established biofilms. These molecules also impeded the formation of biofilms of other bacterial species that secrete amyloid proteins, such as Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the identified molecules decreased the conversion of the yeast protein New1 to the prion state in a heterologous host, indicating the broad range of activity of the molecules. PMID:23352144

  3. Multicellular Organization in a Degradative Biofilm Community

    PubMed Central

    Wolfaardt, G. M.; Lawrence, J. R.; Robarts, R. D.; Caldwell, S. J.; Caldwell, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Diclofop methyl, a commercial herbicide, was used as the sole carbon source to cultivate diclofop-degrading biofilms in continuous-flow slide culture. The biofilms were analyzed by using scanning confocal laser microscopy and image analysis. Spatial relationships among members of the community were distinctive to diclofop-grown biofilms. These relationships did not develop when the biofilms were grown on more labile substrates but were conserved when the biofilms were cultivated with other chlorinated ring compounds. The structures included conical bacterial consortia rising to 30 μm above the surrounding biofilm, grape-like clusters of cocci embedded in a matrix of perpendicularly oriented bacilli, and other highly specific patterns of intra- and intergeneric cellular coaggregation and growth. These unique consortial relationships indicated that syntrophic interactions may be necessary for optimal degradation of diclofop methyl and other chlorinated ring compounds. Images PMID:16349173

  4. Microbial biofilms on building stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppert, M.; Kemmling, A.; Kämper, M.

    2003-04-01

    Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestric ecosystems as well as on man-made material. The organisms take part in biogenic weathering on natural rocks as well as on building stone [1]. Though the presence of biofilms on stone monuments exposed to the outdoor environment is obvious, thin films also occur on monuments under controllable indoor environment conditions. Numerous biofilm organisms produce large volumes of extracellular polymer (EP), mainly polysaccharides. Hydrated, gel-like EP acts as glue between the organisms and the material surface and forms a protected environment for the microbial cells. The contact zone between EP and the material surface is the crucial reactive interface of the bio-organic cover and the underlying building material. At this interface, all hazardous compounds (e.g. organic acids), after diffusion transfer via EP, react with the material surface. Upon dehydration, volume of EP greatly decreases. The thin, varnish-like EP layer still protects the dormant cells from irreversible inactivation. Periodic shrinking and swelling of the EP induces mechanical stress on the stone surface, epecially when the polymer penetrates small pores and cavities in the underlying material surface. Thus, monitoring and structure/functional analysis of EP and EP production by organisms is important to understand biogenic weathering phenomena and building stone deterioration. The study presented here describes biofilms on the surfaces of building material in outdoor and indoor environments. The application of marker techniques and visualization of samples with light and electron microscopy illustrates the role of EP at microscale. EP forms the matrix that encloses microorganisms, dust particles and mineral grains in a rigid film. EP penetrates small pore spaces of the underlying substratum and may also facilitate subsequent penetration of the microorganisms into the material. EP seals the material surface and cements the superficial layer

  5. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism. PMID:26272750

  6. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Speziale, Pietro; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g., in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue, and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow, and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell–cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA, and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG), clumping factor B (ClfB), serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC), the biofilm-associated protein (Bap), and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB) are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap) contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis, proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC). Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap) and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp) of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC) of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in Staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  7. GENETIC CONTROL OF CANDIDA ALBICANS BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Candida species cause frequent infections due to their ability to form biofilms – surface-associated microbial communities – primarily on implanted medical devices. Increasingly, mechanistic studies have identified the gene products that participate directly in Candida albicans biofilm formation, as well as the regulatory circuitry and networks that control their expression and activity. These studies have revealed new mechanisms and signals that govern C. albicans biofilm formation and associated drug resistance, thus providing biological insight and therapeutic foresight. PMID:21189476

  8. Animal models to evaluate bacterial biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Kim; Trøstrup, Hannah; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Medical biofilms have attracted substantial attention especially in the past decade. Animal models are contributing significantly to understand the pathogenesis of medical biofilms. In addition, animal models are an essential tool in testing the hypothesis generated from clinical observations in patients and preclinical testing of agents showing in vitro antibiofilm effect. Here, we describe three animal models - two non-foreign body Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm models and a foreign body Staphylococcus aureus model. PMID:24664830

  9. Biofilm formation and sanitizer resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from "high event period" meat contamination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; King, David A; Luedtke, Brandon E; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Arthur, Terrance M

    2014-11-01

    In the meat industry, a "high event period" (HEP) is defined as a time period during which commercial meat plants experience a higher than usual rate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination. Genetic analysis indicated that within a HEP, most of the E. coli O157:H7 strains belong to a singular dominant strain type. This was in disagreement with the current beef contamination model stating that contamination occurs when incoming pathogen load on animal hides, which consists of diverse strain types of E. coli O157:H7, exceeds the intervention capacity. Thus, we hypothesize that the HEP contamination may be due to certain in-plant colonized E. coli O157:H7 strains that are better able to survive sanitization through biofilm formation. To test our hypothesis, a collection of 45 E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from HEP beef contamination incidents and a panel of 47 E. coli O157:H7 strains of diverse genetic backgrounds were compared for biofilm formation and sanitizer resistance. Biofilm formation was tested on 96-well polystyrene plates for 1 to 6 days. Biofilm cell survival and recovery growth after sanitization were compared between the two strain collections using common sanitizers, including quaternary ammonium chloride, chlorine, and sodium chlorite. No difference in "early stage" biofilms was observed between the two strain collections after incubation at 22 to 25°C for 1 or 2 days. However, the HEP strains demonstrated significantly higher potency of "mature" biofilm formation after incubation for 4 to 6 days. Biofilms of the HEP strains also exhibited significantly stronger resistance to sanitization. These data suggest that biofilm formation and sanitization resistance could have a role in HEP beef contamination by E. coli O157:H7, which highlights the importance of proper and complete sanitization of food contact surfaces and food processing equipment in commercial meat plants. PMID:25364934

  10. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  11. Candida albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip) for high-throughput antifungal drug screening.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans remains the main etiological agent of candidiasis, which currently represents the fourth most common nosocomial bloodstream infection in US hospitals. These opportunistic infections pose a growing threat for an increasing number of compromised individuals, and carry unacceptably high mortality rates. This is in part due to the limited arsenal of antifungal drugs, but also to the emergence of resistance against the most commonly used antifungal agents. Further complicating treatment is the fact that a majority of manifestations of candidiasis are associated with the formation of biofilms, and cells within these biofilms show increased levels of resistance to most clinically-used antifungal agents. Here we describe the development of a high-density microarray that consists of C. albicans nano-biofilms, which we have named CaBChip. Briefly, a robotic microarrayer is used to print yeast cells of C. albicans onto a solid substrate. During printing, the yeast cells are enclosed in a three dimensional matrix using a volume as low as 50 nL and immobilized on a glass substrate with a suitable coating. After initial printing, the slides are incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours to allow for biofilm development. During this period the spots grow into fully developed "nano-biofilms" that display typical structural and phenotypic characteristics associated with mature C. albicans biofilms (i.e. morphological complexity, three dimensional architecture and drug resistance). Overall, the CaBChip is composed of ~750 equivalent and spatially distinct biofilms; with the additional advantage that multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Cell viability is estimated by measuring the fluorescent intensity of FUN1 metabolic stain using a microarray scanner. This fungal chip is ideally suited for use in true high-throughput screening for antifungal drug discovery. Compared to current standards (i.e. the 96-well microtiter plate model of biofilm formation

  12. Mechanics governs single-cell signaling and multi-cell robustness in biofilm infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita

    In biofilms, bacteria and other microbes are embedded in extracellular polymers (EPS). Multiple types of EPS can be produced by a single bacterial strain - the reasons for this redundancy are not well-understood. Our work suggests that different polymers may confer distinct mechanical benefits. Our model organism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen that forms chronic biofilm infections associated with increased antibiotic resistance and evasion of the immune defense. Biofilms initiate when bacteria attach to a surface, sense the surface, and change their gene expression. Changes in gene expression are regulated by a chemical signal, cyclic-di-GMP. We find that one EPS material, called ``PEL,'' enhances surface sensing by increasing mechanical coupling of single bacteria to the surface. Measurements of bacterial motility suggest that PEL may increase frictional interactions between the surface and the bacteria. Consistent with this, we show that bacteria increase cyclic-di-GMP signaling in response to mechanical shear stress. Mechanosensing has long been known to be important to the function of cells in higher eukaryotes, but this is one of only a handful of studies showing that bacteria can sense and respond to mechanical forces. For the mature biofilm, the embedding polymer matrix can protect bacteria both chemically and mechanically. P. aeruginosa infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung often last for decades, ample time for the infecting strain(s) to evolve. Production of another EPS material, alginate, is well-known to tend to increase over time in CF infections. Alginate chemically protects biofilms, but also makes them softer and weaker. Recently, it is being increasingly recognized that bacteria in chronic CF infections also evolve to increase PSL production. We use oscillatory bulk rheology to determine the unique contributions of EPS materials to biofilm mechanics. Unlike alginate, increased PSL stiffens biofilms. Increasing both

  13. Real-Time Measurements of the Redox States of c-Type Cytochromes in Electroactive Biofilms: A Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Virdis, Bernardino; Millo, Diego; Donose, Bogdan C.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM) was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208±49 µA cm−2) and mature (57 days, j = 267±73 µA cm−2) biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190±37 µA cm−2) with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms. PMID:24587123

  14. Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mary Ellen; O'toole, George A.

    2000-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development. PMID:11104821

  15. Spatial structure, cooperation and competition in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria often live within matrix-embedded communities, termed biofilms, which are now understood to be a major mode of microbial life. The study of biofilms has revealed their vast complexity both in terms of resident species composition and phenotypic diversity. Despite this complexity, theoretical and experimental work in the past decade has identified common principles for understanding microbial biofilms. In this Review, we discuss how the spatial arrangement of genotypes within a community influences the cooperative and competitive cell-cell interactions that define biofilm form and function. Furthermore, we argue that a perspective rooted in ecology and evolution is fundamental to progress in microbiology. PMID:27452230

  16. Studying Bacterial Multispecies Biofilms: Where to Start?

    PubMed

    Røder, Henriette L; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-06-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. PMID:27004827

  17. The clinical importance of fungal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Gordon; Williams, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Fungal biofilms have become an increasingly important clinical problem. The widespread use of antibiotics, frequent use of indwelling medical devices, and a trend toward increased patient immunosuppression have resulted in a creation of opportunity for clinically important yeasts and molds to form biofilms. This review will discuss the diversity and importance of fungal biofilms in the context of clinical medicine, provide novel insights into the clinical management of fungal biofilm infection, present evidence why these structures are recalcitrant to antifungal therapy, and discuss how our knowledge and understanding may lead to novel therapeutic intervention. PMID:23763758

  18. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  19. Laboratory modelling of manganese biofiltration using biofilms of Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed

    Hope, C K; Bott, T R

    2004-04-01

    Laboratory biofilters (pilot-scale, 20 l and laboratory-scale, 5l) were constructed in order to model the bioaccumulation of manganese (Mn) under flow conditions similar to those occurring in biofilters at groundwater treatment sites. The biofilters were operated as monocultures of Leptothrix discophora, the predominant organism in mature Mn oxidising biofilms. Biologically mediated Mn bioaccumulation was successfully modelled in both filter systems. The data obtained showed that in the small-scale biofilter, the Mn concentrations that gave the highest rate of Mn bioaccumulation, shortest maturation time, highest optical density (biomass) and growth rate were between 2000 and 3000 microg x l(-1). The non-problematic scale-up of the process from the laboratory-scale to the pilot-scale biofilter model suggests that Mn biofilters may be 'seeded' with laboratory grown cultures of L. discophora. By initially operating the biofilter as a re-circulating batch culture, with an initial Mn concentration of approximately 2500 microg x l(-1), it is hoped to reduce the filter maturation time from months to days. PMID:15026240

  20. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms Induce Macrophage Dysfunction Through Leukocidin AB and Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Tyler D.; Hanke, Mark L.; Huang, Ouwen; James, David B. A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Fey, Paul D.; Torres, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The macrophage response to planktonic Staphylococcus aureus involves the induction of proinflammatory microbicidal activity. However, S. aureus biofilms can interfere with these responses in part by polarizing macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory profibrotic phenotype. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from mature S. aureus biofilms inhibited macrophage phagocytosis and induced cytotoxicity, suggesting the involvement of a secreted factor(s). Iterative testing found the active factor(s) to be proteinaceous and partially agr-dependent. Quantitative mass spectrometry identified alpha-toxin (Hla) and leukocidin AB (LukAB) as critical molecules secreted by S. aureus biofilms that inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis and promote cytotoxicity. A role for Hla and LukAB was confirmed by using hla and lukAB mutants, and synergy between the two toxins was demonstrated with a lukAB hla double mutant and verified by complementation. Independent confirmation of the effects of Hla and LukAB on macrophage dysfunction was demonstrated by using an isogenic strain in which Hla was constitutively expressed, an Hla antibody to block toxin activity, and purified LukAB peptide. The importance of Hla and LukAB during S. aureus biofilm formation in vivo was assessed by using a murine orthopedic implant biofilm infection model in which the lukAB hla double mutant displayed significantly lower bacterial burdens and more macrophage infiltrates than each single mutant. Collectively, these findings reveal a critical synergistic role for Hla and LukAB in promoting macrophage dysfunction and facilitating S. aureus biofilm development in vivo. PMID:26307164

  2. Occupational lifestyle diseases: An emerging issue.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh; Majumdar, P K

    2009-12-01

    Lifestyle diseases characterize those diseases whose occurrence is primarily based on the daily habits of people and are a result of an inappropriate relationship of people with their environment. The main factors contributing to lifestyle diseases include bad food habits, physical inactivity, wrong body posture, and disturbed biological clock. A report, jointly prepared by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Economic Forum, says India will incur an accumulated loss of $236.6 billion by 2015 on account of unhealthy lifestyles and faulty diet. According to the report, 60% of all deaths worldwide in 2005 (35 million) resulted from noncommunicable diseases and accounted for 44% of premature deaths. What's worse, around 80% of these deaths will occur in low and middle-income countries like India which are also crippled by an ever increasing burden of infectious diseases, poor maternal and perinatal conditions and nutritional deficiencies. According to a survey conducted by the Associated Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ASSOC-HAM), 68% of working women in the age bracket of 21-52 years were found to be afflicted with lifestyle ailments such as obesity, depression, chronic backache, diabetes and hypertension. The study 'Preventive Healthcare and Corporate Female Workforce' also said that long hours and working under strict deadlines cause up to 75% of working women to suffer from depression or general anxiety disorder, compared to women with lesser levels of psychological demand at work. The study cited scientific evidence that healthy diet and adequate physical activity - at least 30 minutes of moderate activity at least five days a week - helped prevent NCDs. In India, 10% of adults suffer from hypertension while the country is home to 25-30 million diabetics. Three out of every 1,000 people suffer a stroke. The number of deaths due to heart attack is projected to increase from 1.2 million to 2 million in 2010. The diet [or lifestyle] of different

  3. Physical Activity among Young People in the Context of Lifestyle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telama, Risto; Nupponen, Heimo; Pieron, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    The promotion of a healthy lifestyle is the main goal of physical education in many countries. However, very little is known about the relationship between different lifestyles and physical activity patterns among young people. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lifestyle and physical activity among 12- and…

  4. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Uosaki, Hideki; Cahan, Patrick; Lee, Dong I.; Wang, Songnan; Miyamoto, Matthew; Fernandez, Laviel; Kass, David A.; Kwon, Chulan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation. However, control of CM maturation which is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes, remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs mature early in culture, but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation. PMID:26586429

  5. Effects of xylitol on xylitol-sensitive versus xylitol-resistant Streptococcus mutans strains in a three-species in vitro biofilm.

    PubMed

    Marttinen, Aino M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Saari, Markku A; Ihalin, Riikka A; Söderling, Eva M

    2012-09-01

    We studied the effects of xylitol on biofilms containing xylitol-resistant (Xr) and xylitol-sensitive (Xs) Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and S. sanguinis. The biofilms were grown for 8 and 24 h on hydroxyapatite discs. The viable microorganisms were determined by plate culturing techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using a S. mutans-specific probe. Extracellular cell-bound polysaccharides (EPS) were determined by spectrofluorometry from single-species S. mutans biofilms. In the presence of 5 % xylitol, the counts of the Xs S. mutans decreased tenfold in the young (8 h) biofilm (p < 0.05) but no effect was seen in the mature (24 h) biofilm. No decrease was observed for the Xr strains, and FISH confirmed these results. No differences were detected in the EPS production of the Xs S. mutans grown with or without xylitol, nor between Xr and Xs S. mutans strains. Thus, it seems that xylitol did not affect the EPS synthesis of the S. mutans strains. Since the Xr S. mutans strains, not inhibited by xylitol, showed no xylitol-induced decrease in the biofilms, we conclude that growth inhibition could be responsible for the decrease of the counts of the Xs S. mutans strains in the clinically relevant young biofilms. PMID:22645015

  6. Early application of negative pressure wound therapy to acute wounds contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus: An effective approach to preventing biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    LI, TONGTONG; ZHANG, LIHAI; HAN, LI; WANG, GUOQI; YIN, PENG; LI, ZHIRUI; ZHANG, LICHENG; GUO, QI; LIU, DAOHONG; TANG, PEIFU

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective at preventing biofilm-associated infections; however, its role in biofilm prevention is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of NPWT on biofilm prevention when rapidly initiated following wound contamination. Full-thickness dermal wounds (8 mm) were created in rabbit ears and inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). At 6 h following inoculation, continuous NPWT at −125 mmHg was initiated, with the wounds on the contralateral ear left untreated in order to serve as self-controls. S. aureus rapidly formed mature biofilms in the wound beds post-inoculation, with a persistent bacterial burden of ~105−107 colony-forming units (CFUs)/wound and impaired wound healing. Compared with the untreated group, NPWT resulted in a significant reduction in biofilm matrix, which was verified by scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence. A reduction in bacterial counts followed (P<0.05) with ~103 CFUs/wound on postoperative day 13 and improvement in all healing parameters (P<0.05) relative to control wounds. The results of the present investigation suggest that NPWT is an effective strategy to impeding the formation of S. aureus wound biofilms when initiated rapidly following bacterial contamination. The early application of NPWT, aimed at biofilm prevention, may improve wound care. PMID:26997991

  7. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal.

    PubMed

    Verkaik, Martinus J; Busscher, Henk J; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C

    2010-08-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a salivary pellicle for 2 h or grown after adhesion for 16 h, after which, their removal was evaluated. In a contact mode, no differences were observed between the manual, rotating, or sonic brushing; and removal was on average 39%, 84%, and 95% for Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii, respectively, and 90% and 54% for the dual- and multi-species biofilms, respectively. However, in a non-contact mode, rotating and sonic brushes still removed considerable numbers of bacteria (24-40%), while the manual brush as a control (5-11%) did not. Single A. naeslundii and dual-species (A. naeslundii and S. oralis) biofilms were more difficult to remove after 16 h growth than after 2 h adhesion (on average, 62% and 93% for 16- and 2-h-old biofilms, respectively), while in contrast, biofilms grown from whole saliva were easier to remove (97% after 16 h and 54% after 2 h of growth). Considering the strong adhesion of dual-species biofilms and their easier more reproducible growth compared with biofilms grown from whole saliva, dual-species biofilms of A. naeslundii and S. oralis are suggested to be preferred for use in mechanical plaque removal studies in vitro. PMID:19565279

  8. [The yeast biofilm in human medicine].

    PubMed

    Růzicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, the role of Candida yeasts as causative agents of nosocomial infections has increased. One of the important virulence factors contributing to the development of such infections is biofilm production. This virulence factor enables yeast to colonize both native surfaces and artificial implants. The most common sources of infection are patients themselves, in particular the gastrointestinal tract and skin. The vectors of exogenous yeast infections are predominantly the hands of the health personnel and contaminated medical instruments. The adhesion of yeasts to the implant surfaces is determined both by implant surface and yeast characteristics. This is followed by proliferation and production of microcolonies and extracellular matrix. The final biofilm structure is also influenced by the production of hyphae and pseudohyphae. The entire process of biofilm production is controlled by numerous regulatory systems, with the key role being played by the quorum sensing system. Like the adhered bacterial cultures, candidas growing in the form of a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Resistance of yeast biofilms to antifungals is a complex process with multiple contributing factors. These are especially increased gene expression (e.g. genes encoding the so called multidrug efflux pumps), limited penetration of substances through the extracellular matrix, inhibited cell growth and altered microenvironment in deeper biofilm layers. The concentrations of antifungals able to effectively affect the biofilm cells exceed, by several orders of magnitude, the values of conventionally determined MICs. High biofilm resistance results in ineffective antifungal therapy of biofilm infections. Therefore, if possible, the colonized implant should be removed. Conservative therapy should involve antifungals with a proven effect on the biofilm (e.g. caspofungin). The most effective measure in fighting biofilm infections is prevention, especially adhering to

  9. Calcium Causes Multimerization of the Large Adhesin LapF and Modulates Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Gil, Marta; Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    LapF is a large secreted protein involved in microcolony formation and biofilm maturation in Pseudomonas putida. Its C-terminal domain shows the characteristics of proteins secreted through a type I secretion system and includes a predicted calcium binding motif. We provide experimental evidence of specific binding of Ca2+ to the purified C-terminal domain of LapF (CLapF). Calcium promotes the formation of large aggregates, which disappear in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA. Immunolocalization of LapF also shows the tendency of this protein to accumulate in vivo in certain extracellular regions. These findings, along with results showing that calcium influences biofilm formation, lead us to propose a model in which P. putida cells interact with each other via LapF in a calcium-dependent manner during the development of biofilms. PMID:23042991

  10. Inhibition of biofilm development of uropathogens by curcumin - an anti-quorum sensing agent from Curcuma longa.

    PubMed

    Packiavathy, Issac Abraham Sybiya Vasantha; Priya, Selvam; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2014-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is caused primarily by the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent biofilm forming ability of uropathogens. In the present investigation, an anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) agent curcumin from Curcuma longa (turmeric) was shown to inhibit the biofilm formation of uropathogens, such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Proteus mirabilis and Serratia marcescens, possibly by interfering with their QS systems. The antibiofilm potential of curcumin on uropathogens as well as its efficacy in disturbing the mature biofilms was examined under light microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope. The treatment with curcumin was also found to attenuate the QS-dependent factors, such as exopolysaccharide production, alginate production, swimming and swarming motility of uropathogens. Furthermore, it was documented that curcumin enhanced the susceptibility of a marker strain and uropathogens to conventional antibiotics. PMID:24262582

  11. Maturational and Non-Maturational Factors in Heritage Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the maturational and non-maturational aspects of early bilingualism and language attrition in heritage speakers who have acquired their L1 incompletely in childhood. The study highlights the influential role of age and input dynamics in early L1 development, where the timing of reduction in L1 input and the…

  12. Ethical aspects of paternal preconception lifestyle modification.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Boukje; de Wert, Guido; Steegers, Eric A; de Beaufort, Inez D

    2013-07-01

    This Clinical Opinion points to a potential conflict between the scarcity of evidence on paternal preconception risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and the view that preconception care should be also directed at men. We argue that from an ethical perspective, responsible fatherhood starts already before conception, as long as the evidence increases on the benefits of paternal preconception lifestyle (modification). Our explorative study suggests that the strength of the evidence for paternal preconception lifestyle modification is important for men. We argue that 5 aspects together determine the moral responsibility of prospective fathers to modify their behavior: the strength of the evidence of the risk factor, the modifiability of the risk, the efforts necessary to eliminate or diminish the risk factor, the severity of harm, and the probability that harm will occur and that it will be prevented by modifying the risk factor. The case of paternal preconception smoking illustrates the analysis. PMID:23313726

  13. Biofilm Matrix Exoproteins Induce a Protective Immune Response against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Carmen; Solano, Cristina; Burgui, Saioa; Latasa, Cristina; García, Begoña; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus biofilm mode of growth is associated with several chronic infections that are very difficult to treat due to the recalcitrant nature of biofilms to clearance by antimicrobials. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest in preventing the formation of S. aureus biofilms and developing efficient antibiofilm vaccines. Given the fact that during a biofilm-associated infection, the first primary interface between the host and the bacteria is the self-produced extracellular matrix, in this study we analyzed the potential of extracellular proteins found in the biofilm matrix to induce a protective immune response against S. aureus infections. By using proteomic approaches, we characterized the exoproteomes of exopolysaccharide-based and protein-based biofilm matrices produced by two clinical S. aureus strains. Remarkably, results showed that independently of the nature of the biofilm matrix, a common core of secreted proteins is contained in both types of exoproteomes. Intradermal administration of an exoproteome extract of an exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm induced a humoral immune response and elicited the production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-17 in mice. Antibodies against such an extract promoted opsonophagocytosis and killing of S. aureus. Immunization with the biofilm matrix exoproteome significantly reduced the number of bacterial cells inside a biofilm and on the surrounding tissue, using an in vivo model of mesh-associated biofilm infection. Furthermore, immunized mice also showed limited organ colonization by bacteria released from the matrix at the dispersive stage of the biofilm cycle. Altogether, these data illustrate the potential of biofilm matrix exoproteins as a promising candidate multivalent vaccine against S. aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24343648

  14. Biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating Halomonas venusta.

    PubMed

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Domènech, Òscar; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm development is characterized by distinct stages of initial attachment, microcolony formation and maturation (sessile cells), and final detachment (dispersal of new, planktonic cells). In this work we examined the influence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation on bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of an environmental strain isolated from microbial mats, Halomonas venusta MAT28. This strain was cultured either in an artificial biofilm in which the cells were immobilized on alginate beads (sessile) or as free-swimming (planktonic) cells. For the two modes of growth, conditions allowing or preventing PHA accumulation were established. Cells detached from alginate beads and their planktonic counterparts were used to study cell surface properties and cellular adhesion on polystyrene. Detached cells showed a slightly higher affinity than planktonic cells for chloroform (Lewis-acid) and a greater hydrophobicity (affinity for hexadecane and hexane). Those surface characteristics of the detached cells may explain their better adhesion on polystyrene compared to planktonic cells. Adhesion to polystyrene was not significantly different between H. venusta cells that had accumulated PHA vs. those that did not. These observations suggest that the surface properties of detached cells clearly differ from those of planktonic cells and that for at least the first 48 h after detachment from alginate beads H. venusta retained the capacity of sessile cells to adhere to polystyrene and to form a biofilm. PMID:26421734

  15. c-di-GMP and its Effects on Biofilm Formation and Dispersion: a Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Review.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A

    2015-04-01

    Since its initial discovery as an allosteric factor regulating cellulose biosynthesis in Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the list of functional outputs regulated by c-di-GMP has grown. We have focused this article on one of these c-di-GMP-regulated processes, namely, biofilm formation in the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases encoded in the P. aeruginosa genome still remain uncharacterized; thus, there is still a great deal to be learned about the link between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation in this microbe. In particular, while a number of c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes have been identified that participate in reversible and irreversible attachment and biofilm maturation, there is a still a significant knowledge gap regarding the c-di-GMP output systems in this organism. Even for the well-characterized Pel system, where c-di-GMP-mediated transcriptional regulation is now well documented, how binding of c-di-GMP by PelD stimulates Pel production is not understood in any detail. Similarly, c-di-GMP-mediated control of swimming, swarming and twitching also remains to be elucidated. Thus, despite terrific advances in our understanding of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and the role of c-di-GMP in this process since the last version of this book (indeed there was no chapter on c-di-GMP!) there is still much to learn. PMID:26104694

  16. A systematic review of lifestyle monitoring technologies.

    PubMed

    Brownsell, Simon; Bradley, David; Blackburn, Steve; Cardinaux, Fabien; Hawley, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    The evidence base for lifestyle monitoring is relatively weak, even though there are significant numbers of commercial installations around the world. We conducted a literature review to summarize the current position with regard to lifestyle monitoring based on sensors in the home. In total, 74 papers met the inclusion criteria. Only four papers reported trials involving 20 or more subjects, with a further 21 papers reporting trials involving one or more subjects. Most papers (n = 49) were concerned with technology development. Motion detection was the most common of the technologies employed, followed by door and electrical appliance usage. The predominant monitoring strategy was that of detecting changes in activity. However, little attention has been given to determining when or how changes in the profile of activity should be used to raise a call for assistance from a health or care professional. Lifestyle monitoring remains a relatively immature research area in which there is little detailed understanding of how to provide comprehensive and effective systems. PMID:21508080

  17. Factors affecting metabolic syndrome by lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Nam-Kyun; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Nak-Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to explore lifestyle factors in relation to metabolic syndrome so as to be able to utilize the results as baseline data for the furtherance of health-care and medical treatment. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted with patients who visited a health care center located in Seoul and had abdominal ultrasonography between 2 March 2013 and 28 February, 2014. Heights, weights, and blood pressures were measured by automatic devices. Three radiologists examined the patients using abdominal ultrasonography for gallstone diagnosis. The statuses of patients with regard to smoking, alcohol, coffee, and physical activities were explored for the lifestyle investigation. For investigating baseline demographics, we first used descriptive statistics. We then used the χ2 test to analyze lifestyles and gallstone prevalence with regard to the presence of metabolic syndrome. Lastly, logistic regression analysis was conducted to discover the risk factors of metabolic syndrome. [Results] For men, body mass index, maximum gallstone size, and waist circumference were revealed as risk factors for metabolic syndrome, in descending order of the degree of risk. For females, gallstone presence was the most significant risk factor, followed by waist circumference. [Conclusion] Metabolic disease mainly presents itself along with obesity, and we should become more focused on preventing and treating this disease. A large-scale prospective study is needed in the future, as the cause of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remained unclear in this study. PMID:26957725

  18. Lifestyle and hypertension--an overview.

    PubMed

    Beilin, L J

    1999-01-01

    Dietary and other lifestyle factors play a major role in the prevalence of hypertension. Many of the behaviours likely to reduce blood pressure also have independent beneficial effects on other cardiovascular risk factors to general health and survival. This is particularly the case with weight control, exercise, dietary patterns characterised by a low intake of saturated fat and a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fish and moderation of heavy alcohol consumption. High salt intakes remain a major contributor to hypertension, especially when potassium intake is low. Smoking has a dominant effect in increasing cardiovascular risk in hypertensives. Clustering of risk factors is often associated with clustering of unhealthy lifestyle characteristics and both are most prominent in lower socio-economic groups and in Developing Countries adopting a more sedentary lifestyle and Western diet patterns. Recent trials suggest substantial cardiovascular benefits by a combination of weight control and sodium moderation in the elderly, by non-vegetarian diets rich in fruit and vegetables and low in saturated fat, and by incorporation of regular fish meals into weight control diets. PMID:10423098

  19. [Social diseases, civilization diseases or lifestyle diseases?].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stansław

    2007-01-01

    In general, the development of civilization is viewed as a positive step for the well-being of the human species, leading to an increased duration and quality of life. The accelerated progress of civilization (mainly industrialization, urbanization and nutrition) has lead to new possibilities for adverse effects on human health. In former high civilization--like old Egypt, Greece, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Maya civilizations--the "modem civilization diseases" were unknown. Modem science through improved sanitation, vaccination and antibiotics as well as improved social and economical conditions, has eliminated the threat of death from most infectious diseases. In the years after World War II the social, economic and health conditions changed. Most deaths have resulted from heart disease, stroke, cancer and other diseases as a result of an inappropriate relationship of people with their environment and changed lifestyle. Lifestyle diseases are different from other diseases because they are potentially preventable and can be lowered with changes in diet, lifestyle and environment. PMID:18350729

  20. Planctomycetes dominate biofilms on surfaces of the kelp Laminaria hyperborea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacteria belonging to Planctomycetes display several unique morphological and genetic features and are found in a wide variety of habitats on earth. Their ecological roles in these habitats are still poorly understood. Planctomycetes have previously been detected throughout the year on surfaces of the kelp Laminaria hyperborea from southwestern Norway. We aimed to make a detailed investigation of the abundance and phylogenetic diversity of planctomycetes inhabiting these kelp surfaces. Results Planctomycetes accounted for 51-53% of the bacterial biofilm cells in July and September and 24% in February according to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results. Several separate planctomycetes lineages within Pirellulae, Planctomyces and OM190 were represented in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and the most abundant clones belonged to yet uncultured lineages. In contrast to the abundance, the diversity of the planctomycete populations increased from July to February and was probably influenced by the aging of the kelp tissue. One planctomycete strain that was closely related to Rhodopirellula baltica was isolated using selective cultivation techniques. Conclusions Biofilms on surfaces of L. hyperborea display an even higher proportion of planctomycetes compared to other investigated planctomycete-rich habitats such as open water, sandy sediments and peat bogs. The findings agree well with the hypothesis of the role of planctomycetes as degraders of sulfated polymeric carbon in the marine environment as kelps produce such substances. In addition, the abundant planctomycete populations on kelp surfaces and in association with other eukaryotes suggest that coexistence with eukaryotes may be a key feature of many planctomycete lifestyles. PMID:20950420

  1. MODELING CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN ANAEROBIC BIOFILM SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rigorous steady-state models of acetate- and methanol-utilizing methanogenic biofilms are developed taking into account the mass transfer of neutral and ionic species, pH changes within the biofilm, pH-dependent Monod kinetics, chemical equilibrium,, electronueutrality, gas produ...

  2. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  3. Nanomaterials for the Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Sheng; Gupta, Akash; Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of biofilm-associated infections is challenging, requiring the development of new therapeutic strategies. In this viewpoint, we discuss the use of nanoparticle-based systems as active therapeutic agents and as vehicles to transport drugs to the site of infection. These applications require understanding of the surface interactions of nanoparticles with bacteria/biofilms, an aspect that we likewise summarize. PMID:27622944

  4. Escherichia coli biofilm: development and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G; Sharma, S; Sharma, P; Chandola, D; Dang, S; Gupta, S; Gabrani, R

    2016-08-01

    Escherichia coli biofilm consists of a bacterial colony embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which protects the microbes from adverse environmental conditions and results in infection. Besides being the major causative agent for recurrent urinary tract infections, E. coli biofilm is also responsible for indwelling medical device-related infectivity. The cell-to-cell communication within the biofilm occurs due to quorum sensors that can modulate the key biochemical players enabling the bacteria to proliferate and intensify the resultant infections. The diversity in structural components of biofilm gets compounded due to the development of antibiotic resistance, hampering its eradication. Conventionally used antimicrobial agents have a restricted range of cellular targets and limited efficacy on biofilms. This emphasizes the need to explore the alternate therapeuticals like anti-adhesion compounds, phytochemicals, nanomaterials for effective drug delivery to restrict the growth of biofilm. The current review focuses on various aspects of E. coli biofilm development and the possible therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of biofilm-related infections. PMID:26811181

  5. Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Low, Donald E.; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation. PMID:24185913

  6. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  7. Introduction to Biofilms Thematic Minireview Series.

    PubMed

    Allewell, Norma M

    2016-06-10

    The biofilms that many bacteria and fungi produce enable them to form communities, adhere tightly to surfaces, evade host immunity, and resist antibiotics. Pathogenic microorganisms that form biofilms are very difficult to eradicate and thus are a frequent source of life-threatening, hospital-acquired infections. This series of five minireviews from the Journal of Biological Chemistry provides a broad overview of our current understanding of biofilms and the challenges that remain. The structure, biosynthesis, and biological function of the biofilms produced by pathogenic fungi are the subject of the first article, by Sheppard and Howell. Gunn, Bakaletz, and Wozniak focus on the biochemistry and structure of bacterial biofilms, how these structures enable bacteria to evade host immunity, and current and developing strategies for overcoming this resistance. The third and fourth articles present two of the best understood cell signaling pathways involved in biofilm formation. Valentini and Filloux focus on cyclic di-GMP, while Kavanaugh and Horswill discuss the quorum-sensing (agr) system and the relationship between quorum sensing and biofilm formation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, particularly the role of efflux pumps and the development of persister cells, are the topics of the final article by Van Acker and Coenye. The advances described in this series guarantee that ongoing interdisciplinary and international efforts will lead to new insights into the basic biology of biofilm formation, as well as new strategies for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27129220

  8. Beneficial Biofilms: Wastewater and Other Industrial Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the use of beneficial biofilms for the production of industrial chemicals such as ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. It also emphasizes application of biofilm reactors for treatment of dairy industry wastewater, oily sea water...

  9. Pseudomonas biofilms: possibilities of their control.

    PubMed

    Masák, Jan; Čejková, Alena; Schreiberová, Olga; Rezanka, Tomáš

    2014-07-01

    Genus Pseudomonas includes a large number of species that can be encountered in biotechnological processes as well as in the role of serious human or plant pathogens. Pseudomonads easily form biofilms on various types of surfaces. The biofilm phenotype is characterized by an increased resistance to environmental influences including resistance to antibiotics and other disinfectants, causing a number of problems in health care, food industry, and other areas. Considerable attention is therefore paid to the possibilities of eradication/destruction of pseudomonads biofilms both in terms of understanding the mechanisms of biofilm formation and at the level of finding suitable antibiofilm tools applicable in practice. The first part of this review is devoted to an overview of the regulatory mechanisms that are directly or indirectly involved in the formation of biofilm. The most effective approaches to suppressing the formation of biofilm that do not cause the development of resistance are based on the application of substances that interfere with the regulatory molecules or block the appropriate regulatory mechanisms involved in biofilm development by the cells. Pseudomonads biofilm formation is, similar to other microorganisms, a sophisticated process with many regulatory elements. The suppression of this process therefore also requires multiple antibiofilm tools. PMID:24754832

  10. Biofilm-degrading enzymes from Lysobacter gummosus

    PubMed Central

    Gökçen, Anke; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Wiesner, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm-degrading enzymes could be used for the gentle cleaning of industrial and medical devices and the manufacture of biofilm-resistant materials. We therefore investigated 20 species and strains of the bacterial genus Lysobacter for their ability to degrade experimental biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, a common nosocomial pathogen typically associated with device-related infections. The highest biofilm-degradation activity was achieved by L. gummosus. The corresponding enzymes were identified by sequencing the L. gummosus genome. Partial purification of the biofilm-degrading activity from an extract of extracellular material followed by peptide mass fingerprinting resulted in the identification of two peptidases (α-lytic protease and β-lytic metalloendopeptidase) that were predicted to degrade bacterial cell walls. In addition, we identified two isoforms of a lysyl endopeptidase and an enzyme similar to metalloproteases from Vibrio spp. Potential peptidoglycan-binding C-terminal fragments of two OmpA-like proteins also co-purified with the biofilm-degrading activity. The L. gummosus genome was found to encode five isoenzymes of α-lytic protease and three isoenzymes of lysyl endopeptidase. These results indicated that the extracellular digestion of biofilms by L. gummosus depends on multiple bacteriolytic and proteolytic enzymes, which could now be exploited for biofilm control. PMID:24518560

  11. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Szafranski, Szymon P; Kunze, Brigitte; Sztajer, Helena; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of compounds for their ability to prevent biofilm formation and to resolve an existing G. vaginalis biofilm. The antibiotics metronidazole and tobramycin were highly effective in preventing biofilm formation, but had no effect on an established biofilm. The application of the amphoteric tenside sodium cocoamphoacetate (SCAA) led to disintegration of existing biofilms, reducing biomass by 51% and viability by 61% and it was able to increase the effect of metronidazole by 40% (biomass) and 61% (viability). Our data show that attacking the biofilm and the bacterial cells by the combination of an amphoteric tenside with the antibiotic metronidazole might be a useful strategy against BV. PMID:27111438

  12. Screening of Compounds against Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Gottschick, Cornelia; Szafranski, Szymon P.; Kunze, Brigitte; Sztajer, Helena; Masur, Clarissa; Abels, Christoph; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common infection in reproductive age woman and is characterized by dysbiosis of the healthy vaginal flora which is dominated by Lactobacilli, followed by growth of bacteria like Gardnerella vaginalis. The ability of G. vaginalis to form biofilms contributes to the high rates of recurrence that are typical for BV and which unfortunately make repeated antibiotic therapy inevitable. Here we developed a biofilm model for G. vaginalis and screened a large spectrum of compounds for their ability to prevent biofilm formation and to resolve an existing G. vaginalis biofilm. The antibiotics metronidazole and tobramycin were highly effective in preventing biofilm formation, but had no effect on an established biofilm. The application of the amphoteric tenside sodium cocoamphoacetate (SCAA) led to disintegration of existing biofilms, reducing biomass by 51% and viability by 61% and it was able to increase the effect of metronidazole by 40% (biomass) and 61% (viability). Our data show that attacking the biofilm and the bacterial cells by the combination of an amphoteric tenside with the antibiotic metronidazole might be a useful strategy against BV. PMID:27111438

  13. BIOFILMS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtually anywhere a surface comes into contact with the water in a distribution system, one can find biofilms. Biofilms are formed in distribution system pipelines when microbial cells attach to pipe surfaces and multiply to form a film or slime layer on the pipe. Probably withi...

  14. Biofilms in fresh fruit and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria can attach to surfaces and form biofilms, which have a characteristic structure consisting of microcolonies enclosed in a hydrated matrix of microbially-produced proteins and polysaccharides. In this complex biofilm network, the cells act less as individual entities and more as a