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Sample records for maxillary artery

  1. Divided maxillary artery in relation to the lateral pterygoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Aland, R Claire; Shaw, Vivien

    2016-03-01

    We describe an anatomical variation of the right maxillary artery. The variation loops deep, giving off a middle meningeal artery with an extremely short extracranial segment, then bifurcates into unequal branches. The smaller branch passes superficial to the lateral pterygoid head and distributes primarily to the masticatory muscles. The larger partially pierces the lateral pterygoid lower head, re-emerges superficially, branches again and passes into the pterygopalatine fossa. The larger lies superficial to the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves and deep to the buccal nerve. An embryonic development origin of the cranial arteries is suggested. PMID:26077959

  2. Non-pulsatile traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery following trauma to mandible.

    PubMed

    Soh, Hui Yuh; Muda, Ahmad Sobri; Jabar, Nazimi Abd; Nordin, Rifqah; Nabil, S; Ramli, Roszalina

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic pseudoaneurysm involving the maxillary artery is rare. Owing to its anatomic location, internal maxillary artery is usually protected by its surrounding structures. Formation of pseudoaneurysm usually takes place after several weeks to months of the initial injury. In this case, we reported a pseudoaneurysm arising from left internal maxillary artery following blunt injuries within 3 hours after a road accident and the treatment with endovascular embolization with titanium coils prior to open reduction and internal fixation of the fractured mandibles. PMID:25903486

  3. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery following mandibular condylar fracture

    PubMed Central

    Katakol, Basavaraj; Govindaraj, E.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery is a rare occurrence. A well-organized pulsatile mass that develops after a traumatic event indicates a pseudoaneurysm. Such lesions are commonly misdiagnosed for an abscess or a hematoma. Pulsations and audible bruit are diagnostic features of an aneurysm. Rupture of such false aneurysms cause significant morbidity. Management is either surgical resection or embolization. Endovascular embolization is indicated in deep seated lesions or lesions with high morbidity. Though surgical resection is an invasive procedure, it is considered to be an alternative to embolization. PMID:25593875

  4. Arteriovenous fistula of the internal maxillary artery in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Cluzel, P; Pierot, L; Jason, M; Rose, M; Kieffer, E; Chiras, J

    1992-01-01

    Direct arteriovenous fistulae supplied by the external carotid artery are unusual. Rarely, congenital fistulae have been described involving the head and neck. We describe the first case of congenital internal maxillary arteriovenous fistula in a child. Balloon embolization is currently considered the method of choice for treatment of direct arteriovenous fistula. PMID:1407539

  5. Pseudoaneurysm in the Internal Maxillary Artery Occurring After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Kyung-Su

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pseudoaneurysm is defined as blood leaking out of a vessel that does not have true 3 arterial walls like a true aneurysm, and is susceptible to rupture. Only 4 patients of pseudoaneurysm after endoscopic sinus surgery have been reported so far in English literature. Recently, the authors encountered a pseudoaneurysm in the internal maxillary artery after endoscopic sinus surgery, which was immediately and successfully managed with endovascular embolization. There was no bleeding or complications 6 months after the embolization. PMID:27213747

  6. Location of Posterosuperior Alveolar Artery and Correlation with Maxillary Sinus Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Elie; Nasseh, Ibrahim; Hadchiti, Wahib; Bouchard, Philippe; Moarbes, Maria; Khawam, Georges; Bechara, Boulos; Noujeim, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The blood supply to both the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus and the overlying membrane originates from the posterosuperior alveolar artery (PSAA) and the infraorbital artery. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anatomic characteristics of the PSAA in a large number of subjects of the Lebanese population. Images of 696 sinuses were analyzed using cone beam computed tomography (CT). Coronal, axial, and sagittal CT images were evaluated for the presence of an osseous canal in the lateral wall of the sinus, and the prevalence, position, and location of the canal were studied and presented. PMID:26133149

  7. Internal Maxillary Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass: Infratemporal Approach for Subcranial-Intracranial (SC-IC) Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nossek, Erez; Costantino, Peter D.; Eisenberg, Mark; Dehdashti, Amir R.; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J.; Ortiz, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal maxillary artery (IMax)–middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass has been recently described as an alternative to cervical extracranial-intracranial bypass. This technique uses a “keyhole” craniectomy in the temporal fossa that requires a technically challenging end-to-side anastomosis. OBJECTIVE: To describe a lateral subtemporal craniectomy of the middle cranial fossa floor to facilitate wide exposure of the IMax to facilitate bypass. METHODS: Orbitozygomatic osteotomy is used followed by frontotemporal craniotomy and subsequently laterotemporal fossa craniectomy, reaching its medial border at a virtual line connecting the foramen rotundum and foramen ovale. The IMax was identified by using established anatomic landmarks, neuronavigation, and micro Doppler probe (Mizuho Inc. Tokyo, Japan). Additionally, we studied the approach in a cadaveric specimen in preparation for microsurgical bypass. RESULTS: There were 4 cases in which the technique was used. One bypass was performed for flow augmentation in a hypoperfused hemisphere. The other 3 were performed as part of treatment paradigms for giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms. Vein grafts were used in all patients. The proximal anastomosis was performed in an end-to-side fashion in 1 patient and end-to-end in 3 patients. Intraoperative graft flow measured with the Transonic flow probe ranged from 20 to 60 mL/min. Postoperative angiography demonstrated good filling of the graft with robust distal flow in all cases. All patients tolerated the procedure well. CONCLUSION: IMax to middle cerebral artery subcranial-intracranial bypass is safe and efficacious. The laterotemporal fossa craniectomy technique resulted in reliable identification and wide exposure of the IMax, facilitating the proximal anastomosis. ABBREVIATIONS: EC-IC, extracranial-intracranial IMax, internal maxillary artery MCA, middle cerebral artery SC-IC, subcranial-intracranial STA, superficial temporal artery PMID:24618804

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery: A case report of facial trauma and recurrent bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Nivaldo; de Oliveira Bastos, Endrigo; Massenburg, Benjamin B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoaneurysms occur when there is a partial disruption in the wall of a blood vessel, causing a hematoma that is either contained by the vessel adventitia or the perivascular soft tissue. Presentation of case A 32-year-old male presented to the emergency department presented with comminuted fractures in the left zygoma, ethmoids, and the right ramus of the mandible following a gunshot wound. The patient underwent open reduction of his fractures and the patient was discharged on the eighth day after the trauma. Thirteen days after the discharge and 21 days after the gunshot wound, the patient returned to the ER due to heavy nasopharyngeal bleeding that compromised the patency of the patient’s airways and caused hemodynamic instability. Arteriography of the facial blood vessels revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the maxillary artery. Endovascular embolization with a synthetic embolic agent resulted in adequate hemostasis, and nine days after embolization the patient was discharged. Discussion The diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm is suggested by history and physical examination, and confirmed by one of several imaging methods, such as CT scan with contrast. Progressive enlargement of the lesion may lead to several complications, including rupture of the aneurysm and hemorrhage, compression of adjacent nerves, or release of embolic thrombi. Conclusion This case reports the long-term follow up and natural history of a patient with a post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery and the successful use of endovascular embolization to treat the lesion. PMID:26942333

  9. Embolization of a congenital arteriovenous fistula of the internal maxillary artery: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Alejandro; Johnson, Jeremiah; Birnbaum, Lee A

    2016-06-01

    A 13 year-old girl with a congenital carotid-jugular fistula presented with a pulsatile mass and a thrill on the left side of her neck. Angiography showed a fistula between the left internal maxillary artery and the jugular vein. The patient underwent coil embolization using a transarterial balloon-assisted technique and one week later, a transvenous approach. The fistula was completely obliterated, and the patient's symptoms resolved. PMID:26842609

  10. Intra-arterial chemoradiation therapy with weekly low-dose cisplatin for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Tada, Y; Maruya, S; Takeishi, E; Miura, K; Masubuchi, T; Fushimi, C; Hasegawa, H; Kamata, S

    2015-06-01

    A new intra-arterial chemoradiation regimen that involves infusing low-dose cisplatin in combination with definitive irradiation was used in 36 patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. The safety and therapeutic efficacy of this regimen were reviewed retrospectively. An intra-arterial catheter was inserted in a retrograde manner into the target artery via the superficial temporal artery or occipital artery. Intra-arterial infusion was performed using cisplatin at a dose of 20-50mg/m(2) per week for 6-8 weeks. At the same time, sodium thiosulphate was infused as a neutralizing agent. Irradiation was performed at 60Gy in 30 fractions. All 36 patients completed treatment. Grade 3 adverse events occurred in only seven patients (19.4%) and no grade 4 events were noted. As a primary therapy, the complete response rate was 83.3%, the partial response rate was 16.7%, and the overall response rate was 100%. The 2-year local control rate was 63.0%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. The 2-year preservation rate of the hard palate was 97.1%, that of the eyeball was 97.2%, and that of visual function was 94.4%. This treatment regimen can contribute to improving the quality of life of patients without reducing the curability of the therapy. PMID:25843537

  11. Identification of the Bony Canal of the Posterior Superior Alveolar Nerve and Artery in the Maxillary Sinus: Tomographic, Radiographic, and Macroscopic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    German, Iris Jasmin Santos; Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi; Capelozza, Ana Lúcia Alvares; Shinohara, Andre Luis; Pereira, Mizael; Buchaim, Rogerio Leone

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the shape and route of the bony canal of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) and posterior superior alveolar nerve (PSAN) using different identification methods, including computed tomography (CT), panoramic radiograph, and macroscopic evaluation (corpse and dry skull). Twenty-four patients were analyzed by CT and panoramic and posterior anterior (PA) radiographs; additionally, 90 dry skulls and 21 dissected anatomical specimens were examined. Three-dimensional-CT revealed that the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus resembled a tunnel format in 60% of the treated patients. Out of all 24 patients, the panoramic radiograph identified the bony canal in only one patient; whereas the PA radiograph identified it in 80% of the patients. The dry skulls showed tunnellike routes of the PSAA and PSAN in 65% of the cases. Moreover, the pathway was also visibly observed in the dissected anatomical specimens as a straight shape in 85% of the cases. Thus, our results demonstrated that the most common shape of the bony canal of the PSAA and PSAN is the tunnel format with a straight route by 3D-CT, posterior anterior radiography, and macroscopic evaluation. However, in the panoramic radiographs, it was difficult to identify this canal. PMID:25861685

  12. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults. PMID:11428268

  13. Reappraisal of trimodal combination therapy for maxillary sinus carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, H.; Suzuki, S.; Horiuchi, J.; Takagi, M.; Okuyama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, M.

    1982-12-15

    The introduction of trimodal combination therapy (surgery + radiation + intraarterial infusion) for maxillary carcinoma resulted in a change in the sites of recurrence and no satisfactory improvement in the local control rate. To examine the cause of these phenomena, external carotid angiography was performed on 51 patients prior to the start of the therapy and the results of the treatment were studied. Angiographic findings indicated that maxillary carcinoma is fed not only by the maxillary artery, but also by the internal carotid, facial, transverse facial and other arteries from the external carotid artery. The multiplicity of feeders causes irregular distribution of the intraarterially infused antimetabolites. Irregular and local low distribution of antimetabolites may well bring about the high rate of recurrence. The results of intraarterial transcatheter Tc-99m-MAA injection were also in accord with the angiographic findings.

  14. Hemangioma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Most, D S

    1985-11-01

    Hemangiomas of the maxillary sinus are rare. Hemangiomas of the maxillary sinus with an associated phlebolith have not been previously reported. Severe bleeding can occur upon surgical removal of hemangiomas. PMID:3864111

  15. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males. PMID:16861848

  16. Maxillary sinus carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.; Ogura, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Primary site control, anatomical site of failure, survival, and complications of treatment were determined in a retrospective review of primary maxillary sinus carcinoma. Sixty-one patients were treated by radiation followed by surgery and 35 by radiation alone. Primary tumor control was achieved in 69% of patients receiving combined treatment, 14% of patients treated with radiation alone, and 49% of all patients. Local control did not differ with histological type. Virtually all epidermoid and undifferentiated carcinoma recurrences occurred within 2 years, but 27% of adenocarcinomas recurred after 2 years.

  17. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  18. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  19. [Modern morpho-functional concepts in cephalic arterial distribution].

    PubMed

    Scutariu, M D; Ciupilan, Corina

    2005-01-01

    The present paper provides a general morphofunctional study of the oro-maxillary-facial cephalic arterial area that shows some particular hemodynamic characteristics. The internal maxillary artery supplies a very large territory, with numerous and wide anastomoses. In order to understand the hemodynamic characteristics of this artery, we analyzed some older theories, such as: Ludwig von Bertalanffy's General Systems Theory, Walter Zimmermann's Telome Theory, and some general rheological principles also. PMID:16607795

  20. Curative Transvenous Onyx Embolization of a Maxillary Arteriovenous Malformation in a Child: Report of a New Technique.

    PubMed

    Limbucci, Nicola; Spinelli, Giuseppe; Nappini, Sergio; Renieri, Leonardo; Consoli, Arturo; Rosi, Andrea; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    Endovascular management of maxillary arteriovenous malformation (AVMs) can be complex. Transarterial, transvenous, and direct puncture embolization has been described. The authors report the case of a 9-year-old girl with a hemorrhagic maxillary AVM, which has been treated by transvenous embolization after failure of transarterial embolization. The venous pouch was catheterized with a detachable tip microcatheter and occluded by slow Onyx injection. Onyx filled the pouch and retrogradely reached some arterial feeders, achieving complete occlusion. Bleeding episode ceased and at 6 months follow-up no recurrence was found. Maxillary AVMs can be successfully treated by transvenous Onyx embolization. PMID:26872284

  1. Pediatric maxillary and mandibular tumors.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Samuel J; Krakovitz, Paul R

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric maxillary and mandibular tumors offer considerable challenges to otolaryngologists, oral surgeons, pathologists, and radiologists alike. Because of the close proximity to vital structures, appropriate steps toward a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan are of paramount importance. This article reviews the most common causes of pediatric jaw masses and discusses diagnostic and therapeutic considerations and recommendations. PMID:25442129

  2. Bacteria in chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Karma, P; Jokipii, L; Sipilä, P; Luotonen, J; Jokipii, A M

    1979-07-01

    Sixty-one chronically inflamed maxillary sinuses produced 131 bacterial strains from mucosal pieces that were taken during a Caldwell-Luc operation and cultured aerobically and anaerobically. Sinus secretions showed only 62 and nasal secretions 106 bacterial strains. Fourteen mucosal strains, including 11 Haemophilus influenzae, grew heavily. None of 24 mucosal anaerobes showed heavy growth. Of 52 antral mucosae with culturable bacteria, 37 disclosed mixed and 15 pure growth. The bacteriological characteristics of the diseased sinus and the nose did not correlate. The duration or extent of the disease, the macroscopic appearance of the diseased sinus, or the presence or absence of allergy were unrelated to bacteriological findings, except that H influenzae was concentrated in purulent sinuses. Intraoperative culture of antral mucosa seems to give the most reliable picture of the bacteriological condition in chronic maxillary sinusitis. PMID:313206

  3. Maxillary First Molar with Two Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Saeed; Ghasemi, Negin

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge regarding the anatomic morphology of maxillary molars is absolutely essential for the success of endodontic treatment. The morphology of the permanent maxillary first molar has been reviewed extensively; however, the presence of two canals in a two-rooted maxillary first molar has rarely been reported in studies describing tooth and root canal anatomies. This case report presents a patient with a maxillary first molar with two roots and two root canals, who was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. PMID:23862051

  4. Unusual external resorption of a maxillary lateral.

    PubMed

    Giunta, J L; Kaplan, M A

    1994-01-01

    This article defines an unusual previously unreported entity afflicting a maxillary lateral incisor. Labial idiopathic external root resorption just apical to the cemento-enamel presented as a gingival (periodontal) problem and was misinterpreted as cervical dental caries. This report defines a new possibility for a radicular defect in a maxillary lateral incisor that may cause periodontal problems. PMID:8054293

  5. Maxillary sinusitis with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Prakash, Ved; Singh, Abhishek Bahadur; Saheer, S

    2014-01-01

    Tubercular infection of the nasal cavity is an infrequently encountered condition. More so, after the discovery of relevant antibiotics, nasal sinus tuberculosis is not commonly seen. Few cases have reported tuberculosis of the paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and larynx. With the increasing incidence of HIV, these rare forms of infection have started re-emerging. We present a case of a middle aged man presenting with nasal cavity lesion along with pulmonary tuberculosis, which came to light only after the diagnosis of maxillary sinus tuberculosis. PMID:25085948

  6. Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion in adults.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M A; Kaban, L B; Vargervik, K; Baumrind, S

    1992-01-01

    Twelve adults with maxillary width discrepancy of greater than 5 mm were treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The procedure consisted of bilateral zygomatic buttress and midpalatal osteotomies combined with the use of a tooth-borne orthopedic device postoperatively. Mean palatal expansion of 7.5 mm (range of 6 to 13 mm), measured in the first molar region, was achieved within 3 weeks in all patients. Expansion remained stable during the 12-month study period, with a mean relapse for the entire group of 0.88 +/- 0.48 mm. Morbidity was limited to mild postoperative discomfort. The results of this preliminary study indicated that surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion is a safe, simple, and reliable procedure for achieving a permanent increase in skeletal maxillary width in adults. Further study is necessary to document the three-dimensional movements of the maxillary segments and long-term stability of the skeletal and dental changes. PMID:1453038

  7. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature. PMID:25209225

  8. Unusual Anatomy of Maxillary Second Premolars

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida-Gomes, Fábio; de Sousa, Bruno Carvalho; de Souza, Fabricio Dias; dos Santos, Roberto Alves; Maniglia-Ferreira, Cláudio

    2009-01-01

    In this study, endodontic treatments of maxillary second premolars with unusual anatomical configuration were presented. Maxillary second premolars usually have one root with one or two root canals. The occurrence of variations in anatomical configuration is also common; therefore, it must be taken into account in clinical and radiographic evaluation during the endodontic treatment. These teeth may also require special shaping and filling techniques. This article reports and discusses the treatment recommendations for unusual occurrences of anatomical configurations in four different maxillary second premolars. PMID:19421396

  9. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of maxillary central incisors exposure in patients undergoing maxillary advancement

    PubMed Central

    Trento, Guilherme dos Santos; Bernabé, Felipe Bueno Rosettti; da Costa, Delson João; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo; Scariot, Rafaela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Patients with dentofacial deformities may undergo orthodontic or orthodontic-surgical treatment. Both modalities can affect esthetics. Objective: This study aims to evaluate clinical and radiographic changes in exposure of maxillary central incisors occurring after orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement. Methods: A total of 17 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement between September, 2010 and July, 2011 were selected. Exposure of maxillary central incisors was evaluated clinically and by lateral cephalograms. Measurements were taken one week before and three months after surgery. Data were paired in terms of sex, age, nasolabial angle, height and thickness of the upper lip, the amount of maxillary advancement, clinical exposure and inclination of maxillary central incisor by statistical tests (CI 95%). Results: After maxillary advancement, incisor clinical exposure had increased even with relaxed lips and under forced smile. Moreover, there was a mean increase of 23.33% revealed by lateral cephalograms. There was an inverse correlation between upper lip thickness and incisors postsurgical exposure revealed by radiographic images (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Significant changes in the exposure of maxillary central incisors occur after maxillary advancement, under the influence of some factors, especially lip thickness. PMID:26691970

  10. Maxillary sinus manifestations of methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Faucett, Erynne A; Marsh, Katherine M; Farshad, Kayven; Erman, Audrey B; Chiu, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamines are the second most commonly used illicit drug worldwide and cost the United States health-care system ∼$23.4 billion annually. Use of this drug affects multiple organ systems and causes a variety of clinical manifestations. Although there are commonly known sequelae of methamphetamine abuse such as "meth mouth," there is limited evidence regarding maxillary sinus manifestations. The following cases highlight the initial evaluation and management of two methamphetamine abusers with loculated purulent collections within the maxillary sinus as a result of methamphetamine abuse. Our aim was to delineate the otolaryngologic symptoms associated with the patients' methamphetamine abuse. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed loculated purulent collections within the maxillary sinus of probable odontogenic origin in both patients. Methamphetamine abuse leading to rampant caries and poor oral hygiene may predispose individuals for craniofacial infections and fluid collections. These cases illustrate the development of maxillary sinusitis and maxilla mucoceles that have been associated with methamphetamine use. PMID:25675268

  11. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  12. Infundibula of equine maxillary cheek teeth. Part 1: Development, blood supply and infundibular cementogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suske, A; Pöschke, A; Schrock, P; Kirschner, S; Brockmann, M; Staszyk, C

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in diseases of infundibula of equine maxillary cheek teeth. Imperfect infundibular cementogenesis has been recognized as an aetiopathological factor for the onset of infundibular necrosis. In this article, infundibular development was examined with particular attention to infundibular blood vessels and cementogenesis. Forty-one deciduous maxillary premolars prior to eruption were investigated using routine histological and immunohistological methods to visualize blood vessels and the enamel organ. Selected specimens were scanned by micro-computed tomography to analyze the three-dimensional configuration of the developing infundibulum. Before eruption, the infundibula are supplied by a central infundibular artery entering the infundibulum from an occlusal direction and by arteries entering the mesial infundibulum from the mesial aspect, and the distal infundibulum from the distal aspect. The central infundibular artery is destroyed shortly after tooth eruption but the lateral arteries remain vital for a time after eruption. As the arteries of the distal infundibulum are located in a more apical position, blood is received for a longer period compared with the mesial infundibulum. Cementogenesis starts first at distinct enamel in-foldings in the occlusal part of the infundibula, advancing in an apical direction. The results suggest a distinct asymmetry between the infundibula with the mesial infundibulum prone to incomplete cementogenesis due to early blood supply cessation. PMID:26832811

  13. A rare presentation of multiple dens invaginatus in maxillary dentition

    PubMed Central

    Purani, Jigar M; Purani, Hiral J

    2014-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental disturbance of the tooth and usually occurs in the maxillary lateral incisor of permanent dentition. In this article, a rare case of dens invaginatus affecting multiple permanent maxillary teeth is described. PMID:25085944

  14. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the maxillary sinus related with pulp necrosis of maxillary teeth: case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sin-Young; Yang, Sung-Eun

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a benign lesion composed of myofibroblasts accompanied by varying numbers of inflammatory cells. Various pathogenetic factors have been proposed, but the etiology of most IMTs remains unknown. This article presents a case of IMT occurring in the left maxillary sinus. A 24-year-old man complained of throbbing pain in the maxillary left molars and swelling of the left cheek. His maxillary left second molar was diagnosed as pulp necrosis and root canal treatment performed. After that, his symptoms continued and he was referred to the Department of Otolaryngology. Computerized tomography disclosed compact soft tissue masses in the left maxillary sinus with obstruction of maxillary ostium. Under general anesthesia, the lesions were fully excised. Histopathologically, the lesions were composed of plump or spindled myofibroblasts. Cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin and β-catenin, and were negative for ALK1, CD34, and EMA. The diagnosis was IMT of left maxillary sinus. Although it is very rare, IMT should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients with compact masses in maxillary sinus. PMID:21868269

  15. Delayed removal of a maxillary third molar from the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Gregoire-Ferriol, Johanna; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Removal of an impacted superior third molar is usually a simple and uncomplicated procedure for an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Nevertheless, complications are possible and include infection, facial swallowing, trismus, wound dehiscence, root fracture or even orosinusal fistula. Iatrogenic displacement into the infratemporal fossa is frequently mentioned but rarely reported. This anatomical fossa includes several important structures such as the internal maxillary artery, the venous pterygoid plexus, the sphenopalatine nerve, the coronoid process of the mandible and the pterygoid muscles. Recommended treatment includes immediate surgical removal if possible or initial observation and secondary removal, as necessary, because of infection, limited mandibular movement, inability to extract the tooth, or the patient's psychological unease. Sometimes, the displaced tooth may spontaneously migrate inferiorly and becomes accessible intraorally. This report describes the location and secondary surgical removal of a left maxillary third molar displaced into the infratemporal fossa, two weeks after first attempt at extraction. PMID:20038889

  16. Chronic maxillary sinusitis and diabetes related maxillary osteonecrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dental infections and maxillary sinusitis are the main causes of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis can occur in all age groups, and is more frequently found in the lower jaw than in the upper jaw. Systemic conditions that can alter the patient's resistance to infection including diabetes mellitus, anemia, and autoimmune disorders are predisposing factors for osteomyelitis. We report a case of uncommon broad maxillary osteonecrosis precipitated by uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic maxillary sinusitis in a female patient in her seventies with no history of bisphosphonate or radiation treatment. PMID:26734561

  17. Chronic maxillary sinusitis and diabetes related maxillary osteonecrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huh, Suk; Lee, Chae-Yoon; Ohe, Joo-Young; Lee, Jung-Woo; Choi, Byung-Jun; Lee, Baek-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Dae

    2015-12-01

    Dental infections and maxillary sinusitis are the main causes of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis can occur in all age groups, and is more frequently found in the lower jaw than in the upper jaw. Systemic conditions that can alter the patient's resistance to infection including diabetes mellitus, anemia, and autoimmune disorders are predisposing factors for osteomyelitis. We report a case of uncommon broad maxillary osteonecrosis precipitated by uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic maxillary sinusitis in a female patient in her seventies with no history of bisphosphonate or radiation treatment. PMID:26734561

  18. Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor Versus Agenesis of the Maxillary Central Incisor.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Fabrício Kitazono; Arid, Juliana; De Rossi, Andiara; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is rare and affected individuals may carry a potentially serious condition known as SMMCI syndrome. However, many of these cases do not receive proper attention because they are misdiagnosed as agenesis of the maxillary central incisor. The purpose of this manuscript is to report two cases of children with only one maxillary central incisor and draw diagnostic differences between the entities. A correct diagnosis is very important because if an SMMCI is confirmed, the patient should be referred for genetic counseling. PMID:27098718

  19. Conservative management of a large maxillary cyst.

    PubMed

    Rees, J S

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a large maxillary cyst by root canal treatment and decompression using a hollow drain made from surgical suction tubing. The rationale behind the use of this technique is reviewed and its advantages highlighted. PMID:9477796

  20. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema

    PubMed Central

    Jaija, Abdullah M. Zakria; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; Mostafa, Yehya A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment. PMID:27239374

  1. Revisiting the Factors Underlying Maxillary Midline Diastema.

    PubMed

    Jaija, Abdullah M Zakria; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; Mostafa, Yehya A

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to analyze the etiological factors underlying the presence of maxillary midline diastema in a sample of orthodontic patients. Materials and Methods. One hundred patients who fulfill the inclusion criteria were selected from 1355 patients seeking orthodontic treatment. The pretreatment orthodontic records were analyzed. The width of the maxillary midline diastema was measured clinically with a digital caliper at two levels: the mesioincisal angles of the central incisors and five millimeters from the incisal edge. The two measurements were averaged, and patients with diastema of more than 0.5 millimeter in width were enrolled. Results. Diastema is a multifactorial clinical finding with more than one underlying etiological cause. The interrelationship between the familial pattern of midline diastema and the microdontia, macroglossia, labial frenum, and alveolar cleft conforms was clear. The effect of a mesiodens and the upper lateral incisor whether bilaterally missing, unerupted, or peg shaped was minimal. Conclusion. Etiological factors underlying maxillary midline diastema are interconnected. Using a checklist as a guide during handling maxillary midline diastema is important in the different stages of treatment. PMID:27239374

  2. Metronomic palliative chemotherapy in maxillary sinus tumor

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijay M.; Noronh, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Karpe, Ashay; Talreja, Vikas; Chandrasekharan, Arun; Dhumal, Sachin; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metronomic chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate and celecoxib recently has shown promising results in multiple studies in head and neck cancers. However, these studies have not included patients with maxillary sinus primaries. Hence, the role of palliative metronomic chemotherapy in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma that is not amenable to radical therapy is unknown. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of carcinoma maxillary sinus patients who received palliative metronomic chemotherapy between August 2011 and August 2014. The demographic details, symptomatology, previous treatment details, indication for palliative chemotherapy, response to therapy, and overall survival (OS) details were extracted. SPSS version 16 was used for analysis. Descriptive statistics have been performed. Survival analysis was done by Kaplan–Meier method. Results: Five patients had received metronomic chemotherapy. The median age was 60 years (range 37–64 years). The proportion of patients surviving at 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months were 40%, 40%, and 20%, respectively. The estimated median OS was 126 days (95% confidence interval 0–299.9 days). The estimated median survival in patients with an event-free period after the last therapy of <6 months was 45 days, whereas it was 409 days in patients with an event-free period postlast therapy above 6 months (P = 0.063). Conclusion: Metronomic chemotherapy in carcinoma maxillary sinus holds promise. It has activity similar to that seen in head and neck cancers and needs to be evaluated further in a larger cohort of patients.

  3. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  4. Surgical neuroangiography. Vol. 1: Functional anatomy of craniofacial arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lasjaunias, P.; Berenstein, A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Arterial Anatomy: Introduction. - The Internal Maxillary System. - The Pharyngo-occipital System. - The Upper Cervical Vertebral Column: The Cervical Arteries. - The Musculocutaneous Elements of the Head and Mouth. - Thyrolaryngeal Arteries. - The Transosseous Peripheral Nervous System Arterial Supply. - Dangerous Vessels. - Collateral Circulation. - The Pharyngoocipital Collateral Pattern. - The Internal Maxillary Collateral Pattern. - The Linguofacial Collateral Pattern. - Multiple Constraints and Chronology of the Collateral Response. - Angiographic Protocols. - Angiographic Protocol of the Parasellar Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Posterior Base of the Skull. - Angiographic Protocol of the Carotid Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Nasomaxillaary Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Maxillomandibular Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Temporofacial and Scalp Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Thyrolaryngeal Region. - References. - Subject Index.

  5. A rare case of impacted maxillary first premolar.

    PubMed

    Didilescu, Andreea Cristiana; Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Săndulescu, Mihai

    2015-11-01

    Among the dental and maxillary anomalies, impacted teeth are frequently encountered. However, the incidence of impaction of maxillary first premolars is very low. Herewith, we report a rare case of impacted maxillary left first premolar, in a vertical position, with the apical two-thirds of the root situated in the angle between the medial and antero-lateral walls of the maxillary sinus. The persistence of the maxillary left primary canine was also observed. The cone beam computed tomography evaluation of the case identified the close proximity of the impacted tooth with the root of the permanent canine and the nasal fossa. The finding may be helpful to dental practitioners, not only to anticipate the difficulties which may occur during surgical interventions, but also to prevent possible complications, such as maxillary infections or root resorptions. PMID:25813918

  6. Effects of Airway Problems on Maxillary Growth: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Ahmet Yalcin; Turkkahraman, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    The volume of air passing through the nose and nasopharinx is limited by its shape and diameter. Continuous airflow through the nasal passage during breathing induces a constant stimulus for the lateral growth of maxilla and for lowering of the palatal vault. Maxillary morphological differences exist between patients with airway problems and control groups, identifying a potential etiological role in these patients. The purpose of this article was to review the literature on the interaction between airway problems and expressed maxillary morphology including specific dental and skeletal malocclusions. Statistically significant differences were found between patients with airway problems and control groups, in maxillary skeletal morphology including shorter maxillary length, more proclined maxillary incisors, thicker and longer soft palate, narrower maxillary arch and higher palatal vault. PMID:19756202

  7. Maxillary reconstruction: Current concepts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Subramania; Thankappan, Krishnakumar

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary reconstruction is still an evolving art when compared to the reconstruction of the mandible. The defects of maxilla apart from affecting the functions of the speech, swallowing and mastication also cause cosmetic disfigurement. Rehabilitation of the form and function in patients with maxillary defects is either by using an obturator prosthesis or by a surgical reconstruction. Literature is abundant with a variety of reconstructive methods. The classification systems are also varied, with no universal acceptance of any one of them. The oncologic safety of these procedures is still debated, and conclusive evidence in this regard has not emerged yet. Management of the orbit is also not yet addressed properly. Tissue engineering, that has been hyped to be one of the possible solutions for this vexing reconstructive problem, has not come out with reliable and reproducible results so far. This review article discusses the rationale and oncological safety of the reconstructing the maxillary defects, critically analyzes the classification systems, offers the different reconstructive methods and touches upon the controversies in this subject. The management of the retained and exenterated orbit associated with maxillectomy is reviewed. The surgical morbidity, complications and the recent advances in this field are also looked into. An algorithm, based on our experience, is presented. PMID:24987199

  8. Maxillary reconstruction: Current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Subramania; Thankappan, Krishnakumar

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary reconstruction is still an evolving art when compared to the reconstruction of the mandible. The defects of maxilla apart from affecting the functions of the speech, swallowing and mastication also cause cosmetic disfigurement. Rehabilitation of the form and function in patients with maxillary defects is either by using an obturator prosthesis or by a surgical reconstruction. Literature is abundant with a variety of reconstructive methods. The classification systems are also varied, with no universal acceptance of any one of them. The oncologic safety of these procedures is still debated, and conclusive evidence in this regard has not emerged yet. Management of the orbit is also not yet addressed properly. Tissue engineering, that has been hyped to be one of the possible solutions for this vexing reconstructive problem, has not come out with reliable and reproducible results so far. This review article discusses the rationale and oncological safety of the reconstructing the maxillary defects, critically analyzes the classification systems, offers the different reconstructive methods and touches upon the controversies in this subject. The management of the retained and exenterated orbit associated with maxillectomy is reviewed. The surgical morbidity, complications and the recent advances in this field are also looked into. An algorithm, based on our experience, is presented. PMID:24987199

  9. Treatment of Bi-maxillary Protrusion with Impacted Maxillary and Mandibular Canines: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shdrma, Vipul Kumar; Yadav, Kirti; Nagar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Chaturvedi, Thakur Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Bi-maxillary protrusion in adolescent patients has traditionally been treated by extraction of the four first premolars and retraction ofthe anterior teeth. The ectopic eruption of the maxiIlary permanent canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. Orthodontic treatment of the impacted teeth remains a challenge for clinicians. If it is associated with other dental and skeletalproblems, there will be further complications to the treatment plan. In such cases, if we extract canines, then problems with this approach are restricted to anatomical and functional limitations ofpremolars substitution of canines. Here, we are presenting a case report of bi-maxillary dento-alveolar protrusion with the impacted maxillary and mandibular left canines and its management. PMID:27319045

  10. Alveolar Antral Artery: Review of Surgical Techniques Involving this Anatomic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The horizontal bony canal in the lateral maxillary wall is the site of anastomosis between the arterial branches from the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAa) and the infraorbital artery. This anatomic structure is known as the ‘alveolar antral artery’. Materials and Methods: We performed a literature review. The anatomic location of the alveolar antral artery in the lateral maxillary sinus wall was researched and its importance in surgical procedures routinely performed on this bony wall discussed. Results: This artery can be accidentally involved during surgical procedures on the lateral maxillary sinus wall, such as open sinus lift surgery, horizontal osteotomy of the maxilla, Le Fort I fracture treatment, and Caldwell-Luc surgeries. Conclusion: The alveolar antral artery is an important anatomic structure in the lateral maxillary sinus wall. A preoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan can be used as a good diagnostic procedure to reduce surgical complications in suspected cases as well as conditions that may involve this artery. PMID:24744995

  11. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  12. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  13. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  14. Modified transversal sagittal maxillary expander for correction of upper midline deviation associated with maxillary arch deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maspero, C; Giannini, L; Galbiati, G; Farronato, G

    2015-04-01

    The transversal sagittal maxillary expander (TSME) is a fixed device designed to develop arch form in patients with constricted dental arches. The present article describes a modified TSME appliance, the activation method, the therapeutic benefits as well as clinical advantages. The appliance has two molar bands, a Hyrax-type transverse expansion screw, one 0.045-inch wire extending from the molar band to the palatal surface of the central incisor in the emiarch crossbite and an 8 mm-Hyrax-type screw attached to this wire between the molar band and the incisor. A buccal arm with a terminal loop is welded to the band in the emiarch and it is extended to the labial surface on the central incisor on the side opposite to the crossbite and the maxillary midline deviation. The modified TSME appliance described in this paper are specifically designed for anteroposterior and transverse development. It has a sagittal effect on the maxillary alveolar process and at the same time allow to restore the correct transverse maxillary diameters. PMID:25747426

  15. Cholesteatoma of Maxillary Sinus: What Is the Best Surgical Approach?

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun; Shin, Ji Ho; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-06-01

    Cholesteatoma is a relatively common disease entity within the middle ear or mastoid cavity but cholesteatoma of the paranasal sinuses is a rare diseases entity, especially in the maxillary sinus. As the authors recently experienced a patient of maxillary sinus cholesteatoma, the authors tried to review all the literatures previously reported on the "Cholesteatoma of the maxillary sinus." The aim of this study was to describe authors' recent experience and review previously reported patients of cholesteatoma of the maxillary sinus. Additionally, it is to describe the clinical features focusing on the computed tomography findings and to elucidate which approach may be best for complete excision. The authors thoroughly reviewed 10 patient reports written in English regarding the cholesteatoma of maxillary sinus which have been published since the 1980s. Based on authors' review, the authors suggest some conclusions. First, the diagnosis of cholesteatoma, although rare, should be considered for any slowly expansile lesion of the maxillary sinus. Second, there was no specific computed tomography finding that was helpful for the diagnosis of maxillary sinus cholesteatoma. Last, the surgical approach to cholesteatoma of the maxillary sinus should be chosen to allow visibility and complete removal according to the size, location, and extent of diseases. PMID:27171957

  16. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery. PMID:26183855

  17. Metastatic Lung Carcinoma Involving the Maxillary Gingiva.

    PubMed

    Sawheny, Eva; Khawar, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Shoaib; Jones, Kellie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spread of malignant tumors to the oral soft tissue is rare and account for 0.1% of all oral malignancies. Metastatic spread to the oral soft tissue can present as dental infections, which in turn can create a diagnostic challenge. Metastasis to the oral soft tissue from lung cancer is a rare situation. Here we describe a 52 year-old male patient treated initially with antibiotics for presumed oral abscess, who later was found to have metastatic lung cancer involving the maxillary gingiva. PMID:27027144

  18. Maxillary ameloblastic fibroma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Miles, C R; Bell, C M; Pinkerton, M E; Soukup, J W

    2011-07-01

    A 4-year-old spayed female Golden Retriever was presented for evaluation of a rostral maxillary gingival mass. An en bloc resection was performed after histologic diagnosis of ameloblastic fibroma from an incisional biopsy specimen. Histologically, the tumor was composed of (1) poorly differentiated vimentin-positive mesenchymal cells that surrounded islands and (2) thin anastomosing trabeculae of odontogenic epithelium that variably coexpressed pancytokeratin and vimentin. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of ameloblastic fibroma in a dog. The clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings in this case are compared to those in other domestic animals and humans. PMID:20861502

  19. Benign schwannoma of the maxillary antrum

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Oshin; Desai, Dinkar; Bhandarkar, Gowri P.; Paul, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma also known commonly as neurilemmoma and schwann cell tumor is a benign nerve sheath tumor. About 1/3rd cases of schwannoma arise from the head and neck region but rarely from the nasal and paranasal sinuses. The recurrence rate in these cases has reported to be very rare. We report a rare case of schwannoma in a 60-year-old woman arising from the maxillary sinus further eroding the orbital floor and nasal bone. We have also described the clinical presentation, radiological, histological findings, and management of the case. PMID:27095911

  20. Ectopic 3rd Molar Tooth in the Maxillary Antrum

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Seidu A.; Oketade, Ifeoluwa O.; Osunde, Otasowie D.

    2014-01-01

    Location of ectopic tooth in a nondentate area like the maxillary antrum is rare. A 17-year-old boy, with one year history of recurrent right facial swelling and radiographic finding of a maxillary third molar tooth located at the posterior wall of the maxillary antrum, is presented. Under endotracheal intubation, the tooth was extracted through a Caldwell-Luc antrostomy approach and patient had an uneventful recovery and has been symptom free for eight months. Ectopic tooth in the maxillary antrum is rare and is commonest with maxillary third molar. It may be symptomless but is more commonly associated with inflammatory symptoms. The treatment of choice is surgical excision which is mostly carried out with Caldwell-Luc approach, even though endoscopic approach is being reported. PMID:25132999

  1. Ectopic 3rd molar tooth in the maxillary antrum.

    PubMed

    Bello, Seidu A; Oketade, Ifeoluwa O; Osunde, Otasowie D

    2014-01-01

    Location of ectopic tooth in a nondentate area like the maxillary antrum is rare. A 17-year-old boy, with one year history of recurrent right facial swelling and radiographic finding of a maxillary third molar tooth located at the posterior wall of the maxillary antrum, is presented. Under endotracheal intubation, the tooth was extracted through a Caldwell-Luc antrostomy approach and patient had an uneventful recovery and has been symptom free for eight months. Ectopic tooth in the maxillary antrum is rare and is commonest with maxillary third molar. It may be symptomless but is more commonly associated with inflammatory symptoms. The treatment of choice is surgical excision which is mostly carried out with Caldwell-Luc approach, even though endoscopic approach is being reported. PMID:25132999

  2. A combined frontal and maxillary sinus approach for repulsion of the third maxillary molar in a horse.

    PubMed

    Boutros, C P; Koenig, J B

    2001-04-01

    The 3rd maxillary molar is a difficult tooth to remove by extraction or repulsion. A combined frontal and maxillary approach provides good exposure for repulsion of this tooth, debridement of the sinuses, and placement of an alveolar seal. The improved exposure should minimize operative difficulties and postoperative complications. PMID:11326631

  3. Maxillary sinus disease of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Pushkar; Murad, Haitham

    2004-04-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition and accounts for approximately 10% to 12% of cases of maxillary sinusitis. An odontogenic source should be considered in patients with symptoms of maxillary sinusitis who give a history positive for odontogenic infection or dentoalveolar surgery or who are resistant to standard sinusitis therapy. Diagnosis usually requires a thorough dental and clinical evaluation with appropriate radiographs. Common causes of odontogenic sinusitis include dental abscesses and periodontal disease perforating the Schneidarian membrane, sinus perforations during tooth extraction, or irritation and secondary infection caused by intra-antral foreign bodies. The typical odontogenic infection is now considered to be a mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection, with the latter outnumbering the aerobic species involved. Most common organisms include anaerobic streptococci, Bacteroides, Proteus, and Coliform bacilli. Typical treatment of atraumatic odontogenic sinusitis is a 3- to 4- week trial of antibiotic therapy with adequate oral and sinus flora coverage. When indicated, surgical removal of the offending odontogenic foreign body (primary or delayed) or treatment of the odontogenic pathologic conditions combined with medical therapy is usually sufficient to cause resolution of symptoms. If an oroantral communication is suspected, prompt surgical management is recommended to reduce the likelihood of causing chronic sinus disease. PMID:15064067

  4. Maxillary sinus carcinoma: result of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, H.; Horiuchi, J.; Suzuki, S.; Shioda, S.; Enomoto, S.

    1984-07-01

    This hundred and sixteen patients with carcinoma of the maxillary sinus received primary therapy consisting of external beam irradiation alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy at the Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital, between 1953 and 1982. In our institution, methods of treating cancer of the maxillary sinus have been changed from time to time and showed different control rates and clinical courses. An actuarial 10-year survival rate of 21% has been obtained by the megavoltage irradiation alone as well as 34% actuarial 10-year survival rate by megavoltage irradiation with surgery. After the introduction of conservative surgery followed by conventional trimodal combination therapy, the local control rate has been improved. The amount of functional, cosmetic, and brain damages have been remarkably decreased by this mode of therapy. The actuarial five year survival rate was 67%. In addition, along with the improvement of the local control rate, the control of nodal and distant organ metastases have been emerging as one of the important contributions to the prognosis of this disease.

  5. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-01-01

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation. PMID:24577171

  6. [History of treatment and classification of maxillary sinus neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Skorek, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    History of treatment of maxillary malignant neoplasms goes back to the middle of 19th century, when Gensoul and Lizzard performed their first maxillectomy. However the development of maxillar surgery is connected with achivements of Moure, who as the first one characterized and applied innovative skin cut on the face. Author presents the history of other surgical procedures in therapy of maxillary tumors and describes methods which are apply nowaday. Attention is paid to the Polish contributions and accomplishments in diagnostics and treatment of tumors localized in this area. The classification of maxillary tumors from Sebileau dissertation till the newest TNM classification from 2001 is described. PMID:16471201

  7. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Mutidisciplinary Challenge.

    PubMed

    Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Rohilla, Ajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Kaur, Ravneet

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to primary dentition may interfere with the development of permanent dentition. Among the many malformations, dilaceration is particularly important to the clinician. Management of dilacerated maxillary central incisor requires a multidisciplinary approach. The main purpose of this review is to present the etiological factors, the mechanism, clinical features, radiographic features and treatment of dilaceration of the maxillary central incisors. How to cite this article: Walia PS, Rohilla AK, Choudhary S, Kaur R. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Multidisciplinary Challenge. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):90-98. PMID:27274164

  8. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Mutidisciplinary Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Ajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Kaur, Ravneet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traumatic injuries to primary dentition may interfere with the development of permanent dentition. Among the many malformations, dilaceration is particularly important to the clinician. Management of dilacerated maxillary central incisor requires a multidisciplinary approach. The main purpose of this review is to present the etiological factors, the mechanism, clinical features, radiographic features and treatment of dilaceration of the maxillary central incisors. How to cite this article: Walia PS, Rohilla AK, Choudhary S, Kaur R. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Multidisciplinary Challenge. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):90-98. PMID:27274164

  9. Giant complex odontoma in maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Visioli, Adriano Rossini; de Oliveira e Silva, Cléverson; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present a rare case report of giant complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus, where the applied therapy included complete excision of the lesion with a conservative approach. Odontomas are also called benign growth abnormalities or hamartomas. They represent a more common type of odontogenic tumor and are related to various disorders such as bad dental placements, expansion, increased volumetric bone, and no eruption of permanent teeth. Usually they have an asymptomatic evolutionary course. The etiologic factors, although obscure, are related to local trauma, infection, and genetic factor. The structural composition of an odontoma consists of mature dental tissues. Odontomas can be differentiated according to their anatomical presentations: Compound odontoma-clusters of several denticles and complex odontoma-well defined tumefaction mass. The diagnosis can be performed by radiographic examination. PMID:26389051

  10. Pulp revascularization of immature maxillary first premolar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Nuha S.; Al-Nazhan, Saad

    2015-01-01

    An immature maxillary first premolar in an 8-year-old female was treated using a regenerative approach. The root canal was gently irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite without instrumentation under aseptic conditions and then medicated with calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) for 3 weeks. The Ca(OH)2 was removed, and bleeding was initiated mechanically using a hand file to form an intracanal blood clot. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed over the blood clot, and the access cavity was sealed with a double filling. Increases in root length and width were radiographically evident, at the 6-month follow-up exam. The case was followed for 3 years. The development of 3 roots with complete apical closure was confirmed using cone beam computed tomography. PMID:26752847

  11. Rapid Maxillary Expansion without Posterior Anchorage.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê; Amaral, Cássia

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate an alternative form of maxillary expansion anchored with mini-implants. A patient 12 years, class III in permanent canine teeth, with multiple agenesis of upper posterior teeth was treated with the aid of four mini-implants in the palate and Haas modified type appliance. During the period of expansion, an interincisal diastema was observed as the first clinical sign of disjunction of the sutures. After correction of cross bite, the expansion of the palate was confirmed by upper occlusal radiographs. Thus, the evaluations showed that the technique was effective and that new scientific studies should be conducted to further develop this subject. Keywords: Appliances; Biomechanics; Implants; Malocclusions PMID:27319047

  12. Giant complex odontoma in maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Visioli, Adriano Rossini; de Oliveira E Silva, Cléverson; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present a rare case report of giant complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus, where the applied therapy included complete excision of the lesion with a conservative approach. Odontomas are also called benign growth abnormalities or hamartomas. They represent a more common type of odontogenic tumor and are related to various disorders such as bad dental placements, expansion, increased volumetric bone, and no eruption of permanent teeth. Usually they have an asymptomatic evolutionary course. The etiologic factors, although obscure, are related to local trauma, infection, and genetic factor. The structural composition of an odontoma consists of mature dental tissues. Odontomas can be differentiated according to their anatomical presentations: Compound odontoma-clusters of several denticles and complex odontoma-well defined tumefaction mass. The diagnosis can be performed by radiographic examination. PMID:26389051

  13. Etiology of maxillary canine impaction: a review.

    PubMed

    Becker, Adrian; Chaushu, Stella

    2015-10-01

    This article is a review that enumerates the causes of impaction of the maxillary permanent canines, including hard tissue obstructions, soft tissue lesions, and anomalies of neighboring teeth, and discusses the much-argued relationship between environmental and genetic factors. These phenomena have been shown in many investigations to accompany the diagnosis of canine impaction and have been presented as unrelated anomalous features, each of which is etiologically construed as genetic, including the aberrant canine itself. While in general the influence of genetics pervades the wider picture, a guidance theory proposes an alternative etiologic line of reasoning and interpretation of these studies, in which the same genetically determined anomalous features provide an abnormal milieu in which the canine is reared and from which it is guided in its misdirected and often abortive path of eruption. PMID:26432311

  14. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th-38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18-22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated. PMID:16722608

  15. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18–22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated. PMID:16722608

  16. Evaluation of Anatomic Variations in Maxillary Sinus with the Aid of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in a Population in South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Shoaleh; Zamiri, Barbad; Momeni Danaei, Shahla; Salehi, Setareh; Hamedani, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Anatomic variations of the maxillary sinus can be detected in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and may assist to locate the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) and define the maxillary sinus morphology more accurately for a more strict surgical treatment plan. Purpose The study aimed to determine normal variations of the maxillary sinus with the aid of CBCT in a sample population in south of Iran. Materials and Method This cross-sectional prevalence study was based on evaluation of 198 projection data of CBCT scans of some Iranian patients aged 18-45 who referred to a private oral and maxillofacial radiology center in Shiraz from 2011 to 2013. CBCT scans were taken and analyzed with NewTom VGi device and software. The anatomic variations which were evaluated in the axial images included the presence of alveolar pneumatization, anterior pneumatization, exostosis, and hypoplasia. Moreover the location and height of sinus septa, and the location of PSAA were assessed. SPSS software (version 17.0) was used to analyze the data. Results In a total of 396 examined sinuses, maxillary sinus alveolar pneumatization was the most common anatomic variation detected. Anterior pneumatization was detected in 96 sinuses (24.2%). Antral septa were found in 180 sinuses (45.4%) and were mostly located in the anterior region. Meanwhile, PSAA was mostly detected intra-osseous in 242 sinuses (65.7%). Conclusion Anatomic variations of the maxillary sinus were common findings in CBCT of the maxilla. Preoperative imaging with CBCT seems to be very helpful for assessing the location of PSAA and the maxillary sinus morphology, which may be used to adjust the surgical treatment plan to yield more successful treatments. PMID:26966702

  17. Bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts after orthognathic surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hye; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative maxillary cysts are locally aggressive lesions, usually developing as delayed complications many years after radical antral surgery. This report describes a case of bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts following orthognathic surgery performed approximately 21 years previously. The patient complained of stinging pain on her right cheek. Radiographic examination revealed low-attenuation lesions on both maxillary sinuses with discontinuously corticated margins without distinct expansion or bone destruction. The cysts were enucleated with the removal of metal plates and screws for pain relief. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of postoperative maxillary cysts lined by ciliated, pseudostratified columnar cells. The patient has remained asymptomatic thus far, and there was no evidence of local recurrence at 21 months of postoperative follow-up. PMID:25473641

  18. Maxillary lateral incisor with two roots: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mithun; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Subba Rao, C V

    2011-01-01

    Although the dental literature has indicated that 100% of maxillary lateral incisors have a single canal anatomy, it is possible for these teeth to have extra canals. These extra canals must be identified and debrided to prevent endodontic failure. This report presents an uncommon case involving a maxillary lateral incisor with two roots. Even when the frequency of radicular anatomy abnormality is extremely low, dentists must consider the possibility that a tooth has extra root canals or even extra roots. PMID:21613043

  19. Unusual metastases of lung cancer: bulbus oculi and maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Ates, I; Yazici, O; Ates, H; Ozdemir, N; Zengin, N

    2015-09-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma often makes metastasis to the brain, liver, kidneys, bone, bone marrow and adrenal glands. It can also make metastasis to other parts of the body rarely for example eye, nose, parotid gland and paranasal sinus. We did not encounter with combined ocular bulbus and the maxillary sinus metastases of lung cancer in the accessible literature. In this case report, a patient who was combined ocular bulbus and the maxillary sinus metastases of lung adenocarcinoma will be discussed. PMID:26928715

  20. Unilateral Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Nagihan; Çağırankaya, L. Berna; Akkaya, Nursel

    2014-01-01

    Congenital absence of maxillary permanent canines is an extremely rare condition, which may appear as part of a syndrome or as a nonsyndromic form. Nonsyndromic canine agenesis combined with other types of tooth agenesis has occasionally been described in the literature but isolated cases are rarely observed. This report presents an isolated case of maxillary permanent canine agenesis in a healthy 18-year-old female patient and a literature review on the prevalence, etiology, and differential diagnosis of the condition. PMID:25177502

  1. Treatment of a Maxillary First Molar with Two Palatal Roots

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Vahideh; Rahimi, Saeed; Ghasemi, Negin; Talebzadeh, Bita; Norlouoni, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of the morphology and internal anatomy of the root canal system is essential, because it determines the successful outcome of endodontic treatment. The main goal of endodontic treatment is to prevent apical periodontitis and/or to promote the healing of periapical lesion. Presence of two canals or roots on the palatal side of the first maxillary molar has rarely been reported. This case report presents a maxillary first molar with two separate palatal roots. PMID:26523146

  2. Relapse of a maxillary median diastema: closure and permanent retention.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Claudia Trindade; da Silva, Dayanne Lopes; Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the closure of a maxillary median diastema of a 26-year-old woman that had been corrected before during orthodontic treatment but reopened after dental trauma in a car accident. A clear esthetic device made from a tray like those used for home bleaching was used, providing a comfortable, nearly undetectable, and efficient solution. A permanent fixed retainer was bonded again to the maxillary central incisors to prevent relapse. PMID:22196198

  3. Radiographic appearance of maxillary sinus feed impaction in a horse.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James E; Carmalt, James L

    2013-01-01

    A 15-year-old Belgian gelding presented in respiratory distress, with bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, and right-sided epistaxis. The horse had a 5-year history of dental disease and had been recently losing weight. Radiographs indicated tooth root abscessation of the right maxillary third molar tooth and probable maxillary sinus feed impaction. These findings were confirmed at surgery and necropsy. The stippled, granular radiographic appearance described here is highly characteristic of sinus feed impaction. PMID:24371923

  4. Management of an Unusual Maxillary Canine: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Muppalla, Jaya Nagendra Krishna; Kavuda, Krishnamurthy; Punna, Rajani; Vanapatla, Amulya

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians need to have intimate knowledge and thorough understanding of both pulp chamber and root canal anatomy. They should be aware of possibility of anatomical variations in the root canal system during endodontic treatment. Maxillary canines usually have single root and root canal but rarely may have single root with two root canals. This case describes a lengthier maxillary canine with two root canals. PMID:26779354

  5. Cementoblastoma of posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Dadhich, Anuj S.; Nilesh, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare neoplasm, representing <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It usually occurs in the posterior mandible and is associated with roots of a mandibular first molar or second premolar. This paper presents a rare case of cementoblastoma in the maxillary posterior region involving the maxillary sinus, in a young female patient. The clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed along with a review of previously reported cases in the literature. PMID:26389052

  6. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Somya; Patil, Raju Umaji; Asokan, Alexander; Kambalimath, Deepashri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenitally missing teeth (CMT) are among one of the commonly known dental anomalies. The most frequently missing teeth in the permanent dentition, excluding the third molars, are mandibular second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors. Exclusive agenesis of both maxillary canines is an extremely rare occurrence and only a few cases have been reported. Previous studies showed that the prevalence of maxillary canine agenesis varies between 0.07 and 0.13%. In recent studies on Indian population, no cases of maxillary canine agenesis have been documented. This paper reports a case of non-syndromic bilateral agenesis of permanent maxillary canines, along with agenesis of both mandibular central incisors in a healthy 13-year-old Indian female patient; and a brief literature review on prevalence, etiology and treatment modalities of the condition. How to cite this article: Kambalimath HV, Jain S, Patil RU, Asokan A, Kambalimath D. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015; 8(3):242-246. PMID:26604546

  7. Aetiopathology of maxillary swelling--a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Deb; Crank, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    A wide variety of lesions and not necessarily a malignant tumour can cause maxillary swelling. Non-specificity of clinical and radiological features of these maxillary lesions makes their diagnosis difficult. Review of literature adds a little regarding the aetiopathological distribution of the various lesions causing maxillary swelling. We present our finding regarding the relative distribution of various conditions causing maxillary swelling. The awareness of the spectrum of pathology related to maxillary swelling is essential for correct diagnosis and treatment. Forty-eight patients who presented with a swelling of the maxilla to our hospital between May 1998 and April 2001 were prospectively studied regarding the clinical presentations, radiological features and histological findings. Maxillary swelling was found to be caused by malignant tumours in 54.2%, benign neoplasms in 22.9% and non-neoplastic lesions in 22.9%. Overall squamous cell carcinoma (22.9%) was the commonest lesion, tumour of vascular origin was the commonest benign neoplasm and odontogenic cyst was the commonest among the non-neoplastic lesions. PMID:17611767

  8. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kambalimath, Halaswamy V; Jain, Somya; Patil, Raju Umaji; Asokan, Alexander; Kambalimath, Deepashri

    2015-01-01

    Congenitally missing teeth (CMT) are among one of the commonly known dental anomalies. The most frequently missing teeth in the permanent dentition, excluding the third molars, are mandibular second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors. Exclusive agenesis of both maxillary canines is an extremely rare occurrence and only a few cases have been reported. Previous studies showed that the prevalence of maxillary canine agenesis varies between 0.07 and 0.13%. In recent studies on Indian population, no cases of maxillary canine agenesis have been documented. This paper reports a case of non-syndromic bilateral agenesis of permanent maxillary canines, along with agenesis of both mandibular central incisors in a healthy 13-year-old Indian female patient; and a brief literature review on prevalence, etiology and treatment modalities of the condition. How to cite this article: Kambalimath HV, Jain S, Patil RU, Asokan A, Kambalimath D. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015; 8(3):242-246. PMID:26604546

  9. Jagged1 is essential for osteoblast development during maxillary ossification.

    PubMed

    Hill, Cynthia R; Yuasa, Masato; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Goudy, Steven L

    2014-05-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia occurs due to insufficient maxillary intramembranous ossification, leading to poor dental occlusion, respiratory obstruction and cosmetic deformities. Conditional deletion of Jagged1 (Jag1) in cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using Wnt1-cre; Jagged1(f/f) (Jag1CKO) led to maxillary hypoplasia characterized by intrinsic differences in bone morphology and density using μCT evaluation. Jag1CKO maxillas revealed altered collagen deposition, delayed ossification, and reduced expression of early and late determinants of osteoblast development during maxillary ossification. In vitro bone cultures on Jag1CKO mouse embryonic maxillary mesenchymal (MEMM) cells demonstrated decreased mineralization that was also associated with diminished induction of osteoblast determinants. BMP receptor expression was dysregulated in the Jag1CKO MEMM cells suggesting that these cells were unable to respond to BMP-induced differentiation. JAG1-Fc rescued in vitro mineralization and osteoblast gene expression changes. These data suggest that JAG1 signaling in CNC-derived MEMM cells is required for osteoblast development and differentiation during maxillary ossification. PMID:24491691

  10. The arteries of brain base in species of Bovini tribe.

    PubMed

    Zdun, Maciej; Frąckowiak, Hieronim; Kiełtyka-Kurc, Agata; Kowalczyk, Karolina; Nabzdyk, Maria; Timm, Anita

    2013-11-01

    Studies were conducted on 78 preparations of head and brain arteries in four species of Bos genus, that is in domestic cattle (N = 59), including 22 foetuses (CRL 36.5-78.5 cm), in banteng (Bos javanicus, N = 3), yak (Bos mutus f. grunniens, N = 2), American bison (Bison bison, N = 4), and European bison (Bison bonasus, N = 10). The comparative analysis permitted to demonstrate a similar pattern of brain base arteries in the studied animals. In the studied species, blood vessels of the arterial circle of the brain were found to form by bifurcation of intracranial segments of inner carotid arteries, which protruded from the paired rostral epidural rete mirabile. In Bovidae arterial circle of the brain was supplied with blood mainly by maxillary artery through the blood vessels of the paired rostral epidural rete mirabile. The unpaired caudal epidural rete mirabile was participating in blood supply to the arterial circle of the brain from vertebral and occipital arteries. It manifested character of a taxonomic trait for species of Bos and Bison genera. Basilar artery in all the examined animals manifested a variable diameter, with preliminary portion markedly narrowed, which prevented its participation in blood supply to the arterial circle of the brain. The results and taxonomic position of the species made the authors to suggest a hypothesis that a similar arterial pattern on the brain base might be present also in other species, not included in this analysis. PMID:24106047

  11. Maxillary posterior bone height in relation to maxillary sinus floor in Indian dentulous population.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Chowdhary, R

    2013-06-01

    To establish a ratio of variable bone height (Infrazygomatic alveolar crest height) to constant bone height (Infraorbital zygomatic height) and, to estimate the relative sinus floor position from alveolar crest of maxillary first molar region of dentulous Indian males and females, using Digital panoramic radiographs. Panoramic radiographs of 74 patients were included in the study (37 male, 37 female) to measure maxillary posterior vertical bone height and their ratio in dentulous patients. Measurements were made from reference lines drawn from anatomic landmarks on soft digital versions of standardized panoramic radiographs using Kodak dental imaging software. Later the data were analyzed using normal test (Z-score). When the posterior maxillary bone height and their ratio were evaluated in Indian population, the vertical bone height (x, y, z) of males was more than the females. Ratio of Infrazygomatic-alveolar crest distance (y)/Infraorbital-zygomatic distance (x)-was 0.74 for Indian males and females. The relative sinus floor for Indian males was found to be 8.1 mm and that of Indian females to be 7.8 mm. The results are of significant value as "baseline" data, in serial studies where alveolar bone height for a single patient is compared at different times before and after tooth loss. The relative sinus floor position from alveolar crest can help in implant length selection. This study can be used as a diagnostic and predictive tool in implant treatment planning but further long-term evaluation is still required to prove the efficacy of this study. PMID:24431714

  12. Analgesic effects of maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks in cats undergoing dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Joana; Chebroux, Alexandre; Martinez-Taboada, Fernando; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine in cats undergoing dental extractions. Twenty-nine cats were enrolled. Using an adapted composite pain scale, cats were pain scored before the dental procedure and 30 mins, and 1, 2 and 4 h after isoflurane disconnection. Cats were sedated with buprenorphine (20 µg/kg), medetomidine (10 µg/kg) and acepromazine (20 µg/kg) intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced using alfaxalone (1-2 mg/kg) intravenously and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Each cat was randomly assigned to receive maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks or no nerve blocks prior to dental extractions. Each nerve block was performed using lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and bupivacaine (0.25 mg/kg). Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide and isoflurane vaporiser settings were recorded 5 mins before and after the dental extractions, and the difference calculated. Group mean differences (mean ± SD) for heart rate (-9.7 ± 10.6 vs 7.6 ± 9.5 beats/min [nerve block vs control group, respectively], P <0.0001), systolic arterial blood pressure (-10.33 ± 18.44 vs 5.21 ± 15.23 mmHg, P = 0.02) and vaporiser settings (-0.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.023) were significantly different between groups. The control group had higher postoperative pain scores (median [interquartile range]) at 2 h (3 [1.75-4.00] vs 1 [0-2], P = 0.008) and 4 h (4 [2-6] vs 2 [1-2], P = 0.006) after the dental extractions. Maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine administered prior to dental extractions resulted in a reduction in heart rate and blood pressure while allowing for a reduction in isoflurane. Cats receiving nerve blocks had lower postoperative pain scores than the group without nerve blocks. PMID:24820999

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Persistent Epistaxis due to Pseudoaneurysm Formation of the Ophthalmic Artery Secondary to Nasogastric Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk, Hakan Soylu, Nur; Albayram, Sait; Selcuk, Dogan; Ozer, Harun; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan

    2005-04-15

    We present the case of a 60-year-old man with persistent epistaxis for 20 days that had started 2 weeks after removal of a nasogastric tube placed for an abdominal operation. There was no pathologic finding at selective facial and internal maxillary artery injections. An injury to the ethmoidal branches of the ophthalmic arteries or other arterial origins of bleeding was suspected. The internal carotid artery angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of an anterior ethmoidal branch of the left ophthalmic artery. The pseudoaneurysm was occluded with NBCA-histoacryl (25%) injection.0.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Persistent Epistaxis due to Pseudoaneurysm Formation of the Ophthalmic Artery Secondary to Nasogastric Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk, Hakan Soylu, Nur; Albayram, Sait; Selcuk, Dogan; Ozer, Harun; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan

    2005-04-15

    We present the case of a 60-year-old man with persistent epistaxis for 20 days that had started 2 weeks after removal of a nasogastric tube placed for an abdominal operation. There was no pathologic finding at selective facial and internal maxillary artery injections. An injury to the ethmoidal branches of the ophthalmic arteries or other arterial origins of bleeding was suspected. The internal carotid artery angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of an anterior ethmoidal branch of the left ophthalmic artery. The pseudoaneurysm was occluded with NBCA-histoacryl (25%) injection.

  15. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  16. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  17. Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma of the Maxillary Sinus.

    PubMed

    Avadhani, Vaidehi; Loftus, Patricia Anne; Meltzer, Daniel; Wang, Beverly; Tabaee, Abtin

    2016-06-01

    The clinical course and pathologic features of a 72 year old female who presented with epistaxis are presented. Radiographic findings were notable for a large, soft tissue lesion filling the maxillary sinus with significant bony erosion and expansion. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) and underwent endoscopic resection. She has no evidence of local, regional or distant recurrence 14 months post-surgery. The rarity of this neoplasm, the unusual anatomic location and non-specific symptoms present diagnostic and management challenges. Epithelioid vascular tumors encompass a spectrum of benign and malignant tumors. EHE itself is thought to have an intermediate malignant behavior pattern, though cases with indolent behavior have been reported. Differentiation of EHE from other lesions has historically based on histopathology. Additionally, recent studies have described a recurrent genetic fusion WWTR1-CAMTA1 in EHE, involving t(1;3) (p36;q25). This represents the second reported case of EHE arising in a paranasal sinus. The histopathologic findings of this lesion are reviewed. PMID:25963905

  18. [Maxillary prosthesis for better QOL--early setting and faster construction of maxillary prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Usui, H; Sakakura, Y; Shimozato, K

    1992-12-01

    The maxillofacial prosthesis (MFP) is well accepted as one of the modalities to ameliolate the postsurgical crippling in the patients with maxillary malignancy. In this report, we analyzed 55 primary cases of MFP out of 100, from July, 1981 to July, 1987 in terms of the time of start after operation, and the duration and procedure of the MFP-making. MFP-making set about within 4 weeks in 35% of patients, 8 weeks in 25%, 12 weeks in 22%, and more than 12 weeks in 18%. The completion of MFP-making averaged 10 days. As a result of simplifying of MFP-making, we shortened a period requiring MFP-making within 3 days in recent 10 cases. There were no adverse effects of early wear of MFP after operation. We believe that early wear of MFP after operation improve the quality of life of patients with maxillary malignancy and considered that wear of MFP is not the completion of treatment, but is one of the procedures of treatment for the patients undergone maxillectomy. PMID:1491275

  19. Implant-guided volumetric analysis of edentulous maxillary bone with cone-beam computerized tomography scan. Maxillary sinus pneumatization classification.

    PubMed

    Tolstunov, Len; Thai, David; Arellano, Leo

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this anatomic study was to measure the average bone volume of the edentulous maxilla with a cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scan and to determine its suitability for implant treatment without additional bone grafting. The secondary goal of the study was to estimate the degree of sinus pneumatization (SP) in reviewed CBCT scans, assess the sinus-to-maxillary bone interrelationship in edentulism, and attempt to classify maxillary sinuses based on the degree of their pneumatization. This retrospective radiographic quantitative study consisted of the analysis of CBCT scans of 30 randomly selected maxillary edentulous patients who presented in 2008-2010 to the University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, for evaluation and treatment of their edentulism. A volume of edentulous maxillary bone mesial to the maxillary sinuses (intersinal region) that can be used for a full-arch implant treatment was evaluated based on specifically selected and clinically relevant measurement criteria. There were 30 CBCT scans of maxillary edentulous patients reviewed (9 men, 21 women) with a mean age of 67.3 years (range, 41 to 92 years). The total mean maxillary bone volume (MMBV) suitable for implantation was 4 408.1 mm(3) and ranged from 1489.7 to 7263.1 mm(3). The MMBV in the study was higher than an assumed or hypothetical bone volume minimally suitable for 4-implant treatment as proposed by the authors for comparative purposes (3500 mm(3)). The degree of SP as seen on a CBCT scan (60 sinuses analyzed on panoramic images of 30 CBCT scans) had the following results in the study: SP0 (clear: not interfering with implant treatment in cases of high/small sinus), 2 sinuses or 3.3%; SP1 (mild sinus enlargement), 29 sinuses or 48.3%; SP2 (moderate SP), 16 sinuses or 26.7%; SP3 (severe SP), 9 sinuses or 15.0%; and SP4 (extreme), 4 sinuses or 6.7%. Most analyzed maxillary sinuses (47 of 60, or 78.3%) were in the clear, mild, or moderate

  20. Simple maxillary reconstruction using free tissue transfer and prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Minoru; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Ota, Yojiro; Uchiyama, Kiyotaka; Kishimoto, Seiji; Harii, Kiyonori; Ebihara, Satoshi

    2003-02-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is essential for maintaining postoperative oral function after maxillary reconstruction. However, the maxillary prosthesis becomes unstable in some patients because of extensive palatomaxillary resection and drooping of the transferred flap. In such patients, maintaining sufficient oral function is difficult, especially if the patient is edentulous. To achieve prosthetic retention, the authors performed microvascular maxillary reconstruction with a slit-shaped fenestration in the midline of the hard palate. Maxillary defects after subtotal or total maxillectomy were reconstructed with rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flaps in five patients. Defects of the nasal lining and palate were reconstructed with the single cutaneous portion of the flap, and a slit-shaped fenestration was left between the cutaneous portion of the flap and the edge of the remaining hard palate. Postoperatively, patients were fitted with maxillary prostheses that had a flat projection for the palatal fenestration. In all patients, the prosthesis was stable enough for mastication and prevented nasal regurgitation. Speech function was rated as excellent on Hirose's scoring system for Japanese speech ability. The authors believe that their method of palatomaxillary reconstruction is both simple and reliable. PMID:12560680

  1. Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Denture Lining Material

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Chie; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Matsusue, Yumiko; Horita, Satoshi; Sakagami, Go; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by denture lining material entering through an oroantral fistula after tooth extraction. The patient was an 80-year-old female who visited us with a complaint of pus discharge from the right posterior maxilla. She had extraction of the upper right second molar and had her upper denture relined with silicone lining material. The patient noticed swelling of the right cheek and purulent rhinorrhea 20 days before her first visit to our clinic. Oral examination showed an oroantral fistula with a diameter of 3 mm in the posterior alveolar ridge of the right maxilla. Computed tomography revealed a hyperdense foreign body in the right maxillary sinus and thickening of the mucosal lining. Under diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis caused by a foreign body, endoscopic maxillary surgery was performed simultaneously with the removal of the foreign body. The foreign body removed was 12 × 6 mm in size, oval in shape, light pink in color, and compatible with silicone denture lining material. During the follow-up it was observed that the oroantral fistula closed spontaneously after the removal of the foreign body. The maxillary sinus was in a good shape without recurrence of sinusitis seven months after surgery. PMID:27386012

  2. Predicting acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J. G.; Schmidt, H.; Rosborg, J.; Lund, E.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the diagnostic value of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C reactive protein for acute maxillary sinusitis. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study. SETTING--Danish general practice in cooperation with the otorhinolaryngology and neuroradiology department at Aalborg County Hospital. SUBJECTS--174 patients aged 18-65 years who were suspected by the general practitioner of having acute maxillary sinusitis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--The independent association of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and concentration of C reactive protein in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis defined as purulent or mucopurulent antral aspirate. RESULTS--Only raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.01) and raised C reactive protein (P = 0.007) were found to be independently associated with a diagnosis of acute maxillary sinusitis. The combination of the two variables had a sensitivity of 0.82 and a specificity of 0.57. CONCLUSION--Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein are useful diagnostic criteria for acute maxillary sinusitis. PMID:7627042

  3. Effect of rapid maxillary expansion on sleep characteristics in children

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Navya; Varma, N. K. Sapna; Ajith, V. V.; Gopinath, Siby

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is an orthopedic treatment procedure routinely used to treat constricted maxillary arches and also a potential additional treatment in children presenting with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Aims and Objectives: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of RME on sleep characteristics in children. Materials and Methods: Polysomnography was done on children of 8-13 years of age before expansion (T0), after expansion (T1) and after a period of 3 months after retention (T2). Bonded rapid maxillary expander was cemented in all children. Inter-molar distance was also measured at T0 and T2. Statistical Analysis: Nonparametric Friedman test was used for comparing the averages of sleep parameters at different time period (T0, T1, T2). Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for comparing the averages of inter-molar width (T0-T2). P < 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: All children showed an improvement in sleep parameters with an increase in sleep efficiency, decreased in arousal and desaturation index after expansion. Total sleep time showed a statistically significant increase after expansion. A statistically significant increase in inter-molar distance was obtained after expansion. Conclusions: Rapid maxillary expansion is a useful treatment option for improving quality of sleep even in normal children without SDB. It also induces widening of the maxilla, corrects posterior crossbites and improves maxillary and mandibular dental arch coordination. PMID:25395765

  4. Effects of lateral osteotomy on surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T F M; Pereira-Filho, V A; Gabrielli, M A C; Gonçales, E S; Santos-Pinto, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the potential effects of two different osteotomy designs of the maxillary lateral wall on dental and skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME). Thirty adult patients were divided into two groups according to the lateral osteotomy design: group 1 (n=16) underwent lateral osteotomy performed in a horizontal straight fashion, and group 2 (n=14) underwent lateral osteotomy performed in parallel to the occlusal plane with a step at the zygomatic buttress. Cone beam computed tomography scans were obtained preoperatively (T1), immediately after expansion (T2), and 6 months after expansion (T3). Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis. The results showed no significant interaction effect between groups and time points. Therefore, maxillary expansion was effective in both groups. Statistically significant increases in all dental and skeletal measurements were observed immediately after expansion (P<0.001). Relapse of the nasal floor width, tipping of the supporting teeth, and an increase in root distance in molars occurred at T3 (P<0.05). In summary, the maxillary lateral osteotomy design did not influence the results of SARME, which occurred mainly through the inclination of maxillary segments. PMID:26688294

  5. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  6. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  7. P1 - Maxillary Osteoporosis and Genetic Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, E.; Delle Rose, G.; Duvina, M.; Civitelli, V.; Brancato, L.; Amunni, F.; Tonelli, P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Osteoporosis is a form of dysmetabolic osteopathy of multifactorial origin, characterised by reduction of the bone matrix and mineral portion and, overall, of bone mass, leading to fragility and increased fracture risk. AETIOPATHOGENESIS -ENDOCRINE FACTORS: ACTH, glycocorticoids, PTH, thyroxine, oestrogen, testosterone-GENETIC FACTORS: Major genes that regulate fundamental characteristics of bone, such as density and quality, and minor genes that regulate individual genetic background [lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP5), TGF1, BMP, VDR, COL1A1, ER]. The DIAGNOSIS is based on history, clinical findings (vertebral or appendicular fractures), blood chemistry, conventional radiology and bone mass measurement. For the latter, it is possible to use DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY DENSITOMETRY which measures bone mineral content: according to the WHO definition, in osteoporosis bone mineral density (BMD) is more than 2.5 standard deviations below normal. MAXILLARY OSTEOPOROSIS: because of their function as a support for teeth, which leads to the development of the alveolar process, and their role in mastication, the jawbones (maxilla and mandible) differ from all the other bones of the skeleton. This role, also involving the masticatory muscles, prompts bone trophism. In advancing age a marked reduction of the thickness of the maxillary cortical bone is observed, together with increased porosity and constant functional remodelling of the trabecular part, a phenomenon that, as it increases, leads to tooth loss. Only a mandibular area (a bucco-lingual area of cortical bone in front of the mental foramen) remains unmodified, independently of gender, age and tooth loss. Materials and methods: Kemifar® supplies a test which can be used to study several factors (Er, VDR, COL1A1) that predispose to the development of osteoporosis. OsteoResis®Type is a simple, non-invasive test that allows the complete determination, and interpretation, of several genotypes associated

  8. Unusual cause of maxillary sinus mass with proptosis.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Regi; Babu, Telugu Ramesh; Rupa, Vedantam

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 21-year-old Indian man with an 8-month history of left-sided headache, maxillary sinus mass, proptosis and swelling of the left temple, whose contrast-enhanced CT scans of the paranasal sinuses showed an enhancing, destructive soft tissue mass involving the left maxillary sinus, orbit, infratemporal fossa and anterior cranial fossa, suggestive of a malignancy or chronic granulomatous disease. Histopathological examination of the sinus mass, which was debulked and partially excised via an endoscopic approach, suggested a diagnosis of immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease of the maxillary sinus. Subsequent immunohistochemical staining and biochemical tests confirmed the diagnosis. We highlight the importance of considering this increasingly recognised but rare entity that can mimic a malignant lesion with its clinical and radiological features but which, unlike the latter, has a very good prognosis with appropriate treatment. PMID:26392443

  9. Maxillary odontogenic sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess--case report.

    PubMed

    Onişor-Gligor, F; Lung, T; Pintea, B; Mureşan, O; Pop, P B; Juncar, M

    2012-01-01

    Maxillary sinus inflammation, when untreated or incorrectly treated, may extend locoregionally, the remaining paranasal sinuses being the first affected anatomical structures. This is why the understanding of the inflammatory pathology of the maxillary sinus, and particularly of the complications it can generate, is extremely important. The purpose of this presentation is to point out that inflammations of the paranasal sinuses are susceptible to develop complications in certain conditions and threaten the patient's life due to the proximity of vital structures. This is the case of a 16 years old male patient who developed a left maxillary and frontal sinusitis, complicated with cerebral abscess. Early detection, multidisciplinary approach and proper indication of surgical treatment, as well as early suspicion of complication, especially in young male adolescents, are extremely important. PMID:22712359

  10. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  11. Methylene blue mediated laser therapy of maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Chikina, E. E.; Knyazev, A. B.; Mareev, O. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is a clinical study of photodynamic therapy of maxillary sinusitis. 0.1%-Methylene Blue aqueous solution in combination with He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm) have been used for treatment of maxillary sinus mucous of patients with acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis. The differences between the results of the treatment with dye and light versus treatment with a drug for every group of patients were statistically analyzed by Student’s t test. The efficacy of the photodynamic therapy was estimated with the use of the following criteria: the state of respiration, olfaction, duration of purulent discharge, reconstruction of transport function of ciliary epithelium, etc. The obtained results have shown that the photodynamic therapy is effective in comparison with conservative methods of treatment of the disease.

  12. Aberration in the palatal root of the maxillary first molar

    PubMed Central

    Rajalbandi, Sandeep; Shingte, Sandhya Narayan; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of root canal morphology is essential for the endodontic therapy. Variations in the root and root canal morphology, especially in multirooted teeth, are a constant challenge for diagnosis and management. The dentist needs to be familiar with the various root canal configurations and their variations for successful endodontic therapy. There are rare variations in canal number and configuration in maxillary molars, which could affect treatment outcome. Two lingual root structures are occasionally found on human permanent maxillary molars. One of these is the normal lingual root, which is always present, the other is a supernumerary structure which can be located either mesiolingually (radix mesiolingualis) or distolingually (radix distolingualis). The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and to demonstrate a case report which describes the successful non-surgical endodontic management of an unusual maxillary first molar with four separate roots and four canals. PMID:23632609

  13. Maxillary Tuberosity Fracture Associated with First Molar Extraction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Hidayet B.; Ay, Sinan; Kara, M. Isa

    2007-01-01

    Maxillary tuberosity fractures during molar teeth extraction can occur commonly in dental practice; however, very few cases are reported and discussed in the literature. This article presents a case of large fracture of maxillary tuberosity during extraction of first maxillary molar tooth and its conservative treatment outcomes. PMID:19212477

  14. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, HL; Nagarathna, J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  15. Large, expansile odontogenic cyst with bilateral maxillary sinus involvement.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Maxine; Singer, Steven R; Rinaggio, Joseph; Kim, Irene H; Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2013-03-01

    Residual cysts are common odontogenic lesions of the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws. A case of an unusually large residual cyst that crosses the maxillary midline and occupies portions of the maxillary sinuses is being reported. Investigations included a panoramic radiograph, CT scan and a biopsy. The differential diagnoses were common odontogenic lesions, including cysts and benign tumors. The value of advanced imaging modalities is stressed when determining the presence and extent of lesions in complex structures such as the maxilla. The need to visualize the entire lesion beyond what may be seen on intraoral views, as well as panoramic radiographs, is discussed. PMID:23691727

  16. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, H L; Nagarathna, J; Kumar, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  17. Laser therapy of acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Chikina, Elena E.; Meglinski, Igor V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Knyazev, Anatoly B.; Mareev, Oleg V.

    2006-06-01

    The clinical results of photodynamic therapy of maxillary sinusitis have been presented. 0.1%-Methylene Blue aqueous solution in combination with He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm) has been used for treatment of patients with acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis. Efficacy of the photodynamic therapy was estimated with the use of the following criteria: the state of respiration, olfaction, duration of purulent discharge, reconstruction of transport function of ciliary epithelium, etc. The obtained results have shown that the photodynamic therapy is effective in comparison with conservative methods of treatment of the diseases.

  18. Unilateral cacosmia: a presentation of maxillary fungal infestation.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Sally E; Schelenz, Silke; Philpott, Carl M

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of long-standing unilateral cacosmia in a healthy 67-year-old man due to maxillary fungal infestation. Treatment with septoplasty had been attempted 10 years prior but no further investigation or management undertaken and symptoms continued. Subsequent MRI scan revealed significant opacification of the left maxillary sinus. This was readily amenable to treatment by balloon sinuplasty. This yielded viscous grey mucus which grew Scedosporium apiospermum. The case highlights the need for careful investigation of olfactory symptoms, including blood tests to exclude systemic causes, endoscopy and imaging where indicated. PMID:23563684

  19. Medical therapy of maxillary sinus inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Ki Hwan; Kim, June Sun; Song, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) in the maxillary sinus is a diagnostic challenge. As IMT has various names, it has various findings in magnetic resonance image. Although destructive pattern in computed tomography and hypermetabolism in PET CT suggest malignancy, it is debatable whether it is a tumor or inflammatory lesion. Treatment of IMT usually includes surgery. However, IMT can be dealt with medical treatment according to histologic type and localization. We report a rare case of IMT in the maxillary sinus which is controlled by medical therapy. PMID:27038822

  20. Interdisciplinary approach for the management of bilaterally impacted maxillary canines

    PubMed Central

    Sukh, Ram; Singh, Gyan P.; Tandon, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approach for the management of malocclusion provides a holistic approach of patient management. Prudent treatment planning is necessary to achieve the various treatment goals. This case report describes the orthodontic management of a 16-year-old adolescent female patient with bilateral labially impacted maxillary canines. The problems associated with impacted maxillary canines and the biomechanical interventions used for this patient are discussed. The treatment protocol involved surgical intervention, followed by sequential traction of the impacted teeth. An interdisciplinary approach to treatment with different mechanical strategies led to the achievement of the desired esthetic, functional, and occlusal treatment goals. PMID:25395776

  1. Incidental treatment of maxillary dysesthesia with maxillary sinus lift procedure--a case report.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Clarkson, Earl

    2014-12-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of dysesthesia to the left palate with referred pain to the left infraorbital distribution after extraction of the left maxillary first and second premolars. The clinical and radiologic examination revealed an alveolar crestal bone dehiscence suggestive of an occult oral antral communication (OAC) that had spontaneously healed. Stimulation of the mucosa at this bony dehiscence consistently reproduced the dysesthesia. A sinus lift procedure was performed in this region for implant site development and also resulted in resolution of the dysesthesia. This case represents an instance in which surgical alteration of a trigger zone of neuropathic pain can result in its resolution. PMID:25454712

  2. Recurrent Maxillary Odontogenic Myxoma Following Partial Maxillary Resection and Consecutive Osseous Reconstruction Including Tooth Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Scheuer, Hanna A; Höltje, Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare tumour arising in the jaws. The tumour is purported to be odontogenic in origin due to the frequent localisation of the tumour inside the jaws in close relation to teeth. The aim of this report was to detail the course of a patient who developed OM of the maxilla, underwent adequate ablative surgery and reconstruction, including tooth transplantation to the original tumour site, and subsequently developed a local recurrence in close proximity to the teeth transplanted to the reconstructed maxilla 6 years after the first diagnosis. Once again, a partial maxillary resection was performed, with no reconstruction. The patient has been free from tumour recurrence for over 20 years. We discuss the current hypothesis on OM pathogenesis and the possible impact of actively dividing cells on tumour re-growth. PMID:27272841

  3. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  4. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  5. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  6. Orthodontic management of bilateral maxillary canine-first premolar transposition and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Elena Di; Giuseppe, Biagio Di; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition (Mx.C.P1) is an uncommon dental positional anomaly that may create many orthodontic problems from both esthetic and functional points of view. OBJECTIVE: In this report we show the orthodontic management of a case of Mx.C.P1 associated with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and unilateral mandibular second premolar agenesis METHODS: The patient was treated with a multibracket appliance and the extraction of the lower premolar. RESULTS: treatment was completed without the need for any prosthetic replacement. PMID:25992994

  7. Aneurysmal bone cyst of maxillary alveolus: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subhas Chandra; Adhyapok, Apurba Kumar; Hazarika, Kriti; Malik, Kapil; Vatsyayan, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a nonneoplastic rare pathologic entity of the jaws. Its locally aggressive nature and high recurrence rate after curettage make surgical resection a better treatment option. Here, we present a case of ABC of maxillary alveolus and its management by alveolectomy followed by white head varnish pack application in the surgical defect. PMID:27041915

  8. Immediate maxillary lateral incisor implants with nonocclusal loading provisional crowns.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Lamas, Joana; Peñarrocha, Maria; Garcia, Berta

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report series describes a treatment modality involving immediately placed dental implants in maxillary lateral incisor sites using noncemented immediate provisional crowns retained with calcinable copings (prosthetic complement used in preparing the metal for the definitive prosthesis). Ten implants were placed in eight patients for the replacement of maxillary lateral incisors: two immediate and eight corresponding to cases of agenesis. All were subjected to immediate rehabilitation with provisional acrylic resin crowns in nonocclusal loading. One implant failed 3 weeks after placement due to acute local trauma. The other nine remained functional within the mouth, with normal clinical and radiological characteristics after a minimum of 12-month follow-up. Immediate placement of implant fixed provisional restorations retained by friction in maxillary lateral incisors offers an esthetic solution, eliminates the need for a removable provisional restoration, and avoids implant failures associated with excess cement or screw loosening. Moreover, in the case of extractions, immediate placement and provisionalization of implants in maxillary lateral incisors can effectively optimize the peri-implant esthetic results by maintaining the existing hard and soft tissue architecture of the replaced tooth. As no cement or screws are required, and the provisional crowns are placed in nonocclusal loading, the risk of complications is minimized. PMID:17927733

  9. [Gorlin syndrome with osteoma in the maxillary sinus (case report)].

    PubMed

    Sevinç, Halil; Oztürk, Mustafa; Mavili, Ertuğrul; Ozyazgan, Irfan

    2004-12-01

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, various skeletal abnormalities, and lamellar falx calsifications. Many associated lesions have been reported. In this report, we present a case of Gorlin syndrome with an osteoma in the maxillary sinus which has never been reported in the literature. PMID:15611914

  10. The morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses in living humans.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nathan; Yokley, Todd; Butaric, Lauren

    2013-03-01

    To understand how variation in nasal architecture accommodates the need for effective conditioning of respired air, it is necessary to assess the morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and other aspects of the nasofacial skeleton. Previous studies indicate that the maxillary sinuses may play a key role in accommodating climatically induced nasal variation such that a decrease in nasal cavity volume is associated with a concomitant increase in maxillary sinus volume. However, due to conflicting results in previous studies, the precise interaction of the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses, in humans, is unclear. This is likely due to the prior emphasis on nasal cavity size, whereas arguably, nasal cavity shape is more important with regard to the interaction with the maxillary sinuses. Using computed tomography scans of living human subjects (N=40), the goal of this study is to assess the interaction between nasal cavity form and maxillary sinus volume in European- and African-derived individuals with differences in nasal cavity morphology. First, we assessed whether there is an inverse relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volumes. Next, we examined the relationship between maxillary sinus volume and nasal cavity shape using multivariate regression. Our results show that there is a positive relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volume, indicating that the maxillary sinuses do not accommodate variation in nasal cavity size. However, maxillary sinus volume is significantly correlated with variation in relative internal nasal breadth. Thus, the maxillary sinuses appear to be important for accommodating nasal cavity shape rather than size. PMID:23382025

  11. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions. PMID:26713062

  12. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  13. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  14. Diagnosing and understanding the maxillary lip-tie (superior labial, the maxillary labial frenum) as it relates to breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Kotlow, Lawrence A

    2013-11-01

    Successful breastfeeding is dependent upon an infant's ability to correctly latch onto a mother's breast. If an infant is born with oral soft tissue abnormalities such as tongue-tie or lip-tie, breastfeeding may become challenging or impossible. During the oral evaluation of an infant presenting with breastfeeding problems, one area that is often overlooked and undiagnosed and, thus, untreated is the attachment of the upper lip to the maxillary gingival tissue. Historically, this tissue has been described as the superior labial frenum, median labial frenum, or maxillary labial frenum. These terms all refer to a segment of the mucous membrane in the midline of the upper lip containing loose connective tissue that inserts into the maxillary arch's loose, unattached gingival or tight, attached gingival tissue. There is no muscle contained within this tissue. In severe instances, this tissue may extend into the area behind the upper central incisors and incisive papilla. The author has defined and identified the restrictions of mobility of this tissue as a lip-tie, which reflects the clinical attachment of the upper lip to the maxillary arch. This article discusses the diagnosis and classifications of the lip-tie, as it affects an infant's latch onto the mother's breast. As more and more women choose to breastfeed, lip-ties must be considered as an impediment to breastfeeding, recognizing that they can affect a successful, painless latch and milk transfer. PMID:23821655

  15. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P < 0.05), with the mean overjet increased by 14.28 mm. However, comparison of cephalometric analysis between T2 and T3 showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure. PMID:26629107

  16. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  17. Bowel obstruction following deep circumflex iliac artery free flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Tan, Neil C-W; Brennan, Peter A; Senapati, Asha; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    The deep circumflex iliac artery flap (DCIA) has been well described as an autograft flap used in head and neck reconstructions, particularly for large maxillary and mandibular defects. Complications, particularly at the donor site, have been well documented. Although it is considered a minor complication, herniation should not be underestimated as it can potentially lead to bowel obstruction, necessitating an emergency operation. We report a case of acute obstruction of the small bowel secondary to herniation at the donor site after harvesting a DCIA free flap for a maxillary defect, a complication that to our knowledge has been reported only once. We review the pathogenesis and possible ways to reduce the likelihood of developing this serious complication. PMID:19249144

  18. An Assessment of the Relationship between the Maxillary Sinus Floor and the Maxillary Posterior Teeth Root Tips Using Dental Cone-beam Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Cenk; Kamburoglu, Kivanc; Yuksel, Selcen Pehlivan; Ozen, Tuncer

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the maxillary posterior teeth root tips using dental cone-beam CT. Methods: A total of 87 right and 89 left maxillary sinus regions from 92 patients were examined using dental cone-beam CT. Images were analyzed by a specialist in oral and maxillofacial radiology. Perpendicular lines were drawn on the cross-sectional images between the deepest point of the maxillary sinus floor and the root tips of the maxillary first and second premolars and first, second and third molars, and the distances were measured using built-in measurement tools. Means, standard deviations and minimum and maximum values were calculated for all right and left premolars and molars. T-tests were used to compare measurements between left and right sides and between female and male patients. Results: The distance between sinus floor and root tip was longest for the first premolar root tip and shortest for the second molar buccodistal root tip for both right and left sides. No statistically significant differences were found between the right and left side measurements or between female and male patients (P>.05). Conclusions: Knowledge of the anatomical relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the maxillary posterior teeth root tips is important for the preoperative treatment planning of maxillary posterior teeth. PMID:20922167

  19. Cementoblastoma Solely Involving Maxillary Primary Teeth--A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Urs, Aadithya B; Singh, Hanspal; Rawat, Garima; Mohanty, Sujata; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2016-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare benign neoplasm of odontogenic ectomesenchyme origin, involving the roots of any tooth, which occurs predominantly in second and third decade of life. Very few cases of cementoblastoma associated with a primary tooth or having a maxillary presentation have been reported in the past. Here, a rare case of a ten year old boy who presented to the department with a swelling in maxillary posterior region since one month is being discussed. The radiographic presentation was mimicking an odontoma. The final diagnosis was cementoblastoma. We have advocated the use of polarized microscopy to support the histopathological diagnosis with respect to its cemental origin. Cementoblastoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radio-opaque lesions in the transitional dentition. PMID:26950817

  20. Familial aggregation of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Choudhary, Kartik; Saxena, Aditya

    2013-01-01

    Agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular second premolars is the most frequent form of hypodontia. Its prevalence varies across population from 0.8% to 4.5%. Genetic aberrations and environmental factors may cause agenesis of one or more teeth. The management of child having such a problem is very important since diastema in teeth especially in upper anteriors not only affects child's physical appearance but also its psychological development as the child wants to look like other children. In this article is presented a case of non-syndromic agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLIA) and mandibular central incisors in a 10-year-old boy (patient) in permanent dentition with its management along with the radiographic investigations and photographic presentations of the other members of his family affected with this condition. PMID:23536620

  1. Surgical management of the bilateral maxillary buccal exostosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandna, Shalu; Sachdeva, Surinder; Kochar, Deepak; Kapil, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Buccal exostosis is benign, broad-based surface masses of the outer or facial aspect of the maxilla and less commonly, the mandible. They begin to develop in early adulthood and may very slowly enlarge over the years. A 24-year-old female presented with gingival enlargement on the buccal aspect of both the quadrants of the maxillary arch. The overgrowth was a cosmetic problem for the patient. The etiology of the overgrowth remains unclear though the provisional diagnosis indicates toward a bony enlargement, which was confirmed with the help of transgingival probing. The bony enlargement was treated with resective osseous surgery. The following paper presents a rare case of the bilateral maxillary buccal exostosis and its successful management. PMID:26229284

  2. Solitary median maxillary central incisor: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Uçar, Faruk Izzet; Gümüş, Hüsniye; Aydınbelge, Mustafa; Sisman, Yildiray

    2012-01-01

    A single median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly that may occur alone or be associated with growth deficiency or other systemic abnormalities. The best known association is with holoprosencephaly (HPE). HPE is a complex brain malformation that affects both the forebrain and the face. Early diagnosis of SMMCI is important, since it may be a sign of other severe congenital or developmental abnormalities. Therefore, systematic follow-up and close monitoring of the growth and development of SMMCI patients is crucial. The purpose of this paper was to report the cases of 2 children, each with a single median maxillary central incisor, and describe important symptoms of this syndrome that have not yet been reported. PMID:22583889

  3. Ectopic primary olfactory neuroblastoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Margaret; Su, Shirley Y; Bell, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare malignant tumor. Although the vast majority of cases arise in the nasal cavity, ONB is rarely reported in ectopic locations. We report a case of ONB in the maxillary sinus. A 63-year-old woman presented with left-sided nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a nonenhancing left maxillary sinus tumor. Histologic sections showed ONB, Hyams grade IV, invading bone, skeletal muscle, and adjacent fibroadipose tissue. It is essential to be accurate when diagnosing sinonasal tumors because the differential diagnosis is broad, and one must consider the possibility of ectopic ONB, although it is rare. The behavior of ONB and other neuroendocrine tumors of the sinonasal region is quite different, and there are varied approaches to treatment. Therefore, an accurate diagnosis as well as correct grade and stage must be assigned. PMID:27180059

  4. [Dissertations 25 years after date 26. Maxillary sutural surfaces].

    PubMed

    Remmelink, H J

    2011-06-01

    In the case of growing children with a deviation in the size or position of the upper jaw orthopaedic devices are often used to direct the growth at the level of the sutures. In the PhD thesis 'The postnatal development of the human maxillary sutural surfaces', published in 1985, the orientation and macroscopic morphology of the sutural surfaces of the maxilla in children's skulls were described. The existence of premaxillomaxillary and pterygomaxillary sutures could not be demonstrated. It was observed that the maxillary sutural surfaces were mainly sagittally oriented. Some sutural surfaces became increasingly rough with age, while the majority of the surfaces remained smooth. It was concluded that advice concerning the determination of the direction of orthopaedic forces in relation to the orientation of the sutures needed revision. Subsequent systematic reviews have reported that so far little is known about the long-term stability of orthopaedic effects in orthodontics. PMID:21761798

  5. Cone beam computed tomographic analysis of maxillary premolars and molars to detect the relationship between periapical and marginal bone loss and mucosal thickness of maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet-Ercan; Köse, Emre; Sisman, Yildiray

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed the relationship between mucosal thickness (MT) of the maxillary sinus and periodontal bone loss (PBL) and periapical condition of related teeth. We also aimed to identify the association between root apices and the inferior wall of the maxillary sinus using Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods In this study, CBCT images of 205 patients with 410 maxillary sinuses were examined, retrospectively. A total of 582 maxillary molars and 587 premolars were observed. The relationship of each root with maxillary sinus and apical lesions of these roots were classified, PBL was examined and the situations of adjacent teeth were estimated. The effect of these conditions on sinus mucosal thickness (MT) was evaluated. Results There was a significant correlation between MT of maxillary sinus and both PBL and age (r = 0.52, p=0.000 and r = 0.111, p= 0.002, respectively). The frequency of MT increased as the severity of apical lesion enlarged. A positive correlation was found between MT and degree of PBL and periapical lesions. To reveal the association between MT and pulpoperiapical condition bivariate correlation was done and a significant relationship between the pulpoperiapical condition and MT was found (r = 0.17, p=0.000). Conclusions This retrospective study showed that MT of the maxillary sinus was common among patients with PBL and MT was significantly associated with PBL and apical lesions. The relationship of maxillary sinus to adjacent teeth had also positive correlation with MT. CBCT imaging enabled better evaluation of maxillary sinus, posterior teeth and surrounding structures compared to other imaging tools. Key words:Maxillary sinus mucosal thickness, apical periodontitis, periodontal bone loss, CBCT. PMID:26241459

  6. Prevalence of sinus augmentation associated with maxillary posterior implants.

    PubMed

    Seong, Wook-Jin; Barczak, Michael; Jung, Jae; Basu, Saonli; Olin, Paul S; Conrad, Heather J

    2013-12-01

    Pneumatization of the maxillary sinus limits the quantity of alveolar bone available for implant placement and may result in a lack of primary stability and difficulty in achieving osseointegration. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze a group of patients who had implants placed in the posterior maxilla, calculate the prevalence of sinus augmentation, and identify factors related to sinus augmentation. With institutional review board approval, dental records from a population of patients who had implants placed in the maxillary posterior region between January 2000 and December 2004 were used to create a database. Independent variables were classified as continuous (age of the patient at stage 1 implant surgery [S1], time between extraction and S1, time between extraction and sinus augmentation, and time between sinus augmentation and S1) and categorical (gender, implant failure, American Society of Anesthesiologists system classification, smoking, osteoporosis, residual crestal bone height, implant position, implant proximity, prostheses type, and implant diameter and length). The dependent variable was the incidence of a sinus augmentation procedure. Simple logistic regression was used to assess the influence of each factor on the presence of sinus augmentation (P < .05). The final database included 502 maxillary posterior implants with an overall survival rate of 93.2% over a mean follow-up period of 35.7 months. Of 502 implants, 272 (54.2%) were associated with a sinus augmentation procedure. Among variables, residual crestal bone height (P < .001), implant position (P < .001), implant proximity (P < .001), prosthesis type (P < .001), implant failure (P < .01), and implant diameter (P < .01), were statistically associated with sinus augmentation. Within the limitations of this retrospective study, the results suggest that more than half (54.2%) of the maxillary posterior implants were involved with a sinus augmentation procedure. The

  7. Maxillary expansion with the memory screw: a preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Halicioğlu, Koray; Kiki, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a newly developed rapid maxillary expansion screw-the memory screw-over 6 months. Methods Five subjects, aged between 11.7 and 13.75 years, were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent placement of a maxillary expansion appliance containing superelastic nickel-titanium open-coil springs in its screw bed. The parents of the patients and/or the patients themselves were instructed to activate the expansion screw by 2 quarter-turns 3 times a day (morning, midday, and evening; 6 quarter-turns a day). The mean expansion period was 7.52 ± 1.04 days. Dentoskeletal effects of the procedure, including dentoalveolar inclination, were evaluated. Measurements of all the parameters were repeated after 6 months of retention in order to check for relapse. Results Sella-Nasion-A point (SNA) and Sella-Nasion/Gonion-Menton angles increased, and Sella-Nasion-B point (SNB) angle decreased in all the subjects during the expansion phase. However, they approximated to the initial values at the end of 6 months. On the other hand, the increments in maxillary apical base (Mxr-Mxl) and intermolar widths was quite stable. As expected, some amount of dentoalveolar tipping was observed. Conclusions The newly developed memory expansion screw offers advantages of both rapid and slow expansion procedures. It widens the midpalatal suture and expands the maxilla with relatively lighter forces and within a short time. In addition, the resultant increments in the maxillary apical base and intermolar width remained quite stable even after 6 months of retention. PMID:23112935

  8. Primary small cell undifferentiated (neuroendocrine) carcinoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shetty, Premalatha

    2014-01-01

    Primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SNEC) of the paranasal sinuses is an extremely rare and distinctive tumor with aggressive clinical behavior. Moreover, SNECs originating in the head and neck region have been reported to be highly aggressive and to have a poor prognosis. This report describes a patient with a maxillary sinus SNEC who was successfully treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24639904

  9. Alterations in Maxillary Sinus Volume among Oral and Nasal Breathers

    PubMed Central

    Agacayak, Kamil Serkan; Gulsun, Belgin; Koparal, Mahmut; Atalay, Yusuf; Aksoy, Orhan; Adiguzel, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral breathing causes many changes in the facial anatomical structures in adult patients. In this study we aimed to determine the effects of long-term oral breathing (>5 years) on the maxillary sinus volumes among adult male patients. Material/Methods We accessed medical records of 586 patients who had undergone cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for any reason between September 2013 and April 2014. Patients who had undergone cone-beam dental volumetric tomography scans for any reason and who had answered a questionnaire about breathing were screened retrospectively. Cone beam dental volumetric tomography (I-Cat, Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA) was used to take the images of the maxillo-facial area at a setting of 120 kVp and 3.7 mA. This study involved male patients older than 21 years of age. Results The study included a total of 239 male patients, of which 68 were oral breathers and 171 were nasal breathers. The mean age of the oral breathers was 48.4 years and that of the nasal breathers was 46.7 years and the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The mean maxillary sinus volumes of the oral and nasal breathers were 9043.49±1987.90 and 10851.77±2769.37, respectively, and the difference in maxillary sinus volume between the 2 groups was statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusions The volume of maxillary sinus in oral breathers (>5 years) was significantly lower than in nasal breathers, but it remains unclear whether this is due to malfunctioning of the nasal cavity or due to the underlying pathological condition. PMID:25553770

  10. Masticatory efficiency after rehabilitation of acquired maxillary and mandibular defects

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, N. Vasantha; Ramesh, Ganesh; Thareja, Amit; Patil, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The effect of oral cancer with its therapeutic intervention involves significant facial and functional disabilities. It is customary to rehabilitate these patients by surgical or prosthetic means. Studies have been done to assess mastication and other functions after rehabilitation. A review of these studies for assessing masticatory function has been done under separate sections for maxillary and mandibular defects. Different masticatory tests are mentioned. Further scope for research has been highlighted. PMID:26392731

  11. [Two rare case report of maxillary sinus foreign body].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongliang; Zhu, Jiajing; Ma, Zhancheng

    2015-11-01

    The maxillary sinus is the largest paranasal sinuses. Foreign bodies of nosal sinus can caused by car accidents, firearm attacks, or iatrogeniccause. We reported two rare cases of foreign body of pulp needle and loach. The clinical manifestations might include facial numbness, facial paresthesia, swelling, nasal congestion, facial pain, eye discomfort, limited mouth opening and relapse and etc. Both CT scan and the medical history were helpful in diagnosis. Functional endoscopic surgery would be the first choice of treatment. PMID:26911073

  12. Variation in maxillary sinus anatomy among platyrrhine monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi D; Takai, Masanaru; Tsubamoto, Takehisa; Egi, Naoko; Shigehara, Nobuo

    2005-09-01

    Variations in the maxillary sinus anatomy of extant and fossil catarrhine primates have been extensively examined using computed tomography (CT), and have potential utility for phylogenetic analyses. This approach has also been used to demonstrate its anatomical variation in eight of the 16 extant genera of platyrrhines and the absence of the sinus in Saimiri and Cacajao. We used this approach to evaluate the three-dimensional anatomy of the maxillary sinus in all extant platyrrhine genera, and here argue the phylogenic implications of this variation. This study confirms, for the most part, previous CT studies and augments them with the six genera not studied previously: Ateles, Lagothrix, Callithrix, Cebuella, Pithecia and Chiropotes. The entire maxilla is pneumatized by the sinus in the atelines, Cebus, and Callicebus, whereas the sinus pneumatizes only the medial part of the maxilla in the callitrichines and Aotus. Pithecia has a unique conformation in which the maxillary sinus and the expanded inferior meatus pneumatize the posteromedial and anterolateral parts of the entire maxilla, respectively. Chiropotes has no sinus, and the inferior meatus possibly expands into the area between the middle meatus and medial surface of the maxilla to disturb sinus formation, as in the case of its close relative Cacajao. Finally, we argue that the sinus that pneumatizes the entire maxilla is a primitive feature in extant platyrrhines and was probably shared by the last common ancestor of the anthropoids. PMID:16009397

  13. Rapid maxillary canine retraction by dental distraction: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Koteswara Prasad, N. K.; Chitharanjan, Arun; Kailasam, Vignesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to perform rapid maxillary canine retraction through distraction of the periodontal ligament and investigate the rate and amount of canine retraction, amount of anchor loss, the nature of tooth movement achieved, and radiographic changes in the periodontal ligament region during and after canine distraction. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 10 distractions ranging in age from 14 years to 25 years who needed canine retraction and first premolar extraction in the maxillary arch. Ten canine distractions were carried out with custom-made, tooth-borne intra-oral distraction device. Results: The results indicate that the periodontal ligament can be distracted just like the mid-palatal suture in rapid palatal expansion and the maxillary canines are retracted rapidly into the first premolar extraction space at the rate of about 2.53 mm/week. Conclusion: Though this study indicates that the periodontal ligament can be distracted to elicit rapid tooth movement, the long-term effects of canine distraction are not well known and need close monitoring. PMID:25298710

  14. [Failure in anterior rehabilitation of agenesic maxillary lateral incisors].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Philippart-Rochaix, Martine; Philip-Alliez, Camille

    2016-03-01

    Agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisors poses particular problems for dentists, orthodontists and patients. Treatment of these ageneses is still highly controversial, both functionally and esthetically. The patient's smile and anterior guidance are affected and must be restored. The diagnosis is easy. Few mistakes are possible. However, managing patients with missing maxillary lateral incisors can be a challenge, commonly involving two possible treatment approaches: space opening to replace the missing lateral incisor with a prosthetic unit (denture, bridge or implant) or orthodontic space closure replacing the missing lateral incisor with the maxillary canine camouflaged to mimic the appearance of a lateral incisor. One of these two options will be adopted using multiple means...liable to trigger a multitude of possible errors. Ultimately, optimal results can only be achieved if there is excellent coordination between different practitioners in various specialties. Each clinician will have a specific role to play. Also, the patient and family are at the heart of the decision-making process, by virtue of their consent (treatment duration, financial resources) and their motivation. This multi-factorial, multi-disciplinary decision process means that treatment of the lateral incisor is an ongoing challenge for the clinician striving for the best possible result. Each case is different. No set rules exist. No single factor can be neglected if we are to avoid "failure". PMID:27083223

  15. Removal of an Upper Third Molar from the Maxillary Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Klinger de Souza; da Silva, Vanessa Tavares; da Cunha, Rafael Soares; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; São Mateus, Carla Rocha; Souza, Liane Maciel de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary sinus or antrum is the largest of the paranasal sinuses. It is located in the maxillary bone and has a proximity to the apexes of upper molars and premolars, which allows it to form a direct link between the sinus and the oral cavity. Dislocation of a foreign body or tooth to the interior of a paranasal sinus is a situation that can occur as a result of car accidents, firearm attacks, or iatrogenic in surgical procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to know how to treat this kind of situation. This study's objective is to report the case of a 23-year-old female patient, leucoderma, who sought treatment from the Surgical Unit at the Dental Faculty of the Federal University of Sergipe. She had a history of pain and edema in the right side of the genian region and two failed attempts at removing dental unit (DU) 18. The extraoral clinical exam revealed intense edema of the left hemiface with signs of infection, excoriation of the labial commissure, hematoma, a body temperature of 39°C, and a limited ability to open her mouth. The patient was medicated and treated surgically. The tooth was removed from the maxillary sinus with caution, as should have been done initially. PMID:25705524

  16. Transnasal endoscopic approach to the impacted maxillary canine.

    PubMed

    Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Torroni, Andrea; Gasparini, Giulio; Moro, Alessandro S; Pelo, Sandro

    2014-09-01

    The inclusion of maxillary canines is a very common condition. The intraoral approach to the canine extraction can be buccal or palatal depending on the position of the tooth. However, in some cases, the proximity to the nasal floor or the side wall of the nose makes the transoral approach rather invasive. The aim of this article was to describe a novel transnasal endoscopically assisted approach for the extraction of high palatal/paranasal impacted canines. Thirty-seven maxillary canines have been extracted in 29 patients. The surgical approaches were buccal in 5 cases, palatal in 24 cases, and transnasal endoscopically assisted in 8 cases. Patients treated with the transnasal approach required the least amount of pain killers in the postoperative period, and the average of the operative time was shorter than that of the transoral extraction. In our opinion, the transnasal endoscopically assisted approach is a safe and effective procedure for the extraction of highly impacted maxillary canines located within 2 cm from the piriform aperture. PMID:25102392

  17. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  18. Four cuspal maxillary second premolar with single root and three root canals: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Parul; Nikhil, Vineeta; Goyal, Ayush; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional configuration of maxillary second premolars has been described to have two cusps, one root and one or two root canals. The endodontic literature reports considerable anatomic aberrations in the root canal morphology of maxillary second premolar but the literature available on the variation in cuspal anatomy and its relationship to the root canal anatomy is sparse. The purpose of this clinical report was to describe the root and root canal configuration of a maxillary second premolar with four cusps. PMID:27563190

  19. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis with oro-nasal fistula: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Longoni, Salvatore; Amosso, Ernesto; Carini, Stefania; Garavello, Werner; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study The odontogenic sinusitis has an incidence between 38 and 40.6%. Increased risk of maxillary sinusitis has been reported with the presence of periapical abscesses, periodontal disease, dental trauma, tooth extraction and implant placement when the sinusal membrane is perforated. Materials and methods A patient with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis associated with oro-nasal fistula was treated. Results The follow-up at six months showed the complete resolution of maxillary sinusitis, palatal fistula got closed and pain symptoms disappeared. Conclusion This case report describes a rare complication of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: the oro-nasal fistula. PMID:25678949

  20. Osteoma and Ectopic Tooth of the Left Maxillary Sinus: A Unique Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Ümit; Aşık, Burak; Ahmedov, Asif; Durmaz, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ectopic eruption of a tooth or osteoma rarely occurs within the maxillary sinus. Coexistence of these two rare entities in the maxillary sinus has never been reported in the English literature. Case Report: Herein, we present a 21 year-old male patient with osteoma and ectopic tooth in the left maxillary sinus treated with the removal of the ectopic tooth by endoscopic sinus surgery and excision of the osteoma by the Caldwell-Luc procedure. Conclusion: Unique coexistence of two different entities in the maxillary sinus is most likely due to pediatric facial trauma. Pediatric patients with maxillofacial trauma should be carefully watched for dental injury both clinically and radiologically.

  1. Orthodontic and prosthetic treatment of a patient with cystic fibrosis and agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Harold; Greenberg, Joseph R

    2011-06-01

    The young dental patient with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis, maxillary canine impaction, and cystic fibrosis presents considerable challenges to the dentist. An interdisciplinary approach is described here for the orthodontist and restorative dentist to plan and work together with the patient's and parents' cooperation and consent. Despite some compromises, a successful outcome was achieved, as demonstrated in this case report. The use of conservative yet esthetic and durable fixed replacement prostheses is highlighted. Congenitally absent maxillary lateral incisors, impacted maxillary canines, and cystic fibrosis are clinical conditions that can significantly complicate and compromise dental treatment for any young patient. All three can be present simultaneously, as described in this case report. PMID:23738937

  2. Morphological measurements of anatomic landmarks in human maxillary and mandibular molar pulp chambers.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Allan S; Musikant, Barry Lee

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to measure critical morphology of molar pulp chambers. One hundred random human maxillary and mandibular molars (200 teeth in total) were used. Each molar was radiographed mesiodistally on a millimeter grid. Using a stereomicroscope, the measurements were read to the nearest 0.5 mm. Results were as follows (mean, mm): pulp chamber floor to furcation, maxillary = 3.05 +/- 0.79, mandibular = 2.96 +/- 0.78; pulp chamber ceiling to furcation, maxillary = 4.91 +/- 1.06, mandibular = 4.55 +/- 0.91; buccal cusp to furcation, maxillary = 11.15 +/- 1.21, mandibular = 10.90 +/- 1.21; buccal cusp to pulp chamber floor, maxillary = 8.08 +/- 0.88, mandibular = 7.95 +/- 0.79; buccal cusp to pulp chamber ceiling, maxillary = 6.24 +/- 0.88, mandibular = 6.36 +/- 0.93; and pulp chamber height, maxillary = 1.88 +/- 0.69, mandibular = 1.57 +/- 0.68. The pulp chamber ceiling was at the level of the cementoenamel junction in maxillary, 98%, and mandibular, 97% of the specimens. The measurements showing the lowest percentage variance were buccal cusp to furcation (approximately 11%) and buccal cusp to pulp chamber ceiling (approximately 14%). The measurements were similar for both maxillary and mandibular molars. PMID:15167463

  3. New approach of maxillary protraction using modified C-palatal plates in Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Ki Beom; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chung, Kyu-Rhim

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary protraction is the conventional treatment for growing Class III patients with maxillary deficiency, but it has undesirable dental effects. The purpose of this report is to introduce an alternative modality of maxillary protraction in patients with dentoskeletal Class III malocclusion using a modified C-palatal plate connected with elastics to a face mask. This method improved skeletal measurements, corrected overjet, and slightly improved the profile. The patients may require definitive treatment in adolescence or adulthood. The modified C-palatal plate enables nonsurgical maxillary advancement with maximal skeletal effects and minimal dental side effects. PMID:26258067

  4. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    PubMed Central

    Kurşun, Şebnem; Kılıç, Cenk; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Materials and Methods Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60×60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm3 (FOV60); 2) 80×80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm3 (FOV80); and 3) 100×100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm3 (FOV100). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. Results A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. Conclusion In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements. PMID:25793180

  5. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Rosar, Julia Petruccelli; Sathler, Renata; Ozawa, Terumi Okada

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations. Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds has been previously reported. However, recent studies showed that maxillary lateral incisors have dual embryonic origin, being partially formed by both the medial nasal process and the maxillary process. In other words, the mesial half of the lateral incisor seems to come from the medial nasal process while the distal half of the lateral incisor originates from the maxillary process. In cleft patients, these processes do not fuse, which results in different numerical and positional patterns for lateral incisors relating to the alveolar cleft. In addition to these considerations, this study proposes a nomenclature for maxillary lateral incisors in patients with cleft lip and palate, based on embryology and lateral incisors position in relation to the alveolar cleft. Conclusion: Embryological knowledge on the dual origin of maxillary lateral incisors and the use of a proper nomenclature for their numerical and positional variations renders appropriate communication among professionals and treatment planning easier, in addition to standardizing research analysis. PMID:26560830

  6. Maxillary Midline diastema closure after replacement of primary teeth with implant prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Al-Saqabi, Farah Y; Fenlon, Michael R; Bavisha, Kalpesh A

    2015-05-01

    This case shows an excellent esthetic treatment outcome using implant-retained crowns replacing maxillary laterals and canines in hypodontia patient with unusual incidence of spontaneous diastema closure after the placement of implants. To our knowledge, this is the first case report showing maxillary midline diastema closure after implant placement. PMID:25984308

  7. Case Report: retained gutta-percha as a cause for persistent maxillary sinusitis and pain

    PubMed Central

    Hodnett, Benjamin L.; Ferguson, Berrylin

    2014-01-01

    Dental sources of infection can produce acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis. In some cases, the source of the infection may be related to the presence of endodontic materials in the oral cavity. In this article, we report a case of retained gutta-percha in the maxillary sinus resulting in chronic sinusitis. PMID:24795809

  8. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma with concurrent prolonged foreign body impaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ha; Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Kwang Jae; Kim, Joohwan

    2012-03-01

    Several elements in the maxillary sinus are reported to be carcinogenic. Also, foreign body reaction can cause cancer in any part of the body. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma at the site in the maxillary sinus where a bullet splinter, analyzed as iron afterward, was inserted during the Korean War, approximately 60 years earlier. PMID:22446444

  9. Orthodontic treatment of bilateral geminated maxillary permanent incisors.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Philip, Camille; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2011-05-01

    Geminated teeth occur more frequently in the deciduous dentition than in the permanent dentition, with prevalence figures of 0.6% and 0.1%, respectively. Bilateral presentation is rare. A survey of the literature showed that the prevalence estimates for bilateral double teeth range from 0.01% to 0.04% in the deciduous dentition, and 0.05% in the permanent dentition. In this article, we report a rare case of bilateral fusion of the maxillary permanent incisors, discuss possible histogenetic mechanisms related to this anomaly, and explain the treatment management. PMID:21536214

  10. Liposarcoma of the maxillary antrum: A case report.

    PubMed

    Priyal, G; Shakil, Moidin; Jose, Maji; Hussain, Akther

    2015-01-01

    Atypical Lipomatous Tumor/Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma. (ALT/WDL) is a soft tissue sarcoma of intermediate malignant behavior, which most frequently affects the retroperitoneum and lower extremities. Liposarcomas of head and neck are rare, representing only 2-8% of all sarcomas in this region. The majority of liposarcomas occur in middle-aged adults; however, very uncommonly cases have been reported in infancy and early childhood. We report a case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed as ALT/WDL of the maxillary antrum. PMID:26881583

  11. Carcinoma of the maxillary antrum: surgery or radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Eisert, D.; Hazra, T.A.; King, E.R.

    1981-06-01

    Between the years 1968 and 1978, 57 patients with malignant tumors of the para-nasal sinuses were seen at the Medical College of Virginia. Thirty-nine patients presenting with squamous cell epitheliomas of the maxillary antrum, free of lymph node or distant metastases, and primarily treated at the Medical College of Virginia, form the basis of this study. Nineteen patients underwent radical craniofacial surgery with orbital exenteration and reconstruction. Twenty patients underwent Caldwell-Luc procedure followed by radical radiation therapy. The crude 3 year disease-free survivals are 50% and 37% in the radiation therapy and the surgery group, respectively. Local control, survival, and patterns of failure are discussed.

  12. Spheno-maxillary meningo-encephalocele. A case report.

    PubMed

    Morris, W M; Losken, H W; le Roux, P A

    1989-11-01

    A patient is presented who was born with a large swelling on the left side of his face. This was removed by a paediatric surgeon at six weeks of age, and the histology was that of an encephalocele. Based on our findings at a later procedure to correct the child's facial asymmetry resulting from the congenital deformity, we concluded that this was a spheno-maxillary meningo-encephalocele. We have been able to find only one other such meningo-encephalocele reported in the literature. PMID:2687333

  13. Pulp revascularization of a severely malformed immature maxillary canine.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Chang; Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Hyo-Seol; Choi, Sung Chul; Nam, Ok Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a dental anomaly exhibiting complex anatomical forms. Because of this anatomical complexity, immature DI teeth with necrotic pulp are difficult to treat via apexification. We used revascularization as an alternative treatment for a patient with DI. An 11-year-old boy visited our clinic with chief complaints of gingival swelling and pain in the left maxillary canine. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of type III DI. Revascularization therapy was performed, and a 24-month follow-up examination confirmed healing of the periapical radiolucency and physiological root formation. (J Oral Sci 58, 295-298, 2016). PMID:27349553

  14. Long-term skeletal stability after maxillary advancement with distraction osteogenesis using a rigid external distraction device in cleft maxillary deformities.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Alvaro A; Polley, John W; Friede, Hans; Ko, Ellen W

    2004-11-01

    Rigid external distraction is a highly effective technique for correction of maxillary hypoplasia in patients with orofacial clefts. The clinical results after correction of sagittal maxillary deformities in both the adult and pediatric age groups have been stable. The purpose of this retrospective longitudinal cephalometric study was to review the long-term stability of the repositioned maxilla in cleft patients who underwent maxillary advancement with rigid external distraction. Between April 1, 1995, and April 1, 1999, 17 consecutive patients with cleft maxillary hypoplasia underwent maxillary advancement using rigid external distraction. There were 13 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 5.2 to 23.6 years (mean, 12.6 years). After a modified complete high Le Fort I osteotomy and a latency period of 3 to 5 days, patients underwent maxillary advancement with rigid external distraction until proper facial convexity and dental overjet and overbite were obtained. After active distraction, a 3- to 4-week period of rigid retention was undertaken; this was followed by removable elastic retention for 6 to 8 weeks using, during sleep time, an orthodontic protraction face mask. Cephalometric radiographs were obtained preoperatively, after distraction, at 1 year after distraction, and 2 or more years after distraction. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years (minimum, 2.1 years; maximum, 5.3 years). The following measurements were obtained in each cephalogram: three linear horizontal and two linear vertical maxillary measurements, two angular craniomaxillary measurements, and one craniomandibular measurement. Differences between the preoperative and postoperative cephalometric values were analyzed by paired t tests (p < 0.05). The cephalometric analysis demonstrated postoperatively significant advancement of the maxilla. In addition, the mandibular plane angle opened 1.2 degrees after surgery. After the 1- to 3-year follow-up period, the maxilla was

  15. Progressive immediate loading of a perforated maxillary sinus dental implant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Juboori, Mohammed Jasim

    2015-01-01

    The displacement of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus may lead to implant failure due to exposure of the apical third or the tip of the implant beyond the bone, resulting in soft tissue growth. This case report discusses dental implant placement in the upper first molar area with maxillary sinus involvement of approximately 2 mm. A new technique for progressive implant loading was used, involving immediately loaded implants with maxillary sinus perforation and low primary stability. Follow-up was performed with resonance frequency analysis and compared with an implant placed adjacent in the upper second premolar area using a conventional delayed loading protocol. Implants with maxillary sinus involvement showed increasing stability during the healing period. We found that progressive implant loading may be a safe technique for the placement of immediately loaded implants with maxillary sinus involvement. PMID:25678816

  16. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  17. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  18. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  19. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  20. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  1. Maxillary Sinus Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors: A Review and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Chase C.; Eisenbach, Colby; Torres, Carlos; Graham, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    An inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is an immunohistochemically diverse entity demonstrating neoplastic and nonneoplastic qualities. Although IMTs can arise in any area of the body, lesions arising in certain sites, namely, the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and pterygopalatine fossa, demonstrate a heightened neoplastic and invasive potential. Despite case specific complete tumor regression and disease remission in response to pharmacotherapeutics, a subset of IMTs remain resistant to all forms of therapy. We present such a case, a 34-year-old female patient, with a highly resistant, maxillary sinus IMT. Her refractory, ALK-1 negative IMT has not responded well to novel therapies reported in current literature. This case suggests the role of zonal expressivity within a single lesion as a probable mechanism for its highly resistant nature and should promote determination of each IMT's cytogenetic profile to provide more effective targeted therapy. Paper includes a literature review of all maxillary sinus IMTs from 1985 to 2014 along with their immunohistochemical staining, treatments, and outcomes. PMID:25763286

  2. Ectopic Molar with Maxillary Sinus Drainage Obstruction and Oroantral Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahifakhim, Shahin; Mousaviagdas, Mehrnoush

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Ectopic tooth eruption may result owing to one of 3 processes: developmentalDisturbance, iatrogenic activity, or pathologic process, such as a tumor or a cyst. In rare cases, occlusion of the sinus ostia may predispose a patient to develop a maxillary sinus mucocele. When the maxillary sinus is invaded, symptoms usually occur late in the process. Case Report: A 17 years old boy referred to department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery of university of medical sciences, Tabriz_Iran in 2010 with chronic recurrent mucoprulent discharge from retromollar trigone , posterior to right superior alveolar ridge. CT scan revealed a dense mass resembling tooth, obstructing sinus ostium with homogenous opacity with ring enhancement, occupying whole sinus and expanding all walls. A Caldwell Luke approach in combination with endoscopy was selected. Conclusion: In the present patient, removal of ectopic tooth resolved the symptoms completely, the fistula obstructed and discharges discontinued. An ectopic tooth is a rare entity obstructing sinus ostium. The etiology of ectopic eruption has not yet been completely clarified, but many theories have been suggested,including trauma, infection, developmental anomalies and pathologic conditions, such as dentigerous cysts. In summary, although the ectopic teeth is rare but it would be assumed in presence of unilateral symptoms of sinonasal cavity. Therefore in peristant unilateral sinonasal symptoms we should complete examining of this site to rule out rare causes of these symptoms. PMID:24303440

  3. Experimental maxillary sinus augmentation using a highly bioactive glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Mecca, Carlos Eduardo; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Okamoto, Roberta; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Duarte, Marco Húngaro; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2016-02-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of a biomaterial directly influence its biological behavior and fate. However, anatomical and physiological particularities of the recipient site also seem to contribute with this process. The present study aimed to evaluate bone healing of maxillary sinus augmentation using a novel bioactive glass ceramic in comparison with a bovine hydroxyapatite. Bilateral sinus augmentation was performed in adult male rabbits, divided into 4 groups according to the biomaterial used: BO-particulate bovine HA Bio-Oss(®) (BO), BO+G-particulate bovine HA + particulate autogenous bone graft (G), BS-particulate glass ceramic (180-212 μm) Biosilicate(®) (BS), and BS+G-particulate glass ceramic + G. After 45 and 90 days, animals were euthanized and the specimens prepared to be analyzed under light and polarized microscopy, immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and micro-computed tomography (μCT). Results revealed different degradation pattern between both biomaterials, despite the association with bone graft. BS caused a more intense chronic inflammation with foreign body reaction, which led to a difficulty in bone formation. Besides this evidence, SEM and μCT confirmed direct contact between newly formed bone and biomaterial, along with osteopontin and osteocalcin immunolabeling. Bone matrix mineralization was late in BS group but became similar to BO at day 90. These results clearly indicate that further studies about Biosilicate(®) are necessary to identify the factors that resulted in an unfavorable healing response when used in maxillary sinus augmentation. PMID:26712707

  4. Root canal morphology of South Asian Indian maxillary molar teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian Maxillary molars using a tooth clearing technique. Materials and Methods: Hundred teeth each comprising of first, second, and third molars collected from different dental schools and clinics in India were subjected to standard dye penetration, decalcification and clearing procedure before being studied. Results: The first molar mesiobuccal roots exhibited 69% Type I, 24% Type II, 4% Type IV, 2% Type V, and 1% exhibited a Vertuccis Type VIII canal anatomy. In the group with three separate roots the second molar mesiobuccal roots in exhibited 80.6% Type I, 15.3% Type II, 2.7% Type IV, and 1.4% Type V canal anatomy while the third molars mesiobuccal roots exhibited 57.4% Type I, 32% Type II, 2.1% Type III, 8.5% Type IV, 1% had a Type V canal anatomy in the similar group. Conclusion: A varied root canal anatomy was seen in the mesiobuccal root canal of the maxillary molars. PMID:25713497

  5. [Two cases of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome].

    PubMed

    Catania, P; Conti, C; Poggi, G M; Bardelli, T; Lasagni, D; De Martino, M

    2010-02-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) syndrome is a unique developmental abnormality arising from an unknown event occurring between the 35th and 38th days in utero, and involving mieline structure of the head including the cranial bones, the maxilla and its container dentition (specifically the central incisor tooth germ), together with other midline structures of the body. The SMMCI tooth may be possibly occur as an isolated trait or in association with many other midline developmental anomalies. It is estimated to occur in 1:50000 live births. There is a wide variability in the phenotypic spectrum. SMMCI is considered one of the most minimal expressions of the holoprosencephaly spectrum. Mutation in the Sonic Hedgehog homolog (SHH) gene may be associated with SSMMCI, but recent studies suggests the existence of several other candidate genes. We described two patients with SMMCI. They presented a solitary median maxillary incisor, short stature, hipotelorism and corpus callosus anomalies found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also present severe hiponatremia. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cases of SMMCI with hiponatremia. We suggest that the sodium disorder may be secondary to syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). PMID:20212404

  6. Ossifying fibroma of the maxillary sinus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, J R

    1989-01-01

    A case of ossifying fibroma of the maxillary sinus that occurred in a 45-year-old white female is reported. The lesion's radiographic, histologic and clinical behavior are examined. The clinical and radiographic features of ossifying fibroma distinguish it from monostatic fibrous dysplasia despite histologic similarities. The uncommon location of this ossifying fibroma in the maxillary sinus accounts for its large size, aggressive behavior and widespread osseous destruction. The prognosis is excellent after complete enucleation of the ossifying fibroma has been achieved. The benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jaws share similarities in radiographic and clinical appearance, histogenesis and histopathology, and consequently, pose difficulty in classification and treatment. Common histologic features of these lesions include an active proliferation of fibroblats, young and mature collagenous connective tissue, focal areas of mineralization which may resemble small cemeticles and/or irregular bone trabeculae, and multinucleated giant cells. Differential diagnosis of benign fibro-osseous lesions can therefore be made if clinical behavior, radiographic features, and hematologic changes are correlated with the histologic picture. Representatives of this group include true fibrous dysplasia, ossifying fibroma (both central and peripheral types), osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, cementifying fibroma, florid osseous dysplasia, proliferative periostitis of Garré, focal sclerosing osteomyelitis and osteitis deformans (Paget's disease). PMID:2782841

  7. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Materials and Methods: Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. Results: In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies. PMID:26981462

  8. Transpalatal distraction for the management of maxillary constriction in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Adolphs, Nicolai; Ernst, Nicole; Hoffmeister, Bodo; Raguse, Jan-Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Context: The management of severe maxillary constriction can be challenging. For that purpose surgically assisted maxillary expansion by transpalatal distraction (TPD) can typically be recommended after skeletal maturity. However in selected cases bone borne transpalatal distraction devices can contribute to improve maxillary constriction considerably earlier already during mixed dentition. Aims: To assess the possibility of bone borne transpalatal distraction in pediatric patients. Settings and Design: Clinical paper. Materials and Methods: Since 2010 TPD has been applied to six pediatric patients during mixed dentition when severe maxillary constriction was present and conventional orthodontic widening has already failed. Individually selected devices (Surgitec, Belgium) were inserted in general anaesthesia and distraction was performed according to well known parameters. Results: Maxillary constriction could be improved in all six patients without any drawbacks by bone borne devices during mixed dentition. Skeletal conditions were obviously improved for subsequent orthodontic or orthognathic therapy without functional impairment. Follow-up is up to 36 months after device removal. Conclusions: Transpalatal Distraction is recommendable in selected pediatric patients if massive growth disturbance is present or has to be expected. TPD allows for individually adapted maxillary expansion by selection and positioning of appropriate devices in combination with intraoperative testing of maxillary movements and controlled bone removal. PMID:26389033

  9. Bilateral en-masse distalization of maxillary posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce a new method for bilateral distal movement of the entire maxillary posterior segment. Case report: A 17-year-old girl with Class I skeletal malocclusion (end-to-end molar relationships, deviated midline and space deficiency for left maxillary canine) was referred for orthodontic treatment. She did not accept maxillary first premolars extraction. A modified Hyrax appliance (Dentaurum Ispringen, Germany) was used for bilateral distalization of maxillary posterior teeth simultaneously. Expansion vector was set anteroposteriorly. Posterior legs of Hyrax were welded to first maxillary molar bands. All posterior teeth on each side consolidated with a segment of 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire from the buccal side. Anterior legs of Hyrax were bent into eyelet form and attached to the anterior palate with two mini-screws (2 × 10 mm) (Jeil Medical Corporation Seoul, South Korea). Hyrax opening rate was 0.8 mm per month. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to evaluate the extent of distal movement. 3.5-mm distalization of posterior maxillary teeth was achieved in five months. Results: A nearly bodily distal movement without anchorage loss was obtained. Conclusion: The mini-screw-supported modified Hyrax appliance was found to be helpful for achieving en-masse distal movement of maxillary posterior teeth. PMID:27409657

  10. Orthodontic Treatment of Maxillary Incisors with Severe Root Resorption Caused by Bilateral Canine Impaction in a Class II Division 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Chang, Na-Young; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; An, Ki-Yong; Chae, Jong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    This case report shows the successful alignment of bilateral impacted maxillary canines. A 12-year-old male with the chief complaint of the protrusion of his maxillary anterior teeth happened to have bilateral maxillary canine impaction on the labial side of his maxillary incisors. Four maxillary incisors showed severe root resorption because of the impacted canines. The patient was diagnosed as skeletal Class II malocclusion with proclined maxillary incisors. The impacted canine was carefully retracted using sectional buccal arch wires to avoid further root resorption of the maxillary incisors. To distalize the maxillary dentition, two palatal miniscrews were used. After 25 months of treatment, the maxillary canines were well aligned without any additional root resorption of the maxillary incisors. PMID:26950820

  11. Dentoskeletal features in individuals with ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar

    PubMed Central

    Rozzi, Matteo; Cardoni, Giulia; Ricchiuti, Maria Rosaria; Cozza, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence and distribution of ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar (EEM) in individuals scheduled for orthodontic treatment and to investigate the association of EEM with dental characteristics, maxillary skeletal features, crowding, and other dental anomalies. Methods A total of 1,317 individuals were included and randomly divided into two groups. The first 265 subjects were included as controls, while the remaining 1,052 subjects included the sample from which the final experimental EEM group was derived. The mesiodistal (M-D) crown width of the deciduous maxillary second molar and permanent maxillary first molar, maxillary arch length (A-PML), maxillomandibular transverse skeletal relationships (anterior and posterior transverse interarch discrepancies, ATID and PTID), maxillary and mandibular tooth crowding, and the presence of dental anomalies were recorded for each subject, and the statistical significance of differences in these parameters between the EEM and control groups was determined using independent sample t-tests. Chi-square tests were used to compare the prevalence of other dental anomalies between the two groups. Results The prevalence of maxillary EEM was 2.5%. The M-D crown widths, ATID and PTID, and tooth crowding were significantly greater, while A-PML was significantly smaller, in the EEM group than in the control group. Only two subjects showed an association between EEM and maxillary lateral incisor anomalies, which included agenesis in one and microdontia in the other. Conclusions EEM may be a risk factor for maxillary arch constriction and severe tooth crowding. PMID:26258065

  12. An Analysis of Maxillary Anterior Teeth Dimensions for the Existence of Golden Proportion: Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sandeep, Nalla; Satwalekar, Parth; Srinivas, Siva; Reddy, Chandra Sekhar; Reddy, G Ramaswamy; Reddy, B Anantha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Appearance of the face is a great concern to everyone, as it is a significant part of self-image. The study analyzed the clinical crown dimensions of the maxillary anterior teeth with respect to their apparent mesiodistal widths, width-to-height ratio to determine whether golden proportion existed among the South Indian population. Materials and Methods: A total of 240 dentulous subjects were chosen for the study (120 males and 120 females) age ranging between 18 and 28 years. Full face and anterior teeth images of the subjects were made on specially designed device resembling a face-bow, mounted onto the wall under a standard light source. The width and height of the maxillary central incisors were measured on the stone casts using a digital caliper. Results: The mean perceived maxillary lateral incisor to central incisor width ratio was 0.67 in males and 0.703 in females. The mean perceived maxillary canine to lateral incisor width ratio was 0.744 in males and 0.714 in females. The mean width-to-height ratio of the maxillary central incisor was 79.49% in males and 79.197% in females. Conclusion: The golden proportion was not found between perceived mesiodistal widths of maxillary central and lateral incisors and nor between perceived mesiodistal widths of maxillary lateral incisors and canines. In the majority of subjects, the width-to-height ratio of maxillary central incisor was within 75-80%. There are no statistically significant differences in maxillary anterior teeth proportions between males and females. The results may serve as guidelines for treatment planning in restorative dentistry and periodontal surgery. PMID:26435610

  13. [Atelectasis of the maxillary sinus. Analysis of progression stages. Apropos of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Hazan, A; Le Roy, A; Chevalier, E; Benzaken, J; Waisberg, A; Cymbalista, M; Adotti, F; Peytral, C

    1998-12-01

    We analyzed atelectasic processes occurring in the maxillary sinus. Several publications in the literature have tempted to analyze the pathogenesis. Clinically the processes are often silent and only revealed when the major opthalmological complication, enophthalmia, becomes patent. In other cases there is a long history of chronic sinusitis. There is a spectacular retraction of the maxillary sinus walls leading to collapse of the orbital floor and enophthalmia. We report four cases of maxillary sinusitis with atelectasia of the sinus walls at different stages of progression. These observations and data in the literature emphasize the importance, whatever the state of development, of endoscopic osteal decompression to avoid ophthalmological complications. PMID:9922835

  14. Maxillary Reconstruction for Sinus Lift Complications With Oro-Antral Fistula: The Le Fort I Approach.

    PubMed

    Pigache, Pénélope; Anavekar, Namrata; Raoul, Gwénaël; Ferri, Joël

    2016-03-01

    Although sinus lift procedures are reliable, some complications can lead to serious maxillary sequelae, including the development of oro-antral fistula (OAF). Maxillary reconstruction in such patients presents a challenge owing to sinus floor alterations, graft remnants, chronic infection, and morbidity from the original sinus lift approach. The current study describes our technique of maxillary reconstruction using a Le Fort 1 approach following major sinus lift complications with associated residual OAF. This technique provides excellent access for sinus curettage, OAF closure, and osseous reconstruction. It allowed a successful rehabilitation in our patients, with no implant loss and good functional and esthetic results. PMID:26825748

  15. Endodontic management of maxillary first molar with type I canal configuration- a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Desai, Niranjan; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya; Mittal, Priya; Patil, Gururaj

    2015-04-01

    Thorough knowledge about the root canal variations is essential for the predictable endodontic treatment outcome. The root and root canal anatomy of maxillary first molar varies greatly. A Pub-med literature search about single rooted single canalled maxillary first molar was done to know its details such as incidence, diagnostic method used, age, sex and ethnic background of patient. This article presented report of a single rooted single canalled maxillary first molar in a 27-year-old healthy Asian female. PMID:26023655

  16. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  17. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  18. Mucormycosis (Mucor fungus ball) of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hang Sun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2014-01-01

    A fungus ball is an extramucosal fungal proliferation that completely fills one or more paranasal sinuses and usually occurs as a unilateral infection. It is mainly caused by Aspergillus spp in an immunocompetent host, but some cases of paranasal fungal balls reportedly have been caused by Mucor spp. A Mucor fungus ball is usually found in the maxillary sinus and/or the sphenoid sinus and may be black in color. Patients with mucormycosis, or a Mucor fungal ball infection, usually present with facial pain or headache. On computed tomography, there are no pathognomonic findings that are conclusive for a diagnosis of mucormycosis. In this article we report a case of mucormycosis in a 56-year-old woman and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on the "Mucor fungus ball." To the best of our knowledge, 5 case reports (8 patients) have been published in which the fungus ball was thought to be caused by Mucor spp. PMID:25397383

  19. Maxillary fixed prosthesis design based on the preoperative physical examination.

    PubMed

    Block, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate the use of physical examination findings that can be used to determine the design characteristics of a full arch restoration in the maxilla. These anatomic findings include 1) the resting and 2) smile line exposures of the central incisor; 3) the vertical position of the edentulous ridge when smiling; 4) the anteroposterior relation of the teeth to the edentulous ridge; 5) the presence of bone posterior to the premolar region; 6) the anterior height of the alveolar bone in relation to the floor of the nose; and 7) the planned inclination of the maxillary teeth. Based on these physical findings, the final prosthetic plan can be established before surgery. Determination of the final restorative plan determines the surgical procedures to be performed. PMID:25659360

  20. A technique to salvage endodontically compromised maxillary anterior tooth.

    PubMed

    Comut, Alper; Foran, Denise; Cunningham, Ralph P

    2014-01-01

    A complication of endodontic treatment is over-preparation of the tooth structure in an attempt to access calcified pulp chambers and root canals. This could result in thin root walls that might compromise the long-term prognosis of the tooth. There are various treatment options when such a complication occurs, among them, extraction of the compromised tooth and its replacement with a dental implant. This clinical report describes a nonsurgical, multidisciplinary treatment alternative where a maxillary anterior tooth with a thinned root wall was successfully saved by repairing the damaged root to its original thickness using a composite resin material and subsequently restoring with a cast post and core and a crown. PMID:24654367

  1. Basal cell adenoma of maxillary sinus mimicking ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bhagde, Priya Anil; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare basaloid tumor, with only 20% of cases occurring in minor salivary glands. Histologically, BCA is characterized by the presence of basaloid cells and may frequently be mistaken with canalicular adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry may aid in arriving at a final diagnosis as in the present case. Reported here is a case of locally aggressive BCA. Histologically, the lesion mimicked ameloblastoma and other entities which posed a diagnostic challenge. There are no reports of BCA presenting as an aggressive lesion available in English literature so far; moreover, merely a single case of BCA of maxillary sinus has been previously reported to the best of our cognition. This case report highlights the rarity of this tumor with regards to its site of origin, clinical behavior and histopathological mimics. PMID:27194878

  2. Basal cell adenoma of maxillary sinus mimicking ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhagde, Priya Anil; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare basaloid tumor, with only 20% of cases occurring in minor salivary glands. Histologically, BCA is characterized by the presence of basaloid cells and may frequently be mistaken with canalicular adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry may aid in arriving at a final diagnosis as in the present case. Reported here is a case of locally aggressive BCA. Histologically, the lesion mimicked ameloblastoma and other entities which posed a diagnostic challenge. There are no reports of BCA presenting as an aggressive lesion available in English literature so far; moreover, merely a single case of BCA of maxillary sinus has been previously reported to the best of our cognition. This case report highlights the rarity of this tumor with regards to its site of origin, clinical behavior and histopathological mimics. PMID:27194878

  3. Severe maxillary osteomyelitis in a Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Dental injuries to or abnormalities in functionally important teeth and associated bones in predators may significantly reduce the ability to kill and consume prey (Lazar et al. 2009). This impairment is likely exacerbated in coursing predators, such as Gray Wolves, that bite and hold onto fleeing and kicking prey with their teeth. Damage to carnassials (upper fourth premolar, P4, and lower first molar, M1) and associated bones in Gray Wolves may especially inhibit the consumption of prey because these teeth slice meat and crush bone. Here I report maxillary osteomyelitis involving the carnassials in a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota of such severity that I hypothesize it ultimately caused the Gray Wolf to starve to death.

  4. A rare occurrence of geminated-taloned maxillary lateral incisor.

    PubMed

    Neeraja, R; Kayal, Vizhi G

    2012-05-01

    The talon cusp is a developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp like structure projecting from the cingulum area of the anterior teeth. Gemination is an anomaly caused by a single tooth germ that attempted to divide during its development. These developmental anomalies may cause clinical problems including esthetic impairment, pain, caries and tooth crowding. Co-occurrence of two anomalies in a teeth is rare. This paper presents an unusual case of talon cusp on geminated permanent lateral incisor. How to cite this article: Neeraja R, Kayal VG. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):136-138. PMID:25206153

  5. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Vizhi G

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The talon cusp is a developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp like structure projecting from the cingulum area of the anterior teeth. Gemination is an anomaly caused by a single tooth germ that attempted to divide during its development. These developmental anomalies may cause clinical problems including esthetic impairment, pain, caries and tooth crowding. Co-occurrence of two anomalies in a teeth is rare. This paper presents an unusual case of talon cusp on geminated permanent lateral incisor. How to cite this article: Neeraja R, Kayal VG. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):136-138. PMID:25206153

  6. [Pneumomediastinum Due to the Fracture of the Maxillary Antrum].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Ryutaro; Morimoto, Yuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Urata, Hisashi; Terabe, Masahiro; Miki, Chikao

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to the emergency room, half a day after having fallen down on his right cheek drunkenly onto a concrete block. Physical examination revealed that the contusion was limited to the right side of his face, only around the cheek, without trauma to the neck, chest or abdomen. But wide ranging tactile crepitus with severe swelling was present on his face and neck due to widely spread emphysema. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed some fractures of maxillary antrum, facial and cervical emphysema spreading to the lower part of mediastinum. After a conservative treatment, he recovered without any severe systematic complication. It was found that the facial and cervical emphysema and pneumomediastimum completely disappeared on the follow-up CT scan, 18 days after the event. PMID:27246131

  7. Barotrauma secondary to inflammatory maxillary sinus polyp: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Steven M; Brennan, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    Sinus barotrauma, secondary to mucosal disturbances, is a common finding within the aviation community. Multiple etiologies have all led to mucosal inflammation and thickening with potential obstruction of the sinus osteomeatal complex, especially during the barometric changes of flight. Obstruction can, therefore, lead to problems with sinus pressure equilibration with atmospheric pressure, and can lead to barosinusitis. We present a case of a U.S. Air Force Command Pilot with acute left sinus barotrauma during descent while flying a T-37 aircraft, along with a brief review of the pathophysiologic processes involved during barotrauma. An inflammatory polyp within his sinus was identified by plain radiography, confirmed with computed tomography, and subsequently excised. The patient had complete resolution and clearance to fly after an uneventful 4-wk convalescence and altitude chamber flight. This is the first case of sinus barotrauma secondary to an inflammatory maxillary sinus polyp, confirmed by histologic diagnosis, reported in the aeromedical literature. PMID:12433240

  8. Apicotomy: surgical management of maxillary dilacerated or ankylosed canines.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Eustáquio A; Araújo, Cristiana V; Tanaka, Orlando M

    2013-12-01

    This clinical article reports a technique, apicotomy, for managing dilacerated or ankylosed canines. The records of 3 patients successfully treated with apicotomy are presented. Orthodontists observe clinically significant incidences of impacted maxillary canines in their daily practices. Several procedures have been described to bring an ankylosed, impacted tooth into occlusion. Luxation is the most widely used solution, but there are risks involved with that approach, and the success rate is low. Surgical repositioning has also been used, but morbidity is high, and the aggressiveness of the procedure might also contraindicate it. Ankylosis might be related to the anatomic position of the canine's root apex and its adjacent anatomic structures. Apicotomy is a guided fracture of a canine root apex, followed by its orthodontic traction. It is a conservative surgical alternative for treating impacted canines with dilacerations or apical root ankylosis. PMID:24286914

  9. Quadruple zygomatic implants supported rehabilitation in failed maxillary bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; D'Agostino, Antonio; Zanette, Giovanni; Favero, Vittorio; Procacci, Pasquale

    2016-09-01

    Extreme atrophy of the jaws constitutes a challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. The technique involving Le Fort I osteotomy, bone grafting, and endosseous implants remains the gold standard treatment for class V and class VI atrophy of the maxilla. As severe maxillary atrophy is associated to impaired microvascularization of overlying soft tissues, reconstruction using vascularized free fibula flaps together with endosseous implants is one of the possible treatment plans. When this approach fails, however, retreating these patients using traditional techniques often proves unsatisfactory. This study outlines our clinical experience with full-arch zygoma implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation to treat severe atrophic maxilla following failure of strategies including multiple Le Fort I procedures or vascularized free fibular flaps. PMID:26911802

  10. Postretention stability after orthodontic closure of maxillary interincisor diastemas

    PubMed Central

    de MORAIS, Juliana Fernandes; de FREITAS, Marcos Roberto; de FREITAS, Karina Maria Salvatore; JANSON, Guilherme; CASTELLO BRANCO, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Anterior spaces may interfere with smile attractiveness and compromise dentofacial harmony. They are among the most frequent reasons why patients seek orthodontic treatment. However, midline diastema is commonly cited as a malocclusion with high relapse incidence by orthodontists. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the stability of maxillary interincisor diastemas closure and the association of their relapse and interincisor width, overjet, overbite and root parallelism. Material and Methods Sample comprised 30 patients with at least a pretreatment midline diastema of 0.5 mm or greater after eruption of the maxillary permanent canines. Dental casts and panoramic radiographs were taken at pretreatment, posttreatment and postretention. Results Before treatment, midline diastema width was 1.52 mm (SD=0.88) and right and left lateral diastema widths were 0.55 mm (SD=0.56) and 0.57 mm (SD=0.53), respectively. According to repeated measures analysis of variance, only midline diastema demonstrated significant relapse. In the overall sample the average relapse of midline diastema was 0.49 mm (SD=0.66), whilst the unstable patients showed a mean space reopening of 0.78 mm (SD=0.66). Diastema closure in the area between central and lateral incisors showed great stability. Multivariate correlation tests showed that only initial diastema width (β=0.60) and relapse of overjet (β=0.39) presented association with relapse of midline diastema. Conclusions Midline diastema relapse was statistically significant and occurred in 60% of the sample, while lateral diastemas closure remained stable after treatment. Only initial diastema width and overjet relapse showed association with relapse of midline diastema. There was no association between relapse of interincisor diastema and root parallelism. PMID:24918661

  11. The Shape of the Maxillary Central Incisors and Its Correlation with Maxillary Anterior Papillary Display: A Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Nichani, Ashish S; Ahmed, Arshia Zainab; Ranganath, V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define shapes of maxillary central incisors and determine their relationship with the visual display of interdental papillae during smiling. A sample of 100 patients aged 20 to 25 years were recruited. Photographs were taken and gingival angle, crown width (CW), crown length (CL), contact surface (CS), CW/CL ratio, CS/CL ratio, gingival smile line (GSL), and interdental smile line (ISL) were measured. The data showed an increase in GA leading to an increase in CW and CS/CL ratio. Women showed a higher percentage of papillary display compared with men. This study reinforces the proposed hypothesis that the shape of the teeth and papilla affect the periodontium. PMID:27333012

  12. Maxillary canine substitution for the severely resorbed root of central incisor: 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Koga, Yoshiyuki; Park, Jae Hyun; Tai, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Ectopically erupting maxillary canines can cause problems that necessitate surgical, orthodontic, and restorative treatment. When a canine eruption disturbance causes resorption and requires subsequent extraction of the affected teeth, the resulting spaces are candidates for orthodontic repositioning and recontouring of the remaining teeth. To achieve successful results, the clinician must have a proper knowledge of tooth anatomy, root angulation, gingival margin position, restorative techniques, and occlusion. A collaborative effort from the pediatric dentist, orthodontist, and surgeon is required to produce an esthetic and functional result. This case report describes the substitution of maxillary canines for both the left central and right lateral incisors and substitution of the maxillary right lateral incisor for the maxillary right central incisor. PMID:24640069

  13. Maxillary protraction using skeletal anchorage and intermaxillary elastics in Skeletal Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    Ağlarcı, Cahide; Albayrak, Gayem Eroğlu; Fındık, Yavuz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the treatment of a patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary retrognathia using skeletal anchorage devices and intermaxillary elastics. Miniplates were inserted between the mandibular lateral incisor and canine teeth on both sides in a male patient aged 14 years 5 months. Self-drilling mini-implants (1.6 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were installed between the maxillary second premolar and molar teeth, and Class III elastics were used between the miniplates and miniscrews. On treatment completion, an increase in the projection of the maxilla relative to the cranial base (2.7 mm) and significant improvement of the facial profile were observed. Slight maxillary counterclockwise (1°) and mandibular clockwise (3.3°) rotations were also observed. Maxillary protraction with skeletal anchorage and intermaxillary elastics was effective in correcting a case of Skeletal Class III malocclusion without dentoalveolar side effects. PMID:25798416

  14. Root Canal Configuration of Maxillary First Permanent Molars in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid Reza; Rahimi, Saeed; Ahmadi, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims It is critical to have a proper knowledge of the normal anatomy of the pulp and its variations for the success of endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the root canal system of maxillary first permanent molars in an Iranian population. Materials and methods In this study, 137 maxillary first molars were decalcified, dye-injected, cleared and studied. Results The results demonstrated that 37.96% of the maxillary first molars under study had three canals, 58.4% had four canals and 3.64% had five canals. Conclusion According to the results of this study and considering variations in the root canal systems of maxillary first molars, it seems that great care should be taken in the root canal treatment of these teeth. PMID:23277826

  15. Direct Restorative Treatment of Missing Maxillary Laterals with Composite Laminate Veneer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bagis, Bora; Aydoğan, Elif; Bagis, Yildirim H.

    2008-01-01

    This clinical report describes a direct composite laminate veneer restoration of the maxillary anterior teeth in one chair time to produce a better esthetic appearance in a patient with diastemata and missing laterals. PMID:19088889

  16. Management of non-syndromic double tooth affecting permanent maxillary central incisors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smail-Faugeron, Violaine; Terradot, Jeanne; Muller Bolla, Michèle; Courson, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    To assess management of non-syndromic double tooth affecting permanent maxillary central incisors, we performed a systematic review and also present 2 case reports. We searched MEDLINE via PubMed and the reference lists of included reports. Eligible studies were any type of clinical studies describing the management of non-syndromic double tooth affecting the crown of a permanent maxillary central incisor. We included 68 studies corresponding to 72 relevant case reports. Therapeutic options in descending order of priority were restorative dentistry (35%), hemisection (33%), abstention (17%) or extraction (15%). Orthodontic management resulted in 57% of cases. We report an 11-year-old boy with bilateral fusion of the two maxillary central incisors and a 9-year-old boy with a double left central incisor and a supernumerary lateral right incisor. A multidisciplinary approach is key to management of permanent maxillary central incisors affected by coronary anomalies. PMID:27307427

  17. Efficiency of two protocols for maxillary molar intrusion with mini-implants

    PubMed Central

    Paccini, Juliana Volpato Curi; Cotrim-Ferreira, Flávio Augusto; Ferreira, Flávio Vellini; de Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore; Cançado, Rodrigo Hermont; Valarelli, Fabrício Pinelli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of two protocols for maxillary molar intrusion with two or three mini-implants. Methods: Twenty five maxillary first molars extruded for loss of their antagonists in adult subjects were selected. The sample was divided into two groups, according to the intrusion protocol with two or three mini-implants. Group 1 consisted of 15 molars that were intruded by two mini-implants. Group 2 consisted of 10 molars intruded by three mini-implants. Changes with treatment were analyzed in lateral cephalograms at the beginning and at the end of intrusion of maxillary molars. Results: Results showed that there was no difference in efficiency for the two intrusion protocols. It was concluded that extruded maxillary molars can be intruded with two or three mini-implants with similar efficiency. PMID:27409654

  18. Sporotrichosis of Maxillary Sinuses in a Middle Aged Female Patient from Rural Area of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saumik; Sinha, Ramanuj; Aggarwal, Neeraj; Chakravorty, Sriparna

    2016-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is commonly a chronic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a saprophytic fungus and is usually limited to cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues. Disseminated systemic, osteoarticular or pulmonary sporotrichosis have been reported but nasal sinusitis by this fungus is extremely infrequent. Earlier report from southern India documented a case of maxillary sinusitis by Sporothrix schenckii. Here we report a similar case of bilateral maxillary sinusitis in a middle aged female from a village of Bihar, a state in eastern India. She underwent endoscopic maxillary sinus surgery for nasal symptoms and diagnosed to have sporotrichotic infection of maxillary sinuses. The diagnosis was done by mycological and histopathological examination and patient improved under antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:27134873

  19. The relationship between occlusal support and maxillary development: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Fabricio F.; Santos, Gabriela S. M. Q.; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Sanchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that maxillary development may be affected by occlusal support. Materials and Methods: The sample was composed by Wistar rats (5 weeks old) divided into three groups: Control (n = 10), extraction of mandibular molar teeth – left side (n = 10), extraction mandibular molar teeth – left and right sides (n = 10). The rats were sacrificed 8 weeks postextraction. Cone beam computed tomography scan images were taken for posterior measurement of maxillary length and width. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (Tukey test as post-hoc test). Results: Maxillary length was significantly shorter (P < 0.005) in both groups after tooth extraction. No difference was observed regarding maxillary width and body weight. Conclusion: Reduced occlusal support may impair the development of the maxilla in rats. PMID:26430370

  20. Class II, Division 1 Angle malocclusion with severe proclination of maxillary incisors

    PubMed Central

    Montanha, Kátia

    2016-01-01

    Protrusion of maxillary incisors is a common complaint among patients seeking orthodontic treatment. This report addresses the correction of Class II Angle malocclusion with excessively bucally proclined maxillary incisors, in an adolescent female patient, through the use of extraoral and fixed appliances. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as part of the requirements for obtaining the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:27007768

  1. A maxillary central incisor with three root canals: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Eudes; Setzer, Frank; Zingg, Paula; Karabucak, Bekir

    2009-10-01

    Maxillary central incisors have been reported with 1, 2, and occasionally 3 root canals. The complete biomechanical instrumentation and obturation of the root canal system are mandatory to achieve endodontic success. Root canal systems with abnormal variations present a challenge in diagnosis and clinical management to the practitioner. This article presents a detailed case report of the endodontic treatment of a 3-canal maxillary incisor with an associated periodontal defect. PMID:19801248

  2. Total distalization of the maxillary arch in a patient with skeletal Class II malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Jong-Suk; Cha, Jung-Yul; Park, Young-Chel

    2011-06-01

    In nongrowing patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion, premolar extraction or maxillary molar distalization can be used as camouflage treatment. Orthodontic miniscrew implants are widely used for this purpose because they do not produce undesirable reciprocal effects and do not depend on the patient's cooperation. This article reports on maxillary molar distalization by using miniscrew implants to correct a Class II problem. The main considerations of molar distalization treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. PMID:21640890

  3. Interdisciplinary Approach for Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Aseemkumar; Jain, Nimit; Jose, Nidhin Philip; Shetty, Siddarth

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisors are frequently found congenitally missing, and their replacement has to be done prosthodontically. However, there are a variety of treatment options; a justified solution after orthodontic correction is the use of Maryland Bridges. Following is a case report of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors and an impacted canine and their orthodontic correction followed by prosthetic replacement of the lateral incisors using Maryland bridges. PMID:27029086

  4. A comprehensive clinical review of maxillary sinus floor elevation: anatomy, techniques, biomaterials and complications.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Sani, Seyed Amir; Loomer, Peter M; Wallace, Stephen S

    2016-09-01

    Several systematic reviews have shown that maxillary sinus augmentation is a predictable and effective procedure for augmentation of an atrophic posterior maxilla. However, we know of no reviews that have covered all the clinical aspects. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cinhal, and Cochrane databases up to January 2015 to select relevant studies that cover the different objectives of this review, including the anatomy of the maxillary sinus, surgical techniques, biomaterials used in the sinus augmentation, and potential complications. PMID:27235382

  5. The arterial circle of the brain, its branches and connections in selected representatives of the Antilopinae.

    PubMed

    Frąckowiak, Hieronim; Dębiński, Dariusz; Komosa, Marcin; Zdun, Maciej

    2015-07-01

    The arterial circle of the brain, that is, the circle of Willis, and its branches in ruminants have been chiefly described in farm animals and only in selected wild species. In view of the deficit of information about this vascular region in numerous other species of the Ruminantia, the arteries of the encephalic base were analyzed in five antelope species representing different genera of the Bovidae, Antilopinae. Specimens of the following species were examined: springbuck (Antidorcas marsupialis), blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra), dik-dik (Madoqua kirkii), saiga (Saiga tatarica), and oribi (Ourebia ourebi). Post-autopsy material received from domestic zoological gardens was used to inject the bilateral common carotid arteries with a stained acetone solution of vinyl superchloride. When the material was polymerized, the specimens were macerated enzymatically. The process resulted in casts of arteries of the head and encephalic base on a skeletal scaffold. The investigations revealed that the bilateral components of the arterial circle of the brain, that is, the rostral cerebral artery and caudal communicating artery, arose from the division of the intracranial segment of the internal carotid artery, which emerges from the rostral epidural rete mirabile. The extracranial segment of the internal carotid artery was obliterated. In consequence of this process, the blood reaches the brain chiefly from the maxillary artery. The research proved that the arteries of the encephalic base in the Antilopinae are most similar to the vessels described in antelopes of Tragelaphus, Taurotragus, and Boselaphus genera and small domestic ruminants. However, they are different from the arterial pattern of the encephalic base in bovines and other species classified as the Bovini. PMID:25694115

  6. The impact of frenulum height on strains in maxillary denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Baysal, Gokhan; Sunbuloglu, Emin; Bozdag, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The midline fracture of maxillary complete dentures is a frequently encountered complication. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of frenulum height on midline strains of maxillary complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS A removable maxillary complete denture was fabricated and duplicated seven times. Four different labial frenulum heights were tested for stresses occurring on the palatal cameo surface. The strains were measured with strain gauges placed on 5 different locations and the stresses were calculated. To mimic occlusal forces bilaterally 100 N of load was applied from the premolar and molar region. RESULTS A statistically significant association between the height of the labial frenulum and the calculated stresses and strains was shown (P<.05) predominantly on the midline and especially on the incisive papilla. The results showed that stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that the stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. Surgical or mechanical precautions should be taken to prevent short-term failure of maxillary complete dentures due to stress concentration and low cycle fatigue tendency at the labial frenulum region. PMID:24353878

  7. Compensatory orthodontic treatment for maxillary deficiency: a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Giordani Santos; de Gauw, Johnny Holanda; Motta, Alexandre Trindade; Mucha, José Nelson

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we report the orthodontic treatment of a boy (age 12 years 9 months) who had a midface deficiency, a concave facial profile with maxillary retrusion, a complete crossbite (anterior and posterior), and the maxillary right canine retained in the alveolus. Rapid maxillary expansion was performed followed by complete orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances combined with Class III elastics and anterior vertical elastics. Time was allowed to elapse until growth was virtually over before removing the fixed appliances (at age 18 years 4 months), and no retainer of any type was used. As a result of treatment, significant improvement was noted in his facial appearance, with a proper maxillomandibular relationship, total correction of the maxillary atresia, and satisfactory overjet and overbite. The results remained stable at the 4-year follow-up. Therefore, it can be argued that the use of Class III elastics combined with rapid maxillary expansion has a beneficial effect in the treatment of transverse and sagittal maxillary deficiency in growing patients. Excellence in how the treatment was finished and discontinuation of treatment and control in the final stages of growth contributed to the stability of the final results. PMID:25085306

  8. Three-dimensional evaluation of maxillary anterior alveolar bone for optimal placement of miniscrew implants

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Hwan; Lee, Kee Joon; Park, Young Chel

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to propose clinical guidelines for placing miniscrew implants using the results obtained from 3-dimensional analysis of maxillary anterior interdental alveolar bone by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods By using CBCT data from 52 adult patients (17 men and 35 women; mean age, 27.9 years), alveolar bone were measured in 3 regions: between the maxillary central incisors (U1-U1), between the maxillary central incisor and maxillary lateral incisor (U1-U2), and between the maxillary lateral incisor and the canine (U2-U3). Cortical bone thickness, labio-palatal thickness, and interdental root distance were measured at 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm apical to the interdental cementoenamel junction (ICEJ). Results The cortical bone thickness significantly increased from the U1-U1 region to the U2-U3 region (p < 0.05). The labio-palatal thickness was significantly less in the U1-U1 region (p < 0.05), and the interdental root distance was significantly less in the U1-U2 region (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the interdental root regions U2-U3 and U1-U1 are the best sites for placing miniscrew implants into maxillary anterior alveolar bone. PMID:24696821

  9. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  10. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  11. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  12. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  13. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007315.htm Coronary artery fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one of ...

  14. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  15. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  16. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  17. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  18. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  19. Combination of Rare Right Arterial Variation with Anomalous Origins of the Vertebral Artery, Aberrant Subclavian Artery and Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, H.; San Millán Ruíz, D.; Abdo, G.; Asakura, F.; Yilmaz, H.; Lovblad, K.O.; Rüfenacht, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed. PMID:22005696

  20. [Endoscopic removal of a dental foreign body from maxillary sinus via anterior prelacrimal recess approach: a case report].

    PubMed

    Song, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yongjin; Zhao, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    We present a rare case of dental foreign body from maxillary sinus in a 21-year woman who was hospitalized because of oral cavity and nasal sinus leak for 3 months when doing cheek-bulging action. Admission diagnosis :dental maxillary sinus"foreign body" (left); chronic maxillary sinusitis (left). Computed tomographic scan showed irregular high density shadow in the left maxillary sinus. The "foreign body" was removed via anteri- or prelacrimal recess approach, which was supposed to be the iatrogenic foreign body - alveolar bone. PMID:27382694

  1. A comparison of postnatal arterial patterns in a growth series of giraffe (Artiodactyla: Giraffa camelopardalis)

    PubMed Central

    Gignac, Paul M.; Hieronymus, Tobin L.; Witmer, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all living artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates) possess a derived cranial arterial pattern that is highly distinctive from most other mammals. Foremost among a suite of atypical arterial configurations is the functional and anatomical replacement of the internal carotid artery with an extensive, subdural arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This interdigitating network branches from the maxillary artery and is housed within the cavernous venous sinus. As the cavernous sinus receives cooled blood draining from the nasal mucosa, heat rapidly dissipates across the high surface area of the rete to be carried away from the brain by the venous system. This combination yields one of the most effective mechanisms of selective brain cooling. Although arterial development begins from the same embryonic scaffolding typical of mammals, possession of a rete is typically accompanied by obliteration of the internal carotid artery. Among taxa with available ontogenetic data, the point at which the internal carotid obliterates is variable throughout development. In small-bodied artiodactyls, the internal carotid typically obliterates prior to parturition, but in larger species, the vessel may remain patent for several years. In this study, we use digital anatomical data collection methods to describe the cranial arterial patterns for a growth series of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), from parturition to senescence. Giraffes, in particular, have unique cardiovascular demands and adaptations owing to their exceptional body form and may not adhere to previously documented stages of cranial arterial development. We find the carotid arterial system to be conserved between developmental stages and that obliteration of the giraffe internal carotid artery occurs prior to parturition. PMID:26925324

  2. A comparison of postnatal arterial patterns in a growth series of giraffe (Artiodactyla: Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Haley D; Gignac, Paul M; Hieronymus, Tobin L; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all living artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates) possess a derived cranial arterial pattern that is highly distinctive from most other mammals. Foremost among a suite of atypical arterial configurations is the functional and anatomical replacement of the internal carotid artery with an extensive, subdural arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This interdigitating network branches from the maxillary artery and is housed within the cavernous venous sinus. As the cavernous sinus receives cooled blood draining from the nasal mucosa, heat rapidly dissipates across the high surface area of the rete to be carried away from the brain by the venous system. This combination yields one of the most effective mechanisms of selective brain cooling. Although arterial development begins from the same embryonic scaffolding typical of mammals, possession of a rete is typically accompanied by obliteration of the internal carotid artery. Among taxa with available ontogenetic data, the point at which the internal carotid obliterates is variable throughout development. In small-bodied artiodactyls, the internal carotid typically obliterates prior to parturition, but in larger species, the vessel may remain patent for several years. In this study, we use digital anatomical data collection methods to describe the cranial arterial patterns for a growth series of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), from parturition to senescence. Giraffes, in particular, have unique cardiovascular demands and adaptations owing to their exceptional body form and may not adhere to previously documented stages of cranial arterial development. We find the carotid arterial system to be conserved between developmental stages and that obliteration of the giraffe internal carotid artery occurs prior to parturition. PMID:26925324

  3. Management of the neck in maxillary sinus carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Laura; Shah, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review To discuss and review the role for elective treatment of the neck in maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. Improvements in survival have been seen due to improved local therapies and control, therefore the treatment of the neck has become a topic of debate. Recent findings The risk of occult metastases in neck nodes is higher for T 3-4 tumors. The rate of nodal relapse in the N0 neck without elective treatment is 8-15%. With elective irradiation the nodal relapse rate decreases. However, most nodal relapses are accompanied by local failure or distant disease. Local failure remains the most common site of failure and cause of death in this patient population. Summary Treatment failure occurs overall in 62% of all patients, with local recurrence by far the most common site of treatment failure which is rarely amenable to salvage therapy. Therefore elective neck irradiation is not routinely indicated in the clinically N0 neck; those who recur only in the neck can be surgically salvaged more than 50% of the time. PMID:25692625

  4. A Novel Technique To Correct Multiplanar Maxillary Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sibu Sajjan; Charlu, Arun Paul; Chacko, Rabin Kurudamannil; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-04-01

    Dental malocclusion and facial deformity are frequent observations in patients with clefts of the orofacial region. These patients have a low self perception secondary to their aesthetic appearance. Cleft palate patients are further affected in their speech and oral function with direct impediment to their quality of life. Early identification and treatment in cleft lip and palate patients may directly enhance their overall well being and productivity with sustainable prognosis when managed by skilled and evidence informed operators. We present a successful case management of a patient with a cleft palate and dentofacial deformity with a past surgical history, treated with an anterior maxillary advancement osteotomy, stabilized with an interpositional non vascular iliac bone graft. The posterior open bite was corrected using overlay full coverage crowns. Both these techniques are rarely reported in the literature. The procedure positively improved the quality of life in our patient with regards to her aesthetics, speech and function. This treatment approach could be considered in similar cases to achieve predictable outcomes. PMID:27190966

  5. [Maxillary and mandibular fractures. Treatment concepts in maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Waiss, W; Gosau, M; Koyama, K; Reichert, T E

    2011-11-01

    Maxillary and mandibular fractures are a relatively frequent occurrence due to the exposed location of the jaws and are caused mainly by acts of violence, traffic and recreational accidents. Mandibular fractures can be treated conservatively with dental splints and intermaxillary fixation. Since Michelet, miniplate osteosynthesis via intraoral access has become the method of choice. Champy showed that the monocortical fixation of miniplates at the level of the linea obliqua results in stable osteosynthesis, despite postoperative micro-movements in the fracture gap, and postulated the principle of dynamic compression. Dislocated fractures of the mandibular collum are treated with stable osteosynthesis via an intra- or extraoral approach, while fractures of the mandibular joint are usually treated conservatively and early functional rehabilitation is favored. For mandibular fractures, the principle of load-bearing and load-sharing should be considered, i.e. in the case of sufficient bone and uncomplicated fractures, the bone can bear most of the force, such that miniplates are sufficient (load-sharing). If bones are weakened by atrophy or in the case of infected, comminuted or defect fractures osteosynthesis plates must bear the load alone (load-bearing). PMID:22012486

  6. A Novel Technique To Correct Multiplanar Maxillary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Charlu, Arun Paul; Chacko, Rabin Kurudamannil; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Dental malocclusion and facial deformity are frequent observations in patients with clefts of the orofacial region. These patients have a low self perception secondary to their aesthetic appearance. Cleft palate patients are further affected in their speech and oral function with direct impediment to their quality of life. Early identification and treatment in cleft lip and palate patients may directly enhance their overall well being and productivity with sustainable prognosis when managed by skilled and evidence informed operators. We present a successful case management of a patient with a cleft palate and dentofacial deformity with a past surgical history, treated with an anterior maxillary advancement osteotomy, stabilized with an interpositional non vascular iliac bone graft. The posterior open bite was corrected using overlay full coverage crowns. Both these techniques are rarely reported in the literature. The procedure positively improved the quality of life in our patient with regards to her aesthetics, speech and function. This treatment approach could be considered in similar cases to achieve predictable outcomes. PMID:27190966

  7. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  8. Changes in nasal air flow and school grades after rapid maxillary expansion in oral breathing children

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Hilda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the changes in nasal air flow and school grades after rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in oral breathing children with maxillary constriction. Material and Methods: Forty-four oral breathing children (mean age 10.57 y) underwent orthodontic RME with a Hyrax screw. Forty-four age-matched children (mean age 10.64 y) with nasal physiological breathing and adequate transverse maxillary dimensions served as the control group. The maxillary widths, nasal air flow assessed via peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF), and school grades were recorded at baseline, and 6 months and one year following RME. Results: After RME, there were significant increases in all the maxillary widths in the study group. PNIF was reduced in the study group (60.91 ± 13.13 l/min) compared to the control group (94.50 ± 9.89 l/min) (P < 0.000) at the beginning of the study. Six months after RME, a significant improvement of PNIF was observed in the study group (36.43 ± 22.61). School grades were lower in the study group (85.52 ± 5.74) than in the control group (89.77 ± 4.44) (P < 0.05) at the baseline, but it increased six months after RME (2.77 ± 3.90) (P < 0.001) and one year later (5.02 ± 15.23) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Nasal air flow improved in oral breathing children six months and one year after RME. School grades also improved, but not high enough to be academically significant. Key words:Maxillary constriction, oral breathing, nasal air flow, rapid maxillary expansion, school grades. PMID:22322516

  9. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  10. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.