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Sample records for maximum dose point

  1. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Leonard; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  2. [Estimation of Maximum Entrance Skin Dose during Cerebral Angiography].

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Satoru; Moritake, Takashi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Hamada, Yusuke; Sakuma, Hideyuki; Yoda, Shogo; Satoh, Masayuki; Sun, Lue; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Akahane, Keiichi; Chida, Koichi; Matsumaru, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    Using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter, we measured the entrance skin dose (ESD) in 46 cases and analyzed the correlations between maximum ESD and angiographic parameters [total fluoroscopic time (TFT); number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) frames, air kerma at the interventional reference point (AK), and dose-area product (DAP)] to estimate the maximum ESD in real time. Mean (± standard deviation) maximum ESD, dose of the right lens, and dose of the left lens were 431.2 ± 135.8 mGy, 33.6 ± 15.5 mGy, and 58.5 ± 35.0 mGy, respectively. Correlation coefficients (r) between maximum ESD and TFT, number of DSA frames, AK, and DAP were r=0.379 (P<0.01), r=0.702 (P<0.001), r=0.825 (P<0.001), and r=0.709 (P<0.001), respectively. AK was identified as the most useful parameter for real-time prediction of maximum ESD. This study should contribute to the development of new diagnostic reference levels in our country. PMID:26400558

  3. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  5. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    SciTech Connect

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-11-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

  6. How to Choose the MaximumHow to Choose the Maximum Recommended Safe Dose forRecommended Safe Dose for

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) Convert NOAEL to Human Equivalent Dose (HED) Select most appropriate © Howard Lee, All Rights Reserved Human Equivalent Dose (HED)Human Equivalent Dose (HED) Convert NOAELs to BSA Conversion based on body weight (Kg) available Conversion table for various species provided #12

  7. Maximum likelihood estimates of mean and variance of occupation radiation doses subjected to minimum detection levels.

    PubMed

    Datta, D; Singh, Sanjay; Johnson, B E; Kushwaha, H S

    2008-01-01

    Data collection and its analysis in the field of nuclear safety is an important task in the sense that it powers the improvement of safety as well as reliability of the plant. Thus, occupational exposure data analysis is presented to measure the safety or reliability of radiation protection of a given facility. It also is required as a basic input in making decisions on radiation protection regulations and recommendations. A common practice in radiation protection is to record a zero for observation below minimum detection limit (MDL) doses, which leads to an underestimation of true doses and overestimation of the dose-response relationship. Exposure data (both external and internal) are collected by monitoring each individual and this kind of monitoring generally is graded as low-level monitoring. So, in such low-level monitoring, the occurrence of exposure below MDL invites statistical complications for estimating mean and variance because the data are generally censored, i.e observations below MDL are marked. In Type I censoring, the point of censoring (e.g. the detection limit) is 'fixed' a priori for all observations and the number of the censored observations varies. In Type II censoring, the number of censored observations is fixed a priori, and the point of censoring vary. The methodology generally followed in estimating mean and variance with these censored data was the replacement of missing dose by half the MDL. In this paper, authors have used the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) approach for the estimation of mean and standard deviation. A computer code BDLCENSOR has been developed in which all these MLE-based advanced algorithms are implemented. In addition to the MLE-based method, an expectation maximisation algorithm has also been implemented. The code is written using Visual BASIC 6.0. The paper describes the details of the algorithms adopted for handling such censored data to estimate bias free mean and standard deviation. PMID:18083720

  8. The effect of high leverage points on the maximum estimated likelihood for separation in logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Syaiba Balqish; Midi, Habshah; Arasan, Jayanthi; Rana, Md Sohel

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the performance of the maximum estimated likelihood estimator in the presence of separation in the space of the independent variables and high leverage points. The maximum likelihood estimator suffers from the problem of non overlap cases in the covariates where the regression coefficients are not identifiable and the maximum likelihood estimator does not exist. Consequently, iteration scheme fails to converge and gives faulty results. To remedy this problem, the maximum estimated likelihood estimator is put forward. It is evident that the maximum estimated likelihood estimator is resistant against separation and the estimates always exist. The effect of high leverage points are then investigated on the performance of maximum estimated likelihood estimator through real data sets and Monte Carlo simulation study. The findings signify that the maximum estimated likelihood estimator fails to provide better parameter estimates in the presence of both separation, and high leverage points.

  9. Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose

    E-print Network

    Tamhane, Ajit C.

    Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

  10. Aalborg Universitet Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator

    E-print Network

    Schaltz, Erik

    Aalborg Universitet Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Systems. Poster session presented at The 31st International & 10th European Conference on Thermoelectrics, Aalborg, Denmark. General rights Copyright and moral rights

  11. Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System 

    E-print Network

    Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency and reduces the solar cell...

  12. Submodule Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-print Network

    Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.

    This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use of submodule integrated maximum power point trackers (MPPT). We propose a system architecture that provides ...

  13. Dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using a penalized maximum likelihood reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard; O'Connor, Michael; Glick, Stephen J.

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging modality with limited angle projection data. The ability of tomosynthesis systems to accurately detect smaller microcalcifications is debatable. This is because of the higher noise in the projection data (lower average dose per projection), which is then propagated through the reconstructed image . Reconstruction methods that minimize the propagation of quantum noise have potential to improve microcalcification detectability using DBT. In this paper we show that penalized maximum likelihood (PML) reconstruction in DBT yields images with an improved resolution/noise tradeoff as compared to conventional filtered backprojection (FBP). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) using PML was observed to be higher than that obtained using the standard FBP algorithm. Our results indicate that for microcalcifications, using the PML algorithm, reconstructions obtained with a mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.5 mGy yielded better SNR than that those obtained with FBP using a 4mGy total dose. Thus perhaps total dose could be reduced to one-third or lower with same microcalcification detectability, if PML reconstruction is used instead of FBP. Visibility of low contrast masses with various contrast levels were studied using a contrast-detail phantom in a breast shape structure with an average breast density. Images generated using various dose levels indicate that visibility of low contrast masses generated using PML reconstructions are significantly better than those generated using FBP. SNR measurements in the low-contrast study did not appear to correlate with the visual subjective analysis of the reconstruction indicating that SNR is not a good figure of merit to be used.

  14. Low-Power Maximum Power Point Tracker with Digital Control for Thermophotovoltaic Generators

    E-print Network

    Perreault, Dave

    Low-Power Maximum Power Point Tracker with Digital Control for Thermophotovoltaic Generators Robert present experimental data from a compact, highly efficient peak power tracker and show how the proposed tracker is verified with low-bandgap PV cells illuminated by a quartz halogen lamp producing a PV diode

  15. Integrated CMOS DC-DC Converter with Digital Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Portable Thermophotovoltaic

    E-print Network

    Perreault, Dave

    power generator. The design, implemented in 0.35 µm CMOS technology, consists of a low-power control stage and a dc-dc boost power stage with soft-switching capability. With a nominal input voltage of 1 VIntegrated CMOS DC-DC Converter with Digital Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Portable

  16. Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise

    E-print Network

    Odam, Kofi

    Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems, including how noise affects both tracking speed-performance photovoltaic sys- tems. An intelligent controller adjusts the voltage, current, or impedance seen by a solar

  17. Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-print Network

    Perreault, Dave

    Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications 2012. Abstract--This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic is focused on increasing the efficiency of the power processing stage, as well as on improving the power

  18. Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications

    E-print Network

    Perreault, Dave

    Sub-Module Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use is focused on increasing the efficiency of the power processing stage, as well as on improving the power

  19. Maximum Power-Point Extraction of Small Switched-Inductor Piezoelectric Harvesters

    E-print Network

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    of the Art Since piezoelectric transducers generate alternating currents that produce ac voltagesMaximum Power-Point Extraction of Small Switched-Inductor Piezoelectric Harvesters Jun-Yang Lei, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 U.S.A. E-mail: clei8@gatech.edu and Rincon-Mora@gatech.edu. Abstract--Piezoelectric

  20. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  1. Maximum Power Point Tracking with Dichotomy and Gradient Method for Automobile Exhaust Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, W.; Quan, S. H.; Xie, C. J.; Tang, X. F.; Wang, L. L.; Huang, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a direct-current/direct-current (DC/DC) converter with maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is developed to down-convert the high voltage DC output from a thermoelectric generator to the lower voltage required to charge batteries. To improve the tracking accuracy and speed of the converter, a novel MPPT control scheme characterized by an aggregated dichotomy and gradient (ADG) method is proposed. In the first stage, the dichotomy algorithm is used as a fast search method to find the approximate region of the maximum power point. The gradient method is then applied for rapid and accurate tracking of the maximum power point. To validate the proposed MPPT method, a test bench composed of an automobile exhaust thermoelectric generator was constructed for harvesting the automotive exhaust heat energy. Steady-state and transient tracking experiments under five different load conditions were carried out using a DC/DC converter with the proposed ADG and with three traditional methods. The experimental results show that the ADG method can track the maximum power within 140 ms with a 1.1% error rate when the engine operates at 3300 rpm@71 NM, which is superior to the performance of the single dichotomy method, the single gradient method and the perturbation and observation method from the viewpoint of improved tracking accuracy and speed.

  2. Point and Interval Estimators of the Target Dose in Clinical Dose-Finding Studies with Active Control

    PubMed Central

    Helms, H.-J.; Benda, N.; Friede, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a clinical dose finding study with active control a new drug with several dose levels is compared with an active comparator drug. The main focus of such studies often lies on the estimation of a target dose that leads to the same efficacy as the control. This article investigates the finite sample properties of the maximum likelihood estimation of the target dose and compares several approaches for constructing corresponding confidence intervals under the assumption of a linear dose-response curve and normal error terms. Furthermore, the impact of deviations from the model assumptions regarding the error distribution is explored. PMID:24918730

  3. A numerical investigation for the optimal positions and weighting coefficients of point dose measurements in the weighted CTDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Constantin, Dragos; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    The mean dose over the central phantom plane (i.e., z = 0, dose maximum image) is useful in that it allows us to compare radiation dose levels across different CT scanners and acquisition protocols. The mean dose from a conventional CT scan with table translation is typically estimated by weighted CTDI (CTDIW). However, conventional CTDIW has inconsistent performance, depending on its weighting coefficients ("1/2 and 1/2" or "1/3 and 2/3") and acquisition protocols. We used a Monte Carlo (MC) model based on Geant4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) to generate dose profiles in the central plane of the CTDI phantom. MC simulations were carried out for three different sizes of z-collimator and different tube voltages (80, 100, or 120 kVp), a tube current of 80 mA, and an exposure time of 25 ms. We derived optimal weighting coefficients by taking the integral of the radial dose profiles. The first-order linear equation and the quadratic equation were used to fit the dose profiles along the radial direction perpendicular to the central plane, and the fitted profiles were revolved about the Z-axis to compute the mean dose (i.e., total volume under the fitted profiles/the central plane area). The integral computed using the linear equation resulted in the same equation as conventional CTDIW, and the integral computed using the quadratic equation resulted in a new CTDIW (CTDIMW) that incorporates different weightings ("2/3 and 1/3") and the middle dose point instead of the central dose point. Compared to the results of MC simulations, our new CTDIMW showed less error than the previous CTDIW methods by successfully incorporating the curvature of the dose profiles regardless of acquisition protocols. Our new CTDIMW will also be applicable to the AAPM-ICRU phantom, which has a middle dose point.

  4. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  5. Analysis of the flight dynamics of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) off-sun scientific pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitone, D. S.; Klein, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms are presented which were created and implemented by the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) attitude operations team to support large-angle spacecraft pointing at scientific objectives. The mission objective of the post-repair SMM satellite was to study solar phenomena. However, because the scientific instruments, such as the Coronagraph/Polarimeter (CP) and the Hard X ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS), were able to view objects other than the Sun, attitude operations support for attitude pointing at large angles from the nominal solar-pointing attitudes was required. Subsequently, attitude support for SMM was provided for scientific objectives such as Comet Halley, Supernova 1987A, Cygnus X-1, and the Crab Nebula. In addition, the analysis was extended to include the reverse problem, computing the right ascension and declination of a body given the off-Sun angles. This analysis led to the computation of the orbits of seven new solar comets seen in the field-of-view (FOV) of the CP. The activities necessary to meet these large-angle attitude-pointing sequences, such as slew sequence planning, viewing-period prediction, and tracking-bias computation are described. Analysis is presented for the computation of maneuvers and pointing parameters relative to the SMM-unique, Sun-centered reference frame. Finally, science data and independent attitude solutions are used to evaluate the large-angle pointing performance.

  6. Measurement of maximum skin dose in interventional radiology and cardiology and challenges in the set-up of European alert thresholds.

    PubMed

    Farah, J; Trianni, A; Carinou, E; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Clairand, I; Dabin, J; De Angelis, C; Domienik, J; Jarvinen, H; Kopec, R; Majer, M; Malchair, F; Negri, A; Novák, L; Siiskonen, T; Vanhavere, F; Kneževi?, Ž

    2015-04-01

    To help operators acknowledge patient dose during interventional procedures, EURADOS WG-12 focused on measuring patient skin dose using XR-RV3 gafchromic films, thermoluminescent detector (TLD) pellets or 2D TL foils and on investigating possible correlation to the on-line dose indicators such as fluoroscopy time, Kerma-area product (KAP) and cumulative air Kerma at reference point (CK). The study aims at defining non-centre-specific European alert thresholds for skin dose in three interventional procedures: chemoembolization of the liver (CE), neuroembolization (NE) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Skin dose values of >3 Gy (ICRP threshold for skin injuries) were indeed measured in these procedures confirming the need for dose indicators that correlate with maximum skin dose (MSD). However, although MSD showed fairly good correlation with KAP and CK, several limitations were identified challenging the set-up of non-centre-specific European alert thresholds. This paper presents preliminary results of this wide European measurement campaign and focuses on the main challenges in the definition of European alert thresholds. PMID:25316909

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. 25, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2010 2531 Maximum Power Point Tracking for Photovoltaic

    E-print Network

    Kulkarni, Sanjeev

    manufacturing and efficiency as well as increasingly volatile fuel costs. Solar power is an at- tractive option a maximum power point track- ing algorithm that optimizes solar array performance and adapts to rapidly efficiencies exceeding 99% with transient rise-time to the maximum power point of less than 0.1 s. It is shown

  8. Magnification of starting torques of dc motors by maximum power point trackers in photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Singer, S.

    1989-01-01

    A calculation of the starting torque ratio of permanent magnet, series, and shunt-excited dc motors powered by solar cell arrays is presented for two cases, i.e., with and without a maximum-power-point tracker (MPPT). Defining motor torque magnification by the ratio of the motor torque with an MPPT to the motor torque without an MPPT, a magnification of 3 for the permanent magnet motor and a magnification of 7 for both the series and shunt motors are obtained. The study also shows that all motor types are less sensitive to solar insolation variation in systems including MPPTs as compared to systems without MPPTs.

  9. A reliable, fast and low cost maximum power point tracker for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, J.M.; Andujar, J.M.; Bohorquez, M.A.

    2010-01-15

    This work presents a new maximum power point tracker system for photovoltaic applications. The developed system is an analog version of the ''P and O-oriented'' algorithm. It maintains its main advantages: simplicity, reliability and easy practical implementation, and avoids its main disadvantages: inaccurateness and relatively slow response. Additionally, the developed system can be implemented in a practical way at a low cost, which means an added value. The system also shows an excellent behavior for very fast variables in incident radiation levels. (author)

  10. Target range maximum of cyclosporine blood concentration two hours post dose in stable liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Dahmen, Uta; Beckebaum, S; Cicinnati, V; Valentin-Gamazo, C; Frilling, A; Malago, M; Broelsch, C E

    2006-04-28

    Recently, single blood level measurement 2 hours after cyclosporine administration (C2) is taken as a more sensitive indicator of drug exposure in de novo transplant recipients than trough levels (C0). However, few studies focused on the determination of the C2 target range maximum and its associated adverse events in stable liver recipients. This prospective study was designed to assess the relative risk of developing CsA related side effects in patients with high C2-levels. Adverse effects were determined clinically, and by using a specially designed questionnaire. Eventual adverse events as well as C2 levels were determined repeatedly up to 4 times in 3-months intervals (observation period 9 +/- 3 months) in 36 long-term liver recipients (1-13.5 years post-transplant), in addition to conventional C0 levels. Cyclosporine dose was adjusted according to a predefined C0 target level range and clinical status. Totally 103 questionnaires and the corresponding paired CsA blood level records were obtained. C0 levels and C2 levels ranged from 90 to 287 (143 +/- 31) ng/ml and from 212 to 1358 (672 +/- 203) ng/ml respectively. No patient experienced a rejection episode during the observation period, demonstrating the efficiency of the immunosuppressive therapy. However, 33/36 patients (91%) showed symptoms attributable to CsA therapy. C2 levels above 750 ng/ml, determined at least twice in an interval of 3 months, were identified as a relevant risk factor for the presence of multiple adverse effects, which were defined as the combination of hypertension, renal insufficiency and more than two neurological complaints (RR = 3.11, p<0.01). This risk population was not completely identified by determination of C0 level. PMID:16720277

  11. Quality assurance for radiotherapy in prostate cancer: Point dose measurements in intensity modulated fields with large dose gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Escude, Lluis . E-mail: lluis.escude@gmx.net; Linero, Dolors; Molla, Meritxell; Miralbell, Raymond

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We aimed to evaluate an optimization algorithm designed to find the most favorable points to position an ionization chamber (IC) for quality assurance dose measurements of patients treated for prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and fields up to 10 cm x 10 cm. Methods and Materials: Three cylindrical ICs (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used with volumes of 0.6 cc, 0.125 cc, and 0.015 cc. Dose measurements were made in a plastic phantom (PMMA) at 287 optimized points. An algorithm was designed to search for points with the lowest dose gradient. Measurements were made also at 39 nonoptimized points. Results were normalized to a reference homogeneous field introducing a dose ratio factor, which allowed us to compare measured vs. calculated values as percentile dose ratio factor deviations {delta}F (%). A tolerance range of {delta}F (%) of {+-}3% was considered. Results: Half of the {delta}F (%) values obtained at nonoptimized points were outside the acceptable range. Values at optimized points were widely spread for the largest IC (i.e., 60% of the results outside the tolerance range), whereas for the two small-volume ICs, only 14.6% of the results were outside the tolerance interval. No differences were observed when comparing the two small ICs. Conclusions: The presented optimization algorithm is a useful tool to determine the best IC in-field position for optimal dose measurement conditions. A good agreement between calculated and measured doses can be obtained by positioning small volume chambers at carefully selected points in the field. Large chambers may be unreliable even in optimized points for IMRT fields {<=}10 cm x 10 cm.

  12. Solar Panel System for Street Light Using Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedjaja, A.; Harta, S.; Josses, L.; Winardi; Rinda, H.

    2014-03-01

    Solar energy is one form of the renewable energy which is very abundant in regions close to the equator. One application of solar energy is for street light. This research focuses on using the maximum power point tracking technique (MPPT), particularly the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm, to charge battery for street light system. The proposed charger circuit can achieve 20.73% higher power efficiency compared to that of non-MPPT charger. We also develop the LED driver circuit for the system which can achieve power efficiency up to 91.9% at a current of 1.06 A. The proposed street lightning system can be implemented with a relatively low cost for public areas.

  13. Dithering Digital Ripple Correlation Control for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, C; Pilawa-Podgurski, RCN

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrates a new method for rapid and precise maximum power point tracking in photovoltaic (PV) applications using dithered PWM control. Constraints imposed by efficiency, cost, and component size limit the available PWM resolution of a power converter, and may in turn limit the MPP tracking efficiency of the PV system. In these scenarios, PWM dithering can be used to improve average PWM resolution. In this study, we present a control technique that uses ripple correlation control (RCC) on the dithering ripple, thereby achieving simultaneous fast tracking speed and high tracking accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method solves some of the practical challenges that have to date limited the effectiveness of RCC in solar PV applications. We present a theoretical derivation of the principles behind dithering digital ripple correlation control, as well as experimental results that show excellent tracking speed and accuracy with basic hardware requirements.

  14. Integrated CMOS Energy Harvesting Converter with Digital Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Portable Thermophotovoltaic Power Generator

    E-print Network

    Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert

    This paper presents an integrated maximum power point tracking system for use with a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) portable power generator. The design, implemented in 0.35 ?m CMOS technology, consists of a low-power control ...

  15. Fast maximum likelihood estimation using continuous-time neural point process models.

    PubMed

    Lepage, Kyle Q; MacDonald, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    A recent report estimates that the number of simultaneously recorded neurons is growing exponentially. A commonly employed statistical paradigm using discrete-time point process models of neural activity involves the computation of a maximum-likelihood estimate. The time to computate this estimate, per neuron, is proportional to the number of bins in a finely spaced discretization of time. By using continuous-time models of neural activity and the optimally efficient Gaussian quadrature, memory requirements and computation times are dramatically decreased in the commonly encountered situation where the number of parameters p is much less than the number of time-bins n. In this regime, with q equal to the quadrature order, memory requirements are decreased from O(np) to O(qp), and the number of floating-point operations are decreased from O(np(2)) to O(qp(2)). Accuracy of the proposed estimates is assessed based upon physiological consideration, error bounds, and mathematical results describing the relation between numerical integration error and numerical error affecting both parameter estimates and the observed Fisher information. A check is provided which is used to adapt the order of numerical integration. The procedure is verified in simulation and for hippocampal recordings. It is found that in 95 % of hippocampal recordings a q of 60 yields numerical error negligible with respect to parameter estimate standard error. Statistical inference using the proposed methodology is a fast and convenient alternative to statistical inference performed using a discrete-time point process model of neural activity. It enables the employment of the statistical methodology available with discrete-time inference, but is faster, uses less memory, and avoids any error due to discretization. PMID:25788412

  16. Infimum Microlensing Amplification of the Maximum Number of Images of $n$-point Lens Systems

    E-print Network

    Sun Hong Rhie

    1996-08-04

    The total amplification of a source inside a caustic curve of a binary lens is no less than 3. Here we show that the infimum amplification 3 is satisfied by a family of binary lenses where the source position is at the mid-point between the lens positions independently of the mass ratio which parameterizes the family. We present a new proof of an underlying constraint that the total amplification of the two positive images is bigger than that of the three negative images by one inside a caustic. We show that a similar constraint holds for an arbitrary class of $n$-point lens systems for the sources in the `maximal domains'. We introduce the notion that a source plane consists of {\\it graded caustic domains} and the `maximal domain' is the area of the source plane where a source star results in the maximum $n^2+1$ images. We show that the infimum amplification of a three point lens is 7, and it is bigger than $n^2+1-n$ for $n\\ge 4$. This paper has raised many interesting and very basic questions such as ``whether lensing is a physical process, a mathematical process, or both" since it was submitted for publication a year ago. The result is the addition of 8 page appendix, and that is the reason of this replacement. We hope that the future authors wouldn't have to pay so long for using the elegant Jacobian matrix in complex coordinate basis. (They are neither wrong nor funny!!)

  17. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.; Schaltz, E.; Rosendahl, L.

    2015-09-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is widely discussed and equipment has been built that can perform such analysis. One method is often used to perform such characterization: constant temperature with variable thermal power input. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) methods for TEG systems are mostly tested under steady-state conditions for different constant input temperatures. However, for most TEG applications, the input temperature gradient changes, exposing the MPPT to variable tracking conditions. An example is the exhaust pipe on hybrid vehicles, for which, because of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated in several applications were evaluated; the results showed temperature variation up to 5°C/s for TEG systems. Electrical characterization of a calcium-manganese oxide TEG was performed at steady-state for different input temperatures and a maximum temperature of 401°C. By using electrical data from characterization of the oxide module, a solar array simulator was emulated to perform as a TEG. A trapezoidal temperature profile with different gradients was used on the TEG simulator to evaluate the dynamic MPPT efficiency. It is known that the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm may have difficulty accurately tracking under rapidly changing conditions. To solve this problem, a compromise must be found between the magnitude of the increment and the sampling frequency of the control algorithm. The standard P&O performance was evaluated experimentally by using different temperature gradients for different MPPT sampling frequencies, and efficiency values are provided for all cases. The results showed that a tracking speed of 2.5 Hz can be successfully implemented on a TEG system to provide ˜95% MPPT efficiency when the input temperature is changing at 5°C/s.

  18. Magnification of starting torques of dc motors by maximum power point trackers in photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Singer, S.

    1989-01-01

    Direct current (dc) motors are used in terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) systems such as in water-pumping systems for irrigation and water supply. Direct current motors may also be used for space applications. Simple and low weight systems including dc motors may be of special interest in space where the motors are directly coupled to the solar cell array (with no storage). The system will operate only during times when sufficient insolation is available. An important performance characteristic of electric motors is the starting to rated torque ratio. Different types of dc motors have different starting torque ratios. These ratios are dictated by the size of solar cell array, and the developed motor torque may not be sufficient to overcome the load starting torque. By including a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) in the PV system, the starting to rated torque ratio will increase, the amount of which depends on the motor type. The starting torque ratio is calculated for the permanent magnet, series and shunt excited dc motors when powered by solar cell arrays for two cases: with and without MPPT's. Defining a motor torque magnification by the ratio of the motor torque with an MPPT to the motor torque without an MPPT, a magnification of 3 was obtained for the permanent magnet motor and a magnification of 7 for both the series and shunt motors. The effect of the variation of solar insolation on the motor starting torque was covered. All motor types are less sensitive to insolation variation in systems including MPPT's as compared to systems with MPPT's. The analysis of this paper will assist the PV system designed to determine whether or not to include an MPPT in the system for a specific motor type.

  19. DuraCap: a Supercapacitor-Based, Power-Bootstrapping, Maximum Power Point Tracking Energy-Harvesting System

    E-print Network

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    DuraCap: a Supercapacitor-Based, Power-Bootstrapping, Maximum Power Point Tracking Energy that stores harvested energy in supercapacitors and is voltage-compatible with lithium-ion batteries. The use of supercapacitors instead of batter- ies enables DuraCap to extend the operational life time from tens of months

  20. Study of Different Implementation Approaches for a Maximum Power Point Florent Boico Brad Lehman

    E-print Network

    Lehman, Brad

    (MPPT) for low power portable solar array applications. The discussion will compare different digital of solar panels has limited their use. As the efficiency is limited, harvesting the maximum amount of flexible and lightweight solar panel has unlocked many applications as they can deliver power where

  1. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution of point sources of low-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Kwok, C S; Bialobzyski, P J; Yu, S K; Prestwich, W V

    1990-01-01

    Perturbation in dose distributions of point sources of low-energy electrons at planar interfaces of cortical bone (CB) and red marrow (RM) was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo codes EGS and the TIGER series. Ultrathin LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the dose distributions of point sources of 204Tl and 147Pm in RM. When the point sources were at 12 mg/cm2 from a planar interface of CB and RM equivalent plastics, dose enhancement ratios in RM averaged over the region 0-12 mg/cm2 from the interface were measured to be 1.08 +/- 0.03 (SE) and 1.03 +/- 0.03 (SE) for 204Tl and 147Pm, respectively. The Monte Carlo codes predicted 1.05 +/- 0.02 and 1.01 +/- 0.02 for the two nuclides, respectively. However, EGS gave consistently 3% higher dose in the dose scoring region than the TIGER series when point sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 0.75 MeV energy were considered in the homogeneous RM situation or in the CB and RM heterogeneous situation. By means of the TIGER series, it was demonstrated that aluminum, which is normally assumed to be equivalent to CB in radiation dosimetry, leads to an overestimation of backscattering of low-energy electrons in soft tissue at a CB-soft-tissue interface by as much as a factor of 2. PMID:2233564

  2. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium improves cyclophosphamide chemotherapy at maximum tolerated dose and low-dose metronomic regimens in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li-Jun; Wei, Dong-Ping; Sun, Qi-Ming; Jin, Guang-Hui; Li, Shu-Feng; Huang, Yan; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2007-08-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer is partly limited by the inability of drugs to act on poorly vascularized or avascularized areas of tumors. Tumor-targeting bacteria are capable of preferentially replicating in these poorly perfused regions. Some strains have been combined with chemotherapeutic agents and the results have been promising. However, no systematic work has been carried out to test the effect of bacteria on clinical modes of chemotherapy, such as standard maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and novel low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy. Here Salmonella typhimurium VNP20009 was combined with cyclophosphamide (CTX) at both MTD and LDM schedules in a murine melanoma model. The results showed that VNP20009 significantly improved the effects of all forms of CTX treatments. The combination of VNP20009 and CTX led to a more significant decrease in tumor microvessel density and serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level, compared with either treatment alone. Furthermore, combination therapy remarkably increased the number of bacteria within tumors when compared with bacteria treatment alone. These findings suggest that tumor-targeting bacteria, in conjunction with CTX at standard MTD and LDM regimens, might be of clinical value for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:17397027

  3. Maximum Principle of Optimal Control of the Primitive Equations of the Ocean with Two Point Boundary State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Tachim Medjo, Theodore

    2010-08-15

    We study in this article the Pontryagin's maximum principle for a class of control problems associated with the primitive equations (PEs) of the ocean with two point boundary state constraint. These optimal problems involve a two point boundary state constraint similar to that considered in Wang, Nonlinear Anal. 51, 509-536, 2002 for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The main difference between this work and Wang, Nonlinear Anal. 51, 509-536, 2002 is that the nonlinearity in the PEs is stronger than in the three-dimensional NS systems.

  4. TiO2 dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC): linear relationship of maximum power point and anthocyanin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Radin

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship of anthocyanin concentration from different organic fruit species and output voltage and current in a TiO2 dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and hypothesized that fruits with greater anthocyanin concentration produce higher maximum power point (MPP) which would lead to higher current and voltage. Anthocyanin dye solution was made with crushing of a group of fresh fruits with different anthocyanin content in 2 mL of de-ionized water and filtration. Using these test fruit dyes, multiple DSSCs were assembled such that light enters through the TiO2 side of the cell. The full current-voltage (I-V) co-variations were measured using a 500 ? potentiometer as a variable load. Point-by point current and voltage data pairs were measured at various incremental resistance values. The maximum power point (MPP) generated by the solar cell was defined as a dependent variable and the anthocyanin concentration in the fruit used in the DSSC as the independent variable. A regression model was used to investigate the linear relationship between study variables. Regression analysis showed a significant linear relationship between MPP and anthocyanin concentration with a p-value of 0.007. Fruits like blueberry and black raspberry with the highest anthocyanin content generated higher MPP. In a DSSC, a linear model may predict MPP based on the anthocyanin concentration. This model is the first step to find organic anthocyanin sources in the nature with the highest dye concentration to generate energy.

  5. Effect of tissue inhomogeneity on dose distribution of point sources of low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.S. McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario ); Bialobzyski, P.J.; Yu, S.K.; Prestwich, W.V. )

    1990-09-01

    Perturbation in dose distributions of point sources of low-energy electrons at planar interfaces of cortical bone (CB) and red marrow (RM) was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo codes EGS and the TIGER series. Ultrathin LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the dose distributions of point sources of {sup 204}Tl and {sup 147}Pm in RM. When the point sources were at 12 mg/cm{sup 2} from a planar interface of CB and RM equivalent plastics, dose enhancement ratios in RM averaged over the region 0--12 mg/cm{sup 2} from the interface were measured to be 1.08{plus minus}0.03 (SE) and 1.03{plus minus}0.03 (SE) for {sup 204}Tl and {sup 147}Pm, respectively. The Monte Carlo codes predicted 1.05{plus minus}0.02 and 1.01{plus minus}0.02 for the two nuclides, respectively. However, EGS gave consistently 3% higher dose in the dose scoring region than the TIGER series when point sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 0.75 MeV energy were considered in the homogeneous RM situation or in the CB and RM heterogeneous situation. By means of the TIGER series, it was demonstrated that aluminum, which is normally assumed to be equivalent to CB in radiation dosimetry, leads to an overestimation of backscattering of low-energy electrons in soft tissue at a CB--soft-tissue interface by as much as a factor of 2.

  6. Silica nanoparticles administered at the maximum tolerated dose induce genotoxic effects through an inflammatory reaction while gold nanoparticles do not.

    PubMed

    Downs, Thomas R; Crosby, Meredith E; Hu, Ting; Kumar, Shyam; Sullivan, Ashley; Sarlo, Katherine; Reeder, Bob; Lynch, Matt; Wagner, Matthew; Mills, Tim; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2012-06-14

    While the collection of genotoxicity data and insights into potential mechanisms of action for nano-sized particulate materials (NPs) are steadily increasing, there is great uncertainty whether current standard assays are suitable to appropriately characterize potential risks. We investigated the effects of NPs in an in vivo Comet/micronucleus (MN) combination assay and in an in vitro MN assay performed with human blood. We also incorporated additional endpoints into the in vivo study in an effort to delineate primary from secondary mechanisms. Amorphous silica NPs (15 and 55 nm) were chosen for their known reactivity, while gold nano/microparticles (2, 20, and 200 nm) were selected for their wide size range and lower reactivity. DNA damage in liver, lung and blood cells and micronuclei in circulating reticulocytes were measured after 3 consecutive intravenous injections to male Wistar rats at 48, 24 and 4h before sacrifice. Gold nano/microparticles were negative for MN induction in vitro and in vivo, and for the induction of DNA damage in all tissues. Silica particles, however, caused a small but reproducible increase in DNA damage and micronucleated reticulocytes when tested at their maximum tolerated dose (MTD). No genotoxic effects were observed at lower doses, and the in vitro MN assay was also negative. We hypothesize that silica NPs initiate secondary genotoxic effects through release of inflammatory cell-derived oxidants, similar to that described for crystalline silica (quartz). Such a mechanism is supported by the occurrence of increased neutrophilic infiltration, necrosis, and apoptotic cells in the liver, and induction of inflammatory markers TNF-? and IL-6 in plasma at the MTDs. These results were fairly consistent between silica NPs and the quartz control, thereby strengthening the argument that silica NPs may act in a similar, thresholded manner. The observed profile is supportive of a secondary genotoxicity mechanism that is driven by inflammation. PMID:22504169

  7. Variable selection models based on multiple imputation with an application for predicting median effective dose and maximum effect

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Y.; Datta, S.; Conklin, D.J.; Kong, M.

    2015-01-01

    The statistical methods for variable selection and prediction could be challenging when missing covariates exist. Although multiple imputation (MI) is a universally accepted technique for solving missing data problem, how to combine the MI results for variable selection is not quite clear, because different imputations may result in different selections. The widely applied variable selection methods include the sparse partial least-squares (SPLS) method and the penalized least-squares method, e.g. the elastic net (ENet) method. In this paper, we propose an MI-based weighted elastic net (MI-WENet) method that is based on stacked MI data and a weighting scheme for each observation in the stacked data set. In the MI-WENet method, MI accounts for sampling and imputation uncertainty for missing values, and the weight accounts for the observed information. Extensive numerical simulations are carried out to compare the proposed MI-WENet method with the other competing alternatives, such as the SPLS and ENet. In addition, we applied the MIWENet method to examine the predictor variables for the endothelial function that can be characterized by median effective dose (ED50) and maximum effect (Emax) in an ex-vivo phenylephrine-induced extension and acetylcholine-induced relaxation experiment. PMID:26412909

  8. Point defects and clusters in the hcp metals: their role in the dose transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, D. J.

    1993-11-01

    The transition from low-dose to high-dose irradiation effects has only been studied extensively for zirconium, and hence a wide-ranging review of this subject for the hcp metals in general is not possible at present. A summary of the effects found in zirconium reveals the importance of the low symmetry of the hcp system in the mechanisms of transport of defects created by radiation damage and the ensuing development of damage microstructure. Solute atoms are also shown to be capable of having a strong influence on these phenomena. Hence, in order to gain an understanding of the complex nature of dose effects in the hcp metals, it is necessary to acquire a clear picture of the properties of point defects and their clusters in pure and impure metals. The present paper reviews the areas where significant progress has been made in recent years, namely (i) intrinsic point defect properties found by computer modelling and inferred from experiment, (ii) the roles of interstitial and substitutional solute atoms in diffusion; (iii) the importance of diffusional anisotropy for intrinsic and extrinsic defects; (iv) the factors that influence the formation of vacancy dislocation loops by collapse of displacement cascades; (v) the evolution of interstitial and vacancy loops during irradiation; and (vi) the ways in which understanding of (i)-(v) can provide a model for the experimental observations of dose effects. It is concluded that although real advances have been made, there are many issues of fundamental importance that remain unresolved.

  9. A novel method of estimating effective dose from the point dose method: a case study—parathyroid CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Hoang, Jenny K.; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a novel approach of applying a partial volume correction factor (PVCF) using a limited number of MOSFET detectors in the effective dose (E) calculation. The results of the proposed PVCF method were compared to the results from both the point dose (PD) method and a commercial CT dose estimation software (CT-Expo). To measure organ doses, an adult female anthropomorphic phantom was loaded with 20 MOSFET detectors and was scanned using the non-contrast and 2 phase contrast-enhanced parathyroid imaging protocols on a 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography scanner. E was computed by three methods: the PD method, the PVCF method, and the CT-Expo method. The E (in mSv) for the PD method, the PVCF method, and CT-Expo method was 2.6? ± ?0.2, 1.3? ± ?0.1, and 1.1 for the non-contrast scan, 21.9? ± ?0.4, 13.9? ± ?0.2, and 14.6 for the 1st phase of the contrast-enhanced scan, and 15.5? ± ?0.3, 9.8? ± ?0.1, and 10.4 for the 2nd phase of the contrast-enhanced scan, respectively. The E with the PD method differed from the PVCF method by 66.7% for the non-contrast scan, by 44.9% and by 45.5% respectively for the 1st and 2nd phases of the contrast-enhanced scan. The E with PVCF was comparable to the results from the CT-Expo method with percent differences of 15.8%, 5.0%, and 6.3% for the non-contrast scan and the 1st and 2nd phases of the contrast-enhanced scan, respectively. To conclude, the PVCF method estimated E within 16% difference as compared to 50-70% in the PD method. In addition, the results demonstrate that E can be estimated accurately from a limited number of detectors.

  10. A novel method of estimating effective dose from the point dose method: a case study--parathyroid CT scans.

    PubMed

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Hoang, Jenny K; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a novel approach of applying a partial volume correction factor (PVCF) using a limited number of MOSFET detectors in the effective dose (E) calculation. The results of the proposed PVCF method were compared to the results from both the point dose (PD) method and a commercial CT dose estimation software (CT-Expo). To measure organ doses, an adult female anthropomorphic phantom was loaded with 20 MOSFET detectors and was scanned using the non-contrast and 2 phase contrast-enhanced parathyroid imaging protocols on a 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography scanner. E was computed by three methods: the PD method, the PVCF method, and the CT-Expo method. The E (in mSv) for the PD method, the PVCF method, and CT-Expo method was 2.6? ± ?0.2, 1.3? ± ?0.1, and 1.1 for the non-contrast scan, 21.9? ± ?0.4, 13.9? ± ?0.2, and 14.6 for the 1st phase of the contrast-enhanced scan, and 15.5? ± ?0.3, 9.8? ± ?0.1, and 10.4 for the 2nd phase of the contrast-enhanced scan, respectively. The E with the PD method differed from the PVCF method by 66.7% for the non-contrast scan, by 44.9% and by 45.5% respectively for the 1st and 2nd phases of the contrast-enhanced scan. The E with PVCF was comparable to the results from the CT-Expo method with percent differences of 15.8%, 5.0%, and 6.3% for the non-contrast scan and the 1st and 2nd phases of the contrast-enhanced scan, respectively. To conclude, the PVCF method estimated E within 16% difference as compared to 50-70% in the PD method. In addition, the results demonstrate that E can be estimated accurately from a limited number of detectors. PMID:25658032

  11. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy plays a crucial role in management of cervix cancer. MRI compatible applicators have made it possible to accurately delineate gross-target-volume(GTV) and organs-at-risk(OAR) volumes, as well as directly plan, optimize and adapt dose-distribution for each insertion. We sought to compare DVH of tumor-coverage and OARs to traditional Point-A, ICRU-38 bladder and rectum point-doses for four different planning-techniques. Methods: MRI based 3D-planning was performed on Nucletron-Oncentra-TPS for 3 selected patients with varying tumor-sizes and anatomy. GTV,high-risk-clinical-target-volume(HR-CTV), intermediate-risk-clinical-target-volume(IR-CTV) and OARs: rectum, bladder, sigmoid-colon, vaginal-mucosa were delineated. Three conventionally used techniques: mg-Radium-equivalent(RaEq),equal-dwell-weights(EDW), Medical-College-of-Wisconsin proposed points-optimization (MCWO) and a manual-graphical-optimization(MGO) volume-coverage based technique were applied for each patient. Prescription was 6Gy delivered to point-A in Conventional techniques (RaEq, EDW, MCWO). For MGO, goal was to achieve 90%-coverage (D90) to HR-CTV with prescription-dose. ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder, point-A doses, DVH-doses for HR-CTV-D90,0.1cc-volume(D0.1),1ccvolume( D1),2cc-volume(D2) were collected for all plans and analyzed . Results: Mean D90 for HR-CTV normalized to MGO were 0.89,0.84,0.9,1.0 for EDW, RaEq, MCWO, MGO respectively. Mean point-A doses were 21.7% higher for MGO. Conventional techniques with Point-A prescriptions under covered HR-CTV-D90 by average of 12% as compared to MGO. Rectum, bladder and sigmoid doses were highest in MGO-plans for ICRU points as well as D0.1,D1 and D2 doses. Among conventional-techniques, rectum and bladder ICRU and DVH doses(0.1,1,2cc) were not significantly different (within 7%).Rectum D0.1 provided good estimation of ICRU-rectum-point doses (within 3.9%),rectum D0.1 were higher from 0.8 to 3.9% while bladder D0.1 overestimated the bladder ICRU point dose up to 43% for conventional-techniques.Bladder-D2 provided a good estimation of ICRU bladder point-doses(within 3.6%) for conventional-techniques. This correlation is not observed for MGO plans perhaps due to steering of isodose line, leading to unpredictable dwell-weighting. Conclusion: MRI based HDR-planning provides accurate delineation of tumor volumes and normal structures, and optimized tumor-coverage can be achieved with acceptable normal-tissue doses. This study showed that for conventional techniques D0.1 rectum dose and D2 bladder dose are good representation of ICRU-reference-point doses.

  12. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  13. [Usefulness of one point measurement method of pediatric dose and UV spectrophotometry for filterability test of in-line filter].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, Tsuneaki; Horiuchi, Kenichi; Ishii, Kazunari; Mimura, Yasuhiko; Kato, Atsushi; Adachi, Isao

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of Bevacizumab, Trastuzumab, Rituximab, Nedaplatin, Vincristine sulfate, Nogitecan hydrochloride, Actinomycin D and Ramosetron hydrochloride to 0.2 ?m endotoxin-retentive in-line filters was evaluated with pediatric doses by UV spectrophotometry. The results indicated that some drug adsorption was shown with Nogitecan hydrochloride, Actinomycin D and Ramosetron hydrochloride, and good recovery was shown with the other five drugs. For the three drugs which showed some losses, drug recovery was investigated at multiple test doses. The approximation formula for each drug adsorption was recorded as Y=100-A/X (X: dose (mg), Y: recovery rate (%), A: a constant for individual drug). The results showed there was high correlation between the reciprocal of test drug dose and the recovery rate. Furthermore, in the cases where adsorption to the filter were observed, it was found that it was possible to determine the relationship between dose and the recovery rate from a filterability test with one point pediatric dose. Since the recovery rate obtained from the approximation formula with multiple doses and that calculated from the prediction formula with one point pediatric dose were almost the same, then it was concluded that it is not necessary to conduct the filterability tests with multiple doses. We have shown that using UV spectrophotometry and carrying out a filterability test using one point pediatric dose is relatively easy method and reduces the effort and expense. This method for analysis of drug adsorption is extremely useful when using in-line filters with infusion therapy. PMID:24790051

  14. The effects of quantum zero point energy fluctuations on the variation with concentration of the maximum density temperatures in water alcohol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.; Cronin, B.; O'Leary, D. M.

    2008-11-01

    Unlike the situation for ionic aqueous solutions, the relationship between the density maximum temperature Tmd and solute concentration for aqueous solutions of primary alcohols is known to be strongly non-linear. Using our recent theory for the existence of the maximum density in water in terms of quantum zero point energy effects, we explain why this is so. We also explain why some of the alcohols show a maximum in their Tmd vs. concentration curves but others do not.

  15. Methodology used to compute maximum potential doses from ingestion of edible plants and wildlife found on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Soldat, J.K.; Price, K.R.; Rickard, W.H.

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the assumptions, dose factors, consumption rates, and methodology used to evaluate potential radiation doses to persons who may eat contaminated wildlife or contaminated plants collected from the Hanford Site. This report includes a description of the number and variety of wildlife and edible plants on the Hanford Site, methods for estimation of the quantities of these items consumed and conversion of intake of radionuclides to radiation doses, and example calculations of radiation doses from consumption of plants and wildlife. Edible plants on the publicly accessible margins of the shoreline of the Hanford Site and Wildlife that move offsite are potential sources of contaminated food for the general public. Calculations of potential radiation doses from consumption of agricultural plants and farm animal products are made routinely and reported annually for those produced offsite, using information about concentrations of radionuclides, consumption rates, and factors for converting radionuclide intake into dose. Dose calculations for onsite plants and wildlife are made intermittently when appropriate samples become available for analysis or when special studies are conducted. Consumption rates are inferred from the normal intake rates of similar food types raised offsite and from the edible weight of the onsite product that is actually available for harvest. 19 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of the adverse event profile and pharmacodynamics of toceranib phosphate administered to dogs with solid tumors at doses below the maximum tolerated dose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The receptor kinase inhibitor toceranib phosphate (Palladia) was approved for use in dogs in 2009 using a dose of 3.25 mg/kg administered every other day. Preliminary data suggests that lower doses of toeceranib may be associated with a reduced adverse event profile while maintaining sufficient drug exposure to provide biologic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the Cmax of toceranib in dogs with solid tumors receiving 2.5-2.75 mg/kg every other day and to document the adverse events associated with this dose rate. Secondary objectives included determination of plasma VEGF concentrations in treated dogs and response to therapy. Results Dogs with solid tumors were administered toceranib at an intended target dose ranging from 2.5-2.75 mg/kg every other day and plasma samples were obtained for analysis of toceranib and VEGF plasma concentrations on days 0, 7, 14 and 30 of the study at 6 and 8 hours post drug administration. Additionally, plasma samples were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 6, 8, and 12 hours from dogs on day 30 for confirmation of Cmax. Response to therapy was assessed using standard RECIST criteria and adverse events were characterized using the VCOG-CTCAE. Toceranib administered at doses between 2.4-2.9 mg/kg every other day resulted in an average 6–8 hr plasma concentration ranging from 100–120 ng/ml, well above the 40 ng/ml concentration associated with target inhibition. Plasma VEGF concentrations increased significantly over the 30 day treatment period indicating that VEGFR2 inhibition was likely achieved in the majority of dogs. The lower doses of toceranib used in this study were associated with a substantially reduced adverse event profile compared to the established label dose of 3.25 mg/kg EOD. Conclusions Doses of toceranib ranging from 2.4-2.9 mg/kg every other day provide drug exposure considered sufficient for target inhibition while resulting in an adverse event profile substantially reduced from that associated with the label dose of toceranib. This lower dose range of toceranib should be considered for future use in dogs with cancer. PMID:24079884

  17. Study of a thermoelectric system equipped with a maximum power point tracker for stand-alone electric generation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favarel, C.; Champier, D.; Bédécarrats, J. P.; Kousksou, T.; Strub, F.

    2012-06-01

    According to the International Energy Agency, 1.4 billion people are without electricity in the poorest countries and 2.5 billion people rely on biomass to meet their energy needs for cooking in developing countries. The use of cooking stoves equipped with small thermoelectric generator to provide electricity for basic needs (LED, cell phone and radio charging device) is probably a solution for houses far from the power grid. The cost of connecting every house with a landline is a lot higher than dropping thermoelectric generator in each house. Thermoelectric generators have very low efficiency but for isolated houses, they might become really competitive. Our laboratory works in collaboration with plane`te-bois (a non governmental organization) which has developed energy-efficient multifunction (cooking and hot water) stoves based on traditional stoves designs. A prototype of a thermoelectric generator (Bismuth Telluride) has been designed to convert a small part of the energy heating the sanitary water into electricity. This generator can produce up to 10 watts on an adapted load. Storing this energy in a battery is necessary as the cooking stove only works a few hours each day. As the working point of the stove varies a lot during the use it is also necessary to regulate the electrical power. An electric DC DC converter has been developed with a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) in order to have a good efficiency of the electronic part of the thermoelectric generator. The theoretical efficiency of the MMPT converter is discussed. First results obtained with a hot gas generator simulating the exhaust of the combustion chamber of a cooking stove are presented in the paper.

  18. A proposed adaptive step size perturbation and observation maximum power point tracking algorithm based on photovoltaic system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu

    Solar energy becomes one of the major alternative renewable energy options for its huge abundance and accessibility. Due to the intermittent nature, the high demand of Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) techniques exists when a Photovoltaic (PV) system is used to extract energy from the sunlight. This thesis proposed an advanced Perturbation and Observation (P&O) algorithm aiming for relatively practical circumstances. Firstly, a practical PV system model is studied with determining the series and shunt resistances which are neglected in some research. Moreover, in this proposed algorithm, the duty ratio of a boost DC-DC converter is the object of the perturbation deploying input impedance conversion to achieve working voltage adjustment. Based on the control strategy, the adaptive duty ratio step size P&O algorithm is proposed with major modifications made for sharp insolation change as well as low insolation scenarios. Matlab/Simulink simulation for PV model, boost converter control strategy and various MPPT process is conducted step by step. The proposed adaptive P&O algorithm is validated by the simulation results and detail analysis of sharp insolation changes, low insolation condition and continuous insolation variation.

  19. Arsenic Relative Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils: Comparison of Animal Models, Dosing Schemes, and Biological End Points.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Li, Chao; Sun, Hong-Jie; Juhasz, Albert L; Luo, Jun; Li, Hong-Bo; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-01-01

    Different animals and biomarkers have been used to measure the relative bioavailability of arsenic (As-RBA) in contaminated soils. However, there is a lack of As-RBA comparison based on different animals (i.e., swine and mouse) and biomarkers [area under blood As concentration curve (AUC) after a single gavaged dose vs steady-state As urinary excretion (SSUE) and As accumulation in liver or kidney after multiple doses via diet]. In this study, As-RBA in 12 As-contaminated soils with known As-RBA via swine blood AUC model were measured by mouse blood AUC, SSUE, and liver and kidney analyses. As-RBA ranges for the four mouse assays were 2.8-61%, 3.6-64%, 3.9-74%, and 3.4-61%. Compared to swine blood AUC assay (7.0-81%), though well correlated (R(2) = 0.83), the mouse blood AUC assay yielded lower values (2.8-61%). Similarly, strong correlations of As-RBA were observed between mouse blood AUC and mouse SSUE (R(2) = 0.86) and between urine, liver, and kidney (R(2) = 0.75-0.89), suggesting As-RBA was congruent among different animals and end points. Different animals and biomarkers had little impact on the outcome of in vivo assays to validate in vitro assays. On the basis of its simplicity, mouse liver or kidney assay following repeated doses of soil-amended diet is recommended for future As-RBA studies. PMID:26595746

  20. Locally Weighted Learning Methods for Predicting Dose-Dependent Toxicity with Application to the Human Maximum Recommended

    E-print Network

    from the market or required to have black box warnings appeared to be the daily dose. Most of the top, a recent analysis by Stepan et al. showed that the majority of drugs withdrawn from the market or required to have black box warnings because of unexpected toxicity contained at least one of these structural

  1. Bladder (ICRU) dose point does not predict urinary acute toxicity in adjuvant isolated vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aiza, Antonio; Gomes, Maria José Leite; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio de Assis; Mansur, David B.; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) alone is an adjuvant treatment option for stage I intermediaterisk endometrial cancer after complete surgical resection. The aim of this study was to determine the value of the dose reported to ICRU bladder point in predicting acute urinary toxicity. Oncologic results are also presented. Material and methods One hundred twenty-six patients were treated with postoperative HDR-BT 24 Gy (4 × 6 Gy) per ICRU guidelines for dose reporting. Cox analysis was used to identify variables that affected local control. The mean bladder point dose was examined for its ability to predict acute urinary toxicity. Results Two patients (1.6%) developed grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity and 12 patients (9.5%) developed grades 1-2 urinary toxicity. No grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. The mean bladder point dose was 46.9% (11.256 Gy) and 49.8% (11.952 Gy) for the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, respectively (p = 0.69). After a median follow-up of 36.8 months, the 3-year local failure and 5-year cancer-specific and overall survival rates were 2.1%, 100%, and 94.6%, respectively. No pelvic failure was seen in this cohort. Age over 60 years (p = 0.48), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.77), FIGO histological grade (p = 0.76), isthmus invasion (p = 0.68), and applicator type (cylinder × ovoid) (p = 0.82) did not significantly affect local control. Conclusions In this retrospective study, ICRU bladder point did not correlate with urinary toxicity. Four fractions of 6 Gy HDR-BT effected satisfactory local control, with acceptable urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity.

  2. Maximum power point search method for photovoltaic panels which uses a light sensor in the conditions of real shading and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroczka, Janusz; Ostrowski, Mariusz

    2015-06-01

    Disadvantages of photovoltaic panels are their low efficiency and non-linear current-voltage characteristic. Therefore it is necessary to apply the maximum power tracking systems which are dependent on the sun exposure and temperature. Trackers, that are used in photovoltaic systems, differ from each other in the speed and accuracy of tracking. Typically, in order to determine the maximum power point, trackers use measure of current and voltage. The perturb and observe algorithm or the incremental conductance method are frequent in the literature. The drawback of these solutions is the need to search the entire current-voltage curve, resulting in a significant loss of power in the fast-changing lighting conditions. Modern solutions use an additional measurement of temperature, short-circuit current or open circuit voltage in order to determine the starting point of one of the above methods, what decreases the tracking time. For this paper, a sequence of simulations and tests in real shading and temperature conditions for the investigated method, which uses additional light sensor to increase the speed of the perturb and observe algorithm in fast-changing illumination conditions was performed. Due to the non-linearity of the light sensor and the photovoltaic panel and the influence of temperature on the used sensor and panel characteristics, we cannot directly determine the relationship between them. For this reason, the tested method is divided into two steps. In the first step algorithm uses the correlation curve of the light sensor and current at the maximum power point and determines the current starting point with respect of which the perturb and observe algorithm is run. When the maximum power point is reached, in a second step, the difference between the starting point and the actual maximum power point is calculated and on this basis the coefficients of correlation curve are modified.

  3. Search for Point Sources of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays Above 40 EeV Using a Maximum Likelihood Ratio Test

    E-print Network

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration; G. R. Farrar

    2004-12-23

    We present the results of a search for cosmic ray point sources at energies above 40 EeV in the combined data sets recorded by the AGASA and HiRes stereo experiments. The analysis is based on a maximum likelihood ratio test using the probability density function for each event rather than requiring an a priori choice of a fixed angular bin size. No statistically significant clustering of events consistent with a point source is found.

  4. A segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient deformable image registration method for dose accumulation between HDR CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Haibin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Mell, Loren K.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Cervino, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) of fractional high-dose-rate (HDR) CT images is challenging due to the presence of applicators in the brachytherapy image. Point-to-point correspondence fails because of the undesired deformation vector fields (DVF) propagated from the applicator region (AR) to the surrounding tissues, which can potentially introduce significant DIR errors in dose mapping. This paper proposes a novel segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient DIR (named SPEED) scheme to facilitate dose accumulation among HDR treatment fractions. In SPEED, a semi-automatic seed point generation approach is developed to obtain the incremented fore/background point sets to feed the random walks algorithm, which is used to segment and remove the AR, leaving empty AR cavities in the HDR CT images. A feature-based ‘thin-plate-spline robust point matching’ algorithm is then employed for AR cavity surface points matching. With the resulting mapping, a DVF defining on each voxel is estimated by B-spline approximation, which serves as the initial DVF for the subsequent Demons-based DIR between the AR-free HDR CT images. The calculated DVF via Demons combined with the initial one serve as the final DVF to map doses between HDR fractions. The segmentation and registration accuracy are quantitatively assessed by nine clinical HDR cases from three gynecological cancer patients. The quantitative analysis and visual inspection of the DIR results indicate that SPEED can suppress the impact of applicator on DIR, and accurately register HDR CT images as well as deform and add interfractional HDR doses.

  5. Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation

    E-print Network

    Timothy H. Boyer

    2002-10-30

    By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

  6. SU-E-T-157: Evaluation and Comparison of Doses to Pelvic Lymph Nodes and to Point B with 3D Image Guided Treatment Planning for High Dose Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, N.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the doses received by the obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes and point Methods: CT-MR fused image sets of 15 patients obtained for each of 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring applicator, were used to generate treatment plans optimized to deliver a prescription dose to HRCTV-D90 and to minimize the doses to organs at risk (OARs). For each set of image, target volume (GTV, HRCTV) OARs (Bladder, Rectum, Sigmoid), and both left and right pelvic lymph nodes (obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes) were delineated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for pelvic nodal groups (left and right obturator group, internal and external iliac chains) Per fraction DVH parameters used for dose comparison included dose to 100% volume (D100), and dose received by 2cc (D2cc), 1cc (D1cc) and 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of nodal volume. Dose to point B was compared with each DVH parameter using 2 sided t-test. Pearson correlation were determined to examine relationship of point B dose with nodal DVH parameters. Results: FIGO clinical stage varied from 1B1 to IIIB. The median pretreatment tumor diameter measured on MRI was 4.5 cm (2.7– 6.4cm).The median dose to bilateral point B was 1.20 Gy ± 0.12 or 20% of the prescription dose. The correlation coefficients were all <0.60 for all nodal DVH parameters indicating low degree of correlation. Only 2 cc of obturator nodes was not significantly different from point B dose on t-test. Conclusion: Dose to point B does not adequately represent the dose to any specific pelvic nodal group. When using image guided 3D dose-volume optimized treatment nodal groups should be individually identified and delineated to obtain the doses received by pelvic nodes.

  7. Comparing dose rates near a radioactive patient evaluated using various source models: point, line, cylinder, and anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Kuo-Wei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated radiation exposures from nuclear medicine patients by systematically comparing the dose rates calculated using various source models, ranging from simplified point, line, and cylinder sources to high-quality anthropomorphic phantoms. Three widely used radionuclides, (99m)Tc, (18)F, and I(131), were considered in these source models with uniform or organ-dependent distributions. Conducting Monte Carlo simulations with anthropomorphic phantoms is a realistic but time-consuming approach. The point source model is simple but too conservative, overestimating dose rates by approximately a factor of 2 at a distance of 30 cm and by 30-40% at 1 m. Both the line and cylinder source models provided improved estimates, reducing the overestimation of dose rates to 10-20% at distances of interest. The line source model was comparable to the cylinder source model because of the offset of two competing effects (i.e., attenuation and buildup) caused by the source volume. The influence of various photon energies and cylinder sizes on the result of compensating errors was examined to evaluate the effective range of the line source model. The line source model, which is relatively easy to implement and predicts slightly conservative dose rates, is considered the most practical method for calculating dose rates near radioactive patients. An application of the line source model to 51 post-thyroidectomy patients in Taiwan was demonstrated. The consistency between calculations and measurements was satisfactory after considering the room-scattering effect. PMID:26011499

  8. Step change point estimation in the multivariate-attribute process variability using artificial neural networks and maximum likelihood estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Amiri, Amirhossein; Mousavi, Seyed Meysam

    2015-07-01

    In some statistical process control applications, the combination of both variable and attribute quality characteristics which are correlated represents the quality of the product or the process. In such processes, identification the time of manifesting the out-of-control states can help the quality engineers to eliminate the assignable causes through proper corrective actions. In this paper, first we use an artificial neural network (ANN)-based method in the literature for detecting the variance shifts as well as diagnosing the sources of variation in the multivariate-attribute processes. Then, based on the quality characteristics responsible for the out-of-control state, we propose a modular model based on the ANN for estimating the time of step change in the multivariate-attribute process variability. We also compare the performance of the ANN-based estimator with the estimator based on maximum likelihood method (MLE). A numerical example based on simulation study is used to evaluate the performance of the estimators in terms of the accuracy and precision criteria. The results of the simulation study show that the proposed ANN-based estimator outperforms the MLE estimator under different out-of-control scenarios where different shift magnitudes in the covariance matrix of multivariate-attribute quality characteristics are manifested.

  9. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 11: Estimation of Bladder-Wall Cumulative Dose in Multi-Fraction Image-Based Gynaecological Brachytherapy Using Deformable Point Set Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Zakariaee, R; Brown, C J; Hamarneh, G; Parsons, C A; Spadinger, I

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetric parameters based on dose-volume histograms (DVH) of contoured structures are routinely used to evaluate dose delivered to target structures and organs at risk. However, the DVH provides no information on the spatial distribution of the dose in situations of repeated fractions with changes in organ shape or size. The aim of this research was to develop methods to more accurately determine geometrically localized, cumulative dose to the bladder wall in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The CT scans and treatment plans of 20 cervical cancer patients were used. Each patient was treated with five high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy fractions of 600cGy prescribed dose. The bladder inner and outer surfaces were delineated using MIM Maestro software (MIM Software Inc.) and were imported into MATLAB (MathWorks) as 3-dimensional point clouds constituting the “bladder wall”. A point-set registration toolbox for MATLAB, Coherent Point Drift (CPD), was used to non-rigidly transform the bladder-wall points from four of the fractions to the coordinate system of the remaining (reference) fraction, which was chosen to be the emptiest bladder for each patient. The doses were accumulated on the reference fraction and new cumulative dosimetric parameters were calculated. The LENT-SOMA toxicity scores of these patients were studied against the cumulative dose parameters. Based on this study, there was no significant correlation between the toxicity scores and the determined cumulative dose parameters.

  10. Assessment of the Point-Source Method for Estimating Dose Rates to Members of the Public from Exposure to Patients with 131I Thyroid Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael; Hertel, Nolan; Leggett, Richard; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad; Eckerman, Keith

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations of a human source and target. The latter simulations considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient's tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 cm to 300 cm between the phantoms. Dose rates estimated from these simulations are compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration. PMID:26222218

  11. Assessment of the point-source method for estimating dose rates to members of the public from exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael B.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad S.; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations that considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient’s tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantommore »with Movable Arms and Legs, previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 to 300 cm between the phantoms and compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration.« less

  12. Variability in reference point microindentation and recommendations for testing cortical bone: maximum load, sample orientation, mode of use, sample preparation and measurement spacing.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, T; Coutts, L V; Dunlop, D G; Oreffo, R O C; Cooper, C; Harvey, N C; Thurner, P J

    2015-02-01

    Reference Point Indentation (RPI) is a novel microindentation tool that has emerging clinical potential for the assessment of fracture risk as well as use as a laboratory tool for straight-forward mechanical characterisation of bone. Despite increasing use of the tool, little research is available to advise the set-up of testing protocols or optimisation of testing parameters. Here we consider five such parameters: maximum load, sample orientation, mode of use, sample preparation and measurement spacing, to investigate how they affect the Indentation Distance Increase (IDI), the most published measurement parameter associated with the RPI device. The RPI tool was applied to bovine bone; indenting in the proximal midshaft of five femora and human bone; indenting five femoral heads and five femoral neck samples. Based on the findings of these studies we recommend the following as the best practice. (1) Repeat measurements should be utilised to reduce the coefficient of variation (e.g. 8-15 repeats to achieve a 5-10% error, however the 3-5 measurements used here gives a 15-20% error). (2) IDI is dependent on maximum load (r=0.45 on the periosteal surface and r=0.94 on the machined surface, p<0.05), mode of use (i.e. comparing the device held freehand compared to fixed in its stand, p=0.04) and surface preparation (p=0.004) so these should be kept consistent throughout testing. Though sample orientation appears to have minimal influence on IDI (p>0.05), care should also be taken in combining measurements from different orientations. (3) The coefficient of variation is higher (p=0.04) when holding the device freehand, so it should ideally be kept supported in its stand. (4) Removing the periosteum (p=0.04) and machining the surface of the bone (p=0.08) reduces the coefficient of variation, so should be performed where practical. (5) There is a hyperbolic relationship between thickness and IDI (p<0.001) with a sample thickness 10 fold greater than the maximum indentation depth recommended, to ensure a representative measurement. (6) Measurement spacing does not appear to influence the IDI (p>0.05), so it can be as low as 500 µm. By following these recommendations, RPI users can minimise the potential confounding effects associated with the variables investigated here and reduce the coefficient of variation, hence achieving more consistent testing. This optimisation of the technique enhances both the clinical and laboratory potential of the tool. PMID:25455607

  13. Zero, minimum and maximum relative radial acceleration for planar formation flight dynamics near triangular libration points in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; Masdemont, J. J.; Gómez, G.; Macau, E. E.; Winter, O. C.

    2014-11-01

    Assume a constellation of satellites is flying near a given nominal trajectory around L4 or L5 in the Earth-Moon system in such a way that there is some freedom in the selection of the geometry of the constellation. We are interested in avoiding large variations of the mutual distances between spacecraft. In this case, the existence of regions of zero and minimum relative radial acceleration with respect to the nominal trajectory will prevent from the expansion or contraction of the constellation. In the other case, the existence of regions of maximum relative radial acceleration with respect to the nominal trajectory will produce a larger expansion and contraction of the constellation. The goal of this paper is to study these regions in the scenario of the Circular Restricted Three Body Problem by means of a linearization of the equations of motion relative to the periodic orbits around L4 or L5. This study corresponds to a preliminar planar formation flight dynamics about triangular libration points in the Earth-Moon system. Additionally, the cost estimate to maintain the constellation in the regions of zero and minimum relative radial acceleration or keeping a rigid configuration is computed with the use of the residual acceleration concept. At the end, the results are compared with the dynamical behavior of the deviation of the constellation from a periodic orbit.

  14. ARMA-Based SEM When the Number of Time Points T Exceeds the Number of Cases N: Raw Data Maximum Likelihood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Dolan, Conor V.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrated, through simulation, that stationary autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models may be fitted readily when T>N, using normal theory raw maximum likelihood structural equation modeling. Also provides some illustrations based on real data. (SLD)

  15. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Rajib Lochan; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri; Rao, Ramakrishna; Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption

    E-print Network

    Scheichl, Robert

    Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption Mathew D. Penrose and Vadim;Maximum likelihood estimation for cooperative sequential adsorption M.D. Penrose, Department of the region. Keywords: cooperative sequential adsorption, space-time point pro- cess, maximum likelihood

  17. Backscatter and dose perturbations for low- to medium-energy electron point sources at the interface between materials with different atomic numbers.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Francesca M; Verhaegen, Frank

    2004-12-01

    Electron backscatter at interfaces between dissimilar media can affect dosimetry and should be taken into consideration in radiotherapy and in radiobiology experiments. Backscatter dose perturbations depend upon factors such as electron energy, medium atomic number (Z), and distance from the interface. This study quantifies the backscatter dose factor (BSDF) for electron point sources of energy between 0.1 to 3 MeV in water at the interface with scattering materials ranging in Z from (13)Al to (79)Au. A Monte Carlo code that performs dose calculations for monoenergetic and continuous-spectrum electron sources was developed using EGSnrc transport routines. The BSDF was quantified in a parallel layers geometry (BSDF(1D)) and three-dimensional voxel geometry (BSDF(3D)). The BSDF(1D) near the interface increased up to 52% with decreasing energy from 3 to 0.1 MeV and increasing Z from 13 to 79. The analysis of the BSDF(3D) showed a significant dependence of the scattered electron angular distribution on Z and energy, with a decrease in isotropy going from high to low Z. This effect proves the importance of considering the correct geometry when quantifying the BSDF for electron sources, especially when the dimensions of the relevant dose-collecting volume are comparable with the CSDA range of the source. PMID:15548119

  18. A dose point kernel database using GATE Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for nuclear medicine applications: Comparison with other Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Nikiforidis, George C.; Kagadis, George C.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: GATE is a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit based on the Geant4 package, widely used for many medical physics applications, including SPECT and PET image simulation and more recently CT image simulation and patient dosimetry. The purpose of the current study was to calculate dose point kernels (DPKs) using GATE, compare them against reference data, and finally produce a complete dataset of the total DPKs for the most commonly used radionuclides in nuclear medicine. Methods: Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations can be carried out using Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of GATE extends its applications to Radiotherapy and Dosimetry. Comparison of the proposed method for the generation of DPKs was performed for (a) monoenergetic electron sources, with energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV, (b) beta emitting isotopes, e.g., {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y, and {sup 32}P, and (c) gamma emitting isotopes, e.g., {sup 111}In, {sup 131}I, {sup 125}I, and {sup 99m}Tc. Point isotropic sources were simulated at the center of a sphere phantom, and the absorbed dose was stored in concentric spherical shells around the source. Evaluation was performed with already published studies for different Monte Carlo codes namely MCNP, EGS, FLUKA, ETRAN, GEPTS, and PENELOPE. A complete dataset of total DPKs was generated for water (equivalent to soft tissue), bone, and lung. This dataset takes into account all the major components of radiation interactions for the selected isotopes, including the absorbed dose from emitted electrons, photons, and all secondary particles generated from the electromagnetic interactions. Results: GATE comparison provided reliable results in all cases (monoenergetic electrons, beta emitting isotopes, and photon emitting isotopes). The observed differences between GATE and other codes are less than 10% and comparable to the discrepancies observed among other packages. The produced DPKs are in very good agreement with the already published data, which allowed us to produce a unique DPKs dataset using GATE. The dataset contains the total DPKs for {sup 67}Ga, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 90}Y, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I, {sup 124}I, {sup 125}I, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 177}Lu {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re generated in water, bone, and lung. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have checked GATE's reliability for absorbed dose calculation when transporting different kind of particles, which indicates its robustness for dosimetry applications. A novel dataset of DPKs is provided, which can be applied in patient-specific dosimetry using analytical point kernel convolution algorithms.

  19. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  20. Maximum Jailbreak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.

    First formulated one hundred and fifty years ago by the heretical scholar Nikolai Federov, the doctrine of cosmism begins with an absolute refusal to treat the most basic factors conditioning life on Earth ­ gravity and death ­ as necessary constraints on action. As manifest through the intoxicated cheers of its early advocates that humans should storm the heavens and conquer death, cosmism's foundational gesture was to conceive of the earth as a trap. Its duty was therefore to understand the duty of philosophy, economics and design to be the creation of means to escape it. This could be regarded as a jailbreak at the maximum possible scale, a heist in which the human species could steal itself from the vault of the Earth. After several decades of relative disinterest new space ventures are inspiring scientific, technological and popular imaginations, this essay explores what kind of cosmism might be constructed today. In this paper cosmism's position as a means of escape is both reviewed and evaluated by reflecting on the potential of technology that actually can help us achieve its aims and also through the lens and state-ofthe-art philosophy of accelerationism, which seeks to outrun modern tropes by intensifying them.

  1. Impact of Genomics Platform and Statistical Filtering on Transcriptional Benchmark Doses (BMD) and Multiple Approaches for Selection of Chemical Point of Departure (PoD)

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A. Francina; Chepelev, Nikolai; Gagné, Rémi; Kuo, Byron; Recio, Leslie; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Many regulatory agencies are exploring ways to integrate toxicogenomic data into their chemical risk assessments. The major challenge lies in determining how to distill the complex data produced by high-content, multi-dose gene expression studies into quantitative information. It has been proposed that benchmark dose (BMD) values derived from toxicogenomics data be used as point of departure (PoD) values in chemical risk assessments. However, there is limited information regarding which genomics platforms are most suitable and how to select appropriate PoD values. In this study, we compared BMD values modeled from RNA sequencing-, microarray-, and qPCR-derived gene expression data from a single study, and explored multiple approaches for selecting a single PoD from these data. The strategies evaluated include several that do not require prior mechanistic knowledge of the compound for selection of the PoD, thus providing approaches for assessing data-poor chemicals. We used RNA extracted from the livers of female mice exposed to non-carcinogenic (0, 2 mg/kg/day, mkd) and carcinogenic (4, 8 mkd) doses of furan for 21 days. We show that transcriptional BMD values were consistent across technologies and highly predictive of the two-year cancer bioassay-based PoD. We also demonstrate that filtering data based on statistically significant changes in gene expression prior to BMD modeling creates more conservative BMD values. Taken together, this case study on mice exposed to furan demonstrates that high-content toxicogenomics studies produce robust data for BMD modelling that are minimally affected by inter-technology variability and highly predictive of cancer-based PoD doses. PMID:26313361

  2. Dosimetric Analysis of 3D Image-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Is Point A-Based Dose Prescription Still Valid in Image-Guided Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Houser, Chris; Huq, M. Saiful

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric outcome of 3D image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer treatment and compare dose coverage of high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) to traditional Point A dose. Thirty-two patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were treated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-based image-guided HDR brachytherapy (IGBT). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 5.0-6.0 Gy per fraction for a total 5 fractions. The HRCTV and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated following the GYN GEC/ESTRO guidelines. Total doses for HRCTV, OARs, Point A, and Point T from external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were summated and normalized to a biologically equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The total planned D90 for HRCTV was 80-85 Gy, whereas the dose to 2 mL of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was limited to 85 Gy, 75 Gy, and 75 Gy, respectively. The mean D90 and its standard deviation for HRCTV was 83.2 {+-} 4.3 Gy. This is significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the mean value of the dose to Point A (78.6 {+-} 4.4 Gy). The dose levels of the OARs were within acceptable limits for most patients. The mean dose to 2 mL of bladder was 78.0 {+-} 6.2 Gy, whereas the mean dose to rectum and sigmoid were 57.2 {+-} 4.4 Gy and 66.9 {+-} 6.1 Gy, respectively. Image-based 3D brachytherapy provides adequate dose coverage to HRCTV, with acceptable dose to OARs in most patients. Dose to Point A was found to be significantly lower than the D90 for HRCTV calculated using the image-based technique. Paradigm shift from 2D point dose dosimetry to IGBT in HDR cervical cancer treatment needs advanced concept of evaluation in dosimetry with clinical outcome data about whether this approach improves local control and/or decreases toxicities.

  3. SU-F-BRF-09: A Non-Rigid Point Matching Method for Accurate Bladder Dose Summation in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L; Zhong, Z; Pompos, A; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose and validate a deformable point matching scheme for surface deformation to facilitate accurate bladder dose summation for fractionated HDR cervical cancer treatment. Method: A deformable point matching scheme based on the thin plate spline robust point matching (TPSRPM) algorithm is proposed for bladder surface registration. The surface of bladders segmented from fractional CT images is extracted and discretized with triangular surface mesh. Deformation between the two bladder surfaces are obtained by matching the two meshes' vertices via the TPS-RPM algorithm, and the deformation vector fields (DVFs) characteristic of this deformation is estimated by B-spline approximation. Numerically, the algorithm is quantitatively compared with the Demons algorithm using five clinical cervical cancer cases by several metrics: vertex-to-vertex distance (VVD), Hausdorff distance (HD), percent error (PE), and conformity index (CI). Experimentally, the algorithm is validated on a balloon phantom with 12 surface fiducial markers. The balloon is inflated with different amount of water, and the displacement of fiducial markers is benchmarked as ground truth to study TPS-RPM calculated DVFs' accuracy. Results: In numerical evaluation, the mean VVD is 3.7(±2.0) mm after Demons, and 1.3(±0.9) mm after TPS-RPM. The mean HD is 14.4 mm after Demons, and 5.3mm after TPS-RPM. The mean PE is 101.7% after Demons and decreases to 18.7% after TPS-RPM. The mean CI is 0.63 after Demons, and increases to 0.90 after TPS-RPM. In the phantom study, the mean Euclidean distance of the fiducials is 7.4±3.0mm and 4.2±1.8mm after Demons and TPS-RPM, respectively. Conclusions: The bladder wall deformation is more accurate using the feature-based TPS-RPM algorithm than the intensity-based Demons algorithm, indicating that TPS-RPM has the potential for accurate bladder dose deformation and dose summation for multi-fractional cervical HDR brachytherapy. This work is supported in part by the National Natural ScienceFoundation of China (no 30970866 and no 81301940)

  4. Benchmark Dose Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Finite doses are employed in experimental toxicology studies. Under the traditional methodology, the point of departure (POD) value for low dose extrapolation is identified as one of these doses. Dose spacing necessarily precludes a more accurate description of the POD value. ...

  5. Point-of-care testing and INR within-subject variation in patients receiving a constant dose of vitamin K antagonist.

    PubMed

    van den Besselaar, A M H P; Biedermann, Joseph S; Kruip, Marieke J H A

    2015-11-25

    Many patients treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) determine their INR using point-of-care (POC) whole blood coagulation monitors. The primary aim of the present study was to assess the INR within-subject variation in self-testing patients receiving a constant dose of VKA. The second aim of the study was to derive INR imprecision goals for whole blood coagulation monitors. Analytical performance goals for INR measurement can be derived from the average biological within-subject variation. Fifty-six Thrombosis Centres in the Netherlands were invited to select self-testing patients who were receiving a constant dose of either acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon for at least six consecutive INR measurements. In each patient, the coefficient of variation (CV) of INRs was calculated. One Thrombosis Centre selected regular patients being monitored with a POC device by professional staff. Sixteen Dutch Thrombosis Centres provided results for 322 selected patients, all using the CoaguChek XS. The median within-subject CV in patients receiving acenocoumarol (10.2?%) was significantly higher than the median CV in patients receiving phenprocoumon (8.6?%) (p = 0.001). The median CV in low-target intensity acenocoumarol self-testing patients (10.4?%) was similar to the median CV in regular patients monitored by professional staff (10.2?%). Desirable INR analytical imprecision goals for POC monitoring with CoaguChek XS in patients receiving either low-target intensity acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon were 5.1?% and 4.3?%, respectively. The approximate average value for the imprecision of the CoaguChek XS, i.?e. 4?%, is in agreement with these goals. PMID:26202616

  6. Cord Dose Specification and Validation for Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery of Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong Liu Yan; Chen Qing; Jin Jianyue

    2009-01-01

    Effective dose to a portion of the spinal cord in treatment segment, rather than the maximum point dose in the cord surface, was set as the dose limit in stereotactic-body radiosurgery (SBRS) of spine. Such a cord dose specification is sensitive to the volume size and position errors. Thus, we used stereotactic image guidance to minimize phantom positioning errors and compared the results of a 0.6-cm{sup 3} Farmer ionization chamber and a 0.01-cm{sup 3} compact ionization chamber to determine the detector size effect on 9 SBRS cases. The experimental errors ranging from 2% to 7% were estimated by the deviation of the mean dose in plans to the chamber with spatial displacements of 0.5 mm. The mean and measured doses for the large chamber to individual cases were significantly ({approx}17%) higher than the doses with the compact chamber placed at the same point. Our experimental results shown that the mean doses to the volume of interest could represent the measured cord doses. For the 9 patients, the mean doses to 10% of the cord were about 10 Gy, while the maximum cord doses varied from 11.6 to 17.6 Gy. The mean dose, possibly correlated with the cord complication, provided us an alternative and reliable cord dose specification in SBRS of spine.

  7. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  8. New insights on P-related paramagnetic point defects in irradiated phosphate glasses: Impact of glass network type and irradiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Pukhkaya, V.; Ollier, N.; Trompier, F.

    2014-09-28

    P-related paramagnetic point defects were studied in irradiated Yb-doped phosphate glasses by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (X and Q-bands). A strong impact of the glass network type on the defect nature is shown. In all glasses, r-POHC defects formation is in strong correlation with Q{sup 2} tetrahedra amount supporting the structure of r-POHC. Ultra-phosphate glasses contain the larger defect type: Peroxy radicals, P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 4} defects whose formation is linked to Q{sup 3} tetrahedra presence. In meta-phosphate and poly-phosphate glasses, peroxy radicals appear with r-POHC thermal recovery. In meta-phosphate glasses, a combination of P{sub 1} and P{sub 3} defects was evidenced for the first time, whereas in poly-phosphate glasses, only P{sub 3} defects were identified. Dose effect as well as defect recovery were analyzed.

  9. The effect of dose heterogeneity on radiation risk in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Baiyu; Reiman, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The current estimations of risk associated with medical imaging procedures rely on assessing the organ dose via direct measurements or simulation. The dose to each organ is assumed to be homogeneous. To take into account the differences in radiation sensitivities, the mean organ doses are weighted by a corresponding tissue-weighting coefficients provided by ICRP to calculate the effective dose, which has been used as a surrogate of radiation risk. However, those coefficients were derived under the assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution within each organ. That assumption is significantly violated in most medical-imaging procedures. In helical chest CT, for example, superficial organs (e.g. breasts) demonstrate a heterogeneous dose distribution, whereas organs on the peripheries of the irradiation field (e.g. liver) might possess a discontinuous dose profile. Projection radiography and mammography involve an even higher level of organ dose heterogeneity spanning up to two orders of magnitude. As such, mean dose or point measured dose values do not reflect the maximum energy deposited per unit volume of the organ. In this paper, the magnitude of the dose heterogeneity in both CT and projection X-ray imaging was reported, using Monte Carlo methods. The lung dose demonstrated factors of 1.7 and 2.2 difference between the mean and maximum dose for chest CT and radiography, respectively. The corresponding values for the liver were 1.9 and 3.5. For mammography and breast tomosynthesis, the difference between mean glandular dose and maximum glandular dose was 3.1. Risk models based on the mean dose were found to provide a reasonable reflection of cancer risk. However, for leukaemia, they were found to significantly under-represent the risk when the organ dose distribution is heterogeneous. A systematic study is needed to develop a risk model for heterogeneous dose distributions. PMID:23118440

  10. Maximum Entropy Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, N.

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, the construction of scattered data approximants is studied using the principle of maximum entropy. For under-determined and ill-posed problems, Jaynes's principle of maximum information-theoretic entropy is a means for least-biased statistical inference when insufficient information is available. Consider a set of distinct nodes {xi}i=1n in Rd, and a point p with coordinate x that is located within the convex hull of the set {xi}. The convex approximation of a function u(x) is written as: uh(x) = ?i=1n ?i(x)ui, where {?i}i=1n ? 0 are known as shape functions, and uh must reproduce affine functions (d = 2): ?i=1n ?i = 1, ?i=1n ?ixi = x, ?i=1n ?iyi = y. We view the shape functions as a discrete probability distribution, and the linear constraints as the expectation of a linear function. For n > 3, the problem is under-determined. To obtain a unique solution, we compute ?i by maximizing the uncertainty H(?) = - ?i=1n ?i log ?i, subject to the above three constraints. In this approach, only the nodal coordinates are used, and neither the nodal connectivity nor any user-defined parameters are required to determine ?i—the defining characteristics of a mesh-free Galerkin approximant. Numerical results for {?i}i=1n are obtained using a convex minimization algorithm, and shape function plots are presented for different nodal configurations.

  11. Generalized Maximum Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John

    2005-01-01

    A long standing mystery in using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) is how to deal with constraints whose values are uncertain. This situation arises when constraint values are estimated from data, because of finite sample sizes. One approach to this problem, advocated by E.T. Jaynes [1], is to ignore this uncertainty, and treat the empirically observed values as exact. We refer to this as the classic MaxEnt approach. Classic MaxEnt gives point probabilities (subject to the given constraints), rather than probability densities. We develop an alternative approach that assumes that the uncertain constraint values are represented by a probability density {e.g: a Gaussian), and this uncertainty yields a MaxEnt posterior probability density. That is, the classic MaxEnt point probabilities are regarded as a multidimensional function of the given constraint values, and uncertainty on these values is transmitted through the MaxEnt function to give uncertainty over the MaXEnt probabilities. We illustrate this approach by explicitly calculating the generalized MaxEnt density for a simple but common case, then show how this can be extended numerically to the general case. This paper expands the generalized MaxEnt concept introduced in a previous paper [3].

  12. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AS A SENSITIVE END-POINT FOLLOWING ACUTE PERNATAL EXPOSURE TO A LOW DOSE ATRAZINE METABOLITE MIXTURE IN FEMALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to characterize the potential developmental effects of atrazine (ATR) metabolites at low doses, an environmentally-based mixture (EBM) of ATR and its metabolites hydroxyatrazine, diaminochlorotriazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine was formulated based on surv...

  13. Direct measurement of a patient's entrance skin dose during pediatric cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lue; Mizuno, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Mari; Goto, Takahisa; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Yuka; Tsuboi, Koji; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Children with complex congenital heart diseases often require repeated cardiac catheterization; however, children are more radiosensitive than adults. Therefore, radiation-induced carcinogenesis is an important consideration for children who undergo those procedures. We measured entrance skin doses (ESDs) using radio-photoluminescence dosimeter (RPLD) chips during cardiac catheterization for 15 pediatric patients (median age, 1.92 years; males, n = 9; females, n = 6) with cardiac diseases. Four RPLD chips were placed on the patient's posterior and right side of the chest. Correlations between maximum ESD and dose-area products (DAP), total number of frames, total fluoroscopic time, number of cine runs, cumulative dose at the interventional reference point (IRP), body weight, chest thickness, and height were analyzed. The maximum ESD was 80 ± 59 (mean ± standard deviation) mGy. Maximum ESD closely correlated with both DAP (r = 0.78) and cumulative dose at the IRP (r = 0.82). Maximum ESD for coiling and ballooning tended to be higher than that for ablation, balloon atrial septostomy, and diagnostic procedures. In conclusion, we directly measured ESD using RPLD chips and found that maximum ESD could be estimated in real-time using angiographic parameters, such as DAP and cumulative dose at the IRP. Children requiring repeated catheterizations would be exposed to high radiation levels throughout their lives, although treatment influences radiation dose. Therefore, the radiation dose associated with individual cardiac catheterizations should be analyzed, and the effects of radiation throughout the lives of such patients should be followed. PMID:24968708

  14. Approximate maximum parsimony and ancestral maximum likelihood.

    PubMed

    Alon, Noga; Chor, Benny; Pardi, Fabio; Rapoport, Anat

    2010-01-01

    We explore the maximum parsimony (MP) and ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) criteria in phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Both problems are NP-hard, so we seek approximate solutions. We formulate the two problems as Steiner tree problems under appropriate distances. The gist of our approach is the succinct characterization of Steiner trees for a small number of leaves for the two distances. This enables the use of known Steiner tree approximation algorithms. The approach leads to a 16/9 approximation ratio for AML and asymptotically to a 1.55 approximation ratio for MP. PMID:20150680

  15. SU-E-T-113: Dose Distribution Using Respiratory Signals and Machine Parameters During Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Imae, T; Haga, A; Saotome, N; Kida, S; Nakano, M; Takeuchi, Y; Shiraki, T; Yano, K; Yamashita, H; Nakagawa, K; Ohtomo, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique capable of acquiring projection images during treatment. Treatment plans for lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) are calculated with planning computed tomography (CT) images only exhale phase. Purpose of this study is to evaluate dose distribution by reconstructing from only the data such as respiratory signals and machine parameters acquired during treatment. Methods: Phantom and three patients with lung tumor underwent CT scans for treatment planning. They were treated by VMAT while acquiring projection images to derive their respiratory signals and machine parameters including positions of multi leaf collimators, dose rates and integrated monitor units. The respiratory signals were divided into 4 and 10 phases and machine parameters were correlated with the divided respiratory signals based on the gantry angle. Dose distributions of each respiratory phase were calculated from plans which were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and the machine parameters during treatment. The doses at isocenter, maximum point and the centroid of target were evaluated. Results and Discussion: Dose distributions during treatment were calculated using the machine parameters and the respiratory signals detected from projection images. Maximum dose difference between plan and in treatment distribution was ?1.8±0.4% at centroid of target and dose differences of evaluated points between 4 and 10 phases were no significant. Conclusion: The present method successfully evaluated dose distribution using respiratory signals and machine parameters during treatment. This method is feasible to verify the actual dose for moving target.

  16. Maximum a Posteriori Maximum Entropy Signal Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghouane, Abd-Krim; Knockaert, Luc

    2007-11-01

    When fitting wavelet based models, shrinkage of the empirical wavelet coefficients is an effective tool for signal denoising. Based on different approaches, different shrinkage functions have been proposed in the literature. The shrinkage functions derived using Bayesian estimation theory depend on the prior used on the wavelet coefficients. However, no simple and direct method exists for the choice of the prior. In this paper a new method based on maximum entropy considerations is proposed for the construction of the prior on the wavelet coefficients. The new shrinkage function is obtained by coupling this prior to maximum a posteriori arguments. A comparison with classical shrinkage functions is given in a simulation example of image denoising in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed thresholding method.

  17. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Mota, H. C.; Sempau, J.; Benhabib, S. M.; Campos, D.; Allison, R.; Almeida, C. E. de; Zhu, D.; Sibata, C. H.

    2008-12-15

    A ring-shaped Fricke device was developed to measure the absolute dose on the transverse bisector of a {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source at 1 cm from its center in water, D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}). It consists of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod (axial axis) with a cylindrical cavity at its center to insert the {sup 192}Ir radioactive source. A ring cavity around the source with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 mm height is centered at 1 cm from the central axis of the source. This ring cavity is etched in a disk shaped base with 2.65 cm diameter and 0.90 cm thickness. The cavity has a wall around it 0.25 cm thick. This ring is filled with Fricke solution, sealed, and the whole assembly is immersed in water during irradiations. The device takes advantage of the cylindrical geometry to measure D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}). Irradiations were performed with a Nucletron microselectron HDR unit loaded with an {sup 192}Ir Alpha Omega radioactive source. A Spectronic 1001 spectrophotometer was used to measure the optical absorbance using a 1 mL quartz cuvette with 1.00 cm light pathlength. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code (MC) was utilized to simulate the Fricke device and the {sup 192}Ir Alpha Omega source in detail to calculate the perturbation introduced by the PMMA material. A NIST traceable calibrated well type ionization chamber was used to determine the air-kerma strength, and a published dose-rate constant was used to determine the dose rate at the reference point. The time to deliver 30.00 Gy to the reference point was calculated. This absorbed dose was then compared to the absorbed dose measured by the Fricke solution. Based on MC simulation, the PMMA of the Fricke device increases the D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) by 2.0%. Applying the corresponding correction factor, the D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) value assessed with the Fricke device agrees within 2.0% with the expected value with a total combined uncertainty of 3.43%(k=1). The Fricke device provides a promising method towards calibration of brachytherapy radiation sources in terms of D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) and audit HDR source calibrations.

  18. A silicon strip detector dose magnifying glass for IMRT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Petasecca, M.; Khanna, S.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows the delivery of escalated radiation dose to tumor while sparing adjacent critical organs. In doing so, IMRT plans tend to incorporate steep dose gradients at interfaces between the target and the organs at risk. Current quality assurance (QA) verification tools such as 2D diode arrays, are limited by their spatial resolution and conventional films are nonreal time. In this article, the authors describe a novel silicon strip detector (CMRP DMG) of high spatial resolution (200 {mu}m) suitable for measuring the high dose gradients in an IMRT delivery. Methods: A full characterization of the detector was performed, including dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with Farmer ion chamber measurements, stem effect, dose linearity, uniformity, energy response, angular response, and penumbra measurements. They also present the application of the CMRP DMG in the dosimetric verification of a clinical IMRT plan. Results: The detector response changed by 23% for a 390-fold change in the dose per pulse. A correction function is derived to correct for this effect. The strip detector depth dose curve agrees with the Farmer ion chamber within 0.8%. The stem effect was negligible (0.2%). The dose linearity was excellent for the dose range of 3-300 cGy. A uniformity correction method is described to correct for variations in the individual detector pixel responses. The detector showed an over-response relative to tissue dose at lower photon energies with the maximum dose response at 75 kVp nominal photon energy. Penumbra studies using a Varian Clinac 21EX at 1.5 and 10.0 cm depths were measured to be 2.77 and 3.94 mm for the secondary collimators, 3.52 and 5.60 mm for the multileaf collimator rounded leaf ends, respectively. Point doses measured with the strip detector were compared to doses measured with EBT film and doses predicted by the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The differences were 1.1%{+-}1.8% and 1.0%{+-}1.6%, respectively. They demonstrated the high temporal resolution capability of the detector readout system, which will allow one to investigate the temporal dose pattern of IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) deliveries. Conclusions: The CMRP silicon strip detector dose magnifying glass interfaced to a TERA ASIC DAQ system has high spatial and temporal resolution. It is a novel and valuable tool for QA in IMRT dose delivery and for VMAT dose delivery.

  19. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  20. 3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke; Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard; Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo; Read, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

  1. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Musha, Atsushi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Yokoo, Satoshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM) using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model) in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for head and neck tumors. Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks) according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient. Results The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2–3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE) and 54.3 Gy(RBE), respectively. Conclusions The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2–3 ARM. PMID:26512725

  2. Optimal dose regimen for paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Dunner, D L; Dunbar, G C

    1992-02-01

    The dose regimen for paroxetine in the treatment of depression has been well established through a number of individual dosing studies and analyses from the worldwide clinical data base. The starting dose, which is also the minimal effective dose, is 20 mg/day. For most patients, 20 mg/day will also be the optimal dose. For patients who do not show an adequate therapeutic response within 1 to 3 weeks of initiating therapy, the dose of paroxetine should be increased in 10-mg increments no more often than at weekly intervals to a maximum of 50 mg/day. Medication should be given as a single daily dose, usually in the morning. The therapeutic dose range in the elderly is 20 mg to 40 mg of paroxetine. PMID:1531817

  3. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Yupeng

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  4. Evaluation of low doses BPA-induced perturbation of glycemia by toxicogenomics points to a primary role of pancreatic islets and to the mechanism of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Carchia, E; Porreca, I; Almeida, P J; D'Angelo, F; Cuomo, D; Ceccarelli, M; De Felice, M; Mallardo, M; Ambrosino, C

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies have associated changes of blood glucose homeostasis to Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure. We took a toxicogenomic approach to investigate the mechanisms of low-dose (1 × 10(-9?)M) BPA toxicity in ex vivo cultures of primary murine pancreatic islets and hepatocytes. Twenty-nine inhibited genes were identified in islets and none in exposed hepatocytes. Although their expression was slightly altered, their impaired cellular level, as a whole, resulted in specific phenotypic changes. Damage of mitochondrial function and metabolism, as predicted by bioinformatics analyses, was observed: BPA exposure led to a time-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, to an increase of ROS cellular levels and, finally, to an induction of apoptosis, attributable to the bigger Bax/Bcl-2 ratio owing to activation of NF-?B pathway. Our data suggest a multifactorial mechanism for BPA toxicity in pancreatic islets with emphasis to mitochondria dysfunction and NF-?B activation. Finally, we assessed in vitro the viability of BPA-treated islets in stressing condition, as exposure to high glucose, evidencing a reduced ability of the exposed islets to respond to further damages. The result was confirmed in vivo evaluating the reduction of glycemia in hyperglycemic mice transplanted with control and BPA-treated pancreatic islets. The reported findings identify the pancreatic islet as the main target of BPA toxicity in impairing the glycemia. They suggest that the BPA exposure can weaken the response of the pancreatic islets to damages. The last observation could represent a broader concept whose consideration should lead to the development of experimental plans better reproducing the multiple exposure conditions. PMID:26512966

  5. Spline-based procedures for dose-finding studies with active control

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Hans-Joachim; Benda, Norbert; Zinserling, Jörg; Kneib, Thomas; Friede, Tim

    2015-01-01

    In a dose-finding study with an active control, several doses of a new drug are compared with an established drug (the so-called active control). One goal of such studies is to characterize the dose–response relationship and to find the smallest target dose concentration d*, which leads to the same efficacy as the active control. For this purpose, the intersection point of the mean dose–response function with the expected efficacy of the active control has to be estimated. The focus of this paper is a cubic spline-based method for deriving an estimator of the target dose without assuming a specific dose–response function. Furthermore, the construction of a spline-based bootstrap CI is described. Estimator and CI are compared with other flexible and parametric methods such as linear spline interpolation as well as maximum likelihood regression in simulation studies motivated by a real clinical trial. Also, design considerations for the cubic spline approach with focus on bias minimization are presented. Although the spline-based point estimator can be biased, designs can be chosen to minimize and reasonably limit the maximum absolute bias. Furthermore, the coverage probability of the cubic spline approach is satisfactory, especially for bias minimal designs. © 2014 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25319931

  6. Determination of transit dose profile for a {sup 192}Ir HDR source

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, G. P.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Several studies have reported methodologies to calculate and correct the transit dose component of the moving radiation source for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning systems. However, most of these works employ the average source speed, which varies significantly with the measurement technique used, and does not represent a realistic speed profile, therefore, providing an inaccurate dose determination. In this work, the authors quantified the transit dose component of a HDR unit based on the measurement of the instantaneous source speed to produce more accurate dose values. Methods: The Nucletron microSelectron-HDR Ir-192 source was characterized considering the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) specifications. The transit dose component was considered through the calculation of the dose distribution using a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNP5, for each source position and correcting it by the source speed. The instantaneous source speed measurements were performed in a previous work using two optical fibers connected to a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. Calculated doses were validated by comparing relative dose profiles with those obtained experimentally using radiochromic films. Results: TG-43U1 source parameters were calculated to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. These agreed with the literature, with differences below 1% for the majority of the points. Calculated dose profiles without transit dose were also validated by comparison with ONCENTRA{sup Registered-Sign} Brachy v. 3.3 dose values, yielding differences within 1.5%. Dose profiles obtained with MCNP5 corrected using the instantaneous source speed profile showed differences near dwell positions of up to 800% in comparison to values corrected using the average source speed, but they are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing a maximum discrepancy of approximately 3% of the maximum dose. Near a dwell position the transit dose is about 22% of the dwell dose delivered by the source dwelling 1 s and reached 104.0 cGy per irradiation in a hypothetical clinical case studied in this work. Conclusions: The present work demonstrated that the transit dose correction based on average source speed fails to accurately correct the dose, indicating that the correct speed profile should be considered. The impact on total dose due to the transit dose correction near the dwell positions is significant and should be considered more carefully in treatments with high dose rate, several catheters, multiple dwell positions, small dwell times, and several fractions.

  7. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests that these single-point differences will be within 30% when a new deterministic pion-initiated electromagnetic cascade code is integrated into NAIRAS, an effort which is currently underway.

  8. Variation of k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} for the small-field dosimetric parameters percentage depth dose, tissue-maximum ratio, and off-axis ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Francescon, Paolo Satariano, Ninfa; Beddar, Sam; Das, Indra J.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Evaluate the ability of different dosimeters to correctly measure the dosimetric parameters percentage depth dose (PDD), tissue-maximum ratio (TMR), and off-axis ratio (OAR) in water for small fields. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to estimate the variation of k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} for several types of microdetectors as a function of depth and distance from the central axis for PDD, TMR, and OAR measurements. The variation of k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} enables one to evaluate the ability of a detector to reproduce the PDD, TMR, and OAR in water and consequently determine whether it is necessary to apply correction factors. The correctness of the simulations was verified by assessing the ratios between the PDDs and OARs of 5- and 25-mm circular collimators used with a linear accelerator measured with two different types of dosimeters (the PTW 60012 diode and PTW PinPoint 31014 microchamber) and the PDDs and the OARs measured with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillator detector (PSD) and comparing those ratios with the corresponding ratios predicted by the MC simulations. Results: MC simulations reproduced results with acceptable accuracy compared to the experimental results; therefore, MC simulations can be used to successfully predict the behavior of different dosimeters in small fields. The Exradin W1 PSD was the only dosimeter that reproduced the PDDs, TMRs, and OARs in water with high accuracy. With the exception of the EDGE diode, the stereotactic diodes reproduced the PDDs and the TMRs in water with a systematic error of less than 2% at depths of up to 25 cm; however, they produced OAR values that were significantly different from those in water, especially in the tail region (lower than 20% in some cases). The microchambers could be used for PDD measurements for fields greater than those produced using a 10-mm collimator. However, with the detector stem parallel to the beam axis, the microchambers could be used for TMR measurements for all field sizes. The microchambers could not be used for OAR measurements for small fields. Conclusions: Compared with MC simulation, the Exradin W1 PSD can reproduce the PDDs, TMRs, and OARs in water with a high degree of accuracy; thus, the correction used for converting dose is very close to unity. The stereotactic diode is a viable alternative because it shows an acceptable systematic error in the measurement of PDDs and TMRs and a significant underestimation in only the tail region of the OAR measurements, where the dose is low and differences in dose may not be therapeutically meaningful.

  9. 40 CFR 94.107 - Determination of maximum test speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 1065.510. These data points form the lug curve. It is not necessary to generate the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of maximum test speed... Determination of maximum test speed. (a) Overview. This section specifies how to determine maximum test...

  10. Uncertainties in Assesment of the Vaginal Dose for Intracavitary Brachytherapy of Cervical Cancer using a Tandem-ring Applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.berger@akhwien.at; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Petra; Georg, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The vagina has not been widely recognized as organ at risk in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. No widely accepted dose parameters are available. This study analyzes the uncertainties in dose reporting for the vaginal wall using tandem-ring applicators. Methods and Materials: Organ wall contours were delineated on axial magnetic resonance (MR) slices to perform dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Different DVH parameters were used in a feasibility study based on 40 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment plans of different cervical cancer patients. Dose to the most irradiated, 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, 2 cm{sup 3}, and at defined points on the ring surface and at 5-mm tissue depth were reported. Treatment-planning systems allow different methods of dose point definition. Film dosimetry was used to verify the maximum dose at the surface of the ring applicator in an experimental setup. Results: Dose reporting for the vagina is extremely sensitive to geometrical uncertainties with variations of 25% for 1 mm shifts. Accurate delineation of the vaginal wall is limited by the finite pixel size of MRI and available treatment-planning systems. No significant correlation was found between dose-point and dose-volume parameters. The DVH parameters were often related to noncontiguous volumes and were not able to detect very different situations of spatial dose distributions inside the vaginal wall. Deviations between measured and calculated doses were up to 21%. Conclusions: Reporting either point dose values or DVH parameters for the vaginal wall is based on high inaccuracies because of contouring and geometric positioning. Therefore, the use of prospective dose constraints for individual treatment plans is not to be recommended at present. However, for large patient groups treated within one protocol correlation with vaginal morbidity can be evaluated.

  11. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sheree; Vicini, Frank; Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith; Lyden, Maureen; Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  12. Measurements of individual radiation doses in residents living around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, Shigenobu; Takamura, Noboru; Kamiya, Kenji; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    At the outset of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, the radiation doses experienced by residents were calculated from the readings at monitoring posts, with several assumptions being made from the point of view of protection and safety. However, health effects should also be estimated by obtaining measurements of the individual radiation doses. The individual external radiation doses, determined by a behavior survey in the "evacuation and deliberate evacuation area" in the first 4 months, were <5 mSv in 97.4% of residents (maximum: 15 mSv). Doses in Fukushima Prefecture were <3 mSv in 99.3% of 386,572 residents analyzed. External doses in Fukushima City determined by personal dosimeters were <1 mSv/3 months (September-November, 2011) in 99.7% of residents (maximum: 2.7 mSv). Thyroid radiation doses, determined in March using a NaI (TI) scintillation survey meter in children in the evacuation and deliberate evacuation area, were <10 mSv in 95.7% of children (maximum: 35 mSv). Therefore, all doses were less than the intervention level of 50 mSv proposed by international organizations. Internal radiation doses determined by cesium-134 ((134)C) and cesium-137 ((137)C) whole-body counters (WBCs) were <1 mSv in 99% of the residents, and the maximum thyroid equivalent dose by iodine-131 WBCs was 20 mSv. The exploratory committee of the Fukushima Health Management Survey mentions on its website that radiation from the accident is unlikely to be a cause of adverse health effects in the future. In any event, sincere scientific efforts must continue to obtain individual radiation doses that are as accurate as possible. However, observation of the health effects of the radiation doses described above will require reevaluation of the protocol used for determining adverse health effects. The dose-response relationship is crucial, and the aim of the survey should be to collect sufficient data to confirm the presence or absence of radiation health effects. In particular, the schedule of decontamination needs reconsideration. The decontamination map is determined based on the results of airborne monitoring and the radiation dose calculated from readings taken at the monitoring posts at the initial period of the accident. The decontamination protocol should be reevaluated based on the individual doses of the people who desire to live in those areas. PMID:24131040

  13. university-logo Maximum likelihood

    E-print Network

    McCullagh, Peter

    university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples REML and residual likelihood Peter McCullagh REML #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples JAN: Some personal remarks... IC #12;university-logo Maximum likelihood Applications and examples Outline 1 Maximum likelihood REML

  14. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harremoeës, P.; Topsøe, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural languages. In fact, we are able to relate our theoretical findings to the empirically found Zipf's law which involves statistical aspects of words in a language. The apparent irregularity inherent in models with entropy loss turns out to imply desirable stability properties of languages.

  15. Maximum gravitational recoil.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Manuela; Lousto, Carlos O; Zlochower, Yosef; Merritt, David

    2007-06-01

    Recent calculations of gravitational radiation recoil generated during black-hole binary mergers have reopened the possibility that a merged binary can be ejected even from the nucleus of a massive host galaxy. Here we report the first systematic study of gravitational recoil of equal-mass binaries with equal, but counteraligned, spins parallel to the orbital plane. Such an orientation of the spins is expected to maximize the recoil. We find that recoil velocity (which is perpendicular to the orbital plane) varies sinusoidally with the angle that the initial spin directions make with the initial linear momenta of each hole and scales up to a maximum of approximately 4000 km s-1 for maximally rotating holes. Our results show that the amplitude of the recoil velocity can depend sensitively on spin orientations of the black holes prior to merger. PMID:17677894

  16. Introduction to maximum entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Sivia, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. We review the need for such methods in data analysis and show, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. We conclude with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development, validation and transfer of a near infrared method to determine in-line the end point of a fluidised drying process for commercial production batches of an approved oral solid dose pharmaceutical product.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Antonio; Hammond, Jonathan; Scott, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies are progressively adopting and introducing the principles of Quality by Design with the main purpose of assurance and built-in quality throughout the whole manufacturing process. Within this framework, a Partial Least Square (PLS) model, based on Near Infrared (NIR) spectra and humidity determinations, was built in order to determine in-line the drying end point of a fluidized bed process. The in-process method was successfully validated following the principles described within The International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use - ICH Q2 (r1) - Validation of Analytical Procedures: Text and Methodology. However, in some aspects, the cited guidelines were not appropriate to in-process methods developed and validated exclusively with in-line samples and implemented in dynamic systems, such as drying processes. In this work, a customized interpretation of guidelines has been adopted which provided the framework of evidence to support a validated application. The application has been submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The European Medicines Agency (EMA) during applications for grant of licences. Representatives from these Regulatory Authorities have specifically reviewed this novel application during on-site inspections, and have subsequently approved both the product and this application. Currently, the NIR method is implemented as a primary in-line method to control the drying end point in real-time (to below a control limit of not greater than 1.2% w/w) for commercial production batches of an approved, solid, oral-dose medicine. The implementation of this in-process method allows real-time control with benefits including a reduction in operation time and labour; sample handling and waste generation; and a reduced risk to product quality in further unit operations due to improved consistency of intermediate output at this stage. To date, this has achieved approximately 10% savings in energy efficiency and operational time for this part of the manufacturing process. PMID:20801599

  18. MIRD Dose Estimate Report No. 20: Radiation Absorbed-Dose Estimates for 111In- and 90Y-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Shen, Sui; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2009-04-16

    Absorbed dose calculations provide a scientific basis for evaluating the biological effects associated with administered radiopharmaceuticals. In cancer therapy, radiation dosimetry also supports treatment planning, dose-response analyses, predictions of therapy effectiveness, and completeness of patient medical records. In this study, we evaluated the organ radiation absorbed doses resulting from intravenously administered 111In- and 90Y-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan (Zevalin). Methods: Ten patients (six male, four female) with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, cared for at three different medical centers, were administered tracer 111In-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and were assessed using planar scintillation camera imaging at five time points, blood clearance measurements, and CT-organ volumetrics, to determine patient-specific organ biokinetics and dosimetry. Explicit attenuation correction based on transmission scan or transmission measurements provided the fraction of 111In administered activity in seven major organs, the whole body, and remainder tissues over time through complete decay. Activity-time curves were constructed, and radiation doses were calculated using MIRD methods and implementing software (OLINDA-EXM). Results: Mean radiation absorbed doses in 10 cancer patients for 111In- and for 90-Y-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan are reported for 24 organs and the whole body. Biological uptake and retention data are given for seven major source organs, remainder tissues, and the whole body. Median absorbed dose values calculated by this method were compared to previously published dosimetry for Zevalin and the product package insert. Conclusions: Careful dosimetry techniques provide useful information on absorbed dose from administered radiopharmaceuticals in patients. The importance of patient-specific dosimetry emerges in high-dose radioimmunotherapy when the objective of treatment planning is to achieve disease cures safely by limiting radiation doses to any critical normal organ to a maximum tolerable value.

  19. Estimation Of Organ Doses From Solar Particle Events For Future Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major organ sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of the effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. If sufficient protection is not provided near solar maximum, the radiation risk can be significant due to exposure to sporadic solar particle events (SPEs) as well as to the continuous galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) on future exploratory-class and long-duration missions. For accurate estimates of overall fatal cancer risks from SPEs, the specific doses at various blood forming organs (BFOs) were considered, because proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions. Previous estimates of BFO doses from SPEs have used an average body-shielding distribution for the bone marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). With the development of an 82-point body-shielding distribution at BFOs, the mean and variance of SPE doses in the major active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) will be presented. Consideration of the detailed distribution of bone marrow sites is one of many requirements to improve the estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks.

  20. Dose Calculations for [131I] Meta-Iodobenzylguanidine-Induced Bystander Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gow, M. D.; Seymour, C. B.; Boyd, M.; Mairs, R. J.; Prestiwch, W. V.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is a potentially useful treatment for some cancers and may be potentiated by bystander effects. However, without estimation of absorbed dose, it is difficult to compare the effects with conventional external radiation treatment. Methods: Using the Vynckier – Wambersie dose point kernel, a model for dose rate evaluation was created allowing for calculation of absorbed dose values to two cell lines transfected with the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) gene and treated with [131I]MIBG. Results: The mean doses required to decrease surviving fractions of UVW/NAT and EJ138/NAT cells, which received medium from [131I]MIBG-treated cells, to 25 – 30% were 1.6 and 1.7 Gy respectively. The maximum mean dose rates achieved during [131I]MIBG treatment were 0.09 – 0.75 Gy/h for UVW/NAT and 0.07 – 0.78 Gy/h for EJ138/NAT. These were significantly lower than the external beam gamma radiation dose rate of 15 Gy/h. In the case of control lines which were incapable of [131I]MIBG uptake the mean absorbed doses following radiopharmaceutical were 0.03 – 0.23 Gy for UVW and 0.03 – 0.32 Gy for EJ138. Conclusion: [131I]MIBG treatment for ICCM production elicited a bystander dose-response profile similar to that generated by external beam gamma irradiation but with significantly greater cell death. PMID:24659931

  1. Maximum likelihood clustering with dependent feature trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The decomposition of mixture density of the data into its normal component densities is considered. The densities are approximated with first order dependent feature trees using criteria of mutual information and distance measures. Expressions are presented for the criteria when the densities are Gaussian. By defining different typs of nodes in a general dependent feature tree, maximum likelihood equations are developed for the estimation of parameters using fixed point iterations. The field structure of the data is also taken into account in developing maximum likelihood equations. Experimental results from the processing of remotely sensed multispectral scanner imagery data are included.

  2. Solar Maximum Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, E.G.

    1981-03-15

    The Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft, launched on 1980 February 14, carries seven instruments for the study of solar flares and other aspects of solar activity. These instruments observe in spectral ranges from gamma-rays through the visible, using imaging, spectroscopy, and high-time-resolution light curves to study flares phenomena. In addition, one instrument incorporates an Active Cavity Radiometer for accurate measurement of the total solar radiant output. We review some of the most important current observational and theoretical questions of solar flare physics and indicate the ways in which the experiments on SMM will be able to attack these questions. The SMS observing program is described. The observing programs of the instruments for the study of flares are planned together, at a central location, to provide simultaneous observations of solar events by several instruments whenever possible. A Guest Investigator program has been initiated which allows broad use of these instruments by the scientific community and supports ground-based observations in conjunction with SMM observing programs.

  3. Secondary Neutron Doses for Several Beam Configurations for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Kwak, Jungwon; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong Park, Sung Yong; Park, Soah; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To compare possible neutron doses produced in scanning and scattering modes, with the latter assessed using a newly built passive-scattering proton beam line. Methods and Materials: A 40 x 30.5 x 30-cm water phantom was irradiated with 230-MeV proton beams using a gantry angle of 270{sup o}, a 10-cm-diameter snout, and a brass aperture with a diameter of 7 cm and a thickness of 6.5 cm. The secondary neutron doses during irradiation were measured at various points using CR-39 detectors, and these measurements were cross-checked using a neutron survey meter with a 22-cm range and a 5-cm spread-out Bragg peak. Results: The maximum doses due to secondary neutrons produced by a scattering beam-delivery system were on the order of 0.152 mSv/Gy and 1.17 mSv/Gy at 50 cm from the beam isocenter in the longitudinal (0{sup o}) and perpendicular (90{sup o}) directions, respectively. The neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose, measured from 10 cm to 100 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.071 mSv/Gy to 1.96 mSv/Gy in the direction of the beam line (i.e., {phi} = 0 deg.). The largest neutron dose, of 3.88 mSv/Gy, was observed at 135{sup o} and 25 cm from the isocenter. Conclusions: Although the secondary neutron doses in proton therapy were higher when a scattering mode rather than a scanning mode was used, they did not exceed the scattered photon dose in typical photon treatments.

  4. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  5. A heterogeneous algorithm for PDT dose optimization for prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, Martin D.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Hu, Yida; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Wang, Ken; Li, Jun; Cengel, Keith; Malkowicz, S. B.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    The object of this study is to develop optimization procedures that account for both the optical heterogeneity as well as photosensitizer (PS) drug distribution of the patient prostate and thereby enable delivery of uniform photodynamic dose to that gland. We use the heterogeneous optical properties measured for a patient prostate to calculate a light fluence kernel (table). PS distribution is then multiplied with the light fluence kernel to form the PDT dose kernel. The Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which is fast, linear, and always converges reliably, is applied as a search tool to choose the weights of the light sources to optimize PDT dose. Maximum and minimum PDT dose limits chosen for sample points in the prostate constrain the solution for the source strengths of the cylindrical diffuser fibers (CDF). We tested the Cimmino optimization procedures using the light fluence kernel generated for heterogeneous optical properties, and compared the optimized treatment plans with those obtained using homogeneous optical properties. To study how different photosensitizer distributions in the prostate affect optimization, comparisons of light fluence rate and PDT dose distributions were made with three distributions of photosensitizer: uniform, linear spatial distribution, and the measured PS distribution. The study shows that optimization of individual light source positions and intensities are feasible for the heterogeneous prostate during PDT.

  6. PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-06-05

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  7. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  8. Preliminary liver dose estimation in the new facility for biomedical applications at the RA-3 reactor.

    PubMed

    Gadan, M; Crawley, V; Thorp, S; Miller, M

    2009-07-01

    As a part of the project concerning the irradiation of a section of the human liver left lobe, a preliminary estimation of the expected dose was performed. To obtain proper input values for the calculation, neutron flux and gamma dose rate characterization were carried out using adequate portions of cow or pig liver covered with demineralized water simulating the preservation solution. Irradiations were done inside a container specially designed to fulfill temperature preservation of the organ and a reproducible irradiation position (which will be of importance for future planification purposes). Implantable rhodium based self-powered neutron detectors were developed to obtain neutron flux profiles both external and internal. Implantation of SPND was done along the central longitudinal axis of the samples, where lowest flux is expected. Gamma dose rate was obtained using a neutron shielded graphite ionization chamber moved along external surfaces of the samples. The internal neutron profile resulted uniform enough to allow for a single and static irradiation of the liver. For dose estimation, irradiation condition was set in order to obtain a maximum of 15 Gy-eq in healthy tissue. Additionally, literature reported boron concentrations of 47 ppm in tumor and 8 ppm in healthy tissue and a more conservative relationship (30/10 ppm) were used. To make a conservative estimation of the dose the following considerations were done: i). Minimum measured neutron flux inside the sample (approximately 5 x 10(9) n cm-2 s-1) was considered to calculate dose in tumor. (ii). Maximum measured neutron flux (considering both internal as external profiles) was used to calculate dose in healthy tissue (approximately 8.7 x 10(9) n cm-2 s-1). (iii). Maximum measured gamma dose rate (approximately 13.5 Gy h-1) was considered for both tumor and healthy tissue. Tumor tissue dose was approximately 69 Gy-eq for 47 ppm of (10)B and approximately 42 Gy-eq for 30 ppm, for a maximum dose of 15 Gy-eq in healthy tissue. As can be seen from these results, even for the most conservative case, minimum tumor dose will be acceptable from the treatment point of view, which shows that the irradiation conditions at this facility have quite good characteristics for the proposed irradiation. PMID:19394239

  9. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other radionuclides. However, we continually see {sup 137}Cs in the groundwater at all contaminated atolls; the turnover time of the groundwater is about 5 y. The {sup 137}Cs can only get to the groundwater by leaching through the soil column when a portion of the soluble fraction of {sup 137}Cs inventory in the soil is transported to the groundwater when rainfall is heavy enough to cause recharge of the aquifer. This process is causing a loss of {sup 137}Cs out of the root zone of the plants that provides an environmental loss constant ({lambda}{sub env}) in addition to radiological decay {lambda}{sub rad}. Consequently, there is an effective rate of loss, {lambda}{sub eff} = {lambda}{sub rad} + {lambda}{sub env} that is the sum of the radiological and environmental-loss decay constants. We have had, and continue to have, a vigorous program to determine the rate of the environmental loss process. What we do know at this time is that the loss of {sup 137}Cs over time is greater than the estimate based on radiological decay only, and that the actual dose received by the Utirik people over 30-, 50-, or 70-y will be less than those presented in this report.

  10. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  11. Gravity wave and elevated localized ozone maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Zhong, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    During the 1992 field study of Northern Atlantic Regional Experiment, relatively localized O{sub 3} maximum were observed by aircraft flight along a horizontal sampling path between Nantucket and Halifax on several occasions. While sampling at a constant altitude between 1500 and 2000 m, the aircraft encountered a plume having O{sub 3} mixing ratio twice as much as the values that had been measured prior to entering the plume. Concurrent with this increase in O{sub 3} mixing ratio was a pronounced drop in the dew point. This feature occurred over a horizontal distance of approximately 200 km. Prior to descending to a lower elevation, a second O{sub 3} maximum/dew point minimum appeared to be encountered. Several hypotheses concerning the origin of this localized O{sub 3} maximum along a horizontal path are rejected, and the periodic nature of the phenomena suggests that they could be explained by propagating internal gravity wave at the top of the boundary layer. Observational support of this hypothesis are soundings from surrounding stations that had temperature profiles resemble those that are typical for gravity wave occurrence. A simple numerical model is used to simulate the variations of ozone concentration, temperature, and dew point caused by perturbation horizontal and vertical wind fields associated with traveling internal gravity waves and to illustrate how the localized O{sub 3} maximum are formed from downward displacement of air parcels from the free troposphere by these waves. The observed ozone oscillation corresponds reasonable well in amplitude and phase with the simple model prediction.

  12. Unenhanced low-dose versus standard-dose CT localization in patients with upper urinary calculi for minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL)

    PubMed Central

    Licheng, Jiang; Yidong, Fan; Ping, Wang; Keqiang, Yan; Xueting, Wang; Yingchen, Zhang; Lei, Gao; Jiyang, Ding; Zhonghua, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: With the ethical concern about the dose of CT scan and wide use of CT in protocol of suspected renal colic, more attention has been paid to low dose CT. The aim of the present study was to make a comparison of unenhanced low-dose spiral CT localization with unenhanced standard-dose spiral CT in patients with upper urinary tract calculi for minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MPCNL) treatment. Methods: Twenty eight patients with ureter and renal calculus, preparing to take MPCNL, underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (25 mAs) and standard-dose CT (100 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently evaluated for the characterization of renal/ureteral calculi, perirenal adjacent organs, blood vessels, indirect signs of renal or ureteral calculus (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation), and the indices of localization (percutaneous puncture angulation and depth) used in the MPCNL procedure. Results: In all 28 patients, low-dose CT was 100 per cent coincidence 100 per cent sensitive and 100 per cent specific for depicting the location of the renal and ureteral calculus, renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, adjacent organs, and the presumptive puncture point and a 96.3 per cent coincidence 96 per cent sensitivity and 93 per cent specificity for blood vessel signs within the renal sinus, and with an obvious lower radiation exposure for patients when compared to standard-dose CT (P<0.05). The indices of puncture depth, puncture angulation, and maximum calculus transverse diameter on the axial surface showed no significant difference between the two doses of CT scans, with a significant variation in calculus visualization slice numbers (P<0.05). Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that unenhanced low-dose CT achieves a sensitivity and accuracy similar to that of standard-dose CT in assessing the localization of renal ureteral calculus and adjacent organs conditions and identifying the maximum calculus transverse diameter on the axial surface, percutaneous puncture depth, and angulation in patients, with a significant lower radiation exposure, who are to be treated by MPCNL, and can be used as an alternative localization method. PMID:24820832

  13. Radiation dose delivery verification in the treatment of carcinoma-cervix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrotriya, D.; Kumar, S.; Srivastava, R. N. L.

    2015-06-01

    The accurate dose delivery to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy can be affected by various pelvic tissues heterogeneities. An in-house heterogeneous woman pelvic phantom was designed and used to verify the consistency and computational capability of treatment planning system of radiation dose delivery in the treatment of cancer cervix. Oncentra 3D-TPS with collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithm was used to generate AP/PA and box field technique plan. the radiation dose was delivered by Primus Linac (Siemens make) employing high energy 15 MV photon beam by isocenter technique. A PTW make, 0.125cc ionization chamber was used for direct measurements at various reference points in cervix, bladder and rectum. The study revealed that maximum variation between computed and measured dose at cervix reference point was 1% in both the techniques and 3% and 4% variation in AP/PA field and 5% and 4.5% in box technique at bladder and rectum points respectively.

  14. The myth of mean dose as a surrogate for radiation risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Baiyu; Reiman, Robert

    2010-04-01

    The current estimations of risk associated with medical imaging procedures rely on assessing the organ dose via direct measurements or simulation. Each organ dose is assumed to be homogeneous, a representative sample or mean of which is weighted by a corresponding tissue weighting factor provided by ICRP publication 103. The weighted values are summed to provide Effective Dose (ED), the most-widely accepted surrogate for population radiation risk. For individual risk estimation, one may employ Effective Risk (ER), which further incorporates gender- and age-specific risk factors. However, both the tissue-weighting factors (as used by ED) and the risk factors (as used by ER) were derived (mostly from the atomic bomb survivor data) under the assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution within each organ. That assumption is significantly violated in most medical imaging procedures. In chest CT, for example, superficial organs (eg, breasts) demonstrate a heterogeneous distribution while organs on the peripheries of the irradiation field (eg, liver) possess a nearly discontinuous dose profile. Projection radiography and mammography involve an even wider range of organ dose heterogeneity spanning up to two orders of magnitude. As such, mean dose or point measured dose values do not reflect the maximum energy deposited per unit volume of the organ, and therefore, effective dose or effective risk, as commonly computed, can misrepresent irradiation risk. In this paper, we report the magnitude of the dose heterogeneity in both CT and projection x-ray imaging, provide an assessment of its impact on irradiation risk, and explore an alternative model-based approach for risk estimation for imaging techniques involving heterogeneous organ dose distributions.

  15. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests that these single-point differences will be within 30% when a new deterministic pion-initiated electromagnetic cascade code is integrated into NAIRAS, an effort which is currently underway. PMID:26213513

  16. Evaluation of brachytherapy lung implant dose distributions from photon-emitting sources due to tissue heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used for permanent implantation to treat lung cancer. However, the current brachytherapy dose calculation formalism assumes a homogeneous water medium without considering the influence of radiation scatter or tissue heterogeneities. The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effects of tissue heterogeneities for permanent lung brachytherapy. Methods: The MCNP5 v1.40 radiation transport code was used for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Point sources with energies of 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV were simulated to cover the range of pertinent brachytherapy energies and to glean dosimetric trends independent of specific radionuclide emissions. Source positions from postimplant CT scans of five patient implants were used for source coordinates, with dose normalized to 200 Gy at the center of each implant. With the presence of fibrosis (around the implant), cortical bone, lung, and healthy tissues, dose distributions and {sub PTV}DVH were calculated using the MCNP *FMESH4 tally and the NIST mass-energy absorption coefficients. This process was repeated upon replacing all tissues with water. For all photon energies, 10{sup 9} histories were simulated to achieve statistical errors (k = 1) typically of 1%. Results: The mean PTV doses calculated using tissue heterogeneities for all five patients changed (compared to dose to water) by only a few percent over the examined photon energy range, as did PTV dose at the implant center. The {sub PTV}V{sub 100} values were 81.2%, 90.0% (as normalized), 94.3%, 93.9%, 92.7%, and 92.2% for 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV source photons, respectively. Relative to water, the maximum bone doses were higher by factors of 3.7, 5.1, 5.2, 2.4, 1.2, and 1.0 The maximum lung doses were about 0.98, 0.94, 0.91, 0.94, 0.97, and 0.99. Relative to water, the maximum healthy tissue doses at the mediastinal position were higher by factors of 9.8, 2.2, 1.3, 1.1, 1.1, and 1.1. However, the maximum doses to these healthy tissues were only 3.1, 7.2, 11.3, 10.9, 9.0, and 8.1 Gy while maximum bone doses were 66, 177, 236, 106, 49, and 39 Gy, respectively. Similarly, maximum lung doses were 55, 66, 73, 74, 73, and 73 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The current brachytherapy dose calculation formalism overestimates PTV dose and significantly underestimates doses to bone and healthy tissue. Further investigation using specific brachytherapy source models and patient-based CT datasets as MC input may indicate whether the observed trends can be generalized for low-energy lung brachytherapy dosimetry.

  17. Implications of dose-dependent target tissue absorption for linear and non-linear/threshold approaches in development of a cancer-based oral toxicity factor for hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Haney, J

    2015-07-01

    Dose-dependent changes in target tissue absorption have important implications for determining the most defensible approach for developing a cancer-based oral toxicity factor for hexavalent chromium (CrVI). For example, mouse target tissue absorption per unit dose is an estimated 10-fold lower at the CrVI dose corresponding to the federal maximum contaminant level (MCL) than at the USEPA draft oral slope factor (SFo) point of departure dose. This decreasing target tissue absorption as doses decrease to lower, more environmentally-relevant doses is inconsistent with linear low-dose extrapolation. The shape of the dose-response curve accounting for this toxicokinetic phenomenon would clearly be non-linear. Furthermore, these dose-dependent differences in absorption indicate that the magnitude of risk overestimation by a linear low-dose extrapolation approach (e.g., SFo) increases and is likely to span one or perhaps more orders of magnitude as it is used to predict risk at progressively lower, more environmentally-relevant doses. An additional apparent implication is that no single SFo can reliably predict risk across potential environmental doses (e.g., doses corresponding to water concentrations?the federal MCL). A non-linear approach, consistent with available mode of action data, is most scientifically defensible for derivation of an oral toxicity factor for CrVI-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25910675

  18. Maximum Entropy Production and the

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    : You can't break even. (Carnot 1824, Clausius 1850) #12;Thermodynamics 101 (Prigogine 1962) #12;Maximum representation of dynamical constraints (energy, water, carbon etc.) Type I: MEP through parameter optimization

  19. Maximum entropy signal restoration with linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Hanson, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Dantzig's bounded-variable method is used to express the maximum entropy restoration problem as a linear programming problem. This is done by approximating the nonlinear objective function with piecewise linear segments, then bounding the variables as a function of the number of segments used. The use of a linear programming approach allows equality constraints found in the traditional Lagrange multiplier method to be relaxed. A robust revised simplex algorithm is used to implement the restoration. Experimental results from 128- and 512-point signal restorations are presented.

  20. Lead in soil: Recommended maximum permissible levels

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, S.; Rosenman, K.D.; Shehata, T.

    1989-06-01

    Lead in soil has been recognized as a public health problem, particularly among children. In recent years, attention has been directed to cumulative adverse effects of lead at low levels of intake. Lead-contaminated soil and dust have been identified as important contributors to blood lead levels. Based on available data on blood lead and lead in soil, an approach has been developed to suggest a permissible level of lead in soil, below which there will be reasonable certainty that adverse health effects will not occur. An acceptable level of 600 ppm of lead in soil suggested as a ''safe'' level would contribute no more than 5 micrograms/dl to total blood lead of children under 12 years of age. Maximum permissible levels of lead in soil have been recommended based on the dose-response relationship of lead in soil and blood lead in children.

  1. Use of a realistic breathing lung phantom to evaluate dose delivery errors

    SciTech Connect

    Court, Laurence E.; Seco, Joao; Lu Xingqi; Ebe, Kazuyu; Mayo, Charles; Ionascu, Dan; Winey, Brian; Giakoumakis, Nikos; Aristophanous, Michalis; Berbeco, Ross; Rottman, Joerg; Bogdanov, Madeleine; Schofield, Deborah; Lingos, Tania

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the effect of respiration-induced motion on delivered dose (the interplay effect) for different treatment techniques under realistic clinical conditions. Methods: A flexible resin tumor model was created using rapid prototyping techniques based on a computed tomography (CT) image of an actual tumor. Twenty micro-MOSFETs were inserted into the tumor model and the tumor model was inserted into an anthropomorphic breathing phantom. Phantom motion was programed using the motion trajectory of an actual patient. A four-dimensional CT image was obtained and several treatment plans were created using different treatment techniques and planning systems: Conformal (Eclipse), step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (Pinnacle), step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), complex dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), hybrid IMRT [60% conformal, 40% dynamic IMRT (Eclipse)], volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) [single-arc (Eclipse)], VMAT [double-arc (Eclipse)], and complex VMAT (Eclipse). The complex plans were created by artificially pushing the optimizer to give complex multileaf collimator sequences. Each IMRT field was irradiated five times and each VMAT field was irradiated ten times, with each irradiation starting at a random point in the respiratory cycle. The effect of fractionation was calculated by randomly summing the measured doses. The maximum deviation for each measurement point per fraction and the probability that 95% of the model tumor had dose deviations less than 2% and 5% were calculated as a function of the number of fractions. Tumor control probabilities for each treatment plan were calculated and compared. Results: After five fractions, measured dose deviations were less than 2% for more than 95% of measurement points within the tumor model for all plans, except the complex dynamic IMRT, step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), complex VMAT, and single-arc VMAT plans. Reducing the dose rate of the complex IMRT plans from 600 to 200 MU/min reduced the dose deviations to less than 2%. Dose deviations were less than 5% after five fractions for all plans, except the complex single-arc VMAT plan. Conclusions: Rapid prototyping techniques can be used to create realistic tumor models. For most treatment techniques, the dose deviations averaged out after several fractions. Treatments with unusually complicated multileaf collimator sequences had larger dose deviations. For IMRT treat-ments, dose deviations can be reduced by reducing the dose rate. For VMAT treatments, using two arcs instead of one is effective for reducing dose deviations.

  2. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10?year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients.

  3. The 2011 Northern Hemisphere Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Altrock (1997, Solar Phys. 170, 411) discusses a process in which Fe XIV 530.3 nm emission features appear at high latitudes and gradually migrate towards the equator, merging with the sunspot "butterfly diagram". In cycles 21 - 23 solar maximum occurred when the number of Fe XIV emission regions per day > 0.19 (averaged over 365 days and both hemispheres) first reached latitudes 18°, 21° and 21°, for an average of 20° ± 1.7°. Another high-latitude process is the "Rush to the Poles" of polar crown prominences and their associated coronal emission, including Fe XIV. The Rush is a harbinger of solar maximum (cf. Altrock, 2003, Solar Phys. 216, 343). Solar maximum in cycles 21 - 23 occurred when the center line of the Rush reached a critical latitude. These latitudes were 76°, 74° and 78°, respectively, for an average of 76° ± 2°. Cycle 24 displays an intermittent Rush that is only well-defined in the northern hemisphere. In 2009 an initial slope of 4.6°/yr was found in the north, compared to an average of 9.4 ± 1.7 °/yr in the previous three cycles. However, in 2010 the slope increased to 7.5°/yr. Extending that rate to 76° ± 2° indicates that the solar maximum smoothed sunspot number in the northern hemisphere already occurred at 2011.6 ± 0.3. In the southern hemisphere the Rush is very poorly defined. A linear fit to several maxima would reach 76° in the south at 2014.2. In 1999, persistent Fe XIV coronal emission connected with the ESC appeared near 70° in the north and began migrating towards the equator at a rate 40% slower than the previous two solar cycles. A fit to the early ESC would not reach 20° until 2019.8. However, in 2009 and 2010 an acceleration occurred. Currently the greatest number of emission regions is at 21° in the north and 24°in the south. This indicates that solar maximum is occurring now in the north but not yet in the south. The latest global smoothed sunspot numbers show an inflection point in late 2011, which could represent solar maximum in the northern hemisphere. Sunspot areas in the northern hemisphere reached a maximum in late 2011. The southern areas are still increasing.

  4. The 1980 solar maximum mission event listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speich, D. M.; Nelson, J. J.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Information is contained on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1980 pointed observations. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) Gamma Ray Spectrometer, (2) Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, (3) Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer, (4) Flat Crystal Spectrometer, (5) Bent Crystal Spectrometer, (6) Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter, and (7) Coronagraph/Polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from Sun center are also included.

  5. The 1989 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1989 pointed observations. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) Gamma Ray Spectrometer, (2) Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, (3) Flat Crystal Spectrometer, (4) Bent Crystal Spectrometer, (5) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter, and (6) Coronagraph/Polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Satellite (GOES) X-ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  6. The 1988 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1988 pointed observations is presented. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) gamma ray spectrometer; (2) hard x ray burst spectrometer; (3) flat crystal spectrometers; (4) bent crystal spectrometer; (5) ultraviolet spectrometer polarimeter; and (6) coronagraph/polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts, or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observation. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  7. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested.

  8. Impact of geometric uncertainties on dose calculations for intensity modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Runqing

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) uses non-uniform beam intensities within a radiation field to provide patient-specific dose shaping, resulting in a dose distribution that conforms tightly to the planning target volume (PTV). Unavoidable geometric uncertainty arising from patient repositioning and internal organ motion can lead to lower conformality index (CI) during treatment delivery, a decrease in tumor control probability (TCP) and an increase in normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The CI of the IMRT plan depends heavily on steep dose gradients between the PTV and organ at risk (OAR). Geometric uncertainties reduce the planned dose gradients and result in a less steep or "blurred" dose gradient. The blurred dose gradients can be maximized by constraining the dose objective function in the static IMRT plan or by reducing geometric uncertainty during treatment with corrective verification imaging. Internal organ motion and setup error were evaluated simultaneously for 118 individual patients with implanted fiducials and MV electronic portal imaging (EPI). A Gaussian probability density function (PDF) is reasonable for modeling geometric uncertainties as indicated by the 118 patients group. The Gaussian PDF is patient specific and group standard deviation (SD) should not be used for accurate treatment planning for individual patients. In addition, individual SD should not be determined or predicted from small imaging samples because of random nature of the fluctuations. Frequent verification imaging should be employed in situations where geometric uncertainties are expected. Cumulative PDF data can be used for re-planning to assess accuracy of delivered dose. Group data is useful for determining worst case discrepancy between planned and delivered dose. The margins for the PTV should ideally represent true geometric uncertainties. The measured geometric uncertainties were used in this thesis to assess PTV coverage, dose to OAR, equivalent uniform dose per fraction (EUDf) and NTCP. The dose distribution including geometric uncertainties was determined from integration of the convolution of the static dose gradient with the PDF. Integration of the convolution of the static dose and derivative of the PDF can also be used to determine the dose including geometric uncertainties although this method was not investigated in detail. Local maximum dose gradient (LMDG) was determined via optimization of dose objective function by manually adjusting DVH control points or selecting beam numbers and directions during IMRT treatment planning. Minimum SD (SDmin) is used when geometric uncertainty is corrected with verification imaging. Maximum SD (SDmax) is used when the geometric uncertainty is known to be large and difficult to manage. SDmax was 4.38 mm in anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 2.70 mm in left-right (LR) direction and 4.35 mm in superior-inferior (SI) direction; SDmin was 1.1 mm in all three directions if less than 2 mm threshold was used for uncorrected fractions in every direction. EUDf is a useful QA parameter for interpreting the biological impact of geometric uncertainties on the static dose distribution. The EUD f has been used as the basis for the time-course NTCP evaluation in the thesis. Relative NTCP values are useful for comparative QA checking by normalizing known complications (e.g. reported in the RTOG studies) to specific DVH control points. For prostate cancer patients, rectal complications were evaluated from specific RTOG clinical trials and detailed evaluation of the treatment techniques (e.g. dose prescription, DVH, number of beams, bean angles). Treatment plans that did not meet DVH constraints represented additional complication risk. Geometric uncertainties improved or worsened rectal NTCP depending on individual internal organ motion within patient.

  9. Dose and Dose Risk Caused by Natural Phenomena - Proposed Powder Metallurgy Core Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, W.G.

    2001-08-16

    The offsite radiological effects from high velocity straight winds, tornadoes, and earthquakes have been estimated for a proposed facility for manufacturing enriched uranium fuel cores by powder metallurgy. Projected doses range up to 30 mrem/event to the maximum offsite individual for high winds and up to 85 mrem/event for very severe earthquakes. Even under conservative assumptions on meteorological conditions, the maximum offsite dose would be about 20 per cent of the DOE limit for accidents involving enriched uranium storage facilities. The total dose risk is low and is dominated by the risk from earthquakes. This report discusses this test.

  10. SU-E-T-199: How Number of Control Points Influences the Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Chander, S; Subramani, V; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of number of control points on plan quality and deliverability. Methods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma of rectum were selected. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) i.e. bladder and bowel were contoured. Dynamic IMRT plans (6MV, 7-fields, 45Gy/25 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose) were created in Eclipse (Varian medical system, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system (TPS) for Varian CL2300C/D linear-accelerator. Base plan was calculated with 166 control points, variable mode (Eclipse Default). For generating other plans, all parameters were kept constant, only number of control points (Fixed mode) was varied as follows: 100, 166 and 200. Then, plan quality was analyzed in terms of maximum and mean dose received by the PTV and OARs. For plan deliverability, TPS calculated fluence was verified with I’matriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement (DTA). Total number of monitor units (MU) required to deliver a plan was also noted. Results: The maximum variation for the PTV maximum with respect to eclipse default control point (166) was 0.28% (0.14Gy). Similarly, PTV mean varied only up to 0.22 %( 0.11Gy). Bladder maximum and bladder mean varied up to 0.51% (0.24Gy) and 0.16% (0.06Gy). The variation for the bowel maximum and bowel mean was also only 0.39% (0.19Gy) and 0.33% (0.04Gy). Total MU was within 0.32 % (4MU). Average gamma pass rate using different control points for five patients are 98.75±0.33%, 99.37±0.09%, 99.29±0.12%, 98.14±0.13% and 99.25±0.14% respectively. Conclusion: Slight variation (<1%) in PTV and OARs maximum and mean doses was observed with varying number of control points. Monitor unit was also not varied much. Reducing number of control points did not showed any comprise in plan deliverability in terms of gamma index pass rate.

  11. SU-E-T-622: Identification and Improvement of Patients Eligible for Dose Escalation with Matched Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, K; Holcombe, C; Kapp, D; Buyyounouski, M; Hancock, S; Xing, L; Atwood, T; King, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation-therapy dose-escalation beyond 80Gy may improve tumor control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer. Since toxicity remains a concern, treatment planners must achieve dose-escalation while still adhering to dose-constraints for surrounding structures. Patientmatching is a machine-learning technique that identifies prior patients that dosimetrically match DVH parameters of target volumes and critical structures prior to actual treatment planning. We evaluated the feasibility of patient-matching in (1)identifying candidates for safe dose-escalation; and (2)improving DVH parameters for critical structures in actual dose-escalated plans. Methods: We analyzed DVH parameters from 319 historical treatment plans to determine which plans could achieve dose-escalation (8640cGy) without exceeding Zelefsky dose-constraints (rectal and bladder V47Gy<53%, and V75.6Gy<30%, max-point dose to rectum of 8550cGy, max dose to PTV< 9504cGy). We then estimated the percentage of cases that could achieve safe dose-escalation using software that enables patient matching (QuickMatch, Siris Medical, Mountain View, CA). We then replanned a case that had violated DVH constraints with DVH parameters from patient matching, in order to determine whether this previously unacceptable plan could be made eligible with this automated technique. Results: Patient-matching improved the percentage of patients eligible for dose-escalation from 40% to 63% (p=4.7e-4, t-test). Using a commercial optimizer augmented with patient-matching, we demonstrated a case where patient-matching improved the toxicity-profile such that dose-escalation would have been possible; this plan was rapidly achieved using patientmatching software. In this patient, all lower-dose constraints were met with both the denovo and patient-matching plan. In the patient-matching plan, maximum dose to the rectum was 8385cGy, while the denovo plan failed to meet the maximum rectal constraint at 8571cGy. Conclusion: Patientmatching is a promising method to identify eligible patients, and to assist in creating acceptable plans for dose-escalation. Further study will investigate other disease states. Additionally, the time-savings provided by patientmatching warrants further investigation. The following authors have equity ownership in Siris Medical, Inc: K Bush, TF Atwood.

  12. A Comprehensive Analysis of Cardiac Dose in Balloon-Based High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valakh, Vladimir; Kim, Yongbok; Werts, E. Day; Trombetta, Mark G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation dose to the heart in 60 patients with left-sided breast cancer who were treated with balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using MammoSite or Contura applicators. Methods and Materials: We studied 60 consecutive women with breast cancer who were treated with 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions using MammoSite (n = 37) or Contura (n = 23) applicators. The whole heart and the left and right ventricles were retrospectively delineated, and dose-volume histograms were analyzed. Multiple dosimetrics were reported, such as mean dose (D{sub mean}); relative volume receiving 1.7, 5, 10, and 20 Gy (V1.7, V5, V10, and V20, respectively); dose to 1 cc (D{sub 1cc}); and maximum point dose (D{sub max}). Biologic metrics, biologically effective dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose were computed. The impact of lumpectomy cavity location on cardiac dose was investigated. Results: The average {+-} standard deviation of D{sub mean} was 2.45 {+-} 0.94 Gy (range, 0.56-4.68) and 3.29 {+-} 1.28 Gy (range, 0.77-6.35) for the heart and the ventricles, respectively. The average whole heart V5 and V10 values were 10.2% and 1.3%, respectively, and the heart D{sub max} was >20 Gy in 7 of 60 (11.7%) patients and >25 Gy in 3 of 60 (5%) patients. No cardiac tissue received {>=}30 Gy. The V1.7, V5, V10, V20, and D{sub mean} values were all higher for the ventricles than for the whole heart. For balloons located in the upper inner quadrant of the breast, the average whole heart D{sub mean} was highest. The D{sub mean}, biologically effective dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose values for heart and ventricles decreased with increasing minimal distance from the surface of the balloon. Conclusions: On the basis of these comprehensive cardiac dosimetric data, we recommend that cardiac dose be routinely reported and kept as low as possible in balloon-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning for patients with left-sided breast cancer so the correlation with future cardiac toxicity data can be investigated.

  13. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP) (Grant No. 200900420)

  14. SU-E-T-356: Accuracy of Eclipse Electron Macro Monte Carlo Dose Algorithm for Use in Bolus Electron Conformal Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, R; Popple, R; Benhabib, S; Antolak, J; Sprunger, C; Hogstrom, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of electron dose distribution calculated by the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with recent commercially available bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to those previously measured for cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV CT anatomy for each site. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The bolus ECT treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and calculated using the maximum allowable histories (2×10{sup 9}), resulting in a statistical error of <0.2%. Smoothing was not used for these calculations. Differences between eMC-calculated and measured dose distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Results: Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom showed 89% (41/46) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of ?0.12% with a standard deviation of 2.56%. Results for the nose phantom showed 95% (54/57) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of 1.12% with a standard deviation of 3.03%. Dose calculation times for the retromolar trigone and nose treatment plans were 15 min and 22 min, respectively, using 16 processors (Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.9 GHz) on a Varian Eclipse framework agent server (FAS). Results of this study were consistent with those previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and for the .decimal, Inc. pencil beam redefinition algorithm used to plan the bolus. Conclusion: These results show that the accuracy of the Eclipse eMC algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT.

  15. The Maximum Density of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses a series of experiments performed by Thomas Hope in 1805 which show the temperature at which water has its maximum density. Early data cast into a modern form as well as guidelines and recent data collected from the author provide background for duplicating Hope's experiments in the classroom. (JN)

  16. DECOMPOSITION USING MAXIMUM AUTOCORRELATION FACTORS

    E-print Network

    the maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) transform was proposed for multivariate imagery in [18 with variable ordering. This corresponds to a Q-mode analysis of the data matrix. We denote this methods Q-MAF decomposition. It turns out that in many situations the new variables resulting from the MAF and the Q-MAF

  17. Estimation of External Dose by Car-Borne Survey in Kerala, India

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Akiba, Suminori; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nair, Raghu Ram; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathy Amma; Sebastian, Paul; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Akata, Naofumi; Kudo, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A car-borne survey was carried out in Kerala, India to estimate external dose. Measurements were made with a 3-in × 3-in NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer from September 23 to 27, 2013. The routes were selected from 12 Panchayats in Karunagappally Taluk which were classified into high level, mid-level and low level high background radiation (HBR) areas. A heterogeneous distribution of air kerma rates was seen in the dose rate distribution map. The maximum air kerma rate, 2.1 ?Gy/h, was observed on a beach sand surface. 232Th activity concentration for the beach sand was higher than that for soil and grass surfaces, and the range of activity concentration was estimated to be 0.7–2.3 kBq/kg. The contribution of 232Th to air kerma rate was over 70% at the measurement points with values larger than 0.34 ?Gy/h. The maximum value of the annual effective dose in Karunagappally Taluk was observed around coastal areas, and it was estimated to be 13 mSv/y. More than 30% of all the annual effective doses obtained in this survey exceeded 1 mSv/y. PMID:25885680

  18. Aircraft as adaptive nonlinear system which must be in the adaptational maximum zone for safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ignative, M.; Simatos, N.; Sivasundaram, S.

    1994-12-31

    Safety is a main problem in aircraft. We are considering this problem from the point of view related to existence of the adaptational maximum in complex developing systems. Safety space of aircraft parameters are determined. This space is transformed to different regimes of flight, when one engine malfunctions etc., are considered. Also it is shown that maximum safety is in adaptational maximum zone.

  19. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    PubMed Central

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Kristensen, Claus A.; Rasmussen, Jacob; Specht, Lena; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study using the optimized dose prescription in 20 patients is performed. Methods: Patients treated at our center have five tumor subvolumes from the center of the tumor (PET positive volume) and out delineated. The spatial distribution of 48 failures in patients with complete clinical response after (chemo)radiation is used to derive a model for tumor control probability (TCP). The total TCP is fixed to the clinically observed 70% actuarial TCP at five years. Additionally, the authors match the distribution of failures between the five subvolumes to the observed distribution. The steepness of the dose–response is extracted from the literature and the authors assume 30% and 20% risk of subclinical involvement in the elective volumes. The result is a five-compartment dose response model matching the observed distribution of failures. The model is used to optimize the distribution of dose in individual patients, while keeping the treatment intensity constant and the maximum prescribed dose below 85 Gy. Results: The vast majority of failures occur centrally despite the small volumes of the central regions. Thus, optimizing the dose prescription yields higher doses to the central target volumes and lower doses to the elective volumes. The dose planning study shows that the modified prescription is clinically feasible. The optimized TCP is 89% (range: 82%–91%) as compared to the observed TCP of 70%. Conclusions: The observed distribution of locoregional failures was used to derive an objective, data-driven dose prescription function. The optimized dose is predicted to result in a substantial increase in local control without increasing the predicted risk of toxicity. PMID:23927314

  20. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Kristensen, Claus A.; Rasmussen, Jacob; Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study using the optimized dose prescription in 20 patients is performed.Methods: Patients treated at our center have five tumor subvolumes from the center of the tumor (PET positive volume) and out delineated. The spatial distribution of 48 failures in patients with complete clinical response after (chemo)radiation is used to derive a model for tumor control probability (TCP). The total TCP is fixed to the clinically observed 70% actuarial TCP at five years. Additionally, the authors match the distribution of failures between the five subvolumes to the observed distribution. The steepness of the dose–response is extracted from the literature and the authors assume 30% and 20% risk of subclinical involvement in the elective volumes. The result is a five-compartment dose response model matching the observed distribution of failures. The model is used to optimize the distribution of dose in individual patients, while keeping the treatment intensity constant and the maximum prescribed dose below 85 Gy.Results: The vast majority of failures occur centrally despite the small volumes of the central regions. Thus, optimizing the dose prescription yields higher doses to the central target volumes and lower doses to the elective volumes. The dose planning study shows that the modified prescription is clinically feasible. The optimized TCP is 89% (range: 82%–91%) as compared to the observed TCP of 70%.Conclusions: The observed distribution of locoregional failures was used to derive an objective, data-driven dose prescription function. The optimized dose is predicted to result in a substantial increase in local control without increasing the predicted risk of toxicity.

  1. Algebraic potential of the Hill equation as an alternative tool for plotting dose (or time)/effects relationships in toxicology: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Bounias, M

    1989-01-01

    Use of the Hill equation in plotting the results of toxicological experiments offers the following advantages: 1. In dose/effect relationships, the maximum response RM can be accurately determined by means of a described new noniterative algebraic method, from both hyperbolic and sigmoidal responses expressed in natural (nontransformed) units. The Hill coefficient (n) and the dose giving 50% (f50) or X% (fX) of RM, as well as their SD, are accurately deduced. 2. In time-course experiments with sigmoidal shape, an additional set of parameters, readily available from the former basic 3, makes it possible to avoid arbitrary choices, such as the time at which a percentage or mortality is considered. The slopes of the tangents at the inflexion point (maximum rate of response) and at half-maximum effect, then the coordinates of these points and the horizontal intercept of the tangent at inflexion point (as an index of initial lag-phase) will give increasing and decreasing functions of doses, respectively, depending on RM, f50, and (n). 3. The processes described first allow the classical parameters LD50 (or LDX) and LT50 (or LTX: X%--lethality time) to be calculated with high algebraic accuracy, in addition to RM and (n), both of which are of great interest in the general case of ligand-receptor interactions. Thus, the deduced set of additional indexes, not readily available from classical "Probits-type" transformations, eliminates the mortgage of subjective operations. PMID:2714727

  2. Eects on skin dose from unwanted air gaps under bolus in photon beam radiotherapy

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Eects on skin dose from unwanted air gaps under bolus in photon beam radiotherapy Martin J. Butsona with 10 mm bolus, an air gap of 2 mm produced no reduction in skin dose when measured with the Attix can reduce skin dose, however, at least 90% of maximum dose is still delivered for air gaps up to 10

  3. Comparison of two Bayesian approaches to dose-individualization for once-daily aminoglycoside regimens

    PubMed Central

    Duffull, S. B.; Kirkpatrick, C. M. J.; Begg, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    Aims?Bayesian dose-individualization methods have been shown to have good predictive performance using minimal data points, and are now used widely in clinical practice. This study was designed to compare two computerised Bayesian dose-individualization methods, ABBOTTBASE and SeBA-GEN, in once-daily dosing of aminoglycosides. Methods?ABBOTTBASE uses the maximum a posteriori estimator (MAP) algorithm which analyses all available serum drug concentration data for individual patients simultaneously, while the prior model remains unchanged. SeBA-GEN analyses each data set sequentially while continually modifying the individual patient's prior model, allowing within-patient variability to be modelled. One hundred consecutive patients who received once-daily dosing of aminoglycosides were prospectively dose-individualized using either of these methods. Retrospectively the alternative dosing method was used to provide comparative data. The ability of the methods to predict subsequent serum aminoglycoside concentration data was assessed in terms of their predictive performance, bias and precision. Results?From the 100 patients, 277 serum aminoglycoside concentrations were available. Ninety-eight patients had serum concentrations available from the first dose and 55 from the second dose. Gentamicin was used in 96 patients. There was no significant bias when predicting peak concentrations from the prior model using either SeBA-GEN or ABBOTTBASE. The prior model used by ABBOTTBASE did, however, significantly underpredict the mid-dose concentration (mean bias=?0.79?mg?l?1, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: ?1.3 to ?0.3). When using the Bayesian algorithms for prediction of the second set of concentrations neither method was biased when predicting the peak concentration. ABBOTTBASE significantly overpredicted the mid-dose concentration (mean bias=0.38?mg l?1, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.74). The prior model used by SeBA-GEN was more precise at predicting both peak and mid-dose concentrations (P<0.01), indicating better use of covariates. There was no difference between the methods in terms of estimation of the value of volume of distribution, but they differed significantly in the estimation of clearance (mean difference=0.24?l h?1 for SeBA-GEN-ABBOTTBASE, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.43). Conclusions?Bayesian techniques appear to work well with once-daily aminoglycoside dosing. The method of incorporation of individual patient information into the prior model appears to be important in the optimum choice of the first dose. SeBA-GEN has an advantage in this and in the lack of bias related to predicting low concentrations compared with ABBOTTBASE. PMID:9131944

  4. 6 Cosmological and Biological Reproducibility: Limits on the Maximum Entropy

    E-print Network

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    of the uni- verse, many of the same structures (planets, stars, galaxies) would be reproduced as the universe of Maximum Entropy Production (also De- war, this volume). Dewar points out that our ignorance can, the same constants, forces and the same expansion. The universe begins again hot and dense

  5. Distribution of maximum velocities in avalanches near the depinning transition.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Michael; Angheluta, Luiza; Dahmen, Karin; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2012-09-01

    We report exact predictions for universal scaling exponents and scaling functions associated with the distribution of the maximum collective avalanche propagation velocities v(m) in the mean field theory of the interface depinning transition. We derive the extreme value distribution P(v(m)|T) for the maximum velocities in avalanches of fixed duration T and verify the results by numerical simulation near the critical point. We find that the tail of the distribution of maximum velocity for an arbitrary avalanche duration, v(m), scales as P(v(m))~v(m)(-2) for large v(m). These results account for the observed power-law distribution of the maximum amplitudes in acoustic emission experiments of crystal plasticity and are also broadly applicable to other systems in the mean-field interface depinning universality class, ranging from magnets to earthquakes. PMID:23005300

  6. Maximum life spur gear design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Mackulin, M. J.; Coe, H. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Optimization procedures allow one to design a spur gear reduction for maximum life and other end use criteria. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial guess values. The optimization algorithm is described, and the models for gear life and performance are presented. The algorithm is compact and has been programmed for execution on a desk top computer. Two examples are presented to illustrate the method and its application.

  7. Pontryagin Maximum Principle - a generalization

    E-print Network

    Grabowski, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental theorem of the theory of optimal control, the Pontryagin Maximum Principle (PMP), is extended to the setting of almost Lie (AL) algebroids - geometrical objects generalizing Lie algebroids. This formulation of the PMP may be viewed as a scheme comprising reductions of optimal control problems, like the Euler-Poincar'e equations arise as reductions of the Euler-Lagrange equations for the rigid body. The framework is based on a very general concept of homotopy of admissible paths and geometry of AL algebroids and goes back to some ideas of the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms in this general setting.

  8. Life-Stage-, Sex-, and Dose-Dependent Dietary Toxicokinetics and Relationship to Toxicity of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid (2,4-D) in Rats: Implications for Toxicity Test Dose Selection, Design, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    Life-stage-dependent toxicity and dose-dependent toxicokinetics (TK) were evaluated in Sprague Dawley rats following dietary exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). 2,4-D renal clearance is impacted by dose-dependent saturation of the renal organic anion transporter; thus, this study focused on identifying inflection points of onset of dietary nonlinear TK to inform dose selection decisions for toxicity studies. Male and female rats were fed 2,4-D-fortified diets at doses to 1600 ppm for 4-weeks premating, <2 weeks during mating, and to test day (TD) 71 to parental (P1) males and to P1 females through gestation/lactation to TD 96. F1 offspring were exposed via milk with continuing diet exposure until postnatal day (PND) 35. As assessed by plasma area under the curve for the time-course plasma concentration, nonlinear TK was observed ?1200 ppm (63mg/kg/day) for P1 males and between 200 and 400 ppm (14–27mg/kg/day) for P1 females. Dam milk and pup plasma levels were higher on lactation day (LD) 14 than LD 4. Relative to P1 adults, 2,4-D levels were higher in dams during late gestation/lactation and postweaning pups (PND 21–35) and coincided with elevated intake of diet/kg body weight. Using conventional maximum tolerated dose (MTD) criteria based on body weight changes for dose selection would have resulted in excessive top doses approximately 2-fold higher than those identified incorporating critical TK data. These data indicate that demonstration of nonlinear TK, if present at dose levels substantially above real-world human exposures, is a key dose selection consideration for improving the human relevance of toxicity studies compared with studies employing conventional MTD dose selection strategies. PMID:24105888

  9. MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

    1981-04-01

    The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based on recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). These factors are fixed internally in the code, and are not part of the input option. Dose commitments which are available from the code are as follows: • Individual dose commitments for use in predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations (Radon and short-lived daughters are excluded) • Total individual dose commitments (impacts from all available radionuclides are considered) • Annual population dose commitments (regional, extraregional, total and cummulative). This model is primarily designed for uranium mill facilities, and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes.

  10. Maximum-information photoelectron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Lux, C.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-07-01

    Photoelectron interferograms, manifested in photoelectron angular distributions (PADs), are high-information, coherent observables. In order to obtain the maximum information from angle-resolved photoionization experiments it is desirable to record the full, three-dimensional (3D), photoelectron momentum distribution. Here we apply tomographic reconstruction techniques to obtain such 3D distributions from multiphoton ionization of potassium atoms, and fully analyze the energy and angular content of the 3D data. The PADs obtained as a function of energy indicate good agreement with previous 2D data and detailed analysis [Hockett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 223001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.223001] concerning the main spectral features, but also indicate unexpected symmetry breaking in certain regions of momentum space, thus revealing additional continuum interferences which cannot otherwise be observed. These observations reflect the presence of additional ionization pathways and, most generally, illustrate the power of maximum-information measurements of coherent observables for quantum metrology of complex systems.

  11. Galactic Cosmic Ray Dose Rate at 1 A.U. During Solar Activity Cycle 24 Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.; Case, A. W.; Townsend, L.; Kasper, J. C.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements made by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have been used to create a time history of the absorbed dose rate resulting from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) exposure at a distance from the Sun of 1 astronomical unit (A.U.). These measurements, made during the period 2009-06-26 to 2010-12-31, include the deepest point of solar minimum activity (2009 Oct), maximum GCR dose rate (2010 Jan), and the onset of the first solar energetic particle (SEP) events of solar activity cycle 24 (2010 Jun). General features of the dose rate time history include: (a) an approximately 90-day lag between an increase in the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate/IMF field strength and the modulation of the daily GCR dose rate; a 21% decrease in the average daily GCR dose rate 15 months after solar activity minimum; and the detection of a cluster of 5 particle enhancements between 2010-06-12 and 2010-08-20 at the location of the LRO orbiter. Three additional enhancements measured between 2010-09-01 and 2010-09-23 do not appear to be linked with any observed solar activity, although two of the enhancements occurred during passage of coronal high-speed solar wind streams at the location of Earth.

  12. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  13. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Azcona, J; Burguete, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated.

  14. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-08-05

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with a site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average adult fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum adult fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr. Consumption values for the teen and child age groups should be increased proportionally: (1) teen average = 8.5; maximum = 25.9 kg/yr; and (2) child average = 3.6; maximum = 11.2 kg/yr. 8 refs.

  15. Retrospective Cohort Study of Bronchial Doses and Radiation-Induced Atelectasis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors Located Close to the Bronchial Tree

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Kristin; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia; Wersäll, Peter; Drugge, Ninni; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Persson, Jan-Olov; Rutkowska, Eva; Tullgren, Owe; Lax, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose–response relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 2.0 cm{sup 3}]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Results: Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 0.1cm3}) was used for further analysis. The median value of D{sub 0.1cm3} (?/? = 3 Gy) was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 147 Gy{sub 3} (range, 20-293 Gy{sub 3}). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 210 Gy{sub 3}, and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 105 Gy{sub 3}. Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). Conclusion: In this retrospective study a significant dose–response relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown.

  16. Tipping Point

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... TV falls with about the same force as child falling from the third story of a building. ...

  17. Lagrangian Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Five neutral points (points at which an object experiences no net gravitational force), in the combined gravitational field of two massive bodies which are orbiting their center of mass, at which an object of much smaller mass can exist in equilibrium. They are so named because Joseph-Louis Lagrange in 1772 was the first to find them as solutions to a restricted case of the three-body problem. Th...

  18. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  19. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR ROUTE TO ROUTE DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  20. Peripheral doses from pediatric IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric E.; Maserang, Beth; Wood, Roy; Mansur, David

    2006-07-15

    Peripheral dose (PD) data exist for conventional fields ({>=}10 cm) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery to standard adult-sized phantoms. Pediatric peripheral dose reports are limited to conventional therapy and are model based. Our goal was to ascertain whether data acquired from full phantom studies and/or pediatric models, with IMRT treatment times, could predict Organ at Risk (OAR) dose for pediatric IMRT. As monitor units (MUs) are greater for IMRT, it is expected IMRT PD will be higher; potentially compounded by decreased patient size (absorption). Baseline slab phantom peripheral dose measurements were conducted for very small field sizes (from 2 to 10 cm). Data were collected at distances ranging from 5 to 72 cm away from the field edges. Collimation was either with the collimating jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC) oriented either perpendicular or along the peripheral dose measurement plane. For the clinical tests, five patients with intracranial or base of skull lesions were chosen. IMRT and conventional three-dimensional (3D) plans for the same patient/target/dose (180 cGy), were optimized without limitation to the number of fields or wedge use. Six MV, 120-leaf MLC Varian axial beams were used. A phantom mimicking a 3-year-old was configured per Center for Disease Control data. Micro (0.125 cc) and cylindrical (0.6 cc) ionization chambers were appropriated for the thyroid, breast, ovaries, and testes. The PD was recorded by electrometers set to the 10{sup -10} scale. Each system set was uniquely calibrated. For the slab phantom studies, close peripheral points were found to have a higher dose for low energy and larger field size and when MLC was not deployed. For points more distant from the field edge, the PD was higher for high-energy beams. MLC orientation was found to be inconsequential for the small fields tested. The thyroid dose was lower for IMRT delivery than that predicted for conventional (ratio of IMRT/cnventional ranged from 0.47-0.94) doses {approx}[0.4-1.8 cGy]/[0.9-2.9 cGy]/fraction, respectively. Prior phantom reports are for fields 10 cm or greater, while pediatric central nervous system fields range from 4 to 7 cm, and effectively much smaller for IMRT (2-6 cm). Peripheral dose in close proximity (<10 cm from the field edge) is dominated by internal scatter; therefore, field-size differences overwhelm phantom size affects and increased MU. Distant peripheral dose, dominated by head leakage, was higher than predicted, even when accounting for MUs ({approx}factor of 3) likely due to the pediatric phantom size. The ratio of the testes dose ranged from 3.3-5.3 for IMRT/conventional. PD to OAR for pediatric IMRT cannot be predicted from large-field full phantom studies. For regional OAR, doses are likely lower than predicted by existing ''large field'' data, while the distant PD is higher.

  1. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  2. Understanding and using fluoroscopic dose display information.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Brent D; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Chason, David P; Anderson, Jon A

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopically guided procedures are an area of radiology in which radiation exposure to the patient is highly operator dependent. Modern fluoroscopy machines display a variety of information, including technique factors, field of view, operating geometry, exposure mode, fluoroscopic time, air kerma at the reference point (RAK), and air kerma area-product. However, the presentation of this information is highly vendor specific, and many users are unaware of how to interpret this information and use it to perform a study with the minimum necessary dose. A conceptual framework for understanding the radiation dose readout during a procedure is to compare it to the dashboard of an automobile, where the rate at which radiation is being applied (the RAK rate [mGy/min]) is the dose "speed" and the cumulative amount of radiation applied (cumulative RAK [mGy]) is the dose "odometer." This analogy can be used as a starting point to improve knowledge of these parameters, including how RAK is measured, how RAK correlates with skin dose, and how parameters are displayed differently during fluoroscopy and fluorography. Awareness of these factors is critical to understanding how dose parameters translate to patient risk and the consequences of high-dose studies. With this increased awareness, physicians performing fluoroscopically guided procedures can understand how to use built-in features of the fluoroscopic equipment (pulse rate, beam filtration, and automatic exposure control) and fluoroscopic techniques (procedure planning, patient positioning, proper collimation, and magnification) to reduce patient radiation dose, thereby improving patient safety. PMID:25442356

  3. A mathematical approach to optimal selection of dose values in the additive dose method of ERP dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, R.B.; Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    Additive dose methods commonly used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry are time consuming and labor intensive. We have developed a mathematical approach for determining optimal spacing of applied doses and the number of spectra which should be taken at each dose level. Expected uncertainitites in the data points are assumed to be normally distributed with a fixed standard deviation and linearity of dose response is also assumed. The optimum spacing and number of points necessary for the minimal error can be estimated, as can the likely error in the resulting estimate. When low doses are being estimated for tooth enamel samples the optimal spacing is shown to be a concentration of points near the zero dose value with fewer spectra taken at a single high dose value within the range of known linearity. Optimization of the analytical process results in increased accuracy and sample throughput.

  4. Analytical representation for Varian EDW factors at off-center points

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, Vadim Y.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate a new analytical model for Varian enhanced dynamic wedge factors at off-center points. The new model was verified by comparing measured and calculated wedge factors for the standard set of wedge angles (i.e., 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg. and 60 deg.), different symmetric and asymmetric fields, and two different photon energies. The maximum difference between calculated and measured wedge factors is less than 2%. The average absolute difference is within 1%. The obtained results indicate that the suggested model can be useful for independent dose calculation with enhanced dynamic wedges.

  5. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Richard W.

    2012-06-27

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

  6. From cellular doses to average lung dose.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W; Winkler-Heil, R

    2015-11-01

    Sensitive basal and secretory cells receive a wide range of doses in human bronchial and bronchiolar airways. Variations of cellular doses arise from the location of target cells in the bronchial epithelium of a given airway and the asymmetry and variability of airway dimensions of the lung among airways in a given airway generation and among bronchial and bronchiolar airway generations. To derive a single value for the average lung dose which can be related to epidemiologically observed lung cancer risk, appropriate weighting scenarios have to be applied. Potential biological weighting parameters are the relative frequency of target cells, the number of progenitor cells, the contribution of dose enhancement at airway bifurcations, the promotional effect of cigarette smoking and, finally, the application of appropriate regional apportionment factors. Depending on the choice of weighting parameters, detriment-weighted average lung doses can vary by a factor of up to 4 for given radon progeny exposure conditions. PMID:25920789

  7. Maximum entropy production in daisyworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunu, Haley A.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2012-05-01

    Daisyworld was first introduced in 1983 by Watson and Lovelock as a model that illustrates how life can influence a planet's climate. These models typically involve modeling a planetary surface on which black and white daisies can grow thus influencing the local surface albedo and therefore also the temperature distribution. Since then, variations of daisyworld have been applied to study problems ranging from ecological systems to global climate. Much of the interest in daisyworld models is due to the fact that they enable one to study self-regulating systems. These models are nonlinear, and as such they exhibit sensitive dependence on initial conditions, and depending on the specifics of the model they can also exhibit feedback loops, oscillations, and chaotic behavior. Many daisyworld models are thermodynamic in nature in that they rely on heat flux and temperature gradients. However, what is not well-known is whether, or even why, a daisyworld model might settle into a maximum entropy production (MEP) state. With the aim to better understand these systems, this paper will discuss what is known about the role of MEP in daisyworld models.

  8. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  9. High-dose loading with extended release quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Chae, B-J

    2010-08-01

    Extended release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) was initiated at the recommended maximum dose 800 mg and maintained at the same dose in five patients with schizophrenia. Although the loadings of quetiapine XR were well tolerated in four patients in these five cases, one patient with a history of cerebral infarction developed serious side-effects, notably bladder distention and dizziness. This case series indicates that loading with maximum dose quetiapine XR may be tolerable and used safely in most schizophrenia patients with no other concurrent disease such as brain infarction. PMID:20831551

  10. SVMs, Generative Kernels & Maximum Margin Statistical Models

    E-print Network

    Gales, Mark

    SVMs, Generative Kernels & Maximum Margin Statistical Models Mark Gales & Martin Layton 16 December 2004 Cambridge University Engineering Department Institute of Statistical Mathematics #12;SVMs, Generative Kernels and Maximum Margin Statistical Models Overview · Dependency Modelling in Speech

  11. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, Catarina Royle, Gary; Lourenço, Ana Mónica; Mouinuddin, Syed; Herk, Marcel van; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; McClelland, Jamie R.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used to propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of voxels within the treated volume failed a 2%pD DD-test (DD{sub 2%-pp}). Larger DD{sub 2%-pp} was found within the high dose gradient (21% ± 6%) and regions where the CBCT quality was poorer (28% ± 9%). The differences when estimating the mean and maximum dose delivered to organs-at-risk were up to 2.0%pD and 2.8%pD, respectively. Conclusions: The authors evaluated several DIR algorithms for CT-to-CBCT registrations. In spite of all methods resulting in comparable geometrical matching, the choice of DIR implementation leads to uncertainties in dose warped, particularly in regions of high gradient and/or poor imaging quality.

  12. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations. PMID:26672725

  13. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bilich, F.; Da Silva, R.

    2008-11-06

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  14. Calculate Your Radiation Dose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your County: Loading... This state has no counties. ESTIMATED TOTAL YEARLY DOSE (in mrem) Your result is ... general averages, and should be used to compare estimated doses from common sources of radiation. For most ...

  15. Propane spectral resolution enhancement by the maximum entropy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Stewart, K. P.; Hurley, E. J.; Yeh, K. C.; Inguva, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Burg algorithm for maximum entropy power spectral density estimation is applied to a time series of data obtained from a Michelson interferometer and compared with a standard FFT estimate for resolution capability. The propane transmittance spectrum was estimated by use of the FFT with a 2 to the 18th data sample interferogram, giving a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.06/cm. This estimate was then interpolated by zero filling an additional 2 to the 18th points, and the final resolution was taken to be 0.06/cm. Comparison of the maximum entropy method (MEM) estimate with the FFT was made over a 45/cm region of the spectrum for several increasing record lengths of interferogram data beginning at 2 to the 10th. It is found that over this region the MEM estimate with 2 to the 16th data samples is in close agreement with the FFT estimate using 2 to the 18th samples.

  16. Dose Estimation in Radiation Cytogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Lloyd, David

    2009-04-01

    Throughout the radiation cytogenetics community, a core group of methods exists to produce an estimate of radiation dose from an observed yield of DNA damage in blood. Mathematical and statistical analysis is extremely important for accurate assessment of data and results, and a number of classical statistical methods are commonly employed. However, the large number of statistical techniques, and the complexity of the methods, can lead to errors in data analysis and misinterpretation of results. Cytogenetics dose estimation software has been developed to simplify mathematical and statistical analysis of cytogenetic data. ``Dose Estimate'' is a collection of mathematical and statistical methods based on the cytogenetics methods and programs written by Alan Edwards, David Papworth, and others. Details of the biological and mathematical techniques used in the software will be presented, including maximum likelihood estimation of yield curve coefficients for the dicentric or translocation assays. Proposals for increasing the sophistication of the software through implementation of recently published Bayesian analysis techniques for cytogenetics will also be outlined.

  17. Estimation of the radiation dose from radiotherapy for skin haemangiomas in childhood: the ICTA software for epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsaldin, A.; Lundell, M.; Diallo, I.; Ligot, L.; Chavaudra, J.; de Vathaire, F.

    2000-12-01

    Radium applicators and pure beta emitters have been widely used in the past to treat skin haemangioma in early childhood. A well defined relationship between the low doses received from these applicators and radiation-induced cancers requires accurate dosimetry. A human-based CT scan phantom has been used to simulate every patient and treatment condition and then to calculate the source-target distance when radium and pure beta applicators were used. The effective transmission factor ?(r) for the gamma spectrum emitted by the radium sources applied on the skin surface was modelled using Monte Carlo simulations. The well-known quantization approach was used to calculate gamma doses delivered from radium applicators to various anatomical points. For 32P, 90Sr/90Y applicators and 90Y needles we have used the apparent exponential attenuation equation. The dose calculation algorithm was integrated into the ICTA software (standing for a model that constructs an Individualized phantom based on CT slices and Auxological data), which has been developed for epidemiological studies of cohorts of patients who received radium and beta-treatments for skin haemangioma. The ?(r) values obtained for radium skin applicators are in good agreement with the available values in the first 10 cm but higher at greater distances. Gamma doses can be calculated with this algorithm at 165 anatomical points throughout the body of patients treated with radium applicators. Lung heterogeneity and air crossed by the gamma rays are considered. Comparison of absorbed doses in water from a 10 mg equivalent radium source simulated by ICTA with those measured at the Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital (RAH) showed good agreement, but ICTA estimation of organ doses did not always correspond those estimated at the RAH. Beta doses from 32P, 90Sr/90Y applicators and 90Y needles are calculated up to the maximum beta range (11 mm).

  18. Nonparametric supervised learning by linear interpolation with maximum entropy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maya R; Gray, Robert M; Olshen, Richard A

    2006-05-01

    Nonparametric neighborhood methods for learning entail estimation of class conditional probabilities based on relative frequencies of samples that are "near-neighbors" of a test point. We propose and explore the behavior of a learning algorithm that uses linear interpolation and the principle of maximum entropy (LIME). We consider some theoretical properties of the LIME algorithm: LIME weights have exponential form; the estimates are consistent; and the estimates are robust to additive noise. In relation to bias reduction, we show that near-neighbors contain a test point in their convex hull asymptotically. The common linear interpolation solution used for regression on grids or look-up-tables is shown to solve a related maximum entropy problem. LIME simulation results support use of the method, and performance on a pipeline integrity classification problem demonstrates that the proposed algorithm has practical value. PMID:16640262

  19. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% ? 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the fix-mA doses with local mA values; (2) the general power law relationship between dose and kVp varied from location to location, with the power index ranged between 2.7 and 3.5. The averaged dose measurements at both nipples, which were about 0.6 cm outside the prescribed scan region, ranged from 23 to 27 mGy at the left nipple, and varied from 3 to 20 mGy at the right nipple over the three scan protocols. Large fluctuations over repeated scans were also observed, as a combined result of helical scans of large pitch (1.375) and small active areas of the skin dosimeters. In addition, the averaged skin dose fell off drastically with the distance to the nearest boundary of the scanned region. Conclusions: This study revealed the complexity of CT dose fluctuation and variation with a human cadaver.

  20. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Liu, Tianyu; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% ? 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the fix-mA doses with local mA values; (2) the general power law relationship between dose and kVp varied from location to location, with the power index ranged between 2.7 and 3.5. The averaged dose measurements at both nipples, which were about 0.6 cm outside the prescribed scan region, ranged from 23 to 27 mGy at the left nipple, and varied from 3 to 20 mGy at the right nipple over the three scan protocols. Large fluctuations over repeated scans were also observed, as a combined result of helical scans of large pitch (1.375) and small active areas of the skin dosimeters. In addition, the averaged skin dose fell off drastically with the distance to the nearest boundary of the scanned region. Conclusions: This study revealed the complexity of CT dose fluctuation and variation with a human cadaver. PMID:25186398

  1. Solar Maximum Mission Experiment - Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Polarimetry on the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Cheng, C. C.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Gurman, J. B.; Hyder, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described. It is pointed out that the instrument, which operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A, has a spatial resolution of 2-3 arcsec and a spectral resolution of 0.02 A FWHM in second order. A Gregorian telescope, with a focal length of 1.8 m, feeds a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter comprising rotating Mg F2 waveplates can be inserted behind the spectrometer entrance slit; it permits all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Among the observing modes are rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry. Examples of initial observations made since launch are presented.

  2. A simple method of independent treatment time verification in gamma knife radiosurgery using integral dose

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jianyue; Drzymala, Robert; Li Zuofeng

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a simple independent dose calculation method to verify treatment plans for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Our approach uses the total integral dose within the skull as an end point for comparison. The total integral dose is computed using a spreadsheet and is compared to that obtained from Leksell GammaPlan registered . It is calculated as the sum of the integral doses of 201 beams, each passing through a cylindrical volume. The average length of the cylinders is estimated from the Skull-Scaler measurement data taken before treatment. Correction factors are applied to the length of the cylinder depending on the location of a shot in the skull. The radius of the cylinder corresponds to the collimator aperture of the helmet, with a correction factor for the beam penumbra and scattering. We have tested our simple spreadsheet program using treatment plans of 40 patients treated with Gamma Knife registered in our center. These patients differ in geometry, size, lesion locations, collimator helmet, and treatment complexities. Results show that differences between our calculations and treatment planning results are typically within {+-}3%, with a maximum difference of {+-}3.8%. We demonstrate that our spreadsheet program is a convenient and effective independent method to verify treatment planning irradiation times prior to implementation of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  3. Drug and light dose responses to focal photodynamic therapy of single blood vessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Mamta; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Samkoe, Kimberley; Cramb, David; Wilson, Brian C.

    2009-11-01

    As part of an ongoing program to develop two-photon (2-?) photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treatment of wet-form age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other vascular pathologies, we have evaluated the reciprocity of drug-light doses in focal-PDT. We targeted individual arteries in a murine window chamber model, using primarily the clinical photosensitizer Visudyne/liposomal-verteporfin. Shortly after administration of the photosensitizer, a small region including an arteriole was selected and irradiated with varying light doses. Targeted and nearby vessels were observed for a maximum of 17 to 25 h to assess vascular shutdown, tapering, and dye leakage/occlusion. For a given end-point metric, there was reciprocity between the drug and light doses, i.e., the response correlated with the drug-light product (DLP). These results provide the first quantification of photosensitizer and light dose relationships for localized irradiation of a single blood vessel and are compared to the DLP required for vessel closure between 1-? and 2-? activation, between focal and broad-beam irradiation, and between verteporfin and a porphyrin dimer with high 2-? cross section. Demonstration of reciprocity over a wide range of DLP is important for further development of focal PDT treatments, such as the targeting of feeder vessels in 2-? PDT of AMD.

  4. Application of a Novel Dose-Uncertainty Model for Dose-Uncertainty Analysis in Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Hosang; Palta, Jatinder R.; Kim, You-Hyun; Kim, Siyong

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze dose uncertainty using a previously published dose-uncertainty model, and to assess potential dosimetric risks existing in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The dose-uncertainty model provides a three-dimensional (3D) dose-uncertainty distribution in a given confidence level. For 8 retrospectively selected patients, dose-uncertainty maps were constructed using the dose-uncertainty model at the 95% CL. In addition to uncertainties inherent to the radiation treatment planning system, four scenarios of spatial errors were considered: machine only (S1), S1 + intrafraction, S1 + interfraction, and S1 + both intrafraction and interfraction errors. To evaluate the potential risks of the IMRT plans, three dose-uncertainty-based plan evaluation tools were introduced: confidence-weighted dose-volume histogram, confidence-weighted dose distribution, and dose-uncertainty-volume histogram. Results: Dose uncertainty caused by interfraction setup error was more significant than that of intrafraction motion error. The maximum dose uncertainty (95% confidence) of the clinical target volume (CTV) was smaller than 5% of the prescribed dose in all but two cases (13.9% and 10.2%). The dose uncertainty for 95% of the CTV volume ranged from 1.3% to 2.9% of the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The dose uncertainty in prostate IMRT could be evaluated using the dose-uncertainty model. Prostate IMRT plans satisfying the same plan objectives could generate a significantly different dose uncertainty because a complex interplay of many uncertainty sources. The uncertainty-based plan evaluation contributes to generating reliable and error-resistant treatment plans.

  5. Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones Abstract--Battery life of commercial chargers using solar power have been developed. They focus on correct functionality, but system chargers do not perform the maximum power point tracking [2], [3] of the solar panel. We exclude

  6. ALL-PATHWAYS DOSE ANALYSIS FOR THE PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-10

    A Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) All-Pathways analysis has been conducted that considers the radiological impacts to a resident farmer. It is assumed that the resident farmer utilizes a farm pond contaminated by the OSWDF to irrigate a garden and pasture and water livestock from which food for the resident farmer is obtained, and that the farmer utilizes groundwater from the Berea sandstone aquifer for domestic purposes (i.e. drinking water and showering). As described by FBP 2014b the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model (Schroeder et al. 1994) and the Surface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) model (White and Oostrom 2000, 2006) were used to model the flow and transport from the OSWDF to the Points of Assessment (POAs) associated with the 680-ft elevation sandstone layer (680 SSL) and the Berea sandstone aquifer. From this modeling the activity concentrations radionuclides were projected over time at the POAs. The activity concentrations were utilized as input to a GoldSimTM (GTG 2010) dose model, described herein, in order to project the dose to a resident farmer over time. A base case and five sensitivity cases were analyzed. The sensitivity cases included an evaluation of the impacts of using a conservative inventory, an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer, a low waste zone uranium distribution coefficient (Kd), different transfer factors, and reference person exposure parameters (i.e. at 95 percentile). The maximum base case dose within the 1,000 year assessment period was projected to be 1.5E-14 mrem/yr, and the maximum base case dose at any time less than 10,000 years was projected to be 0.002 mrem/yr. The maximum projected dose of any sensitivity case was approximately 2.6 mrem/yr associated with the use of an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer. This sensitivity case is considered very unlikely because it assumes leakage from the location of greatest concentration in the 680 SSL in to the Berea sandstone aquiver over time and does not conform to standard private water well construction practices. The bottom-line is that all predicted doses from the base case and five sensitivity cases fall well below the DOE all-pathways 25 mrem/yr Performance Objective.

  7. Lack of significant effect of bilastine administered at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses and concomitantly with ketoconazole on ventricular repolarization: results of a thorough QT study (TQTS) with QT-concentration analysis.

    PubMed

    Tyl, Benoît; Kabbaj, Meriam; Azzam, Sara; Sologuren, Ander; Valiente, Román; Reinbolt, Elizabeth; Roupe, Kathryn; Blanco, Nathalie; Wheeler, William

    2012-06-01

    The effect of bilastine on cardiac repolarization was studied in 30 healthy participants during a multiple-dose, triple-dummy, crossover, thorough QT study that included 5 arms: placebo, active control (400 mg moxifloxacin), bilastine at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses (20 mg and 100 mg once daily, respectively), and bilastine 20 mg administered with ketoconazole 400 mg. Time-matched, triplicate electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded with 13 time points extracted predose and 16 extracted over 72 hours post day 4 dosing. Four QT/RR corrections were implemented: QTcB; QTcF; a linear individual correction (QTcNi), the primary correction; and a nonlinear one (QTcNnl). Moxifloxacin was associated with a significant increase in QTcNi at all time points between 1 and 12 hours, inclusively. Bilastine administration at 20 mg and 100 mg had no clinically significant impact on QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 5.02 ms; upper confidence limit [UCL] of the 1-sided, 95% confidence interval, 7.87 ms). Concomitant administration of ketoconazole and bilastine 20 mg induced a clinically relevant increase in QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 9.3 ms; UCL, 12.16 ms). This result was most likely related to the cardiac effect of ketoconazole because for all time points, bilastine plasma concentrations were lower than those observed following the supratherapeutic dose. PMID:21642470

  8. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Klüter, Sebastian Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of ?0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local voxel-based deviation of ?2.41% ± 0.75% for all voxels with dose values >20% were found for 11 modulated plans in the cheese phantom. Averaged over nine patient plans, the deviations amounted to ?0.14% ± 1.97% (voxels >80%) and ?0.95% ± 2.27% (>20%, local deviations). For a lung case, mean voxel-based deviations of more than 4% were found, while for all other patient plans, all mean voxel-based deviations were within ±2.4%. Conclusions: The presented method is suitable for independent dose calculation for helical tomotherapy within the known limitations of the pencil beam algorithm. It can serve as verification of the primary dose calculation and thereby reduce the need for time-consuming measurements. By using the patient anatomy and generating full 3D dose data, and combined with measurements of additional machine parameters, it can substantially contribute to overall patient safety.

  9. SU-E-T-162: Evaluation of Dose Calculation of RayStation Planning System in Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Yi, B; Chung, H; Prado, K; Chen, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical reliability of heterogeneity-based dose algorithm using RayStation treatment planning system v.4.0. Methods: The collapsed cone dose calculations in RayStation (RaySearch, Sweden) were compared with the measurements (ion chamber and EBT2 film) and with an in-house Monte Carlo algorithm. A heterogeneous multi-layer phantom and CT images of 4 lung cancer patients were used here. The phantom, composed of multiple solid water slabs and Styrofoams, was irradiated with 6MV beams perpendicular to the layers. The MLC-defined field sizes were 5×5, 10×10, 15×15 and 20×20cm{sup 2}. The chamber was positioned at center of central solid water layer, and the films were placed at interfaces of solid water and Styrofoam. The RayStation dose and Monte Carlo dose were compared by performing absolute gamma analysis (3mm/3%): 1D gamma for PDD in the phantom and 3D gamma for patient volumes receiving dose above 10% of maximum dose. Results: The point dose differences between RayStation and ion chamber measurement were smaller than 1% for all of the field sizes. Between RayStation and film measurement, 5×5cm2 field had the maximum differences : <4mm for the penumbra and <0.3mm for the field width at all Styrofoam-and-solid-water interfaces. The absolute gamma analysis showed good agreement between RayStation and Monte Carlo. For PDD along beam axis in the phantom, the 1D gamma was 95.4, 98.6, 99.6 and 99.3% for field size 5×5, 10×10, 15×15 and 20×202 respectively. For dose comparison using patient CT images, 3D gamma was > 95% for all the patients. Conclusion: With respect to ion chamber/film measurement and Monte Carlo calculation, the collapsed cone algorithm in RayStation computed reasonable dose in both phantom and patient cases. Heterogeneity-based dose calculation of RayStation is clinically acceptable in heterogeneous media.

  10. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. {sup 131}I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided.

  11. Effect of Breathing Motion on Radiotherapy Dose Accumulation in the Abdomen Using Deformable Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Eccles, Cynthia L.; Craig, Tim; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of breathing motion and dose accumulation on the planned radiotherapy dose to liver tumors and normal tissues using deformable image registration. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one free-breathing stereotactic liver cancer radiotherapy patients, planned on static exhale computed tomography (CT) for 27-60 Gy in six fractions, were included. A biomechanical model-based deformable image registration algorithm retrospectively deformed each exhale CT to inhale CT. This deformation map was combined with exhale and inhale dose grids from the treatment planning system to accumulate dose over the breathing cycle. Accumulation was also investigated using a simple rigid liver-to-liver registration. Changes to tumor and normal tissue dose were quantified. Results: Relative to static plans, mean dose change (range) after deformable dose accumulation (as % of prescription dose) was -1 (-14 to 8) to minimum tumor, -4 (-15 to 0) to maximum bowel, -4 (-25 to 1) to maximum duodenum, 2 (-1 to 9) to maximum esophagus, -2 (-13 to 4) to maximum stomach, 0 (-3 to 4) to mean liver, and -1 (-5 to 1) and -2 (-7 to 1) to mean left and right kidneys. Compared to deformable registration, rigid modeling had changes up to 8% to minimum tumor and 7% to maximum normal tissues. Conclusion: Deformable registration and dose accumulation revealed potentially significant dose changes to either a tumor or normal tissue in the majority of cases as a result of breathing motion. These changes may not be accurately accounted for with rigid motion.

  12. 7 CFR 993.602 - Maximum tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN CALIFORNIA Grade Regulations § 993.602 Maximum...

  13. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  14. Effect of jaw size in megavoltage CT on image quality and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jae Hong; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Kim, Yong Ho; Moon, Seong Kwon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Eun Seog; Chang, Ah Ram; Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Suh, Tae-Suk; Huh, Hyun Do

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Recently, the jaw size for the TomoTherapy Hi-Art II{sup Registered-Sign} (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI) was reduced from 4 mm (J4) to 1 mm (J1) to improve the longitudinal (IEC-Y) resolution in megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) images. This study evaluated the effect of jaw size on the image quality and dose, as well as the dose delivered to the lens of the eye, which is a highly radiosensitive tissue. Methods: MVCT image quality (image noise, uniformity, contrast linearity, high-contrast resolution, and full width at half-maximum) and multiple scan average dose (MSAD) were measured at different jaw sizes. A head phantom and photoluminescence glass dosimeters (PLDs) were used to measure the exposed lens dose (cGy). Different MVCT scan modes (pitch = 1, 2, and 3) and scan lengths (108 mm, 156 mm, and 204 mm) were applied in the MSAD and PLDs measurements. Results: The change in jaw size from J4 to J1 produced no change or only a slight improvement in image noise, uniformity, contrast linearity, and high-contrast resolution. However, the full-width at half-maximum reduced from approximately 7.2 at J4 to 4.5 mm at J1, which represents an enhancement in the longitudinal resolution. The MSAD at the center point changed from approximately 0.69-2.32 cGy (peripheral: 0.83-2.49 cGy) at J4 to 0.85-2.81 cGy (peripheral: 1.05-2.86 cGy) at J1. The measured lens dose increased from 0.92-3.36 cGy at J4 to 1.06-3.91 cGy at J1. Conclusions: The change in jaw size improved longitudinal resolution. The MVCT imaging dose of approximately 3.86 cGy, 1.92 cGy, and 1.22 cGy was delivered at a pitch of 1, 2, and 3, respectively, per fraction in the head and neck treatment plans. Therefore, allowance for an approximately 15% increase in lens dose over that with J4 should be provided with J1.

  15. An evaluation of several different classification schemes - Their parameters and performance. [maximum likelihood decision for crop identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D.; Fuhs, N.; Hixson, M.

    1979-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to apply and evaluate several of the currently available classification schemes for crop identification. The approaches examined were: (1) a per point Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier, (2) a per point sum of normal densities classifier, (3) a per point linear classifier, (4) a per point Gaussian maximum likelihood decision tree classifier, and (5) a texture sensitive per field Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier. Three agricultural data sets were used in the study: areas from Fayette County, Illinois, and Pottawattamie and Shelby Counties in Iowa. The segments were located in two distinct regions of the Corn Belt to sample variability in soils, climate, and agricultural practices.

  16. The pharmacokinetics, CNS pharmacodynamics and adverse event profile of brivaracetam after single increasing oral doses in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Sargentini-Maier, Maria Laura; Rolan, Paul; Connell, John; Tytgat, Dominique; Jacobs, Tom; Pigeolet, Etienne; Riethuisen, Jean-Michel; Stockis, Armel

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Brivaracetam is a new chemical entity structurally related to levetiracetam, displaying a markedly higher affinity for the binding site believed to be primarily involved in the antiepileptic effect of levetiracetam. Studies to evaluate the pharmacological profile of brivaracetam demonstrate an approximately 10-fold higher potency than levetiracetam as well as a higher efficacy in models of epilepsy. If translated into therapeutic effects in humans, this would mean a greater decrease in seizure frequency and a higher number of responders and seizure-free patients in refractory epileptic patients as seen with levetiracetam. What this study adds This article reports the results of the first in human study with brivaracetam. Its pharmacokinetics and adverse events profile after single administration are evaluated, together with the effect of food on the former. Aims The objective of the study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (and how they are affected by food), CNS pharmacodynamics and the adverse event profile of brivaracetam after single increasing doses. Methods Healthy males (n = 27, divided into three alternating panels of nine subjects) received two different single oral doses of brivaracetam (10–1400 mg) and one dose of placebo during three periods of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The effect of food on its pharmacokinetics was assessed using a standard two-way crossover design in a further eight subjects who received two single oral doses of brivaracetam (150 mg) in the fasting state and after a high fat meal. Results Adverse events, none of which were serious, were mostly CNS-related and included somnolence, dizziness, and decreased attention, alertness, and motor control. Their incidence, severity and duration were dose-related. The maximum tolerated dose was established to be 1000 mg. Severe somnolence lasting 1 day occurred in one subject following 1400 mg. Brivaracetam was rapidly absorbed under fasting conditions, with a median tmax of approximately 1 h. Cmax was dose-proportional from 10 to 1400 mg, whereas AUC deviated from dose linearity above 600 mg. A high-fat meal had no effect on AUC (point estimate 0.99, 90%CI: 0.92–1.07) but delayed tmax (3 h) and decreased Cmax (point estimate 0.72, 90%CI: 0.66–0.79). Conclusions Brivaracetam was well tolerated after increasing single doses that represent up to several times the expected therapeutic dose. Brivaracetam was found to have desirable pharmacokinetic properties. The most common adverse events were somnolence and dizziness. PMID:17223857

  17. Planning Consequences of the Maximum dB(A) CONCEPT—A Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RYLANDER, R.; BJÖRKMAN, M.

    2002-02-01

    The maximum noise concept based on the noisiest event represents a new principle to control the effects of an environmental pollutant in the urban area. The report describes these newly developed dose descriptors for the relation between exposure and effects and presents examples for practical actions to control noise exposure.

  18. Estimating landscape carrying capacity through maximum clique analysis.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Therese M; Warrington, Gregory S; Schwenk, W Scott; Dinitz, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    Habitat suitability (HS) maps are widely used tools in wildlife science and establish a link between wildlife populations and landscape pattern. Although HS maps spatially depict the distribution of optimal resources for a species, they do not reveal the population size a landscape is capable of supporting--information that is often crucial for decision makers and managers. We used a new approach, "maximum clique analysis," to demonstrate how HS maps for territorial species can be used to estimate the carrying capacity, N(k), of a given landscape. We estimated the N(k) of Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus) in an 1153-km2 study area in Vermont, USA. These two species were selected to highlight different approaches in building an HS map as well as computational challenges that can arise in a maximum clique analysis. We derived 30-m2 HS maps for each species via occupancy modeling (Ovenbird) and by resource utilization modeling (bobcats). For each species, we then identified all pixel locations on the map (points) that had sufficient resources in the surrounding area to maintain a home range (termed a "pseudo-home range"). These locations were converted to a mathematical graph, where any two points were linked if two pseudo-home ranges could exist on the landscape without violating territory boundaries. We used the program Cliquer to find the maximum clique of each graph. The resulting estimates of N(k) = 236 Ovenbirds and N(k) = 42 female bobcats were sensitive to different assumptions and model inputs. Estimates of N(k) via alternative, ad hoc methods were 1.4 to > 30 times greater than the maximum clique estimate, suggesting that the alternative results may be upwardly biased. The maximum clique analysis was computationally intensive but could handle problems with < 1500 total pseudo-home ranges (points). Given present computational constraints, it is best suited for species that occur in clustered distributions (where the problem can be broken into several, smaller problems), or for species with large home ranges relative to grid scale where resampling the points to a coarser resolution can reduce the problem to manageable proportions. PMID:23387124

  19. Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity at Ultra-Low Dose Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Pease, Ronald; Forney, James; Carts, Martin; Phan, Anthony; Cox, Stephen; Kruckmeyer, Kriby; Burns, Sam; Albarian, Rafi; Holcombe, Bruce; Little, Bradley; Salzman, James; Chaumont, Geraldine; Duperray, Herve; Ouellet, Al; Buchner, Stephen; LaBel, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    We have presented results of ultra-low dose rate irradiations (< or = 10 mrad(Si)/s) for a variety of radiation hardened and commercial linear bipolar devices. We observed low dose rate enhancement factors exceeding 1.5 in several parts. The worst case of dose rate enhancement resulted in functional failures, which occurred after 10 and 60 krad(Si), for devices irradiated at 0.5 and 10 mrad(Si)/s, respectively. Devices fabricated with radiation hardened processes and designs also displayed dose rate enhancement at below 10 mrad(Si)/s. Furthermore, the data indicated that these devices have not reached the damage saturation point. Therefore the degradation will likely continue to increase with increasing total dose, and the low dose rate enhancement will further magnify. The cases presented here, in addition to previous examples, illustrate the significance and pervasiveness of low dose rate enhancement at dose rates lower than 10 mrad(Si). These results present further challenges for radiation hardness assurance of bipolar linear circuits, and raise the question of whether the current standard test dose rate is conservative enough to bound degradations due to ELDRS.

  20. 34 CFR 674.12 - Loan maximums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loan maximums. 674.12 Section 674.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM General Provisions § 674.12 Loan maximums. (a)...

  1. Finding Maximum Length Tours Under Polyhedral Norms

    E-print Network

    Barvinok, Alexander

    Finding Maximum Length Tours Under Polyhedral Norms Alexander Barvinok \\Lambda David S. Johnson y to a polyhedral norm. We show that for any such norm, the problem of finding a tour of maximum length can in time O(n f+1 ), where f is the number of facets of the polyhedron determining the polyhedral norm. Thus

  2. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum grants. 1778.11 Section 1778.11 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not... the filing of an application. (b) Grants made for repairs, partial replacement, or...

  3. 13 CFR 130.440 - Maximum grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum grant. 130.440 Section 130... § 130.440 Maximum grant. No recipient shall receive an SBDC grant exceeding the greater of the minimum statutory amount, or its pro rata share of all SBDC grants as determined by the statutory formula set...

  4. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum grants. 1778.11 Section 1778.11 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not... the filing of an application. (b) Grants made for repairs, partial replacement, or...

  5. 13 CFR 130.440 - Maximum grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maximum grant. 130.440 Section 130... § 130.440 Maximum grant. No recipient shall receive an SBDC grant exceeding the greater of the minimum statutory amount, or its pro rata share of all SBDC grants as determined by the statutory formula set...

  6. 13 CFR 130.440 - Maximum grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum grant. 130.440 Section 130... § 130.440 Maximum grant. No recipient shall receive an SBDC grant exceeding the greater of the minimum statutory amount, or its pro rata share of all SBDC grants as determined by the statutory formula set...

  7. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness...minimum $495 civil penalty applies to a violation...the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious...

  8. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...the maximum civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness...no minimum civil penalty, except for a minimum...the maximum civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious...

  9. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness...minimum $495 civil penalty applies to a violation...the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious...

  10. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness...minimum $495 civil penalty applies to a violation...the maximum civil penalty is $110,000 if the violation results in death, serious...

  11. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...the maximum civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious illness...no minimum civil penalty, except for a minimum...the maximum civil penalty is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious...

  12. Assessment of public doses due to a neutron calibration bunker.

    PubMed

    Suman, H; Kharita, M H; Yousef, S

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the expected neutron and gamma doses in the populated areas outside the newly constructed neutron calibration bunker at the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria will be assessed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4C2. The results showed that the maximum ambient dose equivalent rate (neutrons and gammas) outside the bunker would not exceed 0.5 microSv h(-1), assuming an Am-Be neutron source of emission rate of 10(8) n s(-1). The neutron dose is approximately 10 times higher than the photon dose. Sky shine contributes by about 25-50% of the neutron dose and 7-27% of the gamma dose, depending on the location. The simulation uncertainty due to the possible variations in the simulation parameters has been given particular importance. PMID:19946121

  13. BENCHMARK DOSE SOFTWARE (BMDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced the latest update to the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) tool which is used to facilitate the application of benchmark dose (BMD) methods to EPA hazardous pollutant risk assessments. This latest version (1.4.1b) contains seventeen (17) different models that ar...

  14. A simple computer program for insulin dose adjustment in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, G; Santucci, S; Mannino, D; Alessi, R

    1988-01-01

    A program is described for the adjustment of insulin dose in diabetic patients. The program is written in BASIC and runs on a Casio FX-770P portable computer. On the basis of the maximum daily dose variation allowed, seven twice-daily glucose determinations and the previous insulin dose, the program generated 'cautious' and 'normal' insulin dose adjustment for 66 patients which correlated well with the judgements made by four expert diabetologists. PMID:3289828

  15. Calculation of external dose from distributed source

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a relatively simple calculational method, called the point kernel method (Fo68), for estimating external dose from distributed sources that emit photon or electron radiations. The principles of the point kernel method are emphasized, rather than the presentation of extensive sets of calculations or tables of numerical results. A few calculations are presented for simple source geometries as illustrations of the method, and references and descriptions are provided for other caluclations in the literature. This paper also describes exposure situations for which the point kernel method is not appropriate and other, more complex, methods must be used, but these methods are not discussed in any detail.

  16. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5?cm3to 23.3?cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20?min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  17. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern.

    PubMed

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Denis de Senneville, B; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Lagendijk, J J W; van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5?cm(3)to 23.3?cm(3)) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20?min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions. PMID:26378657

  18. A chronic oral reference dose for hexavalent chromium-induced intestinal cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M; Kirman, Christopher R; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Suh, Mina; Hays, Sean M; Hixon, J Gregory; Harris, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water induce villous cytotoxicity and compensatory crypt hyperplasia in the small intestines of mice (but not rats). Lifetime exposure to such cytotoxic concentrations increases intestinal neoplasms in mice, suggesting that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors involves chronic wounding and compensatory cell proliferation of the intestine. Therefore, we developed a chronic oral reference dose (RfD) designed to be protective of intestinal damage and thus intestinal cancer. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for chromium in mice was used to estimate the amount of Cr(VI) entering each intestinal tissue section (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) from the lumen per day (normalized to intestinal tissue weight). These internal dose metrics, together with corresponding incidences for diffuse hyperplasia, were used to derive points of departure using benchmark dose modeling and constrained nonlinear regression. Both modeling techniques resulted in similar points of departure, which were subsequently converted to human equivalent doses using a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. Applying appropriate uncertainty factors, an RfD of 0.006?mg?kg–1?day–1 was derived for diffuse hyperplasia—an effect that precedes tumor formation. This RfD is protective of both noncancer and cancer effects in the small intestine and corresponds to a safe drinking water equivalent level of 210 µg l–1. This concentration is higher than the current federal maximum contaminant level for total Cr (100 µg l–1) and well above levels of Cr(VI) in US drinking water supplies (typically???5 µg l–1). © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23943231

  19. Visible photoluminescence of color centers in LiF crystals for absorbed dose evaluation in clinical dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal-Barajas, J. E.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Bonfigli, F.; Khan, R. F.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among insulating materials, lithium fluoride (LiF) has been successfully used as ionizing radiation dosemeter for more than 60 years. Thermoluminescence (TL) has been the most commonly used reading technique to evaluate the absorbed dose. Lately, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of visible emitting color centers (CCs) has also been explored in pure and doped LiF. This work focuses on the experimental behaviour of nominally pure LiF crystals dosemeters for 6 MV x rays at low doses based on photoluminescence (PL) of radiation induced CCs. Polished LiF crystals were irradiated using 6 MV x rays produced by a clinical linear accelerator. The doses (absorbed dose to water) covered the 1-100 Gy range. Optical absorption spectra show stable formation of primary F defects up to a maximum concentration of 2×1016 cm-3, while no significant M absorption band at around 450 nm was detected. On the other hand, under Argon laser excitation at 458 nm, PL spectra of the irradiated LiF crystals clearly exhibited the characteristic F2 and F+3 visible broad emission bands. Their sum intensity is linearly proportional to the absorbed dose in the investigated range. PL integrated intensity was also measured using a conventional fluorescence optical microscope under blue lamp illumination. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the integrated F2 and F+3 PL intensities, represented by the net average pixel number in the optical fluorescence images, is also fairly linear. Even at the low point defect densities obtained at the investigated doses, these preliminary experimental results are encouraging for further investigation of CCs PL in LiF crystals for clinical dosimetry.

  20. Accuracy and optimal timing of activity measurements in estimating the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the treatment of Graves' disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, S.; Horowitz, J.; Traino, A. C.; Chipkin, S. R.; Hollot, C. V.; Chait, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Calculation of the therapeutic activity of radioiodine 131I for individualized dosimetry in the treatment of Graves' disease requires an accurate estimate of the thyroid absorbed radiation dose based on a tracer activity administration of 131I. Common approaches (Marinelli-Quimby formula, MIRD algorithm) use, respectively, the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid and the time-integrated activity. Many physicians perform one, two, or at most three tracer dose activity measurements at various times and calculate the required therapeutic activity by ad hoc methods. In this paper, we study the accuracy of estimates of four 'target variables': time-integrated activity coefficient, time of maximum activity, maximum activity, and effective half-life in the gland. Clinical data from 41 patients who underwent 131I therapy for Graves' disease at the University Hospital in Pisa, Italy, are used for analysis. The radioiodine kinetics are described using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. The distributions of the target variables in the patient population are characterized. Using minimum root mean squared error as the criterion, optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules are determined for estimation of the target variables, and probabilistic bounds are given for the errors under the optimal times. An algorithm is developed for computing the optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules for the target variables. This algorithm is implemented in a freely available software tool. Taking into consideration 131I effective half-life in the thyroid and measurement noise, the optimal 1-point time for time-integrated activity coefficient is a measurement 1 week following the tracer dose. Additional measurements give only a slight improvement in accuracy.

  1. BENCHMARK DOSE TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the Agency on the application of the benchmark dose approach in determining the point of departure (POD) for health effects data, whether a linear or nonlinear low dose extrapolation is used. The guidance includes discussion...

  2. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75?cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  3. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

  4. Calculation of total effective dose equivalent and collective dose in the event of a LOCA in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Raisali, G; Davilu, H; Haghighishad, A; Khodadadi, R; Sabet, M

    2006-01-01

    In this research, total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and collective dose (CD) are calculated for the most adverse potential accident in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant from the viewpoint of radionuclides release to the environment. Calculations are performed using a Gaussian diffusion model and a slightly modified version of AIREM computer code to adopt for conditions in Bushehr. The results are comparable with the final safety analysis report which used DOZAM code. Results of our calculations show no excessive dose in populated regions. Maximum TEDE is determined to be in the WSW direction. CD in the area around the nuclear power plant by a distance of 30 km (138 man Sv) is far below the accepted limits. Thyroid equivalent dose is also calculated for the WSW direction (maximum 25.6 mSv) and is below the limits at various distances from the reactor stack. PMID:16785243

  5. Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    A variety of distributional assumptions for dissimilarity judgments in multidimensional scaling are considered, with the lognormal distribution being favored for most situations. Procedures for maximum likelihood estimation in this setting are described and examples are presented. (Author/JKS)

  6. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may not pay any employee an annual rate of...

  7. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may not pay any employee an annual rate of...

  8. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may not pay any employee an annual rate of...

  9. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9701.312 Maximum rates. (a) DHS may not pay any employee an annual rate of...

  10. Probable maximum floods at the Yucca Mountain exploration shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Cardle, J.A.; Lim, S.T.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of flood flows in the Coyote Wash at the proposed high level nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Estimates of the hydrographs at various points in this wash resulting from the 100 year storm and from the probable maximum storms are developed and compared with other results. Flows in this particular wash are particularly critical due to the adjacent location of the proposed exploratory shafts. The resulting hydrographs at the site of the exploratory shaft pad are delineated.

  11. A real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool for patient specific VMAT QA and delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Neelam; Yang Kai; Gersten, David; Yan Di

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool to identify and quantify sources of errors during patient specific volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery and quality assurance. Methods: The authors develop a VMAT delivery monitor tool called linac data monitor that connects to the linac in clinical mode and records, displays, and compares real time machine parameters with the planned parameters. A new measure, called integral error, keeps a running total of leaf overshoot and undershoot errors in each leaf pair, multiplied by leaf width, and the amount of time during which the error exists in monitor unit delivery. Another tool reconstructs Pinnacle{sup 3} Trade-Mark-Sign format delivered plan based on the saved machine logfile and recalculates actual delivered dose in patient anatomy. Delivery characteristics of various standard fractionation and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) VMAT plans delivered on Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs were quantified. Results: The MLC and gantry errors for all the treatment sites were 0.00 {+-} 0.59 mm and 0.05 {+-} 0.31 Degree-Sign , indicating a good MLC gain calibration. Standard fractionation plans had a larger gantry error than SBRT plans due to frequent dose rate changes. On average, the MLC errors were negligible but larger errors of up to 6 mm and 2.5 Degree-Sign were seen when dose rate varied frequently. Large gantry errors occurred during the acceleration and deceleration process, and correlated well with MLC errors (r= 0.858, p= 0.0004). PTV mean, minimum, and maximum dose discrepancies were 0.87 {+-} 0.21%, 0.99 {+-} 0.59%, and 1.18 {+-} 0.52%, respectively. The organs at risk (OAR) doses were within 2.5%, except some OARs that showed up to 5.6% discrepancy in maximum dose. Real time displayed normalized total positive integral error (normalized to the total monitor units) correlated linearly with MLC (r= 0.9279, p < 0.001) and gantry errors (r= 0.742, p= 0.005). There is a strong correlation between total integral error and PTV mean (r= 0.683, p= 0.015), minimum (r= 0.6147, p= 0.033), and maximum dose (r= 0.6038, p= 0.0376). Conclusions: Errors may exist during complex VMAT planning and delivery. Linac data monitor is capable of detecting and quantifying mechanical and dosimetric errors at various stages of planning and delivery.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn; Knych, Heather K; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wack, Raymund F

    2015-03-01

    Information regarding analgesics in pinnipeds is limited. This study aimed to establish the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine (Buprenorphine SR) in juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with regard to its potential to provide long-lasting analgesia that requires infrequent dosing. Seals (n=26) were administered a single dose of sustained release buprenorphine at 0.12 mg/kg s.c. Blood samples were collected from the extradural intervertebral vein at 0 hr and at three or four of the following time points: 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 96, 120, and 144 hr. Seals were examined daily for systemic and local adverse reactions. Plasma was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations. A noncompartmental analysis for pharmacokinetic parameters was calculated using standard methods and equations. An average maximum concentration of 1.21 ng/ml (0.3-2.9 ng/ml) was detected 12 hr postadministration. Concentrations were quantifiable up to 144 hr postadministration but were below those expected to provide analgesia in some other species. No systemic adverse effects were noted in healthy seals receiving sustained release buprenorphine. Cellulitis or abscesses at the injection site were observed in 6/26 (23%) seals between 24 and 168 hr postadministration. Adverse local effects suggest that this drug should be used with caution in northern elephant seals. PMID:25831576

  13. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Pape Møller, Anders

    2015-11-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011–2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31??Gy h?1) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97??Gy h?1), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011–2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

  14. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A; Pape Møller, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31??Gy h(-1)) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97??Gy h(-1)), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity. PMID:26567770

  15. Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships

    PubMed Central

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Della-Vedova, Claire; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Ritz, Christian; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Pape Møller, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011–2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31??Gy h?1) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97??Gy h?1), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011–2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity. PMID:26567770

  16. Maximum confidence measurements via probabilistic quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hai; Yu, Long-Bao; Cao, Zhuo-Liang; Ye, Liu

    2013-03-01

    Probabilistic quantum cloning (PQC) cannot copy a set of linearly dependent quantum states. In this paper, we show that if incorrect copies are allowed to be produced, linearly dependent quantum states may also be cloned by the PQC. By exploiting this kind of PQC to clone a special set of three linearly dependent quantum states, we derive the upper bound of the maximum confidence measure of a set. An explicit transformation of the maximum confidence measure is presented.

  17. Effects of prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on doses in high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong . E-mail: sli1@hfhs.org; Aref, Ibrahim; Walker, Eleanor; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the effects of the prescription depth, cylinder size, treatment length, tip space, and curved end on high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (HDR-VBT) of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were prescribed and optimized based on points at the cylinder surface or at 0.5-cm depth. Cylinder sizes ranging from 2 to 4 cm in diameter, and treatment lengths ranging from 3 to 8 cm were used. Dose points in various depths were precisely defined along the cylinder dome. The given dose and dose uniformity to a depth of interest were measured by the mean dose (MD) and standard deviation (SD), respectively, among the dose points belonging to the depth. Dose fall-off beyond the 0.5 cm treatment depth was determined by the ratio of MD at 0.75-cm depth to MD at 0.5-cm depth. Results: Dose distribution varies significantly with different prescriptions. The surface prescription provides more uniform doses at all depths in the target volume, whereas the 0.5-cm depth prescription creates larger dose variations at the cylinder surface. Dosimetric uncertainty increases significantly (>30%) with shorter tip space. Extreme hot (>150%) and cold spots (<60%) occur if no optimization points were placed at the curved end. Conclusions: Instead of prescribing to a depth of 0.5 cm, increasing the dose per fraction and prescribing to the surface with the exact surface points around the cylinder dome appears to be the optimal approach.

  18. Quantitative Dose Dependency Analysis of Whole-Brain CT Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Manniesing, Rashindra; Oei, Marcel T H; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively assess whether decreasing total radiation dose of the image acquisition protocol has an effect on cerebral CT perfusion values in patients with acute stroke. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee, and informed consent was waived. Twenty consecutive patients with ischemic stroke who underwent CT perfusion imaging with a 320-detector row CT scanner were included. A standard acquisition protocol was used, which was started 5 seconds after injection of a contrast agent, with a scan at 200 mAs, followed after 4 seconds by 13 scans, one every 2 seconds, at 100 mAs, and then five scans, one every 5 seconds, at 75 mAs. The total examination had an average effective dose of 5.0 mSv. For each patient, a patient-specific digital perfusion phantom was constructed to simulate the same protocol at a lower total dose (0.5-5.0 mSv, with stepped doses of 0.5 mSv). The lowest setting for which the maximum mean difference remained within 5% of the reference standard (at 5.0 mSv) was marked as the optimal setting. At the optimal setting, Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations with the reference values, and paired t tests were performed to compare the means. Results At 2.5 mSv, the maximum mean differences in values from those of the reference standard were 4.5%, 5.0%, and 1.9%, for cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficients of perfusion values for white matter and gray matter were 0.864-0.917, and all differences were significant (P < .0001). Paired t tests showed no significant differences between the reference standard and optimal settings (P = .089-.923). Conclusion The total dose of a clinical cerebral CT perfusion protocol can be lowered to 2.5 mSv, with only minor quantitative effects on perfusion values. Dose reduction beyond this point resulted in overestimation of perfusion values. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26114226

  19. The measurement of maximum cylinder pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Chester W

    1929-01-01

    The work presented in this report was undertaken at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine a suitable method for measuring the maximum pressures occurring in aircraft engine cylinders. The study and development of instruments for the measurement of maximum cylinder pressures has been conducted in connection with carburetor and oil engine investigations on a single cylinder aircraft-type engine. Five maximum cylinder-pressure devices have been designed, and tested, in addition to the testing of three commercial indicators. Values of maximum cylinder pressures are given as obtained with various indicators for the same pressures and for various kinds and values of maximum cylinder pressures, produced chiefly by variation of the injection advance angle in high-speed oil engine. The investigations indicate that the greatest accuracy in determining maximum cylinder pressures can be obtained with an electric, balanced-pressure, diaphragm or disk-type indicator so constructed as to have a diaphragm or disk of relatively large area and minimum seat width and mass.

  20. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    MedlinePLUS

    Taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help children with colds and fever feel better. As with all drugs, it is important to give children the correct dose. Acetaminophen is safe when taken as directed. But taking ...

  1. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff.

    PubMed

    Hong, Linda X; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R(50%)); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D(2cm)) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The ?(2) test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V(100% PD) ? 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V(90% PD) ? 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D(2cm), 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives. PMID:25498838

  2. 24 CFR 886.108 - Maximum annual contract commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Maximum annual contract commitment. 886.108 Section 886.108 ...886.108 Maximum annual contract commitment. (a) Number of units assisted...conversion. (b) Maximum annual Contract commitment. The maximum annual housing...

  3. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels § 141.65 Maximum residual disinfectant levels. (a) Maximum...

  4. 44 CFR 208.12 - Maximum Pay Rate Table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...table that identifies the maximum pay rates for selected System positions that may be used for...as the basis for the maximum pay rate schedule. DHS considers System members' experience and sets maximum pay rates at the maximum...

  5. 44 CFR 208.12 - Maximum Pay Rate Table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...table that identifies the maximum pay rates for selected System positions that may be used for...as the basis for the maximum pay rate schedule. DHS considers System members' experience and sets maximum pay rates at the maximum...

  6. 44 CFR 208.12 - Maximum Pay Rate Table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...table that identifies the maximum pay rates for selected System positions that may be used for...as the basis for the maximum pay rate schedule. DHS considers System members' experience and sets maximum pay rates at the maximum...

  7. 44 CFR 208.12 - Maximum Pay Rate Table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...table that identifies the maximum pay rates for selected System positions that may be used for...as the basis for the maximum pay rate schedule. DHS considers System members' experience and sets maximum pay rates at the maximum...

  8. 44 CFR 208.12 - Maximum Pay Rate Table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...table that identifies the maximum pay rates for selected System positions that may be used for...as the basis for the maximum pay rate schedule. DHS considers System members' experience and sets maximum pay rates at the maximum...

  9. Commentary 2 to Cox and Little: radiation-induced oncogenic transformation: the interplay between dose, dose protraction, and radiation quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence for end points such as oncogenic transformation in vitro, and carcinogenesis and life shortening in vivo, suggesting that dose protraction leads to an increase in effectiveness relative to a single, acute exposure--at least for radiations of medium linear energy transfer (LET) such as neutrons. Table I contains a summary of the pertinent data from studies in which the effect is seen. [table: see text] This phenomenon has come to be known as the "inverse dose rate effect," because it is in marked contrast to the situation at low LET, where protraction in delivery of a dose of radiation, either by fractionation or low dose rate, results in a decreased biological effect; additionally, at medium and high LET, for radiobiological end points such as clonogenic survival, the biological effectiveness is independent of protraction. The quantity and quality of the published reports on the "inverse dose rate effect" leaves little doubt that the effect is real, but the available evidence indicates that the magnitude of the effect is due to a complex interplay between dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Here, we first summarize the available data on the inverse dose rate effect and suggest that it follows a consistent pattern in regard to dose, dose rate, and radiation quality; second, we describe a model that predicts these features; and, finally, we describe the significance of the effect for radiation protection.

  10. The 1984 - 1987 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Nelson, J. J.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1984-1987 pointed observations is presented. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) gamma ray spectrometer; (2) hard x-ray burst spectrometer; (3) flat crystal spectrometer; (4) bent crystal spectrometer; (5) ultraviolet spectrometer polarimeter; and (6) coronograph/polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  11. A Maximum Likelihood Approach to Estimating Correlation Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Eric Jones; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    We define a maximum likelihood (ML for short) estimator for the correlation function, ?, that uses the same pair counting observables (D, R, DD, DR, RR) as the standard Landy & Szalay (LS for short) estimator. The ML estimator outperforms the LS estimator in that it results in smaller measurement errors at any fixed random point density. Put another way, the ML estimator can reach the same precision as the LS estimator with a significantly smaller random point catalog. Moreover, these gains are achieved without significantly increasing the computational requirements for estimating ?. We quantify the relative improvement of the ML estimator over the LS estimator and discuss the regimes under which these improvements are most significant. We present a short guide on how to implement the ML estimator and emphasize that the code alterations required to switch from an LS to an ML estimator are minimal.

  12. A maximum likelihood approach to estimating correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Eric Jones; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-12-10

    We define a maximum likelihood (ML for short) estimator for the correlation function, ?, that uses the same pair counting observables (D, R, DD, DR, RR) as the standard Landy and Szalay (LS for short) estimator. The ML estimator outperforms the LS estimator in that it results in smaller measurement errors at any fixed random point density. Put another way, the ML estimator can reach the same precision as the LS estimator with a significantly smaller random point catalog. Moreover, these gains are achieved without significantly increasing the computational requirements for estimating ?. We quantify the relative improvement of the ML estimator over the LS estimator and discuss the regimes under which these improvements are most significant. We present a short guide on how to implement the ML estimator and emphasize that the code alterations required to switch from an LS to an ML estimator are minimal.

  13. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ask the Experts Members Only Doses from Medical Radiation Sources Michael G. Stabin, PhD, CHP Introduction Radiation ... interruption of feeding may be necessary. Doses in Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, much higher doses are ...

  14. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  15. Extreme variations of air dose rates in east Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    This report analyses the data of air (ambient) dose rates measured at 164 points in eastern Fukushima during a period of half a year after 10 June 2011. It is found that at some locations the values decreased or increased extraordinarily although on average the overall dose rates decreased significantly faster than the theoretically predicted rate. Among them the nine most extreme points are selected and analysed. It is found that behind these extraordinary behaviours of air dose rates there exists the combination of wind/rain and artificial structures such as sloped pavements. PMID:25953791

  16. Effets pathogènes d'un faible débit de dose : la relation « dose effet »

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, Roland

    2002-10-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and " severe socio-economic and psychological pressures… poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors" as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. To cite this article: R. Masse, C. R. Physique 3 (2002) 1049-1058.

  17. The estimation of galactic cosmic ray penetration and dose rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrell, M. O.; Wright, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    This study is concerned with approximation methods that can be readily applied to estimate the absorbed dose rate from cosmic rays in rads - tissue or rems inside simple geometries of aluminum. The present work is limited to finding the dose rate at the center of spherical shells or behind plane slabs. The dose rate is calculated at tissue-point detectors or for thin layers of tissue. This study considers cosmic-rays dose rates for both free-space and earth-orbiting missions.

  18. Random walk with random resetting to the maximum position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2015-11-01

    We study analytically a simple random walk model on a one-dimensional lattice, where at each time step the walker resets to the maximum of the already visited positions (to the rightmost visited site) with a probability r , and with probability (1 -r ) , it undergoes symmetric random walk, i.e., it hops to one of its neighboring sites, with equal probability (1 -r )/2 . For r =0 , it reduces to a standard random walk whose typical distance grows as ?{n } for large n . In the presence of a nonzero resetting rate 0 maximum and the average position grow ballistically for large n , with a common speed v (r ) . Moreover, the fluctuations around their respective averages grow diffusively, again with the same diffusion coefficient D (r ) . We compute v (r ) and D (r ) explicitly. We also show that the probability distribution of the difference between the maximum and the location of the walker becomes stationary as n ?? . However, the approach to this stationary distribution is accompanied by a dynamical phase transition, characterized by a weakly singular large deviation function. We also show that r =0 is a special "critical" point, for which the growth laws are different from the r ?0 case and we calculate the exact crossover functions that interpolate between the critical (r =0 ) and the off-critical (r ?0 ) behavior for finite but large n .

  19. Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information

    E-print Network

    B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

    2014-04-29

    Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

  20. Retrospective Reconstructions of Active Bone Marrow Dose-Volume Histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Cristina; Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Mège, Jean Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Quiniou, Eric; Deutsh, Eric; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To present a method for calculating dose-volume histograms (DVH's) to the active bone marrow (ABM) of patients who had undergone radiation therapy (RT) and subsequently developed leukemia. Methods and Materials: The study focuses on 15 patients treated between 1961 and 1996. Whole-body RT planning computed tomographic (CT) data were not available. We therefore generated representative whole-body CTs similar to patient anatomy. In addition, we developed a method enabling us to obtain information on the density distribution of ABM all over the skeleton. Dose could then be calculated in a series of points distributed all over the skeleton in such a way that their local density reflected age-specific data for ABM distribution. Dose to particular regions and dose-volume histograms of the entire ABM were estimated for all patients. Results: Depending on patient age, the total number of dose calculation points generated ranged from 1,190,970 to 4,108,524. The average dose to ABM ranged from 0.3 to 16.4 Gy. Dose-volume histograms analysis showed that the median doses (D{sub 50%}) ranged from 0.06 to 12.8 Gy. We also evaluated the inhomogeneity of individual patient ABM dose distribution according to clinical situation. It was evident that the coefficient of variation of the dose for the whole ABM ranged from 1.0 to 5.7, which means that the standard deviation could be more than 5 times higher than the mean. Conclusions: For patients with available long-term follow-up data, our method provides reconstruction of dose-volume data comparable to detailed dose calculations, which have become standard in modern CT-based 3-dimensional RT planning. Our strategy of using dose-volume histograms offers new perspectives to retrospective epidemiological studies.

  1. SU-E-T-636: Investigation of Dose Variation in High Dose Radiation Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hyvarinen, M; Leventouri, T; Casey, C; Long, S; Pella, S; Dumitru, N; Herrera, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator's placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Significant dose variation was obtained for the Contura, Savi, MLM and Prostate applicators. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended. Florida Atlantic University may provide Travel reimbursements.

  2. Dosimetric impact of source-positioning uncertainty in high-dose-rate balloon brachytherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dosimetric impact of source-positioning uncertainty in high-dose-rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods For 49 HDR balloon patients, each dwell position of catheter(s) was manually shifted distally (+) and proximally (–) with a magnitude from 1 to 4 mm. Total 392 plans were retrospectively generated and compared to corresponding clinical plans using 7 dosimetric parameters: dose (D95) to 95% of planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL), and volume covered by 100% and 90% of the prescribed dose (PD) (V100 and V90); skin and rib maximum point dose (Dmax); normal breast tissue volume receiving 150% and 200% of PD (V150 and V200). Results PTV_EVAL dosimetry deteriorated with larger average/maximum reduction (from ± 1 mm to ± 4 mm) for larger source position uncertainty (p value < 0.0001): from 1.0%/2.5%, 3.3%/5.9%, 6.3%/10.0% to 9.8%/14.5% for D95; from 1.0%/2.6%, 3.1%/5.7%, 5.8%/8.9% to 8.7%/12.3% for V100; from 0.2%/1.5%, 1.0%/4.0%, 2.7%/6.8% to 5.1%/10.3% for V90. ? ± 3 mm shift reduced average D95 to < 95% and average V100 to < 90%. While skin and rib Dmax change was case-specific, its absolute change (??(Value)?) showed that larger shift and high dose group had larger variation compared to smaller and lower dose group (p value < 0.0001), respectively. Normal breast tissue V150 variation was case-specific and small. Average ??(V150)? was 0.2 cc for the largest shift (± 4 mm) with maximum < 1.7 cc. V200 was increased with higher elevation for larger shift: from 6.4 cc/9.8 cc, 7.0 cc/10.1 cc, 8.0 cc/11.3 cc to 9.2 cc/ 13.0 cc. Conclusions The tolerance of ± 2 mm recommended by AAPM TG 56 is clinically acceptable in most clinical cases. However, special attention should be paid to a case where both skin and rib are located proximally to balloon, and the orientation of balloon catheter(s) is vertical to these critical structures. In this case, sufficient dosimetric planning margins are required.

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D Imaging and Treatment Planning for Postoperative Vaginal Apex High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, James K.; Armeson, Kent E.; Richardson, Susan

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate bladder and rectal doses using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D treatment planning for vaginal cuff high-dose rate (HDR) in endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients treated between 2000 and 2007 were evaluated. Seventy-one and 20 patients underwent 2D and 3D planning, respectively. Each patient received six fractions prescribed at 0.5 cm to the superior 3 cm of the vagina. International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) doses were calculated for 2D patients. Maximum and 2-cc doses were calculated for 3D patients. Organ doses were normalized to prescription dose. Results: Bladder maximum doses were 178% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were no different than ICRU doses (p = 0.22). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 59% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Rectal maximum doses were 137% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 87% of ICRU doses (p < 0.0001). Two-cubic centimeter doses were 64% of maximum doses (p < 0.0001). Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final bladder dose to within 10% for 44%, 59%, 83%, 82%, and 89% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 45%, 55%, 80%, 85%, and 85% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 37%, 68%, 79%, 79%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Using the first 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 fractions, we predicted the final rectal dose to within 10% for 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients by using the ICRU dose, and for 60%, 65%, 70%, 75%, and 75% of patients by using the maximum dose, and for 68%, 95%, 84%, 84%, and 84% of patients by using the 2-cc dose. Conclusions: Doses to organs at risk vary depending on the calculation method. In some cases, final dose accuracy appears to plateau after the third fraction, indicating that simulation and planning may not be necessary in all fractions. A clinically relevant level of accuracy should be determined and further research conducted to address this issue.

  4. Motion as a perturbation: Measurement-guided dose estimates to moving patient voxels during modulated arc deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey; Hunt, Dylan; Opp, Daniel; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Wolf, Theresa K.; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To present a framework for measurement-guided VMAT dose reconstruction to moving patient voxels from a known motion kernel and the static phantom data, and to validate this perturbation-based approach with the proof-of-principle experiments. Methods: As described previously, the VMAT 3D dose to a static patient can be estimated by applying a phantom measurement-guided perturbation to the treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated dose grid. The fraction dose to any voxel in the presence of motion, assuming the motion kernel is known, can be derived in a similar fashion by applying a measurement-guided motion perturbation. The dose to the diodes in a helical phantom is recorded at 50 ms intervals and is transformed into a series of time-resolved high-density volumetric dose grids. A moving voxel is propagated through this 4D dose space and the fraction dose to that voxel in the phantom is accumulated. The ratio of this motion-perturbed, reconstructed dose to the TPS dose in the phantom serves as a perturbation factor, applied to the TPS fraction dose to the similarly situated voxel in the patient. This approach was validated by the ion chamber and film measurements on four phantoms of different shape and structure: homogeneous and inhomogeneous cylinders, a homogeneous cube, and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. A 2D motion stage was used to simulate the motion. The stage position was synchronized with the beam start time with the respiratory gating simulator. The motion patterns were designed such that the motion speed was in the upper range of the expected tumor motion (1-1.4 cm/s) and the range exceeded the normally observed limits (up to 5.7 cm). The conformal arc plans for X or Y motion (in the IEC 61217 coordinate system) consisted of manually created narrow (3 cm) rectangular strips moving in-phase (tracking) or phase-shifted by 90 Degree-Sign (crossing) with respect to the phantom motion. The XY motion was tested with the computer-derived VMAT MLC sequences. For all phantoms and plans, time-resolved (10 Hz) ion chamber dose was collected. In addition, coronal (XY) films were exposed in the cube phantom to a VMAT beam with two different starting phases, and compared to the reconstructed motion-perturbed dose planes. Results: For the X or Y motions with the moving strip and geometrical phantoms, the maximum difference between perturbation-reconstructed and ion chamber doses did not exceed 1.9%, and the average for any motion pattern/starting phase did not exceed 1.3%. For the VMAT plans on the cubic and thoracic phantoms, one point exhibited a 3.5% error, while the remaining five were all within 1.1%. Across all the measurements (N = 22), the average disagreement was 0.5 {+-} 1.3% (1 SD). The films exhibited {gamma}(3%/3 mm) passing rates {>=}90%. Conclusions: The dose to an arbitrary moving voxel in a patient can be estimated with acceptable accuracy for a VMAT delivery, by performing a single QA measurement with a cylindrical phantom and applying two consecutive perturbations to the TPS-calculated patient dose. The first one accounts for the differences between the planned and delivered static doses, while the second one corrects for the motion.

  5. Failure of antimony trioxide to induce micronuclei or chromosomal aberrations in rat bone-marrow after sub-chronic oral dosing.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, David; Whitwell, James; Deyo, James; Serex, Tessa

    2007-03-01

    Antimony trioxide (Sb2O3, CAS 1309-64-4) is widely used as a flame retardant synergist in a number of household products, as a fining agent in glass manufacture, and as a catalyst in the manufacture of various types of polyester plastics. It does not induce point mutations in bacteria or mammalian cells, but is able to induce chromosomal aberrations (CA) in cultured cells in vitro. Although no CA or micronuclei (MN) have been induced after acute oral dosing of mice, repeated oral dosing for 14 or 21 days resulted in increased CA in one report, but did not result in increased MN in another. In order to further investigate its in vivo genotoxicity, Sb2O3 was dosed orally to groups of rats for 21 days at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg day. There were no clinical signs of toxicity in the Sb2O3-exposed animals except for some reductions in body-weight gain in the top dose group. Toxicokinetic measurements in a separate study confirmed bone-marrow exposure, and at higher levels than would have been achieved by single oral dosing. Large numbers of cells were scored for CA (600 metaphases/sex group) and MN (12,000 PCE/sex group) but frequencies of CA or MN in Sb2O3-treated rats were very similar to controls, and not biologically or statistically different, at all doses. These results provide further indication that Sb2O3 is not genotoxic to the bone marrow of rodents after 21 days of oral administration at high doses close to the maximum tolerated dose. PMID:17174592

  6. Exenatide dosing in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Cebra, C K; Smith, C C; Stang, B V; Tornquist, S J

    2014-08-01

    In order to investigate whether exenatide could be used to stimulate glucose clearance and insulin secretion in alpacas without causing colic signs, six healthy adult alpacas were injected once a day with increasing subcutaneous doses. A follow-up intravenous glucose injection was given to induce hyperglycemia, and serial blood samples were collected to measure plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and nonesterified fatty acids. The exenatide doses used were saline control (no drug), and 0.02, 0.05, or 0.1 mcg/kg injected subcutaneously. Alpacas had significantly lower plasma glucose concentrations and higher insulin concentrations on all treatment days compared with the control day, but the increase in insulin was significantly greater and lasted significantly longer when the alpacas received the two higher dosages. Two of the alpacas developed mild colic signs at the 0.05 mcg/kg dose and were not evaluated at the highest dose. Based on these findings, the 0.05 mcg/kg dose appears to offer the greatest stimulation of insulin secretion and glucose clearance without excessive risk or severity of complications. PMID:24479825

  7. Forward Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Breast Cancer to Improve Dose Homogeneity: Feasibility of Class Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Peulen, Heike; Hanbeukers, Bianca; Boersma, Liesbeth; Baardwijk, Angela van; Ende, Piet van den; Houben, Ruud; Jager, Jos; Murrer, Lars; Borger, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV){sub 95%} of >99%; V{sub 107%} of <1.8 cc; heart V{sub 5Gy} of <10% and V{sub 10Gy} of <5%; and mean lung dose of <7 Gy. Treatment planning started with classic tangential beams. Optimization was done by adding a maximum of four segments before adding beams, in a second step. A breath-hold technique was used for heart sparing if necessary. Results: Dose constraints were met for all 60 patients. The classic tangential beam setup was not sufficient for any of the patients; in one-third of patients, additional segments were required (<3), and in two-thirds of patients, additional beams (<2) were required. Logistic regression analyses revealed central breast diameter (CD) and central lung distance as independent predictors for transition from additional segments to additional beams, with a CD cut-off point at 23.6 cm. Conclusions: Treatment plans fulfilling strict dose homogeneity criteria and normal tissue constraints could be obtained for all patients by stepwise dose intensity modification using limited numbers of segments and additional beams. In patients with a CD of >23.6 cm, additional beams were always required.

  8. Prediction of the maximum annual mean sunspot number in the coming solar maximum epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, R. P.

    1987-09-01

    Using an earlier correlation analysis between the annual sunspot numbers at sunspot maximum epochs and the minimum annual aa index in the immediately preceding years (Kane, 1978), the minimum annual aa index during 1985-86 is determined. The value obtained (21.6) implies a maximum annual sunspot number of aobut 190 + or - 40 in the coming solar maximum epoch, in about 1988-89.

  9. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-11-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets.

  10. Gigantic maximum of nanoscale noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kohta; Hayashi, Kenichi; Shibayama, Yoshiyuki; Shirahama, Keiya

    2010-12-01

    We report measurements of noncontact friction between surfaces of NbSe2 and SrTiO3 and a sharp Pt-Ir tip that is oscillated laterally by a quartz tuning fork cantilever. At 4.2 K, the friction coefficients on both the metallic and insulating materials show a giant maximum at the tip-surface distance of several nanometers. The maximum is strongly correlated with an increase in the spring constant of the cantilever. These features can be understood phenomenologically by a distance-dependent relaxation mechanism with distributed time scales. PMID:21231483

  11. Maximum predictive power and the superposition principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summhammer, Johann

    1994-01-01

    In quantum physics the direct observables are probabilities of events. We ask how observed probabilities must be combined to achieve what we call maximum predictive power. According to this concept the accuracy of a prediction must only depend on the number of runs whose data serve as input for the prediction. We transform each probability to an associated variable whose uncertainty interval depends only on the amount of data and strictly decreases with it. We find that for a probability which is a function of two other probabilities maximum predictive power is achieved when linearly summing their associated variables and transforming back to a probability. This recovers the quantum mechanical superposition principle.

  12. A differential method of maximum entropy

    E-print Network

    Bajkova, A T

    1998-01-01

    We consider a differential method of maximum entropy that is based on the linearity of Fourier transform and involves reconstruction of images from the differences of the visibility function. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with respect to the recovery of source images with bright components against the background of a sufficiently weak extended base. The simulation results are given along with the maps of an extragalactic radio source 0059+581, which were obtained using the standard and differential methods of maximum entropy for three observation dates and show that the principle of differential mapping allows us to increase considerably the dynamic interval of images.

  13. A differential method of maximum entropy

    E-print Network

    Anisa T. Bajkova

    2002-04-19

    We consider a differential method of maximum entropy that is based on the linearity of Fourier transform and involves reconstruction of images from the differences of the visibility function. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with respect to the recovery of source images with bright components against the background of a sufficiently weak extended base. The simulation results are given along with the maps of an extragalactic radio source 0059+581, which were obtained using the standard and differential methods of maximum entropy for three observation dates and show that the principle of differential mapping allows us to increase considerably the dynamic interval of images.

  14. Efficiency of molecular motors at maximum power

    E-print Network

    Schmiedl, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Molecular motors transduce chemical energy obtained from hydrolizing ATP into mechanical work exerted against an external force. We calculate their efficiency at maximum power output for two simple generic models and show that the qualitative behaviour depends crucially on the position of the transition state. Specifically, we find a transition state near the initial state (sometimes characterized as a "power stroke") to be most favorable with respect to both high power output and high efficiency at maximum power. In this regime, driving the motor further out of equilibrium by applying higher chemical potential differences can even, counter-intuitively, increase the efficiency.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin at traditional versus high doses: implications for once-daily aminoglycoside dosing.

    PubMed Central

    Demczar, D J; Nafziger, A N; Bertino, J S

    1997-01-01

    Two doses of gentamicin (2 and 7 mg/kg of body weight) were administered to 11 healthy volunteers in a randomized, crossover single-dose study to compare their pharmacokinetics. Doses were infused over 1 h with a syringe infusion pump, and 14 concentrations in sera were obtained over an 8-h period. Concentration in serum versus time data were fitted to a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. In addition, to mimic the clinical setting, subjects' data were fitted by the Sawchuk-Zaske method. Distributional and postdistributional peak concentrations, along with the last obtained concentration in serum, were utilized to compare the following pharmacokinetic variables: volume of distribution at steady state (Vss), half-life, clearance (CL), and maximum concentration in serum (Cmax). With two-compartment pharmacokinetic fitting, significant differences in distribution half-life (average, 21.8 and 41.6 min [P < or = 0.05]) and gentamicin CL (76.6 +/- 6.6 and 67.2 +/- 4.2 ml/min/1.73 m2 [P < or = 0.001]) were found between traditional-dose and high-dose groups, respectively. When the data for concentrations in sera were fitted to a one-compartment pharmacokinetic model by using either the distributional or the postdistributional Cmax, statistically significant differences (P < or = 0.001) were found between Vss, half-life, CL, and Cmax values for both dosage groups. The results show that the pharmacokinetics of gentamicin at a large dose differ significantly from those at the traditional dose. This information has direct implications for once-daily aminoglycoside (ODA) literature when the Cmax values reported are distributional and therefore show falsely high Cmax/MIC ratio estimates. In addition, ODA nomogram dosing tools developed with distributional Cmax values are probably inaccurate. PMID:9145878

  16. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  17. SU-E-T-259: Particle Swarm Optimization in Radial Dose Function Fitting for a Novel Iodine-125 Seed

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X; Duan, J; Popple, R; Huang, M; Shen, S; Brezovich, I; Cardan, R; Benhabib, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the coefficients of bi- and tri-exponential functions for the best fit of radial dose functions of the new iodine brachytherapy source: Iodine-125 Seed AgX-100. Methods: The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method was used to search for the coefficients of the biand tri-exponential functions that yield the best fit to data published for a few selected radial distances from the source. The coefficients were encoded into particles, and these particles move through the search space by following their local and global best-known positions. In each generation, particles were evaluated through their fitness function and their positions were changed through their velocities. This procedure was repeated until the convergence criterion was met or the maximum generation was reached. All best particles were found in less than 1,500 generations. Results: For the I-125 seed AgX-100 considered as a point source, the maximum deviation from the published data is less than 2.9% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.2% for tri-exponential fitting function. For its line source, the maximum deviation is less than 1.1% for bi-exponential fitting function and 0.08% for tri-exponential fitting function. Conclusion: PSO is a powerful method in searching coefficients for bi-exponential and tri-exponential fitting functions. The bi- and tri-exponential models of Iodine-125 seed AgX-100 point and line sources obtained with PSO optimization provide accurate analytical forms of the radial dose function. The tri-exponential fitting function is more accurate than the bi-exponential function.

  18. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses atmore »various downwind distances as specified by the user.« less

  19. Dose-volume based ranking of incident beam direction and its utility in facilitating IMRT beam placement

    SciTech Connect

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: Beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is computationally intensive, and various single beam ranking techniques have been proposed to reduce the search space. Up to this point, none of the existing ranking techniques considers the clinically important dose-volume effects of the involved structures, which may lead to clinically irrelevant angular ranking. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically sensible angular ranking model with incorporation of dose-volume effects and to show its utility for IMRT beam placement. Methods and Materials: The general consideration in constructing this angular ranking function is that a beamlet/beam is preferable if it can deliver a higher dose to the target without exceeding the tolerance of the sensitive structures located on the path of the beamlet/beam. In the previously proposed dose-based approach, the beamlets are treated independently and, to compute the maximally deliverable dose to the target volume, the intensity of each beamlet is pushed to its maximum intensity without considering the values of other beamlets. When volumetric structures are involved, the complication arises from the fact that there are numerous dose distributions corresponding to the same dose-volume tolerance. In this situation, the beamlets are not independent and an optimization algorithm is required to find the intensity profile that delivers the maximum target dose while satisfying the volumetric constraints. In this study, the behavior of a volumetric organ was modeled by using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD). A constrained sequential quadratic programming algorithm (CFSQP) was used to find the beam profile that delivers the maximum dose to the target volume without violating the EUD constraint or constraints. To assess the utility of the proposed technique, we planned a head-and-neck and abdominal case with and without the guidance of the angular ranking information. The qualities of the two types of IMRT plans were compared quantitatively. Results: An effective angular ranking model with consideration of volumetric effect has been developed. It is shown that the previously reported dose-based angular ranking represents a special case of the general formalism proposed here. Application of the technique to a abdominal and a head-and-neck IMRT case indicated that the proposed technique is capable of producing clinically sensible angular ranking. In both cases, we found that the IMRT plans obtained under the guidance of EUD-based angular ranking were improved in comparison with that obtained using the conventional uniformly spaced beams. Conclusions: The EUD-based function is a general approach for angular ranking and allows us to identify the potentially good and bad angles for clinically complicated cases. The ranking can be used either as a guidance to facilitate the manual beam placement or as prior information to speed up the computer search for the optimal beam configuration. Thus the proposed technique should have positive clinical impact in facilitating the IMRT planning process.

  20. Maximum rotation frequency of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zdunik, J.L.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-07-15

    Using the MIT bag model of strange-quark matter, we calculate the maximum angular frequency of the uniform rotation of strange stars. After studying a broad range of the MIT bag-model parameters, we obtain an upper bound of 12.3 kHz.

  1. 49 CFR 107.329 - Maximum penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum penalties. 107.329 Section 107.329 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND OIL TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Compliance...

  2. Improved Design Debugging using Maximum Satisfiability

    E-print Network

    Veneris, Andreas

    the performance of current state-of-the-art debugging techniques, thus making them more practical. More and newer debugging techniques must be greatly improved to make debugging practical for industrial problemsImproved Design Debugging using Maximum Satisfiability Sean Safarpour, Hratch Mangassarian, Andreas

  3. Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W; Lee, Stephen M

    1922-01-01

    Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.

  4. Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-08-30

    We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

  5. Maximum Margin Discriminant Analysis based Face Recognition

    E-print Network

    Szepesvari, Csaba

    Maximum Margin Discriminant Analysis based Face Recognition Korn´el Kov´acs1 , Andr´as Kocsor1 that MMDA is capable of finding good features in face recognition and performs very well provided it is preceded by an appropriate preprocessing phase. 1 Introduction Human face recognition is a special

  6. The maximum output parameters of an amplitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiburin, V. B.

    1982-05-01

    Using basic energy concepts, analytic relations are obtained for calculating the maximum value of the output high-frequency power and of the anode current of an amplitron amplifier. The results of the calculations are found to be in agreement with experimental data on the power, efficiency, and anode current. A cylindrical model is used, with the emission limited by a space charge.

  7. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1...Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus...Fourth year medical school GS-9-1 (minus...Medical or dental internship GS-10-1 (minus...determined that a higher maximum...

  8. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1...Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus...Fourth year medical school GS-9-1 (minus...Medical or dental internship GS-10-1 (minus...determined that a higher maximum...

  9. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1...Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus...Fourth year medical school GS-9-1 (minus...Medical or dental internship GS-10-1 (minus...determined that a higher maximum...

  10. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1...Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus...Fourth year medical school GS-9-1 (minus...Medical or dental internship GS-10-1 (minus...determined that a higher maximum...

  11. 5 CFR 534.203 - Maximum stipends.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...1 L-A Below high school graduation GS-1-1...Third year medical school GS-7-1 (minus...Fourth year medical school GS-9-1 (minus...Medical or dental internship GS-10-1 (minus...determined that a higher maximum...

  12. Maximum Possible Transverse Velocity in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medhekar, Sarang

    1991-01-01

    Using a physical picture, an expression for the maximum possible transverse velocity and orientation required for that by a linear emitter in special theory of relativity has been derived. A differential calculus method is also used to derive the expression. (Author/KR)

  13. Maximum entropy analysis of flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Robert K.; Abel, Markus; Schlegel, Michael; Waldrip, Steven H.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines a generalised maximum entropy (MaxEnt) analysis of a flow network, involving flow rates and potential differences on the network, connected by resistance functions. The analysis gives a generic derivation based on an explicit form of the resistance functions. Accounting for the constraints also leads to an extended form of Gibbs' phase rule, applicable to flow networks.

  14. Maximum entropy analysis of hydraulic pipe networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrip, Steven H.; Niven, Robert K.; Abel, Markus; Schlegel, Michael

    2014-12-01

    A Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) method is developed to infer mean external and internal flow rates and mean pressure gradients (potential differences) in hydraulic pipe networks, without or with sufficient constraints to render the system deterministic. The proposed method substantially extends existing methods for the analysis of flow networks (e.g. Hardy-Cross), applicable only to deterministic networks.

  15. Playgrounds with Maximum Safety and Minimal Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoph, Nancy J.

    1999-01-01

    Explores ways of designing playgrounds that afford maximum safety with minimal risk of injury to children, as well as how to conduct a safety audit and the types of playground equipment not recommended for 2- to 5-year olds. Details ways of designing a playground that enhances creative-play experiences. Provides resource information for safety…

  16. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum rates. 9701.312 Section 9701.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN...

  17. Weak scale from the maximum entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2015-03-01

    The theory of the multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model (SM) are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the S3 universe at the final stage S_rad becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the SM, we can check whether S_rad actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard S_rad at the final stage as a function of the weak scale (the Higgs expectation value) vh, and show that it becomes maximum around vh = {{O}} (300 GeV) when the dimensionless couplings in the SM, i.e., the Higgs self-coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by vh ˜ T_{BBN}2 / (M_{pl}ye5), where ye is the Yukawa coupling of electron, T_BBN is the temperature at which the Big Bang nucleosynthesis starts, and M_pl is the Planck mass.

  18. Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle

    E-print Network

    Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kiyoharu Kawana

    2015-03-28

    The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

  19. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  20. Escalation to High-Dose Defibrotide in Patients with Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Brandon M; Kuttab, Hani I; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing

    2015-12-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a serious complication of high-dose chemotherapy regimens, such as those used in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients. Defibrotide is considered a safe and effective treatment when dosed at 25 mg/kg/day. However, patients who develop VOD still have increased mortality despite the use of defibrotide. Data are limited on the use of doses above 60 mg/kg/day for persistent VOD. In this prospective clinical trial 34 patients received escalating doses of defibrotide. For patients with persistent VOD despite doses of 60 mg/kg/day, doses were increased to a maximum of 110 mg/kg/day. Increased toxicity was not observed until doses rose beyond 100 mg/kg/day. Patients receiving doses between 10 and 100 mg/kg/day experienced an average of 3 bleeding episodes per 100 days of treatment, whereas those receiving doses >100 mg/kg/day experienced 13.2 bleeding episodes per 100 days (P = .008). Moreover, dose reductions due to toxicity were needed at doses of 110 mg/kg/day more often than at lower doses. Defibrotide may be safely escalated to doses well above the current standard without an increase in bleeding risk. However, the efficacy of this dose-escalation strategy remains unclear, because outcomes were similar to published cohorts of patients receiving standard doses of defibrotide for VOD. PMID:26278046

  1. Statistical variability and confidence intervals for planar dose QA pass rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Attwood, Kristopher; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The most common metric for comparing measured to calculated dose, such as for pretreatment quality assurance of intensity-modulated photon fields, is a pass rate (%) generated using percent difference (%Diff), distance-to-agreement (DTA), or some combination of the two (e.g., gamma evaluation). For many dosimeters, the grid of analyzed points corresponds to an array with a low areal density of point detectors. In these cases, the pass rates for any given comparison criteria are not absolute but exhibit statistical variability that is a function, in part, on the detector sampling geometry. In this work, the authors analyze the statistics of various methods commonly used to calculate pass rates and propose methods for establishing confidence intervals for pass rates obtained with low-density arrays. Methods: Dose planes were acquired for 25 prostate and 79 head and neck intensity-modulated fields via diode array and electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and matching calculated dose planes were created via a commercial treatment planning system. Pass rates for each dose plane pair (both centered to the beam central axis) were calculated with several common comparison methods: %Diff/DTA composite analysis and gamma evaluation, using absolute dose comparison with both local and global normalization. Specialized software was designed to selectively sample the measured EPID response (very high data density) down to discrete points to simulate low-density measurements. The software was used to realign the simulated detector grid at many simulated positions with respect to the beam central axis, thereby altering the low-density sampled grid. Simulations were repeated with 100 positional iterations using a 1 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, a 2 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, and similar random detector grids. For each simulation, %/DTA composite pass rates were calculated with various %Diff/DTA criteria and for both local and global %Diff normalization techniques. Results: For the prostate and head/neck cases studied, the pass rates obtained with gamma analysis of high density dose planes were 2%-5% higher than respective %/DTA composite analysis on average (ranging as high as 11%), depending on tolerances and normalization. Meanwhile, the pass rates obtained via local normalization were 2%-12% lower than with global maximum normalization on average (ranging as high as 27%), depending on tolerances and calculation method. Repositioning of simulated low-density sampled grids leads to a distribution of possible pass rates for each measured/calculated dose plane pair. These distributions can be predicted using a binomial distribution in order to establish confidence intervals that depend largely on the sampling density and the observed pass rate (i.e., the degree of difference between measured and calculated dose). These results can be extended to apply to 3D arrays of detectors, as well. Conclusions: Dose plane QA analysis can be greatly affected by choice of calculation metric and user-defined parameters, and so all pass rates should be reported with a complete description of calculation method. Pass rates for low-density arrays are subject to statistical uncertainty (vs. the high-density pass rate), but these sampling errors can be modeled using statistical confidence intervals derived from the sampled pass rate and detector density. Thus, pass rates for low-density array measurements should be accompanied by a confidence interval indicating the uncertainty of each pass rate.

  2. Radiation dose to the lens and cataract formation

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Warrington, A.P.; Bessell, E.M. )

    1993-04-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the radiation tolerance of the lens of the eye and the incidence of radiation-induced lens changes in patients treated by fractionated supervoltage radiation therapy for orbital tumors. Forty patients treated for orbital lymphoma and pseudotumor with tumor doses of 20--40 Gy were studied. The lens was partly shielded using lead cylinders in most cases. The dose to the germinative zone of the lens was estimated by measurements in a tissue equivalent phantom using both film densitometry and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Opthalmological examination was performed at 6 monthly intervals after treatment. The lead shield was found to reduce the dose to the germinative zone of the lens to between 36--50% of the tumor dose for Cobalt beam therapy, and to between 11--18% for 5 MeV x-rays. Consequently, the lens doses were in the range 4.5--30 Gy in 10--20 fractions. Lens opacities first appeared from between 3 and 9 years after irradiation. Impairment of visual acuity ensued in 74% of the patients who developed lens opacities. The incidence of lens changes was strongly dose-related. None was seen after doses of 5 Gy or lower, whereas doses of 16.5 Gy or higher were all followed by lens opacities which impaired visual acuity. The largest number of patients received a maximum lens dose of 15 Gy; in this group the actuarial incidence of lens opacities at 8 years was 57% with visual impairment in 38%. The adult lens can tolerate a total dose of 5 Gy during a fractionated course of supervoltage radiation therapy without showing any changes. Doses of 16.5 Gy or higher will almost invariably lead to visual impairment. The dose which causes a 50% probability of visual impairment is approximately 15 Gy. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Influence of dose and dose rate on the physical properties of commercial papers commonly used in libraries and archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Area, María C.; Calvo, Ana M.; Felissia, Fernando E.; Docters, Andrea; Miranda, María V.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dose and dose rate of gamma irradiation on the physical properties of commercial papers commonly used in libraries and archives to optimize the irradiation conditions. Three different brands of paper of different fiber compositions were treated, using a 32 factorial design with four replicates of the center point, with doses ranging from 2 to 11 kGy and dose rates between 1 and 11 kGy/h. Chemical, mechanical and optical properties were determined on the samples. With some differences between the different kinds of papers, tensile strength, elongation, TEA, and air resistance were in general, unaffected by the treatment. The minimum loss of tear resistance and brightness were obtained with doses in the range 4-6 kGy at any dose rate for all three kinds of paper. These conditions are ideal to remove insects and sufficient to eliminate fungus.

  4. 75 FR 43840 - Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... civil monetary penalties per the Inflation Act. See 74 FR 68701 (December 29, 2009). FRA's maximum and... materials violation was $275. 69 FR 30590, May 28, 2004. To implement these SAFETEA-LU amendments to the maximum and minimum penalties, FRA issued a final rule that was published on December 26, 2006, 71...

  5. Theoretical Analysis of Maximum Flow Declination Rate versus Maximum Area Declination Rate in Phonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Maximum flow declination rate (MFDR) in the glottis is known to correlate strongly with vocal intensity in voicing. This declination, or negative slope on the glottal airflow waveform, is in part attributable to the maximum area declination rate (MADR) and in part to the overall inertia of the air column of the vocal tract (lungs to…

  6. Contralateral breast dose from partial breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R Cole; Nelson, Christopher L; Bloom, Elizabeth S; Kisling, Kelly D; Mason, Bryan E; Fisher, Gary D; Kirsner, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dose to the contralateral breast during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare it to external beam-published values. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) packets were used to measure the dose to the most medial aspect of the contralateral breast during APBI simulation, daily quality assurance (QA), and treatment. All patients in this study were treated with a single-entry, multicatheter device for 10 fractions to a total dose of 34 Gy. A mark was placed on the patient's skin on the medial aspect of the opposite breast. Three TLD packets were taped to this mark during the pretreatment simulation. Simulations consisted of an AP and Lateral scout and a limited axial scan encompassing the lumpectomy cavity (miniscan), if rotation was a concern. After the simulation the TLD packets were removed and the patients were moved to the high-dose-rate (HDR) vault where three new TLD packets were taped onto the patients at the skin mark. Treatment was administered with a Nucletron HDR afterloader using Iridium-192 as the treatment source. Post-treatment, TLDs were read (along with the simulation and QA TLD and a set of standards exposed to a known dose of 6 MV photons). Measurements indicate an average total dose to the contralateral breast of 70 cGy for outer quadrant implants and 181 cGy for inner quadrant implants. Compared to external beam breast tangents, these results point to less dose being delivered to the contralateral breast when using APBI. PMID:26699549

  7. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-02

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y?¹. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; (c) Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and (d) Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  8. Low-Power Maximum Power Point Tracker with Digital Control for Thermophotovoltaic Generators

    E-print Network

    Pilawa, Robert

    This paper describes the design, optimization, and evaluation of the power electronics circuitry for a low-power portable thermophotovotaic (TPV) generator system. TPV system is based on a silicon micro-reactor design and ...

  9. The use of experimental design to find the operating maximum power point of PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cr?ciunescu, Aurelian; P?tularu, Lauren?iu; Ciumbulea, Gloria; Olteanu, Valentin; Pitorac, Cristina; Drugan, Elena

    2015-03-10

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are difficult to model due to their complex nonlinear nature. In this paper, the development of a PEM Fuel Cells mathematical model based on the Design of Experiment methodology is described. The Design of Experiment provides a very efficient methodology to obtain a mathematical model for the studied multivariable system with only a few experiments. The obtained results can be used for optimization and control of the PEM Fuel Cells systems.

  10. LADTAPXL Aqueous Dose Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-08-10

    LADTAPXL is an EXCEL spreadsheet model of the NRC computer code LADTAP. LADTAPXL calculates maximally exposed individual and population doses from chronic liquid releases. Environmental pathways include external exposure resulting from recreational activities on the Savannah River and ingestion of water, fish, and invertebrates of Savannah River origin.

  11. Data required for testicular dose calculation during radiotherapy of seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Kokona, Georgiana; Varveris, Haralambos; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the direct calculation of testicular dose resulting from radiotherapy in patients with seminoma. Paraortic (PA) treatment fields and dog-leg (DL) portals including paraortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes were simulated on a male anthropomorphic phantom equipped with an artificial testicle. Anterior and posterior irradiations were performed for five different PA and DL field dimensions. Dose measurements were carried out using a calibrated ionization chamber. The dependence of testicular dose upon the distance separating the testicle from the treatment volume and upon the tissue thickness at the entrance point of the beam was investigated. A clamshell lead shield was used to reduce testicular dose. The scattered dose to testicle was measured in nine patients using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Phantom and patient exposures were generated with a 6 MV x-ray beam. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis was employed to obtain formulas describing the relation between the radiation dose to an unshielded and/or shielded testicle with the field size and the distance from the inferior field edge. Correction factors showing the variation of testicular dose with the patient thickness along beam axis were found. Bland-Altman statistical analysis showed that testicular dose obtained by the proposed calculation method may differ from the measured dose value by less than 25%. The current study presents a method providing reasonable estimations of testicular dose for individual patients undergoing PA or DL radiotherapy.

  12. Skin dose mapping for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry B.; Borrego, David; Balter, Stephen; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To introduce a new skin dose mapping software system for interventional fluoroscopy dose assessment and to analyze the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching. Methods: In this study, a new software system was developed for visualizing patient skin dose during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The system works by translating the reference point air kerma to the location of the patient's skin, which is represented by a computational model. In order to orient the model with the x-ray source, geometric parameters found within the radiation dose structured report (RDSR) are used along with a limited number of in-clinic measurements. The output of the system is a visual indication of skin dose mapped onto an anthropomorphic model at a resolution of 5 mm. In order to determine if patient-dependent and patient-sculpted models increase accuracy, peak skin dose was calculated for each of 26 patient-specific models and compared with doses calculated using an elliptical stylized model, a reference hybrid model, a matched patient-dependent model and one patient-sculpted model. Results were analyzed in terms of a percent difference using the doses calculated using the patient-specific model as the true standard. Results: Anthropometric matching, including the use of both patient-dependent and patient-sculpted phantoms, was shown most beneficial for left lateral and anterior-posterior projections. In these cases, the percent difference using a reference model was between 8 and 20%, using a patient-dependent model between 7 and 15%, and using a patient-sculpted model between 3 and 7%. Under the table tube configurations produced errors less than 5% in most situations due to the flattening affects of the table and pad, and the fact that table height is the main determination of source-to-skin distance for these configurations. In addition to these results, several skin dose maps were produced and a prototype display system was placed on the in-clinic monitor of an interventional fluoroscopy system. Conclusions: The skin dose mapping program developed in this work represents a new tool that, as the RDSR becomes available through automated export or real-time streaming, can provide the interventional physician information needed to modify behavior when clinically appropriate. The program is nonproprietary and transferable, and also functions independent to the software systems already installed on the control room workstation. The next step will be clinical implementation where the workflow will be optimized along with further analysis of real-time capabilities.

  13. When is a dose not a dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although an enormous amount of progress has been made in the fields of radiation protection and risk assessment, a number of significant problems remain. The one problem which transcends all the rest, and which has been subject to considerable misunderstanding, involves what has come to be known as the 'linear non-threshold hypothesis', or 'linear hypothesis'. Particularly troublesome has been the interpretation that any amount of radiation can cause an increase in the excess incidence of cancer. The linear hypothesis has dominated radiation protection philosophy for more than three decades, with enormous financial, societal and political impacts and has engendered an almost morbid fear of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation in large segments of the population. This document presents a different interpretation of the linear hypothesis. The basis for this view lies in the evolution of dose-response functions, particularly with respect to their use initially in the context of early acute effects, and then for the late effects, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. 11 refs., 4 figs. (MHB)

  14. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  15. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-04-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  16. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  17. Maximum likelihood estimation of turbulence spectrum parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the integral scale and intensity of a generic turbulence record is treated as a statistical problem of parameter estimation. Properties of parameter estimators and the method of maximum likelihood are reviewed. Likelihood equations are derived for estimation of the integral scale and intensity applicable to a general class of turbulence spectra that includes the von Karman and Dryden transverse and longitudinal spectra as special cases. The method is extended to include the Bullen transverse and longitudinal spectra. Coefficients of variation are given for maximum likelihood estimates of the integral scale and intensity of the von Karman spectra. Application of the method is illustrated by estimating the integral scale and intensity of an atmospheric turbulence vertical velocity record assumed to be governed by the von Karman transverse spectrum.

  18. MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION FOR SOCIAL NETWORK DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tom A.B.; Koskinen, Johan; Schweinberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A model for network panel data is discussed, based on the assumption that the observed data are discrete observations of a continuous-time Markov process on the space of all directed graphs on a given node set, in which changes in tie variables are independent conditional on the current graph. The model for tie changes is parametric and designed for applications to social network analysis, where the network dynamics can be interpreted as being generated by choices made by the social actors represented by the nodes of the graph. An algorithm for calculating the Maximum Likelihood estimator is presented, based on data augmentation and stochastic approximation. An application to an evolving friendship network is given and a small simulation study is presented which suggests that for small data sets the Maximum Likelihood estimator is more efficient than the earlier proposed Method of Moments estimator. PMID:25419259

  19. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope. PMID:26159097

  20. Nonparametric Maximum Entropy Estimation on Information Diagrams

    E-print Network

    Martin, Elliot A; Meinke, Alexander; D?cht?renko, Filip; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Maximum entropy estimation is of broad interest for inferring properties of systems across many different disciplines. In this work, we significantly extend a technique we previously introduced for estimating the maximum entropy of a set of random discrete variables when conditioning on bivariate mutual informations and univariate entropies. Specifically, we show how to apply the concept to continuous random variables and vastly expand the types of information-theoretic quantities one can condition on. This allows us to establish a number of significant advantages of our approach over existing ones. Not only does our method perform favorably in the undersampled regime, where existing methods fail, but it also can be dramatically less computationally expensive as the cardinality of the variables increases. In addition, we propose a nonparametric formulation of connected informations and give an illustrative example showing how this agrees with the existing parametric formulation in cases of interest. We furthe...

  1. Revealing the maximum strength in nanotwinned copper.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Chen, X; Huang, X; Lu, K

    2009-01-30

    The strength of polycrystalline materials increases with decreasing grain size. Below a critical size, smaller grains might lead to softening, as suggested by atomistic simulations. The strongest size should arise at a transition in deformation mechanism from lattice dislocation activities to grain boundary-related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced strain hardening and tensile ductility. The strongest twin thickness originates from a transition in the yielding mechanism from the slip transfer across twin boundaries to the activity of preexisting easy dislocation sources. PMID:19179523

  2. Estimating the Standard Error of the Maximum Likelihood Ability Estimator in Adaptive Testing Using the Posterior-Weighted Test Information Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.

    2007-01-01

    The standard error of the maximum likelihood ability estimator is commonly estimated by evaluating the test information function at an examinee's current maximum likelihood estimate (a point estimate) of ability. Because the test information function evaluated at the point estimate may differ from the test information function evaluated at an…

  3. Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2010-10-08

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

  4. REMARKS ON THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD APPLIED TO FINITE TEMPERATURE LATTICE QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.; MATSUFURU, H.

    2005-07-25

    We make remarks on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) for studies of the spectral function of hadronic correlators in finite temperature lattice QCD. We discuss the virtues and subtlety of MEM in the cases that one does not have enough number of data points such as at finite temperature. Taking these points into account, we suggest several tests which one should examine to keep the reliability for the results, and also apply them using mock and lattice QCD data.

  5. Maximum entropy analysis of cosmic ray composition

    E-print Network

    Nosek, Dalibor; Vícha, Jakub; Trávní?ek, Petr; Nosková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    We focus on the primary composition of cosmic rays with the highest energies that cause extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. A way of examining the two lowest order moments of the sample distribution of the depth of shower maximum is presented. The aim is to show that useful information about the composition of the primary beam can be inferred with limited knowledge we have about processes underlying these observations. In order to describe how the moments of the depth of shower maximum depend on the type of primary particles and their energies, we utilize a superposition model. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we are able to determine what trends in the primary composition are consistent with the input data, while relying on a limited amount of information from shower physics. Some capabilities and limitations of the proposed method are discussed. In order to achieve a realistic description of the primary mass composition, we pay special attention to the choice of the parameters of the sup...

  6. The maximum rate of mammal evolution.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alistair R; Jones, David; Boyer, Alison G; Brown, James H; Costa, Daniel P; Ernest, S K Morgan; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L; Hamilton, Marcus J; Harding, Larisa E; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S Kathleen; Okie, Jordan G; Saarinen, Juha J; Sibly, Richard M; Smith, Felisa A; Stephens, Patrick R; Theodor, Jessica M; Uhen, Mark D

    2012-03-13

    How fast can a mammal evolve from the size of a mouse to the size of an elephant? Achieving such a large transformation calls for major biological reorganization. Thus, the speed at which this occurs has important implications for extensive faunal changes, including adaptive radiations and recovery from mass extinctions. To quantify the pace of large-scale evolution we developed a metric, clade maximum rate, which represents the maximum evolutionary rate of a trait within a clade. We applied this metric to body mass evolution in mammals over the last 70 million years, during which multiple large evolutionary transitions occurred in oceans and on continents and islands. Our computations suggest that it took a minimum of 1.6, 5.1, and 10 million generations for terrestrial mammal mass to increase 100-, and 1,000-, and 5,000-fold, respectively. Values for whales were down to half the length (i.e., 1.1, 3, and 5 million generations), perhaps due to the reduced mechanical constraints of living in an aquatic environment. When differences in generation time are considered, we find an exponential increase in maximum mammal body mass during the 35 million years following the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event. Our results also indicate a basic asymmetry in macroevolution: very large decreases (such as extreme insular dwarfism) can happen at more than 10 times the rate of increases. Our findings allow more rigorous comparisons of microevolutionary and macroevolutionary patterns and processes. PMID:22308461

  7. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  8. High dose per fraction dosimetry of small fields with Gafchromic EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Basavatia, Amar; Bayliss, Adam; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Small field dosimetry is prone to uncertainties due to the lack of electronic equilibrium and the use of the correct detector size relative to the field size measured. It also exhibits higher sensitivity to setup errors as well as large variation in output with field size and shape. Radiochromic film is an attractive method for reference dosimetry in small fields due to its ability to provide 2D dose measurements while having minimal impact on the dose distribution. Gafchromic EBT2 has a dose range of up to 40 Gy; therefore, it could potentially be useful for high dose reference dosimetry with high spatial resolution. This is a requirement in stereotactic radiosurgery deliveries, which deliver high doses per fraction to small targets. Methods: Targets of 4 mm and 12 mm diameters were treated to a minimum peripheral dose of 21 Gy prescribed to 80% of the maximum dose in one fraction. Target doses were measured with EBT2 film (both targets) and an ion chamber (12 mm target only). Measured doses were compared with planned dose distributions using profiles through the target and minimum peripheral dose coverage. Results: The measured target doses and isodose coverage agreed with the planned dose within {+-}1 standard deviation of three measurements, which were 2.13% and 2.5% for the 4 mm and 12 mm targets, respectively. Conclusions: EBT2 film is a feasible dosimeter for high dose per fraction reference 2D dosimetry.

  9. Phase I dose intensification study of 2-weekly epirubicin with GM-CSF in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Michael, M; Toner, G C; Olver, I N; Fenessy, A; Bishop, J F

    1997-06-01

    This study investigated dose intensification of epirubicin administered as a 2-weekly regimen with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) support. The aim was to define the maximally tolerated dose of epirubicin and to assess the efficacy of GM-CSF to ameliorate its toxicity. Patients with anthracycline-responsive advanced malignancies were eligible. Six dose levels, commencing at 90 mg/m2, of epirubicin administered every 2 weeks for four courses were planned with GM-CSF 10 micrograms/kg/day administered for 10 days from the second day of each course. Six patients were to be entered at each dose level, and escalation to the next level was based upon toxicity criteria. Twelve patients were entered, six at dose level 1 (90 mg/m2) and six at dose level 2 (120 mg/m2). Prospectively defined haematological dose-limiting toxicities were noted in one patient at dose level 1 and in five patients at dose level 2. Further dose escalation was not attempted. Significant nonhaematological toxicities included febrile neutropenia in two and four patients at dose levels 1 and 2, respectively. This study has demonstrated that epirubicin can be safely administered at 2 week intervals with GM-CSF at a dose of 90 mg/m2, equivalent to the previously reported maximum tolerated dose intensity of 45 mg/m2/week. Neutropenia was dose-limiting despite the use of GM-CSF. PMID:9167749

  10. SU-E-J-63: Estimating the Effects of Respiratory Motion On Dose Heterogeneity for ITV-Based Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between the amount of dose heterogeneity in a treatment plan that uses an internal target volume (ITV) to account for respiratory motion and the true amount of heterogeneity in the dose delivered to the tumor contained within that ITV. Methods: We develop a convolution-based framework for calculating dose delivered to a tumor moving inside an ITV according to a common sinusoid-based breathing model including asymmetry. We model the planned ITV dose distribution as a centrally peaked analytic function approximating the profile of clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments. Expressions for the minimum and maximum dose received by the tumor are derived and evaluated for a range of clinically relevant parameters. Results of the model are validated with phantom measurements using an ion chamber array. Results: An analytic expression is presented for the maximum and minimum doses received by the tumor relative to the planned ITV dose. The tumor dose heterogeneity depends solely on the ratio of tumor size to ITV size, the peak dose in the planned ITV dose distribution, and the respiratory asymmetry parameter. Under the assumptions of this model, using a typical breathing asymmetry parameter and a dose distribution with a fixed size ITV covered by the 100% line and with a 130% hotspot, the maximum dose to the tumor varies between 113%–130%, and the minimum dose varies between 100%–116% depending on the amount of tumor motion. Conclusion: This modeling exercise demonstrates the interplay between motion and dose heterogeneity. Tumors that exhibit large amounts of respiratory motion relative to their size will receive a more homogeneous dose and a larger minimum dose than would be inferred from the ITV dose distribution. This effect is not captured in current clinical treatment planning methods unless 4D dose calculation techniques are used. This work was partially supported by a Varian Medical Systems research grant.

  11. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062 Section...Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed...

  12. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062 Section...Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed...

  13. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062 Section...Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed...

  14. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062 Section...Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed...

  15. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  16. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  17. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  18. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062 Section...Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed...

  19. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  20. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062 Section...Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed...

  1. 24 CFR 886.308 - Maximum total annual contract commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Maximum total annual contract commitment. 886.308 Section 886.308 ...308 Maximum total annual contract commitment. (a) Number of units assisted...by which the maximum annual contract commitment per year exceeds amounts paid...

  2. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Levels § 141.13 ...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity...both community water systems and non-community...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity in drinking water, measured...

  3. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Levels § 141.13 ...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity...both community water systems and non-community...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity in drinking water, measured...

  4. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Levels § 141.13 ...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity...both community water systems and non-community...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity in drinking water, measured...

  5. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Levels § 141.13 ...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity...both community water systems and non-community...maximum contaminant levels for turbidity in drinking water, measured...

  6. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  7. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

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  8. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  9. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  10. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  11. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable material temperatures. 1505.8 Section 1505.8 Commercial...1505.8 Maximum acceptable material temperatures. The maximum acceptable material temperatures for electrically operated toys shall...

  12. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

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  13. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  14. 16 CFR 1505.8 - Maximum acceptable material temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  15. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. 1505.7 Section 1505.7 Commercial...1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys...

  16. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity. 141.13 Section...PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Levels § 141.13 Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity. The...

  17. Final Aperture Superposition Technique applied to fast calculation of electron output factors and depth dose curves.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, B A; Villarreal-Barajas, J E

    2005-11-01

    The Final Aperture Superposition Technique (FAST) is described and applied to accurate, near instantaneous calculation of the relative output factor (ROF) and central axis percentage depth dose curve (PDD) for clinical electron beams used in radiotherapy. FAST is based on precalculation of dose at select points for the two extreme situations of a fully open final aperture and a final aperture with no opening (fully shielded). This technique is different than conventional superposition of dose deposition kernels: The precalculated dose is differential in position of the electron or photon at the downstream surface of the insert. The calculation for a particular aperture (x-ray jaws or MLC, insert in electron applicator) is done with superposition of the precalculated dose data, using the open field data over the open part of the aperture and the fully shielded data over the remainder. The calculation takes explicit account of all interactions in the shielded region of the aperture except the collimator effect: Particles that pass from the open part into the shielded part, or visa versa. For the clinical demonstration, FAST was compared to full Monte Carlo simulation of 10 x 10, 2.5 x 2.5, and 2 x 8 cm2 inserts. Dose was calculated to 0.5% precision in 0.4 x 0.4 x 0.2 cm3 voxels, spaced at 0.2 cm depth intervals along the central axis, using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment head of a commercial linear accelerator for six different electron beams with energies of 6-21 MeV. Each simulation took several hours on a personal computer with a 1.7 Mhz processor. The calculation for the individual inserts, done with superposition, was completed in under a second on the same PC. Since simulations for the pre calculation are only performed once, higher precision and resolution can be obtained without increasing the calculation time for individual inserts. Fully shielded contributions were largest for small fields and high beam energy, at the surface, reaching a maximum of 5.6% at 21 MeV. Contributions from the collimator effect were largest for the large field size, high beam energy, and shallow depths, reaching a maximum of 4.7% at 21 MeV. Both shielding contributions and the collimator effect need to be taken into account to achieve an accuracy of 2%. FAST takes explicit account of the shielding contributions. With the collimator effect set to that of the largest field in the FAST calculation, the difference in dose on the central axis (product of ROF and PDD) between FAST and full simulation was generally under 2%. The maximum difference of 2.5% exceeded the statistical precision of the calculation by four standard deviations. This occurred at 18 MeV for the 2.5 x 2.5 cm2 field. The differences are due to the method used to account for the collimator effect. PMID:16370417

  18. Monitoring the eye lens: which dose quantity is adequate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.; Dietze, G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a rather low dose threshold (below 0.5 Gy) for the induction of a cataract of the eye lens. Some other studies even assume that there is no threshold at all. Therefore, protection measures have to be optimized and current dose limits for the eye lens may be reduced in the future. The question of which personal dose equivalent quantity is appropriate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens arises from this situation. While in many countries dosemeters calibrated in terms of the dose equivalent quantity Hp(0.07) have been seen as being adequate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens, this might be questionable in the case of reduced dose limits and, thus, it may become necessary to use the dose equivalent quantity Hp(3) for this purpose. To discuss this question, the dose conversion coefficients for the equivalent dose of the eye lens (in the following eye lens dose) were determined for realistic photon and beta radiation fields and compared with the values of the corresponding conversion coefficients for the different operational quantities. The values obtained lead to the following conclusions: in radiation fields where most of the dose comes from photons, especially x-rays, it is appropriate to use dosemeters calibrated in terms of Hp(0.07) on a slab phantom, while in other radiation fields (dominated by beta radiation or unknown contributions of photon and beta radiation) dosemeters calibrated in terms of Hp(3) on a slab phantom should be used. As an alternative, dosemeters calibrated in terms of Hp(0.07) on a slab phantom could also be used; however, in radiation fields containing beta radiation with the end point energy near 1 MeV, an overestimation of the eye lens dose by up to a factor of 550 is possible.

  19. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Cancer.gov

    36.8 33.8 43.9 32.7 16.1 23.6 23.8 25.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Bx in Degassed Buffer Flash-frozen Bx Pre-Dose Deep Pre-Dose Shallow Post-Dose Shallow Validation and Fitness Testing of a Quantitative Immunoassay for HIF1? in Biopsy Specimens

  1. Dose rate, dose-equivalent rate, and quality factor in SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Braby, L. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.

    1992-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) sensitive to the lineal energy range of 0.26-300 keV micrometer-1 was flown on STS-40 (39 degrees x 278 km x 296 km) inside the Spacelab. This instrument was previously flown on STS-31 but was modified to provide a finer resolution at lower lineal energies to better map the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) protons. The instrument was turned on 6 June 1991, and operated for 7470 min (124.5 h). The flight duration was characterized by a very large number of X-ray solar flares and enhanced magnetic field fluctuations; however, no significant dose from the solar particles was measured at the location of this instrument. The flight data can be separated into trapped and galactic cosmic radiation parts. The dose rate, dose-equivalent rate and quality factor for trapped radiation were 4.21 +/- 0.03 mrad day-1, 7.72 +/- 0.05 mrem day-1, and 1.83 +/- 0.1, respectively. The dose rate, dose-equivalent rate, and quality factor for galactic cosmic radiation were 5.34 +/- 0.03 mrad day-1, 14.63 +/- 0.06 mrem day-1, and 2.74 +/- 0.1, respectively. The overall quality factor for the flight was 2.38. The dose from the GCR is higher than from SAA protons because of the high inclination and low altitude of this flight. The AP8MAX model of the trapped radiation gives a dose rate of 2.43 mrad day-1 and a quality factor of 1.77. The CREME solar maximum model of galactic cosmic radiation gives a dose rate of 2.54 mrad day-1 and a quality factor of 2.91. Thus the AP8MAX model underestimates the dose by a factor of 1.8 whereas the CREME model leads to an underestimation of the dose by a factor of 2. A comparison of the LET spectra using the AP8MAX model and galactic cosmic radiation transport codes shows only a qualitative agreement.

  2. Test images for the maximum entropy image restoration method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, James E.

    1990-01-01

    One of the major activities of any experimentalist is data analysis and reduction. In solar physics, remote observations are made of the sun in a variety of wavelengths and circumstances. In no case is the data collected free from the influence of the design and operation of the data gathering instrument as well as the ever present problem of noise. The presence of significant noise invalidates the simple inversion procedure regardless of the range of known correlation functions. The Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) attempts to perform this inversion by making minimal assumptions about the data. To provide a means of testing the MEM and characterizing its sensitivity to noise, choice of point spread function, type of data, etc., one would like to have test images of known characteristics that can represent the type of data being analyzed. A means of reconstructing these images is presented.

  3. Massively Parallel Spatially-Variant Maximum Likelihood Image Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, A. F.; Redding, D. C.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mo, J.

    Motivated by attributes of images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field/Planetary Cameras (WF/PC-1 and WFPC-2), in this paper we report on massively parallel implementations of maximum likelihood image restoration with spatially-variant point-spread (SV-PSF) models. We use an interpolative procedure to realize a SV-PSF model from sparse reference data, and realize the large amount of concurrency inherent in the restoration computation by employing a Trussel & Hunt-style segmentation of the restoration task, distributing the work load on a network of UNIX workstations using the public domain PVM system. We give examples of application of the restoration code to recent WFPC2 observations of HH 47.

  4. Energy and maximum norm estimates for nonlinear conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, Pelle; Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We have devised a technique that makes it possible to obtain energy estimates for initial-boundary value problems for nonlinear conservation laws. The two major tools to achieve the energy estimates are a certain splitting of the flux vector derivative f(u)(sub x), and a structural hypothesis, referred to as a cone condition, on the flux vector f(u). These hypotheses are fulfilled for many equations that occur in practice, such as the Euler equations of gas dynamics. It should be noted that the energy estimates are obtained without any assumptions on the gradient of the solution u. The results extend to weak solutions that are obtained as point wise limits of vanishing viscosity solutions. As a byproduct we obtain explicit expressions for the entropy function and the entropy flux of symmetrizable systems of conservation laws. Under certain circumstances the proposed technique can be applied repeatedly so as to yield estimates in the maximum norm.

  5. Application of Maximum Entropy Deconvolution to ${\\gamma}$-ray Skymaps

    E-print Network

    Raab, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Skymaps measured with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) represent the real source distribution convolved with the point spread function of the observing instrument. Current IACTs have an angular resolution in the order of 0.1$^\\circ$ which is rather large for the study of morphological structures and for comparing the morphology in $\\gamma$-rays to measurements in other wavelengths where the instruments have better angular resolutions. Serendipitously it is possible to approximate the underlying true source distribution by applying a deconvolution algorithm to the observed skymap, thus effectively improving the instruments angular resolution. From the multitude of existing deconvolution algorithms several are already used in astronomy, but in the special case of $\\gamma$-ray astronomy most of these algorithms are challenged due to the high noise level within the measured data. One promising algorithm for the application to $\\gamma$-ray data is the Maximum Entropy Algorithm. The advantages of th...

  6. Attitude sensor alignment calibration for the solar maximum mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitone, Daniel S.; Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1990-01-01

    An earlier heuristic study of the fine attitude sensors for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) revealed a temperature dependence of the alignment about the yaw axis of the pair of fixed-head star trackers relative to the fine pointing Sun sensor. Here, new sensor alignment algorithms which better quantify the dependence of the alignments on the temperature are developed and applied to the SMM data. Comparison with the results from the previous study reveals the limitations of the heuristic approach. In addition, some of the basic assumptions made in the prelaunch analysis of the alignments of the SMM are examined. The results of this work have important consequences for future missions with stringent attitude requirements and where misalignment variations due to variations in the temperature will be significant.

  7. Quantum entanglement and fixed-point bifurcations

    E-print Network

    Andrew P. Hines; G. J. Milburn; Ross H. McKenzie

    2005-02-28

    How does the classical phase space structure for a composite system relate to the entanglement characteristics of the corresponding quantum system? We demonstrate how the entanglement in nonlinear bipartite systems can be associated with a fixed point bifurcation in the classical dynamics. Using the example of coupled giant spins we show that when a fixed point undergoes a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation, the corresponding quantum state - the ground state - achieves its maximum amount of entanglement near the critical point. We conjecture that this will be a generic feature of systems whose classical limit exhibits such a bifurcation.

  8. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2010-03-01

    Dose-volume data for myelopathy in humans treated with radiotherapy (RT) to the spine is reviewed, along with pertinent preclinical data. Using conventional fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy/fraction to the full-thickness cord, the estimated risk of myelopathy is <1% and <10% at 54 Gy and 61 Gy, respectively, with a calculated strong dependence on dose/fraction (alpha/beta = 0.87 Gy.) Reirradiation data in animals and humans suggest partial repair of RT-induced subclinical damage becoming evident about 6 months post-RT and increasing over the next 2 years. Reports of myelopathy from stereotactic radiosurgery to spinal lesions appear rare (<1%) when the maximum spinal cord dose is limited to the equivalent of 13 Gy in a single fraction or 20 Gy in three fractions. However, long-term data are insufficient to calculate a dose-volume relationship for myelopathy when the partial cord is treated with a hypofractionated regimen.

  9. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels §...

  10. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels §...

  11. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels §...

  12. 40 CFR 141.65 - Maximum residual disinfectant levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Maximum Contaminant Levels and Maximum Residual Disinfectant Levels §...

  13. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-21

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  14. DNS of Viscoelastic Turbulent Channel Flow at Maximum Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Jin; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2003-11-01

    Maximum Drag Reduction (MDR) by dilute polymer solutions is investigated in a turbulent channel flow by DNS. The simulations were performed using a semi-Lagrangian scheme employing pseudo-spectral methods for the solvent and a Backward tracking Lagrangian Particle Method (BLPM) with a multimode (FENE-LSMR) constitutive model for the polymer. The polymer and flow parameters (Re_? ˜ 225, b=45000, nk_BT/? u^2_?=1.15× 10-3) were selected to replicate one of the experimental data points of Virk (1975). Simulations were performed for We_? ranging from 35 to 200, and resulted in drag reductions of 30-70% (MDR). The computed turbulence statistics agree with the experimental data of Warholic et al.(1999) for comparable drag reduction. All simulations with We_? ? 100 result in maximum drag reduction and a mean velocity profile in agreement with Virk's asymptote. However, the condition of zero Reynolds shear stress is achieved only for We_? ? 150. The physics of drag reduction at MDR is currently under study and will be discussed.

  15. Control strategy for maximum anaerobic co-digestion performance.

    PubMed

    García-Gen, Santiago; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M

    2015-09-01

    A control strategy for optimising the performance of anaerobic co-digestion in terms of methane productivity, digestate quality and process stability is presented. A linear programming approach is adopted to calculate the feeding of multiple substrates for maximum methane productivity, subjected to restrictions based on experimental and heuristic knowledge. Process stability is quantitatively assessed by an empirical diagnosis function comparing alkalinity ratio measurements against reference values (outputs between (-1,1]). A second empirical diagnosis function is defined to compare methane flow rate measurements against a reference value of maximum capacity (outputs between (0,1]). A variable-gain control function (outputs between (-1,1]), derived from the diagnosis functions, is defined to determine the quantitative change applied to the most active constraint of the substrate blend optimisation problem leading to a new set-point of feeding substrates blend. The control strategy works in a closed-loop architecture under which the process performance for each blend of substrates is continuously assessed. The system was successfully validated in a 1 m(3) hybrid Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket - Anaerobic Filter (UASB-AF) reactor, treating blends of substrates (gelatine, glycerine and pig manure supernatant) at OLR values between 0.71 and 6.33 gCOD/L d over a period of 210 days at mesophilic conditions. PMID:26001824

  16. Thermodynamics of Maximum Transition Entropy for Quantum Assemblies

    E-print Network

    David M. Rogers

    2015-03-27

    This work presents a general unifying theoretical framework for quantum non-equilibrium systems. It is based on a re-statement of the dynamical problem as one of inferring the distribution of collision events that move a system toward thermal equilibrium from an arbitrary starting distribution. Using a form based on maximum entropy for this transition distribution leads to a statistical description of open quantum systems with strong parallels to the conventional, maximum-entropy, equilibrium thermostatics. A precise form of the second law of thermodynamics can be stated for this dynamics at every time-point in a trajectory. Numerical results are presented for low-dimensional systems interacting with cavity fields. The dynamics and stationary state are compared to a reference model of a weakly coupled oscillator plus cavity supersystem thermostatted by periodic partial measurements. Despite the absence of an explicit cavity in the present model of open quantum dynamics, both the relaxation rates and stationary state properties closely match the reference. Additionally, the time-course of energy exchange and entropy increase is given throughout an entire measurement process for a single spin system. The results show the process to be capable of initially absorbing heat when starting from a superposition state, but not from an isotropic distribution. Based on these results, it is argued that logical inference in the presence of environmental noise is sufficient to resolve the paradox of wavefunction collapse.

  17. Prospective randomized trial of lisofylline for the prevention of toxicities of high-dose interleukin 2 therapy in advanced renal cancer and malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Margolin, K; Atkins, M; Sparano, J; Sosman, J; Weiss, G; Lotze, M; Doroshow, J; Mier, J; O'Boyle, K; Fisher, R; Campbell, E; Rubin, J; Federighi, D; Bursten, S

    1997-04-01

    The therapeutic application of high-dose interleukin (IL) 2 in human malignancy is limited by severe multiorgan toxicities that are mediated, in part, by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-1. CT1501R (lisofylline; LSF) is one of several methyl xanthine congeners that inhibit the effects of TNF by the interruption of specific signal transduction pathways. This randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to assess the activity of LSF in reducing the toxicities of high-dose IL-2 therapy. Fifty-three patients with metastatic renal cancer or malignant melanoma were treated with i.v. bolus IL-2, 600, 000 IU/kg every 8 h for 5 days (14 doses), followed by 9 days of rest and another 5-day course of IL-2. Patients were randomly assigned to LSF, 1.5 mg/kg i.v. bolus, or placebo every 6 h during IL-2 therapy. All patients were to be treated to individual maximum tolerance of IL-2 at the intensive care unit level of support. The end points for statistical analysis were the number of IL-2 doses administered during the first cycle of treatment (maximum, 28) and the toxicities experienced by each group after the first 8 planned IL-2 doses. There was no difference between the LSF and placebo groups in the mean number of IL-2 doses tolerated in the entire first cycle of therapy (19.6 +/- 5.4 versus 19.5 +/- 5.8, P = 0.86) or in the first or second 5-day course of IL-2. The only significant difference in toxicities occurring through the eighth dose of IL-2 was in the maximum elevation of serum creatinine (mean, 1.7 +/- 0.8 for placebo versus 1.5 +/- 0.6 mg/dl for LSF, P = 0.013). A Monte Carlo analysis of major toxicities over the first 14-dose course of therapy showed a statistically significant difference favoring the LSF-treated group (P = 0.025). LSF was well tolerated, associated only with mildly increased nausea (P = 0.006 after eight IL-2 doses, but not significant for the entire first cycle). The antitumor activity was comparable in both groups (objective responses, 2 of 28 with LSF versus 4 of 24 with placebo). The mean peak plasma concentrations of LSF on days 1, 5, and 19 were 6.24, 3.83, and 5.04 micromol/liter, respectively. In conclusion, with this dose and schedule, LSF did not alter the toxicities of high-dose i.v. IL-2 sufficiently to impact the overall dose intensity of IL-2. Successful IL-2 toxicity modulation may require the use of higher doses of LSF, the development of agents with more potent anti-TNF activity, and/or combined modulating agents that function via distinct mechanisms to interrupt cytokine-mediated signaling. PMID:9815721

  18. To quantify explosiveness, we also measured the maximum change in C as one

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    · To quantify explosiveness, we also measured the maximum change in C as one edge is added, or C product rule. · The competitive rule on directed networks has a less explosive transition than the same rule on undirected networks even though its transition point is delayed even further. Explosive

  19. Biological-Based Modeling of Low Dose Radiation Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R., Ph.D.

    2006-11-08

    The objective of this project was to refine a biological-based model (called NEOTRANS2) for low-dose, radiation-induced stochastic effects taking into consideration newly available data, including data on bystander effects (deleterious and protective). The initial refinement led to our NEOTRANS3 model which has undergone further refinement (e.g., to allow for differential DNA repair/apoptosis over different dose regions). The model has been successfully used to explain nonlinear dose-response curves for low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation-induced mutations (in vivo) and neoplastic transformation (in vitro). Relative risk dose-response functions developed for neoplastic transformation have been adapted for application to cancer relative risk evaluation for irradiated humans. Our low-dose research along with that conducted by others collectively demonstrate the following regarding induced protection associated with exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation: (1) protects against cell killing by high-LET alpha particles; (2) protects against spontaneous chromosomal damage; (3) protects against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations; (4) suppresses mutations induced by a large radiation dose even when the low dose is given after the large dose; (5) suppresses spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced cancers; (6) suppresses metastasis of existing cancer; (7) extends tumor latent period; (8) protects against diseases other than cancer; and (9) extends life expectancy. These forms of radiation-induced protection are called adapted protection as they relate to induced adaptive response. Thus, low doses and dose rates of low-LET radiation generally protect rather than harm us. These findings invalidate the linear not threshold (LNT) hypothesis which is based on the premise that any amount of radiation is harmful irrespective of its type. The hypothesis also implicates a linear dose-response curve for cancer induction that has a positive slope and no threshold. However, low-dose and low-dose-rate induced adapted protection leads to hormetic type dose-response relationships (e.g. U or J shaped) for cancer induction. Indeed, our research findings point to several dose zones of biological responses: (1) The natural background radiation dose zone over which increasing background radiation doses appear to lead to decrease cancer risk (Transition Zone A) due to activation (in a stochastic manner) of a system of protective processes that include high-fidelity DNA repair, apoptosis of unstable cells, and immune system activation. (2) A dose zone just above natural background radiation exposure over which cancer risk appears to further decrease and then remain suppressed at a relatively constant level below the spontaneous frequency (Zone of Maximal Protection); (3) higher but moderate doses over which cancer risk increases rather steeply over relative narrow dose range (Transition Zone B) due to radiation related suppression of protective processes (immune system function and selective apoptosis of unstable cells); (4) higher doses (LNT zone) where cancer risk increases as a linear function of dose for a range of doses (protective processes maximally suppressed in this zone). The indicted dose zones are dose-rate and radiation-type dependent with the protective zone increasing as dose rate is decreases and exposure time extended. In fact, natural background low-LET radiation appears to be protecting us not only from cancer occurrence but also from other genomic instability associated diseases via repeatedly inducing transient adapted protection. Reducing natural background radiation exposure (e.g., via relocation) over extended periods (years) would be expected to cause more harm than benefit. The harm would be expressed as increased cases of cancer and other genomic-instability-associated diseases as well as in significantly reduced life expectancy.

  20. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive /sup 131/I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of /sup 131/I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 10/sup 6/ person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 10/sup 7/ person-rem (2 x 10/sup 5/ Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  1. Detection of low level gaseous releases and dose evaluation from continuous gamma dose measurements using a wavelet transformation technique.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Rao, D D; Sarkar, P K

    2012-11-01

    Measurement of environmental dose in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant site (Tarapur, India) is carried out continuously for the years 2007-2010 and attempts have been made to quantify the additional contributions from nuclear power plants over natural background by segregating the background fluctuations from the events due to plume passage using a non-decimated wavelet approach. A conservative estimate obtained using wavelet based analysis has shown a maximum annual dose of 38 ?Sv in a year at 1.6 km and 4.8 ?Sv at 10 km from the installation. The detected events within a year are in good agreement with the month wise wind-rose profile indicating reliability of the algorithm for proper detection of an event from the continuous dose rate measurements. The results were validated with the dispersion model dose predictions using the source term from routine monitoring data and meteorological parameters. PMID:22940411

  2. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  3. The sun and heliosphere at solar maximum.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Marsden, R G; Balogh, A; Gloeckler, G; Geiss, J; McComas, D J; McKibben, R B; MacDowall, R J; Lanzerotti, L J; Krupp, N; Krueger, H; Landgraf, M

    2003-11-14

    Recent Ulysses observations from the Sun's equator to the poles reveal fundamental properties of the three-dimensional heliosphere at the maximum in solar activity. The heliospheric magnetic field originates from a magnetic dipole oriented nearly perpendicular to, instead of nearly parallel to, the Sun's rotation axis. Magnetic fields, solar wind, and energetic charged particles from low-latitude sources reach all latitudes, including the polar caps. The very fast high-latitude wind and polar coronal holes disappear and reappear together. Solar wind speed continues to be inversely correlated with coronal temperature. The cosmic ray flux is reduced symmetrically at all latitudes. PMID:14615526

  4. Maximum entropy spectral analysis for streamflow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huijuan; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Configurational entropy spectral analysis (CESAS) is developed with spectral power as a random variable for streamflow forecasting. It is found that the CESAS derived by maximizing the configurational entropy yields the same solution as by the Burg entropy spectral analysis (BESA). Comparison of forecasted streamflows by CESAS and BESA shows less than 0.001% difference between the two analyses and thus the two entropy spectral analyses are concluded to be identical. Thus, the Burg entropy spectral analysis and two configurational entropy spectral analyses form the maximum entropy spectral analysis.

  5. Therapeutic Experience of Maximum Feasible Participation

    E-print Network

    Castile, George Pierre

    2006-03-01

    of Maximum Feasible Participation George Pierre Castile In 1965 a number of scholars looked about them at the state of Native Americans, among them was Henry Dobyns, whose contribution to the collec tion, "The American Indian Today," was titled... by the undermining of Indian community organization and the sub- 0026-3079/2005/4603/4-077$2.50/0 American Studies, 46:3/4 (Fall-Winter 2005): 77-87 Indigenous Studies Today, 1 (Fall 2005/Spring 2006) 77 78 George Pierre Castile stitution of government...

  6. Maximum power operation of interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubeva, N.; Imparato, A.

    2013-07-01

    We study the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of different traffic models for kinesin which are relevant in biological and experimental contexts. We find that motor-motor interactions play a fundamental role by enhancing the thermodynamic efficiency at maximum power of the motors, as compared to the noninteracting system, in a wide range of biologically compatible scenarios. We furthermore consider the case where the motor-motor interaction directly affects the internal chemical cycle and investigate the effect on the system dynamics and thermodynamics.

  7. Design of toroidal transformers for maximum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the most efficient toroidal transformer that can be built given the frequency, volt-ampere rating, magnetic flux density, window fill factor, and materials is described. With the above all held constant and only the dimensions of the magnetic core varied, the most efficient design occurs when the copper losses equal 60 percent of the iron losses. When this criterion is followed, efficiency is only slightly dependent on design frequency and fill factor. The ratios of inside diameter to outside diameter and height to build of the magnetic core that result in transformers of maximum efficiency are computed.

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  11. Optimization of pre-sowing magnetic field doses through RSM in pea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Ahmad, I.; Hussain, S. M.; Khera, R. A.; Bokhari, T. H.; Shehzad, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Seed pre-sowing magnetic field treatment was reported to induce biochemical and physiological changes. In the present study, response surface methodology was used for deduction of optimal magnetic field doses. Improved growth and yield responses in the pea cultivar were achieved using a rotatable central composite design and multivariate data analysis. The growth parameters such as root and shoot fresh masses and lengths as well as yield were enhanced at a certain magnetic field level. The chlorophyll contents were also enhanced significantly vs. the control. The low magnetic field strength for longer duration of exposure/ high strength for shorter exposure were found to be optimal points for maximum responses in root fresh mass, chlorophyll `a' contents, and green pod yield/plant, respectively and a similar trend was observed for other measured parameters. The results indicate that the magnetic field pre-sowing seed treatment can be used practically to enhance the growth and yield in pea cultivar and response surface methodology was found an efficient experimental tool for optimization of the treatment level to obtain maximum response of interest.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and dose proportionality of ketoconazole in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y C; Colaizzi, J L; Bierman, R H; Woestenborghs, R; Heykants, J

    1986-08-01

    Ketoconazole is an orally effective, broad-spectrum, systemic antifungal agent. The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of ketoconazole given as a 200-mg single dose in a tablet, suspension, or solution were studied in 24 fasting healthy males by using a crossover design. Levels of ketoconazole in plasma were determined for up to 48 h by a sensitive reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method. The absorption of ketoconazole was rapid, with mean maximum concentrations of the drug in plasma of 4.2, 5.0, and 6.2 micrograms/ml attained at 1.7, 1.2, and 1.0 h, respectively, after administration of the tablet, suspension, and solution, respectively. The mean distribution and elimination half-life values were 1.5 to 1.7 and 7.5 to 7.9 h, respectively. The mean oral clearance of the solution dose was 209 (+/- 82.9 [standard deviation]) ml/min, and the mean apparent volume of distribution was 88.31 (+/- 68.72) liters. The relative bioavailabilities for the tablet and suspension were 81.2 (+/- 33.5) and 89.0 (+/- 23.1)%, respectively, of that of the solution. The data indicated the bioequivalence of the tablet to the suspension and of the suspension of the solution. Dose proportionality of ketoconazole was also studied in 12 volunteers after they received solution doses of 200, 400, and 800 mg. Linear correlations between the dose and the maximum concentration of the drug in plasma, the time to the maximum concentration, and the area under the concentration-time curve were observed. However, the increase in the area under the curve was more than proportional to the dose given. The levels in plasma seemed to decay at a lower rate after 400- and 800-mg doses. The mean oral clearance decreased from 244.9 to 123.6 and 80.0 ml/min, respectively, as the dose increased from 200 to 400 and 800 mg. The apparent dose-dependent kinetics may have been due to the presystemic elimination and capacity-limited hepatic metabolism which become saturated at higher doses. PMID:3767339

  13. Dose of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusions and Prevention of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Ness, Paul M.; Brecher, Mark E.; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Woodson, Robert D.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Skerrett, Donna L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Sloan, Steven R.; Uhl, Lynne; George, James N.; Aquino, Victor M.; Manno, Catherine S.; McFarland, Janice G.; Hess, John R.; Leissinger, Cindy; Granger, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a trial of prophylactic platelet transfusions to evaluate the effect of platelet dose on bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. METHODS We randomly assigned hospitalized patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or chemotherapy for hematologic cancers or solid tumors to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions at a low dose, a medium dose, or a high dose (1.1×1011, 2.2×1011, or 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter of body-surface area, respectively), when morning platelet counts were 10,000 per cubic millimeter or lower. Clinical signs of bleeding were assessed daily. The primary end point was bleeding of grade 2 or higher (as defined on the basis of World Health Organization criteria). RESULTS In the 1272 patients who received at least one platelet transfusion, the primary end point was observed in 71%, 69%, and 70% of the patients in the low-dose group, the medium-dose group, and the high-dose group, respectively (differences were not significant). The incidences of higher grades of bleeding, and other adverse events, were similar among the three groups. The median number of platelets transfused was significantly lower in the low-dose group (9.25×1011) than in the medium-dose group (11.25×1011) or the high-dose group (19.63×1011) (P = 0.002 for low vs. medium, P<0.001 for high vs. low and high vs. medium), but the median number of platelet transfusions given was significantly higher in the low-dose group (five, vs. three in the medium-dose and three in the high-dose group; P<0.001 for low vs. medium and low vs. high). Bleeding occurred on 25% of the study days on which morning platelet counts were 5000 per cubic millimeter or lower, as compared with 17% of study days on which platelet counts were 6000 to 80,000 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Low doses of platelets administered as a prophylactic transfusion led to a decreased number of platelets transfused per patient but an increased number of transfusions given. At doses between 1.1×1011 and 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter, the number of platelets in the prophylactic transfusion had no effect on the incidence of bleeding. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00128713.) PMID:20164484

  14. TLD array for precise dose measurements in stereotactic radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertl, Adolf; Hartl, Roman F. E.; Zehetmayer, Martin; Kitz, Klaus; Griffitt, W.

    1996-12-01

    We developed a new TLD array for precise dose measurement and verification of the spatial dose distribution in small radiation targets. It consists of a hemicylindrical, tissue-equivalent rod made of polystyrene with 17 parallel moulds for an exact positioning of each TLD. The spatial resolution of the TLD array was evaluated using the Leskell spherical phantom. Dose planning was performed with KULA 4.4 under stereotactic conditions on axial CT images. In the Leksell gamma unit the TLD array was irradiated with a maximal dose of 10 Gy with an unplugged 14 mm collimator. The doses delivered to the TLDs were rechecked by diode detector and film dosimetry and compared to the computer-generated dose profile. We found excellent agreement of our measured values, even at the critical penumbra decline. For the 14 mm and 18 mm collimator and for the 11 mm collimator combination we compared the measured and calculated data at full width at half maximum. This TLD array may be useful for phantom or tissue model studies on the spatial dose distribution in confined radiation targets as used in stereotactic radiotherapy.

  15. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: Data and dose assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Conrado, C.L.

    1997-07-01

    Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from {sup 137}Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y{sup -1}. The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} to 4.5 mSv y{sup -1}. The 50-y integral dose ranges from 0.5 to 65 mSv. 35 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ?2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  17. Efficient heuristics for maximum common substructure search.

    PubMed

    Englert, Péter; Kovács, Péter

    2015-05-26

    Maximum common substructure search is a computationally hard optimization problem with diverse applications in the field of cheminformatics, including similarity search, lead optimization, molecule alignment, and clustering. Most of these applications have strict constraints on running time, so heuristic methods are often preferred. However, the development of an algorithm that is both fast enough and accurate enough for most practical purposes is still a challenge. Moreover, in some applications, the quality of a common substructure depends not only on its size but also on various topological features of the one-to-one atom correspondence it defines. Two state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms for finding maximum common substructures have been implemented at ChemAxon Ltd., and effective heuristics have been developed to improve both their efficiency and the relevance of the atom mappings they provide. The implementations have been thoroughly evaluated and compared with existing solutions (KCOMBU and Indigo). The heuristics have been found to greatly improve the performance and applicability of the algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the applied methods and present the experimental results. PMID:25865959

  18. Maximum entropy, Nonadditive entropies and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Steve

    2014-03-01

    Gibbs once presciently noted that the elegance and simplicity of the principles of statistical physics were worthy of independent development outside of thermodynamics. Biophysical systems -from the single cell to the single protein level- provide an ideal framework in which to test and apply far-from-equilibrium generalizations of statistical physics. Here we discuss two theoretical topics at the intersection of statistical physics and biology. First, we will describe a recipe for deriving, from first principles, probabilistic equations of motion from limited biophysical single particle tracking data. That is, we will show that maximum entropy principles can be used to determine the most likely statistical weights of trajectories from an ensemble of allowed system trajectories. For instance, using this reasoning, we can show under what circumstances Markov processes and chemical master equations rigorously follow from the data. Second, we will explore the logical implications of using a principle other than maximum entropy to select models (e.g. a model could be a trajectory ensemble in conformational space of a biomolecule) from non-equilibrium biophysical data. In particular, we will show that nonadditive entropy maximization can lead to biophysical models with features that go beyond what is warranted by the data.

  19. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    PubMed

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. PMID:25964210

  20. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez V, Reina A.

    2007-10-26

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae.

  1. Continuity of the maximum-entropy inference: Convex geometry and numerical ranges approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, Leiba; Spitkovsky, Ilya M.; Szko?a, Arleta; Weis, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We study the continuity of an abstract generalization of the maximum-entropy inference—a maximizer. It is defined as a right-inverse of a linear map restricted to a convex body which uniquely maximizes on each fiber of the linear map a continuous function on the convex body. Using convex geometry we prove, amongst others, the existence of discontinuities of the maximizer at limits of extremal points not being extremal points themselves and apply the result to quantum correlations. Further, we use numerical range methods in the case of quantum inference which refers to two observables. One result is a complete characterization of points of discontinuity for 3 × 3 matrices.

  2. Comparison of measured and computed portal dose for IMRT treatment.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Savino; Viola, Pietro; Azario, Luigi; Grimaldi, Luca; Craus, Maurizio; D'Onofrio, Guido; Fidanzio, Andrea; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Piermattei, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    A new 2D array Seven 29T model (PTW, Freiburg), equipped with 729 vented plane-parallel ion chambers, projected for pretreatment verification of radiotherapy plans, was used as a detector for the transmitted or portal dose measurements below a Rando phantom. The dosimetric qualities of the 2D array make it attractive for measuring transmitted dose maps from step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). It is well known that for step-and-shoot IMRT beams that use a small number of monitor units (MUs) per sequence, the early and recent electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) present a different response at X-ray start-up that affects the accuracy of the measured transmitted dose. The comparison of portal doses measured to those calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system (TPS) can verify correct dose delivery during treatment. This direct validation was tested by irradiating a simulated head tumor in a Rando anthropomorphic phantom by step-and-shoot IMRT beams. The absolute transmitted doses on a plane orthogonal to the beam central axis below the phantom were measured by the 2D array calibrated in terms of dose to water and compared with the computed portal dose extracted by custom software. In a previous paper, the comparison between the IMRT portal doses, computed by a commercial TPS and measured by a linear array that supplied a 1 mm spatial dose resolution, was carried out. The gamma-index analysis supplied an agreement of more than 95% of the dose point with acceptance criteria, in terms of dose difference, DeltaDmax, and distance agreement, deltadmax, equal to 4% and 4 mm, respectively. In this paper, we verify the possible use of the PTW 2D array for measurements of the transmitted doses during several fractions of head and neck tumor radiotherapy. There are two advantages in the use of this 2D array as a portal dose device for the IMRT quality assurance program: first is the ability to perform absolute dose comparisons for hundreds of measurement positions to verify the correct dose delivery in several fractions of the therapy; second is the efficiency in time to detect these kinds of dose distributions within the field of view area of the CT scanner. PMID:17533343

  3. Validation of the EGS usercode DOSE3D for internal beta dose calculation at the cellular and tissue levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulot, J.; Ricard, M.; Aubert, B.

    2003-08-01

    Internal radiotherapy is currently focusing on beta emitters such as 90Y or 131I because of their high-energy emissions. However, conventional dosimetric methods (MIRD) are known to be limited for such applications. They are unable to take into account microscopic radionuclide distribution because standardized anthropomorphic phantoms are used, and absorbed dose is calculated at the organ level. New tools are therefore required for dose assessment at cellular and tissue level (10-100 µm). The purpose of this study was to validate, at this scale, a Monte Carlo usercode (DOSE3D), based on the MORSE combinatorial geometry package and the EGS code system. Dose point-kernel calculations in water were compared to those published by Cross et al and Simpkin and Mackie. They confirm that DOSE3D is a reliable tool for cellular dosimetry in various geometric configurations.

  4. Validation of the EGS usercode DOSE3D for internal beta dose calculation at the cellular and tissue levels.

    PubMed

    Coulot, J; Ricard, M; Aubert, B

    2003-08-21

    Internal radiotherapy is currently focusing on beta emitters such as 90Y or 131I because of their high-energy emissions. However, conventional dosimetric methods (MIRD) are known to be limited for such applications. They are unable to take into account microscopic radionuclide distribution because standardized anthropomorphic phantoms are used, and absorbed dose is calculated at the organ level. New tools are therefore required for dose assessment at cellular and tissue level (10-100 microm). The purpose of this study was to validate, at this scale, a Monte Carlo usercode (DOSE3D), based on the MORSE combinatorial geometry package and the EGS code system. Dose point-kernel calculations in water were compared to those published by Cross et al and Simpkin and Mackie. They confirm that DOSE3D is a reliable tool for cellular dosimetry in various geometric configurations. PMID:12974576

  5. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  6. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  7. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  8. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  9. 40 CFR 141.13 - Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant levels for... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Maximum Contaminant Levels § 141.13 Maximum contaminant levels for turbidity. The maximum contaminant levels for turbidity are applicable...

  10. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a maximum working pressure not less than the maximum pressure to which it may be subjected and at least 1034...

  11. 46 CFR 154.556 - Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. 154.556 Section... Equipment Cargo Hose § 154.556 Cargo hose: Maximum working pressure. A cargo hose must have a maximum working pressure not less than the maximum pressure to which it may be subjected and at least 1034...

  12. Fast Forward Maximum entropy reconstruction of sparsely sampled data.

    PubMed

    Balsgart, Nicholas M; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    We present an analytical algorithm using fast Fourier transformations (FTs) for deriving the gradient needed as part of the iterative reconstruction of sparsely sampled datasets using the forward maximum entropy reconstruction (FM) procedure by Hyberts and Wagner [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129 (2007) 5108]. The major drawback of the original algorithm is that it required one FT and one evaluation of the entropy per missing datapoint to establish the gradient. In the present study, we demonstrate that the entire gradient may be obtained using only two FT's and one evaluation of the entropy derivative, thus achieving impressive time savings compared to the original procedure. An example: A 2D dataset with sparse sampling of the indirect dimension, with sampling of only 75 out of 512 complex points (15% sampling) would lack (512-75)×2=874 points per ?(2) slice. The original FM algorithm would require 874 FT's and entropy function evaluations to setup the gradient, while the present algorithm is ?450 times faster in this case, since it requires only two FT's. This allows reduction of the computational time from several hours to less than a minute. Even more impressive time savings may be achieved with 2D reconstructions of 3D datasets, where the original algorithm required days of CPU time on high-performance computing clusters only require few minutes of calculation on regular laptop computers with the new algorithm. PMID:22975245

  13. Floating Point Control Library

    SciTech Connect

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  14. Mode of action analysis for liver tumors from oral 1,4-dioxane exposures and evidence-based dose response assessment.

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael; Reichard, John; Nance, Patricia; Burleigh-Flayer, Heather; Parker, Ann; Vincent, Melissa; McConnell, Ernest E

    2014-04-01

    1,4-Dioxane is found in consumer products and is used as a solvent in manufacturing. Studies in rodents show liver tumors to be consistently reported after chronic oral exposure. However, there were differences in the reporting of non-neoplastic lesions in the livers of rats and mice. In order to clarify these differences, a reread of mouse liver slides from the 1978 NCI bioassay on 1,4-dioxane in drinking water was conducted. This reread clearly identified dose-related non-neoplastic changes in the liver; specifically, a dose-related increase in the hypertrophic response of hepatocytes, followed by necrosis, inflammation and hyperplastic hepatocellular foci. 1,4-Dioxane does not cause point mutations, DNA repair, or initiation. However, it appears to promote tumors and stimulate DNA synthesis. Using EPA Guidelines (2005), the weight of the evidence suggests that 1,4-dioxane causes liver tumors in rats and mice through cytotoxicity followed by regenerative hyperplasia. Specific key events in this mode of action are identified. A Reference Dose (RfD) of 0.05mg/kgday is proposed to protect against regenerative liver hyperplasia based on a benchmark dose (BMD) approach. Based on this RfD, a maximum contaminant level goal of 350?g/L is proposed using a default relative source contribution for water of 20%. PMID:24491968

  15. Evaluation of treatment planning system of brachytherapy according to dose to the rectum delivered.

    PubMed

    Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Sarkhosh, Mina; Aghili, Mahdi; Jaberi, Ramin; Adelnia, Akbar; Geraily, Ghazale

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the actual dose delivered to the rectum and compare it with the treatment planning system (TPS) reports. In this study, the dose delivered to the rectum was measured by semiconductor diode detectors (PTW, Germany). The factors that influence diode response were investigated as well. Calibration factors of diodes were measured weekly to investigate the effect of time interval on the accuracy of calibration. Then 40 applications of patients with cervix carcinoma were evaluated. Rectum dose was measured by means of rectal dosemeter and compared with the TPS-calculated dose. In this research, the differences between the measured and the calculated dose were investigated. The mean difference between the TPS-calculated dose and the measured dose was 6.5% (range: -22 to +39) for rectum. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured maximum dose. The study showed that the main reason for the difference was due to the movements of the patient and applicator shift in the elapsed time between the imaging and treatment stage. It is recommended that in vivo dosimetry should be performed in addition to treatment planning computation. In vivo dosimetry is a reliable solution to compare the planned and actual dose delivered to organs at risk. PMID:22128355

  16. Experience of micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator based single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery: Tumor dose inhomogeneity, conformity, and dose fall off

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Linda X.; Garg, Madhur; Lasala, Patrick; Kim, Mimi; Mah, Dennis; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Mynampati, Dinesh; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Sharp dose fall off outside a tumor is essential for high dose single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plans. This study explores the relationship among tumor dose inhomogeneity, conformity, and dose fall off in normal tissues for micromultileaf collimator (mMLC) linear accelerator (LINAC) based cranial SRS plans. Methods: Between January 2007 and July 2009, 65 patients with single cranial lesions were treated with LINAC-based SRS. Among them, tumors had maximum diameters {<=}20 mm: 31; between 20 and 30 mm: 21; and >30 mm: 13. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons on a Trilogy linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with a tertiary m3 high-resolution mMLC (Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany), using either noncoplanar conformal fixed fields or dynamic conformal arcs. The authors also created retrospective study plans with identical beam arrangement as the treated plan but with different tumor dose inhomogeneity by varying the beam margins around the planning target volume (PTV). All retrospective study plans were normalized so that the minimum PTV dose was the prescription dose (PD). Isocenter dose, mean PTV dose, RTOG conformity index (CI), RTOG homogeneity index (HI), dose gradient index R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} (defined as the difference between equivalent sphere radius of 50% isodose volume and prescription isodose volume), and normal tissue volume (as a ratio to PTV volume) receiving 50% prescription dose (NTV{sub 50}) were calculated. Results: HI was inversely related to the beam margins around the PTV. CI had a ''V'' shaped relationship with HI, reaching a minimum when HI was approximately 1.3. Isocenter dose and mean PTV dose (as percentage of PD) increased linearly with HI. R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} and NTV{sub 50} initially declined with HI and then reached a plateau when HI was approximately 1.3. These trends also held when tumors were grouped according to their maximum diameters. The smallest tumor group (maximum diameters {<=}20 mm) had the most HI dependence for dose fall off. For treated plans, CI averaged 2.55{+-}0.79 with HI 1.23{+-}0.06; the average R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} was 0.41{+-}0.08, 0.55{+-}0.10, and 0.65{+-}0.09 cm, respectively, for tumors {<=}20 mm, between 20 and 30 mm, and >30 mm. Conclusions: Tumor dose inhomogeneity can be used as an important and convenient parameter to evaluate mMLC LINAC-based SRS plans. Sharp dose fall off in the normal tissue is achieved with sufficiently high tumor dose inhomogeneity. By adjusting beam margins, a homogeneity index of approximately 1.3 would provide best conformity for the authors' SRS system.

  17. Biphasic and monophasic repair: comparative implications for biologically equivalent dose calculations in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Millar, W T; Davidson, S E

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To consider the implications of the use of biphasic rather than monophasic repair in calculations of biologically-equivalent doses for pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy of cervix carcinoma. Methods: Calculations are presented of pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) doses equivalent to former low-dose-rate (LDR) doses, using biphasic vs monophasic repair kinetics, both for cervical carcinoma and for the organ at risk (OAR), namely the rectum. The linear-quadratic modelling calculations included effects due to varying the dose per PDR cycle, the dose reduction factor for the OAR compared with Point A, the repair kinetics and the source strength. Results: When using the recommended 1?Gy per hourly PDR cycle, different LDR-equivalent PDR rectal doses were calculated depending on the choice of monophasic or biphasic repair kinetics pertaining to the rodent central nervous and skin systems. These differences virtually disappeared when the dose per hourly cycle was increased to 1.7?Gy. This made the LDR-equivalent PDR doses more robust and independent of the choice of repair kinetics and ?/? ratios as a consequence of the described concept of extended equivalence. Conclusion: The use of biphasic and monophasic repair kinetics for optimised modelling of the effects on the OAR in PDR brachytherapy suggests that an optimised PDR protocol with the dose per hourly cycle nearest to 1.7?Gy could be used. Hence, the durations of the new PDR treatments would be similar to those of the former LDR treatments and not longer as currently prescribed. Advances in knowledge: Modelling calculations indicate that equivalent PDR protocols can be developed which are less dependent on the different ?/? ratios and monophasic/biphasic kinetics usually attributed to normal and tumour tissues for treatment of cervical carcinoma. PMID:23934965

  18. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20?km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6?mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19?mSv. PMID:23591638

  19. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20?km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6?mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19?mSv. PMID:23591638

  20. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv.

  1. Dermal Absorption of Finite Doses of Volatile Compounds

    PubMed Central

    FRASCH, H. FREDERICK

    2015-01-01

    Laplace domain solutions to a previously published finite dose skin diffusion model are presented. The purpose of the current analysis is to derive a simple algebraic expression quantifying the total mass that is systemically absorbed at infinite time after exposure, relative to the applied mass. The resulting expression is a function of two dimensionless parameters: f, the fractional depth within the skin surface through which the permeant is initially deposited, and ?, the ratio of maximum evaporation flux to maximum dermal flux. The result may be useful for dermal risk assessment as well as in the evaluation of cosmetic and pharmaceutical product performance. PMID:22499361

  2. Fetal radiation dose estimates for I-131 sodium iodide in cases where conception occurs after administration

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    After administration of I-131 to the female patient, the possibility of radiation exposure of the embryo/fetus exists if the patient becomes pregnant while radioiodine remains in the body. Fetal radiation dose estimates for such cases were calculated. Doses were calculated for various maternal thyroid uptakes and time intervals between administration and conception, including euthyroid and hyperthyroid cases. The maximum fetal dose calculating was about 9.8E-03 mGy/MBq, which occurred with 100% maternal thyroid uptake and a 1 week interval between administration and conception. Placental crossover of the small amount of radioiodine remaining 90 days after conception was also considered. Such crossover could result in an additional fetal dose of 9.8E-05 mGy/MBq and a maximum fetal thyroid self dose of 3.5E-04 mGy/MBq.

  3. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm{sup 3}), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose {>=}105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm{sup 3}) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm{sup 3}), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm{sup 3}). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities.

  4. New Observations of Subarcsecond Photospheric Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Schrijver, C. J.; Shine, R. A.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Scharmer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have used an interference filter centered at 4305 A within the bandhead of the CH radical (the 'G band') and real-time image selection at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope on La Palma to produce very high contrast images of subarcsecond photospheric bright points at all locations on the solar disk. During the 6 day period of 1993 September 15-20 we observed active region NOAA 7581 from its appearance on the East limb to a near-disk-center position on September 20. A total of 1804 bright points were selected for analysis from the disk center image using feature extraction image processing techniques. The measured Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) distribution of the bright points in the image is lognormal with a modal value of 220 km (0 sec .30) and an average value of 250 km (0 sec .35). The smallest measured bright point diameter is 120 km (0 sec .17) and the largest is 600 km (O sec .69). Approximately 60% of the measured bright points are circular (eccentricity approx. 1.0), the average eccentricity is 1.5, and the maximum eccentricity corresponding to filigree in the image is 6.5. The peak contrast of the measured bright points is normally distributed. The contrast distribution variance is much greater than the measurement accuracy, indicating a large spread in intrinsic bright-point contrast. When referenced to an averaged 'quiet-Sun' area in the image, the modal contrast is 29% and the maximum value is 75%; when referenced to an average intergranular lane brightness in the image, the distribution has a modal value of 61% and a maximum of 119%. The bin-averaged contrast of G-band bright points is constant across the entire measured size range. The measured area of the bright points, corrected for pixelation and selection effects, covers about 1.8% of the total image area. Large pores and micropores occupy an additional 2% of the image area, implying a total area fraction of magnetic proxy features in the image of 3.8%. We discuss the implications of this area fraction measurement in the context of previously published measurements which show that typical active region plage has a magnetic filling factor on the order of 10% or greater. The results suggest that in the active region analyzed here, less than 50% of the small-scale magnetic flux tubes are demarcated by visible proxies such as bright points or pores.

  5. The number e^{(1/2)} is the ratio between the time of maximum value and the time of maximum growth rate for restricted growth phenomena?

    E-print Network

    Zi-Niu Wu

    2013-10-02

    For many natural process of growth, with the growth rate independent of size due to Gibrat law and with the growth process following a log-normal distribution, the ratio between the time (D) for maximum value and the time (L) for maximum growth rate (inflexion point) is then equal to the square root of the base of the natural logarithm (e^{1/2}). On the logarithm scale this ratio becomes one half ((1/2)). It remains an open question, due to lack of complete data for various cases with restricted growth, whether this e^{1/2} ratio can be stated as e^{1/2}-Law. Two established examples already published, one for an epidemic spreading and one for droplet production, support however this ratio. Another example appears to be the height of humain body. For boys the maximum height occurs near 23 years old while the maximum growth rate is at the age near 14, and there ratio is close to e^{1/2}. The main theoretical base to obtain this conclusion is problem independent, provided the growth process is restricted, such as public intervention to control the spreading of communicable epidemics, so that an entropy is associated with the process and the role of dissipation, representing the mechanism of intervention, is maximized. Under this formulation the principle of maximum rate of entropy production is used to make the production process problem independent.

  6. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    E-print Network

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields $H_s$ of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness $\\sim 0.1\\; \\mu$m at the Nb surface could increase $H_s\\simeq 240$ mT of a clean Nb up to $H_s\\simeq 290$ mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  7. Emitter frequency refinement based on maximum likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Frequency estimation via signal sorting is widely recognized as one of the most practical technologies in signal processing. However, the estimated frequencies via signal sorting may be inaccurate and biased due to signal fluctuation under different emitter working modes, problems of transmitter circuit, environmental noises or certain unknown interference sources. Therefore, it has become an important issue to further analyze and refine signal frequencies after signal sorting. To address the above problem, we have brought forward an iterative frequency refinement method based on maximum likelihood. Iteratively, the initial estimated signal frequency values are refined. Experimental results indicate that the refined signal frequencies are more informative than the initial ones. As another advantage of our method, noises and interference sources could be filtered out simultaneously. The efficiency and flexibility enables our method to apply in a wide application area, i.e., communication, electronic reconnaissance and radar intelligence analysis.

  8. Approximate maximum likelihood decoding of block codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberger, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate maximum likelihood decoding algorithms, based upon selecting a small set of candidate code words with the aid of the estimated probability of error of each received symbol, can give performance close to optimum with a reasonable amount of computation. By combining the best features of various algorithms and taking care to perform each step as efficiently as possible, a decoding scheme was developed which can decode codes which have better performance than those presently in use and yet not require an unreasonable amount of computation. The discussion of the details and tradeoffs of presently known efficient optimum and near optimum decoding algorithms leads, naturally, to the one which embodies the best features of all of them.

  9. Diffusivity Maximum in a Reentrant Nematic Phase

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Tillmann; Mazza, Marco G.; Schoen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of confined liquid crystals using the Gay–Berne–Kihara model. Upon isobaric cooling, the standard sequence of isotropic–nematic–smectic A phase transitions is found. Upon further cooling a reentrant nematic phase occurs. We investigate the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient of the fluid in the nematic, smectic and reentrant nematic phases. We find a maximum in diffusivity upon isobaric cooling. Diffusion increases dramatically in the reentrant phase due to the high orientational molecular order. As the temperature is lowered, the diffusion coefficient follows an Arrhenius behavior. The activation energy of the reentrant phase is found in reasonable agreement with the reported experimental data. We discuss how repulsive interactions may be the underlying mechanism that could explain the occurrence of reentrant nematic behavior for polar and non-polar molecules. PMID:22837730

  10. Maximum likelihood and the single receptor

    E-print Network

    Robert G. Endres; Ned S. Wingreen

    2009-09-25

    Biological cells are able to accurately sense chemicals with receptors at their surfaces, allowing cells to move towards sources of attractant and away from sources of repellent. The accuracy of sensing chemical concentration is ultimately limited by the random arrival of particles at the receptors by diffusion. This fundamental physical limit is generally considered to be the Berg & Purcell limit [H.C. Berg and E.M. Purcell, Biophys. J. {\\bf 20}, 193 (1977)]. Here we derive a lower limit by applying maximum likelihood to the time series of receptor occupancy. The increased accuracy stems from solely considering the unoccupied time intervals - disregarding the occupied time intervals as these do not contain any information about the external particle concentration, and only decrease the accuracy of the concentration estimate. Receptors which minimize the bound time intervals achieve the highest possible accuracy. We discuss how a cell could implement such an optimal sensing strategy by absorbing or degrading bound particles.

  11. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields Hs of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness ˜0.1 ?m at the Nb surface could increase Hs ? 240 mT of a clean Nb up to Hs ? 290 mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb3Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  12. Experimental shock metamorphism of maximum microcline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    A series of recovery experiments are conducted to study the behavior of single-crystal perthitic maximum microcline shock-loaded to a peak pressure of 417 kbar. Microcline is found to deform in a manner similar to quartz and other alkali feldspars. It is observed that shock-induced cleavages occur initially at or slightly below the Hugoniot elastic limit (60-85 kbar), that shock-induced rather than thermal disordering begins above the Hugoniot elastic limit, and that all types of planar elements form parallel to crystallographic planes of low Miller indices. When increasing pressure, it is found that bulk density, refractive indices, and birefringence of the recovered material decrease and approach diaplectic glass values, whereas disappearance and weakening of reflections in Debye-Sherrer patterns are due to disordering of the feldspar lattice.

  13. Maximum power flux of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph

    1991-08-01

    Distant observations of intense auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) are discussed in light of the increased maximum AKR power flux registered by the 3D radio-mapping instrument on ISEE 3. Only AKR events that contain the highest frequency signals are selected, and during spacecraft rotation the spacecraft antenna gain is employed to increase the dynamic range of the instrument. The technique is found to result in the screening of false signals created by instrument overloading as well as the detection of genuine second-harmonic AKR signals while the spacecraft was 17 R(E) from earth. A very strong power flux of fundamental AKR is also reported, exceeding 3 x 10 to the -13th W/sq m/Hz at 360 kHz. The most intense source-region values detected by Isis I and Viking measurements are compared to the strong signal, and the signal is concluded to be the combined signal of a number of sources.

  14. Power Spectrum Estimation II. Linear Maximum Likelihood

    E-print Network

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton

    2005-03-29

    This second paper of two companion papers on the estimation of power spectra specializes to the topic of estimating galaxy power spectra at large, linear scales using maximum likelihood methods. As in the first paper, the aims are pedagogical, and the emphasis is on concepts rather than technical detail. The paper covers most of the salient issues, including selection functions, likelihood functions, Karhunen-Loeve compression, pair-integral bias, Local Group flow, angular or radial systematics (arising for example from extinction), redshift distortions, quadratic compression, decorrelation, and disentanglement. The procedures are illustrated with results from the IRAS PSCz survey. Most of the PSCz graphics included in this paper have not been published elsewhere.

  15. Estimating missing information by maximum likelihood deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Heintzmann, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    The ability of iteratively constrained maximum likelihood (ML) deconvolution to reconstruct out-of-band information is discussed and exemplified by simulations. The frequency dependent relative energy regain, a novel way of quantifying the reconstruction ability, is introduced. The positivity constraint of ML deconvolution allows reconstructing information outside the spatial frequency bandwidth which is set by the optical system. This is demonstrated for noise-free and noisy data. It is also shown that this property depends on the type of object under investigation. An object is constructed where no significant out-of-band reconstruction is possible. It is concluded that in practical situations the amount of possible out-of-band reconstruction depends on the agreement between reality and the model describing "typical objects" incorporated into the algorithm by appropriate penalty functions. PMID:16914319

  16. Maximum entropy model for business cycle synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Azaele, Sandro; Wang, Yougui

    2014-11-01

    The global economy is a complex dynamical system, whose cyclical fluctuations can mainly be characterized by simultaneous recessions or expansions of major economies. Thus, the researches on the synchronization phenomenon are key to understanding and controlling the dynamics of the global economy. Based on a pairwise maximum entropy model, we analyze the business cycle synchronization of the G7 economic system. We obtain a pairwise-interaction network, which exhibits certain clustering structure and accounts for 45% of the entire structure of the interactions within the G7 system. We also find that the pairwise interactions become increasingly inadequate in capturing the synchronization as the size of economic system grows. Thus, higher-order interactions must be taken into account when investigating behaviors of large economic systems.

  17. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for the purposes of...

  18. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for the purposes of...

  19. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for the purposes of...

  20. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed...engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for the purposes of...

  1. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  2. Dose to craniofacial region through portal imaging of pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, Christine J; Osa, Etin-Osa; Dewyngaert, J Keith; Chang, Jenghwa; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) from portal imaging (PI) of the craniofacial region in pediatric brain tumor patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Twenty pediatric brain tumor patients were retrospectively studied. Each received portal imaging of treatment fields and orthogonal setup fields in the craniofacial region. The number of PI and monitor units used for PI were documented for each patient. Dose distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated to quantify the maximum, minimum, and mean dose to the PTV, and the mean dose to OARs through PI acquisition. The doses resulting from PI are reported as percentage of prescribed dose. The average maximum, minimum, and mean doses to PTV from PI were 2.9 ± 0.7%, 2.2 ± 1.0%, and 2.5 ± 0.7%, respectively. The mean dose to the OARs from PI were brainstem 2.8 ± 1.1%, optic nerves/chiasm 2.6 ± 0.9%, cochlea 2.6 ± 0.9%, hypothalamus/pituitary 2.4 ± 0.6%, temporal lobes 2.3 ± 0.6%, thyroid 1.6 ± 0.8%, and eyes 2.6 ± 0.9%. The mean number of portal images and the mean number of PI monitor units per patient were 58.8 and 173.3, respectively. The dose from PI while treating pediatric brain tumors using IMRT is significant (2%-3% of the prescribed dose). This may result in exceeding the tolerance limit of many critical structures and lead to unwanted late complications and secondary malignancies. Dose contributions from PI should be considered in the final documented dose. Attempts must be made in PI practices to lower the imaging dose when feasible. PMID:22231206

  3. Measurement of doses to the extremities of nuclear medicine staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Farag, Hamed; Hassan, Ramadan A.

    Medical uses of ionizing radiation now represent>95% of all man-made radiation exposure, and is the largest single radiation source after natural background radiation. Therefore, it is important to quantify the amount of radiation received by occupational individuals to optimize the working conditions for staff, and further, to compare doses in different departments to ensure compatibility with the recommended standards. For some groups working with unsealed sources in nuclear medicine units, the hands are more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation than the rest of the body. A personal dosimetry service runs extensively in Egypt. But doses to extremities have not been measured to a wide extent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the equivalent radiation doses to the fingers for five different nuclear medicine staff occupational groups for which heavy irradiation of the hands was suspected. Finger doses were measured for (1) nuclear medicine physicians, (2) technologists, (3) nurses and (4) physicists. The fifth group contains three technicians handling 131I, while the others handled 99mTc. Each staff member working with the radioactive material wore two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during the whole testing period, which lasted from 1 to 4 weeks. Staff performed their work on a regular basis throughout the month, and mean annual doses were calculated for these groups. Results showed that the mean equivalent doses to the fingers of technologist, nurse and physicist groups were 30.24±14.5, 30.37±17.5 and 16.3±7.7 ?Sv/GBq, respectively. Equivalent doses for the physicians could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts (mSv) that accumulated in one week. Similarly, the dose to the fingers of individuals in Group 5 was estimated to be 126.13±38.2 ?Sv/GBq. The maximum average finger dose, in this study, was noted in the technologists who handled therapeutic 131I (2.5 mSv). In conclusion, the maximum expected annual dose to extremities is less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y).

  4. Determination of the temporal resolution required for the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 008

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the radiation doses that may have-been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 008) examined the potential for changes in the uncertainty distributions of potential doses from releases in the year 1945 as a function of temporal resolution of the intermediate data storage. This study builds on the work initiated in the fifth scoping calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain; and the seventh, which evaluated the spatial scales across the domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and ingestion of cow`s milk.

  5. Determination of the spatial resolution required for the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 007

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 007) examined the spatial distribution of potential doses resulting from releases in the year 1945. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping calculation, of iodine in cow`s milk; the third scoping calculation, which added additional pathways; the fifth calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; and the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from-Feeding Regime 1 as described in scoping calculation 001.

  6. Relative Biologic Effects of Low-Dose-Rate {alpha}-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Rituximab and {beta}-Emitting {sup 90}Y-Tiuexetan-Ibritumomab Versus External Beam X-Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dahle, Jostein Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biologic effects (RBE) of {alpha}-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-rituximab and of {beta}-radiation from {sup 90}Y-tiuexetan-ibritumomab (Zevalin) compared with external beam X-radiation in the Raji lymphoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Radioimmunoconjugates were administered intravenously in nude mice with Raji lymphoma xenografts at different levels of activity. Absorbed dose to tumor was estimated by separate biodistribution experiments for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and Zevalin. Tumor growth was measured two to three times per week after injection or X-radiation. Treatment-induced increase in growth delay to reach tumor volumes of 500 and 1,000 mm{sup 3}, respectively, was used as an end point. Results: The absorbed radiation dose-rate in tumor was slightly more than 0.1 Gy/d for the first week following injection of {sup 227}Th-rituximab, and thereafter gradually decreased to 0.03 Gy/d at 21 days after injection. For treatment with Zevalin the maximum dose-rate in tumor was achieved already 6 h after injection (0.2 Gy/d), and thereafter decreased to 0.01 Gy/d after 7 days. The relative biologic effect was between 2.5 and 7.2 for {sup 227}Th-rituximab and between 1 and 1.3 for Zevalin. Conclusions: Both at low doses and low-dose-rates, the {sup 227}Th-rituximab treatment was more effective per absorbed radiation dose unit than the two other treatments. The considerable effect at low doses suggests that the best way to administer low-dose-rates, {alpha}-emitting radioimmunoconjugates is via multiple injections.

  7. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Maha M.; El-Moslemany, Riham M.; Ramadan, Alyaa A.; Amer, Eglal I.; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z.; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.

    2015-01-01

    Miltefosine (MFS) is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD). This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%), good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs, allowing targeting via the oral route. From a clinical point of view, data suggest MFS-LNCs as a potential single dose oral nanomedicine for enhanced therapy of schistosomiasis mansoni and possibly other diseases. PMID:26574746

  8. Truman State University Chapter Honor Point Structure Effective October 10, 2014 Activity Requirements Points Max Total

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    /a Service/Student Event Informed Alumni Relations of event or participation. 5 points per person, maximum 30. Graduation gifts paid for by one week after graduation. 5 10 Personal letters and packages to alumni, chapter members and students. Must inform Alumni Relations within one week of send date. 2 50 Chapter Newsletter

  9. 47 CFR 73.7003 - Point system selection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., convenience, and necessity. (b) Based on information provided in each application, each applicant will be... parameters. One point to the applicant covering the largest geographic area and population with its relevant... supplement their applications to supply point information, and its maximum technical qualifications...

  10. 47 CFR 73.7003 - Point system selection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., convenience, and necessity. (b) Based on information provided in each application, each applicant will be... parameters. One point to the applicant covering the largest geographic area and population with its relevant... supplement their applications to supply point information, and its maximum technical qualifications...

  11. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  12. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  13. Gauging the Nearness and Size of Cycle Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2003-01-01

    A simple method for monitoring the nearness and size of conventional cycle maximum for an ongoing sunspot cycle is examined. The method uses the observed maximum daily value and the maximum monthly mean value of international sunspot number and the maximum value of the 2-mo moving average of monthly mean sunspot number to effect the estimation. For cycle 23, a maximum daily value of 246, a maximum monthly mean of 170.1, and a maximum 2-mo moving average of 148.9 were each observed in July 2000. Taken together, these values strongly suggest that conventional maximum amplitude for cycle 23 would be approx. 124.5, occurring near July 2002 +/-5 mo, very close to the now well-established conventional maximum amplitude and occurrence date for cycle 23-120.8 in April 2000.

  14. Testing the Maximum Magnetic Shear Model with THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Petrinec, S. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Phan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause is the mechanism by which magnetic fields in different regions change topology to create open magnetic field lines that allow energy and momentum to flow into the magnetosphere. One of the long standing questions about magnetic reconnection is the location of the reconnection line. There are two reconnection scenarios discussed in the literature: a) anti-parallel reconnection where shear angles between the magnetospheric field and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are near 180°, and b) component reconnection where a tilted reconnection line which crosses the magnetopause in the sub-solar region at shear angles not near 180°. Early satellite observations were limited to the detection of accelerated ion beams in the magnetopause boundary layer to determine the general direction of the reconnection line location with respect to the satellite. An improved view of the reconnection location at the magnetopause was determined from ionospheric emissions observed by polar-orbiting imagers which revealed that both scenarios occur. The time-of-flight effect of precipitating ions in the cusp in connection with the low-velocity cutoff method pin-pointed reconnection locations and their dependency on IMF conditions. These results are summarized by the Maximum Magnetic Shear Model. This study uses confirmed magnetic reconnection locations from the THEMIS mission which observed accelerated ion flow reversals at the magnetopause to test the predictions of this reconnection location model. The results reveal that the Maximum Magnetic Shear model predicts the observed reconnection locations for dominant IMF BY conditions very well, but needs further improvement and modifications for dominant southward IMF conditions.

  15. Beyond maximum entropy: Fractal Pixon-based image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puetter, Richard C.; Pina, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a new Bayesian image reconstruction method that has been shown to be superior to the best implementations of other competing methods, including Goodness-of-Fit methods such as Least-Squares fitting and Lucy-Richardson reconstruction, as well as Maximum Entropy (ME) methods such as those embodied in the MEMSYS algorithms. Our new method is based on the concept of the pixon, the fundamental, indivisible unit of picture information. Use of the pixon concept provides an improved image model, resulting in an image prior which is superior to that of standard ME. Our past work has shown how uniform information content pixons can be used to develop a 'Super-ME' method in which entropy is maximized exactly. Recently, however, we have developed a superior pixon basis for the image, the Fractal Pixon Basis (FPB). Unlike the Uniform Pixon Basis (UPB) of our 'Super-ME' method, the FPB basis is selected by employing fractal dimensional concepts to assess the inherent structure in the image. The Fractal Pixon Basis results in the best image reconstructions to date, superior to both UPB and the best ME reconstructions. In this paper, we review the theory of the UPB and FPB pixon and apply our methodology to the reconstruction of far-infrared imaging of the galaxy M51. The results of our reconstruction are compared to published reconstructions of the same data using the Lucy-Richardson algorithm, the Maximum Correlation Method developed at IPAC, and the MEMSYS ME algorithms. The results show that our reconstructed image has a spatial resolution a factor of two better than best previous methods (and a factor of 20 finer than the width of the point response function), and detects sources two orders of magnitude fainter than other methods.

  16. Maximum Entropy, Word-Frequency, Chinese Characters, and Multiple Meanings

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoyong; Minnhagen, Petter

    2015-01-01

    The word-frequency distribution of a text written by an author is well accounted for by a maximum entropy distribution, the RGF (random group formation)-prediction. The RGF-distribution is completely determined by the a priori values of the total number of words in the text (M), the number of distinct words (N) and the number of repetitions of the most common word (kmax). It is here shown that this maximum entropy prediction also describes a text written in Chinese characters. In particular it is shown that although the same Chinese text written in words and Chinese characters have quite differently shaped distributions, they are nevertheless both well predicted by their respective three a priori characteristic values. It is pointed out that this is analogous to the change in the shape of the distribution when translating a given text to another language. Another consequence of the RGF-prediction is that taking a part of a long text will change the input parameters (M, N, kmax) and consequently also the shape of the frequency distribution. This is explicitly confirmed for texts written in Chinese characters. Since the RGF-prediction has no system-specific information beyond the three a priori values (M, N, kmax), any specific language characteristic has to be sought in systematic deviations from the RGF-prediction and the measured frequencies. One such systematic deviation is identified and, through a statistical information theoretical argument and an extended RGF-model, it is proposed that this deviation is caused by multiple meanings of Chinese characters. The effect is stronger for Chinese characters than for Chinese words. The relation between Zipf’s law, the Simon-model for texts and the present results are discussed. PMID:25955175

  17. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (<1.0 Gy); at higher doses (>1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  18. 76 FR 73721 - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, LLC, Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2, Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, LLC, Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2, Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to the Proposed License Amendment To Increase the Maximum Reactor Power Level The U.S....

  19. 75 FR 13600 - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, LLC, Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, LLC, Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2; Draft Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Related to the Proposed License Amendment To Increase the Maximum Reactor Power Level In...

  20. A Comparison of Skin and Chest Wall Dose Delivered With Multicatheter, Contura Multilumen Balloon, and MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Mihaela; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Skin and chest wall doses have been correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy . This investigation compared the ability to control skin and chest wall doses between patients treated with multicatheter (MC), Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB), and MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: 43 patients treated with the MC technique, 45 patients treated with the CMLB, and 83 patients treated with the MS were reviewed. The maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall were calculated for all patients. Results: The mean maximum skin doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.2 Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose), respectively. Although the skin distances were similar (p = 0.23) for the two balloon techniques, the mean skin dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.05). The mean maximum rib doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.6 Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose), respectively. Again, the mean rib dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The MC and CMLB techniques are associated with significantly lower mean skin and rib doses than is the MS. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or rib in excess of 125% of the prescription. Treatment with the CMLB may prove to yield less normal tissue toxicity than treatment with the MS.

  1. Chemoradiation of Hepatic Malignancies: Prospective, Phase 1 Study of Full-Dose Capecitabine With Escalating Doses of Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Ryan; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Gates, Vanessa L.; Vouche, Michael; Habib, Ali; Kircher, Sheetal; Newman, Steven; Nimeiri, Halla; Benson, Al B.; Salem, Riad

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiosensitizing chemotherapy improves the outcomes in comparison with radiation alone for gastrointestinal cancers. The delivery of radiation therapy with yttrium90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization, in combination with the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent capecitabine, provides the opportunity to enhance the effects of radiation on hepatic malignancies. This phase 1 study sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of {sup 90}Y plus capecitabine in patients with cholangiocarcinoma or liver metastases confined to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients were given initial treatment at full-dose capecitabine during days 1 to 14 of a 21-day cycle. At days 1 to 7 of the second cycle, whole-liver {sup 90}Y was given at the test dose, after which time capecitabine was continued. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined 6 weeks after {sup 90}Y infusion. If a DLT was not observed, the {sup 90}Y dose was escalated. The planned dose cohorts were 110, 130, 150, and 170 Gy. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD of {sup 90}Y with full-dose capecitabine. Results: Sixteen patients were treated according to the study protocol. Two patients experienced DLTs. Nine patients required capecitabine dose reduction as a result of toxicities attributable to capecitabine alone. The criteria for establishing {sup 90}Y MTD were not met, indicating an MTD of >170 Gy. Conclusion: The MTD of {sup 90}Y delivered in conjunction with capecitabine in the setting of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or metastatic disease confined to the liver exceeds 170 Gy. This is the highest {sup 90}Y dose reported to date and has important implications on combined therapy with the radiosensitizing oral chemotherapeutic capecitabine. Further studies are under way.

  2. Single or 2-Dose Micafungin Regimen for Treatment of Invasive Candidiasis: Therapia Sterilisans Magna!

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda

    2015-12-01

    The time the earth takes to rotate its axis (the day) has dictated how often pharmaceutical compounds are dosed. The scientific link between the 2 events is materia medica arcana. As an example, in the treatment of invasive candidiasis, antifungal therapy with intravenous micafungin is dosed daily. A literature review revealed population pharmacokinetic analyses, in vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics studies, and maximum-tolerated-dose studies of micafungin that examined optimal micafungin dosing strategies. The half-life of micafungin in patient blood was 14 hours in several studies, but was even longer in different organs, so that the concentration will persist above minimum inhibitory concentrations of Candida species for several days. Studies in mice and rabbits with persistent neutropenia and disseminated candidiasis, otherwise fatal, demonstrated that a single large dose of micafungin could clear disseminated candidiasis, even though the micafungin half-life in such animals is shorter than in humans. Human pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics studies confirmed this link between micafungin efficacy and the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve, and the optimal exposures initially identified in neutropenic animals. Maximum tolerated dose studies have demonstrated safety of 900 mg administered daily for several weeks, whereas case reports demonstrate efficacy and safety of single 1400-mg doses. Thus, a single dose of micafungin, or 2 such doses within a few days of each other, is not only logical, but might even lead to faster clearance of Candida. PMID:26567282

  3. Variations of dose rate observed by MSL/RAD in transit to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Hassler, Donald M.; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Köhler, Jan; Rafkin, Scot; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K.; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Brinza, David E.; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Günther

    2015-05-01

    Aims: To predict the cruise radiation environment related to future human missions to Mars, the correlation between solar modulation potential and the dose rate measured by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) has been analyzed and empirical models have been employed to quantify this correlation. Methods: The instrument RAD, onboard Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures a broad spectrum of energetic particles along with the radiation dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase as well as on the surface of Mars. With these first ever measurements inside a spacecraft from Earth to Mars, RAD observed the impulsive enhancement of dose rate during solar particle events as well as a gradual evolution of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced radiation dose rate due to the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the solar magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. Results: We analyzed the dependence of the dose rate measured by RAD on solar modulation potentials and estimated the dose rate and dose equivalent under different solar modulation conditions. These estimations help us to have approximate predictions of the cruise radiation environment, such as the accumulated dose equivalent associated with future human missions to Mars. Conclusions: The predicted dose equivalent rate during solar maximum conditions could be as low as one-fourth of the current RAD cruise measurement. However, future measurements during solar maximum and minimum periods are essential to validate our estimations.

  4. A Method for Correcting IMRT Optimizer Heterogeneity Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F. Mills, Michael D.

    2010-04-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning for volumes close to the patient's surface, in lung tissue and in the head and neck region, can be challenging for the planning system optimizer because of the complexity of the treatment and protected volumes, as well as striking heterogeneity corrections. Because it is often the goal of the planner to produce an isodose plan with uniform dose throughout the planning target volume (PTV), there is a need for improved planning optimization procedures for PTVs located in these anatomical regions. To illustrate such an improved procedure, we present a treatment planning case of a patient with a lung lesion located in the posterior right lung. The intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan generated using standard optimization procedures produced substantial dose nonuniformity across the tumor caused by the effect of lung tissue surrounding the tumor. We demonstrate a novel iterative method of dose correction performed on the initial IMRT plan to produce a more uniform dose distribution within the PTV. This optimization method corrected for the dose missing on the periphery of the PTV and reduced the maximum dose on the PTV to 106% from 120% on the representative IMRT plan.

  5. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  6. Maximum life spiral bevel reduction design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Prasanna, M. G.; Coe, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Optimization is applied to the design of a spiral bevel gear reduction for maximum life at a given size. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial values. Gear tooth bending strength and minimum contact ratio under load are included in the active constraints. The optimal design of the spiral bevel gear reduction includes the selection of bearing and shaft proportions in addition to gear mesh parameters. System life is maximized subject to a fixed back-cone distance of the spiral bevel gear set for a specified speed ratio, shaft angle, input torque, and power. Significant parameters in the design are: the spiral angle, the pressure angle, the numbers of teeth on the pinion and gear, and the location and size of the four support bearings. Interpolated polynomials expand the discrete bearing properties and proportions into continuous variables for gradient optimization. After finding the continuous optimum, a designer can analyze near optimal designs for comparison and selection. Design examples show the influence of the bearing lives on the gear parameters in the optimal configurations. For a fixed back-cone distance, optimal designs with larger shaft angles have larger service lives.

  7. Maximum mass of magnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manreza Paret, Daryel; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto; Perez Martínez, Aurora

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the problem of the maximum masses of magnetized white dwarfs (WDs). The impact of a strong magnetic field on the structure equations is addressed. The pressures become anisotropic due to the presence of the magnetic field and split into parallel and perpendicular components. We first construct stable solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations for parallel pressures and find that physical solutions vanish for the perpendicular pressure when B ? 1013 G. This fact establishes an upper bound for a magnetic field and the stability of the configurations in the (quasi) spherical approximation. Our findings also indicate that it is not possible to obtain stable magnetized WDs with super-Chandrasekhar masses because the values of the magnetic field needed for them are higher than this bound. To proceed into the anisotropic regime, we can apply results for structure equations appropriate for a cylindrical metric with anisotropic pressures that were derived in our previous work. From the solutions of the structure equations in cylindrical symmetry we have confirmed the same bound for B ? 1013 G, since beyond this value no physical solutions are possible. Our tentative conclusion is that massive WDs with masses well beyond the Chandrasekhar limit do not constitute stable solutions and should not exist.

  8. Maximum likelihood continuity mapping for fraud detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, J.

    1997-05-01

    The author describes a novel time-series analysis technique called maximum likelihood continuity mapping (MALCOM), and focuses on one application of MALCOM: detecting fraud in medical insurance claims. Given a training data set composed of typical sequences, MALCOM creates a stochastic model of sequence generation, called a continuity map (CM). A CM maximizes the probability of sequences in the training set given the model constraints, CMs can be used to estimate the likelihood of sequences not found in the training set, enabling anomaly detection and sequence prediction--important aspects of data mining. Since MALCOM can be used on sequences of categorical data (e.g., sequences of words) as well as real valued data, MALCOM is also a potential replacement for database search tools such as N-gram analysis. In a recent experiment, MALCOM was used to evaluate the likelihood of patient medical histories, where ``medical history`` is used to mean the sequence of medical procedures performed on a patient. Physicians whose patients had anomalous medical histories (according to MALCOM) were evaluated for fraud by an independent agency. Of the small sample (12 physicians) that has been evaluated, 92% have been determined fraudulent or abusive. Despite the small sample, these results are encouraging.

  9. Maximum windmill efficiency in finite time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huleihil, Mahmoud

    2009-05-01

    The fraction of the kinetic energy of the wind impinging on the rotor-swept area that a wind turbine can convert to useful power has been shown by Betz in an idealized laminar-flow model to have an upper limit of 16/27 or 59% approximately [I. H. Shames, Mechanics of Fluids, 2nd ed. (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1982), pp. A26-A31]. This figure is known as Betz number. Other studies [A. Rauh and W. Seelret, Appl. Energy 17, 15 (1984)] suggested that this figure should be considered as a guideline. In this paper, a new model is introduced and its efficiency at maximum power output is derived. The derived value is shown to be a function of the Betz number B and given by the formula ?mp=1-?1-B . This value is 36.2%, which agrees well with those of actually operating wind turbines. As a guideline, the wind turbine efficiency can be considered to be within the range of the two numbers of merit, the Betz number and ?mp.

  10. Uncertainty analysis for Probable Maximum Precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micovic, Zoran; Schaefer, Melvin G.; Taylor, George H.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of uncertainty associated with Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) estimates is presented. The focus of the study is firmly on PMP estimates derived through meteorological analyses and not on statistically derived PMPs. Theoretical PMP cannot be computed directly and operational PMP estimates are developed through a stepwise procedure using a significant degree of subjective professional judgment. This paper presents a methodology for portraying the uncertain nature of PMP estimation by analyzing individual steps within the PMP derivation procedure whereby for each parameter requiring judgment, a set of possible values is specified and accompanied by expected probabilities. The resulting range of possible PMP values can be compared with the previously derived operational single-value PMP, providing measures of the conservatism and variability of the original estimate. To our knowledge, this is the first uncertainty analysis conducted for a PMP derived through meteorological analyses. The methodology was tested on the La Joie Dam watershed in British Columbia. The results indicate that the commonly used single-value PMP estimate could be more than 40% higher when possible changes in various meteorological variables used to derive the PMP are considered. The findings of this study imply that PMP estimates should always be characterized as a range of values recognizing the significant uncertainties involved in PMP estimation. In fact, we do not know at this time whether precipitation is actually upper-bounded, and if precipitation is upper-bounded, how closely PMP estimates approach the theoretical limit.

  11. Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation using Exponential Families.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Iván; Rosenblum, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE) is a general method for estimating parameters in semiparametric and nonparametric models. The key step in any TMLE implementation is constructing a sequence of least-favorable parametric models for the parameter of interest. This has been done for a variety of parameters arising in causal inference problems, by augmenting standard regression models with a "clever-covariate." That approach requires deriving such a covariate for each new type of problem; for some problems such a covariate does not exist. To address these issues, we give a general TMLE implementation based on exponential families. This approach does not require deriving a clever-covariate, and it can be used to implement TMLE for estimating any smooth parameter in the nonparametric model. A computational advantage is that each iteration of TMLE involves estimation of a parameter in an exponential family, which is a convex optimization problem for which software implementing reliable and computationally efficient methods exists. We illustrate the method in three estimation problems, involving the mean of an outcome missing at random, the parameter of a median regression model, and the causal effect of a continuous exposure, respectively. We conduct a simulation study comparing different choices for the parametric submodel. We find that the choice of submodel can have an important impact on the behavior of the estimator in finite samples. PMID:26197469

  12. The Kernel of Maximum Agreement Subtrees.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Krister M; Chen, Eric; Pattengale, Nicholas D; Sankoff, David

    2012-01-01

    A Maximum Agreement SubTree (MAST) is a largest subtree common to a set of trees and serves as a summary of common substructure in the trees. A single MAST can be misleading, however, since there can be an exponential number of MASTs, and two MASTs for the same tree set do not even necessarily share any leaves. In this paper, we introduce the notion of the Kernel Agreement SubTree (KAST), which is the summary of the common substructure in all MASTs, and show that it can be calculated in polynomial time (for trees with bounded degree). Suppose the input trees represent competing hypotheses for a particular phylogeny. We explore the utility of the KAST as a method to discern the common structure of confidence, and as a measure of how confident we are in a given tree set. We also show the trend of the KAST, as compared to other consensus methods, on the set of all trees visited during a Bayesian analysis of flatworm genomes. PMID:22231622

  13. Maximum likelihood inference of reticulate evolutionary histories

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun; Dong, Jianrong; Liu, Kevin J.; Nakhleh, Luay

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization plays an important role in the evolution of certain groups of organisms, adaptation to their environments, and diversification of their genomes. The evolutionary histories of such groups are reticulate, and methods for reconstructing them are still in their infancy and have limited applicability. We present a maximum likelihood method for inferring reticulate evolutionary histories while accounting simultaneously for incomplete lineage sorting. Additionally, we propose methods for assessing confidence in the amount of reticulation and the topology of the inferred evolutionary history. Our method obtains accurate estimates of reticulate evolutionary histories on simulated datasets. Furthermore, our method provides support for a hypothesis of a reticulate evolutionary history inferred from a set of house mouse (Mus musculus) genomes. As evidence of hybridization in eukaryotic groups accumulates, it is essential to have methods that infer reticulate evolutionary histories. The work we present here allows for such inference and provides a significant step toward putting phylogenetic networks on par with phylogenetic trees as a model of capturing evolutionary relationships. PMID:25368173

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  15. Estimation of organ doses to patients undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures.

    PubMed

    Garzón, W J; Kramer, R; Khoury, H J; de Barros, V S M; Andrade, G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate organ and tissue absorbed doses to patients undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures performed in two hospitals in the city of Recife, Brazil. Forty eight patients undergoing fifty hepatic chemoembolization procedures were investigated. For the 20 cases with PA projection only, organs and tissues dose to KAP conversion coefficients were calculated using the mesh-based anthropometric phantom series FASH and MASH coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Clinical, dosimetric and irradiations parameters were registered for all patients. The maximum organ absorbed doses found were 2.4 Gy, 0.85 Gy, 0.76 Gy and 0.44 Gy for skin, kidneys, adrenals and liver, respectively. PMID:26270613

  16. Absorbed dose to the fetus during bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, W.R.; DiSimone, R.N.; Wolf, B.H.; Langer, A.

    1988-07-01

    The authors observed the uptake of radiopharmaceutical and calculated absorbed dose in fetuses of two patients who underwent bone scintigraphy with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate. Dose estimates per administered activity were 17 mrad/mCi (4.6 microGy/MBq) for an 8-week-old fetus and 9.7 mrad/mCi (2.6 microGy/MBq) for an 18-week-old fetus. Neither fetus demonstrated radionuclide uptake above maternal background levels. The uterine activity showed rapid clearance, with an effective half-life of 12 minutes after reaching a maximum within 1 minute after injection. Major contribution to fetal dose comes from the presence of the radionuclide in the maternal bladder. The authors conclude that bone scintigraphy performed unknowingly in pregnant individuals presents negligible increased risk to the fetus.

  17. Ultrasonic absorbed dose, dose rate, and produced lesion volume

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Ultrasonic absorbed dose, dose rate, and produced lesion volume R. L. JOHNSTON and F. DUNN Histological preparations of ultrasonically produced lesions in cat brain, at 3 and 4 MHz, have been studied to ultrasonic exposure may exist for different tissues. Ultrasound is becoming more widely used in medical prac

  18. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Kim, Sung-woo; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, the CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, must be converted to an electron density for radiation dose calculations for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages are applied to take the patient's CT image without applying the specific CT number to the electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of the dose calculation is not assured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to changes in the tube voltage were demonstrated, and the dose calculation errors in the percentage depth dose (PDD), along with a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in the PDD from the treatment planning system (TPS) dose calculation and from the Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3% and 1.1%, respectively, when applying the same CT number to the electron density conversion curve for the 80-kVp and 140-kVp images. In the clinical case, different CT number to electron density conversion curves at tube voltage of 80 kVp and 140 kVp were applied to the same image and the maximum differences in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 1.1%, 1.2%, and 1.0%, respectively, at the central region of the phantom and 0.6%, 0.9%, and 0.8%, respectively, at the peripheral region of the phantom.

  19. Multicenter, Phase I, Dose-Escalation Trial of Lenalidomide Plus Bortezomib for Relapsed and Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Paul G.; Weller, Edie; Jagannath, Sundar; Avigan, David E.; Alsina, Melissa; Schlossman, Robert L.; Mazumder, Amitabha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Doss, Deborah; Warren, Diane L.; Lunde, Laura E.; McKenney, Mary; Delaney, Carol; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Hideshima, Teru; Dalton, William; Knight, Robert; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide and bortezomib are active in relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). In preclinical studies, lenalidomide sensitized MM cells to bortezomib and dexamethasone. This phase I, dose-escalation study (ie, NCT00153933) evaluated safety and determined the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of lenalidomide plus bortezomib in patients with relapsed or with relapsed and refractory MM. Patients and Methods Patients received lenalidomide 5, 10, or 15 mg/d on days 1 through 14 and received bortezomib 1.0 or 1.3 mg/m2 on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of 21-day cycles. Dexamethasone (20mg or 40 mg on days 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, and 12) was added for progressive disease after two cycles. Primary end points were safety and MTD determination. Results Thirty-eight patients were enrolled across six dose cohorts. The MTD was lenalidomide 15 mg/d plus bortezomib 1.0 mg/m2. Dose-limiting toxicities (n = 1 for each) were grade 3 hyponatremia and herpes zoster reactivation and grade 4 neutropenia. The most common treatment-related, grades 3 to 4 toxicities included reversible neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and leukopenia. Among 36 response-evaluable patients, 61% (90% CI, 46% to 75%) achieved minimal response or better. Among 18 patients who had dexamethasone added, 83% (90% CI, 62% to 95%) achieved stable disease or better. Median overall survival was 37 months. Conclusion Lenalidomide plus bortezomib was well tolerated and showed promising activity with durable responses in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory MM, including patients previously treated with lenalidomide, bortezomib, and/or thalidomide. The combination of lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone is being investigated in a phase II study in this setting and in newly diagnosed MM. PMID:19786667

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shwetha, Bondel; Ravikumar, Manickam; Supe, Sanjay S.; Sathiyan, Saminathan; Lokesh, Vishwanath; Keshava, Subbarao L.

    2012-04-01

    Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.